Science.gov

Sample records for risk-adapted intensive chemotherapy

  1. A risk-adapted strategy of radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy in stage II seminoma.

    PubMed

    Domont, Julien; Massard, Christophe; Patrikidou, Anna; Bossi, Alberto; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Rose, Mathieu; Wibault, Pierre; Fizazi, Karim

    2013-07-01

    Indications for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage II seminoma are currently debated. Since 1980, the policy at Institut Gustave Roussy was to treat patients with stage IIA-B disease with external radiotherapy and patients with stage IIB-C with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In stage IIB disease, 3 cm was the usual tumor size threshold above which individual patients were considered for chemotherapy. During the period 1980-2001, 67 patients with stage II seminoma were treated: stage IIA (n = 5), stage IIB (n = 31), and stage IIC (n = 31). The median age was 40 years (range: 23-64). Among 37 patients who received radiotherapy, 5, 28, and 4 had a stage IIA, IIB, and IIC, respectively. Among 30 patients who received chemotherapy, 27 had a stage IIC. With a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 19 relapses (28%) occurred, including 11 and 8 cases treated with radiotherapy (30%) and chemotherapy (27%), respectively. The 5-year relapse-free survival was 71% (95% CI: 59-80). All but three relapses were salvaged with chemotherapy followed in selected cases by surgical resection of residual masses. Only 3 patients died of seminoma. The 5-year overall survival rate is 97% (95% CI: 89-99). Five patients subsequently developed a non-germ-cell second cancer, which occurred within the radiation field in 3 cases. With an overall survival rate of 97%, the overall outcome of patients with stage II seminoma managed according to this risk-adapted strategy is good. The possibility of extending the indications for chemotherapy to selected stage IIB seminoma patients needs to be further evaluated as potentially beneficial in terms of relapse risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk-adapted chemotherapy without procarbazine in treatment of children with Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi-Jin; Tang, Jing-Yan; Pan, Ci; Lu, Feng-Juan; Xue, Hui-Liang; Chen, Jing

    2013-02-01

    Because procarbazine is not available in the mainland of China, a risk-adapted chemotherapy without the drug was adopted for children with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in two tertiary referral centers for childhood cancer in Shanghai. The objective of the present study was to obtain the results comparable with those of previous studies. From January 1998 to December 2009, patients below 18 years with newly diagnosed, untreated HL were enrolled in the study. The patients were stratified into risk groups R1 (early stage), R2 (intermediate stage) and R3 (advanced stage). All the patients who had attained a complete remission were not given involved field radiotherapy. Fifty-six patients were eligible for the study. The 4-year event-free survival (EFS) rate was 100%, 80.3%±7.2%, and 62.5%±12.1% for the risk groups R1, R2, and R3, respectively. There was statistically significant difference in EFS between patients with and those without B symptoms (P<0.001). In group R2, the EFS rate was higher for patients treated with chemotherapy combined with radiation (100% vs. 75%±8.8%). But no statistical difference was observed (P=0.177). At the time of evaluation (December 31, 2010), secondary malignancy was not observed. A significant fraction of children with early stage or intermediate stage HL can be cured with a chemotherapy regimen without procarbazine. Complete response to chemotherapy seems not to be a determinant to omit radiotherapy.

  3. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer cells. This is called palliative chemotherapy. Chemotherapy for conditions other than cancer Some chemotherapy drugs ... you'll receive. Side effects that occur during chemotherapy treatment Common side effects of chemotherapy drugs include: ...

  4. Effects of tumor type, degree of obesity, and chemotherapy regimen on chemotherapy dose intensity in obese cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, T; Mochinaga, S; Kimura, S; Aragane, N; Yakabe, T; Morita, S; Okudaira, K; Fujito, H

    2013-01-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology recently published a Clinical Practice Guideline entitled "Appropriate Chemotherapy Dosing for Obesity Adult Patients with Cancer." The panel recommended that full weight (actual weight)-based cytotoxic chemotherapy doses are used to treat obese patients with cancer, particularly when the goal of treatment is cure. However, no study has examined dosage calculation methods used for obese cancer patients in Japan. Here, we retrospectively studied the relationships between chemotherapy dose intensity, the occurrence of adverse events, and treatment outcomes in obese patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patients were divided into two groups: the actual BW group (BWg) was composed of patients receiving dosage amounts calculated using their actual BW (n = 64), and the ideal BWg was composed of patients receiving dosage amounts calculated using their ideal BW (n = 41). There were significant differences in the incidence of Grade 3/4 hematological toxicity in the actual and ideal BWg in solid tumor patients, but not in patients with hematological malignancies. In solid tumor patients with ≥30 body mass index (BMI), the incidence of Grade 3/4 hematological toxicity was significantly lower in the ideal BWg than in the actual BWg. Particularly, in patients with complications, incidence of Grade 4 hematological toxicity was significantly higher in the actual BWg than in the ideal BWg. These results suggest that the tumor type, degree of obesity, complications, and choice of chemotherapy regimen should be considered when determining chemotherapy dosage for obese patients.

  5. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is most often given in cycles. These cycles may last 1 day, several days, or a ... period when no chemotherapy is given between each cycle. A rest period may last for days, weeks, ...

  6. Chemotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  7. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people. But knowing what chemotherapy is, how it works, and what to expect can often help calm your fears. It can also give you a better sense of control over your cancer treatment. ... Drugs Work CancerQuest: Chemotherapy [video] Interactive Chemotherapy Program from Emmi ...

  8. Enoxaparin can be used safely in patients with severe thrombocytopenia due to intensive chemotherapy regimens.

    PubMed

    Herishanu, Yair; Misgav, Mudi; Kirgner, Ilya; Ben-Tal, Ofira; Eldor, Amiram; Naparstek, Ella

    2004-07-01

    Treatment with intensive chemotherapy regimens is frequently complicated by severe thrombocytopenia. During the period of severe thrombocytopenia, anticoagulant treatment is not uncommonly indicated for thromboembolic events or thromboprophylaxis in these patients. We report 10 hematological patients treated with intensive chemotherapy protocols that were anticoagulated with enoxaparin for catheter related central venous thrombosis and thromboprophylaxis. During the period of severe thrombocytopenia the dosages of enoxaparin were reduced and no major bleeding occurred. Based on our experience we suggest that reduced dosages of low molecular weight heparins may be used relatively safely during transient severe thrombocytopenia.

  9. Risk-adapted stratification for optimally intensive treatment assignment of pediatric patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma is an effective strategy in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Belgaumi, Asim F; Anas, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Khawar S; Akhter, Mohammed F; Al-Kofide, Amani

    2017-06-01

    Pediatric patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in developing countries (DCs) present with greater tumor load even at lower stages and with comorbidities that impact therapy delivery. This causes toxic mortality with "standard" intensive protocols or recurrences with "gentler" treatment. We developed and evaluated a risk stratification schema that guides intensity of therapy. Sixty-nine patients were prospectively assigned to five risk groups (A-E; n = 6, 15, 16, 15, and 17) following staging and treated with protocols of risk-stratified intensity. Risk stratification utilized St. Jude stage, disease bulk, and sites involved. Between 2006 and 2011, 69 patients with B-cell NHL were enrolled. Among these, 72.5% were boys with mean age of 6.9 years (±3.33 [SD]; range 2.4-14.2 years). Eighty-seven percent had Burkitt lymphoma, 82.6% had advanced stage (25 [36.2%] stage III; 32 [46.4%] stage IV), and 24.6% were central nervous system positive. Mean lactate dehydrogenase increased progressively across the risk strata. Among these, 0/6, 1/15, 3/16, 2/15, and 7/17 patients relapsed/progressed within each risk stratum. Fifteen patients died; three from treatment-related toxicity. At a median follow-up of 6.2 years, the overall and event-free survival (EFS) for all patients was 78.1 and 75.4%, respectively; EFS was related to risk assignment. The frequency of documented infectious and noninfectious toxicities increased with higher risk group assignment causing prolongation of admissions and potential treatment delays. Reduction in treatment intensity for an identified subset of patients with NHL is feasible, while high-intensity therapy is required for high-risk groups. This risk stratification system may be a first step toward improving the outcomes in some DCs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J.; Richard, S.; Khalil, A.; Alexandre, I.; Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G.; Lotz, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:25493378

  11. Novel strategies for improving hematopoietic reconstruction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baron, Frédéric; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-02-01

    High-dose conditioning regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) as well as intensive poly-chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induce prolonged periods of neutropenia. The duration of the neutropenia is particularly long following umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). Areas covered: After briefly reviewing the impact of hematopoietic growth factors administration to hasten hematologic reconstitution after allo-HCT or intensive AML chemotherapy, this article summarizes recent approaches that have been investigated to prompt hematologic reconstruction after UCBT or intensive AML chemotherapy. Expert opinion: In the allo-HCT setting, administration of G-CSF or GM-CSF shortened the duration of the neutropenia but failed to decrease infection-related mortality or to improve survival. Novel approaches to hasten hematological reconstruction after UCBT such as double UCBT with expansion of one of the 2 UCB units with Notch ligand, mesenchymal stromal cells, nicotinamide, or StemRegenin 1, co-transplanting a single UCB unit with HLA-haploidentical CD34+ cells, or increasing UCB HSC homing to marrow niches via direct intra bone UCB administration, pulse treatment with dmPGE2 or enforced fucosylation are promising and deserve further investigations in prospective phase III studies. In the AML setting, G-CSF or GM-CSF administration after intensive chemotherapy decreased the duration of the neutropenia without improving survival.

  12. Outpatient management following intensive induction or salvage chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, Roland B; Taylor, Lenise R; Gardner, Kelda M; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E; Estey, Elihu H

    2013-01-01

    Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized "preemptively" until blood count recovery, owing to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effective oral prophylactic antimicrobials are now available, and transfusion support of outpatients has become routine in recent years. As a result, the care of patients with hematologic malignancies treated with intensive modalities is increasingly shifting from inpatient to outpatient settings. Benefits of this shift could include the reduced need for medical resources (eg, transfusions or intravenous antimicrobial therapy), improved quality of life (QOL), decreased rates of nosocomial infections, and lower costs. Increasing evidence indicates that select AML patients undergoing intensive remission induction or salvage chemotherapy can be discharged early after completion of chemotherapy and followed closely in a well-equipped outpatient facility in a safe and costeffective manner. Further demonstration that the current approach of preemptive hospitalization is medically unjustified, economically more burdensome, and adversely affects health-related QOL would very likely change the management of these patients throughout this country and elsewhere, resulting in the establishment of a new standard practice that improves cancer care.

  13. Proactive nurse management guidelines for managing intensive chemotherapy regimens in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, J; Ajani, J A

    2008-07-01

    Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Intensive chemotherapy regimens may be effective for the treatment of this disease but may be associated with a significant number of severe adverse events. Optimal management of these adverse events can improve outcome for the patient. Currently, there is little information in the literature about the nursing management of this particular group of patients. This American study involved the nursing management of all patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer enrolled in clinical trials at a single center. Patients had close contact with research nurses and received education about adverse events and how to deal with them. Patients completed a detailed treatment diary for each cycle of treatment. Protocols were established for the management of emergent adverse events. The guidelines developed during this study could help to underpin the role of the specialist oncology nurse and improve the management of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, with the potential of improving outcome, or at least quality of life, for the patients. The nurses' role should be pivotal in the management of intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer.

  14. Response of therapy-associated acute nonlymphocytic leukemia to intensive induction chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, S.F.; Peterson, B.A.; Bloomfield, C.D.; Michels, S.D.; Hurd, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    Among 31 consecutive patients who developed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy, 17 were treated with intensive chemotherapy aimed at inducing a complete remission. Seven of these 17 patients (41%) obtained a complete remission that ranged in duration from 2 to 11 (median 3) months. Two additional patients who failed to develop normal peripheral blood counts despite postinduction bone marrows that were normocellular and free of leukemia were classified as nonresponders. The median time to complete remission and median duration of leukopenia (WBC less than 1000/mu 1) were 34 days and 23 days, respectively. Induction chemotherapy was complicated by fever in all patients, documented infection in six patients, and death secondary to sepsis in three. Survival of the 17 patients ranged from less than 1 to 39 (median 4) months. Patients achieving a complete remission had a median survival time of 10 months compared to 2 months for the nonresponders. The other 14 patients received only supportive care and had a median survival of 2 months. These findings indicate that therapy-associated acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (t-ANLL) can frequently respond to chemotherapy and that achieving a complete remission is associated with longer survival. Although these results are encouraging, patients with t-ANLL still have a relatively poor prognosis and efforts directed at improving treatment outcome need to be continued.

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  16. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  17. Development of an Individualized Yoga Intervention to Address Fatigue in Hospitalized Children Undergoing Intensive Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Celis Ekstrand, Amanda; Hesser, Tanya; O'Sullivan, Cathy; Lee, Michelle; Schechter, Tal; Sung, Lillian

    2016-09-01

    Purpose Fatigue is an important problem in children receiving intensive chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Exercise may be an effective intervention for fatigue. Individualized yoga represents an ideal intervention because it can be tailored according to an individual child's needs. Little is known about how to structure a standardized yoga program for intensivelytreated children. Therefore, this study describes the development of a yoga program and an approach to monitoring sessions suitable for hospitalized children receiving intensive chemotherapy or HSCT. Methods The yoga program was designed to increase mobility in hospitalized children and to provide children with relaxation techniques that could be used independently in a variety of environments. The program was founded on 4 key tenets: safety, adaptability, environmental flexibility, and appeal to children. We also developed quality and consistency assurance procedures. Results A menu format with a fixed structure was selected for the yoga program. Each yoga session contained up to 6 sections: breathing exercises, warmup exercises, yoga poses, balancing poses, cool-down poses, and final relaxation. Yoga instructors selected specific yoga poses for each session from a predetermined list organized by intensity level (low, moderate, or high). Monitoring procedures were developed using videotaping and multirater adjudication. Conclusion We created a standardized yoga program and an approach to monitoring that are now ready for incorporation in clinical trials. Future work should include the adaptation of the program to different pediatric populations and clinical settings.

  18. Dasatinib and low-intensity chemotherapy in elderly patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, Philippe; Coudé, Marie Magdelaine; Gokbuget, Nicola; Gambacorti Passerini, Carlo; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Chevallier, Patrice; Salanoubat, Celia; Bonmati, Caroline; Alexis, Magda; Hunault, Mathilde; Glaisner, Sylvie; Agape, Philippe; Berthou, Christian; Jourdan, Eric; Fernandes, José; Sutton, Laurent; Banos, Anne; Reman, Oumedaly; Lioure, Bruno; Thomas, Xavier; Ifrah, Norbert; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Bornand, Anne; Morisset, Laure; Robin, Valérie; Pfeifer, Heike; Delannoy, Andre; Ribera, Josep; Bassan, Renato; Delord, Marc; Hoelzer, Dieter; Dombret, Herve; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2016-08-11

    Prognosis of Philadelphia-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the elderly has improved during the imatinib era. We investigated dasatinib, another potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with low-intensity chemotherapy. Patients older than age 55 years were included in the European Working Group on Adult ALL (EWALL) study number 01 for Ph(+) ALL (EWALL-PH-01 international study) and were treated with dasatinib 140 mg/day (100 mg/day over 70 years) with intrathecal chemotherapy, vincristine, and dexamethasone during induction. Patients in complete remission continued consolidation with dasatinib, sequentially with cytarabine, asparaginase, and methotrexate for 6 months. Maintenance therapy was dasatinib and vincristine/dexamethasone reinductions for 18 months followed by dasatinib until relapse or death. Seventy-one patients with a median age of 69 years were enrolled; 77% had a high comorbidity score. Complete remission rate was 96% and 65% of patients achieved a 3-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 transcript levels during consolidation. Only 7 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At 5 years, overall survival was 36% and up to 45% taking into account deaths unrelated to disease or treatment as competitors. Thirty-six patients relapsed, 24 were tested for mutation by Sanger sequencing, and 75% were T315I-positive. BCR-ABL1(T315I) was tested by allele-specific oligonucleotide reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 43 patients and detection was associated with short-term relapses. Ten patients (23%) were positive before any therapy and 8 relapsed, all with this mutation. In conclusion, dasatinib combined with low-intensity chemotherapy was well-tolerated and gave long-term survival in 36% of elderly patients with Ph(+) ALL. Monitoring of BCR-ABL1(T315I) from diagnosis identified patients with at high risk of early relapse and may help to personalize therapy. © 2016 by The American Society

  19. Dasatinib and low-intensity chemotherapy in elderly patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL

    PubMed Central

    Coudé, Marie Magdelaine; Gokbuget, Nicola; Gambacorti Passerini, Carlo; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Chevallier, Patrice; Salanoubat, Celia; Bonmati, Caroline; Alexis, Magda; Hunault, Mathilde; Glaisner, Sylvie; Agape, Philippe; Berthou, Christian; Jourdan, Eric; Fernandes, José; Sutton, Laurent; Banos, Anne; Reman, Oumedaly; Lioure, Bruno; Thomas, Xavier; Ifrah, Norbert; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Bornand, Anne; Morisset, Laure; Robin, Valérie; Pfeifer, Heike; Delannoy, Andre; Ribera, Josep; Bassan, Renato; Delord, Marc; Hoelzer, Dieter; Dombret, Herve; Ottmann, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis of Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the elderly has improved during the imatinib era. We investigated dasatinib, another potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with low-intensity chemotherapy. Patients older than age 55 years were included in the European Working Group on Adult ALL (EWALL) study number 01 for Ph+ ALL (EWALL-PH-01 international study) and were treated with dasatinib 140 mg/day (100 mg/day over 70 years) with intrathecal chemotherapy, vincristine, and dexamethasone during induction. Patients in complete remission continued consolidation with dasatinib, sequentially with cytarabine, asparaginase, and methotrexate for 6 months. Maintenance therapy was dasatinib and vincristine/dexamethasone reinductions for 18 months followed by dasatinib until relapse or death. Seventy-one patients with a median age of 69 years were enrolled; 77% had a high comorbidity score. Complete remission rate was 96% and 65% of patients achieved a 3-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 transcript levels during consolidation. Only 7 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At 5 years, overall survival was 36% and up to 45% taking into account deaths unrelated to disease or treatment as competitors. Thirty-six patients relapsed, 24 were tested for mutation by Sanger sequencing, and 75% were T315I-positive. BCR-ABL1T315I was tested by allele-specific oligonucleotide reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 43 patients and detection was associated with short-term relapses. Ten patients (23%) were positive before any therapy and 8 relapsed, all with this mutation. In conclusion, dasatinib combined with low-intensity chemotherapy was well-tolerated and gave long-term survival in 36% of elderly patients with Ph+ ALL. Monitoring of BCR-ABL1T315I from diagnosis identified patients with at high risk of early relapse and may help to personalize therapy. PMID:27121472

  20. [Parenteral nutrition of patients under intensive chemotherapy: comparative study of two lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, M D; Rubio, M A; Redondo, M J; Cabrerizo, L; Romeo, S; Alonso, J L; Nieto, Y L; Ayala, F; Martín, M

    1998-01-01

    Neoplastic patients receiving intensive chemotherapy often need total parenteral nutrition (TPN), with lipid emulsions based on long-chain triglycerides (LCT) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). Potential benefits of MCT include easier metabolism and limited storage. Our present investigation was performed to define if there is any real clinical advantage of any of these lipid emulsions in this group of patients. Fifty-one patients receiving the LCT emulsion and sixty of them receiving the MCT-LCT one were evaluated retrospectively. TPN with 40% of non-protein kilocalories as fat was administered during a mean time of 11.5 days. No differences in total cholesterol, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and transaminases were found between both groups, neither in nitrogen balances. In conclusion, in a group of neoplastic patients receiving intensive chemotherapy, we did not found any advantage of TPN with LCT or MCT-LCT either in nutritional laboratory parameters or in liver function.

  1. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  2. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788). The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2) and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3) were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential. PMID:20470428

  3. Intensive Care Unit Admission after Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy. Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    López-Basave, Horacio N.; Morales-Vasquez, Flavia; Mendez-Herrera, Carmen; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Calderillo-Ruiz, German; Cabrera Rojas, Jesús; Ruiz-Garcia, Erika; Herrera-Gomez, Angel; Ruiz-Molina, Juan M.; Meneses Garcia, Abelardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cytoreductive surgery (CS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a new approach for peritoneal carcinomatosis. However, high rates of complications are associated with CS and HIPEC due to treatment complexity; that is why some patients need stabilization and surveillance for complications in the intensive care unit. Objective. This study analyzed that ICU stay is necessary after HIPEC. Methods. 39 patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis were treated according to strict selection criteria with CS and HIPEC, with closed technique, and the chemotherapy administered were cisplatin 25 mg/m2/L and mitomycin C 3.3 mg/m2/L for 90-minutes at 40.5°C. Results. 26 (67%) of the 39 patients were transferred to the ICU. Major postoperative complications were seen in 14/26 patients (53%). The mean time on surgical procedures was 7.06 hours (range 5−9 hours). The mean blood loss was 939 ml (range 100–3700 ml). The mean time stay in the ICU was 2.7 days. Conclusion. CS with HIPEC for the treatment of PC results in low mortality and high morbidity. Therefore, ICU stay directly following HIPEC should not be standardized, but should preferably be based on the extent or resections performed and individual patient characteristics and risk factors. Late complications were comparable to those reported after large abdominal surgery without HIPEC. PMID:24864143

  4. Effect of Low-Intensity Physical Activity and Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise During Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Physical Fitness, Fatigue, and Chemotherapy Completion Rates: Results of the PACES Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    van Waart, Hanna; Stuiver, Martijn M; van Harten, Wim H; Geleijn, Edwin; Kieffer, Jacobien M; Buffart, Laurien M; de Maaker-Berkhof, Marianne; Boven, Epie; Schrama, Jolanda; Geenen, Maud M; Meerum Terwogt, Jetske M; van Bochove, Aart; Lustig, Vera; van den Heiligenberg, Simone M; Smorenburg, Carolien H; Hellendoorn-van Vreeswijk, Jeannette A J H; Sonke, Gabe S; Aaronson, Neil K

    2015-06-10

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a low-intensity, home-based physical activity program (Onco-Move) and a moderate- to high-intensity, combined supervised resistance and aerobic exercise program (OnTrack) versus usual care (UC) in maintaining or enhancing physical fitness, minimizing fatigue, enhancing health-related quality of life, and optimizing chemotherapy completion rates in patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. We randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy (N = 230) to Onco-Move, OnTrack, or UC. Performance-based and self-reported outcomes were assessed before random assignment, at the end of chemotherapy, and at the 6-month follow-up. We used generalized estimating equations to compare the groups over time. Onco-Move and OnTrack resulted in less decline in cardiorespiratory fitness (P < .001), better physical functioning (P ≤ .001), less nausea and vomiting (P = .029 and .031, respectively) and less pain (P = .003 and .011, respectively) compared with UC. OnTrack also resulted in better outcomes for muscle strength (P = .002) and physical fatigue (P < .001). At the 6-month follow-up, most outcomes returned to baseline levels for all three groups. A smaller percentage of participants in OnTrack required chemotherapy dose adjustments than those in the UC or Onco-Move groups (P = .002). Both intervention groups returned earlier (P = .012), as well as for more hours per week (P = .014), to work than the control group. A supervised, moderate- to high-intensity, combined resistance and aerobic exercise program is most effective for patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. A home-based, low-intensity physical activity program represents a viable alternative for women who are unable or unwilling to follow the higher intensity program. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Determining resource intensity weights in ambulatory chemotherapy related to nursing workload.

    PubMed

    Green, Esther; Preyra, Colin; Stewart, Janice; McLennan, Cindy; Bland, Rosemary; Dus, Tamara; Langhorn, Marcia; Beattie, Kathy; Cheung, Annie; Hertz, Sherrie; Sechter, Haim; Burns, Judy; Angus, Helen; Sawka, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Ontario cancer programs aim to deliver high-quality nursing care and treatment that is safe for patients and staff. The reality of health care is that financial constraints, inherent in the delivery of care, require that funding mechanisms count not only the cost of drugs, but factors such as pharmacy and nursing human resource costs. While some organizations have developed patient classification systems to measure nursing intensity and workload, these systems apply primarily to inpatient populations, and are fraught with numerous challenges, such as the need for nurses to document to justify the workload required for care. The purpose of this paper is to outline the methodology and engagement of nurses to develop regimen-based resource intensity weights that can be applied to ambulatory chemotherapy suites. The methodology included determination of workload related to nursing time to prepare, teach, counsel and assess patients, as well as time to gather supplies, access lines, monitor, manage adverse reactions, manage symptoms and document care. Resource intensity weights provide better measures of the complexity of care required by cancer patients in ambulatory settings.

  6. Ototoxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Children With Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Lobo, Mark; Teh, Bin S.; Okcu, M. Fatih; South, Michael; Butler, E. Brian; Su, Jack; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) Grade 3 or 4 ototoxicity in a cohort of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by posterior fossa (PF) and/or tumor bed (TB) boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 44 patients with medulloblastoma were treated with CSI followed by IMRT to the PF and/or TB and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients with standard-risk disease were treated with 18 to 23.4 Gy CSI followed by either a (1) PF boost to 36 Gy and TB boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy or (2) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Patients with high-risk disease received 36 to 39.6 Gy CSI followed by a (1) PF boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy, (2) PF boost to 45 Gy and TB boost to 55.8 Gy, or (3) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Median audiogram follow-up was 41 months (range, 11-92.4 months). Results: POG Grade Ototoxicity 0, 1, 2, 3. and 4 was found in 29, 32, 11, 13. and 3 ears. respectively, with POG Grade 3 or 4 accounting for 18.2% of cases. There was a statistically significant difference in mean radiation dose (D{sub mean}) cochlea according to degree of ototoxicity, with D{sub mean} cochlea increasing with severity of hearing loss (p = 0.027). Conclusions: Severe ototoxicity was seen in 18.2% of ears in children treated with IMRT boost and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Increasing dose to the cochlea was associated with increasing severity of hearing loss.

  7. Hypofractionated Dose-Painting Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard L.; Lee, Nancy; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose-painting intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) with a hypofractionated regimen to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with concomitant toxicity reduction. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2007, 25 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled in a prospective trial. DP-IMRT was prescribed to deliver 70.2 Gy using 2.34-Gy fractions to the gross tumor volume for the primary and nodal sites while simultaneously delivering 54 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to regions at risk of microscopic disease. Patients received concurrent and adjuvant platin-based chemotherapy similar to the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient and disease characteristics are as follows: median age, 46; 44% Asian; 68% male; 76% World Health Organization III; 20% T1, 52% T2, 16% T3, 12% T4; 20% N0, 36% N1, 36% N2, 8% N3. With median follow-up of 33 months, 3-year local control was 91%, regional control was 91%, freedom from distant metastases was 91%, and overall survival was 89%. The average mean dose to each cochlea was 43 Gy. With median audiogram follow-up of 14 months, only one patient had clinically significant (Grade 3) hearing loss. Twelve percent of patients developed temporal lobe necrosis; one patient required surgical resection. Conclusions: Preliminary findings using a hypofractionated DP-IMRT regimen demonstrated that local control, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival compared favorably with other series of IMRT and chemotherapy. The highly conformal boost to the tumor bed resulted low rates of severe ototoxicity (Grade 3-4). However, the incidence of in-field brain radiation necrosis indicates that 2.34 Gy per fraction is not safe in this setting.

  8. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Y. O'Meara, William; Chan, Kelvin; Della-Bianca, Cesar; Mechalakos, James G.; Zhung, Joanne; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and June 2005, 20 laryngeal and 11 hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients underwent IMRT with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy; most patients had Stage IV disease. The prescription of the planning target volume for gross, high-risk, and low-risk subclinical disease was 70, 59.4, and 54 Gy, respectively. Acute/late toxicities were retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria scale. The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of the living patients was 26 months (range, 17-58 months). The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rate was 86%, 94%, 89%, 92%, and 63%, respectively. Grade 2 mucositis or higher occurred in 48% of patients, and all experienced Grade 2 or higher pharyngitis during treatment. Xerostomia continued to decrease over time from the end of RT, with none complaining of Grade 2 toxicity at this analysis. The 2-year post-treatment percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-dependency rate for those with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors was 31% and 15%, respectively. The most severe late complications were laryngeal necrosis, necrotizing fascitis, and a carotid rupture resulting in death 3 weeks after salvage laryngectomy. Conclusion: These preliminary results have shown that IMRT achieved encouraging locoregional control of locoregionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Xerostomia improved over time. Pharyngoesophageal stricture with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency remains a problem, particularly for patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma and, to a lesser

  9. [Interest of an intensive chemotherapy for intravascular large B cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Baldolli, Aurélie; Chuffart, Marie; Geffray, Loik; Verneuil, Laurence; Reman, Oumédaly

    2013-04-01

    We describe three cases of intravascular lymphoma B with different clinical presentation: one case of a cutaneous variant and two cases with surrenal and cutaneous localisation. All patients are in complete remission after chemotherapy alone or after chemotherapy and autologous stem cells transplantation. The review of the literature as well as our cases specify the interest of an aggressive chemotherapy with autologous of peripheral stem cells if it was possible.

  10. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D.; Sher, David J.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  11. Effect of a multimodal high intensity exercise intervention in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Morten; Andersen, Christina; Møller, Tom; Herrstedt, Jørn; Kronborg, Dorte; Baadsgaard, Marie T; Vistisen, Kirsten; Midtgaard, Julie; Christiansen, Birgitte; Stage, Maria; Kronborg, Morten T; Rørth, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for advanced disease. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Two university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants 269 patients with cancer; 73 men, 196 women, mean age 47 years (range 20-65) representing 21 diagnoses. Main exclusion criteria were brain or bone metastases. 235 patients completed follow-up. Intervention Supervised exercise comprising high intensity cardiovascular and resistance training, relaxation and body awareness training, massage, nine hours weekly for six weeks in addition to conventional care, compared with conventional care. Main outcome measures European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS SF-36), Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire, muscular strength (one repetition maximum), maximum oxygen consumption (Vo2max). Statistical methods The general linear model was used for continuous outcome while analysis of associates between categorical outcomes was performed as analysis of marginal homogeneity in contingency tables. Results Adjusted for baseline score, disease, and demographic covariates, the intervention group showed an estimated improvement at six weeks for the primary outcome, fatigue, of −6.6 points (95% confidence interval −12.3 to −0.9, P=0.02; effect size=0.33, 0.04 to 0.61). Significant effects were seen on vitality (effect size 0.55, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.82), physical functioning (0.37, 0.09 to 0.65), role physical (0.37, 0.10 to 0.64), role emotional (0.32, 0.05 to 0.59), and mental health (0.28, 0.02 to 0.56) scores. Improvement was noted in physical capacity: estimated mean difference between groups for maximum oxygen consumption

  12. Comparative Analysis of Resource Utilization and Safety of Outpatient Management Following Intensive AML Induction/Salvage Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Othus, Megan; Powell, Morgan A.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Rizzuto, Donelle L.; Hendrie, Paul C.; Becker, Pamela S.; Pottinger, Paul S.; Estey, Elihu H.; Walter, Roland B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) typically remain hospitalized after induction or salvage chemotherapy until blood count recovery, with resulting prolonged inpatient stays being a primary driver of healthcare cost. Pilot studies suggest that outpatient management following chemotherapy might be safe and could reduce cost for these patients. Objective To compare safety, resource utilization, infections and cost between adults discharged early following AML induction or salvage chemotherapy and inpatient controls. Design Non-randomized phase 2 study. Setting Single center study conducted at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, WA. Participants Over a 43-month period (January 1, 2011 – July 31, 2014), 178 adults receiving intensive AML chemotherapy were enrolled. After completion of chemotherapy, 107 met pre-designated medical and logistical criteria for early discharge (ED), while 29 met medical criteria only and served as inpatient controls. Interventions for Clinical Trials ED patients were discharged from the hospital at the completion of chemotherapy, and supportive care was provided in the outpatient setting until count recovery (median 21 days, range 2–45 days). Controls received inpatient supportive care (median 16 days, range 3–42 days). Main Outcome Measures 1) differences in early mortality 2) differences in resource utilization (ICU days, transfusions/study-day and IV antibiotics/study-day) 3) numbers of infections and 3) total and inpatient charges/study-day between early discharge patients and controls. Results Four patients discharged early (4%) but no controls died within 30 days of enrollment (p=0.58). Nine patients discharged early (8%) but no controls required intensive care unit-level care (p=0.20). No differences were noted in the average daily number of red blood cell (p=0.55) or platelet (p=0.31) transfusions. Patients discharged early did have more positive blood cultures (p=0.04) but required fewer

  13. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  14. Investigating the effect of therapeutic touch on the intensity of acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting in breast cancer women under chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matourypour, Pegah; Vanaki, Zohreh; Zare, Zahra; Mehrzad, Valiolah; Dehghan, Mojtaba; Ranjbaran, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the worst and the most prevalent complications experienced by 70-80% of patients. Complementary treatments including therapeutic touch are cost-effective and low-risk, independent nursing interventions. Present research aims at investigating the effect of therapeutic touch on the intensity of acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting in these patients. As a single-blind, randomized clinical trial, the present research was carried out on women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were divided into three groups of control, placebo, and intervention. The intervention was applied to each patient once for 20 min on the aura (human energy field) focusing on solar chakra. Data gathering instruments included demographic questionnaire and acute vomiting intensity scale. There was a significant difference among the three groups (and also after the intervention) (P < 0.0001). Paired comparisons among the groups using Mann-Whitney test showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the control group and the intervention group and between the control group and the placebo group (P < 0.0001). However, there was no significant difference between the placebo and intervention groups (P = 0.07). Therapeutic touch was effective in reducing vomiting in the intervention group. However, the patients experienced lower-intensity vomiting which may be because of presence of a therapist and probably the reduced anxiety related to an additional intervention. So, further research is recommended considering the placebo group and employing another person in addition to the therapist, who is not skilled for this technique.

  15. Investigating the effect of therapeutic touch on the intensity of acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting in breast cancer women under chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matourypour, Pegah; Vanaki, Zohreh; Zare, Zahra; Mehrzad, Valiolah; Dehghan, Mojtaba; Ranjbaran, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nausea and vomiting are the worst and the most prevalent complications experienced by 70–80% of patients. Complementary treatments including therapeutic touch are cost-effective and low-risk, independent nursing interventions. Present research aims at investigating the effect of therapeutic touch on the intensity of acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting in these patients. Materials and Methods: As a single-blind, randomized clinical trial, the present research was carried out on women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were divided into three groups of control, placebo, and intervention. The intervention was applied to each patient once for 20 min on the aura (human energy field) focusing on solar chakra. Data gathering instruments included demographic questionnaire and acute vomiting intensity scale. Results: There was a significant difference among the three groups (and also after the intervention) (P < 0.0001). Paired comparisons among the groups using Mann–Whitney test showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the control group and the intervention group and between the control group and the placebo group (P < 0.0001). However, there was no significant difference between the placebo and intervention groups (P = 0.07). Conclusions: Therapeutic touch was effective in reducing vomiting in the intervention group. However, the patients experienced lower-intensity vomiting which may be because of presence of a therapist and probably the reduced anxiety related to an additional intervention. So, further research is recommended considering the placebo group and employing another person in addition to the therapist, who is not skilled for this technique. PMID:27186202

  16. Effect of Intensive Chemotherapy on Physical, Cognitive, and Emotional Health of Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Tooze, Janet A; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Mihalko, Shannon L; Danhauer, Suzanne C; Rao, Arati V; Wildes, Tanya M; Williamson, Jeff D; Powell, Bayard L; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2016-10-01

    To measure short-term changes in physical and cognitive function and emotional well-being of older adults receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Prospective observational study. Single academic institution. Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML who received induction chemotherapy (N = 49, mean age 70 ± 6.2, 56% male). Geriatric assessment (GA) was performed during inpatient examination for AML and within 8 weeks after hospital discharge after induction chemotherapy. Measures were the Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (activity of daily living, instrumental activity of daily living (IADL), mobility questions), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), grip strength, Modified Mini-Mental State examination, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Distress Thermometer. Changes in GA measures were assessed using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance models were used to evaluate relationships between GA variables and change in function over time. After chemotherapy, IADL dependence worsened (mean 1.4 baseline vs 2.1 follow-up, P < .001), as did mean SPPB scores (7.5 vs 5.9, P = .02 for total). Grip strength also declined (38.9 ± 7.7 vs 34.2 ± 10.3 kg, P < .001 for men; 24.5 ± 4.8 vs 21.8 ± 4.7 kg, P = .007 for women). No significant changes in cognitive function (mean 84.7 vs 85.1, P = .72) or depressive symptoms (14.0 vs. 11.3, P = .11) were detected, but symptoms of distress declined (5.0 vs 3.2, P < .001). Participants with depressive symptoms at baseline and follow-up had greater declines in SPPB scores those without at both time points. Short-term survivors of intensive chemotherapy for AML had clinically meaningful declines in physical function. These data support the importance of interventions to maintain physical function during and after chemotherapy. Depressive symptoms before and during chemotherapy may be linked to potentially modifiable physical function declines. © 2016, Copyright

  17. Efficacy of Concurrent Chemotherapy for Intermediate Risk NPC in the Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Era: a Propensity-Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Wen-Fei; Liu, Xu; Guo, Rui; Sun, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate the efficacy of additional concurrent chemotherapy for intermediate risk (stage II and T3N0M0) NPC patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).440 patients with intermediate risk NPC were studied retrospectively, including 128 patients treated with IMRT alone [radiotherapy group (RT group)] and 312 paitents treated with IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy [chemoradiotherapy group (CRT group)]. Propensity score matching was carried out to create RT and CRT cohorts equally matched for host and tumor factor. Significantly more severe acute toxicities were observed in the CRT group than in the RT group. Multivariate analyses of 440 patients failed to demonstrate concurrent chemotherapy as an independent prognostic factor for FFS, LR-FFS, and D-FFS. Between the well-matched RT cohort and the CRT cohort, no significant difference was demonstrated in all survival endpoints (FFS: 92.8% versus 91.2%, P = 0.801; LR-FFS: 95.2% versus 94.4%, P = 0.755; D-FFS: 96.4% versus 96.3%, P = 0.803; OS: 98.2% versus 98.9%, P = 0.276). Our results demonstrated that for patients with intermediate risk NPC treated with IMRT, additional concurrent chemotherapy did not provide any significant survival benefit but significantly more severe acute toxicities. However, prospective randomized trials are warranted for the ultimate confirm of our findings. PMID:26611462

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Defining high-risk patients who may benefit before concurrent chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiao-Jing; Tang, Ling-Long; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Guo, Rui; Liu, Xu; Sun, Ying; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Kang, Tie-Bang; Shao, Jian-Yong; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a prognostic model for distant metastasis in patients with locally advanced NPC who accept concurrent chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (CCRT) to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). A total of 881 patients with newly-diagnosed, non-disseminated, biopsy-proven locoregionally advanced NPC were retrospectively reviewed; 411 (46.7%) accepted CCRT and 470 (53.3%) accepted NACT followed by CCRT. Multivariate analysis demonstrated N2–3 disease, plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) DNA > 4000 copies/mL, serum albumin ≤46 g/L and platelet count >300 k/cc were independent prognostic factors for distant metastasis in the CCRT group. Using these four factors, a prognostic model was developed, as follows: 1) low-risk group: 0–1 risk factors; and 2) high-risk group: 2–4 risk factors. In the high-risk group, patients who accepted NACT + CCRT had significantly higher distant metastasis-free survival and progression-free survival rates than the CCRT group (P = 0.001; P = 0.011). This simple prognostic model for distant metastasis in locoregionally advanced NPC may facilitate with the selection of high-risk patients who may benefit from NACT prior to CCRT. PMID:26564805

  19. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  20. Preoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Vulvar Carcinoma: Analysis of Pattern of Relapse

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil; Shukla, Gaurav; Shinde, Ashwin; Heron, Dwight E.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Richards, Scott; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Krivak, Thomas C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To examine clinical outcomes and relapse patterns in locally advanced vulvar carcinoma treated using preoperative chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with stage I-IV{sub A} (stage I, n=3; stage II, n=13; stage III, n=23; stage IV{sub A}, n=3) vulvar cancer were treated with chemotherapy and IMRT via a modified Gynecological Oncology Group schema using 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with twice-daily IMRT during the first and last weeks of treatment or weekly cisplatin with daily radiation therapy. Median dose of radiation was 46.4 Gy. Results: Thirty-three patients (78.6%) had surgery for resection of vulva; 13 of these patients also had inguinal lymph node dissection. Complete pathologic response was seen in 48.5% (n=16) of these patients. Of these, 15 had no recurrence at a median time of 26.5 months. Of the 17 patients with partial pathological response, 8 (47.1%) developed recurrence in the vulvar surgical site within a median of 8 (range, 5-34) months. No patient had grade ≥3 chronic gastrointestinal/genitourinary toxicity. Of those having surgery, 8 (24.2%) developed wound infections requiring debridement. Conclusions: Preoperative chemotherapy/IMRT was well tolerated, with good pathologic response and clinical outcome. The most common pattern of recurrence was local in patients with partial response, and strategies to increase pathologic response rate with increasing dose or adding different chemotherapy need to be explored to help further improve outcomes.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Lian; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Helen; Ajani, Jaffer; Swisher, Stephen; Cox, James D; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the dosimetry, efficacy and toxicity of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on 7 patients who were definitively treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Patients who did not receive IMRT radiation and concurrent chemotherapy were not included in this analysis. IMRT plans were evaluated to assess the tumor coverage and normal tissue avoidance. Treatment response was evaluated and toxicities were assessed. RESULTS: Five- to nine-beam IMRT were used to deliver a total dose of 59.4-66 Gy (median: 64.8 Gy) to the primary tumor with 6-MV photons. The minimum dose received by the planning tumor volume (PTV) of the gross tumor volume boost was 91.2%-98.2% of the prescription dose (standard deviation [SD]: 3.7%-5.7%). The minimum dose received by the PTV of the clinical tumor volume was 93.8%-104.8% (SD: 4.3%-11.1%) of the prescribed dose. With a median follow-up of 15 mo (range: 3-21 mo), all 6 evaluable patients achieved complete response. Of them, 2 developed local recurrences and 2 had distant metastases, 3 survived with no evidence of disease. After treatment, 2 patients developed esophageal stricture requiring frequent dilation and 1 patient developed tracheal-esophageal fistula. CONCLUSION: Concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy resulted in an excellent early response in patients with locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer. However, local and distant recurrence and toxicity remain to be a problem. Innovative approaches are needed to improve the outcome. PMID:17006988

  2. Partial response after intensive chemotherapy for adrenal cortical carcinoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Aricò, M; Bossi, G; Livieri, C; Raiteri, E; Severi, F

    1992-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) in childhood is a rare tumor with high fatality rate. Available reports provide event free survival rates ranging between 10 to 50%. Optimal treatment has not yet been established; surgery plays a major role, and the value of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be evaluated further, especially in children who develop recurrent disease and those with metastases at diagnosis. Optimal therapy of ACC has not been established. Surgery has been curative after complete tumor resection. Children with inoperable, recurrent and metastatic ACC have been treated with O,P'DDD, with response rates ranging from 10 to 60% in different series [7,11-20]. Radiotherapy [21] and other anti-cancer drugs have been used [4-22] but their efficacy has not been established. Combination chemotherapy containing oncovin, cisPlatinum, epipodophyllotoxin and cyclophosphamide (OPEC) produced regression of metastatic ACC in a 5-year-old male [23]. We report one girl with relapsed disseminated ACC who showed good, even if temporary, control of the disease, with disappearance of lung, liver and spleen metastases, and marked reduction of the adrenal mass, following combined chemotherapy according to the "eight-drugs-in-one-day" protocol.

  3. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. Materials and Methods A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. Results The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. Conclusion High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model. PMID:27587968

  4. Enhancement of cancer chemotherapy in vitro by intense ultrawideband electric field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David W.; Uhler, Michael D.; Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments have been performed to enhance the Jurkat cell-killing effects of the cancer chemotherapy agent bleomycin using electric field pulses of 50-200 kV/cm peak electric field strength, ~150 ns duration, and nanosecond rise time. Dramatic increases in cell killing (factors of ~1000) were observed with a low dose of bleomycin after treatment with trains of ten or more pulses at all electric field strengths tested, compared to pulse-only or drug-only treatments. Cell death occurred within 24 h for treated cells, with some evidence of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization at 6 h postexposure but no significant increase in caspase activity, indicating that the primary mode of cell death was not caspase-mediated apoptosis.

  5. Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Results of Intensive Chemotherapy Regimens (MACOP-B/VACOP-B) Plus Involved Field Radiotherapy on 53 Patients. A Single Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarotto, Renzo . E-mail: renzo.mazzarotto@unipd.it; Boso, Caterina; Vianello, Federica; Aversa, Maria Savina; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Trentin, Livio; Zambello, Renato; Muzzio, Pier Carlo; Fiore, Davide; Sotti, Guido

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal therapy for primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL) remains undefined. The superiority of intensive chemotherapy regimens (Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Prednisone, Bleomycin [MACOP-B]/Etoposide, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Prednisone, Bleomycin [VACOP-B]) over Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, Prednisone (CHOP)-like chemotherapy is upheld by some authors. The role of radiotherapy is still debated. In the absence of randomized trials, we report clinical findings and treatment response in 53 consecutive patients treated with intensive chemotherapy and mediastinal involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT). Methods and Material: Fifty-three consecutive patients with PMLBCL were retrospectively analyzed. Planned treatment consisted of induction chemotherapy (I-CT; Prednisone, Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, Etoposide-Mechloroethamine, Vincristine, Procarbazine, Prednisone [ProMACE-MOPP] in the first 2 patients, MACOP-B in the next 11, and VACOP-B in the last 40) followed by IFRT. Planned treatment was concluded in 43 of 53 patients; in 10 patients, I-CT was not immediately followed by IFRT. Among these 10 patients, 6 received high-dose chemotherapy (HD-CT) followed by IFRT, 2 received HD-CT, and 2 received no further treatment. Results: After a median follow-up of 93.9 months (range, 6-195 months), 45 of 53 patients (84.9%) were alive without disease. Eight patients died: 7 of PMLBCL and 1 of toxicity during HD-CT. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 93.42% and 86.6%, respectively. The response rates after I-CT were complete response (CR) in 20 (37.73%) and partial response (PR) in 30 (56.60%); 3 patients (5.66%) were considered nonresponders. Among patients in PR after chemotherapy, 92% obtained a CR after IFRT. Conclusions: Our report confirms the efficacy of intensive chemotherapy plus mediastinal IFRT. IFRT plays a pivotal role in

  6. Azacitidine might be beneficial in a subgroup of older AML patients compared to intensive chemotherapy: a single centre retrospective study of 227 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, Lieke H; Scheepers, Ellen R M; Veeger, Nic J G M; Daenen, Simon M G J; Mulder, André B; van den Berg, Eva; Vellenga, Edo; Huls, Gerwin

    2013-04-16

    Treatment options in older acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients include intensive chemotherapy, best supportive care (BSC), and hypomethylating agents. Currently, limited data is available on hypomethylating agents in older AML patients in unselected patient populations. To compare the effectiveness of azacitidine with conventional therapy, we collected data of 227 consecutive AML patients (≥60 years) who were treated with azacitidine (N = 26), intensive chemotherapy (N = 90), or BSC (N = 97). Azacitidine-treated patients were older and had more comorbidities, but lower white blood cell- and bone marrow blast counts compared with intensive chemotherapy patients. Complete or partial response was achieved in 42% of azacitidine-treated patients and in 73% of intensive chemotherapy patients (P = 0.005). However, the overall survival (OS) was similar (1-year-OS 57% versus 56%, P = 0.93; 2-year-OS 35% versus 35%, P = 0.92), and remained similar after correction for risk factors in a multivariate analysis. Patients treated with BSC had an inferior OS (1-year- and 2-year-OS 16% and 2%, P < 0.001). Compared to intensive chemotherapy, azacitidine-treated patients spent less days in the hospital (median in first three months 0.5 versus 56, P < 0.001), and needed less red blood cell and platelet transfusions (median per month 2.7 versus 7, P < 0.001 and 0.3 versus 5, P < 0.001) in the first three months. Azacitidine treatment is associated with a comparable OS but higher tolerability in a subgroup of older AML patients compared with intensive chemotherapy. Patients receiving BSC had a poor prognosis.

  7. Effect of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy on the Risk of Mucositis During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Sormani, Maria Pia; Marur, Shanthi; Gunn, G. Brandon; Rao, Nikhil; Cianchetti, Marco; Ricchetti, Francesco; McNutt, Todd; Wu Binbin; Forastiere, Arlene

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To define the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the risk of Grade 3+ mucositis during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: 164 consecutive patients treated with IMRT at two institutions in nonoverlapping treatment eras were selected. All patients were treated with a dose painting approach, three dose levels, and comprehensive bilateral neck treatment under the supervision of the same radiation oncologist. Ninety-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy (cCHT) and 14 received induction chemotherapy (iCHT). Individual information of the dose received by the oral mucosa (OM) was extracted as absolute cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), corrected for the elapsed treatment days and reported as weekly (w) DVH. Patients were seen weekly during treatment, and peak acute toxicity equal to or greater than confluent mucositis at any point during the course of IMRT was considered the endpoint. Results: Overall, 129 patients (78.7%) reached the endpoint. The regions that best discriminated between patients with/without Grade 3+ mucositis were found at 10.1 Gy/w (V10.1) and 21 cc (D21), along the x-axis and y-axis of the OM-wDVH, respectively. On multivariate analysis, D21 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.023, p < 0.001) and cCHT (OR = 4.118, 95% CI, 1.659-10.217, p = 0.002) were the only independent predictors. However, V10.1 and D21 were highly correlated (rho = 0.954, p < 0.001) and mutually interchangeable. cCHT would correspond to 88.4 cGy/w to at least 21 cc of OM. Conclusions: Radiotherapy and chemotherapy act independently in determining acute mucosal toxicity; cCHT increases the risk of mucosal Grade 3 toxicity Almost-Equal-To 4 times over radiation therapy alone, and it is equivalent to an extra Almost-Equal-To 6.2 Gy to 21 cc of OM over a 7-week course.

  8. Randomized study of reduced-intensity chemotherapy combined with imatinib in adults with Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chalandon, Yves; Thomas, Xavier; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Abbal, Claire; Huguet, Françoise; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Leguay, Thibaut; Rousselot, Philippe; Lepretre, Stéphane; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Maury, Sébastien; Berthon, Céline; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Lambert, Jean-François; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Lhéritier, Véronique; Chevret, Sylvie; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-06-11

    In this study, we randomly compared high doses of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib combined with reduced-intensity chemotherapy (arm A) to standard imatinib/hyperCVAD (cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone) therapy (arm B) in 268 adults (median age, 47 years) with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The primary objective was the major molecular response (MMolR) rate after cycle 2, patients being then eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) if they had a donor, or autologous SCT if in MMolR and no donor. With fewer induction deaths, the complete remission (CR) rate was higher in arm A than in arm B (98% vs 91%; P = .006), whereas the MMolR rate was similar in both arms (66% vs 64%). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 5-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were estimated at 37.1% and 45.6%, respectively, without difference between the arms. Allogeneic transplantation was associated with a significant benefit in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; P = .036) and OS (HR, 0.64; P = .02), with initial white blood cell count being the only factor significantly interacting with this SCT effect. In patients achieving MMolR, outcome was similar after autologous and allogeneic transplantation. This study validates an induction regimen combining reduced-intensity chemotherapy and imatinib in Ph+ ALL adult patients and suggests that SCT in first CR is still a good option for Ph+ ALL adult patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00327678.

  9. Therapeutic Options for Patients who are not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Estey, Elihu

    2013-01-01

    Although “less intense” therapies are finding more use in AML, the principal problem in AML remains lack of efficacy rather than toxicity. Hence less intense therapies are of little use if they are not more effective as well as less toxic than standard therapies. Assignment of patients to less intense therapies should be based on other factors in addition to age. Azacitidine and decitabine, the most commonly used less intense therapies in AML very probably produce better OS than best “supportive care” or “low-dose” ara-C. However improvement is relatively small when compared to expected life expectancy in the absence of disease. Accordingly, while azacitidine or decitabine should be considered the standards against which newer therapies are compared, continued investigation of potentially more effective therapies needs to continue. Better means for evaluating the large number of these therapies (and their combinations) are also needed. PMID:23936621

  10. Alternatives, and adjuncts, to prophylactic platelet transfusion for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Murphy, Michael F

    2016-08-22

    Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy since the mid-1970s, some areas continue to provoke debate especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. To determine whether agents that can be used as alternatives, or adjuncts, to platelet transfusions for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation are safe and effective at preventing bleeding. We searched 11 bibliographic databases and four ongoing trials databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE (OvidSP, 1946 to 19 May 2016), Embase (OvidSP, 1974 to 19 May 2016), PubMed (e-publications only: searched 19 May 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP and the ISRCTN Register (searched 19 May 2016). We included randomised controlled trials in people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, desmopressin (DDAVP), or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard care or platelet transfusion). We excluded studies of antifibrinolytic drugs, as they were the focus of another review. Two review authors screened all electronically derived citations and abstracts of papers identified by the review search strategy. Two review authors assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data independently. We identified 16 eligible trials. Four trials are ongoing and two have been completed but the results have not yet been published (trial completion dates: April 2012 to February 2017). Therefore, the

  11. Alternatives, and adjuncts, to prophylactic platelet transfusion for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Murphy, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy since the mid-1970s, some areas continue to provoke debate especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. Objectives To determine whether agents that can be used as alternatives, or adjuncts, to platelet transfusions for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation are safe and effective at preventing bleeding. Search methods We searched 11 bibliographic databases and four ongoing trials databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE (OvidSP, 1946 to 19 May 2016), Embase (OvidSP, 1974 to 19 May 2016), PubMed (e-publications only: searched 19 May 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP and the ISRCTN Register (searched 19 May 2016). Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials in people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, desmopressin (DDAVP), or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard care or platelet transfusion). We excluded studies of antifibrinolytic drugs, as they were the focus of another review. Data collection and analysis Two review authors screened all electronically derived citations and abstracts of papers identified by the review search strategy. Two review authors assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data independently. Main results We identified 16 eligible trials. Four trials are ongoing and two have been completed but the results have

  12. Reticulated platelets: a reliable measure to reduce prophylactic platelet transfusions after intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, Driss; Chakroun, Tahar; Robert, Françoise; Rio, Bernard; Belhocine, Ramdane; Legrand, Ollivier; Salanoubat, Celia; Lecrubier, Chantal; Casadevall, Nicole; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Elalamy, Ismail

    2005-05-01

    Reticulated platelets (RPs) are the youngest circulating platelets (PLTs). The aim of our study was to predict PLT recovery with RP percentage (RP%) and therefore to identify PLT transfusions that could be avoided after autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation. With a whole-blood dual-labeling flow cytometric method, RP% was prospectively assessed in 47 patients who received myeloablative chemotherapy followed by autologous PBPC transplantation. Retrospective analysis of RP evolution identified three time points: nadir of the RP% (NRP), imminent PLT recovery (IPR) corresponding to an RP% of greater than 7 percent, and PLT transfusion autonomy (PTA). Median occurrences of NRP, IPR, and PTA were on Days +5, +8, and +12 after transplantation, respectively. The RP% value at NRP (4%) was significantly lower compared to the IPR (15%) and PTA (14%). Thirty patients (64%) achieved PTA within 4 days after IPR. On Day +8, if RP% was greater than 7 percent, positive and negative predictive values for PTA within 4 days, specificity, and sensitivity were 79, 63, 66, and 76 percent, respectively. Fever between IPR and PTA was the only factor found to negatively influence PLT recovery (p = 0.02). All patients required at least one PLT transfusion. Among patients with rapid PLT recovery (IPR-PTA interval < 4 days; n = 30), half of them received one PLT transfusion after RP increase, which could be avoided. These encouraging results may allow us to reduce the prophylactic PLT transfusion according to patients RP% increase.

  13. [PONV after strabismus surgery : Risk adapted prophylaxis?].

    PubMed

    Wolf, R; Morinello, E; Kestler, G; Käsmann-Kellner, B; Bischoff, M; Hager, T; Schöpe, J; Eberhart, L H J

    2016-07-01

    Following strabismus surgery, patients frequently develop variable degrees of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). These symptoms cause discomfort and result in serious complications such as intramuscular bleeding and subconjunctival hemorrhage. In children long lasting PONV can lead to and electrolyte imbalance and dehydration. A prolonged course of recovery is the consequence. For the hospital, PONV can also involve negative economic impacts because of a damaged public reputation of the institution. There is still an ongoing debate on wether prophylaxis of PONV is necessary and how the prophylaxis of PONV should be performed. On one hand, there are proponents of a liberal prophylaxis. These intend to treat almost all patients regardless of their individual risk for PONV. On the other hand, opponents point out that every medication has to be indicated individually. In their view, risk scores should be the base of a risk-adapted approach. The aim of the study was to reduce the frequency of PONV by using an anesthetic technique adapted to the individual risk for PONV. Until now, all trials studying the efficiency of a score-based antiemetic prophylaxis were performed on adult patients. In this study, a risk-adapted approach was evaluated on children for the first time. In 92 patients, the incidence of PONV was analyzed after strabismus surgery. Before surgery we evaluated the risk factors for PONV according to the POVOC score in children (n = 45, 49 %) and the Apfel's score in adults (n = 47, 51 %). Patients with 0-2 risk factors received a balanced anesthesia (n = 47, 51 %). Those with 3-4 risk factors were operated in total IV anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol (n = 45, 49 %). In addition, as an antiemetic prophylaxis, 0.15 mg/kg dexamethason and 0.1 mg/kg ondansetron were applied in the latter patients. we documented the symptoms and severity of PONV 2, 6 and 24 h after surgery by means of a standardized questionnaire for PONV

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  15. Intensive systemic chemotherapy is effective against recurrent malignant Brenner tumor of the ovary: An analysis of 10 cases within a single center.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Wha; Park, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Young-Tak; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Malignant Brenner tumors (MBTs) of the ovary are very rare, and their definition, biology, and treatment modality have not been established. This study investigated the clinical characteristics of MBTs and the importance of chemotherapy for recurrent disease. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 10 patients with MBT of the ovary treated at a single tertiary center from 1991 to 2013. The median age was 55.5 years (range, 37-68 years). Nine of the 10 patients were symptomatic. The median size of the ovarian tumors was 10.5 cm (range, 2.5-25.0 cm). The cancer antigen-125 level was elevated in three patients. Six patients had a stage I tumor, one had a stage II tumor, two had a stage III tumor, and one had a stage IV tumor. Six patients received systemic adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery. The mean follow-up duration was 54.5 months (range, 8-173 months). Disease recurrence occurred in four of the 10 patients. The median time to recurrence was 11 months (range, 9-18 months). Two patients with locoregional recurrence showed favorable results after chemotherapy, regardless of the initial stage of the tumor. The patient with the stage IIIC tumor is alive at 13 months after recurrence on current chemotherapy. The patient with the stage IV tumor showed no evidence of the disease > 12 years after the last chemotherapy. Lastly, two patients with distant recurrence died after showing a long-term survival of 49 months and 88 months, respectively, after recurrence and intensive chemotherapy. Our results showed that systemic chemotherapy is beneficial in patients with recurrence of a primary MBT of the ovary, especially in the locoregional recurrence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia: a consensus statement on risk-adapted approaches to therapy.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Martin; Douer, Dan; Gore, Steven; Powell, Bayard L; Ravandi, Farhad; Rowe, Jacob; Ranganathan, Aarati; Sanz, Miguel A

    2010-10-01

    The integration of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) with anthracycline chemotherapy into up-front regimens for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has produced striking improvements in clinical outcomes, making APL one of the most curable forms of hematologic malignancies in adults. In addition, arsenic trioxide has proven efficacy in relapse and when combined with ATRA in frontline regimens has demonstrated high efficacy in a number of trials and the potential to replace chemotherapy, which would thereby reduce chemotherapy-related adverse events. Cure in APL is also largely dependent on timely and effective supportive care measures that counteract such life-threatening emergencies as coagulopathy and APL differentiation syndrome. The risk of mortality during induction and the risk of relapse following frontline therapy are related to the individual's initial clinical presentation and relapse-risk score at diagnosis; however, these risks are now quite low even in high-risk patients as long as appropriate therapy is initiated expeditiously. Multiple European and North American trials have investigated risk-adapted approaches to the treatment of APL and have reported high success rates. Further refinement of risk-adapted strategies is ongoing and will likely contribute to better patient care. A roundtable conference was conducted to discuss risk-adapted therapy for APL and to develop a consensus statement and approach for clinical oncologists. Expert opinions and evidence-based strategies presented during the roundtable are summarized herein.

  17. Retrospective analysis of relative dose intensity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving CHOP-based chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Lodovico; Mo, May; Abella, Esteban; Saven, Alan

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate primary prophylaxis with pegfilgrastim, a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, on maintaining relative dose intensity (RDI) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) receiving cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) or CHOP-rituximab (CHOP-R). This retrospective analysis pooled data from pegfilgrastim NHL clinical trials. Patients received up to 6 cycles of CHOP/CHOP-R every 2 (Q2W) or 3 (Q3W) weeks. RDI and the patient incidence of dose delay, reduction, discontinuation, and adverse events leading to dose alteration/discontinuation were summarized overall and by age group (below 65, 65 to 75, and above 75 y) and treatment schedule. RDI during treatment exposure and RDI adjusted by the planned 6 cycles of treatment were calculated. The adjusted RDI was also evaluated with multiple regression analysis. Mean RDI during treatment exposure was 93% and 94% in overall patients in the Q2W and Q3W regimens, respectively. Mean adjusted RDI was 88% and 80%, respectively. The incidence of patients with RDI>85% was lower in older patients (65 y and above). In older patients, the incidence of dose reduction and discontinuation were higher regardless of treatment schedule, whereas dose delay was higher in the Q2W regimen. Multiple regression analysis identified age and cancer stage as potential factors associated with RDI. Adverse events leading to dose alteration/discontinuation were spread across hematological and nonhematological toxicities; older patients had a higher incidence of these adverse events. Pegfilgrastim primary prophylaxis maintained RDI in NHL patients receiving CHOP/CHOP-R during treatment. Adjusted RDI was lower in elderly patients because of early termination of chemotherapy.

  18. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  19. Early Clinical Outcome With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Extended-Field, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil . E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu; Gan, Gregory N.; Heron, Dwight E.; Selvaraj, Raj N.; Kim, Hayeon; Lalonde, Ron; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the early clinical outcomes with concurrent cisplatin and extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) for carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with Stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with EF-IMRT were evaluated. The pelvic lymph nodes were involved in 19 patients, and of these 19 patients, 10 also had para-aortic nodal disease. The treatment volume included the cervix, uterus, parametria, presacral space, upper vagina, and pelvic, common iliac, and para-aortic nodes to the superior border of L1. Patients were assessed for acute toxicities according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. All late toxicities were scored with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. Results: All patients completed the prescribed course of EF-IMRT. All but 2 patients received brachytherapy. Median length of treatment was 53 days. The median follow-up was 18 months. Acute Grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and myelotoxicity were seen in 1, 1, and 10 patients, respectively. Thirty-four patients had complete response to treatment. Of these 34 patients, 11 developed recurrences. The first site of recurrence was in-field in 2 patients (pelvis in 1, pelvis and para-aortic in 1) and distant in 9 patients. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and Grade {>=}3 toxicity rates for the entire cohort were 80%, 51%, 65%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: Extended-field IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy was tolerated well, with acceptable acute and early late toxicities. The locoregional control rate was good, with distant metastases being the predominant mode of failure. We are continuing to accrue a larger number of patients and longer follow-up data to further extend our initial observations with this approach.

  20. Prophylactic ciprofloxacin treatment prevented high mortality, and modified systemic and intestinal immune function in tumour-bearing rats receiving dose-intensive CPT-11 chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xue, H; Field, C J; Sawyer, M B; Dieleman, L A; Baracos, V E

    2009-05-19

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality from dose-intensive cancer chemotherapy. In spite of the importance of intestinal bacteria translocation in these infections, information about the effect of high-dose chemotherapy on gut mucosal immunity is minimal. We studied prophylactic ciprofloxacin (Cipro) treatment on irinotecan (CPT-11) toxicity and host immunity in rats bearing Ward colon tumour. Cipro abolished chemotherapy-related mortality, which was 45% in animals that were not treated with Cipro. Although Cipro reduced body weight loss and muscle wasting, it was unable to prevent severe late-onset diarrhoea. Seven days after CPT-11, splenocytes were unable to proliferate (stimulation index=0.10+/-0.02) and produce proliferative and inflammatory cytokines (i.e., Interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1beta, IL-6) on mitogen stimulation in vitro (P<0.05 vs controls), whereas mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells showed a hyper-proliferative response and a hyper-production of pro-inflammatory cytokines on mitogen stimulation. This suggests compartmentalised effects by CPT-11 chemotherapy on systemic and intestinal immunity. Cipro normalised the hyper-responsiveness of MLN cells, and in the spleen, it partially restored the proliferative response and normalised depressed production of IL-1beta and IL-6. Taken together, Cipro prevented infectious challenges associated with immune hypo-responsiveness in systemic immune compartments, and it may also alleviate excessive pro-inflammatory responses mediating local gut injury.

  1. Phase I Trial of Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Temozolomide Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Changhu; Damek, Denise; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Robischon, Monica; Stuhr, Kelly; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Level 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34-84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60-90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0-12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3-33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6-12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with

  2. Systemic chemotherapy followed by locoregional definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy yields prolonged survival in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with distant metastasis at initial diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shao-xuan; He, Xiao-hui; Dong, Mei; Jia, Bo; Zhou, Sheng-yu; Yang, Jian-liang; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Chang-Gong; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Gui, Lin

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy is the current mainstay of treatment for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), whereas the role of locoregional radiotherapy remains to be defined. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the outcome of systemic chemotherapy followed by locoregional definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as first-line treatment for these patients. Forty-one patients with pathologically confirmed NPC with distant metastasis at initial diagnosis seen between March 2005 and February 2014 were included. All the patients were treated with platinum-based systemic chemotherapy followed by definitive IMRT to the primary head and neck region with or without concurrent chemotherapy. In addition, local treatment to metastatic lesions was given in 19 patients. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, 24 patients had died, and the estimated median overall survival time was 31.2 months. The 1-, 2-, 3- and 5-year estimated OS rates were 89.9, 67.4, 41.1 and 22.5%, respectively. Prognostic analyses showed that serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P = 0.021) and number of metastatic sites (single vs. multiple; P = 0.016) were significant prognostic factors. Five patients are still alive without evidence of disease after 52 to >101 months. All of them had a single metastatic lesion and received local treatment to metastatic sites. These results suggest that the use of definitive IMRT to treat the locoregional tumor in combination with systemic chemotherapy may prolong survival in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic NPC, making curability a possible consideration in selected patients with single metastasis. Further prospective clinical trials are warranted.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  4. Results of a prospective dose intensity and neutropenia prophylaxis evaluation programme (DIEPP) in cancer patients at risk of febrile neutropenia due to myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mądry, Radosław; Popławska, Lidia; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Šafanda, Martin; Ghizdavescu, Doru; Benkovicova, Jana; Csőszi, Tibor; Mihaylov, Georgi; Niepel, Daniela; Jaeger, Christine; Frkanova, Iveta; Macovei, Alina; Staudigl, Christine

    2016-04-01

    To describe the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and use of pegfilgrastim in cancer patients with high overall risk of FN and to investigate the relationship between granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) guideline adherence and chemotherapy delivery in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and Austria. Dose Intensity Evaluation Program and Prophylaxis (DIEPP) was a multicentre, prospective, and observational study of adult patients with breast cancer, lymphoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, and ovarian cancer, who received chemotherapy with pegfilgrastim support and who had an overall risk of FN ≥ 20 %. Physicians assessed patient risk factors and reported their reasons for administering pegfilgrastim. Patients were enrolled from 113 centres in CEE and Austria between August 2010 and July 2013, and data were analysed from 1072 patients. The most common tumour types were breast cancer (50 %) and lymphoma (24 %). FN incidence was 5 % overall. FN occurred in 3 % of patients (28/875) who received pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis (PP) and 13 % of patients (19/142) who received it as secondary prophylaxis (SP); 79 % of FN events in SP patients occurred in the first cycle before pegfilgrastim was administered. The three most frequently chosen reasons for using pegfilgrastim were planned chemotherapy with high FN risk, female gender, and advanced disease. Overall, 40 % of patients received > 90 % of their planned chemotherapy dose within 3 days of the planned schedule. FN incidence was relatively low with pegfilgrastim PP in patients with a physician-assessed overall FN risk of ≥ 20 %. The most important reasons for pegfilgrastim use were consistent with the investigators' risk assessment and international guidelines.

  5. Dosimetric Evaluation and Treatment Outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Li-Ming; Li, Ye-Xiong; Fang, Hui; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Liu, Qing-Feng; Chen, Bo; Qi, Shu-Nan; Ren, Hua; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: The value of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is unknown. We assessed the dosimetric parameters, treatment outcomes, and toxicity of IMRT in PMBCL. Methods and Materials: Forty-one PMBCL patients underwent mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Thirty-eight patients had stage I-II disease, and 3 patients had stage III-IV disease. Most patients presented with bulky mediastinal disease (65.9%) and local invasion (82.9%). The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The average planning target volume (PTV) mean dose was 39 Gy. Only 0.5% and 1.4% of the PTV received <90% and <95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, indicating excellent target coverage. The median mean lung dose and percentage lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20) were 16.3 Gy and 30.6%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were 95.1% and 89.8%. After chemotherapy, consolidation radiation therapy in patients with complete/partial response resulted in significantly better survival than salvage radiation therapy in patients with stable/progressive disease (3-year OS 100% vs 75%; 3-year LC 96.6% vs 62.5%). No grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions: Mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy can be safely and efficiently delivered, and it provides favorable outcomes in PMBCL patients with a large target volume and high-risk features.

  6. Treatment outcome after low intensity chemotherapy [CVP] in children and adolescents with early stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma - an Anglo-French collaborative report.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Ananth; Hall, Georgina W; Gorde-Grosjean, Stephanie; Hasenclever, Dirk; Leblanc, Thierry; Hayward, Janis; Lambilliotte, Anne; Daw, Stephen; Perel, Yves; McCarthy, Keith; Lejars, Odile; Coulomb, Aurore; Oberlin, W Odile; Wallace, W Hamish; Landman-Parker, Judith

    2012-07-01

    To examine whether three cycles of a low-intensity chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide [500 mg/m(2) - day 1], vinblastine [6 mg/m(2) - days 1 and 8] and prednisolone [40 mg/m(2) - days 1-7] (CVP) is safe and therapeutically effective in children and adolescents with early stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma [nLPHL]. Fifty-five children and adolescents with early stage nLPHL [median age 13 years, range 4-17 years] diagnosed between June 2005 and October 2010 in the UK and France are the subjects of this report. Staging investigations included conventional cross sectional as well as 18 fluro-deoxyglucose [FDG] PET imaging. Histology was confirmed as nLPHL by an expert pathology panel. Of the 45 patients, who received CVP as first line treatment, 36 [80%, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: (68; 92)] either achieved a complete remission [CR] or CR unconfirmed [CRu], the remaining nine patients achieved a partial response. All nine subsequently achieved CR with salvage chemotherapy [n=7] or radiotherapy [n=2]. Ten patients received CVP at relapse after primary treatment that consisted of surgery alone and all achieved CR. To date, only three patients have relapsed after CVP chemotherapy and all had received CVP as first line treatment at initial diagnosis. The 40-month freedom from treatment failure and overall survival for the entire cohort were 75.4% (SE ± 6%) and 100%, respectively. No significant early toxicity was observed. Our results show that CVP is an effective chemotherapy regimen in children and adolescents with early stage nLPHL that is well tolerated with minimal acute toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Concurrent intensive chemotherapy and imatinib before and after stem cell transplantation in newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Final results of the CSTIBES02 trial.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Oriol, Albert; González, Marcos; Vidriales, Belén; Brunet, Salut; Esteve, Jordi; Del Potro, Eloy; Rivas, Concepción; Moreno, Maria-José; Tormo, Mar; Martín-Reina, Victoria; Sarrá, Josep; Parody, Ricardo; de Oteyza, Jaime Pérez; Bureo, Encarna; Bernal, Maria-Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Imatinib, given concurrently or alternating with chemotherapy, has improved the response and survival of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+) ALL) but relapses are still frequent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and results of giving imatinib concurrently with intensive chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and post-transplant imatinib maintenance therapy in patients with newly diagnosed Ph(+) ALL. This was a phase II study of patients with newly diagnosed Ph(+) ALL given standard chemotherapy, together with imatinib (400 mg/day) until stem cell transplantation, followed by imatinib maintenance therapy for all patients regardless of the molecular status of the disease. Of the 30 patients included, 27 (90%) achieved complete remission, one was resistant to treatment and two died during induction therapy. The percentages of major and complete molecular responses were 86% and 21% after induction, and 81% and 65% after consolidation, respectively. Similar results were observed assessing minimal residual disease by flow cytometry. Of the 27 patients who achieved complete remission, 21 underwent stem cell transplantation (16 allogeneic, 5 autologous). Imatinib (400 mg/day) could be administered after transplantation for a median of 3.9 months in 12 patients, although it was interrupted in 10 patients (in 2 cases because of side effects of the drug). Nine patients relapsed, four before and five after stem cell transplantation and eight patients died of transplant-related causes. With a median follow-up of 4.1 years, the probabilities (95% CI) of disease-free and overall survival were 30% (15% to 45%) and 30% (16% to 45%), respectively. These results confirm that imatinib is an effective first-line treatment for adult Ph(+) ALL when given concurrently with chemotherapy, making stem cell transplantation feasible in a high proportion of patients. However, post-transplantation imatinib administration was

  8. Autologous or Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Chemotherapy-Sensitive Mantle-Cell Lymphoma: Analysis of Transplantation Timing and Modality

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Timothy S.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Ayala, Ernesto; Burns, Linda J.; Cashen, Amanda; Costa, Luciano J.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert P.; Hamadani, Mehdi; Holmberg, Leona A.; Inwards, David J.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Munker, Reinhold; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rizzieri, David A.; Schouten, Harry C.; Smith, Sonali M.; Waller, Edmund K.; Wirk, Baldeep M.; Laport, Ginna G.; Maloney, David G.; Montoto, Silvia; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the outcomes of patients with chemotherapy-sensitive mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL) following a first hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HCT), comparing outcomes with autologous (auto) versus reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic (RIC allo) HCT and with transplantation applied at different times in the disease course. Patients and Methods In all, 519 patients who received transplantations between 1996 and 2007 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research were analyzed. The early transplantation cohort was defined as those patients in first partial or complete remission with no more than two lines of chemotherapy. The late transplantation cohort was defined as all the remaining patients. Results Auto-HCT and RIC allo-HCT resulted in similar overall survival from transplantation for both the early (at 5 years: 61% auto-HCT v 62% RIC allo-HCT; P = .951) and late cohorts (at 5 years: 44% auto-HCT v 31% RIC allo-HCT; P = .202). In both early and late transplantation cohorts, progression/relapse was lower and nonrelapse mortality was higher in the allo-HCT group. Overall survival and progression-free survival were highest in patients who underwent auto-HCT in first complete response. Multivariate analysis of survival from diagnosis identified a survival benefit favoring early HCT for both auto-HCT and RIC allo-HCT. Conclusion For patients with chemotherapy-sensitive MCL, the optimal timing for HCT is early in the disease course. Outcomes are particularly favorable for patients undergoing auto-HCT in first complete remission. For those unable to achieve complete remission after two lines of chemotherapy or those with relapsed disease, either auto-HCT or RIC allo-HCT may be effective, although the chance for long-term remission and survival is lower. PMID:24344210

  9. Concurrent intensive chemotherapy and imatinib before and after stem cell transplantation in newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Final results of the CSTIBES02 trial

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Oriol, Albert; González, Marcos; Vidriales, Belén; Brunet, Salut; Esteve, Jordi; del Potro, Eloy; Rivas, Concepción; Moreno, Maria-José; Tormo, Mar; Martín-Reina, Victoria; Sarrá, Josep; Parody, Ricardo; de Oteyza, Jaime Pérez; Bureo, Encarna; Bernal, Maria-Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Background Imatinib, given concurrently or alternating with chemotherapy, has improved the response and survival of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) but relapses are still frequent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and results of giving imatinib concurrently with intensive chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and post-transplant imatinib maintenance therapy in patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. Design and Methods This was a phase II study of patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL given standard chemotherapy, together with imatinib (400 mg/day) until stem cell transplantation, followed by imatinib maintenance therapy for all patients regardless of the molecular status of the disease. Results Of the 30 patients included, 27 (90%) achieved complete remission, one was resistant to treatment and two died during induction therapy. The percentages of major and complete molecular responses were 86% and 21% after induction, and 81% and 65% after consolidation, respectively. Similar results were observed assessing minimal residual disease by flow cytometry. Of the 27 patients who achieved complete remission, 21 underwent stem cell transplantation (16 allogeneic, 5 autologous). Imatinib (400 mg/day) could be administered after transplantation for a median of 3.9 months in 12 patients, although it was interrupted in 10 patients (in 2 cases because of side effects of the drug). Nine patients relapsed, four before and five after stem cell transplantation and eight patients died of transplant-related causes. With a median follow-up of 4.1 years, the probabilities (95% CI) of disease-free and overall survival were 30% (15% to 45%) and 30% (16% to 45%), respectively. Conclusions These results confirm that imatinib is an effective first-line treatment for adult Ph+ ALL when given concurrently with chemotherapy, making stem cell transplantation feasible in a high proportion of patients. However, post

  10. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Mignogna, Samantha; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Cilla, Savino; Calista, Franco; Serafini, Giovanni; Digesu, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Caravatta, Luciana; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Sallustio, Giuseppina; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m{sup 2} plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  11. Treatment of metastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone: evaluation of increasing the dose intensity of chemotherapy--a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Miser, James S; Goldsby, Robert E; Chen, Zhengjia; Krailo, Mark D; Tarbell, Nancy J; Link, Michael P; Fryer, Christopher J H; Pritchard, Douglas J; Gebhardt, Mark C; Dickman, Paul S; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Meyers, Paul A; Donaldson, Sarah S; Moore, Sheila G; Rausen, Aaron R; Vietti, Teresa J; Grier, Holcombe E

    2007-12-01

    The outcome for patients with Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFTs) of bone with metastases at diagnosis remains poor despite new approaches to treatment. We evaluated whether a dose-intensity chemotherapy regimen improved survival for patients with ESFTs of bone with metastases at diagnosis. We entered 60 patients with metastatic ESFTs of bone onto a single arm trial of a new intensive therapy. Treatment consisted of 51-weeks of chemotherapy and local control of the primary with radiation, surgery, or both. The chemotherapeutic protocol included two alternating blocks: one with vincristine (2 mg/m(2)), doxorubicin (90 mg/m(2)), and cyclophosphamide (2,200 mg/m(2)); and the second with ifosfamide (2,800 mg/m(2)/day x 5 days) and etoposide (100 mg/m(2)/day x 5 days). Of the 60 patients with metastatic ESFTs of bone enrolled onto this single arm trial, 12 had metastasis to lung only, 7 to bone marrow or bone only, 38 to multiple sites, 2 in other sites and 3 not specified. There were three toxic deaths. Six patients (6-year cumulative incidence: 9%) developed second malignant neoplasms and died. The 6-year overall event-free survival (EFS) was 28% (standard error (SE) 6%) and survival (S) was 29% (SE 6%). An intensified treatment regimen using higher doses of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin increased toxicity and risk of second malignancy without improving EFS and S. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  12. Comparison of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim to prevent neutropenia and maintain dose intensity of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Skarlos, Dimosthenis V; Gogas, Helen; Pentheroudakis, George; Koutras, Angelos; Fountzilas, George; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of prophylactic single fixed dose of pegfilgrastim and daily administration of filgrastim on febrile neutropenia (FN), severe neutropenia, treatment delay, and dose reduction in patients with breast cancer receiving dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy. A retrospective cohort study with 1058 breast cancer patients matched by age and chemotherapy was conducted. The primary endpoints were FN, severe (grade 3, 4) neutropenia, dose reduction (>10 % reduction of the dose planned), and treatment delay (dose given more than 2 days later). Eighteen episodes of FN (3.4%) in the filgrastim group and 23 (4.3%) in the pegfilgrastim group (p = 0.500) were recorded. More than half of the total episodes (27/41) occurred during the first 4 cycles of treatment. Patients who received filgrastim were almost three times more likely to experience a severe neutropenia episode and were significantly more likely to experience a dose reduction (18.5%) compared to those who received pegfilgrastim (10.8%) (p < 0.001). The percentage of patients, who received their planned dose on time, was significantly lower in patients receiving filgrastim (58%) compared to those receiving pegfilgrastim (72.4%, p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected on FN rate between daily administration of filgrastim and single administration of pegfilgrastim. However, patients receiving pegfilgrastim had a significantly lower rate of severe neutropenia, as well as dose reduction and treatment delay, thus, achieving a higher dose density.

  13. Whole Abdominopelvic Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy in the Palliative Treatment of Chemotherapy-Resistant Ovarian Cancer With Bulky Peritoneal Disease: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    De Meerleer, Gert; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Ost, Piet; Delrue, Louke; Denys, Hannelore; Makar, Amin; Speleers, Bruno; Van Belle, Simon; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Fonteyne, Valerie; De Neve, Wilfried

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our experience with whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy (WAPRT) using intensity-modulated arc therapy in the palliative treatment of chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer with bulky peritoneal disease. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and April 2008, 13 patients were treated with WAPRT using intensity-modulated arc therapy. We prescribed a dose of 33 Gy to be delivered in 22 fractions of 1.5 Gy to the abdomen and pelvis. All patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III or IV ovarian cancer at the initial diagnosis. At referral, the median age was 61 years, and the patients had been heavily pretreated with surgery and chemotherapy. All patients had symptoms from their disease, including gastrointestinal obstruction or subobstruction in 6, minor gastrointestinal symptoms in 2, pain in 4, ascites in 1, and vaginal bleeding in 2. A complete symptom or biochemical response required complete resolution of the patient's symptoms or cancer antigen-125 level. A partial response required {>=}50% resolution of these parameters. The actuarial survival was calculated from the start of radiotherapy. Results: The median overall survival was 21 weeks, with a 6-month overall survival rate of 45%. The 9 patients who completed treatment obtained a complete symptom response, except for ascites (partial response). The median and mean response duration (all symptoms grouped) was 24 and 37 weeks, respectively. Of the 6 patients presenting with obstruction or subobstruction, 4 obtained a complete symptom response (median duration, 16 weeks). Conclusion: WAPRT delivered using intensity-modulated arc therapy offers important palliation in the case of peritoneal metastatic ovarian cancer. WAPRT resolved intestinal obstruction for a substantial period.

  14. Intensive BFM chemotherapy for childhood ALL: interim analysis of the AIEOP-ALL 91 study. Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica.

    PubMed

    Conter, V; Aricò, M; Valsecchi, M G; Rizzari, C; Testi, A; Miniero, R; Di Tullio, M T; Lo Nigro, L; Pession, A; Rondelli, R; Messina, C; Santoro, N; Mori, P G; De Rossi, G; Tamaro, P; Silvestri, D; Biondi, A; Basso, G; Masera, G

    1998-09-01

    Since 1988 the AIEOP has used BFM-based chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Current organization and results and role of cranial irradiation in the AIEOP-ALL 91 study are reported. From 1991 to 1995, 1194 children (< 15 years) with non-B ALL, were enrolled and assigned to the standard risk [SR: age > 1 year, non-T-ALL, BFM risk factor (RF) < 0.8], intermediate risk (IR: RF > or = 0.8 but < 1.7, or with RF < 0.8 and age < 1 year, or T-ALL), or high risk [HR: RF > or = 1.7, or t(9;22), or t(4;11) or prednisone poor response or late response or CNS involvement] groups. All patients received initially protocol Ia. Thereafter SR patients received HD-MTX 2 g/m2, a modified protocol II, and continuation therapy with triple intrathecal chemotherapy (TIT); IR patients received protocol Ib, HD-MTX 5 g/m2, protocol II and continuation therapy with TIT; HR patients received 9 polychemotherapy blocks, cranial irradiation and continuation therapy. Duration of treatment was 24 months. A randomized study was conducted to evaluate the impact of high-dose asparaginase in non high risk patients: the results of this study cannot be disclosed yet. One thousand one hundred and fifty-two (96.5%) patients achieved CR. Overall EFS (SE) at 5-years was 71.0% (1.4), with a survival of 80.3% (1.3). Relapse occurred in 262 children (21.9%), either in the marrow (n = 192 isolated and 32 with other sites, 18.7%), in the CNS (n = 18, 1.5%), or elsewhere (n = 20, 1.7%). 5-year EFS (SE) was 83.3% (2.4) in SR, 74.7% (1.8) in IR, and 39.7% (3.5) in HR groups, respectively. Overall cure rate was higher than in the previous AIEOP-ALL 88 study. Treatment intensification with polychemotherapy blocks did not improve results in HR. Cranial irradiation can be safely omitted in over 80% of children treated with BFM based chemotherapy.

  15. Comparison of Methods for Determining Aerobic Exercise Intensity Using Heart Rate in Acute Leukemia Patients Prior to Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Story, Christina; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Phillips, Brett; Bailey, Charlotte; Shields, Edgar W; Battaglini, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), the gold standard of cardiopulmonary evaluation, is used to determine VO2 levels at different aerobic exercise training intensities; however, it may not be feasible to conduct CPET in all clinical settings. To compare the heart rate reserve (HRR) and percent of 220-age methods for prescribing cycle ergometry exercise intensity using heart rate (HR) against the HRs obtained during a CPET in adults undergoing treatment for acute leukemia (AL). In this exploratory study, part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 14 adults with AL completed CPET on a cycle ergometer with indirect calorimetry within 96 hr of admission to a cancer hospital to determine VO2peak and HR corresponding to low (40% VO2peak), moderate (60% VO2peak), and high (75% VO2peak) exercise intensities. Analyses of variance were used to compare estimated HR for each intensity level using the HRR and percent of 220-age methods with HR determined via VO2peak. HR corresponding to low-intensity exercise differed significantly across all three methods (p ≤ .05). No significant differences were observed between HR estimated via the percent of 220-age method and determined via VO2peak at moderate (100 ± 8 and 113 ± 24 bpm, p = .122) or high intensities (125 ± 10 and 123 ± 25 bpm, p = .994). In adults with AL, HR-based methods for defining aerobic exercise intensities should be used with caution. At low intensity, neither should be used, while at moderate and high intensities, the percent of 220-age equation might serve as an adequate substitute for CPET. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Receipt of maintenance therapy is most predictive of survival in older acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated with intensive induction chemotherapy regimens.

    PubMed

    Landsburg, Daniel J; Stadtmauer, Edward; Loren, Alison; Goldstein, Steven; Frey, Noelle; Nasta, Sunita D; Porter, David L; Tsai, Donald E; Perl, Alexander E; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Luger, Selina

    2013-08-01

    While the prognosis for older adults diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is frequently poor, long-term survival can be achieved in patients treated with curative intent. We reviewed the outcomes of 37 patients age ≥60 treated at our institution with either DVP- or hyperCVAD-based chemotherapy regimens from 2003-2011. In this patient population, a complete response rate of 92%, relapse rate of 56% and median overall survival of 18.1 months was experienced. Univariate analysis revealed that receipt of maintenance therapy vs. no maintenance therapy was associated with a statistically-significant impact on overall survival (p = 0.001, HR 0.15 for death), while disease-related characteristics including high-risk white blood cell count at diagnosis and Philadelphia chromosome status as well as treatment-related factors including chemotherapy regimen or completion of intensive therapy were not. Many patients were unable to initiate or remain on maintenance therapy due to toxicities including infections and cytopenias. Our analysis reveals the benefit of prolonged therapy in the treatment of older adults with ALL as well as the high incidence of treatment-related toxicity experienced by these patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Long-term effect of chemotherapy-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT) on dentofacial development in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Owosho, Adepitan A; Brady, Paul; Wolden, Suzanne L; Wexler, Leonard H; Antonescu, Cristina R; Huryn, Joseph M; Estilo, Cherry L

    2016-09-01

    Dentofacial developmental abnormalities have been reported in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma (HNRMS) patients treated with conventional radiotherapy technique and chemotherapy. This current study investigates dentofacial long-term effects among HNRMS survivors managed with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and chemotherapy. In general, IMRT is a more effective 3D-conformal radiotherapy technique, which delivers high doses of radiation to the tumor target while minimizing doses received by the surrounding normal tissues. The medical records and radiographs of thirteen patients were reviewed to identify the following: 1. Facial asymmetry and jaw hypoplasia. 2. Effects on the dental tissue causing tooth agenesis/hypodontia, root agenesis/stunting/malformation, and/or enamel hypoplasia. 3. Trismus, hyposalivation/xerostomia. Seven patients presented with facial asymmetry and jaw hypoplasia, 9 patients presented with effects on the dental tissue [root agenesis/stunting/malformation (9), tooth agenesis/hypodontia (7) and enamel hypoplasia (3)] and 7 patients developed trismus and /or xerostomia. All patients with facial asymmetry and jaw hypoplasia also developed dental abnormalities. Patients with dentofacial developmental abnormalities were ≤7 years of age at treatment. Our study shows that dentofacial developmental abnormalities are still a burden in the era of IMRT and as prognosis of childhood malignancy improves and more patients survive, these late dentofacial sequelae among childhood cancer survivors will become more common. Dental oncologists should be integral members in the management of children with head and neck cancers.

  18. Improved efficacy using rituximab and brief duration, high intensity chemotherapy with filgrastim support for Burkitt or aggressive lymphomas: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 10002

    PubMed Central

    Rizzieri, David A.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Byrd, John C.; Lozanski, Gerard; Blum, Kristie A.; Powell, Bayard L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Hoke, Eva; Cheson, Bruce D.; Larson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary To improve long-term outcomes for Burkitt leukaemia/lymphoma (BL) or aggressive lymphomas in adults, we assessed the benefit of adding rituximab and filgrastim support to a dose-dense modified chemotherapy regimen from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9251 trial. One hundred and five patients (aged 19–79 years) were enrolled; 27% were >60 years old; 47% had high or high-intermediate risk by International Prognostic Index (IPI) criteria. Common severe toxicities included stomatitis/upper gastrointestinal toxicity (69%), renal insufficiency (10%), neurological events (25%) and pulmonary events (18%). Seven died from treatment-related causes (1 central nervous system bleed, 4 infections, 2 respiratory failure); 5 were > 60 years old. Results in this adult population are encouraging as complete response (CR) was observed in 83% and 4-year event-free (EFS) and overall survivals (OS) were 74% and 78%, respectively. Results compare favourably to our prior chemotherapy alone study (CALGB 9251) but despite this, high-risk patients still had worse outcomes. In conclusion, short duration, intensive chemo-immunotherapy is feasible and should be considered in adults with BL as it results in high remission rates and durable remissions. PMID:24428673

  19. Impact of Chemotherapy on Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Receiving Pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Jose G.; Luxton, Gary; Kozak, Margaret M.; Anderson, Eric M.; Hancock, Steven L.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine how chemotherapy agents affect radiation dose parameters that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients treated with pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (P-IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We assessed HT in 141 patients who received P-IMRT for anal, gynecologic, rectal, or prostate cancers, 95 of whom received concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were separated into 4 groups: mitomycin (MMC) + 5-fluorouracil (5FU, 37 of 141), platinum ± 5FU (Cis, 32 of 141), 5FU (26 of 141), and P-IMRT alone (46 of 141). The pelvic bone was contoured as a surrogate for pelvic bone marrow (PBM) and divided into subsites: ilium, lower pelvis, and lumbosacral spine (LSS). The volumes of each region receiving 5-40 Gy were calculated. The endpoint for HT was grade ≥3 (HT3+) leukopenia, neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Normal tissue complication probability was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT3+ and dosimetric parameters. Results: Twenty-six patients experienced HT3+: 10 of 37 (27%) MMC, 14 of 32 (44%) Cis, 2 of 26 (8%) 5FU, and 0 of 46 P-IMRT. PBM dosimetric parameters were correlated with HT3+ in the MMC group but not in the Cis group. LSS dosimetric parameters were well correlated with HT3+ in both the MMC and Cis groups. Constrained optimization (0chemotherapy received. Patients receiving P-IMRT ± 5FU have better bone marrow tolerance than those receiving irradiation concurrent with either Cis or MMC. Treatment with MMC has a lower TD{sub 50} and more steeply rising normal tissue complication probability curve compared with treatment with Cis. Dose tolerance of PBM and the LSS subsite may be lower for

  20. Dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, idarubicin and etoposide (DC-IE): a novel, intensive induction chemotherapy regimen for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ballester, O F; Moscinski, L C; Fields, K K; Hiemenz, J W; Zorsky, P E; Goldstein, S C; Saba, H I; Spiers, A S; Kronish, L; Sullivan, P; Elfenbein, G J

    1997-03-01

    We evaluated toxicities and responses to a novel, dose intensive and time sequenced, chemotherapy programme (DC-IE) in 45 patients with high-risk myeloma. DC-IE consisted of: dexamethasone (days 1-4); cyclophosphamide (day 5); idarubicin and etoposide (days 8-10). Complete response (CR) was achieved in four patients, six patients achieved near complete responses (nCR) and 21 patients achieved a partial remission (PR). Overall response rate was 76% (CI 56-94%) for newly diagnosed patients (n = 21) and 62% (CI 36-81%) for relapsed/refractory patients (n = 24). Toxicities were limited to myelosuppression; two patients died of sepsis during neutropenia (4%). DC-IE is active and tolerable for high-risk multiple myeloma, including patients with relapsed or refractory disease to anthracycline containing regimens.

  1. Clinical effectiveness of itraconazole as antifungal prophylaxis in AML patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Keighley, C L; Manii, P; Larsen, S R; van Hal, S

    2017-02-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis regimens vary between centres, informed by local epidemiology and antifungal stewardship practices. The advantages of itraconazole over posaconazole prophylaxis include maintaining the utility of azole therapy for suspected breakthrough invasive fungal infection (bIFI). We examined the effectiveness and tolerability of itraconazole as prophylaxis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. We sought to determine the rate of probable and proven bIFI in the context of itraconazole prophylaxis in a real-life setting. Eighty-four patients corresponded to 175 episodes of primary antifungal prophylaxis with itraconazole solution (200 mg twice daily) as prophylaxis supported by a dedicated clinical pharmacist during induction, re-induction and consolidation chemotherapy for AML between January 2010 and January 2014. Assessment of clinical course included blinded review of all radiology scans. Episodes of bIFI were categorised according to consensus criteria. A low rate of bIFI (6/175, 3.4 %) occurred with the use of itraconazole. Tolerance was excellent with adverse events consisting predominantly of deranged liver function tests reported in 7/175 (4 %). Therapeutic drug monitoring performed at clinicians' discretion demonstrated appropriate levels in 12/14 (86 %). Persisting fever and suspicion of invasive fungal infection (IFI) led to empiric antifungal therapy with voriconazole or caspofungin in 33/175 episodes (19 %), ceased after a median of 5 days following investigation in 16/175 (9 %). In this setting, itraconazole is effective and well-tolerated as prophylaxis. An additional benefit was seen in empiric therapy of suspected bIFI with amphotericin formulations kept in reserve. Local epidemiology is vital in guiding prophylaxis strategy.

  2. Effect of Application and Intensity of Bevacizumab-based Maintenance After Induction Chemotherapy With Bevacizumab for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stein, Alexander; Schwenke, Carsten; Folprecht, Gunnar; Arnold, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    The administration and intensity of bevacizumab-based maintenance therapy after induction treatment with bevacizumab is still a matter of debate. Thus, the present meta-analysis and an indirect comparison were performed to clarify these issues. Trials evaluating a separately defined "maintenance phase," with randomization after the induction phase, were selected. Three trials of maintenance with bevacizumab with or without a fluoropyrimidine (CAIRO3, SAKK 41/06, and AIO KRK 0207) were analyzed regarding the effect on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of any maintenance therapy compared with observation alone and different maintenance intensities (bevacizumab with or without fluoropyrimidine) compared with observation alone and between each other. Maintenance with bevacizumab with or without fluoropyrimidine after bevacizumab-based induction treatment for 4 to 6 months significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.75; P = .0004) and showed a trend toward prolonged OS (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.78-1.02; P = .09) compared with observation alone. The effect on PFS increased with the intensity of the maintenance regimen (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.60-0.85 for single-agent bevacizumab vs. HR, 0.45; 95%, CI 0.39-0.51 for combination therapy, both compared to observation alone). In contrast, the HRs for OS remained in the same range. A similarly improved PFS (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50-0.79) was shown for the more intensive maintenance therapy (bevacizumab and fluoropyrimidine) compared with bevacizumab alone. Bevacizumab-based maintenance therapy after induction chemotherapy with bevacizumab significantly improves PFS and showed a trend toward prolonged OS and should thus be considered, in particular, in patients with a response to induction treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count < 200/μL and bone marrow involvement were associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2 [1.2-8.3] and HR 2.7 [1.1-6.6]) and PFS (HR 3.5 [1.3-9.1] and HR 2.4 [1-5.7]), bone marrow involvement with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 14.4 [1.7-119.7] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score > 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement.

  4. High cure rates in Burkitt lymphoma and leukemia: a Northern Italy Leukemia Group study of the German short intensive rituximab-chemotherapy program.

    PubMed

    Intermesoli, Tamara; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rossi, Giuseppe; Delaini, Federica; Romani, Claudio; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Pagani, Chiara; Angelucci, Emanuele; Terruzzi, Elisabetta; Levis, Alessandro; Cassibba, Vincenzo; Mattei, Daniele; Gianfaldoni, Giacomo; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Di Bona, Eros; Oldani, Elena; Parolini, Margherita; Gökbuget, Nicola; Bassan, Renato

    2013-11-01

    We evaluate the long-term results of a prospective clinical study enrolling more than 100 adult patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia. Depending on extent of disease, treatment consisted of six to eight rituximab infusions and four to six courses of intensive chemotherapy (attenuated in patients aged >55 years) with high-dose methotrexate, fractionated ifosfamide/cyclophosphamide, other drugs in rotation, and intrathecal chemoprophylaxis. One-hundred five patients were treated (median age 47 years, range 17-78 years); 48% had Burkitt leukemia, 25% were older than 60 years, 37% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score >1, and 14% were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. The complete response rate and 3-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 79%, 67% and 75%, respectively, ranging from 100% to 45% for survival (P=0.000) and from 100% to 60% for disease-free survival (P=0.01) in patients with low, intermediate and high adapted International Prognostic Index scores. In multivariate analysis, only age (≤ versus >60 years) and performance status (0-1 versus >1) retained prognostic significance, identifying three risk groups with overall and disease-free survival probabilities of 88% and 87.5%, 57% and 70.5%, 20% and 28.5% (P=0.0000 and P=0.0001), respectively. The relapse rate was only 7% in patients treated with an intercycle interval ≤ 25 days. This regimen achieved 100% curability in patients with low adapted International Prognostic Index scores (21% of total), and very close to 90% in patients aged ≤ 60 years with performance score 0-1 (48% of total). Rapid diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia with prompt referral of patients to prevent clinical deterioration, and careful supervision of treatment without chemotherapy delay can achieve outstanding therapeutic results. ClinicalTrials.gov ID, NCT01290120.

  5. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity.

  6. Effectivity of a strategy in elderly AML patients to reach allogeneic stem cell transplantation using intensive chemotherapy: Long-term survival is dependent on complete remission after first induction therapy.

    PubMed

    von dem Borne, P A; de Wreede, L C; Halkes, C J M; Marijt, W A F; Falkenburg, J H F; Veelken, H

    2016-07-01

    Intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can cure AML. Most studies on alloSCT in elderly AML report results of highly selected patient cohorts. Hardly any data exist on the effectiveness of prospective strategies intended to bring as many patients as possible to transplant. Between 2006 and 2011 we implemented a treatment algorithm for all newly diagnosed AML patients aged 61-75 years, consisting of intensive chemotherapy cycles to induce complete remission, followed by alloSCT. 44 of 60 (73%) newly diagnosed elderly AML patients started with chemotherapy. By meticulously following our algorithm in almost all patients, we could induce complete remission (CR) in 66% of patients starting with chemotherapy, and transplant 32% of these patients in continuous CR. Main reasons for failure were early relapse (16%), early death (14%), primary refractory disease (9%), and patient or physician decision to stop treatment (16%). Patients in continuous CR after first induction benefit most with 36% long-term survival. Patients not in CR after first induction benefit less; although additional chemotherapy induces CR in 45% of these patients, only 23% are transplanted and no long-term survival is observed, mainly due to relapse. Long-term survival in the group of 44 patients is 9% (median 4.5 years after alloSCT). Considering that 27% of patients do not start with chemotherapy and 64% of patients starting with chemotherapy do not reach alloSCT, the reasons for failure presented here should be used as a guide to develop new treatment algorithms to improve long-term survival in elderly AML patients.

  7. Phase II study of dose-intense chemotherapy with sequential topoisomerase-targeting regimens with irinotecan/oxaliplatin followed by etoposide/carboplatin in chemotherapy naive patients with extensive small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Joanne; Reddy, Vishnu; Cantor, Alan; Miley, Debi; Robert, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    Topoisomerase inhibitors are active agents in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and preclinical models indicate that sequential administration of a topoisomerase I inhibitor followed by a topoisomerase II inhibitor can result in enhanced cytotoxicity. In this phase II study, patients with extensive SCLC were treated with two sequential topoisomerase-based regimens: irinotecan (150 mg/m(2))/oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) [regimen A] on day 1 followed by etoposide (100 mg/m(2)×3)/carboplatin (AUC 6) [regimen B] on day 15. Regimen A was repeated 3 weeks later. The primary objective was objective response rate. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity, and exploratory correlative analysis of the tumor expression of the excision repair cross complementing (ERCC1) and topoisomerase II-α. Patients received a maximum of 5 cycles of sequential therapy of regimen A→B. The overall response rate was 96%, the 6-month PFS was 76.9%, the median PFS was 8.95 months, and OS was 12.9 months in 26 evaluable patients. Grade 4 neutropenia (23%) and thrombocytopenia (58%) were observed with regimen B; and grade 2/3 nausea-vomiting (54%) and diarrhea (46%) with regimen A. Seven patients required dose reductions in regimen A and 19 patients in regimen B. The dose intensity, delivered during the first three cycles was 89%. No significant correlations were observed between the tumor expression of the ERCC1 and topoisomerase II-α and clinical outcomes (PFS or OS). Although cross-study comparisons are difficult to make, our data suggests that sequential topoisomerase-targeting regimens may enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy in newly diagnosed SCLC patients (Clinical Trial Registration Number, 9 NCT00240097; Clinical Trials.gov number, NCT00240097). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Prospective study of functional bone marrow-sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for pelvic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M; Rose, Brent S; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K; Lawson, Joshua D; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J; Bydder, Graeme M; Mell, Loren K

    2013-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V(10) (volume receiving ≥10 Gy) and V(20) (volume receiving ≥20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prospective Study of Functional Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Pelvic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Rose, Brent S.; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J.; Bydder, Graeme M.; and others

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). Methods and Materials: We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. Results: In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V{sub 10} (volume receiving {>=}10 Gy) and V{sub 20} (volume receiving {>=}20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. Conclusions: IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial.

  10. High pentraxin 3 level predicts septic shock and bacteremia at the onset of febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy of hematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vänskä, Matti; Koivula, Irma; Hämäläinen, Sari; Pulkki, Kari; Nousiainen, Tapio; Jantunen, Esa; Juutilainen, Auni

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated pentraxin 3 as a marker for complications of neutropenic fever in 100 hematologic patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. Pentraxin 3 and C-reactive protein were measured at fever onset and then daily to day 3. Bacteremia was observed in 19 patients and septic shock in 5 patients (three deaths). In comparison to C-reactive protein, pentraxin 3 achieved its maximum more rapidly. Pentraxin 3 correlated not only with the same day C-reactive protein but also with the next day C-reactive protein. High pentraxin 3 on day 0 was associated with the development of septic shock (P=0.009) and bacteremia (P=0.046). The non-survivors had constantly high pentraxin 3 levels. To conclude, pentraxin 3 is an early predictor of complications in hematologic patients with neutropenic fever. High level of pentraxin 3 predicts septic shock and bacteremia already at the onset of febrile neutropenia. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00781040.) PMID:21880642

  11. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  12. Randomized trial and pharmacokinetic study of pegfilgrastim versus filgrastim after dose-intensive chemotherapy in young adults and children with sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Fox, Elizabeth; Widemann, Brigitte C; Hawkins, Douglas S; Jayaprakash, Nalini; Dagher, Ramzi; Aikin, Alberta A; Bernstein, Donna; Long, Lauren; Mackall, Crystal; Helman, Lee; Steinberg, Seth M; Balis, Frank M

    2009-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of a single dose of pegfilgrastim to daily filgrastim in children and young adults with sarcomas treated with dose-intensive combination chemotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive a single dose of 100 mcg/kg of pegfilgrastim s.c. or 5 mcg/kg/day of filgrastim s.c., daily until neutrophil recovery after two treatment cycles with vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (VDC) and two cycles of etoposide and ifosfamide (IE). The duration of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count, < or =500/mcL) during cycles 1 to 4 and cycle duration for all cycles were compared. Pharmacokinetics of pegfilgrastim and filgrastim and CD34+ stem cell mobilization were studied on cycle 1. Growth factor-related toxicity, transfusions, and episodes of fever and neutropenia and infections were collected for cycles 1 to 4. Thirty-four patients (median age, 20 years; range 3.8-25.8) were enrolled, and 32 completed cycles 1 to 4. The median (range) duration of absolute neutrophil count of <500/mcL was 5.5 (3-8) days for pegfilgrastim and 6 (0-9) days for filgrastim (P = 0.76) after VDC, and 1.5 (0-4) days for pegfilgrastim and 3.75 (0-6.5) days for filgrastim (P = 0.11) after IE. More episodes of febrile neutropenia and documented infections occurred on the filgrastim arm. Serum pegfilgrastim concentrations were highly variable. Pegfilgrastim apparent clearance (11 mL/h/kg) was similar to that reported in adults. A single dose per cycle of pegfilgrastim was well tolerated and may be as effective as daily filgrastim based on the duration of severe neutropenia and number of episodes of febrile neutropenia and documented infections after dose-intensive treatment with VDC and IE.

  13. Randomized trial and pharmacokinetic study of pegfilgrastim vs. filgrastim after dose-intensive chemotherapy in young adults and children with sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Elizabeth; Widemann, Brigitte C.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Jayaprakash, Nalini; Dagher, Ramzi; Aikin, Alberta A.; Bernstein, Donna; Long, Lauren; Mackall, Crystal; Helman, Lee; Steinberg, Seth M.; Balis, Frank M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effectiveness, tolerance and pharmacokinetics of a single dose of pegfilgrastim to daily filgrastim in children and young adults with sarcomas treated with dose-intensive combination chemotherapy. Experimental Design Patients were randomized to receive a single dose of 100 mcg/kg of pegfilgrastim subcutaneously or 5 mcg/kg/day of filgrastim subcutaneously, daily until neutrophil recovery after 2 treatment cycles with vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (VDC) and 2 cycles of etoposide and ifosfamide (IE). The duration of severe neutropenia (ANC ≤500/mcL) during cycles 1–4 and cycle duration for all cycles were compared. Pharmacokinetics of pegfilgrastim and filgrastim and CD34+ stem cell mobilization were studied on cycle 1. Growth factor related toxicity, transfusions, and episodes of fever and neutropenia and infections were collected for cycles 1–4. Results Thirty-four patients (median age 20 years, range 3.8–25.8) were enrolled, 32 completed cycles 1–4. The median (range) duration of ANC<500/mcL was 5.5 (3–8) days for pegfilgrastim and 6 (0–9) days for filgrastim (p= 0.76) after VDC, and 1.5 (0–4) days for pegfilgrastim and 3.75 (0–6.5) days for filgrastim (p=0.11) after IE. More episodes of febrile neutropenia and documented infections occurred on the filgrastim arm. Serum pegfilgrastim concentrations were highly variable. Pegfilgrastim apparent clearance (11 ml/h/kg) was similar to that reported in adults. Conclusion A single dose per cycle of pegfilgrastim was well tolerated and may be as effective as daily filgrastim based on the duration of severe neutropenia and number of episodes of febrile neutropenia and documented infections after dose-intensive treatment with VDC and IE. PMID:19920107

  14. Improved outcome in acute myeloid leukemia patients enrolled in clinical trials: A national population-based cohort study of Danish intensive chemotherapy patients

    PubMed Central

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Mette; Sengeløv, Henrik; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Kjeldsen, Lars; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Marcher, Claus Werenberg; Jensen, Morten Krogh; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are critical to improve AML treatment. It remains, however, unclear if clinical trial participation per se affects prognosis and to what extent the patients selected for trials differ from those of patients receiving intensive therapy off-trial. We conducted a population-based cohort study of newly diagnosed Danish AML patients treated with intensive chemotherapy between 2000–2013. We estimated accrual rates and compared characteristics, complete remission (CR) rates, and relative risks (RRs) of death at 90-day, 1-year, and 3-years in clinical trial patients to patients treated off-trial. Of 867 patients, 58.3% (n = 504) were included in a clinical trial. Accrual rates were similar across age groups (p = 0.55). Patients with poor performance status, comorbidity, therapy-related and secondary AML were less likely to be enrolled in trials. CR rates were 80.2% in trial-patients versus 68.6% in patients treated off- trial. Also, trial-patients had superior survival at 1-year; 72%, vs. 54% (adjusted RR of death 1.28(CI = 1.06–1.54)), and at 3 years; 45% vs. 29% (adjusted RR 1.14(CI = 1.03–1.26)) compared to patients treated off-trial. Despite high accrual rates, patients enrolled in clinical trials had a favorable prognostic profile and a better survival than patients treated off-trial. In conclusion, all trial results should be extrapolated with caution and population-based studies of “real world patients” have a prominent role in examining the prognosis of AML. PMID:27732947

  15. Hypothyroidism as a Consequence of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Taxane-Based Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Roberto; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Morales-Paliza, Manuel; Koehler, Elizabeth; Phillips, John G.; Stinson, Scott; Gilbert, Jill; Chung, Christine H.; Murphy, Barbara A.; Murphy, Patrick B.; Shyr, Yu; Cmelak, Anthony J.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To conduct a retrospective review of 168 consecutively treated locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LAHNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/chemotherapy, to determine the rate and risk factors for developing hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered in 33 daily fractions to 69.3 Gy to gross disease and 56.1 Gy to clinically normal cervical nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of IMRT plans were used to determine radiation dose to thyroid and were compared with DVHs using conventional three-dimensional radiotherapy (3D-RT) in 10 of these same patients randomly selected for replanning and with DVHs of 16 patients in whom the thyroid was intentionally avoided during IMRT. Weekly paclitaxel (30 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin area under the curve-1 were given concurrently with IMRT. Results: Sixty-one of 128 evaluable patients (47.7%) developed hypothyroidism after a median of 1.08 years after IMRT (range, 2.4 months to 3.9 years). Age and volume of irradiated thyroid were associated with hypothyroidism development after IMRT. Compared with 3D-RT, IMRT with no thyroid dose constraints resulted in significantly higher minimum, maximum, and median dose (p < 0.0001) and percentage thyroid volume receiving 10, 20, and 60 Gy (p < 0.05). Compared with 3D-RT, IMRT with thyroid dose constraints resulted in lower median dose and percentage thyroid volume receiving 30, 40, and 50 Gy (p < 0.005) but higher minimum and maximum dose (p < 0.005). Conclusions: If not protected, IMRT for LAHNC can result in higher radiation to the thyroid than with conventional 3D-RT. Techniques to reduce dose and volume of radiation to thyroid tissue with IMRT are achievable and recommended.

  16. Worse prognosis of KRAS c.35 G > A mutant metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients treated with intensive triplet chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (FIr-B/FOx)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prognosis of KRAS wild-type and mutant metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients (pts) treated with bevacizumab (BEV)-containing chemotherapy is not significantly different. Since specific KRAS mutations confer different aggressive behaviors, the prognostic role of prevalent KRAS mutations was retrospectively evaluated in MCRC pts treated with first line FIr-B/FOx, associating BEV to triplet chemotherapy. Methods Tumor samples were screened for KRAS codon 12, 13 and BRAF V600E mutations by SNaPshot and/or direct sequencing. MCRC pts <75-years-old were consecutively treated with FIr-B/FOx: weekly 12 hour-timed-flat-infusion/5-fluorouracil (900 mg/m2 on days 1,2, 8, 9, 15, 16,22, 23), irinotecan plus BEV (160 mg/m2 and 5 mg/kg, respectively, on days 1,15); and oxaliplatin (80 mg/m2, on days 8,22). Pts were classified as liver-limited (L-L) and other/multiple metastatic (O/MM). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared using the log-rank test. Results Fifty-nine pts were evaluated at a median follow-up of 21.5 months. KRAS mutant pts: c.35 G > A, 15 (25.4%); c.35 G > T, 7 (11.8%); c.38 G > A, 3 (5%); other, 3 (5%). KRAS wild-type, 31 pts (52.7%). The objective response rate (ORR), PFS and OS were, respectively: c.35 G > A mutant, 71%, 9 months, 14 months; other than c.35 G > A mutants, 61%, 12 months, 39 months. OS was significantly worse in c.35 G > A pts compared to KRAS wild-type (P = 0.002), KRAS/BRAF wild-type (P = 0.03), other MCRC patients (P = 0.002), other than c.35 G > A (P = 0.05), other codon 12 (P = 0.03) mutant pts. OS was not significantly different compared to c.35 G > T KRAS mutant (P = 0.142). Conclusions KRAS c.35 G > A mutant status may be significantly associated with a worse prognosis of MCRC pts treated with first line FIr-B/FOx intensive regimen compared to KRAS/BRAF wild type and other than c.35 G > A mutant pts. PMID:23497191

  17. Prognostic factors for relapse in stage I seminoma: a new nomogram derived from three consecutive, risk-adapted studies from the Spanish Germ Cell Cancer Group (SGCCG).

    PubMed

    Aparicio, J; Maroto, P; García del Muro, X; Sánchez-Muñoz, A; Gumà, J; Margelí, M; Sáenz, A; Sagastibelza, N; Castellano, D; Arranz, J A; Hervás, D; Bastús, R; Fernández-Aramburo, A; Sastre, J; Terrasa, J; López-Brea, M; Dorca, J; Almenar, D; Carles, J; Hernández, A; Germà, J R

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to analyze prognostic factors for relapse in stage I seminoma managed by either active surveillance or adjuvant chemotherapy, and to describe the long-term patterns of recurrence in both groups. From 1994 to 2008, 744 patients were included in three consecutive, prospective risk-adapted studies by the Spanish Germ Cell Cancer Group. Low-risk patients were managed by surveillance and high-risk patients were given two courses of adjuvant carboplatin. Relapses were treated mainly with chemotherapy. Patient age, tumor size, histological variant, pT staging, rete testis invasion, and preoperative serum BHCG levels were assessed for prediction of disease-free survival (DFS). After a median follow-up of 80 months, 63 patients (11.1%) have relapsed: 51/396 (14.8%) on surveillance and 12/348 (3.2%) following adjuvant carboplatin. Actuarial overall 5-year DFS was 92.3% (88.3% for surveillance versus 96.8% for chemotherapy, P = 0.0001). Median time to relapse was 14 months. Most recurrences were located at retroperitoneum (86%), with a median tumor size of 26 mm. All patients were rendered disease-free with chemotherapy (92%), radiotherapy (5%), or surgery followed by chemotherapy (3%). A nomogram was developed from surveillance patients that includes two independent, predictive factors for relapse: rete testis invasion and tumor size (as a continuous variable). Long-term follow-up confirms the risk-adapted approach as an effective option for patients with stage I seminoma. The pattern of relapses after adjuvant chemotherapy is similar to that observed following surveillance. A new nomogram for prediction of DFS among patients on surveillance is proposed. Rete testis invasion and tumor size should be taken into account when considering the administration of adjuvant carboplatin. Prospective validation is warranted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  18. Reduced Dose Intensity of Chemotherapy may not Lead to Inferior Palliation in Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Gall Bladder: An Experience from a Regional Cancer Centre in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aparna; Nath, Partha; Biswas, Jaydip

    2015-09-01

    To assess impact of relative total dose intensity (RTDI) on clinical benefit among patients with locally advanced carcinoma gall bladder receiving gemcitabine-cisplatin (GemCis). Comparison of clinical benefit among patients receiving variable RTDI was the primary objective. The secondary objective was an impact of RTDI on chemotherapy toxicity. One-hundred twenty-one patients with locally advanced inoperable carcinoma gall bladder undergoing chemotherapy with three weekly gemcitabine-cisplatin chemotherapies (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) on day 1 and 8, cisplatin 70 mg/m(2) on day 1) were studied. Clinical benefit and treatment toxicity was assessed. Total dose of chemotherapy and relative total dose intensity, the proportion of planned dose actually received was calculated. RTDI of at least 50 % conferred substantial clinical benefit compared to lower RTDI (75.49 vs. 21.05 %). RTDI above 50-59 % did not improve clinical benefit; two-tailed p values of RTDI >60 % vs. RTDI >50 % and RTDI >70 % vs. RTDI >50 % were 1.000 and 0.4266, respectively. Subsequent extended cholecystectomy rates did not significantly improve among patients who received RTDI greater than 50-59 %; two-tailed p values of RTDI >60 % vs. RTDI >50 % and RTDI >70 % vs. >50 % were 0.0920 and 0.5648, respectively. Significantly higher neutropenia and anemia of at least grade 2 occurred with RTDI >70 % vs. RTDI 50-59 %; two-tailed p values 0.0019 and 0.0048, respectively. Relative total dose intensity of chemotherapy higher than 60 % among patients with inoperable locally advanced carcinoma gall bladder conferred no significant improvement in clinical benefit and subsequent rates of extended cholecystectomy. Higher RTDI however led to significantly increased toxicity among these patients.

  19. Phase II trial of dose-dense chemotherapy followed by dose-intense erlotinib for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    PETTY, W. JEFFREY; LAUDADIO, JENNIFER; BRAUTNICK, LYNSAY; LOVATO, JAMES; DOTSON, TRAVIS; STREER, NATHAN P.; WEAVER, KATHRYN E.; MILLER, ANTONIUS A.

    2013-01-01

    This phase II study investigated dose-intense erlotinib maintenance after dose-dense chemotherapy for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and examined two cell cycle biomarkers. Patients with newly diagnosed metastatic non-small cell lung cancer received docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1 and pegfilgrastim on day 2 every 14 days for four cycles. Patients then received erlotinib with initial doses based on smoking status. Doses were increased in 75 mg increments every two weeks depending on toxicities until each patient's maximal tolerable dose (MTD) was achieved. Cyclin D1 and D3 biomarkers were measured by immunohistochemistry. The objectives of the study were to evaluate time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) for the entire population and biomarker subgroups. Forty-five patients were enrolled. Intra-patient erlotinib MTD ranged from 0 to 525 mg. Median MTD achieved in smokers was higher than in non-smokers (300 vs. 150 mg; P=0.019). TTP for the entire cohort was not significantly improved compared to historical controls. Patients with high cyclin D1 expressing tumors demonstrated improved TTP on erlotinib (8.2 vs. 4.7 months; hazard ratio, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.6–0.6; P=0.003) and improved OS (20.5 vs. 8.0 months; hazard ratio 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2–6.3; P=0.016). Intratumoral cyclin D3 expression did not impact clinical outcomes. Current smokers but not former smokers exhibit a higher erlotinib MTD. High cyclin D1 expression was associated with favorable TTP and OS. PMID:24100924

  20. Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes of Involved-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy After Chemotherapy for Early-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma With Mediastinal Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Ningning; Li Yexiong; Wu Runye; Zhang Ximei; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Song Yongwen; Fang Hui; Ren Hua; Wang Shulian; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Chen Bo; Dai Jianrong; Yu Zihao

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and clinical outcomes of involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IF-IMRT) for patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with early-stage HL that involved the mediastinum were reviewed. Eight patients had Stage I disease, and 44 patients had Stage II disease. Twenty-three patients (44%) presented with a bulky mediastinum, whereas 42 patients (81%) had involvement of both the mediastinum and either cervical or axillary nodes. All patients received combination chemotherapy followed by IF-IMRT. The prescribed radiation dose was 30-40 Gy. The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The median mean dose to the primary involved regions (planning target volume, PTV1) and boost area (PTV2) was 37.5 Gy and 42.1 Gy, respectively. Only 0.4% and 1.3% of the PTV1 and 0.1% and 0.5% of the PTV2 received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent PTV coverage. The median mean lung dose and V20 to the lungs were 13.8 Gy and 25.9%, respectively. The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 100%, 97.9%, and 96%, respectively. No Grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Despite the large target volume, IF-IMRT gave excellent dose coverage and a favorable prognosis, with mild toxicity in patients with early-stage mediastinal HL.

  1. Poor Growth, Thyroid Dysfunction and Vitamin D Deficiency Remain Prevalent Despite Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kasiani C; Howell, Jonathan C.; Wallace, Gregory; Dandoy, Christopher; El-Bietar, Javier; Lane, Adam; Davies, Stella M.; Jodele, Sonata; Rose, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloablative conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are known to affect endocrine function, but little is known regarding reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We retrospectively reviewed 114 children and young adults after single RIC HSCT. Analysis was grouped by age (<2y and ≥2y), and diagnosis (HLH/XLP, other immune disorders, metabolic/genetic disorders). All groups displayed short stature by mean height adjusted Z-score (HAZ) before −1.29 and after HSCT (HAZ −1.38, p=0.47). After HSCT, younger children with HLH/XLP grew better (HAZ −3.41 vs −1.65, p= 0.006), while older subjects had worsening (HAZ −0.8 vs −1.01, p= 0.06). Those with steroid therapy beyond standard GVHD prophylaxis were shorter than those without (p 0.04). After HSCT, older subjects with HLH/XLP became thinner with mean BMI Z-score of 1.20 vs. 0.64, p=0.02, likewise in metabolic/genetic disorders (BMI-Z= 0.59 vs. −0.99, p<0.001). BMI increased among younger children in these same groups. Thyroid function was abnormal in 24% (18/76). 25-OH vitamin D levels, were insufficient in 73% (49/65), with low bone mineral density in 8 of 19 evaluable subjects. Despite RIC, children and young adults still have significant late endocrine effects. Further research is required to compare post-transplant endocrine effects after RIC to standard chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26974276

  2. Association Between Bone Marrow Dosimetric Parameters and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mell, Loren K. Schomas, David A.; Salama, Joseph K.; Devisetty, Kiran; Aydogan, Bulent; Miller, Robert C.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Kindler, Hedy L.; Roeske, John C.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the volume of pelvic bone marrow (PBM) receiving 10 and 20 Gy or more (PBM-V{sub 10} and PBM-V{sub 20}) is associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 48 consecutive anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median radiation dose to gross tumor and regional lymph nodes was 50.4 and 45 Gy, respectively. Pelvic bone marrow was defined as the region extending from the iliac crests to the ischial tuberosities, including the os coxae, lumbosacral spine, and proximal femora. Endpoints included the white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin, and platelet count nadirs. Regression models with multiple independent predictors were used to test associations between dosimetric parameters and HT. Results: Twenty patients (42%) had Stage T3-4 disease; 15 patients (31%) were node positive. Overall, 27 (56%), 24 (50%), 4 (8%), and 13 (27%) experienced acute Grade 3-4 leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, respectively. On multiple regression analysis, increased PBM-V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were significantly associated with decreased WBC and ANC nadirs, as were female gender, decreased body mass index, and increased lumbosacral bone marrow V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} (p < 0.05 for each association). Lymph node positivity was significantly associated with a decreased WBC nadir on multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This analysis supports the hypothesis that increased low-dose radiation to PBM is associated with acute HT during chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer. Techniques to limit bone marrow irradiation may reduce HT in anal cancer patients.

  3. Baseline cytokine profiling identifies novel risk factors for invasive fungal disease among haematology patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ceesay, M Mansour; Kordasti, Shahram; Rufaie, Eamaan; Lea, Nicholas; Smith, Melvyn; Wade, Jim; Douiri, Abdel; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is a disease of immunocompromised hosts. Cytokines are important mediators of innate and adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to identify cytokine profiles that correlate with increased risk of IFD. We prospectively enrolled 172 adult haematology patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy, immunosuppressive therapy, and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pro-inflammatory cytokine profiling using 30-plex Luminex assay was performed at baseline and during treatment. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4.1, TLR4.2, TLR6, CLEC7A, CARD9, and INFG) were investigated among transplant recipients and donors. The incidence of IFD in this cohort was 16.9% (29/172). Median baseline serum concentrations of IL-15, IL-2R, CCL2, and MIP-1α were significantly higher whilst IL-4 was lower in patients with proven/probable IFD compared to those with no evidence of IFD. Baseline high IL-2R and CCL2 were associated with increased risk of IFD in the multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio 2.3 [95% CI 1.1-5.1; P = 0.037], and hazard ratio 2.7 [95% CI 1.2-6.1; P = 0.016], respectively). However, these differences were not significant in follow up measurements. Similarly, no significant independent prognostic value was associated with baseline cytokine profile. High baseline IL-2R and CCL2 concentrations were independent indicators of the risk of developing IFD and could be used to identify patients for enhanced prophylaxis and early antifungal therapy. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of life and quality-adjusted survival (Q-TWiST) in patients receiving dose-intensive or standard dose chemotherapy for high-risk primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, J; Zahrieh, D; Zhang, J J; Martinelli, G; Basser, R; Hürny, C; Forbes, J F; Aebi, S; Yeo, W; Thürlimann, B; Green, M D; Colleoni, M; Gelber, R D; Castiglione-Gertsch, M; Price, K N; Goldhirsch, A; Coates, A S

    2008-01-15

    Quality of life (QL) is an important consideration when comparing adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer, especially if they differ substantially in toxicity. We evaluated QL and Q-TWiST among patients randomised to adjuvant dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide administered with filgrastim and progenitor cell support (DI-EC) or standard-dose anthracycline-based chemotherapy (SD-CT). We estimated the duration of chemotherapy toxicity (TOX), time without disease symptoms and toxicity (TWiST), and time following relapse (REL). Patients scored QL indicators. Mean durations for the three transition times were weighted with patient reported utilities to obtain mean Q-TWiST. Patients receiving DI-EC reported worse QL during TOX, especially treatment burden (month 3: P<0.01), but a faster recovery 3 months following chemotherapy than patients receiving SD-CT, for example, less coping effort (P<0.01). Average Q-TWiST was 1.8 months longer for patients receiving DI-EC (95% CI, -2.5 to 6.1). Q-TWiST favoured DI-EC for most values of utilities attached to TOX and REL. Despite greater initial toxicity, quality-adjusted survival was similar or better with dose-intensive treatment as compared to standard treatment. Thus, QL considerations should not be prohibitive if future intensive therapies show superior efficacy.

  5. Chemotherapy Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Falling Fatigue Fertility and Sexual Side Effects Fever Hair ... Cancers Caused by Cancer Treatment Some cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy may increase a person's risk ...

  6. The effect of endocrine responsiveness on high-risk breast cancer treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy: results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 15-95 after prolonged follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Colleoni, M.; Sun, Z.; Martinelli, G.; Basser, R. L.; Coates, A. S.; Gelber, R. D.; Green, M. D.; Peccatori, F.; Cinieri, S.; Aebi, S.; Viale, G.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant dose-intensive chemotherapy and its efficacy according to baseline features has not yet been established. Patients and methods: Three hundred and forty-four patients were randomized to receive seven courses of standard-dose chemotherapy (SD-CT) or three cycles of dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (epirubicin 200 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 4 mg/m2 with filgrastim and progenitor cell support). All patients were assigned tamoxifen at the completion of chemotherapy. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). This paper updates the results and explores patterns of recurrence according to predicting baseline features. Results: At 8.3-years median follow-up, patients assigned DI-EC had a significantly better DFS compared with those assigned SD-CT [8-year DFS percent 47% and 37%, respectively, hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval 0.58–1.00; P = 0.05]. Only patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease benefited from the DI-EC (HR 0.61; 95% confidence interval 0.39, 0.95; P = 0.03). Conclusions: After prolonged follow-up, DI-EC significantly improved DFS, but the effect was observed only in patients with ER-positive disease, leading to the hypothesis that efficacy of DI-EC may relate to its endocrine effects. Further studies designed to confirm the importance of endocrine responsiveness in patients treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy are encouraged. PMID:19468030

  7. Restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategies for people with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without haematopoietic stem cell support.

    PubMed

    Estcourt, Lise J; Malouf, Reem; Trivella, Marialena; Fergusson, Dean A; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F

    2017-01-27

    Many people diagnosed with haematological malignancies experience anaemia, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion plays an essential supportive role in their management. Different strategies have been developed for RBC transfusions. A restrictive transfusion strategy seeks to maintain a lower haemoglobin level (usually between 70 g/L to 90 g/L) with a trigger for transfusion when the haemoglobin drops below 70 g/L), whereas a liberal transfusion strategy aims to maintain a higher haemoglobin (usually between 100 g/L to 120 g/L, with a threshold for transfusion when haemoglobin drops below 100 g/L). In people undergoing surgery or who have been admitted to intensive care a restrictive transfusion strategy has been shown to be safe and in some cases safer than a liberal transfusion strategy. However, it is not known whether it is safe in people with haematological malignancies. To determine the efficacy and safety of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategies for people diagnosed with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised trials (NRS) in MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1982), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 6), and 10 other databases (including four trial registries) to 15 June 2016. We also searched grey literature and contacted experts in transfusion for additional trials. There was no restriction on language, date or publication status. We included RCTs and prospective NRS that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal RBC transfusion strategy in children or adults with malignant haematological disorders or undergoing HSCT. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We identified six studies eligible for inclusion in this review; five RCTs and one NRS. Three

  8. Restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategies for people with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without haematopoietic stem cell support

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Malouf, Reem; Trivella, Marialena; Fergusson, Dean A; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    Background Many people diagnosed with haematological malignancies experience anaemia, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion plays an essential supportive role in their management. Different strategies have been developed for RBC transfusions. A restrictive transfusion strategy seeks to maintain a lower haemoglobin level (usually between 70 g/L to 90 g/L) with a trigger for transfusion when the haemoglobin drops below 70 g/L), whereas a liberal transfusion strategy aims to maintain a higher haemoglobin (usually between 100 g/L to 120 g/L, with a threshold for transfusion when haemoglobin drops below 100 g/L). In people undergoing surgery or who have been admitted to intensive care a restrictive transfusion strategy has been shown to be safe and in some cases safer than a liberal transfusion strategy. However, it is not known whether it is safe in people with haematological malignancies. Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategies for people diagnosed with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised trials (NRS) in MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1982), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 6), and 10 other databases (including four trial registries) to 15 June 2016. We also searched grey literature and contacted experts in transfusion for additional trials. There was no restriction on language, date or publication status. Selection criteria We included RCTs and prospective NRS that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal RBC transfusion strategy in children or adults with malignant haematological disorders or undergoing HSCT. Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Main results

  9. Exploring the Impact of Human Papillomavirus Status, Comorbidity, Polypharmacy, and Treatment Intensity on Outcome of Elderly Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Caparrotti, Francesca; O'Sullivan, Brian; Bratman, Scott V; Ringash, Jolie; Lu, Lin; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, John; Giuliani, Meredith; Hope, Andrew; Kim, John; Waldron, John; Hansen, Aaron; Goldstein, David; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Tong, Li; Song, Yuyao; Xu, Wei; Huang, Shao Hui

    2017-07-15

    To explore the impact of tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status, comorbidity, polypharmacy, and treatment intensity on overall survival (OS) of elderly oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients. All elderly (>70 years) OPC patients receiving definitive (chemo-) radiation therapy in 2000 to 2013 were reviewed. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI, comorbidity alone) and the comorbidity-polypharmacy score (CPS, comorbidity and medication) were calculated. Overall survival was compared between HPV-positive (HPV+) and HPV-negative (HPV-) cohorts. Multivariable analyses (MVA) incorporating either the CCI (MVA-CCI) or the CPS (MVA-CPS) identified survival predictors. Among 231 of 287 patients (80%) with p16 staining, 117 were HPV+ and 114 HPV-. Systemic treatments were administered in 48 patients (21%) (chemotherapy 17; epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor 31). The distribution of CCI (P=.59), CPS (P=.23), and age (P=.50) were similar between HPV+ versus HPV- cohorts. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. The HPV+ patients had better 5-year OS (57% vs 32%, P<.001) versus HPV- patients. Multivariable analysis adjusted for T-/N-category confirmed that HPV+ status (MVA-CCI: hazard ratio [HR] 0.58, P=.01; MVA-CPS: HR 0.60, P=.02), Zubrod scale score (0-1) (MVA-CCI: HR 0.44, P<.001; MVA-CPS: HR 0.43, P<.001), and higher radiation therapy dose (MVA-CCI: HR 0.97, P=.001; MVA-CPS: HR 0.96, P<.001) were correlated with higher OS. A marginal inverse correlation between CPS and OS was observed in the entire cohort (HR 1.05, P=.05) and was stronger for the HPV+ cohort (HR 1.11, P=.02). Nonsignificant higher OS was also found with ≤20 pack-years of smoking (MVA-CCI: P=.10; MVA-CPS: P=.15) and with systemic treatments (MVA-CCI: P=.13; MVA-CPS: P=.19). No association with OS was found for CCI (P=.46). Elderly HPV+ OPC patients have longer survival than their HPV- counterparts. Lower Zubrod scale score and higher radiation therapy dose are associated with longer OS, whereas fewer smoking

  10. Patient-reported voice and speech outcomes after whole-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy and chemotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M; Griffith, Kent A; Feng, Felix Y; Vineberg, Karen A; Chepeha, Douglas B; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-08-01

    To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy-intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and independently associated with GL dose. These findings support

  11. Prognostic value of KRAS genotype in metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients treated with intensive triplet chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (FIr-B/FOx) according to extension of metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab (BEV) plus triplet chemotherapy can increase efficacy of first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC), particularly integrated with secondary liver surgery in liver-limited (L-L) patients. The prognostic value of the KRAS genotype in L-L and other or multiple metastatic (O/MM) MCRC patients treated with the FIr-B/FOx regimen was retrospectively evaluated. Methods Tumoral and metastatic samples were screened for KRAS codon 12 and 13 and BRAF mutations by SNaPshot and/or direct sequencing. Fit MCRC patients <75 years were consecutively treated with FIr-B/FOx regimen: weekly 12-h timed flat-infusion/5-fluorouracil (TFI 5-FU) 900 mg/m2, days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22 and 23; irinotecan (CPT-11) 160 mg/m2 plus BEV 5 mg/kg, days 1, 15; oxaliplatin (OXP) 80 mg/m2, days 8, 22; every 4 weeks. MCRC patients were classified as L-L and O/MM. Activity and efficacy were evaluated and compared using log-rank test. Results In all, 59 patients were evaluated: 31 KRAS wild-type (53%), 28 KRAS mutant (47%). At 21.5 months median follow-up, objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were, respectively: KRAS wild-type 90%, 14 months, 38 months; KRAS mutant 67%, 11 months, 20 months. PFS and OS were not significantly different. PFS and OS were significantly different in L-L compared to O/MM evaluable patients. In KRAS wild-type patients, clinical outcome of 12 L-L compared to 18 O/MM was significantly different: PFS 21 versus 12 months and OS 47 versus 28 months, respectively. In KRAS mutant patients, the clinical outcome of 13 L-L compared to 14 O/MM was not significantly different: PFS 11 months equivalently and OS 39 versus 19 months, respectively. Conclusions The KRAS genotype wild-type and mutant does not significantly affect different clinical outcomes for MCRC patients treated with the first-line FIr-B/FOx intensive regimen. KRAS wild-type patients with L-L disease may achieve a significantly

  12. Clinical outcome after front-line intensive sequential chemotherapy (ISC) in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and high-risk international prognostic index (IPI 3): final analysis of survival in two consecutive ISC trials.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, R; Stoppa, A M; Coso, D; Bardou, V J; Blaise, D; Chabannon, C; Gastaut, J A; Maraninchi, D

    2001-04-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) in patients under the age of 60 have a very poor prognosis when the international prognostic index (IPI) is high, with an age-adjusted (Aa)-IPI score at 3. In such patients, conventional chemotherapy results in a low complete response (CR) rate of 46%, a five-year survival and disease-free survival (DFS) of 32% and 58%, respectively. For this report we have analyzed whether front-line high-dose chemotherapy could influence the outcome of this group of patients. From 1992 onwards we conducted two pilot clinical trials of intensive sequential chemotherapy (ISC) with growth factors and blood stem cell support as initial treatment in 62 poor-risk patients with aggressive NHL. Of these patients, 33 were considered to be a high-risk group based on the Aa-IPI. The median age was 42 years (range 21-60). The treatment was completed in 88% of patients, 86% receiving greater than 75% or more of the projected dose-intensity. Twenty patients (61%) achieved a CR. At a median follow-up of 48 months (range 26-86), the estimated five-year survival and DFS was 51% (95% confidence interval (CI): 34%-68%) and 70% (95% CI: 50%-90%), respectively. These results suggest that primary treatment using high-dose therapy supported by both growth factors and peripheral blood stem cells can cure up to 50% of high-risk patients with malignant lymphomas.

  13. [Microscopic hematuria : Reasonable and risk-adapted diagnostic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Löbig, N; Wezel, F; Martini, T; Schröppel, B; Bolenz, C

    2017-06-22

    Microscopic hematuria that is not explained by an obvious underlying condition is a frequent and often an incidental finding that commonly triggers urological or nephrological evaluation. Potential underlying conditions range from benign to severe malignant diseases of the kidneys and urinary tract. A nonsystematic literature search was performed, focusing on potential urological and nephrological causes of hematuria. National and international guidelines were considered and diagnostic as well as follow-up strategies are discussed. We provide a recommendation for practices in the clinical evaluation of hematuria. The overall prevalence for microscopic hematuria is estimated at approximately 2%, whereas risk populations show an increase to around 30%. In 13-35% of patients presenting with microscopic hematuria, a medical or surgical intervention is required. Malignant tumors of the kidneys or urinary tract can be diagnosed in 2.6-4% of all patients and in up to 25.8% of at-risk populations. "Idiopathic microscopic hematuria" without an obvious underlying medical condition accounts for approximately 80% of patients with asymptomatic hematuria. After exclusion of nephrological diseases, standard diagnostic procedures by means of medical history, physical and laboratory examination as well as ultrasound of the kidneys and the urinary tract should be performed. In the presence of risk factors, an extended diagnostic work-up using cystoscopy, urinary cytology, and cross-sectional imaging of the upper urinary tract is indicated. Evidence-based strategies of a risk-adapted diagnostic evaluation for microscopic hematuria are not available. The development of reliable clinical and molecular markers offers great potential for the identification of patients at higher risk for harboring severe diseases.

  14. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Despite troubled beginnings, anticancer chemotherapy has made significant contribution to the control of cancer in man, particularly within the last two decades. Early conceptual observations awakened the scientific community to the potentials of cancer chemotherapy. There are now more than 50 agents that are active in causing regression of clinical cancer. Chemotherapy's major conceptual contributions are two-fold. First, there is now proof that patients with overt metastatic disease can be cured, and second, to provide a strategy for control of occult metastases. In man, chemotherapy has resulted in normal life expectancy for some patients who have several types of metastatic cancers, including choriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphomas, Wilm's tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkins disease, diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and others. Anticancer chemotherapy in Veterinary medicine has evolved from the use of single agents, which produce only limited remissions, to the concept of combination chemotherapy. Three basic principles underline the design of combination chemotherapy protocols; the fraction of tumor cell killed by one drug is independent of the fraction killed by another drug; drugs with different mechanisms of action should be chosen so that the antitumor effects will be additive; and since different classes of drugs have different toxicities the toxic effects will not be additive.

  15. Pre-treatment with oral hydroxyurea prior to intensive chemotherapy improves early survival of patients with high hyperleukocytosis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mamez, Anne-Claire; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Chevret, Sylvie; Lemiale, Virginie; Boissel, Nicolas; Canet, Emmanuel; Schlemmer, Benoît; Dombret, Hervé; Azoulay, Elie; Lengliné, Etienne

    2016-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with high white blood cell count (WBC) is a medical emergency. A reduction of tumor burden with hydroxyurea may prevent life-threatening complications induced by straight chemotherapy. To evaluate this strategy, we reviewed medical charts of adult patients admitted to our institution from 1997 to 2011 with non-promyelocytic AML and WBC over 50 G/L. One hundred and sixty patients were included with a median WBC of 120 G/L (range 50-450), 107 patients received hydroxyurea prior to chemotherapy, and 53 received emergency induction chemotherapy (CT). Hospital mortality was lower for patients treated with hydroxyurea (34% versus 19%, p = 0.047) even after adjusting for age (p < 0.01) and initial WBC count (p = 0.02). No evidence of any difference between treatment groups in terms of WBC decline kinetics and disease free survival (p = 0.87) was found. Oral hydroxyurea prior to chemotherapy seems a safe and efficient strategy to reduce early death of hyperleukocytic AML patients.

  16. Lenalidomide combined with intensive chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia and higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. Results of a phase II study by the Groupe Francophone Des Myélodysplasies.

    PubMed

    Ades, Lionel; Prebet, Thomas; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Recher, Christian; Guieze, Romain; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Hunault, Mathilde; Wattel, Eric; Stalnikiewicz, Laure; Toma, Andrea; Dombret, Hervé; Vey, Norbert; Sebert, Marie; Gardin, Claude; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Chevret, Sylvie; Fenaux, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia or higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes with 5q deletion (generally within a complex karyotype) respond poorly to intensive chemotherapy and have very poor survival. In this population, we evaluated escalating doses of lenalidomide combined with intensive chemotherapy in a phase II study. Treatment consisted of daunorubicin (45 mg/m(2)/day, days 1-3 in cohort 1, escalated to 60 mg/m(2)/day, days 1-3 in cohorts 2 and 3) combined with cytosine arabinoside (200 mg/m(2)/day, days 1-7) and lenalidomide (10 mg/day, days 1-21 in cohorts 1 and 2, escalated to 25 mg/day, days 1-21 in cohort 3). Eighty-two patients with 5q deletion were enrolled, including 62 with acute myeloblastic leukemia, 62/79 (78%) of whom had a complex karyotype (median 7 cytogenetic abnormalities, all but 2 of them monosomal) and three had unknown karyotypes. Thirty-eight patients (46%) achieved complete remission and the overall response rate was 58.5%. Among the 62 patients with a complex karyotype, 27 achieved complete remission (44%) and 21 had cytogenetic responses. A lower response rate was observed in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia but other pretreatment factors, including cytogenetic complexity and treatment cohort, did not significantly influence response. Fifteen patients underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including 11 patients in first remission. The 1-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 64.6% and the median overall survival was 8.2 months. By comparison with conventional intensive chemotherapy, the treatment protocol we used appeared to produce higher hematologic and cytogenetic complete remission rates in patients with very poor cytogenetics, but response duration was short in this very poor risk population, highlighting the need for better post-induction strategies. Clinical trial registry number: NCT00885508.

  17. Serial intense chemotherapy combining topotecan, etoposide, carboplatin and cyclophosphamide (TECC) followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell support in patients with high risk soft tissue sarcoma (STS).

    PubMed

    Bernbeck, B; Bahci, S; Meisel, R; Troeger, A; Schönberger, S; Laws, H-J; Kramm, C; Wessalowski, R; Koscielniak, E; Dilloo, D; Göbel, U

    2007-01-01

    In nine patients (pts) with soft tissue sarcoma refractory to conventional therapy (incomplete response or relapse) intensified chemotherapy was administered combining 0.75 mg/m (2) topotecan, 100 mg/m (2) etoposide, 100 mg/m (2) carboplatin and 200 mg/m (2) cyclophosphamide on day 1-5 (TECC). To avoid prolonged intervals between the serial TECC courses autologous hematopoietic stem cell supports (median 1.0 x 10(6) CD34+ cells per kg body weight (bw), range 0.5-2.8 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg bw, SD 0.6 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg bw) were given on day 7. All pts received granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) from day 8 in addition. All together 39 TECC courses (minimum 2 courses, maximum 6 courses per pt) were administered, with a median interval of 32 (range 21-52) days until recovery. Leukopenia (<1000/microl) occurred 9 days (range 3-13 days; SD 2.4 days) after end of chemotherapy and persisted for 9 (range 3-15 days; SD 3 days) days. In 31/39 TECC courses readmission to hospital was required for supportive therapy mainly due to neutropenic fever. In this period pts received 0.83 (range 0-1) red blood cell units and 2.35 (range 1-4) platelet units. C-reactive protein in neutropenic pts as an indicator for infection after TECC chemotherapy was detectable after 36 of 39 chemotherapy courses leading to further supportive therapy (median 10.4 mg/dl, range 1.1-28.3 mg/dl; SD 6.67 mg/dl). Duration of total inpatient treatment per TECC course including supportive therapy was in median 13.5 days (range 7-53 days; SD 4.3 days). Only two children had a prolonged infection (77 and 100 days). Clinical and objective tumor responses, defined as complete remission, very good partial response and partial response were observed in 9/9 pts at eight weeks after the last TECC course and were maintained at six months in 7/9 pts. Median time to progression and median overall survival time after TECC chemotherapy were 20.3 months and 25.2 months, respectively. These data provide

  18. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  19. Intensive sequential chemotherapy (ISC 95) with growth factors and blood stem cell support in high-intermediate and high-risk (IPI 2 and IPI 3) aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: an oligocentric report on 42 patients.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, R; Stoppa, A M; Rossi, J F; Lepeu, G; Coso, D; Xerri, L; Ladaique, P; Chabannon, C; Blaise, D; Bardou, V J; Alzieu, C; Gastaut, J A; Maraninchi, D

    1999-06-01

    We previously reported feasibility and efficacy of a monocentric pilot study of intensive sequential chemotherapy (ISC) in poor-risk aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in patients < 60 years. To validate these results on a large cohort of patients, we designed a new and oligocentric study. After a COP (cyclophosphamide (Cy), vincristine (Vcr), prednisone (Pred) debulking, patients received four courses of high-dose CHOP (Cy, doxorubicin (Doxo), Ver, Pred), with the addition of etoposide and cisplatin during the two last courses. G-CSF was delivered after each cycle, and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) were used to support the two last cycles. Total duration of chemotherapy was 13 weeks, with a planned dose-intensity (DI) of 1420 mg/m2/week and 23 mg/m2/week for Cy and Doxo, respectively. Radiotherapy (involved fields) was then delivered for patients with node size > or = 5 cm at diagnosis. Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study; 36 completed the treatment and received 75% or more of the planned DI for both Cy and Doxo. Median duration of grade 4 neutropenia was 14 days (range, 2 to 28) for the regimen as a whole, and median duration of rehospitalization for febrile neutropenia was 18 days (range, 4 to 41). Overall response rate was 83%, with 29 patients (69%) in complete response (CR). Six patients failed to respond and one died of toxicity. With a median follow-up of 22.5 months (range, 10 to 42), the 3-year event-free survival (EFS) is 55% (95% CI, 39-71), while disease-free survival (DFS) is 79% (95% CI, 63-95). Ambulatory ISC is accessible and feasible in an oligocentric study. PBSC allow repeated delivery of high-dose chemotherapy cycles, and result in encouraging CR, EFS, and DFS rates for poor-risk aggressive NHL's patients.

  20. Metronomic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna

    2014-01-01

    Toxic effects and chemoresistance are major hurdles in chemotherapy and to avoid these problems caused by traditional chemotherapeutic regimens, a new modality of drug administration called “metronomic chemotherapy” has emerged. Such regimen involves the frequent administration of conventional chemotherapeutic agents at very low doses to target activated endothelial cells in tumors, the advantages of which include minimal adverse effects and a rare chance of developing acquired drug resistance. Previously it was thought that they act by targeting angiogenesis, but recently additional mechanisms have been discovered which has established metronomic chemotherapy as a type of multi-targeted therapy. The knowledge gained from the preclinical studies of metronomic chemotherapy, along with clinical experience, will help to design better therapeutic protocols against cancer. Detailed pharmacogenomic and pharmacoproteomic studies on tumor endothelial cells and large multi-centered clinical trials, integrating bio-marker analyzes, are needed to investigate and validate the best treatment combinations for each tumor type and patient population. PMID:25210398

  1. Intracavitary chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling has suggested, and clinical investigations have confirmed, that intracavitary drug administration can result in a much greater drug exposure for the cavity into which the agent is instilled compared to the plasma. Both the safety and the efficacy of several agents administered individually or in combination have now been demonstrated. Several malignancies, in particular ovarian carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma, which remain confined to body cavities for much of their natural history, might be most rationally treated by the intracavitary treatment approach. Early clinical trials have demonstrated significant activity of intracavitary chemotherapy in both of these malignancies. Optimal drugs and dosages as well as appropriate scheduling for the various tumors involving body cavities remain to be defined. Whether or not combination intracavitary chemotherapy will significantly improve survival of patients with malignant disease confined to body cavities must await carefully controlled clinical trials comparing this treatment approach to standard systemically administered chemotherapy. 144 references.

  2. Extended intrathecal methotrexate may replace cranial irradiation for prevention of CNS relapse in children with intermediate-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-based intensive chemotherapy. The Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica.

    PubMed

    Conter, V; Aricò, M; Valsecchi, M G; Rizzari, C; Testi, A M; Messina, C; Mori, P G; Miniero, R; Colella, R; Basso, G

    1995-10-01

    To assess the effect of treatment intensification and that of extended intrathecal methotrexate substitution for cranial irradiation in intermediate-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) children treated with a Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM)-based intensive chemotherapy. Three hundred ninety-six children with non-B-ALL were enrolled onto the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologic Pediatrica (AIEOP) ALL 88 study. Standard risk (SR) included patients with low tumor burden (BFM risk index [RI], < 0.8); intermediate risk (IR) were patients with an RI > or = 0.8 but less than 1.2; and high risk (HR) were those with an RI > or = 1.2 or CNS involvement at diagnosis. The treatment schedule was a modified version of the ALL-BFM 86 study. CNS-directed treatment consisted of high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX; 5 g/m2 for four courses) plus intrathecal methotrexate (IT-MTX; nine doses); IR patients additionally received extended IT-MTX (nine doses during continuation therapy); cranial irradiation was given only to HR patients. Of the 375 (94.7%) children who achieved remission, 1.3% had an adverse event other than relapse. The estimated event-free survival (EFS) at 6 years was 66.6% (SE 2.4) overall; 80.7% (4.5) in the SR patients, 77.5% (3.9) in the IR patients, and 54.5% (3.7) in the HR patients. Relapse occurred in 107 children (27.0%). Isolated CNS relapse occurred in 20 children (5.0%): 5 (6.3%) in the SR group, 1 (0.8%) in the IR group, and 14 (7.1%) in the HR group. The estimated 6-year CNS leukemia-free survival was 94.6% (1.2) overall: 93.5% (2.8) in the SR group, 99.1% (0.9) in the IR group, and 92.3% (2.0) in the HR group. Cranial irradiation may be omitted safely in IR ALL patients treated with BFM-based intensive chemotherapy when extended intrathecal chemotherapy is given. Because the CNS disease control was less complete in the SR group, these data challenge the effectiveness of HD-MTX for protection from CNS disease and support the protective role of

  3. Understanding Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may get chemotherapy before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Fill this section in with your doctor or nurse. I am getting chemo ... can be given in these forms: An IV (intravenously) A shot (injection) into a muscle or other part of your body A pill ...

  4. Neuropsychological functioning of children treated with intensive chemotherapy followed by myeloablative consolidation chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell rescue for newly diagnosed CNS tumors: an analysis of the Head Start II survivors.

    PubMed

    Sands, Stephen A; Oberg, Jennifer A; Gardner, Sharon L; Whiteley, Jennifer A; Glade-Bender, Julia L; Finlay, Jonathan L

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the neuropsychological late effects amongst survivors treated on the Head Start II protocol between 1997 and 2003. Forty-nine patients (mean age 2.9 years) diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor underwent baseline neuropsychological assessment prior to autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AuHCT). Twenty-six survivors were retested after 3 years of follow-up as 20 patients did not survive. Patients were evaluated for intelligence, academic achievement, receptive language, visual-motor integration (VMI), learning/memory, social-emotional and behavioral functioning based upon age at testing. Overall intelligence and VMI at baseline were low average while verbal and non-verbal intelligence, academic achievement, and receptive vocabulary were in average range. Parents reported social-emotional and behavioral functioning within normal limits. Serial testing revealed Full Scale (FSIQ)/Mental Development Index (MDI), Verbal (VIQ), and Performance (PIQ) Intelligence to be generally stable over 3-year follow-up. Group-average analysis at follow-up demonstrated low average intelligence, academic achievement, receptive language, and VMI. Age at diagnosis was positively correlated with internalizing symptoms and visual immediate memory, while time since diagnosis was inversely correlated with FSIQ, VIQ, PIQ, reading and delayed verbal memory. Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) was avoided in two-thirds of patients. Induction, with or without intensification using intravenous methotrexate, followed by myeloablative consolidation chemotherapy with AuHCT, may avoid or delay CSI, with possible stabilization of neuropsychological functioning, including those younger at diagnosis. Continued follow-up is necessary to determine the preservation of neuropsychological, academic, social-emotional and behavioral functioning. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Pilot Study of Intensive Chemotherapy with Peripheral Hematopoietic Cell Support for Children Less than 3 Years of Age with Malignant Brain Tumors, The CCG-99703 Phase I/II Study. A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bruce H.; Geyer, J. Russell; Miller, Douglas C.; Curran, John G.; Zhou, Tianni; Holmes, Emi; Ingles, Sue Ann; Dunkel, Ira J.; Hilden, Joanne; Packer, Roger J.; Pollack, Ian F.; Gajjar, Amar; Finlay, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary goals of the CCG-99703 study were to assess the feasibility and tolerability of, as well as the response rate to, a novel dose-intensive chemotherapy regimen. Methods Between March 1998 and October 2004, 92 eligible patients were enrolled. Following biopsy/resection, patients received three identical cycles of Induction chemotherapy (vincristine, cyclophosphamide, etoposide and cisplatin) administered every 21–28 days. Patients without tumor progression then received three Consolidation cycles of marrow-ablative chemotherapy (thiotepa and carboplatin) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell rescue. Results The Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) of thiotepa was 10mg/kg/day x 2 days per cycle. The toxic mortality rate was zero during Induction and 2.6% during Consolidation. Centrally evaluated response rates to Induction and Consolidation in evaluable patients with residual tumor were 73.3% and 66.7% respectively. Disease progression rates on Induction and Consolidation were 4%. Five-year EFS and OS were 43.9±5.2% and 63.6±5% respectively. Gross total resection (GTR) versus

  6. Post cardiac transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder presenting as t(8;14) Burkitt leukaemia/lymphoma treated with low intensity chemotherapy and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Windebank, Kevin; Walwyn, Tom; Kirk, Richard; Parry, Gareth; Hasan, Asif; Bown, Nick; Wilkins, Bridget

    2009-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occasionally presents as Burkitt lymphoma/L3 leukaemia (BLL). We reviewed records of cases of PTLD post-cardiac transplantation (1990-2007) occurring in our unit. There were 15 episodes in 13 patients including four cases of EBV-driven Burkitt-type disease with t(8;14) translocations presenting with advanced stage disease. The first case was treated with a variety of low dose chemotherapy combinations. Despite problems during therapy he obtained complete remission, but died from complications of pre-existing cardiac allograft vasculopathy 7 months later. The subsequent three cases were treated with a UKCCSG low stage lymphoma protocol, NHL 9001 and Rituximab. They remain in complete remission. In the context of PTLD the prognostic significance of advanced stage EBV-driven BLL with the t(8;14) translocation may be different to that in immunocompetent children. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Inter-Reader Reliability of Early FDG-PET/CT Response Assessment Using the Deauville Scale after 2 Cycles of Intensive Chemotherapy (OEPA) in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, Regine; Chavdarova, Lidia; Hoffmann, Martha; Kobe, Carsten; Malkowski, Bogdan; Montravers, Françoise; Kurch, Lars; Georgi, Thomas; Dietlein, Markus; Wallace, W. Hamish; Karlen, Jonas; Fernández-Teijeiro, Ana; Cepelova, Michaela; Wilson, Lorrain; Bergstraesser, Eva; Sabri, Osama; Mauz-Körholz, Christine; Körholz, Dieter; Hasenclever, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The five point Deauville (D) scale is widely used to assess interim PET metabolic response to chemotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. An International Validation Study reported good concordance among reviewers in ABVD treated advanced stage HL patients for the binary discrimination between score D1,2,3 and score D4,5. Inter-reader reliability of the whole scale is not well characterised. Methods Five international expert readers scored 100 interim PET/CT scans from paediatric HL patients. Scans were acquired in 51 European hospitals after two courses of OEPA chemotherapy (according to the EuroNet-PHL-C1 study). Images were interpreted in direct comparison with staging PET/CTs. Results The probability that two random readers concord on the five point D score of a random case is only 42% (global kappa = 0.24). Aggregating to a three point scale D1,2 vs. D3 vs. D4,5 improves concordance to 60% (kappa = 0.34). Concordance if one of two readers assigns a given score is 70% for score D1,2 only 36% for score D3 and 64% for D4,5. Concordance for the binary decisions D1,2 vs. D3,4,5 is 67% and 86% for D1,2,3 vs D4,5 (kappa = 0.36 resp. 0.56). If one reader assigns D1,2,3 concordance probability is 92%, but only 64% if D4,5 is called. Discrepancies occur mainly in mediastinum, neck and skeleton. Conclusion Inter-reader reliability of the five point D-scale is poor in this interobserver analysis of paediatric patients who underwent OEPA. Inter-reader variability is maximal in cases assigned to D2 or D3. The binary distinction D1,2,3 versus D4,5 is the most reliable criterion for clinical decision making. PMID:26963909

  8. Topical Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor for Oral Mucositis Induced by Intensive Chemotherapy with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Final Analysis of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Myeong Gyu; Lee, Hyun Jung; Koh, Youngil; Kwon, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Inho; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Byoung Kook; Oh, Jung Mi; Kim, Kyung Im; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) oral spray for oral mucositis (OM) induced by intensive chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this phase 2 study, patients were randomized to either rhEGF (50 microg/mL) or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. The primary endpoint was incidence of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grade ≥2 OM. A total of 138 patients were enrolled in this study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, rhEGF did not reduce the incidence of NCI grade ≥2 OM (p = 0.717) nor reduce its duration (p = 0.725). Secondary endpoints including the day of onset and duration of NCI grade ≥2 OM, the incidence of NCI grade ≥3 OM and its duration, and patient-reported quality of life were also similar between the two groups. In the per-protocol analysis, however, the duration of opioid analgesic use was shorter in the rhEGF group (p = 0.036), and recipients in the rhEGF group required a lower cumulative dose of opioid analgesics than those in the placebo group (p = 0.046), among patients with NCI grade ≥2 OM. Adverse events were mild and transient. This study found no evidence to suggest that rhEGF oral spray reduces the incidence of OM. However, further studies are needed to investigate the effect of rhEGF on OM-induced pain reduction after intensive chemotherapy. PMID:28045958

  9. Topical Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor for Oral Mucositis Induced by Intensive Chemotherapy with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Final Analysis of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2 Trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Myeong Gyu; Lee, Hyun Jung; Koh, Youngil; Kwon, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Inho; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Byoung Kook; Oh, Jung Mi; Kim, Kyung Im; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) oral spray for oral mucositis (OM) induced by intensive chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this phase 2 study, patients were randomized to either rhEGF (50 microg/mL) or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. The primary endpoint was incidence of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grade ≥2 OM. A total of 138 patients were enrolled in this study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, rhEGF did not reduce the incidence of NCI grade ≥2 OM (p = 0.717) nor reduce its duration (p = 0.725). Secondary endpoints including the day of onset and duration of NCI grade ≥2 OM, the incidence of NCI grade ≥3 OM and its duration, and patient-reported quality of life were also similar between the two groups. In the per-protocol analysis, however, the duration of opioid analgesic use was shorter in the rhEGF group (p = 0.036), and recipients in the rhEGF group required a lower cumulative dose of opioid analgesics than those in the placebo group (p = 0.046), among patients with NCI grade ≥2 OM. Adverse events were mild and transient. This study found no evidence to suggest that rhEGF oral spray reduces the incidence of OM. However, further studies are needed to investigate the effect of rhEGF on OM-induced pain reduction after intensive chemotherapy.

  10. Higher stem cell dose infusion after intensive chemotherapy does not improve symptom burden in older patients with multiple myeloma and amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nina; Shi, Qiuling; Williams, Loretta A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Reuben, James M.; Dougherty, Patrick M.; Bashir, Qaiser; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cleeland, Charles S.; Giralt, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with high symptom burden, particularly for older patients and those with amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. Symptom burden peaks during leukopenia. We hypothesized that higher doses of CD34+ stem cells would be associated with an improved symptom outcome. Patients undergoing ASCT for MM who were ≥60 years old or had AL amyloidosis were randomized to receive either a standard (4–6×106 cells/kg) or high dose (10–15×106 cells/kg) of CD34+ cells after melphalan 200 mg/m2. Symptom burden was assessed via the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory MM module (MDASI-MM). Eighty patients were enrolled. Median CD34+ cell doses were 5.1×106 cells/kg (standard dose) and 10.5×106 cells/kg (high dose). The most severe symptoms during the first week were fatigue, lack of appetite, drowsiness, disturbed sleep, and pain. The AUC for the mean composite severity score of these symptoms was similar between treatment arms (P = .819). Median times to neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet engraftment were also similar between groups. IL-6 increased similarly for both groups throughout the ASCT course. Infusion of higher autologous stem cell dose after high-dose chemotherapy does not yield a difference in symptom burden or engraftment time in the first few weeks post-ASCT. PMID:26253006

  11. A risk-adapted study of cisplatin and etoposide, with or without ifosfamide, in patients with metastatic seminoma: results of the GETUG S99 multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fizazi, Karim; Delva, Rémi; Caty, Armelle; Chevreau, Christine; Kerbrat, Pierre; Rolland, Frederic; Priou, Frank; Geoffrois, Lionnel; Rixe, Olivier; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Malhaire, Jean-Pierre; Culine, Stephane; Aubelle, Marie-Stephanie; Laplanche, Agnes

    2014-02-01

    Whether patients with good prognosis and intermediate/poor prognosis advanced seminoma should be treated differently has not been defined. To assess a risk-adapted chemotherapy regimen in patients with advanced seminoma. A total of 132 patients were included in this prospective study. Patients with a good prognosis according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaboration Group (IGGCCG) were treated with four cycles of cisplatin-etoposide (EP). Patients with an intermediate prognosis according to the IGCCCG (or a poor prognosis according to the Medical Research Council classification) were treated with four cycles of VIP (EP and ifosfamide) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up was 4.5 yr (range: 0.4-11.6 yr). Among 108 patients (82%) with a good prognosis who received EP, grade 3-4 toxicity included neutropenia (47%) and neutropenic fever (12%). Among the 24 patients (18%) with an intermediate/poor prognosis who received VIP plus G-CSF, toxicity included grade 3-4 neutropenia (36%), neutropenic fever (23%), thrombocytopenia (23%), anemia (23%), and a toxicity-related death (n=1; 4%). The 3-yr progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 93% (range: 85-97%) in the good prognosis group and 83% (range: 63-93%) in the intermediate/poor prognosis group (p=0.03 for PFS). The 3-yr overall survival (OS) rate was 99% (range: 92-100%) and 87% (range: 67-95%), respectively (p<0.005 for OS). Only four patients died of seminoma or its treatment. A risk-adapted chemotherapy policy for advanced seminoma yielded an excellent outcome with a 3-yr OS rate of 96%. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  13. Satisfactory outcome after intensive chemotherapy with pragmatic use of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in older patients with Philadelphia-negative B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a Swedish registry-based study.

    PubMed

    Bergfelt, Emma; Kozlowski, Piotr; Ahlberg, Lucia; Hulegårdh, Erik; Hägglund, Hans; Karlsson, Karin; Markuszewska-Kuczymska, Alicja; Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata; Smedmyr, Bengt; Åström, Maria; Amini, Rose-Marie; Hallböök, Heléne

    2015-04-01

    The introduction of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring, in the Swedish national guidelines for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, was evaluated in 35 patients aged 46-79 years (median 61), who were diagnosed from 2007 to 2011 and treated with high-intensity, block-based chemotherapy (ABCDV/VABA induction). Both a high complete remission rate (91 %) and acceptable overall survival (OS) rate (47 %) at 5 years were achieved. MRD by flow cytometry was measured in 73 % of the patients reaching complete remission after the first course, but was omitted by the clinicians for eight patients who were either over 70 years of age or already met conventional high-risk criteria. Factors negatively influencing OS were age over 65 years and WHO status ≥2. MRD < 0.1 % after induction had positive impact on continuous complete remission but not on OS. Only five patients were allocated to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission, mainly due to conventional high risk factors. Thus, use of intensive remission induction therapy is effective in a selection of older patients. In a population for whom the possibilities of treatment escalation are limited, the optimal role of MRD monitoring remains to be determined.

  14. 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine with intensive chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for high-risk neuroblastoma. A new approaches to neuroblastoma therapy (NANT) phase II study.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Gregory A; Villablanca, Judith G; Maris, John M; Weiss, Brian; Groshen, Susan; Marachelian, Araz; Park, Julie R; Tsao-Wei, Denice; Hawkins, Randall; Shulkin, Barry L; Jackson, Hollie; Goodarzian, Fariba; Shimada, Hiro; Courtier, Jesse; Hutchinson, Raymond; Haas-Koga, Daphne; Hasenauer, C Beth; Czarnecki, Scarlett; Katzenstein, Howard M; Matthay, Katherine K

    2015-04-01

    (131)I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine ((131)I-MIBG) has been used as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma. The activity and toxicity of (131)I-MIBG when combined with carboplatin, etoposide, and melphalan (CEM) and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) are now investigated in a phase II multicenter study. Fifty patients with MIBG-avid disease were enrolled into 2 cohorts, stratified by response to induction therapy. The primary study endpoint was response of patients with refractory (n = 27) or progressive disease (n = 15). A second cohort of patients (n = 8) with a partial response (PR) to induction therapy was included to obtain preliminary response data. (131)I-MIBG was administered on day -21 to all patients, with CEM given days -7 to -4, and SCT given on day 0. (131)I-MIBG dosing was determined by pre-therapy glomerular filtration rate (GFR), with 8 mCi/kg given if GFR was 60 to 99 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) (n = 13) and 12 mCi/kg if GFR ≥ 100 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) (n = 37). External beam radiotherapy was delivered to the primary and metastatic sites, beginning approximately 6 weeks after SCT. Responses (complete response + PR) were seen in 4 of 41 (10%) evaluable patients with primary refractory or progressive disease. At 3 years after SCT, the event-free survival (EFS) was 20% ± 7%, with overall survival (OS) 62% ± 8% for this cohort of patients. Responses were noted in 3 of 8 (38%) of patients with a PR to induction, with 3-year EFS 38% ± 17% and OS 75% ± 15%. No statistically significant difference was found comparing EFS or OS based upon pre-therapy GFR or disease cohort. Six of 50 patients had nonhematologic dose-limiting toxicity (DLT); 1 of 13 in the low GFR and 5 of 37 in the normal GFR cohorts. Hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) was seen in 6 patients (12%), with 5 events defined as dose-limiting SOS. The median times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 10 and 15 days

  15. Types of chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000910.htm Types of chemotherapy To use the sharing features on this page, ... or on cancer cells. How Doctors Choose Your Chemotherapy The type and dose of chemotherapy your doctor ...

  16. Sequential chemotherapy followed by reduced-intensity conditioning and allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with relapse or refractory acute myeloid leukaemia: a survey from the Acute Leukaemia Working Party of EBMT.

    PubMed

    Ringdén, Olle; Labopin, Myriam; Schmid, Christoph; Sadeghi, Behnam; Polge, Emmanuelle; Tischer, Johanna; Ganser, Arnold; Michallet, Mauricette; Kanz, Lothar; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    This study analysed the outcome of 267 patients with relapse/refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who received sequential chemotherapy including fludarabine, cytarabine and amsacrine followed by reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The transplants in 77 patients were from matched sibling donors (MSDs) and those in 190 patients were from matched unrelated donors. Most patients (94·3%) were given anti-T-cell antibodies. The incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of grades II-IV was 32·1% and that of chronic GVHD was 30·2%. The 3-year probability of non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 25·9%, that of relapse was 48·5%, that of GVHD-free and relapse-free survival (GRFS) was 17·8% and that of leukaemia-free survival (LFS) was 25·6%. In multivariate analysis, unrelated donor recipients more frequently had acute GVHD of grades II-IV [hazard ratio (HR) = 1·98, P = 0·017] and suffered less relapses (HR = 0·62, P = 0·01) than MSD recipients. Treatment with anti-T-cell antibodies reduced NRM (HR = 0·35, P = 0·01) and improved survival (HR = 0·49, P = 0·01), GRFS (HR = 0·37, P = 0·0004) and LFS (HR = 0·46, P = 0·005). Thus, sequential chemotherapy followed by RIC HSCT and use of anti-T-cell antibodies seems promising in patients with refractory AML. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical-dosimetric analysis of measures of dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube dependence among head and neck cancer patients treated definitively by intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between dose to various anatomical structures and dysphagia among patients with head and neck cancer treated by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and materials Thirty-nine patients with squamous cancer of the head and neck were treated by definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 68 to 72). In each patient, a gastrostomy tube (GT) was prophylacticly placed prior to starting treatment. Prolonged GT dependence was defined as exceeding the median GT duration of 192 days. Dysphagia was scored using standardized quality-of-life instruments. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data incorporating the superior/middle pharyngeal constrictors (SMPC), inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), cricoid pharyngeal inlet (CPI), and cervical esophagus (CE) were analyzed in relation to prolonged GT dependence, dysphagia, and weight loss. Results At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, 87% and 44% of patients, respectively, were GT dependent. Spearman's ρ analysis identified statistical correlations (p < 0.05) between prolonged GT dependence or high grade dysphagia with IPC V65, IPC V60, IPC Dmean, and CPI Dmax. Logistic regression model showed that IPC V65 > 30%, IPC V60 > 60%, IPC Dmean > 60 Gy, and CPI Dmax > 62 Gy predicted for greater than 50% probability of prolonged GT dependence. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that adhering to the following parameters may decrease the risk of prolonged GT dependence and dysphagia: IPC V65 < 15%, IPC V60 < 40%, IPC Dmean < 55 Gy, and CPI Dmax < 60 Gy. PMID:19909531

  18. Long-term results of a prospective randomized trial evaluating G-CSF priming in intensive induction chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bug, Gesine; Koschmieder, Steffen; Krauter, Juergen; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Wiebe, Stefanie; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Klein, Stefan A; Wegener, Gerd; Göhring, Gudrun; Heit, Wolfgang; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ganser, Arnold; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2014-02-01

    Few studies have evaluated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming in elderly patients with intensively treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and no data are available for genetically defined AML subgroups. We provide long-term results (median follow-up 7.6 years) of a randomized trial in which 183 patients (median age 67 years) received G-CSF prior to (G-CSF priming) or after two cycles of induction chemotherapy. CR rates with G-CSF priming and G-CSF post-chemotherapy were comparable (57 vs. 67 %, p = 0.153), with overall survival (OS) probabilities of 14 vs. 17 % at 10 years. Induction mortality was significantly higher with G-CSF priming (23 vs. 10 %, p = 0.015), primarily in normal karyotype (NK) AML. In this subgroup, a trend for better relapse-free survival (RFS) was observed with G-CSF priming (44 vs. 22 % at 10 years, p = 0.074) but did not translate into an OS benefit. G-CSF priming had no impact on AML with FLT3-ITD and NPM mutations and did not improve outcome in patients with adverse cytogenetics. In a landmark analysis, late consolidation with autologous stem cell transplantation or a second consolidation cycle significantly improved RFS compared with one consolidation cycle (21.0 vs. 12.8 months, p = 0.046). Future studies on G-CSF priming should be restricted to NK AML and used only in post-remission therapy.

  19. DNA Detection of Schistosoma japonicum: Diagnostic Validity of a LAMP Assay for Low-Intensity Infection and Effects of Chemotherapy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Wang, Yan-Yan; Cao, Yun; Zhang, Hui-Qin; Zhu, Xing-Quan; He, Yong-Kang; Xia, Chao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis has decreased significantly in prevalence and intensity of infection in China, thus more accurate and sensitive methods are desperately needed for the further control of schistosomiasis. The present work aimed to assess the utility of the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection of light intensity infection or false-negative patients and patients post-treatment, targeting the highly repetitive retrotransposon SjR2 of Schistosoma japonicum. Methodology/ Principal Findings LAMP was first assessed in rabbits with low intensity infection (EPG<10). Then 110 patient sera from Hunan Province, China, and 47 sera after treatment by praziquantel were used to evaluate the diagnostic validity of LAMP. Meanwhile, 42 sera from healthy individuals in a non-endemic area, and 60 sera from "healthy” residents who were identified as being negative for feces examination and immuno-methods in an endemic area were also examined. The results showed that LAMP could detect S. japonicum DNA in sera from rabbits at 3rd day post-infection. Following administration of praziquantel, the S. japonicum DNA in rabbit sera became negative at 10 weeks post-treatment. Of 110 sera from patients, LAMP showed 95.5% sensitivity, and even for 41 patients with less than 10 EPG, the sensitivity of LAMP still reached to 95.1%. For 47 patients after treatment, the negative conversion rate of S. japonicum DNA in patient sera increased from 23.4%, 61.7% to 83.0% at 3 months, 6 months and 9 months post-treatment, respectively. No false-positive result was obtained for 42 human sera from non-endemic area, while for the 60 “healthy” individuals from endemic area, 10 (16.7%) individuals were positive by LAMP, which suggested that these individuals might be false-negative patients. Conclusions/ Significance The present study demonstrated that the LAMP assay is sensitive, specific, and affordable, which would help reduce schistosomiasis transmission through targeted

  20. Effectiveness and Safety of Intensive Triplet Chemotherapy Plus Bevacizumab, FIr-B/FOx, in Young-Elderly Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cannita, Katia; Giordano, Aldo Victor; Vicentini, Roberto; Ficorella, Corrado; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Four-drug regimens, such as FIr-B/FOx schedule, can improve efficacy of first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients. The present study specifically evaluates feasibility of FIr-B/FOx first-line intensive regimen in fit young-elderly MCRC patients, representing approximately 40% of overall MCRC patients. Activity, efficacy, and safety were equivalent to overall MCRC patients, not significantly different according to KRAS genotype. Clinical outcome was significantly prolonged in liver-limited compared to other/multiple metastatic disease. Safety evaluation of the individual young-elderly patient showed that limiting toxicity syndromes (LTS) in multiple sites were significantly increased, compared to LTS in single site, with respect to non-elderly patients. PMID:24307987

  1. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin Versus Best Supportive Care in Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Unsuitable for Intensive Chemotherapy: Results of the Randomized Phase III EORTC-GIMEMA AML-19 Trial.

    PubMed

    Amadori, Sergio; Suciu, Stefan; Selleslag, Dominik; Aversa, Franco; Gaidano, Gianluca; Musso, Maurizio; Annino, Luciana; Venditti, Adriano; Voso, Maria Teresa; Mazzone, Carla; Magro, Domenico; De Fabritiis, Paolo; Muus, Petra; Alimena, Giuliana; Mancini, Marco; Hagemeijer, Anne; Paoloni, Francesca; Vignetti, Marco; Fazi, Paola; Meert, Liv; Ramadan, Safaa Mahmoud; Willemze, Roel; de Witte, Theo; Baron, Frédéric

    2016-03-20

    To compare single-agent gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) with best supportive care (BSC) including hydroxyurea as first-line therapy in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia unsuitable for intensive chemotherapy. In this trial, patients at least 61 years old were centrally randomized (1:1) to receive either a single induction course of GO (6 mg/m(2) on day 1 and 3 mg/m(2) on day 8) or BSC. Patients who did not progress after GO induction could receive up to eight monthly infusions of the immunoconjugate at 2 mg/m(2). Randomization was stratified by age, WHO performance score, CD33 expression status, and center. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) by intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 237 patients were randomly assigned (118 to GO and 119 to BSC). The median OS was 4.9 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 6.8 months) in the GO group and 3.6 months (95% CI, 2.6 to 4.2 months) in the BSC group (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.90; P = .005); the 1-year OS rate was 24.3% with GO and 9.7% with BSC. The OS benefit with GO was consistent across most subgroups, and was especially apparent in patients with high CD33 expression status, in those with favorable/intermediate cytogenetic risk profile, and in women. Overall, complete remission (CR [complete remission] + CRi [CR with incomplete recovery of peripheral blood counts]) occurred in 30 of 111 (27%) GO recipients. The rates of serious adverse events (AEs) were similar in the two groups, and no excess mortality from AEs was observed with GO. First-line monotherapy with low-dose GO, as compared with BSC, significantly improved OS in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia who were ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. No unexpected AEs were identified and toxicity was manageable. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  3. IKZF1 expression is a prognostic marker in newly diagnosed standard-risk multiple myeloma treated with lenalidomide and intensive chemotherapy: a study of the German Myeloma Study Group (DSMM).

    PubMed

    Krönke, J; Kuchenbauer, F; Kull, M; Teleanu, V; Bullinger, L; Bunjes, D; Greiner, A; Kolmus, S; Köpff, S; Schreder, M; Mügge, L-O; Straka, C; Engelhardt, M; Döhner, H; Einsele, H; Bassermann, F; Bargou, R; Knop, S; Langer, C

    2017-01-20

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory compound with high clinical activity in multiple myeloma. Lenalidomide binding to the Cereblon (CRBN) E3 ubiquitin ligase results in targeted ubiquitination and degradation of the lymphoid transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1) and Aiolos (IKZF3) leading to growth inhibition of multiple myeloma cells. Recently, Basigin (BSG) was identified as another protein regulated by CRBN that is involved in the activity of lenalidomide. Here, we analyzed the prognostic value of IKZF1, IKZF3, CRBN and BSG mRNA expression levels in pretreatment plasma cells from 60 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma uniformly treated with lenalidomide in combination with intensive chemotherapy within a clinical trial. We found that IKZF1 mRNA expression levels are significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS). Patients in the lowest quartile (Q1) of IKZF1 expression had a superior PFS compared with patients in the remaining quartiles (Q2-Q4; 3-year PFS of 86 vs 51%, P=0.01). This translated into a significant better overall survival (100 vs 74%, P=0.03). Subgroup analysis revealed a significant impact of IKZF1, IKZF3 and BSG expression levels on PFS in cytogenetically defined standard-risk but not high-risk patients. Our data suggest a prognostic role of IKZF1, IKZF3 and BSG expression levels in lenalidomide-treated multiple myeloma.Leukemia advance online publication, 20 January 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.384.

  4. Induction Chemotherapy Improved Long-term Outcomes of Patients with Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Propensity Matched Analysis of 5-year Survival Outcomes in the Era of Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term therapeutic gain of induction chemotherapy (IC) in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Data on 957 patients with stage T1-2N2-3 or T3-4N1-3 NPC treated with IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Propensity score matching (PSM) method was adopted to balance influence of various covariates. Patient survival between IC and non-IC groups were compared. Results: For the 318 pairs selected from the original 957 patients by PSM, the median follow-up duration was 57.13 months (range, 1.27-78.1 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) rates for IC group vs. non-IC group were 87.2% vs. 80.8% (P = 0.023), 88.1% vs. 83.2% (P = 0.071), 80.7% vs. 71.4% (P = 0.011) and 92.1% vs. 86.7% (P = 0.081), respectively. Multivariate analysis identify IC as an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 0.595; 95% CI, 0.397-0.891; P = 0.012) and DFS (HR, 0.627; 95% CI, 0.451-0.872; P = 0.006). After excluding the patients not receiving concurrent chemotherapy, IC was found to be an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 0.566; 95% CI, 0.368-0.872; P = 0.01), DMFS (HR, 0.580; 95% CI, 0.367-0.916; P = 0.02) and DFS (HR, 0.633; 95% CI, 0.444-0.903; P = 0.012). Conclusions: IC is an effective treatment modality for patients with stage T1-2N2-3 and T3-4N1-3 NPC, and the incorporation of IC with standard CCRT could achieve the best therapeutic gain. PMID:28261337

  5. Amitriptyline in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kautio, Anna-Liisa; Haanpää, Maija; Leminen, Arto; Kalso, Eija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Saarto, Tiina

    2009-07-01

    Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy. The tricyclic antidepressant, amitriptyline, is a gold standard in the treatment of neuropathic pain. This double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial assessed the efficacy of amitriptyline to prevent chemotherapy-induced neuropathic symptoms. Patients without previous neuropathy, who started chemotherapy with vinca alcaloids, platina derivatives or taxanes, were randomized to receive amitriptyline (target dose, 100 mg daily) or placebo for the duration of their chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic symptoms were evaluated with a patient diary and after every third chemotherapy cycle with clinical examination. The diary data were transformed to a neuropathy score. A total of 114 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to the treatment or control arm. There was no difference in the appearance of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic symptoms between the groups. In general, the intensity of neuropathic symptoms was mild. Amitriptyline does not prevent chemotherapy-induced neuropathy.

  6. A randomised phase 2 trial of intensive induction chemotherapy (CBOP/BEP) and standard BEP in poor-prognosis germ cell tumours (MRC TE23, CRUK 05/014, ISRCTN 53643604).

    PubMed

    Huddart, Robert A; Gabe, Rhian; Cafferty, Fay H; Pollock, Philip; White, Jeff D; Shamash, Jonathan; Cullen, Michael H; Stenning, Sally P

    2015-03-01

    Standard chemotherapy for poor-prognosis metastatic nonseminoma has remained bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) for many years; more effective regimens are required. To explore whether response rates with a new intensive chemotherapy regimen, CBOP/BEP (carboplatin, bleomycin, vincristine, cisplatin/BEP), versus those in concurrent patients treated with standard BEP justify a phase 3 trial. We conducted a phase 2 open-label randomised trial in patients with germ cell tumours of any extracranial primary site and one or more International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group poor-prognosis features. Patients were randomised between 2005 and 2009 at 16 UK centres. BEP (bleomycin 30,000 IU) was composed of four cycles over 12 wk. CBOP/BEP was composed of 2×CBOP, 2×BO, and 3×BEP (bleomycin 15,000 IU). Primary end point was favourable response rate (FRR) comprising complete response or partial response and normal markers. Success required the lower two-sided 90% confidence limit to exclude FRRs <60%; 44 patients on CBOP/BEP gives 90% power to achieve this if the true FRR is ≥80%. Equal numbers were randomised to BEP to benchmark contemporary response rates. A total of 89 patients were randomised (43 CBOP/BEP, 46 BEP); 40 and 41, respectively, completed treatment. CBOP/BEP toxicity, largely haematologic, was high (96% vs 63% on BEP had Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3 grade ≥3). FRRs were 74% (90% confidence interval [CI], 61-85) with CBOP/BEP, 61% with BEP (90% CI, 48-73). After a median of 58-mo follow-up, 1-yr progression-free survival (PFS) was 65% and 43%, respectively (hazard ratio: 0.59; 95% CI, 0.33-1.06); 2-yr overall survival (OS) was 67% and 61%. Overall, 3 of 14 CBOP/BEP and 2 of 18 BEP deaths were attributed to toxicity, one after an overdose of bleomycin during CBOP/BEP. The trial was not powered to compare PFS. The primary outcome was met, the CI for CBOP/BEP excluding FRRs <61%, but CBOP/BEP was more toxic. PFS and OS data

  7. Significant reduction of red blood cell transfusion requirements by changing from a double-unit to a single-unit transfusion policy in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Martin David; Gerber, Bernhard; Arn, Kornelius; Senn, Oliver; Schanz, Urs; Stussi, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditionally, single-unit red blood cell transfusions were believed to be insufficient to treat anemia, but recent data suggest that they may lead to a safe reduction of transfusion requirements. We tested this hypothesis by changing from a double- to a single-unit red blood cell transfusion policy. Design and Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving intensive chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The major end-points were the reduction in the total number of red blood cell units per therapy cycle and per day of aplasia. The study comprised 139 patients who received 272 therapy cycles. Overall 2212 red blood cell units were administered in 1548 transfusions. Results During the periods of the double- and single-unit policies, one red blood cell unit was transfused in 25% and 84% of the cases and the median number of red blood cell units per transfusion was two and one, respectively. Single-unit transfusion led to a 25% reduction of red blood cell usage per therapy cycle and 24% per aplasia day, but was not associated with a higher out-patient transfusion frequency. In multivariate analysis, single-unit transfusion resulted in a reduction of 2.7 red blood cell units per treatment cycle (P=0.001). The pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels were lower during the single-unit period (median 61 g/L versus 64 g/L) and more transfusions were administered to patients with hemoglobin values of 60 gl/L or less (47% versus 26%). There was no evidence of more severe bleeding or more platelet transfusions during the single-unit period and the overall survival was similar in both cohorts. Conclusions Implementing a single-unit transfusion policy saves 25% of red blood cell units and, thereby, reduces the risks associated with allogeneic blood transfusions. PMID:21933858

  8. Seven year update of an EORTC phase III trial of high-dose intensity M-VAC chemotherapy and G-CSF versus classic M-VAC in advanced urothelial tract tumours.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, C N; de Mulder, P; Schornagel, J H; Theodore, C; Fossa, S D; van Oosterom, A T; Witjes, J A; Spina, M; van Groeningen, C J; Duclos, B; Roberts, J T; de Balincourt, C; Collette, L

    2006-01-01

    EORTC protocol 30924 is an international randomized trial reporting a 7.3 year update of a 2 weekly regimen of high-dose intensity chemotherapy with M-VAC plus granulocyte colony stimulating factor (HD-M-VAC) compared to classic M-VAC in advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Two hundred and sixty three untreated patients with bidimensionally measurable TCC were included. In an intention to treat analysis, there were 28 complete responses (CR) (21%) and 55 partial responses (PR) (41%), for an overall response rate (RR) of 64% on the HD-M-VAC arm. On M-VAC, there were 12 CR (9%) and 53 PR (41%), for an overall RR of 50% . The P-value for the difference in CR was 0.009; and for RR, was 0.06. After a median follow-up of 7.3 years, 24.6% are alive on the HD-M-VAC arm vs. 13.2% on the M-VAC arm. Median progression-free survival was better with HD-MVAC (9.5 months) vs. M-VAC (8.1 months). The mortality hazard ratio (HR) was 0.76. The 2-year survival rate for HD-M-VAC was 36.7% vs. 26.2% for M-VAC. At 5 years, the survival rate was 21.8% in the HD-M-VAC vs. 13.5%. Median survival was 15.1 months on HD-MVAC and 14.9 months on M-VAC. There was one death from toxicity in each arm; and more patients died to malignant disease in the M-VAC arm (76%) than in the HD-M-VAC arm (64.9%). With longer follow-up initial results have been confirmed, and shows that HD-M-VAC produces a borderline statistically significant relative reduction in the risk of progression and death compared to M-VAC.

  9. Long-term results of dose-intensive chemotherapy with G-CSF support (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a review of 59 consecutive cases treated at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Miyuki; Tsunoda, Saburo; Izumi, Tohru; Tanaka, Masaru; Katano, Susumu; Inoue, Koichi; Igarashi, Seiji; Hirabayashi, Kaoru; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ohmine, Ken; Sato, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Keiya; Kirito, Keita; Nagashima, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Kano, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of very dose-intensive chemotherapy (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma, in which an eight-cycle regimen with 11 drugs was given with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support (total 18 weeks). Fifty-nine patients were treated during February 1, 1991 and March 31, 2001 (median age: 48 years). Forty-three patients (73%) were in a high-intermediate risk or high-risk group (HI/H) according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (aa-IPI). Forty-six patients received 7 or 8 cycles of therapy. Ten of 15 patients over age 60 stopped before 7 cycles. Forty-three patients with an initial bulky mass or a residual mass received involved-field radiation. Overall, 56 patients (95%) achieved complete remission (CR). Grade 4 hematotoxicity was observed in all patients. With a median follow-up of 128 months, the 10-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 76% and 61%, respectively. Neither aa-IPI risk factors nor the index itself was associated with response, OS, or PFS. One patient died of sepsis during the therapy and one died of secondary leukemia. This retrospective study suggests that the TCC-NHL-91 regimen achieves high CR, OS, and PFS in patients with advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma up to 60 years old and may be a valuable asset in the management of this disease. Further evaluation and prospective studies of the TCC-NHL-91 are warranted.

  10. Chemotherapy | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy works by killing cancer cells, but healthy cells get attacked too. Damage to healthy cells can cause uncomfortable side effects. Use this action deck to get information on common chemotherapy side effects and learn how to manage them.

  11. Proliferation is a central independent prognostic factor and target for personalized and risk-adapted treatment in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hose, Dirk; Rème, Thierry; Hielscher, Thomas; Moreaux, Jérôme; Messner, Tobias; Seckinger, Anja; Benner, Axel; Shaughnessy, John D.; Barlogie, Bart; Zhou, Yiming; Hillengass, Jens; Bertsch, Uta; Neben, Kai; Möhler, Thomas; Rossi, Jean François; Jauch, Anna; Klein, Bernard; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    allows selection of patients for risk-adapted anti-proliferative treatment on the background of conventional and gene expression-based risk factors. PMID:20884712

  12. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  13. [History of cancer and chemotherapy before chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bonnichon, Philippe; Berger, J P; Bonni, N; Fontaine, M; Pion-Graff, J

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy stands today for cancer. In 1909, Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915) advocates the use of arsphenamine by infusion. So, he is considered as the father of chemotherapy. In fact, the first to have thought through chemotherapy was Sir Christopher Wren (1632-1723). In 1676, ideas and experiments on animals had sufficiently progressed to allow Michel Ettmuller (1644-1683) to publish the first edition of his book and several others were printed until 1753. In this book, he describes the first intravenous treatment, it sets the first indications, dosages and different products which can be used. However this method has been forgotten until the late 19th century.

  14. Comparison of Intensive Chemotherapy and Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Study of the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Potter, Victoria T; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Maertens, Johann; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Passweg, Jakob R; Yakhoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Tabrizi, Reza; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Chevallier, Patrice; Chalandon, Yves; Huynh, Anne; Cahn, Jean Yves; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Lenhoff, Stig; Russell, N H; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Benedetto, Bruno; Meijer, Ellen; Mufti, G J; de Witte, Theo; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data set was used to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of hypomethylating therapy (HMA) compared with those of conventional chemotherapy (CC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 209 patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes. Median follow-up was 22.1 months and the median age of the group was 57.6 years with 37% of the population older than > 60 years. The majority of patients (59%) received reduced-intensity conditioning and 34% and 27% had intermediate-2 and high international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores. At time of HSCT, 32% of patients did not achieve complete remission (CR) and 13% had primary refractory disease. On univariate analysis, outcomes at 3 years were not significantly different between HMA and CC for overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): OS (42% versus 35%), RFS (29% versus 31%), CIR (45% versus 40%), and NRM (26% versus 28%). Comparing characteristics of the groups, there were more patients < 55 years old, more patients in CR (68% versus 32%), and fewer patients with primary refractory disease in the CC group than in the HMA group (10% versus 19%, P < .001). Patients with primary refractory disease had worse outcomes than those in CR with regard to OS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 4.13; P = .001), RFS (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.37 to 3.76; P = .001), and NRM (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.26; P = .016). In addition, an adverse effect of IPSS-R cytogenetic risk group was evident for RFS. In summary, outcomes after HSCT are similar for patients receiving HMA compared with those receiving CC, despite the higher proportion of patients with primary refractory disease in the HMA group. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemotherapy Studies on Schistosomiasis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Schistosoma mansoni, *Chemotherapy, *Prophylaxis, Preventive medicine, Mice, Drugs, Brazil , Laboratory tests, Snails, Cercariae, Tropical medicine, Selection, Parasitology, Schistosomiasis, Chemotherapeutic agents, Medical research

  16. Managing thrombocytopenia associated with cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuter, David J

    2015-04-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in cancer patients. Aside from bleeding risk, thrombocytopenia limits chemotherapy dose and frequency. In evaluating thrombocytopenic cancer patients, it is important to assess for other causes of thrombocytopenia, including immune thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, infection, drug reaction, post-transfusion purpura, and thrombotic microangiopathy. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia varies greatly depending on the treatment used; the highest rates of this condition are associated with gemcitabine- and platinum-based regimens. Each chemotherapy agent differs in how it causes thrombocytopenia: alkylating agents affect stem cells, cyclophosphamide affects later megakaryocyte progenitors, bortezomib prevents platelet release from megakaryocytes, and some treatments promote platelet apoptosis. Thrombopoietin is the main regulator of platelet production. In numerous studies, recombinant thrombopoietin raised the platelet count nadir, reduced the need for platelet transfusions, reduced the duration of thrombocytopenia, and allowed maintenance of chemotherapy dose intensity. Two thrombopoietin receptor agonists now available, romiplostim and eltrombopag, are potent stimulators of platelet production. Although few studies have been completed to demonstrate their ability to treat chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia, these agents may be useful in treating this condition in some situations. Chemotherapy dose reduction and platelet transfusions remain the major treatments for affected patients.

  17. Chemotherapy-Related Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy may have detrimental effects on either the central or peripheral nervous system. Central nervous system neurotoxicity resulting from chemotherapy manifests as a wide range of clinical syndromes including acute, subacute, and chronic encephalopathies, posterior reversible encephalopathy, acute cerebellar dysfunction, chronic cognitive impairment, myelopathy, meningitis, and neurovascular syndromes. These clinical entities vary by causative agent, degree of severity, evolution, and timing of occurrence. In the peripheral nervous system, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and myopathy are the two main complications of chemotherapy. CIPN is the most common complication, and the majority manifest as a dose-dependent length-dependent sensory axonopathy. In severe cases of CIPN, the dose of chemotherapy is reduced, the administration delayed, or the treatment discontinued. Few treatments are available for CIPN and based on meta-analysis, duloxetine is the preferred symptomatic treatment. Myopathy due to corticosteroid use is the most frequent cause of muscle disorders in patients with cancer.

  18. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2010-12-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Forty-seven percent of female patients consider hair loss the most traumatic aspect of chemotherapy, and 8% would decline chemotherapy because of fear of hair loss. A number of agents have been evaluated on the basis of the current understanding of the underlying pathobiology. Among the agents that have been evaluated, topical minoxidil was able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration but could not prevent hair loss. The major approach to minimize chemotherapy-induced hair loss is by scalp cooling, although most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Because chemotherapy-induced toxicity has been associated with nutritional status, nutritional assessment and support might confer beneficial effects. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacological agents are under evaluation including: anti-oxidants, cytokines and growth factors, cell cycle and proliferation modifiers, and inhibitors of apoptosis. At present, no approved pharmacologic treatment of chemotherapy-induced hair loss exists. The incidence and severity of the condition are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. Fortunately, chemotherapy-induced hair loss is mostly reversible, and appropriate hair and scalp care and temporarily wearing a wig may be the most effective coping strategy.

  20. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease.

  1. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... using sunscreen. previous continue Common Side Effects (continued) Hair Loss and Scalp Sensitivity Because chemotherapy often kills the healthy cells responsible for hair growth, it's common for kids undergoing chemo to ...

  2. Cancer Chemotherapy - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cancer Chemotherapy URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cancerchemotherapy.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  3. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication.

  4. Risk based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratna, Isuru S.; Navai, Neema

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is an aggressive disease that frequently requires radical cystectomy (RC) to achieve durable cure rates. Surgery is most effective when performed in organ-confined disease, with the best outcomes for those patients with a pT0 result. The goals of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) are to optimize surgical outcomes for a malignancy with limited adjuvant therapies and a lack of effective salvage treatments. Despite level 1 evidence demonstrating a survival benefit, the utilization of NC has been hampered by several issues, including, the inability to predict responders and the perception that NC may delay curative surgery. In this article, we review the current efforts to identify patients that are most likely to derive a benefit from NC, in order to create a risk-adapted paradigm that reserves NC for those who need it. PMID:26816830

  5. Management of clinical stage I testicular seminoma: active surveillance versus adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ondrusova, M; Ondrus, D; Miskovska, V; Kajo, K; Szoldova, K; Usakova, V; Stastna, V

    2015-07-01

    Surveillance after orchiectomy alone has become popular in the management of clinical stage I nonseminomatous germ cell testicular tumors (CSI NSGCTT), and adjuvant chemotherapy has been accepted in high-risk CSI NSGCTT. Because of the late toxicity of standard radiotherapy in CSI testicular seminoma (SGCTT), this therapeutic approach has been accepted also in the management of CSI SGCTT. In the current study, we analyzed single-center experience with risk-adapted therapeutic approaches (active surveillance and adjuvant chemotherapy) in patients with CSI SGCTT. The study analyzed a total of 90 patients collected at a single center from April 2008 to March 2015 with CSI SGCTT who were stratified into two groups according to risk-adapted therapeutic approaches. In the group A (low-risk CSI SGCTT-no rete testis invasion, tumor size <4 cm, pT1 stage), which consisted of 74 patients who underwent surveillance, relapse occurred in seven (9.5 %) patients after a mean follow-up of 14.5 months. In the group B (high-risk CSI SGCTT-rete testis invasion, tumor size >4 cm or pT ≥ 2 stage), which consisted of 16 patients who were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, relapse occurred in two (12.5 %) patients after a mean follow-up of 13.8 months. Overall survival of patients in both groups was 100 %. The statistically significant difference in progression-free survival between these two groups was not found. Radiotherapy is currently not recommended as an adjuvant treatment in CSI SGCTT patients. The benefit of using risk-adapted therapeutic approaches in CSI SGCTTs patients is evident.

  6. Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-27

    Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Down Syndrome; Stage I B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. A Contribution to Solve the Problem of the Need for Consolidative Radiotherapy after Intensive Chemotherapy in Advanced Stages of Hodgkin's Lymphoma-Analysis of a Quality Control Program Initiated by the Radiotherapy Reference Center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    SciTech Connect

    Eich, Hans Theodor Gossmann, Axel; Engert, Andreas; Kriz, Jan; Bredenfeld, Henning; Hansemann, Katja; Skripnitchenko, Roman; Brillant, Corinne; Pfistner, Beate; Staar, Susanne; Diehl, Volker; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The role of radiotherapy (RT) after intensive chemotherapy in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is still unclear. The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) randomized HD12 trial was designed to test whether consolidative RT in the region of initial bulky disease and of residual disease is necessary after effective chemotherapy. A quality control program based on a multidisciplinary panel of radiation oncologists, radiologists, and medical oncologists who reviewed all patients' staging and restaging imaging was initiated. Methods and Materials: A total of 1661 patients aged 16 to 65 years with HL in Stage IIB (large mediastinal mass and/or E-lesions) or Stage III to IV were randomized from January 1999 to January 2003 according to a factorial design between: 8 esc.BEACOPP + RT (arm A), 8 esc.BEACOPP non-RT (arm B), 4+4BEACOPP + RT (arm C), 4+4BEACOPP non-RT (arm D). Results: In the fifth interim analysis, 1449 patients were eligible for the arm comparison with regard to RT. After a median observation time of 48 months the FFTF rate was 86% and the OS 92%. The FFTF was 95% in the RT arms A+C and 88% in the non-RT arms B+D: no sequential significant difference. One thousand and eighty four patients were evaluated by the panel. The panel defined initial bulky disease in 800 patients and residual disease in 600 patients. The panel recommended continuation of therapy according to the randomization for 934 of 1084 patients and additive RT independently from the randomization arm for 145 of 1084 patients. Conclusions: The study showed that RT can be reduced substantially after effective chemotherapy. However, because of the irradiation of 10% of patients in the non-RT arms, equivalent effectiveness of a non-RT strategy cannot be proved. A substantial limitation of consolidative RT according to expert panel recommendations appears to be possible without reducing effectiveness.

  8. A Contribution to solve the problem of the need for consolidative radiotherapy after intensive chemotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's lymphoma--analysis of a quality control program initiated by the radiotherapy reference center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG).

    PubMed

    Eich, Hans Theodor; Gossmann, Axel; Engert, Andreas; Kriz, Jan; Bredenfeld, Henning; Hansemann, Katja; Skripnitchenko, Roman; Brillant, Corinne; Pfistner, Beate; Staar, Susanne; Diehl, Volker; Müller, Rolf-Peter

    2007-11-15

    The role of radiotherapy (RT) after intensive chemotherapy in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is still unclear. The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) randomized HD12 trial was designed to test whether consolidative RT in the region of initial bulky disease and of residual disease is necessary after effective chemotherapy. A quality control program based on a multidisciplinary panel of radiation oncologists, radiologists, and medical oncologists who reviewed all patients' staging and restaging imaging was initiated. A total of 1661 patients aged 16 to 65 years with HL in Stage IIB (large mediastinal mass and/or E-lesions) or Stage III to IV were randomized from January 1999 to January 2003 according to a factorial design between: 8 esc.BEACOPP + RT (arm A), 8 esc.BEACOPP non-RT (arm B), 4+4BEACOPP + RT (arm C), 4+4BEACOPP non-RT (arm D). In the fifth interim analysis, 1449 patients were eligible for the arm comparison with regard to RT. After a median observation time of 48 months the FFTF rate was 86% and the OS 92%. The FFTF was 95% in the RT arms A+C and 88% in the non-RT arms B+D: no sequential significant difference. One thousand and eighty four patients were evaluated by the panel. The panel defined initial bulky disease in 800 patients and residual disease in 600 patients. The panel recommended continuation of therapy according to the randomization for 934 of 1084 patients and additive RT independently from the randomization arm for 145 of 1084 patients. The study showed that RT can be reduced substantially after effective chemotherapy. However, because of the irradiation of 10% of patients in the non-RT arms, equivalent effectiveness of a non-RT strategy cannot be proved. A substantial limitation of consolidative RT according to expert panel recommendations appears to be possible without reducing effectiveness.

  9. Hepatic Artery Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, J.; Kroiss, A.; Dinstl, K.

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy was given to 36 patients, using totally implantable devices consisting of a port and external pump. Twenty-seven patients had inoperable liver metastases of colorectal origin. The infusion system was inserted by laparotomy into the hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery. There was no operative mortality. Thirteen infusion systems could not be used for chemotherapy due to dislodgement, early death and lack of follow-up. FUdR was infused every two weeks. There were minor local complications like thrombosis of the system and dislodgement of the port. Toxic effects could be managed by reducing the dose. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated by survival, clinical condition, CEA, ultrasound and CT six months after onset of arterial chemotherapy. Ten/twenty-three patients (43%) responded to therapy, eight of them died on the average 19 months after initial chemotherapy. Six patients were non-responders, seven had stable disease. Five/ten patients developed extrahepatic metastases. Mean survival time was 13.1 months, mean interval until relapse 10.6 months. PMID:2149279

  10. Chemotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia in adults: Medical Research Council.

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were randomized between 2 regimens of chemotherapy: TRAP and BARTS III. Overall, patients randomized to TRAP, which was the more intensive of the 2 regimens, fared slightly better (P = 0.06) than those on BARTS III. However, the improvement in survival associated with more intensive chemotherapy was substantial only for patients who had favourable prognostic features at presentation, such as a normal total leucocyte count, or absence of palpable liver, or, especially, age under 40. Indeed, for patients under 40, those allocated to the more intensive regimen (TRAP) lived considerably longer than those allocated to BARTS III (P less than 0.002) while for patients over 40 there was no material difference in survival between patients on the 2 protocols. It thus appears that intensive chemotherapy is likely to be more effective when favourable prognostic features are recorded. PMID:365212

  11. Chemotherapy and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bagnyukova, Tetyana; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Zhou, Yan; Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth A; Golemis, Erica A

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, oncologists have begun to conclude that chemotherapy has reached a plateau of efficacy as a primary treatment modality, even if toxicity can be effectively controlled. Emerging specific inhibitors of signaling and metabolic pathways (i.e., targeted agents) contrast with traditional chemotherapy drugs in that the latter primarily interfere with the DNA biosynthesis and the cell replication machinery. In an attempt to improve on the efficacy, combination of targeted drugs with conventional chemotherapeutics has become a routine way of testing multiple new agents in early phase clinical trials. This review discusses the recent advances including integrative systematic biology and RNAi approaches to counteract the chemotherapy resistance and to buttress the selectivity, efficacy and personalization of anticancer drug therapy. PMID:20935499

  12. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part II.

    PubMed

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Carino, Arvie; Braskett, Melinda

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy desensitization protocols are safe, but labor-intensive, processes that allow patients with cancer to receive medications even if they initially experienced severe hypersensitivity reactions. Part I of this column discussed the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and described the development of desensitization protocols in oncology settings. Part II incorporates the experiences of an academic medical center and provides a practical guide for the nursing care of patients undergoing chemotherapy desensitization.
.

  13. Chemotherapy of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Skarin, A T; Canellos, G P

    1979-10-01

    From the therapuetic point of view, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas can be classified into two groups: favourable prognosis histology (DWDL, NWDL, NPDL, and NM) and unfavourable prognosis histology (DPDL, DM, DH, NH, DU). The latter group also includes lymphoblastic lymphoma (T cell) and Burkitt's lymphoma (B cell). Further classification by immunological markers (T, B, monocyte, null cell) and functional categories (T-cell subsets) may reveal prognostic groups which require separate consideration. Intensive chemotherapy of unfavourable histoligies can result in long-term disease-free survival as reported in several series. It would appear that the 10 year survival rates will not differ greatly between several multi-drug regimens. At the present time, the histopathological subtype permits selection of patients for a trial of intensive chemotherapy. The progress in the future will be made with improved techniques for the management of bulky abdominal disease and central nervous system invasion. Although the above may result in some statistical improvement in survival of the unfavourable group, the vast majority of patients with favourable histology lymphoma require new approaches. These may take the form of treatment with immunological manoeuvres such as idiotypic-specific antibodies and/or the use of intensive chemotherapy, especially when there is convincing evidence of a change in the biology of the disease.

  14. Design of the EXercise Intervention after Stem cell Transplantation (EXIST) study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an individualized high intensity physical exercise program on fitness and fatigue in patients with multiple myeloma or (non-) Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of high-dose chemotherapy combined with autologous stem cell transplantation has improved the outcome of hematologic malignancies. Nevertheless, this treatment can cause persistent fatigue and a reduced global quality of life, role and physical function. Physical exercise interventions may be beneficial for physical fitness, fatigue and quality of life. However, the trials conducted so far to test the effects of physical exercise interventions in this group of patients were of poor to moderate methodological quality and economic evaluations are lacking. Hence there is need for a rigorous, appropriately controlled assessment of the effectiveness of exercise programs in these patients. The aims of the present study are (1) to determine the effectiveness of an individualized high intensity strength and interval training program with respect to physiological and psychological health status in patients with multiple myeloma or (non-)Hodgkin's lymphoma who have recently undergone high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation; and (2) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this program. Methods A multicenter, prospective, single blind randomized controlled trial will be performed. We aim to recruit 120 patients within an inclusion period of 2 years at 7 hospitals in the Netherlands. The patients will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) intervention plus usual care; or (2) usual care. The intervention consists of an 18-week individualized supervised high-intensity exercise program and counselling. The primary outcomes (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength and fatigue) and secondary outcomes are assessed at baseline, at completion of the intervention and at 12 months follow-up. Discussion The strengths of this study include the solid trial design with clearly defined research groups and standardized outcome measures, the inclusion of an economic evaluation and the inclusion of both resistance and endurance

  15. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  16. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Infection “I am extra careful to stay away ... doctor or nurse right away. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection Take these steps to lower your chances ...

  17. Chemotherapy of herpesvirus infections.

    PubMed

    Jawetz, E

    1975-07-01

    Herpesviruses commonly produce lesions that come to the attention of physicians. Many different chemicals are known to suppress the growth of herpesviruses in vitro, but only a few of these have found application in clinical practice. A critical assessment of the place of some of these forms of chemotherapy was briefly presented.

  18. A phase 1 trial of temsirolimus and intensive re-induction chemotherapy for 2nd or greater relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a Children's Oncology Group study (ADVL1114).

    PubMed

    Rheingold, Susan R; Tasian, Sarah K; Whitlock, James A; Teachey, David T; Borowitz, Michael J; Liu, Xiaowei; Minard, Charles G; Fox, Elizabeth; Weigel, Brenda J; Blaney, Susan M

    2017-03-14

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway is commonly dysregulated in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A phase 1 trial of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus in combination with UKALL R3 re-induction chemotherapy was conducted in children and adolescents with second or greater relapse of ALL. The initial temsirolimus dose level (DL1) was 10 mg/m(2) weekly × 3 doses. Subsequent patient cohorts received temsirolimus 7·5 mg/m(2) weekly × 3 doses (DL0) or, secondary to toxicity, 7·5 mg/m(2) weekly × 2 doses (DL-1). Sixteen patients were enrolled, 15 were evaluable for toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred at all three dose levels and included hypertriglyceridaemia, mucositis, ulceration, hypertension with reversible posterior leucoencephalopathy, elevated gamma-glutamyltransferase or alkaline phosphatase and sepsis. The addition of temsirolimus to UKALL R3 re-induction therapy resulted in excessive toxicity and was not tolerable in children with relapsed ALL. However, this regimen induced remission in seven of fifteen patients. Three patients had minimal residual disease levels <0·01%. Inhibition of PI3K signalling was detected in patients treated at all dose levels of temsirolimus, but inhibition at an early time point did not appear to correlate with clinical responses at the end of re-induction therapy.

  19. Curative cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frei, E

    1985-12-01

    Cancer chemotherapy provides variably effective treatment for the majority of forms of human cancer and curative treatment for some 12 categories of cancer. Curative treatment is defined as the proportion of patients who survive beyond the time after which the risk of treatment failure approaches zero, i.e., the disease-free survival plateau. This progress has resulted from a closely integrated scientific effort, including drug development, pharmacology, preclinical modeling, experimental design with respect to clinical trials, quantitative criteria for response, and a series of clinical trials (initially in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia) in which the importance of complete remission, of dose and schedule, of sequencing chemotherapeutic agents, of pharmacological sanctuaries, and particularly of combination chemotherapy was studied. The principles derived from these studies, particularly those relating to combination chemotherapy, resulted in curative treatment for disseminated Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, pediatric solid tumors, testicular cancer, and limited small cell lung cancer. Many patients with certain stages of solid tumors, such as breast cancer and osteogenic sarcoma, are at high risk of having disseminated microscopic disease. Experimental studies indicate that treatment which is only partially effective against macroscopic disease is much more effective against microscopic tumors. Therefore chemotherapy is administered immediately following control of the primary tumor in patients at high risk of having disseminated microscopic disease, a treatment known as adjuvant chemotherapy. This program has been highly successful in increasing the cure rate in patients with pediatric solid tumors and in prolonging disease-free survival in patients with premenopausal breast cancer. Given dissemination of the technology, it is estimated that 15,000-30,000 patients per year are potentially curable in the United States. Curability of cancer

  20. Chemotherapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Siew-Fei; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2016-05-01

    Cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is uncommon, complicating between 0.02% and 0.1% of all pregnancies. Nonetheless, due to increasing age of childbearing, the incidence of cancer during pregnancy is likely to increase due to higher incidence of several age-dependent malignancies. The most common malignancies include breast cancer, cervical cancer, malignant melanoma and lymphoma. One of the key challenges in the management of cancer in pregnancy is treating the women with standard chemotherapy regimen, without compromising the safety of the developing foetus. Exposure of chemotherapy in the first trimester is associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, whereas use in the second and third trimesters is associated with intrauterine growth restriction, low birthweight and stillbirth. In this article, we review available data regarding the use of chemotherapeutic agents in pregnancy, and we summarise the neonatal outcomes, including malformations, perinatal complications and long-term follow-up. In addition, the management plan during pregnancy is also discussed.

  1. Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    NOTES 1S. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side linscoeawy and identiIIy by block number) LEISHMANIA LEISHMANIASIS CHEMOTHERAPY ANTILEISHMANIAL PENTOSTAM...number of compounds was supplied by WRAIR for testing on four strains of Leishmania in December 1977. Preliminary data were supplied to WRAIR by the...1 Visceral leishmaniasis The laboratory model used for the investigation of drug activity against visceral infection in this laboratory is L. donovani

  2. Chemotherapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bacterial emerging diseases. 43rd Annual Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council Meeting. Ocho Rios, Jamaica, April, 1998. Palmer, C.J., J...1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0196 TITLE: CHEMOTHERAPY OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: DR. ARBA AGER CONTRACTING ...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a

  3. Pneumomediastinum after acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Portelles, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema are frequently benign and most commonly result from air escaping from the upper respiratory tract, intrathoracic airways, or gastrointestinal tract. Gas can also be generated by certain infections or reach the mediastinal space from outside air after trauma or surgery. In the article presented by Showkat et al a 14-year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) under chemotherapy developed pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema. In the author’s opinion, these complications were caused by ALL or chemotherapy that progressed to severe respiratory failure until the patient finally died in the intensive care unit. I would like to underline some important points, which have been raised following a paper published in the October issue of World Journal of Clinical Cases. PMID:24868520

  4. Responses and adverse effects of carboplatin-based chemotherapy for pediatric intracranial germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Suntae; Chueh, Hee Won; Kim, Ju Youn; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2011-03-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been commonly used for the treatment of intracranial germ cell tumors (IC-GCTs). However, this treatment exhibits some adverse effects such as renal problems and hearing difficulty. Carboplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to pediatric patients with IC-GCTs from August 2004 at the Samsung Medical Center. In this study, we assessed the responses and adverse effects of carboplatin-based chemotherapy in pediatric IC-GCTs patients according to the risk group, and compared the results with those of the previous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. We examined 35 patients (27 men and 8 women) diagnosed with IC-GCTs between August 2004 and April 2008 and received risk-adapted carboplatin-based chemotherapy at the Samsung Medical Center. Patients were divided into either low-risk (LR) or high-risk (HR) groups and a retrospective analysis was performed using information from the medical records. Although hematological complications were common, hearing difficulties or grade 3 or 4 creatinine level elevation were not observed in patients who underwent carboplatin-based chemotherapy. The frequency of febrile neutropenia did not differ between the risk groups. The overall survival was 100% and event-free survival (EFS) was 95.7%. The EFS rate was 100% in the LR group and 90% in the HR group, respectively. Despite their common occurrence in high-risk patients, no lethal hematological complications were associated with carboplatin-based treatment. The current carboplatin-based chemotherapy protocol is safe and effective for the treatment of pediatric patients with IC-GCTs.

  5. Cancer chemotherapy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koren, Gideon; Carey, Nathalie; Gagnon, Robert; Maxwell, Cynthia; Nulman, Irena; Senikas, Vyta

    2013-03-01

    To promote careful education, administration, monitoring and restricted distribution when prescribing and dispensing chemotherapeutic and potentially teratogenic medications, as well as to develop clinical recommendations for the use of cancer chemotherapy in pregnant women and women of child-bearing age. To ensure that women of child-bearing age receiving chemotherapy can be appropriately counselled on the risks of becoming pregnant during treatment, and to provide guidance for health care practitioners treating pregnant women with antineoplastic agents. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in 2011, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., antineoplastic agents, neoplasms, pregnancy) and key words (e.g., cancer, neoplasms, pregnancy, chemotherapy, antineoplastic agents). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Studies were restricted to those with available English abstracts or text. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to October 2011. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and from national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence is rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). This guideline highlights the need to prevent pregnancy in women who are being treated for cancer and informs health care professionals treating pregnant women with chemotherapy of the potential risks of the therapy or ameliorated treatment protocols. Summary Statements and Recommendations Summary Statements 1. As women are postponing child-bearing, more of them are experiencing cancer in pregnancy. (II-2) 2

  6. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. Results The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4–5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%–12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%–30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%–53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%–72%). Conclusions The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available. PMID:20145276

  7. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group.

    PubMed

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-04-01

    About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4-5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%-12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%-30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%-53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%-72%). The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available.

  8. Secondary malignancies following cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, P; Kaldor, J M

    1994-01-01

    Many agents used in cancer chemotherapy are known carcinogens. However, few secondary malignancies have been definitely linked to chemotherapy, since studies on this problem are complicated by methodological problems. A causal relationship has been established between alkylating agents and leukaemia and between cyclophosphamide and bladder cancer. The risk of leukaemia peaks at 5-10 years after beginning of chemotherapy and declines steadily after its end. The interaction between chemotherapy and radiotherapy has not been fully clarified, nor has the leukaemogenic potency of individual drugs, although combinations without nitrogen mustard seem to entail a lower risk. Other tumours reported at increased incidence, in particular among Hodgkin's disease patients, for whom a carcinogenic effect of chemotherapy seems plausible, are non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and lung cancer. Other secondary solid tumors have also been reported, but for none of them an independent effect of chemotherapy has been demonstrated.

  9. Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Tooth Ache Following Chemotherapy: a Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzekanani, Maryam; Haghani, Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    Currently, localized pulpalgia is listed as a rare manifestation of chemotherapy treatments in patients with malignant tumors. The neuropathy originated from neurotoxicity of anticancer drugs is usually described as a diffuse jaw pain or numbness in orofacial structures. This article reports localized tooth pain as a possible outcome of administrating high dosage chemotherapy drugs particularly in the last cycles of application. PMID:25628837

  10. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-03-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The prerequisite for successful development of strategies for CIA prevention is the understanding of the pathobiology of CIA. The incidence and severity of CIA are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. CIA is traditionally categorized as acute diffuse hair loss caused by dystrophic anagen effluvium; however, CIA presents with different clinical patterns of hair loss. When an arrest of mitotic activity occurs, obviously numerous and interacting factors influence the shedding pattern. The major approach to minimize CIA is by scalp cooling. Unfortunately, most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacologic agents are under evaluation and include drug-specific antibodies, hair growth cycle modifiers, cytokines and growth factors, antioxidants, inhibitors of apoptosis, and cell-cycle and proliferation modifiers. Ultimately, the protection should be selective to the hair follicle; for example, topical application, such that the anticancer efficacy of chemotherapy is not hampered. Among the few agents that have been evaluated so far in humans, AS101 and minoxidil were able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration of CIA, but could not prevent CIA.

  11. Why chemotherapy can fail?

    PubMed

    Król, M; Pawłowski, K M; Majchrzak, K; Szyszko, K; Motyl, T

    2010-01-01

    There are many reasons that lead to failure of cancer chemotherapy. Cancer has the ability to become resistant to many different types of drugs. Increased efflux of drug, enhanced repair/increased tolerance to DNA damage, high antiapoptotic potential, decreased permeability and enzymatic deactivation allow cancer cell survive the chemotherapy. Treatment can lead to the death of most tumor cells (drug-sensitive), but some of them (drug-resistant) survive and grow again. These tumor cells may arise from stem cells. There are many studies describing human experiments with multidrug resistance, especially in breast cancer. Unfortunately, studies of canine or feline ABC super family members are not as extensive as in human or mice and they are limited to several papers describing PGP in mammary cancer, cutaneous mast cell tumors and lymphoma. Multidrug resistance is one of the most significant problems in oncology today. The involvement of many different, not fully recognized, mechanisms in multidrug resistance of cancer cells makes the development of effective methods of therapy very difficult. Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells may improve the results of treatment. This review article provides a synopsis of all aspects that refer to cancer cell resistance to antitumor drugs.

  12. Preoperative Chemotherapy for Gastric Cancer: Personal Interventions and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Beeharry, Maneesh K.; Yan, Min; Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the declining incidence of gastric cancer (GC) in recent years, the mortality rate is still high. The asymptomatic nature and nonspecific clinical manifestations combined with the lack of efficient screening programs delay the diagnosis of GC. Therefore, the prevalence of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has prompted the need for aggressive and intensive treatment options. Among the various treatment options for AGC, surgery is still the mainstay. However, the efficacy of surgery alone is not established. Results from multiple randomized controlled trials suggest that preoperative chemotherapy is promising intervention for the treatment and management of AGC. The main objective of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is to downstage or control micrometastasis in resectable tumor before surgery. On the other hand, conversion chemotherapy refers to surgical treatment aiming at R0 resection after chemotherapy for originally nonresectable or marginally resectable tumors. Nevertheless, preoperative chemoradiotherapy is considered beneficial for AGC patients. Over the last few decades, the combination of chemotherapy and targeted therapy prior to surgery demonstrated great results for the treatment of AGC. The rapid developments in genomics and proteomics have heralded the era of precision medicine. The combination of preoperative chemotherapy and precision medicine may enhance survival in AGC patients. PMID:28105420

  13. Randomized trial of two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin as induction monotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in older patients not considered candidates for intensive chemotherapy. A phase II study of the EORTC and GIMEMA leukemia groups (AML-19)

    PubMed Central

    Amadori, Sergio; Suciu, Stefan; Selleslag, Dominik; Stasi, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana; Baila, Liliana; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Borlenghi, Erika; Gaidano, Gianluca; Magro, Domenico; Torelli, Giuseppe; Muus, Petra; Venditti, Adriano; Cacciola, Emma; Lauria, Francesco; Vignetti, Marco; de Witte, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study compared two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) as induction monotherapy for untreated acute myeloid leukemia in older patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy, to identify the more promising regimen for further study. Patients were randomized to receive either best supportive care or a course of GO according to one of two schedules: 3 mg/m2 on days 1, 3 and 5 (arm A), or GO 6 mg/m2 on day 1 and 3 mg/m2 on day 8 (arm B). Primary endpoint was the rate of disease non-progression (DnP), defined as the proportion of patients either achieving a response or maintaining a stable disease following GO induction in each arm. Fifty-six patients were randomized in the two GO arms (A, n=29; B, n=27). The rate of DnP was 38% (90% confidence interval [CI], 23%–55%) in arm A, and 63% (90% CI, 45%–78%) in arm B. Peripheral cytopenias were the most common adverse events for both regimens. The all-cause early mortality rate was 14% in arm A and 11% in arm B. The day 1+8 schedule, which was associated with the highest rate of DnP, met the statistical criteria to be selected as the preferred regimen for phase III comparison with best supportive care. PMID:20230405

  14. Randomized trial of two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin as induction monotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia in older patients not considered candidates for intensive chemotherapy. A phase II study of the EORTC and GIMEMA leukaemia groups (AML-19).

    PubMed

    Amadori, Sergio; Suciu, Stefan; Selleslag, Dominik; Stasi, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana; Baila, Liliana; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Borlenghi, Erika; Gaidano, Gianluca; Magro, Domenico; Torelli, Giuseppe; Muus, Petra; Venditti, Adriano; Cacciola, Emma; Lauria, Francesco; Vignetti, Marco; de Witte, Theo

    2010-05-01

    This study compared two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) as induction monotherapy for untreated acute myeloid leukaemia in older patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy, to identify the more promising regimen for further study. Patients were randomized to receive either best supportive care or a course of GO according to one of two schedules: 3 mg/m(2) on days 1, 3 and 5 (arm A), or GO 6 mg/m(2) on day 1 and 3 mg/m(2) on day 8 (arm B). Primary endpoint was the rate of disease non-progression (DnP), defined as the proportion of patients either achieving a response or maintaining a stable disease following GO induction in each arm. Fifty-six patients were randomized in the two GO arms (A, n = 29; B, n = 27). The rate of DnP was 38% [90% confidence interval (CI), 23-55] in arm A, and 63% (90% CI, 45-78) in arm B. Peripheral cytopenias were the most common adverse events for both regimens. The all-cause early mortality rate was 14% in arm A and 11% in arm B. The day 1 + 8 schedule, which was associated with the highest rate of DnP, met the statistical criteria to be selected as the preferred regimen for phase III comparison with best supportive care.

  15. Palliative chemotherapy: oxymoron or misunderstanding?

    PubMed

    Roeland, E J; LeBlanc, T W

    2016-03-21

    Oncologists routinely prescribe chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancer. This practice is sometimes misunderstood by palliative care clinicians, yet data clearly show that chemotherapy can be a powerful palliative intervention when applied appropriately. Clarity regarding the term "palliative chemotherapy" is needed: it is chemotherapy given in the non-curative setting to optimize symptom control, improve quality of life, and sometimes to improve survival. Unfortunately, oncologists lack adequate tools to predict which patients will benefit. In a study recently published in BMC Palliative Care, Creutzfeldt et al. presented an innovative approach to advancing the science in this area: using patient reported outcomes to predict responses to palliative chemotherapy. With further research, investigators may be able to develop predictive models for use at the bedside to inform clinical decision-making about the risks and benefits of treatment. In the meantime, oncologists and palliative care clinicians must work together to reduce the use of "end-of-life chemotherapy"-chemotherapy given close to death, which does not improve longevity or symptom control-while optimizing the use of chemotherapy that has true palliative benefits for patients.

  16. Chemotherapy in Retinoblastoma: Current Approaches.

    PubMed

    Yanık, Özge; Gündüz, Kaan; Yavuz, Kıvılcım; Taçyıldız, Nurdan; Ünal, Emel

    2015-12-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common childhood malignant intraocular tumor. Although enucleation and external beam radiotherapy have been historically used, today the most commonly used eye-sparing approach is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy can be used in both intraocular and extraocular RB cases. Chemotherapeutic agents may be applied in different ways, including systemic, subconjunctival, intra-arterial and intravitreal routes. The main purposes of application of systemic therapy are to reduce the tumor size for local treatment (chemoreduction), or to reduce the risk of metastasis after enucleation surgery (adjuvant therapy). Intra-arterial chemotherapy with the current name "super-selective intra-arterial infusion therapy" could be applied as primary therapy in tumors confined to the retina or as a secondary method in tumor recurrence. The most important advantage of intra-arterial therapy is the prevention of systemic chemotherapy complications. Intravitreal chemotherapy is administered in the presence of persistent or recurrent vitreous seeding. The term "extraocular RB" includes orbital invasion and metastatic disease. Current treatment for orbital invasion is neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical enucleation and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after surgery. In metastatic disease, regional lymph node involvement, distant metastases, and/or central nervous system (CNS) involvement may occur. Among them, CNS involvement has the worst prognosis, remaining at almost 100% mortality. In metastatic disease, high-dose salvage chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue therapy are the possible treatment options; radiotherapy could also be added to the protocol according to the side of involvement.

  17. Chemotherapy in Retinoblastoma: Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yanık, Özge; Gündüz, Kaan; Yavuz, Kıvılcım; Taçyıldız, Nurdan; Ünal, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common childhood malignant intraocular tumor. Although enucleation and external beam radiotherapy have been historically used, today the most commonly used eye-sparing approach is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy can be used in both intraocular and extraocular RB cases. Chemotherapeutic agents may be applied in different ways, including systemic, subconjunctival, intra-arterial and intravitreal routes. The main purposes of application of systemic therapy are to reduce the tumor size for local treatment (chemoreduction), or to reduce the risk of metastasis after enucleation surgery (adjuvant therapy). Intra-arterial chemotherapy with the current name “super-selective intra-arterial infusion therapy” could be applied as primary therapy in tumors confined to the retina or as a secondary method in tumor recurrence. The most important advantage of intra-arterial therapy is the prevention of systemic chemotherapy complications. Intravitreal chemotherapy is administered in the presence of persistent or recurrent vitreous seeding. The term “extraocular RB” includes orbital invasion and metastatic disease. Current treatment for orbital invasion is neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical enucleation and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after surgery. In metastatic disease, regional lymph node involvement, distant metastases, and/or central nervous system (CNS) involvement may occur. Among them, CNS involvement has the worst prognosis, remaining at almost 100% mortality. In metastatic disease, high-dose salvage chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue therapy are the possible treatment options; radiotherapy could also be added to the protocol according to the side of involvement. PMID:27800245

  18. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, I.

    1982-02-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility.

  19. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  20. A history of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    DeVita, Vincent T; Chu, Edward

    2008-11-01

    The use of chemotherapy to treat cancer began at the start of the 20th century with attempts to narrow the universe of chemicals that might affect the disease by developing methods to screen chemicals using transplantable tumors in rodents. It was, however, four World War II-related programs, and the effects of drugs that evolved from them, that provided the impetus to establish in 1955 the national drug development effort known as the Cancer Chemotherapy National Service Center. The ability of combination chemotherapy to cure acute childhood leukemia and advanced Hodgkin's disease in the 1960s and early 1970s overcame the prevailing pessimism about the ability of drugs to cure advanced cancers, facilitated the study of adjuvant chemotherapy, and helped foster the national cancer program. Today, chemotherapy has changed as important molecular abnormalities are being used to screen for potential new drugs as well as for targeted treatments.

  1. Myeloablative chemotherapy for recurrent aggressive oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, G.; Swinnen, L.; Bayer, R.; Rosenfeld, S.; Salzman, D.; Paleologos, N.; Kaminer, L.; Forsyth, P.; Stewart, D.; Peterson, K.; Hu, W.; Macdonald, D.; Ramsay, D.; Smith, A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the duration of tumor control and the toxicities of dose-intense myeloablative chemotherapy for patients with recurrent oligodendrogliomas. Patients with previously irradiated oligodendrogliomas, either pure or mixed, that were contrast enhancing, measurable, and behaving aggressively at recurrence were eligible for this study. Only complete responders or major partial responders (75 % reduction in tumor size) to induction chemotherapy--either intensive-dose procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine or cisplatin plus etoposide-could receive high-dose thiotepa (300 mg/m2/day for 3 days) followed by hematopoietic reconstitution using either bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. Thirty-eight patients began induction chemotherapy and 20 (10 men, 10 women; median age 46 years; median Karnofsky score 80) received high-dose thiotepa. For the high-dose group, the median event-free, progression-free, and overall survival times from recurrence were 17, 20, and 49 months, respectively. Tumor control in excess of 2 years was observed in 6 patients (30%). Four patients (20%) are alive and tumor free 27 to 77 months (median, 42 months) from the start of induction therapy; however, fatal treatment-related toxicities also occurred in 4 patients (20%). Three patients died as a result of a progressive encephalopathy which, in 2 instances, was accompanied by a wasting syndrome; 1 patient died as a consequence of an intracerebral (intratumoral) hemorrhage. Fatal toxicities occurred in patients with pretreatment Karnofsky scores of 60 or 70. High-dose thiotepa to consolidate response was a disappointing treatment strategy for patients with recurrent aggressive oligodendroglial neoplasms, although several patients had durable responses. Moreover, as prescribed, high-dose thiotepa had significant toxic effects in previously irradiated patients, especially those with poorer performance status. PMID:11303620

  2. Alternative Methods to Treat Nausea and Vomiting from Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Ali; Ebadi, Ahmad; Talaeizadeh, Abdolhassan; Rahmani, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV) is among the most intensive side effects and critical concerns for patients with cancer. Most of these patients experience nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy. Sometimes, this is so annoying that it may prevent them from continuing the therapy. With the recent advances, a variety of therapeutic methods are innovated and applied to control CINV. Among them, the main methods include medicinal therapy, relaxation, and herbal therapy. Yet, using dexamethasone together with massage therapy and ginger is identified as the most effective method. PMID:26634155

  3. Correlation between the expression of S100A4 and the efficacy of TAC neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Lei; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Bao-Guo; DU, Qian; Zhou, Chang-Xin; Tian, Xing-Song

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of S100A4 and the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. A total of 65 patients with invasive breast cancer were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy using the TAC regimen. The expression of S100A4 was detected by an immunohistochemical two-step method prior to treatment, after 2 cycles of chemotherapy and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Pathological evaluations of the chemotherapy were performed using the Miller and Payne (MP) grading system and their correlation with the changes of S100A4 expression during and after the treatment were explored. Between pre-neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 4 cycles post-chemotherapy, there was a significant difference in the expression of S100A4 (P<0.05); S100A4 expression was associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, between pre-neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 2 cycles post-chemotherapy, there was no significant difference in the expression of S100A4 (P>0.05). The intensity and changes of S100A4 expression were positively correlated with the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (r=0.259, P<0.05). When patients with an MP grade of I or II following the second cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were continually treated with the original chemotherapy for another 2 cycles, the desired effect was generally not achieved. S100A4 may be used as a predictor of the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, guiding the formulation of individualized programs to improve the effectiveness of the treatment. For patients with an MP grade level of I or II after 2 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the use of alternative chemotherapy regimens should be considered.

  4. Combination chemotherapy for advanced bilharzial bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khaled, H M; Gad el-Mawla, N; el-Said, A; Hamza, M R; Gaafar, R; el-Attar, I; Abu Rabia, A; Magrath, I

    1996-09-01

    Carcinoma of the bilharzial bladder, the most common cancer in Egyptian patients has been, until recently, largely treated by surgery. We have studied the activity of a series of single agents in phase II trials and identified a number of active agents. Here we report the results of a trial in which therapeutic combinations of the most active agents were administered in alternating cycles to patients who had never received chemotherapy. The study included 30 patients with histologically proven inoperable (20), recurrent (5, 2 of whom subsequently developed metastases), or metastatic disease (5). There were 27 males and 3 females, with a median age of 48.5 years (range 29-65 years). Fourteen patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 12 had transitional cell carcinoma, 2 had adenocarcinoma, and the remaining 2 had undifferentiated carcinoma. Chemotherapy consisted of epidoxorubicin (120 mg/sqm i.v. d1) and vincristine (1.4 mg/sqm i.v., days 1 and 8) alternating with etoposide (100 mg/sqm i.v. infusion over 1 hour, days 1 to 5) and ifosfamide (1800 mg/sqm i.v. infusion over 2 hours, days 1 to 5). Mesna was given as a uroprotector at 40% of the ifosfamide dose at 0, 4, and 8 hours after the ifosfamide infusion. Courses were repeated every 3-4 weeks. Among the 22 evaluable patients, 8 (36.5%) had a partial and one (4.5%), a complete response, giving a response rate of 46%. Three more patients had responses that were less than a partial remission, and 6 patients showed disease stabilisation on chemotherapy. Toxicities were tolerable and consisted mainly of myelosuppression. Results were further analysed in relation to pathologic subtype, disease status at the start of chemotherapy, and the delivered dose intensity. No relationship was found between any of these parameters and response to therapy. Advanced bilharzial bladder cancer is relatively sensitive to combination chemotherapy, but complete remission and prolonged survival is rare in this subgroup of patients with

  5. Prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sarrión-Pérez, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common side effects of cancer treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy). It is an inflammatory process that affects the mucosa of the oral cavity, giving rise to erythematous areas in combination with ulcers that can reach a large size. The true importance of oral mucositis is the complications it causes – fundamentally intense pain associated to the oral ulcers, and the risk of overinfection. This in turn may require reduction or even suspension of the antineoplastic treatment, with the risk of seriously worsening the patient prognosis. This points to the importance of establishing therapeutic tools of use in the prevention and/or treatment of mucositis. The present study offers a literature review of all the articles published over the last 10 years referred to the prevention and/or treatment of oral mucositis associated to chemotherapy. Key words:Oral mucositis, management, prevention, treatment, chemotherapy. PMID:24596640

  6. Chemotherapy of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Thomas E; Webb, Risa M

    2017-04-01

    The management of tuberculosis (TB) can be a challenging process that has implications both for the affected patient and public health. Effective anti-TB chemotherapy both cures and renders the patient noncontagious. Biological factors specific to M. tuberculosis necessitate the use of multiple drugs for prolonged durations to adequately eradicate infection. Recommended regimens address the complexities of eliminating organisms from diverse reservoirs while preventing the emergence of drug resistance. First-line anti-TB therapy for drug susceptible disease effectively cures almost all patients within 6-9 months. The loss of first-line agents, due to resistance or intolerance, necessitates lengthy treatment courses, frequently 12-18 months or longer. Due to the long treatment times and the implications of missed doses, directly-observed therapy (DOT) is considered the standard of care. Drugs used for the treatment of TB have serious potential toxicities that require close monitoring and prompt response. A strong public health infrastructure and robust social supports are important elements to assure successful treatment. These numerous factors compel public health entities to take a lead role in the management of TB, either through the direct management of TB treatment or by assuring the activities of partner organizations.

  7. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly used drugs are ifosfamide (Ifex ® ) and doxorubicin (Adriamycin ® ). When ifosfamide is used, the drug mesna ... a shortened name such as: MAID (mesna, Adriamycin [doxorubicin], ifosfamide, and dacarbazine). Chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells ...

  8. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Millikan, Randall E; Stadler, Walter; De Mulder, Pieter; Sherif, Amir; von der Maase, Hans; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Soloway, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed, as is chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. The conference panel consisted of 10 medical oncologists and urologists from 3 continents who are experts in this field and who reviewed the English-language literature through October 2004. Relevant English-language literature was identified with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of the disease were made with reference to a 4-point scale. Results of the authors' deliberations are presented as a consensus document. Meta-analysis of randomized trials on cisplatin-containing combination neoadjuvant chemotherapy revealed a 5% difference in favor of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. No randomized trials have yet compared survival with transurethral resection of bladder tumor alone versus cystectomy for the management of patients with muscle-invasive disease. Collaborative international adjuvant chemotherapy trials are needed to assist researchers in assessing the true value of adjuvant chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients

  9. Ceramide in chemotherapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Rebillard, Amélie; Gulbins, Erich

    2011-09-01

    It is well known that tumor formation arises from the imbalance between cell death and proliferation. For many years, cancer research has engaged an important part of its efforts to find new therapeutic strategies based on cell death induction. One of the predominant ways to kill tumor cells is to trigger apoptosis by chemotherapy. However tumor responsiveness to chemotherapy is dependent on different biological factors including cancer types, genetics and pharmacogenetics. Although molecular mechanisms involved in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis are diverse and depend on cell-type and drugs used, a common pathway leading to tumor cell death has been shown to implicate the generation of a simple cellular sphingolipid, ceramide. Ceramide is released by the activity of neutral or acidic sphingomyelinases or de novo synthesis during treatment with chemotherapy. This review in particular focuses on enzymes involved in chemotherapy-induced cell death such as neutral or acidic sphingomyelinases and ceramide synthases, the role of ceramide in cellular effects of chemotherapy at the plasma membrane or the mitochondria and the induction of cell death by ceramide. It also includes recent advances on novel patented sphingolipid compounds and cancer therapeutic strategies based on ceramide release.

  10. Impact of obesity on chemotherapy management and outcomes in women with gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Neil S; Wright, Alexi A

    2015-07-01

    To describe the effects of obesity on the pharmacokinetics and dosing of chemotherapies and provide recommendations for chemotherapy management in obese women with gynecologic malignancies. PubMEd and MEDLINE databases were searched for articles published before June 2014. Only English-language articles were considered. 84 manuscripts were reviewed and 66 were included. Search terms included: obesity, overweight, body mass index, body surface area, glomerular filtration rate, chemotherapy, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, inflammation, and pharmacokinetics, Obese cancer patients have worse clinical outcomes, compared with non-obese patients. This may be because of differences in pharmacokinetics, metabolic dysregulation, or physicians' decisions to reduce chemotherapy dose-intensity during treatment to minimize toxicities. A 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline recommends using actual body weight for chemotherapy dosing in all patients treated with curative intent, irrespective of obesity, to avoid compromising clinical outcomes, including progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In women with gynecologic cancers most studies demonstrate no difference in PFS or OS when obese patients receive the same chemotherapy dose intensity as non-obese patients, except perhaps with bevacizumab. Chemotherapy dose-intensity is a critical determinant of cancer outcomes and should be maintained in all patients, irrespective of obesity. Future studies should prospectively examine the impact of obesity on clinical outcomes (adverse events, survival) to improve the care of this growing population of patients who are at risk for inferior clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of obesity on chemotherapy management and outcomes in women with gynecologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Neil S.; Wright, Alexi A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the effects of obesity on the pharmacokinetics and dosing of chemotherapies and provide recommendations for chemotherapy management in obese women with gynecologic malignancies. Methods PubMEd and MEDLINE databases were searched for articles published before June 2014. Only English-language articles were considered. 84 manuscripts were reviewed and 66 were included. Search terms included: obesity, overweight, body mass index, body surface area, glomerular filtration rate, chemotherapy, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, inflammation, and pharmacokinetics, Results Obese cancer patients have worse clinical outcomes, compared with non-obese patients. This may be because of differences in pharmacokinetics, metabolic dysregulation, or physicians' decisions to reduce chemotherapy dose-intensity during treatment to minimize toxicities. A 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline recommends using actual body weight for chemotherapy dosing in all patients treated with curative intent, irrespective of obesity, to avoid compromising clinical outcomes, including progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In women with gynecologic cancers most studies demonstrate no difference in PFS or OS when obese patients receive the same chemotherapy dose intensity as non-obese patients, except perhaps with bevacizumab. Conclusions Chemotherapy dose-intensity is a critical determinant of cancer outcomes and should be maintained in all patients, irrespective of obesity. Future studies should prospectively examine the impact of obesity on clinical outcomes (adverse events, survival) to improve the care of this growing population of patients who are at risk for inferior clinical outcomes. PMID:25870918

  12. Chemotherapy in Early Breast Cancer: When, How and Which One?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Summary The efficacy of chemotherapy depends on the level of risk of the individual patient. Because of this, careful estimation of the risk level is mandatory. In addition to well-established clinicopathological factors, validated gene expression signatures might be useful in selected patients if all other criteria are inconclusive for therapeutic decision-making. If indicated, chemotherapy can be used either after surgery (adjuvant) or before surgery (neoadjuvant). Both approaches lead to comparable long-term survival. The neoadjuvant setting offers the additional opportunity for elaborate translational studies to develop and validate predictive biomarkers and to discover mechanisms of resistance to therapy. If possible, chemotherapy regimens should include both anthracyclines and taxanes. Docetaxel should be used every 3 weeks; better tolerability with equivalent efficacy favors the concurrent over the sequential approach. Paclitaxel, on the other hand, should be administered sequentially, either weekly or every 2 weeks. Especially, intense dose-dense sequential chemotherapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support is very effective in high-risk breast cancer patients. In order to decrease toxicities, anthracycline-free regimens or a shortening of the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy are potential options that should be further explored. PMID:25177256

  13. The influence of chemotherapy on taste perception and food hedonics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boltong, Anna; Keast, Russell

    2012-04-01

    Altered food relationships in people receiving chemotherapy are prevalent and distressing. Whether, or to what extent, taste perception and food hedonics plays in altered food relationships is unknown among people receiving chemotherapy. This two-armed systematic review addressed the question "Does chemotherapy influence taste perception and hedonic experience of food?" A systematic review was undertaken of (1) taste perception and (2) food hedonics. Search phrases used in the taste arm were: "chemotherapy AND taste", and in the food hedonics arm, "chemotherapy AND (liking OR food OR appetite OR hedonic(∗))". Databases searched were PsycINFO, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. English language, peer-reviewed publications investigating adults (>18years) receiving chemotherapy as the only cancer treatment were eligible. One hundred and sixty three papers were screened in the taste arm, of which eight (5%) met inclusion criteria. Nine hundred and seventy two papers were screened in the food hedonics arm of which 25 (3%) met inclusion criteria. Chemotherapy had variable influence on both taste sensitivity and perceived intensity of the taste qualities sweet, salty, sour and bitter. Liking of food and drink decreased after chemotherapy treatment commenced. Caffeinated foods and drinks, red meat and citrus fruits or juices were most frequently reported as aversive during chemotherapy. A reduction in appetite was reported between baseline (pre-chemotherapy) and cycles 1-3 of chemotherapy with no further worsening in latter chemotherapy cycles and an improvement after completion of chemotherapy treatment. There was a lack of consistency of results between studies due to differences in study design, chemotherapy regimen, tumor type and stage of treatment examined. These results provide insufficient evidence to suggest chemotherapy has a significant or consistent influence on taste. There is a consistent, albeit small, body of evidence indicating

  14. [High-intensity chemotherapy versus palliative chemotherapy in patients over 60 years with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Medrano-Contreras, Jesús; Talavera-Piña, Juan Osvaldo; Guerrero-Rivera, Susana; Gutiérrez-Espíndola, Guillermo Rodolfo; Gómez-Cortés, Cynthia; Pérez-Rocha, Juan Fernando; Terreros-Muñoz, Eduardo; Meillón-García, Luis Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el tratamiento con quimioterapia intensa (QTI) en pacientes con leucemia mieloblástica (LMA) mayores de 60 años es controversial. En el presente estudio se evaluó la remisión completa y la supervivencia global de pacientes con LMA mayores de 60 años, tratados con QTI o quimioterapia paliativa. Métodos: los pacientes con adecuada función orgánica y ECOG ≤ 2 recibieron QTI a base de citarabina por cinco o siete días más un antracíclico por tres días y terapia de soporte. En caso de lograr remisión completa de la leucemia recibieron uno o dos ciclos de consolidación con citarabina. El tratamiento paliativo consistió en medidas de soporte o quimioterapia oral o intravenosa en dosis bajas. Resultados: del grupo de QTI siete pacientes alcanzaron remisión completa, comparados con uno del grupo de quimioterapia paliativa. La supervivencia global fue de 13.25 meses para los pacientes con QTI y de 3.35 meses para los pacientes de quimioterapia paliativa (p < 0.05). Conclusión: es posible que los pacientes con LMA mayores de 60 años de edad se beneficien de recibir QTI, comparada con la quimioterapia paliativa.

  15. All-trans retinoic acid as adjunct to intensive treatment in younger adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia: results of the randomized AMLSG 07-04 study.

    PubMed

    Schlenk, Richard F; Lübbert, Michael; Benner, Axel; Lamparter, Alexander; Krauter, Jürgen; Herr, Wolfgang; Martin, Hans; Salih, Helmut R; Kündgen, Andrea; Horst, Heinz-A; Brossart, Peter; Götze, Katharina; Nachbaur, David; Wattad, Mohammed; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Fiedler, Walter; Bentz, Martin; Wulf, Gerald; Held, Gerhard; Hertenstein, Bernd; Salwender, Hans; Gaidzik, Verena I; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Weber, Daniela; Döhner, Konstanze; Ganser, Arnold; Döhner, Hartmut

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in combination with chemotherapy and to assess the NPM1 status as biomarker for ATRA therapy in younger adult patients (18-60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients were randomized for intensive chemotherapy with or without open-label ATRA (45 mg/m(2), days 6-8; 15 mg/m(2), days 9-21). Two cycles of induction therapy were followed by risk-adapted consolidation with high-dose cytarabine or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Due to the open label character of the study, analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) and a per-protocol (PP) basis. One thousand one hundred patients were randomized (556, STANDARD; 544, ATRA) with 38 patients treated vice versa. Median follow-up for survival was 5.2 years. ITT analyses revealed no difference between ATRA and STANDARD for the total cohort and for the subset of NPM1-mutated AML with respect to event-free (EFS; p = 0.93, p = 0.17) and overall survival (OS; p = 0.24 and p = 0.32, respectively). Pre-specified PP analyses revealed better EFS in NPM1-mutated AML (p = 0.05) and better OS in the total cohort (p = 0.03). Explorative subgroup analyses on an ITT basis revealed better OS (p = 0.05) in ATRA for genetic low-risk patients according to ELN recommendations. The clinical trial is registered at clinicaltrialsregister.eu (EudraCT Number: 2004-004321-95).

  16. Blood Transfusion Requirements for Patients With Sarcomas Undergoing Combined Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Helena M.; Whitehead, Lynne; Jefferies, Sarah J.; Burnet, Neil G.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with bony and soft tissue sarcomas may require intensive treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which often leads to a fall in haemoglobin levels, requiring blood transfusion. There may be advantages in predicting which patients will require transfusion, partly because anaemia and hypoxia may worsen the response of tumours to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between 1997 and 2003, a total of 26 patients who received intensive treatment with curative intent were identified. Transfusions were given to maintain the haemoglobin at 10g/dl or above during chemotherapy, and at 12 g/dl or above during radiotherapy. Eighteen (69%) required a transfusion, the majority as a result of both the chemotherapy and RT criteria. There were 78 transfusion episodes, and 181 units of blood given. In the 18 patients who required transfusion, the average number of units was 10.1, but seven patients required more blood than this. The most significant factor influencing blood transfusion was choice of intensive chemotherapy. Intensive chemotherapy and presenting Hb less than 11.6 g/dl identified 13 out of 18 patients who needed transfusion. Adding a drop in haemoglobin of greater than 1.7 g/dl after one cycle of chemotherapy identified 16 out of 18 patients who required transfusion. The seven patients who had heavy transfusion requirements were identified by age 32 or less, intensive chemotherapy and a presenting Hb of 12 g/dl or less. Erythropoietin might be a useful alternative to transfusion in selected patient groups, especially those with heavy transfusion requirements. PMID:18521418

  17. Practical considerations in ovarian cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cristea, Mihaela; Han, Ernest; Salmon, Lennie; Morgan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy despite advances in treatment. The standard management generally involves a combination of surgical tumor debulking and chemotherapy. Over the decades, chemotherapy for ovarian cancer has evolved and currently involves a combination of intravenous platinum and taxane chemotherapy. Over the past decade, three randomized phase III trials have been reported, and all have demonstrated a significant survival advantage for intraperitoneal compared with intravenous chemotherapy. However, there are potential barriers and controversies related to the administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients. In this review, we discuss the evolution and current management considerations of chemotherapy for the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:21789133

  18. Sphingolipids and response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Rebillard, Amélie

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is frequently used to treat primary or metastatic cancers, but intrinsic or acquired drug resistance limits its efficiency. Sphingolipids are important regulators of various cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, angiogenesis, stress, and inflammatory responses which are linked to various aspects of cancer, like tumor growth, neoangiogenesis, and response to chemotherapy. Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, generally mediates antiproliferative and proapoptotic functions, whereas sphingosine-1-phosphate and other derivatives have opposing effects. Among the variety of enzymes that control ceramide generation, acid or neutral sphingomyelinases and ceramide synthases are important targets to allow killing of cancer cells by chemotherapeutic drugs. On the contrary, glucosylceramide synthase, ceramidase, and sphingosine kinase are other targets driving cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy. This chapter focuses on ceramide-based mechanisms leading to cancer therapy sensitization or resistance which could have some impacts on the development of novel cancer therapeutic strategies.

  19. Acute Bilateral Renal and Splenic Infarctions Occurring during Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Noriko; Tomoda, Koichi; Matsuda, Masayuki; Fujita, Yukio; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Hontsu, Shigeto; Tasaki, Masato; Yoshikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of acute bilateral renal and splenic infarctions occurring during chemotherapy for lung cancer. A 60-year-old man presented with acute and intensive upper abdominal and back pain during chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for lung cancer. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral renal and splenic infarctions. After the administration of unfractionated heparin his pain was relieved with a clearance of the infarctions in the CT findings and a recovery of renal dysfunction. Enhanced coagulation by lung cancer and arterial ischemia by chemotherapy may therefore contribute to the development of these infarctions. PMID:27980265

  20. Acute Bilateral Renal and Splenic Infarctions Occurring during Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Noriko; Tomoda, Koichi; Matsuda, Masayuki; Fujita, Yukio; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Hontsu, Shigeto; Tasaki, Masato; Yoshikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Hiroshi

    We herein report a rare case of acute bilateral renal and splenic infarctions occurring during chemotherapy for lung cancer. A 60-year-old man presented with acute and intensive upper abdominal and back pain during chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for lung cancer. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral renal and splenic infarctions. After the administration of unfractionated heparin his pain was relieved with a clearance of the infarctions in the CT findings and a recovery of renal dysfunction. Enhanced coagulation by lung cancer and arterial ischemia by chemotherapy may therefore contribute to the development of these infarctions.

  1. Progress in systemic chemotherapy of primary breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hortobagyi, G N

    2001-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the multidisciplinary management of primary breast cancer during the last 30 years. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to significantly reduce the annual risk of cancer recurrence and mortality, and these effects persist even 15 years after diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy is superior to single-agent therapy and anthracycline-containing regimens. Those that combine an anthracycline with 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide are more effective than regimens without an anthracycline. Six cycles of a single regimen appear to provide optimal benefit. Dose reductions below the standard range are associated with inferior results. Dose increases that require growth factor or hematopoietic stem cell support are under investigation; at this time, the existing results provide no compelling reason to use this strategy outside a clinical trial. Regimens using fixed crossover designs with two non-cross-resistant regimens are being evaluated. The addition of a taxane to anthracycline-containing regimens is currently under intense scrutiny, and preliminary analysis of the first three clinical trials has shown encouraging, albeit not compelling, results. For patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, the sequential administration of chemotherapy and 5 years of tamoxifen therapy provides additive benefits. No compelling evidence exists to combine ovarian ablation with chemotherapy. Most side effects and toxic effects are self-limited, although premature menopause requires monitoring and preventive interventions to preserve bone mineral density. The small risk of acute leukemia is of concern, and additional research to develop safer regimens is clearly indicated. The overall effect of optimal local/regional treatment combined with an anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy and a taxane (and, for patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 5 years of tamoxifen therapy) is a greater than 50% reduction in annual risks of

  2. Low-dose decitabine versus best supportive care in elderly patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy: final results of the randomized phase III study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Leukemia Group and the German MDS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Michael; Suciu, Stefan; Baila, Liliana; Rüter, Björn Hans; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Beeldens, Filip; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Coens, Corneel; Hagemeijer, Anne; Eckart Schaefer, Hans; Ganser, Arnold; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre W

    2011-05-20

    To compare low-dose decitabine to best supportive care (BSC) in higher-risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) age 60 years or older and ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. Two-hundred thirty-three patients (median age, 70 years; range, 60 to 90 years) were enrolled; 53% had poor-risk cytogenetics, and the median MDS duration at random assignment was 3 months. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Decitabine (15 mg/m(2)) was given intravenously over 4 hours three times a day for 3 days in 6-week cycles. OS prolongation with decitabine versus BSC was not statistically significant (median OS, 10.1 v 8.5 months, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.88; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.17; two-sided, log-rank P = .38). Progression-free survival (PFS), but not acute myeloid leukemia (AML) -free survival (AMLFS), was significantly prolonged with decitabine versus BSC (median PFS, 6.6 v 3.0 months, respectively; HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.88; P = .004; median AMLFS, 8.8 v 6.1 months, respectively; HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.12; P = .24). AML transformation was significantly (P = .036) reduced at 1 year (from 33% with BSC to 22% with decitabine). Multivariate analyses indicated that patients with short MDS duration had worse outcomes. Best responses with decitabine versus BSC, respectively, were as follows: complete response (13% v 0%), partial response (6% v 0%), hematologic improvement (15% v 2%), stable disease (14% v 22%), progressive disease (29% v 68%), hypoplasia (14% v 0%), and inevaluable (8% v 8%). Grade 3 to 4 febrile neutropenia occurred in 25% of patients on decitabine versus 7% of patients on BSC; grade 3 to 4 infections occurred in 57% and 52% of patients on decitabine and BSC, respectively. Decitabine treatment was associated with improvements in patient-reported quality-of-life (QOL) parameters. Decitabine administered in 6-week cycles is active in older patients with higher-risk MDS, resulting in improvements of OS and AMLFS (nonsignificant), of PFS

  3. Cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy for sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    de Jonghe, E; Murray, C J; Chum, H J; Nyangulu, D S; Salomao, A; Styblo, K

    1994-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy for pulmonary sputum smear-positive tuberculosis was examined in the national tuberculosis control programmes of Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. In these three programmes, routine cure rates have exceeded 80 per cent. Average, average incremental and marginal unit costs for standard, short-course and retreatment regimens with and without hospitalization have been measured. The average incremental cost per year of life saved through chemotherapy ranged from US $0.90-3.10. In all conditions, short-course chemotherapy is preferable to standard 12-month chemotherapy. When hospitalization during the intensive phase of chemotherapy increases the cure rate by 10-15 percentage points, it can be relatively cost-effective. Analysing the cost-effectiveness of short-course and standard chemotherapy, where the depth of the margin of benefit is different, illustrates some of the dangers of simplistic use of cost-effectiveness ratios.

  4. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Memory Changes What is causing these changes? Your doctor ... thinking or remembering things Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes Get help to remember things. Write down ...

  5. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were ... too much at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself ...

  6. Retrospective Analysis of the Survival Benefit of Induction Chemotherapy in Stage IVa-b Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiao-Wen; Zou, Xue-Bin; Xiao, Yao; Tang, Jie; OuYang, Pu-Yun; Su, Zhen; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2016-01-01

    The value of adding induction chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LA-NPC) remains controversial, yet high-risk patients with LA-NPC have poor outcomes after chemoradiotherapy. We aimed to assess the survival benefits of induction chemotherapy in stage IVa-b NPC. A total of 602 patients with stage IVa-b NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Overall survival (OS), locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. In univariate analysis, 5-year OS was 83.2% for induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy and 74.8% for concurrent chemotherapy alone, corresponding to an absolute risk reduction of 8.4% (P = 0.022). Compared to concurrent chemotherapy alone, addition of induction chemotherapy improved 5-year DMFS (83.2% vs. 74.4%, P = 0.018) but not 5-year LRFS (83.7% vs. 83.0%, P = 0.848) or PFS (71.9% vs. 66.0%, P = 0.12). Age, T category, N category, chemotherapy strategy and clinical stage were associated with 5-year OS (P = 0.017, P = 0.031, P = 0.007, P = 0.022, P = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy was an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.90, P = 0.012) and DMFS (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.38-0.83, P = 0.004). In subgroup analysis, induction chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year DMFS in stage IVa (86.8% vs. 77.3%, P = 0.008), but provided no significant benefit in stage IVb. In patients with stage IVa-b NPC treated with IMRT, addition of induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year OS and 5-year DMFS. This study provides a basis for selection of high risk patients in future clinical therapeutic

  7. Optimizing Chemotherapy: Concomitant Medication Lists

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Marie H.; dela Cruz, Brian L.; Shord, Stacy S.; Medina, Patrick J.; Fazili, Javid; Thompson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying sources of variability in the response to cancer chemotherapy requires knowledge of all variables including concomitant medications, which can alter metabolism and pharmacokinetics of chemotherapy. This study investigated the accuracy of concomitant medication lists in the charts of cancer patients. Collated information from a questionnaire, patient interview and patient’s medical chart were used to obtain validated medication lists. Patients took an average of 4.8 prescription drugs, 1.6 non-prescription drugs and 1.6 other remedies within three days prior to chemotherapy. Medical records did not report 24% of prescription drugs, 84% of non-prescription drugs and 83% of other remedies. Electronic medical records were more complete than paper charts, but failed to report more than 75% of non-prescription drugs and other remedies. Potential drug interactions were noted. This study documents the extent and complexity of concomitant drugs taken by patients undergoing chemotherapy and the deficiencies in recording this information in medical charts. PMID:21124312

  8. Chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss occurs with an estimated incidence of 65%. Forty-seven percent of female patients consider hair loss to be the most traumatic aspect of chemotherapy and 8% would decline chemotherapy due to fears of hair loss. At present, no approved pharmacologic intervention exists to circumvent this side-effect of anticancer treatment, though a number of agents have been investigated on the basis of the current understanding of the underlying pathobiology. Among the agents that have been evaluated, topical minoxidil was able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration, but it did not prevent hair loss. The major approach to minimize chemotherapy-induced hair loss is by scalp cooling, though most published data on this technique are of poor quality. Fortunately, the condition is usually reversible, and appropriate hair and scalp care along with temporarily wearing a wig may represent the most effective coping strategy. However, some patients may show changes in color and/or texture of regrown hair, and in limited cases the reduction in density may persist.

  9. Chemotherapy of enterobiasis (oxyuriasis).

    PubMed

    St Georgiev, V

    2001-02-01

    Enterobius vermicularis (syn. Oxyurus vermicularis), also known as pinworm or seatworm, is the causative agent of human enterobiasis (oxyuriasis). The disease is more prevalent in temperate regions and is facilitated by factors such as overcrowding in schools and family groupings, as well as inadequate personal and community hygiene. Although the infection is more likely to occur in lower socioeconomic groups, enterobiasis has been reported to affect virtually every level of the general population and especially children. In the great majority of cases, enterobiasis is asymptomatic. One common symptom is intense pruritus ani that in some patients can lead to insomnia, restlessness and irritability. Scratching may cause skin irritation, and in more serious cases, eczematous dermatitis, haemorrhage or secondary bacterial infections. Ectopic migration of E. vermicularis often results in pinworm infestation of the female genital tract often causing granulomas of the uterus, ovary and the fallopian tubes and pelvic peritoneum. Anthelmintic therapies for enterobiasis are successful and include mebendazole, albendazole and pyrantel pamoate. Mass medication of affected groups reduced symptoms rapidly, progressively and in a cost-effective way.

  10. Successful administration of aggressive chemotherapy concomitant to tuberculostatic and highly active antiretroviral therapy in a patient with AIDS-related Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C; Wyen, C; Hoffmann, C; Fätkenheuer, G

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of AIDS-related malignant lymphoma (ARL) remains a therapeutic challenge. There are concerns not only about infectious and haematological complications in HIV-infected patients during intensive chemotherapy, but also about potential interactions between chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Current data on patients treated concomitantly with intensive chemotherapy and HAART are limited, and no data exist on patients with ARL suffering from active opportunistic infections. We report the case of a 38-year-old man with advanced HIV-1 infection, pulmonary tuberculosis and Burkitt's lymphoma. Intensive chemotherapy was administered in parallel with tuberculostatic therapy and HAART. Six months later, the patient achieved not only a complete remission of Burkitt's lymphoma and sustained viral suppression, but also a full recovery from tuberculosis. This case report provides some useful observations on the successful application of intensive chemotherapy in addition to tuberculostatic therapy and HAART in HIV-infected patients.

  11. Procarbazine, CCNU, and Vincristine Chemotherapy in Gliomatosis Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Gon; Lee, Keun Soo; Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Sung Tae

    2014-10-01

    A 49-year-old female patient was admitted due to memory disturbances. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging suggested gliomatosis cerebri (GC), which had spread to both insular lobes, both frontal and basal ganglia and the brain stem. A stereotactic biopsy was performed at the high signal intensity area of the T2-weighted MR image, and the revealed a diffuse astrocytoma. Radiation therapy was judged not to be an appropriate treatment for the patient because of her cognitive impairment. A combinatorial chemotherapy regiment consisting of Procarbazine, CCNU, and Vincristine (PCV) was agreed upon after discussion. The patient underwent six cycles of PCV chemotherapy (a full dose was applied until the 3rd cycle, and dose then was reduced to 75% for the remaining cycles). Although the patient exhibited side effects such as bone marrow suppression and gastrointestinal symptoms, these were managed by medication. Over the 28 months following initiation of treatment, the high signal area in the right frontal and temporal lobes in the T2-weighted MR image decreased, and the patient's cognitive function [global deterioration scale (GDS) 4 points, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) 25 point] also improved (GDS 1 points, MMSE 29 points). PCV chemotherapy can therefore be an alternative therapeutic option for patients with GC who cannot be treated with radiation therapy or other chemotherapies.

  12. Low Incidence of Chest Wall Pain with a Risk-Adapted Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Approach Using Three or Five Fractions Based on Chest Wall Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John H.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Hacker, Fred L.; Hermann, Gretchen; Kozono, David; Mannarino, Edward; Molodowitch, Christina; Wee, Jon O.; Sher, David J.; Killoran, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW) toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture) for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. Methods We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total) if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10–12 Gy×5 fractions (50–60 Gy total) otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3%) patients developed CW pain including three (4.2%) grade 1, two (2.8%) grade 2 and one (1.4%) grade 3. Five (6.9%) patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. Conclusions Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain. PMID:24728448

  13. Long-term outcomes of primary systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis in patients treated upfront with bortezomib or lenalidomide and the importance of risk adapted strategies.

    PubMed

    Kastritis, Efstathios; Roussou, Maria; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Migkou, Magdalini; Kalapanida, Despina; Pamboucas, Constantinos; Kaldara, Elisavet; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Psimenou, Erasmia; Toumanidis, Savvas T; Tasidou, Anna; Terpos, Evangelos; Dimopoulos, Meletios A

    2015-04-01

    Bortezomib and lenalidomide are increasingly used in patients with AL amyloidosis, but long term data on their use as primary therapy in AL amyloidosis are lacking while early mortality remains significant. Thus, we analyzed the long term outcomes of 85 consecutive unselected patients, which received primary therapy with bortezomib or lenalidomide and we prospectively evaluated a risk adapted strategy based on bortezomib/dexamethasone to reduce early mortality. Twenty-six patients received full-dose bortezomib/dexamethasone, 36 patients lenalidomide with oral cyclophosphamide and low-dose dexamethasone and 23 patients received bortezomib/dexamethasone at a dose and schedule adjusted to the risk of early death. On intent to treat, 67% of patients achieved a hematologic response (24% hemCRs) and 34% an organ response; both were more frequent with bortezomib. An early death occurred in 20%: in 36% of those treated with full-dose bortezomib/dexamethasone, in 22% of lenalidomide-treated patients but only in 4.5% of patients treated with risk-adapted bortezomib/dexamethasone. Activity of full vs. adjusted dose bortezomib/dexamethasone was similar; twice weekly vs. weekly administration of bortezomib also had similar activity. After a median follow up of 57 months, median survival is 47 months and is similar for patients treated with bortezomib vs. lenalidomide-based regimens. However, risk adjusted-bortezomib/dexamethasone was associated with improved 1-year survival vs. full-dose bortezomib/dexamethasone or lenalidomide-based therapy (81% vs. 56% vs. 53%, respectively). In conclusion, risk-adapted bortezomib/dexamethasone may reduce early mortality and preserve activity while long term follow up indicates that remissions obtained with lenalidomide or bortezomib may be durable, even without consolidation with alkylators. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting During Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mustian, Karen M; Devine, Katie; Ryan, Julie L; Janelsins, Michelle C; Sprod, Lisa K; Peppone, Luke J; Candelario, Grace D; Mohile, Supriya G; Morrow, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are two of the most troubling side effects patients experience during chemotherapy. While newly available treatments have improved our ability to manage nausea and vomiting, anticipatory and delayed nausea and vomiting are still a major problem for patients receiving chemotherapy. Many cancer patients will delay or refuse future chemotherapy treatments and contemplate stopping chemotherapy altogether because of their fear of experiencing further nausea and vomiting. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the patho-psychophysiology of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and the recommended guidelines for treatment. PMID:24466408

  15. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomata.

    PubMed Central

    Bonadonna, G.; De Lena, M.; Lattuada, A.; Milani, F.; Monfardini, S.; Beretta, G.

    1975-01-01

    The results obtained with intensive chemotherapy and intensive chemotherapy plus radiotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomata are reported. A quintuple drug regimen (mechloretamine, adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine and prednisone) in histiocytic lymphomata (Stage III and IV) yielded complete remissions in 53% and complete plus partial remissions in 77%. These figures were 44% and 64% respectively in lymphocytic lymphoma. In Stage III complete responders after combination chemotherapy were subsequently irradiated (involved field irradiation). The median duration of complete remission after completion of radiotherapy was 9-5 months in histiocytic and 12-0 months in lymphocytic lymphomata. At 2 years actuarial survival in Stage III and IV was better in patients with the lymphocytic type and with nodular pattern than with histiocytic and diffuse patterns. A more recent trial compares, in Stage IV patients, cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone (CVP) versus adriamycin, bleomycin and prednisone (ABP). Although the number of evaluable patients is still limited, there appears to be no difference in the response rate between CVP and ABP. In Stages I and II, 6 cycles of CVP were given as adjuvant treatment after radiotherapy. At the present moment, there is no statistical difference in the relapse rate between the group of patients treated with radiotherapy alone and that with radiotherapy plus CVP. PMID:52367

  16. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  17. Hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy: natural history, pathogenesis, and management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jen; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2013-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic in the Asian-Pacific region, and reactivation of HBV post-cancer chemotherapy has become an emerging clinical challenge. Patients with detectable serum HBV DNA before chemotherapy and those receiving intensive chemotherapy are particularly at a risk of HBV reactivation. Most patients with HBV reactivation are positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and are, therefore, easily identified by recommended serological screening before chemotherapy. However, a small, but significant proportion of subjects who have apparently recovered from HBV infection as reflected by HBsAg negativity and hepatitis B core antibody positivity in HBV endemic areas may also experience reactivation when host immunity is severely compromised by cancer chemotherapy. Serum alanine aminotransferase, HBsAg, and/or HBV DNA should be monitored closely in these subjects and antiviral therapy should be administered immediately when any evidence of HBV reactivation is detected during chemotherapy. The prophylactic use of nucleos(t)ide analogs before chemotherapy and its continuation until reconstitution of host immunity remain the mainstay of effective prevention of hepatitis B reactivation in this special clinical entity.

  18. Assessment of adherence to the guidelines for the management of nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    França, Monique Sedlmaier; Usón, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Prado, Bernard Lobato; Donnarumma, Carlos del Cistia; Mutão, Taciana Sousa; Rodrigues, Heloisa Veasey; del Giglio, Auro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess adherence of the prescribing physicians in a private cancer care center to the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline for antiemetic prophylaxis, in the first cycle of antineoplastic chemotherapy. Methods: A total of 139 chemotherapy regimens, of 105 patients, were evaluated retrospectively from 2011 to 2013. Results: We observed 78% of non-adherence to the guideline rate. The main disagreements with the directive were the prescription of higher doses of dexamethasone and excessive use of 5-HT3 antagonist for low risk emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. On univariate analysis, hematological malignancies (p=0.005), the use of two or more chemotherapy (p=0.05) and high emetogenic risk regimes (p=0.012) were factors statistically associated with greater adherence to guidelines. Treatment based on paclitaxel was the only significant risk factor for non-adherence (p=0.02). By multivariate analysis, the chemotherapy of high emetogenic risk most correlated with adherence to guideline (p=0.05). Conclusion: We concluded that the adherence to guidelines is greater if the chemotherapy regime has high emetogenic risk. Educational efforts should focus more intensely on the management of chemotherapy regimens with low and moderate emetogenic potential. Perhaps the development of a computer generated reminder may improve the adherence to guidelines. PMID:26154543

  19. Assessment of adherence to the guidelines for the management of nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    França, Monique Sedlmaier; Usón Junior, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Prado, Bernard Lobato; Donnarumma, Carlos del Cistia; Mutão, Taciana Sousa; Rodrigues, Heloisa Veasey; Giglio, Auro del

    2015-01-01

    To assess adherence of the prescribing physicians in a private cancer care center to the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline for antiemetic prophylaxis, in the first cycle of antineoplastic chemotherapy. A total of 139 chemotherapy regimens, of 105 patients, were evaluated retrospectively from 2011 to 2013. We observed 78% of non-adherence to the guideline rate. The main disagreements with the directive were the prescription of higher doses of dexamethasone and excessive use of 5-HT3 antagonist for low risk emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. On univariate analysis, hematological malignancies (p=0.005), the use of two or more chemotherapy (p=0.05) and high emetogenic risk regimes (p=0.012) were factors statistically associated with greater adherence to guidelines. Treatment based on paclitaxel was the only significant risk factor for non-adherence (p=0.02). By multivariate analysis, the chemotherapy of high emetogenic risk most correlated with adherence to guideline (p=0.05). We concluded that the adherence to guidelines is greater if the chemotherapy regime has high emetogenic risk. Educational efforts should focus more intensely on the management of chemotherapy regimens with low and moderate emetogenic potential. Perhaps the development of a computer generated reminder may improve the adherence to guidelines.

  20. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in counteracting chemotherapy-induced adverse effects: an exploratory review.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Cannabinoids (the active constituents of Cannabis sativa) and their derivatives have got intense attention during recent years because of their extensive pharmacological properties. Cannabinoids first developed as successful agents for alleviating chemotherapy associated nausea and vomiting. Recent investigations revealed that cannabinoids have a wide range of therapeutic effects such as appetite stimulation, inhibition of nausea and emesis, suppression of chemotherapy or radiotherapy-associated bone loss, chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity, pain relief, mood amelioration, and last but not the least relief from insomnia. In this exploratory review, we scrutinize the potential of cannabinoids to counteract chemotherapy-induced side effects. Moreover, some novel and yet important pharmacological aspects of cannabinoids such as antitumoral effects will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Reversibility of chemotherapy-related liver injury.

    PubMed

    Vigano, Luca; De Rosa, Giovanni; Toso, Christian; Andres, Axel; Ferrero, Alessandro; Roth, Arnaud; Sperti, Elisa; Majno, Pietro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura

    2017-07-01

    Chemotherapy-associated liver injury (CALI) increases the risk of liver resection and may prejudice further surgery and chemotherapy. The reversibility of CALI is therefore important; however, no data concerning this are available. This study aimed to retrospectively analyze the reversibility of CALI in patients undergoing liver resection for colorectal metastases. All resections of colorectal liver metastases after oxaliplatin and/or irinotecan-based chemotherapy were included. First, liver resections were stratified by time between end of chemotherapy and hepatectomy and several possible cut-off values tested. CALI prevalence in various groups was compared. Second, CALI in the two specimens from each patient who had undergone repeat liver resections without interval chemotherapy were compared. Overall, 524 liver resections in 429 patients were analyzed. The median interval chemotherapy-surgery was 56days (15-1264). CALI prevalence did not differ significantly between groups with a chemotherapy-surgery interval <270days. Grade 2-3 sinusoidal dilatation (SOS, 19.4% vs. 40.0%, p=0.022) and nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH, 6.5% vs. 20.1%, p=0.063) occurred less frequently in patients with an interval >270days (n=31); prevalence of steatosis and steatohepatitis was similar in all groups. A chemotherapy-surgery interval >270days was an independent protector against Grade 2-3 SOS (p=0.009). Forty-seven patients had repeat liver resection without interval chemotherapy. CALI differed between surgeries only for a chemotherapy-surgery interval >270days (n=15), Grade 2-3 SOS having regressed in 4/5 patients and NRH in 7/8; whereas steatosis and steatohepatitis had persisted. CALI persists for a long time after chemotherapy. SOS and NRH regress only after nine months without chemotherapy, whereas steatosis and steatohepatitis persist. The patients affected by colorectal liver metastases often receive chemotherapy before liver resection, but chemotherapy causes liver

  2. Effects of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for oesophago-gastric cancer on neuro-muscular gastric function.

    PubMed

    Sung, E Z H; Arasaradnam, R P; Jarvie, E M; James, S; Goodyear, S J; Borman, R A; Snead, D; Sanger, G J; Nwokolo, C U

    2012-12-01

    Delayed gastric emptying symptoms are often reported after chemotherapy. This study aims to characterise the effects of chemotherapy on gastric neuro-muscular function. Patients undergoing elective surgery for oesophago-gastric cancer were recruited. Acetylcholinesterase, nNOS, ghrelin receptor and motilin expressions were studied in gastric sections from patients receiving no chemotherapy (n = 3) or oesophageal (n = 2) or gastric (n = 2) chemotherapy. A scoring system quantified staining intensity (0-3; no staining to strong). Stomach sections were separately suspended in tissue baths for electrical field stimulation (EFS) and exposure to erythromycin or carbachol; three patients had no chemotherapy; four completed cisplatin-based chemotherapy within 6 weeks prior to surgery. AChE expression was markedly decreased after chemotherapy (scores 2.3 ± 0.7, 0.5 ± 0.2 and 0 ± 0 in non-chemotherapy, oesophageal- and gastric-chemotherapy groups (p < 0.03 each) respectively. Ghrelin receptor and motilin expression tended to increase (ghrelin: 0.7 ± 0.4 vs 2.0 ± 0.4 and 1.2 ± 0.2 respectively; p = 0.04 and p = 0.2; motilin: 0.7 ± 0.5 vs 2.2 ± 0.5 and 2.0 ± 0.7; p = 0.06 and p = 0.16). Maximal contraction to carbachol was 3.7 ± 0.7 g and 1.9 ± 0.8 g (longitudinal muscle) and 3.4 ± 0.4 g and 1.6 ± 0.6 (circular) in non-chemotherapy and chemotherapy tissues respectively (p < 0.05 each). There were loss of AChE and reduction in contractility to carbachol. The tendency for ghrelin receptors to increase suggests an attempt to upregulate compensating systems. Our study offers a mechanism by which chemotherapy markedly alters neuro-muscular gastric function.

  3. The Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Compared to Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Healing after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jordan D; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2017-01-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy is the latest advancement in the treatment of breast cancer. The authors aimed to investigate the effects of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy in nipple-sparing mastectomy. Patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy from 2006 to June of 2015 were identified. Results were stratified by presence of neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. A total of 840 nipple-sparing mastectomies were performed. Twenty-eight were in those who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 93 were in patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients receiving both neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy were included in the neoadjuvant group. Nipple-sparing mastectomies that received neoadjuvant (with or without adjuvant) chemotherapy were compared to those in patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy. Those with neoadjuvant (with or without adjuvant) chemotherapy were more likely to have explantation (p = 0.0239) and complete nipple-areola complex necrosis (p = 0.0021). Those with neoadjuvant (with or without adjuvant) chemotherapy were more likely to have implant explantation (p = 0.0015) and complete nipple-areola complex necrosis (p = 0.0004) compared to those with no chemotherapy. Compared to nipple-sparing mastectomies in patients with no chemotherapy, those with adjuvant chemotherapy were more likely to have a hematoma (p = 0.0021). Those that received both neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy were more likely to have complete nipple-areola complex necrosis compared with both the neoadjuvant chemotherapy-only and adjuvant chemotherapy-only groups (p < 0.0001). Nipple-sparing mastectomy is safe to perform in the setting of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. As a whole, neoadjuvant (with or without adjuvant) chemotherapy increases risk of complications. Therapeutic, III.

  4. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  5. [Chemotherapy in Patients Complicated with Interstitial Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Sata, Masafumi; Kato, Terufumi

    2016-08-01

    Interstitial pneumonia has high risk for chemotherapy-related exacerbation. Chemotherapy-related exacerbation is often fatal with respiratory failure. When we treat the cancer patient with interstitial pneumonia, it is necessary for us to regard of the efficacy of chemotherapy, and the frequency and mortality of chemotherapy-related exacerbation. All anti-cancer drugs has the possibilities of chemotherapy-related exacerbation. The incidence of chemotherapy-related exacerbation was higher in patients with target therapy agent or immune-checkpoint therapy agent, though there is not an interstitial pneumonia patient. In patients complicated with interstitial pneumonia, you should not use of these drugs, such as target therapy agent or immune-checkpoint therapy agent.

  6. [A Case of Concurrent Cancer of the Esophagus and Stomach with Severe Sepsis following Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Amatatsu, Masahiko; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Megumi, Koichi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Arigami, Takaaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Ishigami, Sumiya; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-10-01

    A 66-year-old man was diagnosed with synchronous early esophageal cancer and advanced gastric cancer. He received CDDP-based combination chemotherapy (docetaxcel, CDDP, and TS-1). During chemotherapy for gastric cancer, he suddenly developed septic shock, requiring intensive treatment with antibiotics, intravenous immunoglobulin, circulatory and respiratory care, and hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B column. He also had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), complicated by sepsis. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) was administered to treat DIC. The intensive treatments described above allowed the patient to recover from septic shock and DIC several days later. Early and adequate treatment could be used to rescue a compromised cancer-bearing patient from septic shock following chemotherapy.

  7. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause nerve problems and burning, numbness, tingling, or shooting pain in the fingers and toes. Certain types ... more comfortable wearing hats, scarves, or wigs to school or other events. Or, you may look great ...

  8. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells to get better. Because everyone's different, some people will have fewer side effects than others. Common side effects of chemo are ... infections easily. Medicines are available that can help people feel better if they have side effects from chemo. Doctors, nurses, and other members of ...

  9. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Use only mild shampoos and hair products. And talk with your doctor about sunscreen if you're going to be outside. Practice infection protection. Wash your hands before eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. If friends or family members have infections such ...

  10. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to change the environment around the cell. Hormones—These substances may interfere with tumor growth by blocking the production of certain proteins in the tumor cells. Mitotic inhibitors—These agents are usually plant-based, natural substances that interfere with the production ...

  11. [Use of chemotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Benardete-Harari, Denise N; Kershenovich-Gersson, Janisse; Meraz-Ávila, Diego; Galnares-Olalde, Javier Andrés; Olaya-Guzmán, Emilio José

    2016-01-01

    The presence of malignant tumors during pregnancy complicates the management of both tumor and pregnancy, since any diagnostic or therapeutic intervention could imply risks that may bring on detrimental effects to fetus or mother. The risks involved in exposing a fetus to cytotoxic therapy are associated to gestational age and the time of in utero exposure to that therapy. Cancer treatment has two different objectives: local control by surgery and radiotherapy, and one that seeks to eradicate systemic disease through chemotherapy, immunotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapies.

  12. Successful chemotherapy of transfusion babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Wittner, M; Rowin, K S; Tanowitz, H B; Hobbs, J F; Saltzman, S; Wenz, B; Hirsch, R; Chisholm, E; Healy, G R

    1982-05-01

    We describe babesiosis transmitted by transfusion. The infected blood donor was identified and a minimum period of infectivity of the donor's blood was established. We report a new modality for chemotherapy consisting of quinine plus clindamycin, and a new endemic focus for this zoonosis on Fire Island, New York. There are insufficient data to establish a reasonably safe period after which visitors and residents of Babesia-endemic foci can become blood donors. Screening of such persons by a rapid serologic test, such as the ELISA or immunofluorescent antibody tests, is suggested.

  13. Immunological aspects of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate and adaptive immune systems make a crucial contribution to the antitumour effects of conventional chemotherapy-based and radiotherapy-based cancer treatments. Moreover, the molecular and cellular bases of the immunogenicity of cell death that is induced by cytotoxic agents are being progressively unravelled, challenging the guidelines that currently govern the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we review the immunological aspects of conventional cancer treatments and propose that future successes in the fight against cancer will rely on the development and clinical application of combined chemo- and immunotherapies.

  14. [Oral complications of chemotherapy of malignant neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Obralić, N; Tahmiscija, H; Kobaslija, S; Beslija, S

    1999-01-01

    Function and integrity disorders of the oral cavity fall into the most frequent complication of the chemotherapy of leucemias, malignant lymphomas and solid tumors. Complications associated with cancer chemotherapy can be direct ones, resulting from the toxic action of antineoplastic agents on the proliferative lining of the mouth, or indirect, as a result of myelosuppression and immunosuppression. The most frequent oral complications associated with cancer chemotherapy are mucositis, infection and bleeding. The principles of prevention and management of oral complications during cancer chemotherapy are considered in this paper.

  15. Rationale for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has usually been considered as an alternative to more traditional modalities. Moreover, it has previously been felt that chemotherapy is inherently immunosuppressive and not suitable for combining with immunotherapy. In this review, the concept of combining different modalities that result in cell death, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with immunotherapy is explored. Tumors actively cause immune suppression which can be reversed by their removal but when this is not possible, enhancing the immune response with nonspecific immune stimulation can enhance the response to other modalities, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, several chemotherapy agents at low doses selectively inhibit regulatory and suppressor cells.

  16. [Adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Qvortrup, Camilla; Mortensen, John Pløen; Pfeiffer, Per

    2013-09-09

    A new Cochrane meta-analysis evaluated adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based, not modern combination chemotherapy) in almost 10,000 patients with rectal cancer and showed a 17% reduction in mortality corresponding well to the efficacy observed in recent studies, which reported a reduction in mortality just about 20%. The authors recommend adjuvant chemotherapy which is in accordance with the Danish national guidelines where 5-FU-based chemotherapy is recommended for stage III and high-risk stage II rectal cancer.

  17. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: exploring patients’ subjective experience

    PubMed Central

    Salihah, Noor; Mazlan, Nik; Lua, Pei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to explore the subjective experience of nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy treatment among breast cancer patients and the impacts on their daily lives. Methods A qualitative descriptive study was conducted in breast cancer patients who received chemotherapy and had experienced nausea and/or vomiting. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed using content analysis based on Giorgi’s method. Results Of 15 patients who participated, 13 were included in the final analysis (median age =46 years, interquartile range [IQR] =6.0; all were Malays). Vomiting was readily expressed as the “act of throwing up”, but nausea was a symptom that was difficult to describe. Further exploration found great individual variation in patterns, intensity, and impact of these chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) symptoms. While not all patients expressed CINV as bothersome, most patients described the symptom as quite distressing. CINV was reported to affect many aspects of patients’ lives particularly eating, physical, emotional, and social functioning, but the degree of impacts was unique to each patient. One of the important themes that emerged was the increase in worship practices and “faith in God” among Malay Muslim patients when dealing with these adverse effects. Conclusion CINV continues to be a problem that adversely affects the daily lives of patients, hence requiring better understandings from the health care professionals on patients’ needs and concerns when experiencing this symptom. PMID:27110121

  18. Implantable chemotherapy-loaded silk protein materials for neuroblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Jeannine; Harris, Jamie; Zakharov, Alexander D; Poirier, Jennifer; Ikegaki, Naohiko; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Pilichowska, Monika; Lyubimov, Alexander V; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Kaplan, David L; Chiu, Bill

    2017-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial childhood solid tumor. Treatment of high risk tumors require intense multicycle chemotherapies, resulting in short- and long-term toxicities. Here, we present treatment of an orthotopic neuroblastoma mouse model, with silk fibroin materials loaded with vincristine, doxorubicin or the combination as a intratumoral, sustained release system. The materials, loaded with vincristine with or without doxorubicin, significantly decreased neuroblastoma tumor growth compared to materials loaded without drug or doxorubicin only as well as intravenous (IV) drug treatment. The intratumoral drug concentration was significantly higher with intratumoral delivery versus IV. Furthermore, intratumor delivery decreased the maximum plasma concentration compared to IV delivery, reducing systemic exposure and possibly reduing long-term side effects of chemotherapy exposure. Histopathologically, tumors with remission periods >25 days before recurrence transformed from a "small-round-blue cell" (SBRC) to predominantly "large cell" neuroblastoma (LCN) histopathology, a more aggressive tumor subtype with unfavorable clinical outcomes. These results show that intratumoral chemotherapy delivery may be a treatment strategy for pediatric neuroblastoma, potentially translatable to other focal tumors types. Furthermore, this treatment modality allows for a clinically relevant mouse model of tumor transformation that may be used for studying the phenotypical tumor recurrence and developing more effective treatment strategies for recurrent tumors.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  20. Systemic Chemotherapy and White Matter Integrity in Tracts Associated with Cognition Among Children With Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    de Blank, Peter Matthew Kennedy; Berman, Jeffrey I; Fisher, Michael Jay

    2016-05-01

    Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are predisposed to both brain tumors and cognitive deficits. While changes in white matter integrity after multimodal therapy are associated with cognitive dysfunction, the effect of isolated chemotherapy in NF1 is unknown. To determine whether chemotherapy is associated with white matter microstructural changes, we examined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in NF1 subjects. We reviewed DTI measures in tracts associated with cognition but free from tumor in 24 children with NF1-associated optic pathway gliomas unexposed to surgery or radiation. Twelve age-matched pairs were identified based on exposure to chemotherapy. A paired t-test was used to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) in tracts of interest between subjects with and without chemotherapy exposure. On paired t-test, FA was significantly lower in the corpus callosum (P = 0.015) and cerebellothalamic (P = 0.038) tracts of subjects exposed to chemotherapy. There was no effect of age or time from chemotherapy on the difference between groups. In multivariable analysis, FA of these tracts was associated with chemotherapy exposure after adjusting for age, tumor location, and DTI acquisition. In longitudinal measures, FA decreased after chemotherapy exposure while FA increased with age in unexposed subjects. Exposure to low-intensity chemotherapy in NF1 is associated with changes in white matter microstructure in tracts associated with cognition. Future studies should determine whether these changes are associated with cognitive decline. While chemotherapy may spare cognition relative to radiation and surgery, children with NF1 exposed to chemotherapy may benefit from early cognitive testing to allow for earlier intervention. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chemotherapy for intraperitoneal use: a review of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, Sarah; Detelich, Danielle; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal spread of tumors is a major problem in cancer management. Patients develop a marked deterioration in quality of life and shortened survival. This is in part due to bowel obstructions, marked ascites, and overall increase debilitation. Standard medical management has shown to be inadequate for the treatment of these problems. Surgery can palliate symptoms, however, it is unable to be complete at the microscopic level by a significant spillage of tumor cells throughout the abdomen. Chemotherapy can have some improvement in symptoms however it is short lived due to poor penetration into the peritoneal cavity. The role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to maximize tumor penetration and optimize cell death while minimizing systemic toxicity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) are two treatment methods that serve this role and have been shown to improve survival. This review will discuss different chemotherapies used for both of these treatment options. PMID:26941983

  2. Risk adapted single-agent dactinomycin or carboplatin for second-line treatment of methotrexate resistant low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Winter, M C; Tidy, J A; Hills, A; Ireson, J; Gillett, S; Singh, K; Hancock, B W; Coleman, R E

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome of patients treated with second-line chemotherapy for methotrexate-resistant low-risk GTN at the Sheffield Centre, UK between 2001 and 2015, including the novel use of single-agent carboplatin as a strategy to reduce exposure to combination chemotherapy. 392 low-risk GTN patients were treated with first-line methotrexate. The selection of chemotherapy regimen following methotrexate-resistance depended on the volume of residual disease as indicated by the serum hCG value at the time, with patients switching to either single-agent dactinomycin at an hCG level<150IU/L from 2001-2010 and <300IU/L since 2010, or to combination treatment with etoposide/dactinomycin (EA) above these thresholds. In order to reduce exposure to more toxic combination chemotherapy regimens, our treatment policy was revised in 2011, with the recommendation of single-agent carboplatin as an alternative to EA at hCG levels >300IU/L. 136 (35%) of 392 received second-line chemotherapy following methotrexate-resistance. 59 patients received single-agent dactinomycin with 53 (90%) patients achieving complete hCG response, 3 patients requiring combination chemotherapy or surgery, and 3 patients subsequently spontaneously resolving. 56 patients received EA chemotherapy with hCG complete response in 50 (89%) patients, and the remaining 6 patients were cured with further multi-agent chemotherapy or surgery. With carboplatin, 17/21 (81%) achieved an overall complete hCG response rate, with 4 patients requiring third-line EA. Carboplatin was well tolerated with no significant alopecia; myelosuppression was the most significant toxicity. Overall survival for all patients was 100%. These data show the continued excellent outcomes for methotrexate-resistant low-risk patients treated with single-agent dactinomycin or EA. Our experience with carboplatin is promising and provides an alternative regimen for methotrexate-resistant low-risk disease that avoids alopecia and in

  3. How rural land use management facilitates drought risk adaptation in a changing climate - A case study in arid northern China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yongdeng; Zhang, Hailin; Chen, Fu; Zhang, Linbo

    2016-04-15

    Under a warming climate, frequent drought and water scarcity in northern China have severely disrupted agricultural production and posed a substantial threat to farmers' livelihoods. Based on first-hand data collected through in-depth interviews with local managers and farmer households, this study evaluated the effectiveness of rural land use management in mitigating drought risk, ensuring food security and improving farmers' livelihoods. Our findings indicate that a) reforestation on low-yield cropland not only can improve the eco-environment but can also prominently mitigate the production risk to local farmers; b) replacing the traditional border irrigation with sprinkler irrigation has substantially curbed agricultural water usage and increased the per unit of output; and c) in recent years, instead of planting water-intensive grain crops, local farmers cultivated more forage crops to raise animals, which greatly diversified their income sources and reduced the drought risk of agricultural production. By performing an empirical case study in drought-prone Inner Mongolia, this study provides decision-makers with insights into how to strategically adapt to drought risk and reduce rural poverty within the broader context of climate change.

  4. Surgical technology and pharmacology of hyperthermic perioperative chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Van der Speeten, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic perioperative chemotherapy (HIPEC) have not been shown to be effective by themselves, as a combined treatment they are now standard of care for peritoneal metastases from appendiceal cancer and from colorectal cancer as well as peritoneal mesothelioma. The timing of the HIPEC in relation to the CRS is crucial in that the HIPEC is to destroy minimal residual disease that remains following the CRS and prevent microscopic tumor emboli within the abdomen and pelvis from implanting within the resection site, within fibrinous clot, or within blood clot. Proper selection of chemotherapy agents is crucial to the long-term benefit of CRS and HIPEC. One must consider the response expected with the cancer chemotherapy agent, its area under the curve (AUC) ratio indicating the amount of dose intensity within the peritoneal space, and the drug retention within the peritoneal space for a prolonged exposure. Hyperthermia will augment the cytotoxicity of the cancer chemotherapy agents and improve drug penetration. Irrigation techniques should not be overlooked as an important means of reducing the cancer cell burden within the abdomen and pelvis. Multiple technologies for HIPEC exist and these have advantages and disadvantages. The techniques vary from a totally open technique with a vapor barrier over the open abdominal space to a totally closed technique whereby the HIPEC is administered at the completion of the surgical procedure. The open techniques depend on a table-mounted retractor for suspension of the skin edges allowing a reservoir to occur within the abdomen and pelvis. There are nearly a dozen commercially available hyperthermia pumps, all of which seem to perform adequately for HIPEC although there is a variable degree of convenience and documentation of the HIPEC procedure. As the management of peritoneal metastases has progressed over three decades, early cases are now seen in which a laparoscopic CRS and HIPEC

  5. Pneumonia during Remission Induction Chemotherapy in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Javier Barreda; Lei, Xiudong; Wierda, William; Cortes, Jorge E.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is a major cause of death during induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The purpose of this study was to quantify the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of pneumonia in patients with acute leukemia. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 801 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who underwent induction chemotherapy. Measurements and Main Results: Pneumonia was present at induction start in 85 patients (11%). Of the 716 remaining patients, 148 (21%) developed pneumonia. The incidence rate of pneumonia was higher in MDS and AML than in ALL (0.013 vs. 0.008 vs. 0.003 pneumonias per day, respectively; P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age greater than or equal to 60 years, AML, low platelet count, low albumin level, neutropenia, and neutrophil count greater than 7,300 were risk factors. The case fatality rate of pneumonia was 17% (40 of 233). Competing risk analysis demonstrated that in the absence of pneumonia, death was rare: 28-day mortality was 6.2% for all patients but only 1.26% in those without pneumonia. Compared with patients without pneumonia, patients with pneumonia had more intensive care unit days, longer hospital stays, and 49% higher costs (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Pneumonia after induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia continues to be common, and it is the most important determinant of early mortality after induction chemotherapy. Given the high incidence, morbidity, mortality, and cost of pneumonia, interventions aimed at prevention are warranted in patients with acute leukemia. PMID:23987587

  6. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then I got used ... uncovered.” Questions other people have asked: Why does hair fall out? Chemotherapy can harm the cells that ...

  7. Usefulness of a pharmacist outpatient service for S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Go, Makiko; Iwai, Mina; Usami, Eiseki; Teramachi, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

    2017-09-01

    S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy is an outpatient treatment for gastric cancer. To evaluate the role of the pharmacist outpatient service in increasing medication adherence and reducing adverse events associated with S-1, the present study retrospectively analyzed prescription recommendations from pharmacists to physicians and the persistence rate of S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy use in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 40 subjects who utilized the pharmacist outpatient service between November 2014 and March 2016 comprised the pharmacist group; and 94 patients who underwent S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer between September 2012 and October 2014, but not as pharmacist outpatients, comprised the control group. Data on the prescription recommendations, persistence rate of S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy for 1 year and relative dose intensity were collected. The number of interventions and consultations for the pharmacist outpatient group were 40 and 644, respectively. Prescription recommendations regarding dosage, drug administration interval, and supportive therapy were provided in 62, 15 and 132 cases, respectively. The prescription proposal acceptance rate was 92.5%. The persistence rate of S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy for 1 year was significantly higher in the pharmacist group (82.5%) compared with the control group (39.4%; P<0.0001). The discontinuation rate due to adverse events was significantly lower in the pharmacist group (7.5%) compared with the control group (31.9%; P=0.0015). In subjects who completed S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy, the relative dose intensities in the control and pharmacist groups were 82.9 and 84.7%, respectively. In conclusion, the continued pharmaceutical intervention ensured a high persistence rate of S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy.

  8. Risk-adapted partial larynx and/or carotid artery sparing modulated radiation therapy of glottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Glanzmann, Christoph; Huber, Gerhard; Studer, Gabriela

    2014-06-13

    To evaluate outcome in patients with glottic cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to show effectiveness of partial laryngeal- and/or carotid artery sparing in low to intermediate risk tumors. Retrospective analysis. From 01/2004 to 03/2013 77 consecutive patients presenting with glottic cancer were treated in our department with IMRT as definitive treatment. T-stages distributed as follows: T1: n = 17, T2: n = 24, T3: n = 15, T4: n = 13 and recurrences: 8 patients. Concomitant systemic therapy was applied in 39 patients consisting of either cisplatin or cetuximab. Mean/median follow-up (FU) time was 32.2/28 months (range: 4-98.7). Three year local control (LC), ultimate LRC and laryngectomy free survival rate was 77%, 92% and 80%, respectively. Three year overall survival of the entire cohort was 81%. Three year local control for T1/T2, T3/T4, and recurred tumors was 95%, 65%, and 38%, respectively. Three year overall survival was 86% for T1-4 stages, 55% for recurred disease, respectively. Partial laryngeal/carotid artery sparing was performed in all T1 patients (n = 17) and 17/22 T2N0 patients. Rate of late sequels was low. IMRT for glottic cancer shows high control rates. In low to intermediate risk tumors an individualized treatment volume with partial larynx +/- carotid artery sparing is effective and holds the potential to reduce long term toxicity. The therapeutic outcome was not compromised.

  9. Risk-adapted partial larynx and/or carotid artery sparing modulated radiation therapy of glottic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate outcome in patients with glottic cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to show effectiveness of partial laryngeal- and/or carotid artery sparing in low to intermediate risk tumors. Study design Retrospective analysis. Material and methods From 01/2004 to 03/2013 77 consecutive patients presenting with glottic cancer were treated in our department with IMRT as definitive treatment. T-stages distributed as follows: T1: n = 17, T2: n = 24, T3: n = 15, T4: n = 13 and recurrences: 8 patients. Concomitant systemic therapy was applied in 39 patients consisting of either cisplatin or cetuximab. Results Mean/median follow-up (FU) time was 32.2/28 months (range: 4–98.7). Three year local control (LC), ultimate LRC and laryngectomy free survival rate was 77%, 92% and 80%, respectively. Three year overall survival of the entire cohort was 81%. Three year local control for T1/T2, T3/T4, and recurred tumors was 95%, 65%, and 38%, respectively. Three year overall survival was 86% for T1-4 stages, 55% for recurred disease, respectively. Partial laryngeal/carotid artery sparing was performed in all T1 patients (n = 17) and 17/22 T2N0 patients. Rate of late sequels was low. Conclusion IMRT for glottic cancer shows high control rates. In low to intermediate risk tumors an individualized treatment volume with partial larynx +/- carotid artery sparing is effective and holds the potential to reduce long term toxicity. The therapeutic outcome was not compromised. PMID:24923417

  10. [Chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shigenori; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2011-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a clinically important and sometimes dose-limiting toxicity of cancer treatment, including standard-dose chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Consequently, dose reductions or treatment delays resulting from mucositis may impair treatment effectiveness. Symptoms are oral mucositis, dysphagia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, depending on the affected site. Although the underlying pathobiology of oral mucositis has been considerably elucidated over the past decade, there are few interventions for the prevention or treatment validated by randomized trials. The most commonly accepted intervention is basic oral care. Diarrhea is most common in patients treated with irinotecan and in some cases, life-threatening. No definitive interventions for the prevention of diarrhea exist, but there is evidence that loperamide and octreotide are effective for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. In future, there is a need for well designed trials, preferably including a placebo or no treatment control, validating more effective interventions for managing chemotherapy- induced mucositis.

  11. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  12. Impact of Chemotherapy for HIV-1 Related Lymphoma on Residual Viremia and Cellular HIV-1 DNA in Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cillo, Anthony R.; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Para, Michael F.; Mellors, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical Trials Registration Unique Identifier: NCT00001137 PMID:24638072

  13. Impact of chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma on residual viremia and cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Anthony R; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Para, Michael F; Mellors, John W

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical trials registration unique identifier: NCT00001137.

  14. [Genomic markers and anticancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko

    2008-02-01

    Worldwide research on the human genome exerts a major impact on medical science. The growing evidence that genetic polymorphisms in the metabolism, the disposition, and the targets of drugs can have an even greater influence on the efficacy and the toxicity led to the creation of a novel chemotherapeutic strategy, personalized medicine. Much effort has been directed toward identifying the indicators of individual response to drugs, and these studies have provided a variety of potent predictive markers of individual drug response, which include some significant markers in clinical practice with sufficient evidence. Personalized medicine based on the response prediction using genomic marker is increasingly being recognized as a practical treatment approach in cancer chemotherapy, and to be indispensable when molecular targeted drugs are involved in the therapy. Even so, the ingenious and intricate mechanism of individual drug response creates obstacles in predicting chemotherapeutic response: Multiple factors are involved in the mechanisms, and key factors for drug response vary significantly among individuals. DNA chip technology enables us to overview a huge number of gene expressions simultaneously, but gene expression profiles of drug sensitivity vary considerably even for the same drug, which shows the limited value of a static microarray-expression profile as a marker aimed at individualizing patient therapy. Selection of a set of truly significant genomic markers and understanding of their interplay are of key importance in prediction of individual response to drug therapies. Challenges to such biological complexity are now started to identify a better genomic marker. The contribution of genomic marker research to anticancer chemotherapy and problems of the day were reviewed.

  15. Trace Elements and Chemotherapy Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Yang, Weiping; Long, Gang; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-10-01

    Trace elements might be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the efficacy of chemotherapy against HCC. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the association between trace elements and efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with HCC. Cancer, cancer-adjacent, and cancer-free tissues were collected intraoperatively from 55 patients with HCC between January 2001 and April 2004 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University in Guangxi (China), a high HCC incidence area in the world. Trace element levels were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In vitro sensitivity of cancer cells to five chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin) was tested using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in cancer cells from 32 patients. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium levels had the same gradient distribution in different liver tissues: cancer < cancer-adjacent < cancer-free tissues. Copper levels of cancer tissues were negatively correlated with body weight (r = -0.278, P = 0.027), while manganese and selenium levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.297, P = 0.015; r = -0.285, P = 0.018, respectively). Simple correlation analyses revealed that the carboplatin sensitivity was negatively correlated with selenium levels of cancer tissues, while doxorubicin sensitivity was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.497, P = 0.004). Partial correlation analyses showed that doxorubicin sensitivity only was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.450, P = 0.014). These results suggest that the selenium and manganese content in primary HCC tissues could influence the response of the HCC cells to carboplatin and doxorubicin. These preliminary results provide a basis for future studies.

  16. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Evaluation of the Therapeutic Effect of Chemotherapy for Patients with Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Naoyuki; Nagira, Haruki; Sannomiya, Naoko; Ikunishi, Saeko; Hattori, Yuiko; Kamida, Akira; Koyanagi, Yuki; Shimabayashi, Kenta; Sato, Kengo; Saito, Hiroaki; Hirooka, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background The therapeutic effect of chemotherapy for liver metastases is currently determined by changes in tumor diameter depicted on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, but it cannot accurately determine if there is central necrosis. Furthermore, due to the risk of radiation exposure and high cost, frequent examination using these methods places a heavy burden on patients. Meanwhile, real-time observation of blood flow and vessel morphology within tumors has become possible by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). However, use of CEUS in evaluating the therapeutic effect of anticancer chemotherapy has rarely been investigated. This study investigated whether changes in the time-intensity curve (TIC) of CEUS are useful indicators of the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy. Methods Five patients with liver metastases who had undergone CEUS before and after chemotherapy were included in this study. The TIC of each time point was prepared to examine whether the following five TIC parameters serve as indicators of the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy: peak intensity, time to wash-in, time to peak intensity, slope of wash-in, and area under the curve. In each parameter, rate of change (ROC) was calculated by the expression [(values before chemotherapy minus those after chemotherapy)/those before chemotherapy × 100(%)]. Results (i) Among the five TIC parameters tested, ROC of the slope of wash-in and the area under the curve reflected the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy better than the remaining three parameters. (ii) TIC parameters after one cycle of chemotherapy were examined in two of five patients, and changes in the slope of wash-in and the area under the curve were in good agreement with the computed tomography findings indicative of the therapeutic effect after the fourth chemotherapy cycle. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that ROC of the slope of wash-in and the area under the curve of the TIC are useful in evaluating

  17. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Oliveira, Thaís Marchini; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the intensity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the management of cancer has increased the incidence of adverse effects, especially oral mucositis. a bibliographical review was conducted on the definition of oral mucositis, its clinical findings, the incidence, its etiology, the pathophysiology, associated morbidity, prevention and treatment. current studies define oral mucositis as a very frequent and painful inflammation with ulcers on the oral mucosa that are covered by a pseudo membrane. The incidence and severity of lesions are influenced by patient and treatment variables. Oral mucositis is a result of two major mechanisms: direct toxicity on the mucosa and myelosuppression due to the treatment. Its pathophysiology is composed of four interdependent phases: an initial inflammatory/vascular phase; an epithelial phase; an ulcerative/bacteriological phase; and a healing phase. It is considered a potential source of life-threatening infection and often is a dose-limiting factor in anticancer therapy. Some interventions have been shown to be potentially effective to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Further intensive research through well-structured clinical trials to obtain the best scientific evidence over the standard therapy of oral mucositis is necessary to attain ideal parameters for radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  18. Beneficial effects of an anabolic steroid during cytotoxic chemotherapy for metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Spiers, A S; DeVita, S F; Allar, M J; Richards, S; Sedransk, N

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the effects of concurrent administration of an anabolic steroid upon hematopoiesis and metabolism in patients with cancer who were receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy, a randomized trial was conducted. Thirty-three evaluable patients received intensive multiple-agent chemotherapy: 17 received in addition nandrolone decanoate ("Deca-Durabolin"), 200 mg intramuscularly each week. The nandrolone-treated patients showed significantly better maintenance of hemoglobin concentrations and body weight, and a highly significant reduction in number of blood transfusions. Improved survival in the androgen-treated patients did not achieve significance. There were no differences in neutrophil or platelet counts or in tolerance of cytotoxic drugs. Toxicity from nandrolone therapy was minimal.

  19. Incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: ADVICE (Actual Data of Vomiting Incidence by Chemotherapy Evaluation) study.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Yolanda; Cajaraville, Gerardo; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; Álvarez, Rosa; Muñoz, Andrés; Olariaga, Olatz; Tamés, María José; Muros, Begoña; Lecumberri, María Jose; Feliu, Jaime; Martínez, Purificación; Adansa, Juan Carlos; Martínez, María José; López, Rafael; Blasco, Ana; Gascón, Pere; Calvo, Virginia; Luna, Pablo; Montalar, Joaquín; Del Barrio, Patricia; Tornamira, María Victoria

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to determine the incidence of nausea and vomiting (CINV) after moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC), under medical practice conditions and the accuracy with which physicians perceive CINV. Chemotherapy-naive patients receiving MEC between April 2012 and May 2013 were included. Patients completed a diary of the intensity of nausea and number of vomiting episodes. Complete response and complete protection were assessed as secondary endpoints. Of 261 patients included, 240 were evaluated. Median age was 64 years, 44.2 % were female and 11.2 % were aged less than 50 years; 95.3 % of patients received a combination of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) antagonist + corticosteroid as antiemetic treatment. Vomiting within 5 days of chemotherapy administration occurred in 20.8 %, nausea in 42 % and significant nausea in 23.8 % of patients. An increase in the percentage of patients with significant nausea (from 9.4 to 21.7 %) and vomiting (from 9.2 to 16.5 %) was observed from the acute to the delayed phase. Complete response was 84.2 % in the acute phase, 77 % in the late phase and 68.9 % in overall period. Complete protection was 79.5 % in the acute phase, 68.8 % in the late phase and 62.4 % throughout the study period. Physicians estimated prophylaxis would be effective for 75 % of patients receiving MEC, compared with 54.1 % obtained from patients' diary. Despite receiving prophylactic treatment, 31 % of patients did not achieve a complete response and 38 % complete protection. In general, nausea was worse controlled than vomiting. The results also showed the late phase was worse controlled than the acute phase in all variables. Healthcare providers overestimated the effectiveness of antiemetic prophylaxis.

  20. Administration of chemotherapy in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, James C; Craft, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of patients on dialysis has increased and these patients present a challenge for chemotherapy administration when diagnosed with cancer. A consensus on the dosage and timing of different chemotherapeutic agents in relation to dialysis has not been established. We describe the pattern of care and treatment outcome for cancer patients on dialysis in our institution. The dataset from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry of patients on dialysis who had a diagnosis of cancer was obtained and matched to the pharmacy records in our institution to identify patients who had received chemotherapy while on dialysis. Relevant clinical information including details of the dialysis regimen, chemotherapy administration and adverse events was extracted for analysis. Between July 1999 and July 2014, 21 patients on dialysis were included for analysis. Five (23.8%) received chemotherapy, most of which was administered before dialysis sessions. As a result of adverse events, one patient discontinued treatment; two other patients required dose reduction or treatment delay. Chemotherapy administration was feasible in cancer patients on dialysis, but chemotherapy usage was low. Better understanding of the altered pharmacokinetics in patients on dialysis may improve chemotherapy access and practice.

  1. Metronomic chemotherapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2017-08-01

    Systemic chemotherapy given at maximum tolerated doses (MTD) has been the mainstay of cancer treatment for more than half a century. In some chemosensitive diseases such as hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, MTD has led to complete remission and even cure. The combination of maintenance therapy and standard MTD also can generate good disease control; however, resistance to chemotherapy and disease metastasis still remain major obstacles to successful cancer treatment in the majority of advanced tumors. Metronomic chemotherapy, defined as frequent administration of chemotherapeutic agents at a non-toxic dose without extended rest periods, was originally designed to overcome drug resistance by shifting the therapeutic target from tumor cells to tumor endothelial cells. Metronomic chemotherapy also exerts anti-tumor effects on the immune system (immunomodulation) and tumor cells. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance host anti-tumor immunities. Adding immunomodulators such as metronomic chemotherapy to immunotherapy can improve the clinical outcomes in a synergistic manner. Here, we review the anti-tumor mechanisms of metronomic chemotherapy and the preliminary research addressing the combination of immunotherapy and metronomic chemotherapy for cancer treatment in animal models and in clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Virtual Reality: A Distraction Intervention for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susan M.; Hood, Linda E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in adults receiving chemotherapy treatments for breast, colon, and lung cancer. Design Crossover design in which participants served as their own control. Setting Outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. Sample 123 adults receiving initial chemotherapy treatments. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and then received no intervention (control) during an alternate matched chemotherapy treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale–2, Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, and State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. The Presence Questionnaire and an open-ended questionnaire were used to evaluate the subjects’ VR experience. The influence of type of cancer, age, and gender on symptom outcomes was explored. Mixed models were used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress. Main Research Variables Virtual reality and symptom distress. Findings Patients had an altered perception of time (p < 0.001) when using VR, which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients believed the head-mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and 82% would use VR again. However, analysis demonstrated no significant differences in symptom distress immediately or two days following chemotherapy treatments. Conclusions Patients stated that using VR made the treatment seem shorter and that chemotherapy treatments with VR were better than treatments without the distraction intervention. However, positive experiences did not result in a decrease in symptom distress. The findings support the idea that using VR can help to make chemotherapy treatments more tolerable, but clinicians should not assume that use of VR will improve chemotherapy

  3. Overview, prevention and management of chemotherapy extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Kreidieh, Firas Y; Moukadem, Hiba A; El Saghir, Nagi S

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy extravasation remains an accidental complication of chemotherapy administration and may result in serious damage to patients. We review in this article the clinical aspects of chemotherapy extravasation and latest advances in definitions, classification, prevention, management and guidelines. We review the grading of extravasation and tissue damage according to various chemotherapeutic drugs and present an update on treatment and new antidotes including dexrazoxane for anthracyclines extravasation. We highlight the importance of education and training of the oncology team for prevention and prompt pharmacological and non-pharmacological management and stress the availability of new antidotes like dexrazoxane wherever anthracyclines are being infused. PMID:26862492

  4. Chemotherapy for cholangiocarcinoma: An update.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Merino, Natalia; Aix, Santiago Ponce; Cortés-Funes, Hernán

    2013-07-15

    Cholangiocarcinomas (bile duct cancers) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from the epithelial cells of the intrahepatic, perihilar and extrahepatic bile ducts. Patients diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma must be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team and be treated with individualized management. First of all, it is very important to define the potential resectability of the tumor because surgery is the main therapeutic option for these patients. Overall, cholangiocarcinomas have a very poor prognosis. The 5-year survival rate is 5%-10%. In cases with a potentially curative surgery, 5-year survival rates of 25%-30% are reported. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the cure rate from surgery, exploring the survival benefit of any adjuvant strategy. It is difficult to clarify the role of adjuvant treatment in localized and locally advanced cholangiocarcinomas. There are limited data and the role of adjuvant chemotherapy/chemoradiation in patients with resected biliary tract cancer is poorly defined. The most relevant studies in the adjuvant setting are one from Japan, the well known ESPAC-3 and BILCAP from the United Kingdom and a meta-analysis. We show the results of these trials. According to medical oncology guidelines, postoperative adjuvant therapy is widely recommended for all patients with intrahepatic or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who have microscopically positive resection margins, as well as for those with a complete resection but node-positive disease. Clinical trials are ongoing. The locally advanced cholangiocarcinoma setting includes a heterogeneous mix of patients: (1) patients who have had surgery but with macroscopic residual disease; (2) patients with locally recurrent disease after potentially curative treatment; and (3) patients with locally unresectable disease at presentation. In these patients, surgery is not an option and chemoradiation therapy can prolong overall survival and provide control of symptoms due to local

  5. Chemotherapy for cholangiocarcinoma: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Merino, Natalia; Aix, Santiago Ponce; Cortés-Funes, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (bile duct cancers) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from the epithelial cells of the intrahepatic, perihilar and extrahepatic bile ducts. Patients diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma must be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team and be treated with individualized management. First of all, it is very important to define the potential resectability of the tumor because surgery is the main therapeutic option for these patients. Overall, cholangiocarcinomas have a very poor prognosis. The 5-year survival rate is 5%-10%. In cases with a potentially curative surgery, 5-year survival rates of 25%-30% are reported. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the cure rate from surgery, exploring the survival benefit of any adjuvant strategy. It is difficult to clarify the role of adjuvant treatment in localized and locally advanced cholangiocarcinomas. There are limited data and the role of adjuvant chemotherapy/chemoradiation in patients with resected biliary tract cancer is poorly defined. The most relevant studies in the adjuvant setting are one from Japan, the well known ESPAC-3 and BILCAP from the United Kingdom and a meta-analysis. We show the results of these trials. According to medical oncology guidelines, postoperative adjuvant therapy is widely recommended for all patients with intrahepatic or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who have microscopically positive resection margins, as well as for those with a complete resection but node-positive disease. Clinical trials are ongoing. The locally advanced cholangiocarcinoma setting includes a heterogeneous mix of patients: (1) patients who have had surgery but with macroscopic residual disease; (2) patients with locally recurrent disease after potentially curative treatment; and (3) patients with locally unresectable disease at presentation. In these patients, surgery is not an option and chemoradiation therapy can prolong overall survival and provide control of symptoms due to local

  6. Prediction of bacteremia in children with febrile episodes during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lücking, Vibeke; Rosthøj, Steen

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to identify risk factors for bacteremia in febrile episodes occurring during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children, and to develop a risk score permitting risk-adapted antibiotic therapy. We reviewed a total of 172 febrile episodes occurring during chemotherapy in 31 children and adolescents with ALL. Temperature, hematological parameters, culture findings, and antibiotic therapy were recorded. Bacteremias were classified as transmucosal or CVC-dependent. Blood cultures were positive with mucosal pathogens in 15 cases (9%) and with skin/environmental bacteria in 34 (20%). CVC-dependent infections occurred throughout the treatment phases, while transmucosal primarily during induction therapy. Transmucosal bacteremia was associated with induction therapy, leukocyte count ≤0.5 × 10(9)/L, neutrophil count ≤0.1 × 10(9)/L, monocyte count ≤0.01 × 10(9)/L, and platelet count ≤50 × 10(9)/L. Based on logistic conversion of the odds ratios for the five factors, a weight of 2 was assigned to induction therapy and leukocyte count ≤0.5 × 10(9)/L, and a weight of 1 to the remaining three parameters. The weights were included in a simple additive score ranging from 0 to 7, which defined groups with 4%, 6%, 24%, and 40% risk of transmucosal bacteremia. CVC-dependent bacteremia was not associated with markers of poor bone marrow function. In conclusion, transmucosal bacteremia in children with ALL is related to infiltration or suppression of the bone marrow. A score reflecting the condition of the marrow can define low-risk and high-risk groups and may prove clinically useful.

  7. [Use of Pegfilgrastim in Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Abe, Noriko; Ohtake, Tohru; Abe, Sadahiko; Aoto, Keita; Okano, Maiko; Tachibana, Kazunoshin; Takenoshita, Seiich

    2016-11-01

    We assessed the incidence of febrile neutropenia(FN), infection, and relative dose intensity(RDI)with or without the use of pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty-five patients received 4 cycles of FEC(5-FU 500mg/m2 plus epirubicin 100 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 100 mg/m2 q3w)followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel(75mg/m2 q3w). Ten patients were administered pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis throughout all cycles of chemotherapy, and 15 patients were not. The rate of FN was only 7% in patients not undergoing pegfilgrastim therapy. The infection rate and RDI were not significantly different between the 2 groups, but the incidence of fever was lower in patients treated with pegfilgrastim. In patients with early stage breast cancer, the use of primary pegfilgrastim during all chemotherapy cycles should be considered a safe option.

  8. In vivo metabolic imaging of mouse tumor models in response to chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukina, Maria M.; Dudenkova, Varvara; Shumilova, Anastasia V.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate energy metabolism in human cervical cancer cells HeLa Kyoto after chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo using two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM). Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. Cancer metabolism was analyzed in dynamics after treatment with cisplatin. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopies as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize cancer tissue structure. We showed an increase of the optical redox ratio FAD/NAD(P)H in cancer cells in vitro and decrease of the relative contribution of free NAD(P)H (ɑ1) in vitro and in vivo, which presumably indicate a shift to more oxidative metabolism after chemotherapy. These data demonstrate the possibility to detect response of cancer cells to chemotherapy using optical metabolic imaging.

  9. Treatment of Pulmonary Tumor Embolism from Choriocarcinoma: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge through Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Heun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Hyun Myung; Jang, Jin Ook; Ye, Byung Min; Yoon, Gun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dohyung; Cho, Woo Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman with a 1-month history of shortness of breath that was treated as a case of tuberculosis and pulmonary embolism was referred to the authors’ hospital. Because of the hemodynamic instability in this patient, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was administered in the intensive care unit. She underwent a pulmonary embolectomy for the treatment of progressive circulatory collapse secondary to a pulmonary embolism. The histopathologic result was consistent with a metastatic choriocarcinoma. Despite the surgical management, persistent refractory cardiogenic shock occurred. Subsequently, the patient was treated with chemotherapy in the presence of ECMO and responded well to chemotherapy. She was discharged after 3 months. This case suggests that metastatic choriocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age presenting with a pulmonary embolism, and ECMO may be beneficial in patients with pulmonary embolism for bridging to surgical embolectomy and chemotherapy. PMID:27384162

  10. Treatment of Pulmonary Tumor Embolism from Choriocarcinoma: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge through Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Heun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Hyun Myung; Jang, Jin Ook; Ye, Byung Min; Yoon, Gun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dohyung; Cho, Woo Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman with a 1-month history of shortness of breath that was treated as a case of tuberculosis and pulmonary embolism was referred to the authors' hospital. Because of the hemodynamic instability in this patient, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was administered in the intensive care unit. She underwent a pulmonary embolectomy for the treatment of progressive circulatory collapse secondary to a pulmonary embolism. The histopathologic result was consistent with a metastatic choriocarcinoma. Despite the surgical management, persistent refractory cardiogenic shock occurred. Subsequently, the patient was treated with chemotherapy in the presence of ECMO and responded well to chemotherapy. She was discharged after 3 months. This case suggests that metastatic choriocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age presenting with a pulmonary embolism, and ECMO may be beneficial in patients with pulmonary embolism for bridging to surgical embolectomy and chemotherapy.

  11. Natural products for cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Demain, Arnold L.; Vaishnav, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Summary For over 40 years, natural products have served us well in combating cancer. The main sources of these successful compounds are microbes and plants from the terrestrial and marine environments. The microbes serve as a major source of natural products with anti‐tumour activity. A number of these products were first discovered as antibiotics. Another major contribution comes from plant alkaloids, taxoids and podophyllotoxins. A vast array of biological metabolites can be obtained from the marine world, which can be used for effective cancer treatment. The search for novel drugs is still a priority goal for cancer therapy, due to the rapid development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, the high toxicity usually associated with some cancer chemotherapy drugs and their undesirable side‐effects increase the demand for novel anti‐tumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side‐effects and/or with greater therapeutic efficiency. This review points out those technologies needed to produce the anti‐tumour compounds of the future. PMID:21375717

  12. Chemotherapy of trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Simon L; Barrett, Michael P; Urbina, Julio A

    2005-11-01

    New formulations, therapeutic switching of the established drugs amphotericin B and paromomycin, and the serendipitous discovery of miltefosine have markedly improved leishmaniasis chemotherapy in the past 21 years. The situation for the two trypanosomiases has been less encouraging. Apart from the introduction of eflornithine for the treatment of late-stage human African trypanosomiasis, with its serious limitations in terms of cost and difficulty of administration, no new drugs have been incorporated into the chemotherapeutic arsenal in the past 25 years, despite important advances in knowledge of the biology of the etiological agents and the pathophysiology of these diseases. In the case of Chagas disease, several classes of compound that target the validated biochemical pathways of the parasite (e.g. inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis and cysteine proteases) are in the pipeline. With the availability of complete genome sequences for all three pathogens, and methods for rapid validation of targets, it is hoped that much-needed amelioration will occur soon. Financial constraints continue to represent a major hurdle to drug development. However, the appearance of not-for-profit product-development partnerships offers a new paradigm for bringing new drugs to patients.

  13. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  14. Novel Combination Chemotherapy for Localized Ewing Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, researchers will test whether the addition of the drug combination vincristine, topotecan, and cyclophosphamide to a standard chemotherapy regimen improves overall survival in patients with extracranial Ewing

  15. Chemotherapy induced liver abnormalities: an imaging perspective

    PubMed Central

    Houshyar, Roozbeh; Bhosale, Priya; Choi, Joon-Il; Gulati, Rajesh; Lall, Chandana

    2014-01-01

    Treating patients undergoing chemotherapy who display findings of liver toxicity, requires a solid understanding of these medications. It is important for any clinician to have an index of suspicion for liver toxicity and be able to recognize it, even on imaging. Cancer chemotherapy has evolved, and newer medications that target cell biology have a different pattern of liver toxicity and may differ from the more traditional cytotoxic agents. There are several hepatic conditions that can result and keen clinical as well as radiographic recognition are paramount. Conditions such as sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, steatosis, and pseudocirrhosis are more commonly associated with chemotherapy. These conditions can display clinical signs of acute hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and even liver failure. It is important to anticipate and recognize these adverse reactions and thus appropriate clinical action can be taken. Often times, patients with these liver manifestations can be managed with supportive therapies, and liver toxicity may resolve after discontinuation of chemotherapy. PMID:25320738

  16. [Value of systemic chemotherapy in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Goebell, P J; vom Dorp, F; Rübben, H

    2006-05-01

    Almost half of the patients with muscle invasive disease already harbor at the time of their first diagnosis occult or distant metastases. Systemic disease has a poor prognosis with a long term survival of less than 10%. The administration of systemic chemotherapy aims to improve the course of locally advanced or metastatic disease.A survival benefit of 5% for patients receiving neoadjuvant and 9-11% using adjuvant chemotherapy is in the first scenario minimal, in the adjuvant setting to be noteworthy. The MVAC-schedule and the Gemcitabine/Cisplatin-combination chemotherapy have to be regarded as standard for induction chemotherapy. However, the 5-year survival rates with 15 or 13% are disappointing.Thus, prognostic factors gain importance since with their consideration significant differences in survival rates can be found. Hope is provided by a novel class of substances, the target-specific drugs, which selectively interfere with the cascade of steps involved in tumorigenesis.

  17. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  18. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Chiu, Gabriel S; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J; Walker, Adam K

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients.

  19. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Walker, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients. PMID:25954147

  20. POG 8625: a randomized trial comparing chemotherapy with chemoradiotherapy for children and adolescents with Stages I, IIA, IIIA1 Hodgkin Disease: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Kung, Faith H; Schwartz, Cindy L; Ferree, Carolyn R; London, Wendy B; Ternberg, Jessie L; Behm, Fred G; Wharam, Moody D; Falletta, John M; de Alarcon, Pedro; Chauvenet, Allen R

    2006-06-01

    To determine if 6 courses of chemotherapy alone could achieve the same or better outcome than 4 courses of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy (chemoradiotherapy) in pediatric and adolescent patients with Hodgkin disease. Children < or =21 years old with biopsy-proven, pathologically staged I, IIA, or IIIA1 Hodgkin disease were randomly assigned 6 courses of alternating nitrogen mustard, oncovin, prednisone, and procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (treatment 1) or 4 courses of alternating nitrogen mustard, oncovin, prednisone, and procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine +2550 cGy involved-field radiotherapy (treatment 2). The complete response rate was 89%, with a complete response and partial response rate of 99.4%. There was no statistically significant difference in event-free survival (EFS) or overall survival between arms. The EFS for those who achieved an early complete response was significantly higher than for those who did not. For pediatric patients with asymptomatic low-stage and intermediate-stage Hodgkin disease, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy both resulted in 3-year EFS of approximately 90% and statistically indistinguishable 8-year EFS and overall survival, without significant long-term toxicity. Early response to therapy was associated with higher EFS, a concept that has led to the Children's Oncology Group paradigm of response-based risk-adapted therapy for pediatric Hodgkin disease.

  1. [Neoadjuvant, inductive or adjuvant chemotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, C-H; De Santis, M

    2013-11-01

    Perioperative chemotherapy is a standard treatment for patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma undergoing radical cystectomy; however, direct comparisons of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy are lacking. Evidence-based data and implementation into daily clinical practice favor neoadjuvant chemotherapy; nevertheless, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is still underused in daily practice compared to adjuvant chemotherapy. If neoadjuvant chemotherapy has not been used and patients are fit enough to receive cisplatin, adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in patients with pT3-pT4 and/or lymph node metastases.

  2. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: A URCC CCOP study of 576 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Julie L.; Heckler, Charles E.; Roscoe, Joseph A.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Kirshner, Jeffrey; Flynn, Patrick J.; Hickok, Jane T.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite the widespread use of antiemetics, nausea continues to be reported by over 70% of patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods In this double blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 744 cancer patients to four arms: 1) placebo, 2) 0.5g ginger, 3) 1.0g ginger, or 4) 1.5g ginger. Nausea occurrence and severity were assessed at a baseline cycle and the two following cycles during which patients were taking their assigned study medication. All patients received a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetic on Day 1 of all cycles. Patients took three capsules of ginger (250mg) or placebo twice daily for six days starting three days before the first day of chemotherapy. Patients reported the severity of nausea on a 7-point rating scale (“1” = “Not at all Nauseated” and “7” = “Extremely Nauseated”) for Days 1-4 of each cycle. The primary outcomes were to determine the dose and efficacy of ginger at reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea on Day 1 of chemotherapy. Results A total of 576 patients were included in final analysis (91% female, mean age = 53). Mixed model analyses demonstrated that all doses of ginger significantly reduced acute nausea severity compared to placebo on Day 1 of chemotherapy (p=0.003). The largest reduction in nausea intensity occurred with 0.5g and 1.0g of ginger (p=0.017 and p=0.036, respectively). Anticipatory nausea was a key factor in acute chemotherapy-induced nausea (p<0.0001). Conclusions Ginger supplementation at daily dose of 0.5g-1.0g significantly aids in reduction of the severity of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in adult cancer patients. PMID:21818642

  3. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Caroline E; Olsen, Elise A

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia has been well documented as a cause of distress to patients undergoing cancer treatment. Despite the importance of hair loss to patients, however, patients often receive little more counseling than the advice to purchase a wig or other head covering for the duration of their treatment. Research into non-camouflage (wigs, turbans, and head scarves) treatment methods has been complicated both by a lack of a standardized methodology for evaluating hair loss and hair regrowth and by a lack of human trials. Nevertheless, scalp cooling as a method of preventing hair loss during chemotherapy and 2% topical minoxidil as a therapy for accelerating regrowth after chemotherapy are both effective non-camouflage options for treatment. Other proposed treatments for prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy have demonstrated promise in early trials, but these findings will need validation from rigorous further studies. The increasing number of reports of permanent alopecia not just with pre-bone marrow transplant, high-dose busulfan, and cyclophosphamide regimens but also with standard breast cancer chemotherapy regimens illustrates the importance of further research into treatment methods for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of a modified prognostic index of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma aged 70 years or younger: a possible risk-adapted management strategies including allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Utsunomiya, Atae; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Owatari, Satsuki; Miyagi, Takashi; Taguchi, Jun; Choi, Ilseung; Otsuka, Eiichi; Nakachi, Sawako; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Saiko; Tobinai, Kensei; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2017-03-24

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma is a distinct type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation after chemotherapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, there is no consensus about indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation because there is no established risk stratification system for transplant eligible patients. We conducted a nationwide survey of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma to construct a new large database that includes 1,792 patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 and received intensive first-line chemotherapy. We randomly divided patients into two groups (training and validation sets). Acute type, poor performance status, high soluble interleukin-2 receptor level (> 5,000 U/mL), high adjusted calcium level (≥ 12 mg/dL), and high C-reactive protein level (≥ 2.5 mg/dL) were independent adverse prognostic factors using the training set. We used these five variables to divide patients into three risk groups. In the validation set, medial overall survival was 626 days, 322 days, and 197 days for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. In the intermediate- and high-risk groups, transplanted recipients had significantly better overall survival than non-transplanted patients. We developed a new promising risk stratification system to identify patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who may benefit from upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm the benefit of this treatment strategy.

  5. The Role of High-Dose Chemotherapy Supported by Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Anna Liza; Tariman, Joseph D.; Enecio, Toreend; Estrella, Stella Marie

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells originating from the B-cell line, is associated with deleterious complications and poor outcomes. The failure of conventional combination chemotherapies to improve the overall survival of patients with MM has led to the use of high-dose chemotherapy supported by stem cell transplantation (SCT). Although several novel therapies have emerged since the late 1990s, their survival benefits are undetermined. High-dose chemotherapy with SCT provides better response rates compared to conventional chemotherapy and yields a trend toward greater survival benefits, especially with the use of a tandem (two successive) transplantation strategy. This article discusses standard SCT in patients with MM and some of the new transplantation strategies, including tandem autologous SCTs and reduced-intensity nonmyeloablative allogeneic SCT, and their implications for nursing. PMID:17723970

  6. Is Gemcitabine and Cisplatin Induction Chemotherapy Superior in Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Qiu, Sufang; Huang, Lingling; Pan, Jianji

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the outcome of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Between June 2005 and October 2007, 604 patients with locoregionally advanced NPC were analyzed, of whom 399 and 205 were treated with conventional radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) respectively. Meanwhile, 153 patients received concurrent chemotherapy, and 520 were given induction chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up time of 65 months, the 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS), locoregional free survival (LRFS), and distant-metastasis free survival (DMFS) rates were 82.5% vs. 72.6%, 90.6% vs. 87.1%, and 82.5% vs. 81.2%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy was not an independent prognostic factor for OS (P=0.193) or LRFS, but there was a positive tendency for DMFS (P=0.088). GP regimen (gemcitabine + cisplatin) was an independent prognostic factor for OS (P = 0.038) and it had a trend toward improved DMFS (P = 0.109). TP regimen (taxol + cisplatin) was only a significant prognostic factor for DMFS (P =0.038). Conclusions: Adding induction chemotherapy had no survival benefit, but GP regimen benefited overall survival and had a trend toward improved DMFS. GP regimen may be superior to TP/FP regimen (fluorouracil + cisplatin) in treating locoregionally advanced NPC. PMID:26430402

  7. Maculopapular skin rashes associated with high-dose chemotherapy: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wright, Lynette G

    2006-11-27

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for maculopapular skin rashes associated with high-dose chemotherapy. Observational pilot study. A bone marrow transplant hematology-oncology unit in a private city hospital. Data were collected on 14 patients who developed maculopapular rashes out of 127 patients who received high-dose chemotherapy (purposive sampling). Observation of the distribution and nature of skin rashes in relation to chemotherapy, disease, adjuvant medications, and white blood cell counts. Diseases, chemotherapy protocols and doses, adjuvant medications, and blood counts. Skin reactions ranged from mild, scattered macular or maculopapular rashes to severe rashes. Patients newly diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who received induction protocols containing cytarabine had the most rashes, affecting 6 of 11 patients (55%). No rashes were observed on patients treated with the protocol that included high-dose corticosteroids. Patients rarely had recurrence of the rash with further courses of chemotherapy. Cytarabine doses higher than 700 mg/m2 may be a cause of maculopapular skin rashes. Patients most at risk were those newly diagnosed with AML who received induction therapy. Corticosteroids may prevent the development of skin rashes. No useful nursing strategy exists to prevent, lessen the intensity of, or shorten the course of a delayed hypersensitivity rash. Knowing which patients are most at risk is useful to enable close monitoring and patient and staff education.

  8. Activating mutations in the NT5C2 nucleotidase gene drive chemotherapy resistance in relapsed ALL.

    PubMed

    Tzoneva, Gannie; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Carpenter, Zachary; Khiabanian, Hossein; Tosello, Valeria; Allegretta, Maddalena; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Hof, Jana; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2013-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an aggressive hematological tumor resulting from the malignant transformation of lymphoid progenitors. Despite intensive chemotherapy, 20% of pediatric patients and over 50% of adult patients with ALL do not achieve a complete remission or relapse after intensified chemotherapy, making disease relapse and resistance to therapy the most substantial challenge in the treatment of this disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identify mutations in the cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II gene (NT5C2), which encodes a 5'-nucleotidase enzyme that is responsible for the inactivation of nucleoside-analog chemotherapy drugs, in 20/103 (19%) relapse T cell ALLs and 1/35 (3%) relapse B-precursor ALLs. NT5C2 mutant proteins show increased nucleotidase activity in vitro and conferred resistance to chemotherapy with 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine when expressed in ALL lymphoblasts. These results support a prominent role for activating mutations in NT5C2 and increased nucleoside-analog metabolism in disease progression and chemotherapy resistance in ALL.

  9. Basic T1 Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chun; Feng, Xiaoyan; Bian, Dujun; Du, Wanping; Wang, Xiangquan; Zhao, Yan

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the dynamic changes of blood perfusion coinciding with tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Thirty patients with LACC received conventional 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging scans at 3 different times (before NACT, 2 weeks after the first NACT, and 2 weeks after the second NACT). Characteristics of time-intensity diagrams and patterns of blood perfusion maps according to the parameter of area under the curve (AUC) were observed. Eight perfusion parameters were compared among 3 time points at 2 different chemotherapy-sensitive groups by the software of Basic T1 Perfusion. The effective chemotherapy rate was 73.3% (22/30). The characteristic of time-intensity diagrams in cervical cancer was a rapid onset with plateau. There were 3 patterns of AUC perfusion maps. The common perfusion map was rich blood supply type in the effective chemotherapy group and peripheral blood supply type in the ineffective chemotherapy group. Four parameter values (relative enhancement, maximum enhancement, wash-in rate, and AUC) were significantly reduced 2 weeks after the second NACT than those before the therapy (P = 0.000; P = 0.009; P = 0.011; and P = 0.000) in the effective chemotherapy group, especially the value of relative enhancement 2 weeks after the first NACT, was obviously decreased compared to that before the therapy (P = 0.042). The value of time to peak 2 weeks after the second NACT was significantly longer than that before the therapy in the effective chemotherapy group (P = 0.001). There were no obvious changes of blood perfusion parameters among the 3 different times in the ineffective chemotherapy group. Tumor blood perfusion has obviously decreased after effective NACT in the treatment of LACC.

  10. [Fever with chemotherapy induced neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Conen, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients under chemotherapy are at high risk for neutropenia. If fever occurs in this situation an oncologic emergency is underway. Patient should receive immediate basic diagnostic procedures and broad-spectrum antibiotics have to be initiated. Definition of febrile neutropenia (FN) encloses oral temperature of > 38.3 °C or two consecutive readings of > 38.0 °C one hour apart and an absolute neutrophil count of < 0.5 × 109/l. FN management requires immediate action and therefore needs patient education and standard operating procedures in the clinical setting. Treatment strategies depend on risk factors and symptoms of the patient. Instruments, mainly the Multinational Association for Supportive Care (MASCC), can predict low and high risk situations and are useful tools in clinical practice. Low-risk patients can either be treated by oral or short term intravenous antibacterial therapy with an early change to an oral protocol (oral treatment recommendation: Quinolone with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid). Hospital admission is recommended in low-risk patients but outpatient management has become increasingly appealing in selected cases due to costs, reduction in nosocomial infections and patient's convenience. High-risk patients should always be admitted to the hospital and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be commenced promptly (intravenous treatment recommendation: anti-pseudomonas cephalosporin. Local epidemiologic bacterial isolate and resistance patterns are important since MRSA or other resistances should be covered). Duration of treatment depends on neutrophil count, patient's symptoms and fever. Evaluation should be done on a daily basis. If fever continues after 48 - 72 hours, antibiotic rotation and/or antifungal therapy may be needed.

  11. An Undesired Effect of Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sumit; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Seema; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; McClellan, Steven; Nirodi, Chaitanya S.; Piazza, Gary A.; Grizzle, William E.; Owen, Laurie B.; Singh, Ajay P.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling plays an important role in gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer (PC) cells. Here, we explored the effect of gemcitabine on this resistance mechanism. Our data demonstrate that gemcitabine induces CXCR4 expression in two PC cell lines (MiaPaCa and Colo357) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Gemcitabine-induced CXCR4 expression is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation because it is abrogated by pretreatment of PC cells with the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. CXCR4 up-regulation by gemcitabine correlates with time-dependent accumulation of NF-κB and HIF-1α in the nucleus. Enhanced binding of NF-κB and HIF-1α to the CXCR4 promoter is observed in gemcitabine-treated PC cells, whereas their silencing by RNA interference causes suppression of gemcitabine-induced CXCR4 expression. ROS induction upon gemcitabine treatment precedes the nuclear accumulation of NF-κB and HIF-1α, and suppression of ROS diminishes these effects. The effect of ROS on NF-κB and HIF-1α is mediated through activation of ERK1/2 and Akt, and their pharmacological inhibition also suppresses gemcitabine-induced CXCR4 up-regulation. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that nuclear accumulation of NF-κB results from phosphorylation-induced degradation of IκBα, whereas HIF-1α up-regulation is NF-κB-dependent. Lastly, our data demonstrate that gemcitabine-treated PC cells are more motile and exhibit significantly greater invasiveness against a CXCL12 gradient. Together, these findings reinforce the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in gemcitabine resistance and point toward an unintended and undesired effect of chemotherapy. PMID:23740244

  12. Understanding resistance to combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Justin R; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Hemann, Michael T

    2012-10-01

    The current clinical application of combination chemotherapy is guided by a historically successful set of practices that were developed by basic and clinical researchers 50-60 years ago. Thus, in order to understand how emerging approaches to drug development might aid the creation of new therapeutic combinations, it is critical to understand the defining principles underlying classic combination therapy and the original experimental rationales behind them. One such principle is that the use of combination therapies with independent mechanisms of action can minimize the evolution of drug resistance. Another is that in order to kill sufficient cancer cells to cure a patient, multiple drugs must be delivered at their maximum tolerated dose - a condition that allows for enhanced cancer cell killing with manageable toxicity. In light of these models, we aim to explore recent genomic evidence underlying the mechanisms of resistance to the combination regimens constructed on these principles. Interestingly, we find that emerging genomic evidence contradicts some of the rationales of early practitioners in developing commonly used drug regimens. However, we also find that the addition of recent targeted therapies has yet to change the current principles underlying the construction of anti-cancer combinatorial regimens, nor have they made substantial inroads into the treatment of most cancers. We suggest that emerging systems/network biology approaches have an immense opportunity to impact the rational development of successful drug regimens. Specifically, by examining drug combinations in multivariate ways, next generation combination therapies can be constructed with a clear understanding of how mechanisms of resistance to multi-drug regimens differ from single agent resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy on testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used alone or in combination in the curative management of many malignancies in adolescent and adult males. Over the last 15-20 years, the striking success in the treatment of some common cancers in reproductive males has led to increasing concern for damage to normal tissues, such as the testes, resulting from curative cancer treatment. Indeed, a major future goal for cancer treatment will be to improve on the complication-free cure rate. Inherent in achieving this goal is to understand the pathophysiology and clinical expression of testicular injury. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy result in germ cell depletion with the development of oligo- to azoospermia and testicular atrophy. The type of drug (particularly the alkylating agents), duration of treatment, intensity of treatment, and drug combination are major variables in determining the extent and duration of testicular injury. Testicular injury with chemotherapy also appears to vary with the age of the patient at the time of treatment. Newer drug combinations are now being used which appear to have curative potential in tumors such as Hodgkin's disease and germ cell testicular cancer with less potential for testicular injury. The most accurate and complete information on radiation injury to the testes is derived from two studies of normal volunteers who received graded single doses directly to the testes. A clear dose-response relationship of clinical and histological testicular damage was found with gradual recovery occurring following doses of up to 600 cGy. While these two studies provide an important clinical data base, radiation therapy used in treating cancers involves multiple daily treatments, usually 25-35 delivered over several weeks. Additionally, direct testicular irradiation is seldom used clinically. 37 references.

  14. Prognostic Factors in Chemotherapy-Treated Patients with HIV-Associated Plasmablastic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Eric S.; Stachurski, Dariusz; Perez, Kimberly; Jabbour, Melhem; Milani, Cannon; Colvin, Gerald; Butera, James N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma commonly seen in the oral cavity of HIV-infected individuals. PBL has a poor prognosis, but prognostic factors in patients who have received chemotherapy have not been adequately evaluated. Methods. An extensive literature search rendered 248 cases of PBL, from which 157 were HIV+. Seventy cases with HIV-associated PBL that received chemotherapy were identified. Whenever possible, authors of the original reports were contacted to complete clinicopathological data. Univariate analyses were performed calculating Kaplan–Meier estimates and compared using the log-rank test. Results. The mean age was 39 years, with a male predominance. The mean CD4+ count was 165 cells/mm3. Advanced clinical stage was seen in 51% and extraoral involvement was seen in 43% of the cases. The expression levels of CD20 and Epstein-Barr virus–encoded RNA were 13% and 86%, respectively. The overall survival duration was 14 months. In a univariate analysis, early clinical stage and a complete response to chemotherapy were associated with longer survival. There was no apparent difference in survival with regimens more intensive than cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP). Conclusions. Patients with HIV-associated PBL have a poor prognosis. Prognosis is strongly associated with achieving a complete clinical response to CHOP or CHOP-like chemotherapy. The role of more intensive regimens is currently unclear. Further research is needed to improve responses using novel therapeutic agents and strategies. PMID:20167839

  15. [Effectiveness of chemotherapy of intrathoracic tuberculosis in children: late follow-up data].

    PubMed

    Iukhimenko, N V

    2001-01-01

    Clinical and X-ray studies were made in 148 children 2-10 years after hospital treatment to evaluate the stability of clinical recovery by the frequency of relapses in relation to the use of different drug treatment regimens. Children from an experimental group (n = 75) received shorter chemotherapy with 3-4 drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide in uncomplicated tuberculosis plus streptomycin in complicated one) in the intensive phase of chemotherapy. Pyrazinamide was not used in the intensive phase in the control group (n = 73). Long-term follow-ups showed a high efficiency of shorter chemotherapy regimens in treating intrathoracic tuberculosis in children since they do not lead to the higher incidence of recurrences--2.7% in both groups. The latter occurred in adolescents who had severe residual changes, who had been irregularly followed up at the tuberculosis control dispensary after hospital discharge, who had not received seasonal preventive chemotherapy courses, and who had experienced complicated, generalized or acute tuberculosis.

  16. [Adapting immunisation schedules for children undergoing chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Prada, María; Rodríguez-Martínez, María; García-García, Rebeca; García-Corte, María Dolores; Martínez-Ortega, Carmen

    2016-10-20

    Children undergoing chemotherapy for cancer have special vaccination needs after completion of the treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adaptation of post-chemotherapy vaccination schedules. An observational study was performed on a retrospective cohort that included all children aged from 0 to 14 years, who completed chemotherapy in a tertiary hospital between 2009 and 2015. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Immunisation was administered in accordance with the guidelines of the Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics. Primary Care immunisation and clinical records of the Preventive Medicine and Public Health Department were reviewed. Of the 99 children who had received chemotherapy, 51 (70.6% males) were included in the study. As regards the type of tumour, 54.9% had a solid organ tumour, and 45.1% had a haematological tumour. Post-chemotherapy immunisation was administered to 70.6%. The most common vaccines received were: diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis or diphtheria-tetanus (54.9%), meningococcus C (41.2%), and seasonal influenza (39.2%). The rate of adaptation of the immunisation schedule after chemotherapy was 9.8%. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against 7v or 13v was administered to 21.6% of study subjects. However, only 17.6% received polysaccharide 23v. None received vaccination against hepatitis A. No statistically significant differences were observed between adherence to immunisation schedules and type of tumour (P=.066), gender (P=.304), or age (P=.342). Post-chemotherapy immunisation of children with cancer is poor. The participation of health professionals in training programs and referral of paediatric cancer patients to Vaccine Units could improve the rate of schedule adaptation and proper immunisation of this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemotherapy in NETs: When and how.

    PubMed

    Angelousi, Anna; Kaltsas, Gregory; Koumarianou, Anna; Weickert, Martin O; Grossman, Ashley

    2017-09-11

    The majority of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are well-differentiated tumours that follow an indolent course, in contrast to a minority of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) which exhibit an aggressive course and assocaited with an overall short survival. Although surgery is the only curative treatment for NETs it is not always feasible,necessitating the application of other therapies including chemotherapy. Streptozotocin (STZ)-based regimens have long been used for advanced or metastatic well-to-moderately differentiated (G1-G2) NETs, especially those originating from the pancreas (pNETs). In poorly differentiated grade 3 (G3) tumours, platinum-based chemotherapy is recommended as first-line therapy, albeit without durable responses. Although data for temozolomide (TMZ)-based chemotherapy are still evolving, this treatment may replace STZ-based regimens in pNETs due to its better tolerability and side effect profile. In addition, there is evidence that TMZ could also be used in the subgroup of well-differentiated G3 NETs. There is less clear-cut evidence of a benefit for chemotherapy in intestinal NETs, but still evolving data suggest that TMZ may be efficacious in particular patients. In lung and thymic carcinoids, chemotherapy is reserved for patients with progressive metastatic disease in whom other treatment options are unavailable. Overall, chemotherapy is indicated in patients who have progressed on first-line treatment with somatostatin analogues, have extensive tumour load or exhibit rapid growth following a period of follow-up, and/or have a high proliferative rate; it may occasionally can be used in a neo-adjuvant setting. Prospective randomised studies are awaited to substantiate the role of chemotherapy in the therapeutic algorithm of NETs along with other evolving treatments.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced myeloid suppressor cells and antitumor immunity: The Janus face of chemotherapy in immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhi-Chun; Munn, David H; Zhou, Gang

    Tumor recurrence remains a major problem for patients with cancer, even after initial beneficial responses to standard-of-care chemotherapeutic agents. With the recent advances in immunotherapy strategies, there is growing interest in synergistically combining immunotherapy with conventional chemotherapy to achieve durable antitumor effects. In some cases, chemotherapy-induced myeloid suppressor cells represent a critical obstacle to achieving this goal.

  19. A Novel Method for Predicting Late Genitourinary Toxicity After Prostate Radiation Therapy and the Need for Age-Based Risk-Adapted Dose Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Alcantara, Pino; Li, Linna; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-07-15

    Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dose–volume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpoint was grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ≥3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ≥2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (≤ 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P<.05) in multivariable analysis. Overall, bladder wall CPE values were higher than solid bladder values. The AUHC for bladder wall provided the greatest discrimination for late bladder toxicity when compared with alternative DVH points, with CPE values of 0.68 for age ≤68 years and 0.81 for age >68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ≥2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored.

  20. Long-term event-free and overall survival after risk-adapted melphalan and SCT for systemic light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Landau, H; Smith, M; Landry, C; Chou, J F; Devlin, S M; Hassoun, H; Bello, C; Giralt, S; Comenzo, R L

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT), an effective therapy for amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis patients, is associated with low treatment-related mortality (TRM) with appropriate patient selection and risk-adapted dosing of melphalan (RA-SCT). Consolidation after SCT increases hematologic complete response (CR) rates and may improve overall survival (OS) for patients with

  1. The use of low-dose metronomic chemotherapy in dogs-insight into a modern cancer field.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, T B; Henriques, J; Marconato, L; Queiroga, F L

    2017-03-20

    The era of chemotherapy, which started in the middle of the last century, has been ruled by the routine use of dose-intense protocols, based on the "maximum-tolerated dose" concept. By promoting a balance between patient's quality of life and the goal of rapidly killing as many tumour cells as possible, these protocols still play a prominent role in veterinary oncology. However, with the opening of a new millennium, metronomic chemotherapy (MC) started to be considered a possible alternative to traditional dose-intense chemotherapy. Characterized by a long-term daily administration of lower doses of cytotoxic drugs, this new modality stands out for its unique combination of effects, namely on neovascularization, immune response and tumour dormancy. This article reviews the rationale for treatment with MC, its mechanism of action and the main studies conducted in veterinary medicine, and discusses the key challenges yet to be solved.

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  3. Challenging historical perspectives of the 24-h chemotherapy day: Flexible chemotherapy dose-timing guidelines.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Marliese; Coenders, Frank; Murray, Danielle; Kirsa, Sue; Seymour, John

    2016-03-01

    Variation in dose-timing within multiday chemotherapy regimens is largely unknown with convention being to administer subsequent days of treatment at 24-h intervals. However, in reality there are many occasions where doses are given either earlier or later to accommodate a variety of clinical and operational priorities. This project aimed to evaluate the degree of existing variation in chemotherapy dose-timing and to investigate whether deliberate variation could improve quality and efficiency outcomes such as reduction of after hours chemotherapy administration or reduced inpatient length of stay. Chemotherapy charts and hospital admission datasets (n = 112) from sarcoma and hematology inpatient regimens were retrospectively audited to ascertain existing variation in dose-timing and overall length of stay. Clinical practice guidelines enabling a safe degree of dose-timing variation for individual chemotherapy regimens were developed, implemented over a 3-month period, and evaluated against safety, efficiency and economic outcomes. Baseline dose-timing variation was common with administration occurring up to 8 h early and 7 h later than conventional 24-h dosing intervals. Following implementation of clinical practice guidelines, there was a 10% reduction in chemotherapy finishing after hours and a significant reduction in length of stay for two sarcoma regimens, projected to save 24 inpatient bed days (over $20,000) across more than forty inpatient episodes annually. Deviation from the standard 24-h chemotherapy day (deliberately or inadvertently) was a common yet unstandardized practice. Clinical practice guidelines enabling flexible dose-timing of chemotherapy provided an opportunity to improve chemotherapy administration safety measures, tailor chemotherapy delivery to ward and patient needs, and in some instances reduce non-value-added length of stay. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Pregnancy outcomes after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mila Trementosa; Lin, Lawrence Hsu; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2016-12-01

    The successful development of chemotherapy enabled a fertilitysparing treatment for patients with trophoblastic neoplasia. After disease remission, the outcome of a subsequent pregnancy becomes a great concern for these women. To analyze existing studies in the literature that describe the reproductive outcomes of patients with trophoblastic neoplasia treated with chemotherapy. Systematic review was performed searching for articles on Medline/ Pubmed, Lilacs and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms "gestational trophoblastic disease" and "pregnancy outcome". A total of 18 articles were included. No evidence of decreased fertility after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia was observed. The abortion rates in patients who conceived within 6 months after chemotherapy was higher compared to those who waited longer. Some studies showed increased rates of stillbirth and repeat hydatidiform moles. Only one work showed increased congenital abnormalities. The pregnancies conceived after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia should be followed with clinical surveillance due to higher rates of some pregnancy complications. However, studies in the literature provide reassuring data about reproductive outcomes of these patients.

  5. Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Paus, Ralf; Haslam, Iain S; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkarev, Vladimir A

    2013-02-01

    Hair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ratiometric spectral imaging for fast tumor detection and chemotherapy monitoring in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B.; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2011-06-01

    We report a novel in vivo spectral imaging approach to cancer detection and chemotherapy assessment. We describe and characterize a ratiometric spectral imaging and analysis method and evaluate its performance for tumor detection and delineation by quantitatively monitoring the specific accumulation of targeted gallium corrole (HerGa) into HER2-positive (HER2 +) breast tumors. HerGa temporal accumulation in nude mice bearing HER2 + breast tumors was monitored comparatively by a. this new ratiometric imaging and analysis method; b. established (reflectance and fluorescence) spectral imaging; c. more commonly used fluorescence intensity imaging. We also tested the feasibility of HerGa imaging in vivo using the ratiometric spectral imaging method for tumor detection and delineation. Our results show that the new method not only provides better quantitative information than typical spectral imaging, but also better specificity than standard fluorescence intensity imaging, thus allowing enhanced in vivo outlining of tumors and dynamic, quantitative monitoring of targeted chemotherapy agent accumulation into them.

  7. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J; Zarate, R; Bandres, E; Viudez, A; Chopitea, A; García-Foncillas, J; Gil-Bazo, I

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:17990352

  8. [A pheochromocytoma of urinary bladder treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Naokazu; Komura, Kazumasa; Koyama, Kouhei; Inamoto, Teruo; Segawa, Naoki; Tanimoto, Keiji; Tuji, Motomu; Azuma, Haruhito; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2009-12-01

    A 69-year-old female presented with hypertension and a solid mass in the bladder on ultrasonography. Cystoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the right lateral wall of the bladder. A transurethral resection was performed. Histologically, pathologic examination revealed a malignant pheochromocytoma. She refused surgical therapy and radiation therapy. She had no treatment for two years. She suddenly complained of gross hematuria. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a bladder tumor of high intensity and extra-bladder invasion. She was treated with chemotherapy (CVD) for 26 cycles. Since the tumor size was reduced, she was referred to our hospital for operative indication. Partial cystectomy was performed. Histologically, the tumor was a pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder. Ten months after the operation, she has no clinical evidence of recurrence.

  9. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part I.

    PubMed

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Braskett, Melinda; Carino, Arvie

    2016-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to chemotherapeutic agents can cause the discontinuation of first-line therapies. Chemotherapy desensitization is a safe, but labor-intensive, process to administer these important medications. A desensitization protocol can enable a patient to receive the entire target dose of a medication, even if the patient has a history of severe infusion reactions. In this article, the authors explain the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and describe the recent development of desensitization protocols in oncology. In part II of this article, which will appear in the April 2016 issue of the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, the authors will give a detailed account of how a desensitization protocol is performed at an academic medical center.
.

  10. When the Patient Seeks Cure: Challenging Chemotherapy and Radiation Side Effects Requiring Creative Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Aurelie C; Drapek, Lorraine; Fahey, Jean; Rowen, Brenna; Burns-Britton, Betty; Lavadinho-Lemos, Maria; Hultman, Todd

    2016-04-01

    When undergoing concomitant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for anal cancer, patients often experience significant side effects, including grade 1 or 2 radiation dermatitis, pain, exudate, and diarrhea. This case study presents a grade 3 reaction complicated by complex medical conditions. In addition to an evidence-based skin care treatment and side effect management plan that support patients during this intense period, this article offers creative strategies to provide a cost-effective healing option.

  11. Reducing psychological distress in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Milanti, Ariesta; Metsälä, Eija; Hannula, Leena

    Psychological distress is a common problem among patients with cancer, yet it mostly goes unreported and untreated. This study examined the association of a psycho-educational intervention with the psychological distress levels of breast cancer and cervical cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The design of the study was quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design with a comparison group. One hundred patients at a cancer hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, completed Distress Thermometer screening before and after chemotherapy. Fifty patients in the intervention group were given a psycho-educational video with positive reappraisal, education and relaxation contents, while receiving chemotherapy. Patients who received the psycho-educational intervention had significantly lower distress levels compared with those in the control group. Routine distress screening, followed by distress management and outcome assessment, is needed to improve the wellbeing of cancer patients.

  12. Overview of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2003-11-01

    To provide a general overview of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID) that will highlight the pathophysiology, incidence, and impact of this problem, as well as describe the oncology nurse's role in the management of CID. Primary and tertiary literature, the authors' clinical experience. CID is a frequent complication of many types of chemotherapy that can significantly affect patient quality of life, increase treatment costs, and limit the ability to deliver full doses of chemotherapy. Because patients may be reluctant to discuss diarrhea with their health care providers, vigilance on the part of the health care team is needed. Through ongoing, regular patient contact, the oncology nurse is uniquely situated to monitor patients for the development of CID, assess its severity, and provide guidance to the health care team on the patient's status.

  13. [Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer?].

    PubMed

    Hupe, M C; Kramer, M W; Kuczyk, M A; Merseburger, A S

    2015-05-01

    Advanced urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is associated with a high metastatic potential. Life expectancy for metastatic patients is poor and rarely exceeds more than one year without further therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can decrease the tumour burden while reducing the risk of death. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been discussed controversially. Patients with lymph node-positive metastases seem to benefit the most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In selected patients, metastasectomy can prolong survival. In metastastic patients, the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin has become the new standard regimen due to a lower toxicity in comparison to the combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC). For second-line treatment, vinflunine is the only approved therapeutic agent.

  14. [Chemotherapy of brain tumors in aduts].

    PubMed

    Roth, P; Weller, M

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of patients with brain tumors has long been the domain of neurosurgery and radiotherapy but chemotherapy is now well established as an additional treatment option for many tumor entities in neuro-oncology. This is particularly true for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsing glioblastoma and anaplastic glioma as well as the treatment of medulloblastoma and primary lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS). In addition to purely histopathological features, treatment decisions including those for chemotherapy are now based increasingly more on molecular tumor profiling. Within the group of gliomas these markers include the methylation status of the O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and the 1p/19q status, which reflects the loss of genetic material on chromosome arms 1p and 19q. The presence of a 1p/19q codeletion is associated with a better prognosis and increased sensitivity to alkylating chemotherapy in patients with anaplastic gliomas.

  15. Ambulatory chemotherapy for teenagers and young adults.

    PubMed

    Newston, Caroline; Ingram, Bethan

    Ambulatory chemotherapy allows high-dose chemotherapy to be delivered in an outpatient facility with multidisciplinary planning and management. At University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, this model of care has been successfully applied to a teenage and young adult population. A mobile infusion device, CADD-Solis VIP pump has allowed chemotherapy and supportive therapy administration in the ambulatory setting. Continuous and intermittent therapies have been delivered. Patients attend the ambulatory care unit daily for assessment and treatment set up. Overnight, they reside in nearby accommodation. Patients are educated to self-manage, promoting independence and empowerment; however, they also have 24-hour access to nursing and medical advice. Clear communication and patient education, adopting a multidisciplinary team approach and clear assessment guidance for patients and staff, is essential to make this model of care successful.

  16. CMV chemotherapy for advanced transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, G. M.; Mead, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Between May 1986 and September 1990 a total of 43 patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary tract have been treated at our institution with combination chemotherapy (CMV) consisting of cisplatin 100 mg m-2 i.v. day 2; methotrexate 30 mg m-2 i.v. days 1.8; and vinblastine 4 mg m-2 i.v. days 1.8. Chemotherapy was recycled on day 22 and continued for a maximum of six cycles in responding patients. Of 33 patients with measurable disease 8 (24%) achieved a complete remission (CR). The median survival for patients achieving a CR was 13 months (range 5-29+) whilst the median survival for all 43 patients was 7 months (range 1-29+). Only three patients are still alive--two are disease free. More effective and/or less toxic chemotherapy regimens are needed for the treatment of patients with metastatic TCC. PMID:1520591

  17. Role of chemotherapy in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Seam, Pamela; Janik, John E; Longo, Dan L; Devita, Vincent T

    2009-01-01

    The development of curative chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is one of the true success stories in oncology. Most patients diagnosed with HL today can be cured. The major task remaining before us is curing as many patients as possible with their initial therapeutic approach while minimizing the acute toxicities and limiting the lifetime risks of important secondary events such as cardiovascular complications and secondary malignancies. In the 40 years since DeVita et al. developed the mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone chemotherapy regimen, we have learned a great deal about risk stratification to minimize treatment-related toxicity. Positron emission tomography may further assist us in reducing radiation treatment without compromising cures. This review will discuss the development of the chemotherapy regimens used in the management of early and advanced stage HL and the advantages and disadvantages of their use in combination with radiation therapy.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopy in Cancer Diagnosis and Chemotherapy Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, N. I.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate that IR spectroscopic analysis can be used in diagnosis and chemotherapy monitoring for cancers of various organs at the molecular level. We used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to study human breast and thyroid tumor tissues which were removed during surgery. The characteristic frequencies of C = O stretching vibrations in the IR spectra of tissues of pathological foci were compared with data from histological examination. In the IR spectra of healthy tissues or for benign tumors, the most intense absorption bands ν(C = O) are located in the interval 1675-1650 cm-1. When malignant neoplasms are present in the organs, the intensity of the bands in this range of the spectrum is reduced, while the intensities of the absorption bands in the 1710-1680 cm-1 interval increase. We also studied lung tissue for mice of the C57B1/6 line for healthy tissue and after implantation of B-16 melanoma tumor. The IR spectra of healthy mouse lung tissue and mouse lung tissue with B-16 melanoma metastases in the region of the C = O stretching vibrations display the same differences. We found that when lung malignancy was treated with the optimal dose of a synthesized drug based on palladium complexes of methylenediphosphonic acid, the spectroscopic signs of the presence of metastases in the lungs disappear, and the IR spectrum of the lung tissue after treatment practically coincides with the spectrum of healthy lung tissue.

  19. Results of a conservative treatment combining induction (neoadjuvant) and consolidation chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, and external and interstitial irradiation in 98 patients with locally advanced breast cancer (IIIA-IIIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquillat, C.; Baillet, F.; Weil, M.; Auclerc, G.; Housset, M.; Auclerc, M.; Sellami, M.; Jindani, A.; Thill, L.; Soubrane, C.

    1988-05-15

    Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIIA-IIIB) were entered into a pilot study combining intensive induction (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (VTMFAP) with or without hormonochemotherapy, external and interstitial radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy with or without hormonochemotherapy. Tumor regression over 50% was observed in 91% patients after chemotherapy, and complete clinical remission occurred in 100% patients after irradiation. The rate of local relapse is 13%. The 3-year disease-free survival is 62% and 3-year global survival is 77%. Initial chemotherapeutic tumor regression greater than 75% is the main predictive factor for disease-free survival.

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the impacts on infection and morbidity attributable to three chemotherapy schemes against Schistosoma japonicum in hyperendemic areas of the Dongting Lake region, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongbao; Sarol, Jesus N; Hutton, Guy; Tan, Dunli; Tanner, Marcel

    2002-09-01

    A study was carried out in 8 villages endemic with S. japonicum in Hunan Province, China from 1998 to 2000 to evaluate the cost-effectiveness in preventing schistosome infection and related morbidity under three chemotherapy schemes: (1) 'clue' chemotherapy, consisting of treatment to those with contact with infected water and/or symptoms of infection; (2) 'mass' chemotherapy-treatment to all the villagers except those not able to take praziquantel; and (3) 'screen' chemotherapy-treatment prescribed to the stool egg positive cases after Kato-Katz examination. An itemized cost menu was used to estimate the cost incurred to each scheme, from the perspective of the health care provider. The numbers of cases prevented by chemotherapy schemes were estimated through standardized attributable fractions of the outcomes to absence of chemotherapy before intervention. The cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated using weighted ranks of unit costs of the four outcome measurements: the costs per case with infection, liver and spleen abnormality (as determined by ultrasonography) prevented and 1% reduction in intensity of infection (as estimated by egg per gram feces, EPG) after the two years of intervention. Sensitivity of total cost to changes in the costs of personnel, praziquantel and other key factors were analyzed. It is demonstrated that all the three schemes had a significant impacts on the prevalence and intensity of infection, but the overall effects on liver and spleen morbidity of the residents varied between schemes. Mass chemotherapy achieved the best cost-effectiveness ratio, with unit costs of preventing cases of infection, liver and spleen abnormality and 1% reduction of EPG being RMB yuan 161.2, 99.8, 219.3 and 176.3, respectively. However, clue and screen chemotherapy schemes did not show significant prevention of liver damages in the villagers. The unit costs per case prevented for the outcomes were RMB yuan 140.2, 602.7 and 169.3, respectively for clue

  1. Vesicant chemotherapy extravasation antidotes and treatments.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Oncology nurses and pharmacists often are given the responsibility of developing or updating institutional policies to manage vesicant chemotherapy extravasations. Antidote and treatment recommendations of vesicant chemotherapy manufacturers, antidotes and treatments approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and guidelines and recommendations made by professional oncology organizations are useful resources in this process. This article describes manufacturers' recommendations, lists antidotes and treatments approved by the FDA, and reviews published guidelines and recommendations. Available antidote and treatment formulations and their preparation and administration also are discussed.

  2. The dose-dense principle in chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Iarosz, Kelly C; Batista, Antonio M; Seoane, Jesús M; Viana, Ricardo L; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2017-10-07

    Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment modality that uses drugs to kill tumor cells. A typical chemotherapeutic protocol consists of several drugs delivered in cycles of three weeks. We present mathematical analyses demonstrating the existence of a maximum time between cycles of chemotherapy for a protocol to be effective. A mathematical equation is derived, which relates such a maximum time with the variables that govern the kinetics of the tumor and those characterizing the chemotherapeutic treatment. Our results suggest that there are compelling arguments supporting the use of dose-dense protocols. Finally, we discuss the limitations of these protocols and suggest an alternative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemotherapy safety in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Klahn, Shawna

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to chemotherapy is a health hazard for all personnel in facilities that store, prepare, or administer antineoplastic agents. Contamination levels have been measured as much as 15 times higher in the veterinary medicine sector than in human facilities. Recent publications in human and veterinary medicine indicate that exposure extends beyond the clinic walls to affect the patient's home and family. This article provides an update on the advances in chemotherapy safety, the current issues, and the impact on cancer management in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  5. [Concomitant radiochemotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with poorly differentiated nasopharyngeal cancer; tolerance and early results of treatment].

    PubMed

    Kawecki, Andrzej; Jagielska, Beata; Jarzabski, Andrzej; Szutkowski, Zbigniew; Kiprian, Dorota; Rolski, Wojciech; Pawłowska-Sendułka, Beata

    2005-01-01

    Recently, concomitant radiochemotherapy became a method of choice in patients with poorly differentiated nasopharyngeal cancer. The aim of this study is to estimate tolerance and early results of the concomitant radiochemotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (modified US Head and Neck Intergroup protocol). Analysing protocol consist of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (TD = 70 Gy) given concomitantly with cisplatin (30 mg/m2 daily during 3 days every 3 weeks). This part of treatment was followed by 3 courses of PF (cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy. Between August 1998 and September 2003 thirty six patients (27 male and 9 female) were qualified to treatment. Median age was 33 years. Tolerance of concomitant radiochemotherapy was acceptable. Intensive mucosal acute reactions (>G2) were observed in 67% patients. Life threatening complications (sepsis + DIC) was observed in single case. All patients received radiotherapy in planned total dose. Eighty six percent of patients received cisplatin in planned cumulated doses. Tolerance of the adjuvant chemotherapy was worse. Only 44% patients received all three courses of PF chemotherapy. The reasons of incomplete chemotherapy were neutropenia, infections, prolongated acute reactions or performance status decreasing. Complete regression was obtained in 86% patients. Two years overall and disease free survival rates were 83% and 72%, respectively. Our results confirm high activity of the concomitant radiochemotherapy followed by chemotherapy in patients with poorly differentiated nasopharyngeal cancer. Those results confirm also high toxicity of this regimen, what suggest very careful patients qualification to treatment.

  6. A systematic review of utility values for chemotherapy-related adverse events.

    PubMed

    Shabaruddin, Fatiha H; Chen, Li-Chia; Elliott, Rachel A; Payne, Katherine

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapy offers cancer patients the potential benefits of improved mortality and morbidity but may cause detrimental outcomes due to adverse drug events (ADEs), some of which requiring time-consuming, resource-intensive and costly clinical management. To appropriately assess chemotherapy agents in an economic evaluation, ADE-related parameters such as the incidence, (dis)utility and cost of ADEs should be reflected within the model parameters. To date, there has been no systematic summary of the existing literature that quantifies the utilities of ADEs due to healthcare interventions in general and chemotherapy treatments in particular. This review aimed to summarize the current evidence base of reported utility values for chemotherapy-related ADEs. A structured electronic search combining terms for utility, utility valuation methods and generic terms for cancer treatment was conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE in June 2011. Inclusion criteria were: (1) elicitation of utility values for chemotherapy-related ADEs and (2) primary data. Two reviewers identified studies and extracted data independently. Any disagreements were resolved by a third reviewer. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria from the 853 abstracts initially identified, collectively reporting 218 utility values for chemotherapy-related ADEs. All 18 studies used short descriptions (vignettes) to obtain the utility values, with nine studies presenting the vignettes used in the valuation exercises. Of the 218 utility values, 178 were elicited using standard gamble (SG) or time trade-off (TTO) approaches, while 40 were elicited using visual analogue scales (VAS). There were 169 utility values of specific chemotherapy-related ADEs (with the top ten being anaemia [34 values], nausea and/or vomiting [32 values], neuropathy [21 values], neutropenia [12 values], diarrhoea [12 values], stomatitis [10 values], fatigue [8 values], alopecia [7 values], hand-foot syndrome [5 values] and skin reaction [5 values

  7. THE CHEMOTHERAPY OF CARDIAC ARREST.

    PubMed

    MINUCK, M

    1965-01-02

    Direct-air ventilation, external cardiac compression, and external defibrillation are established techniques for patients who unexpectedly develop cardiac arrest. The proper use of drugs can increase the incidence of successful resuscitation. Intracardiac adrenaline (epinephrine) acts as a powerful stimulant during cardiac standstill and, in addition, converts fine ventricular fibrillation to a coarser type, more responsive to electrical defibrillation. Routine use of intravenous sodium bicarbonate is recommended to combat the severe metabolic acidosis accompanying cardiac arrest. Lidocaine is particularly useful when ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia tends to recur. Analeptics are contraindicated, since they invariably increase oxygen requirements of already hypoxic cerebral tissues. The following acrostic is a useful mnemonic for recalling the details of the management of cardiac arrest in their proper order: A (Airway), B (Breathing), C (Circulation), D (Diagnosis of underlying cause), E (Epinephrine), F (Fibrillation), G (Glucose intravenously), pH (Sodium bicarbonate), I (Intensive care).

  8. Associations between palliative chemotherapy and adult cancer patients' end of life care and place of death: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexi A; Zhang, Baohui; Keating, Nancy L; Weeks, Jane C; Prigerson, Holly G

    2014-03-04

    To determine whether the receipt of chemotherapy among terminally ill cancer patients months before death was associated with patients' subsequent intensive medical care and place of death. Secondary analysis of a prospective, multi-institution, longitudinal study of patients with advanced cancer. Eight outpatient oncology clinics in the United States. 386 adult patients with metastatic cancers refractory to at least one chemotherapy regimen, whom physicians identified as terminally ill at study enrollment and who subsequently died. intensive medical care (cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, or both) in the last week of life and patients' place of death (for example, intensive care unit). survival, late hospice referrals (≤ 1 week before death), and dying in preferred place of death. 216 (56%) of 386 terminally ill cancer patients were receiving palliative chemotherapy at study enrollment, a median of 4.0 months before death. After propensity score weighted adjustment, use of chemotherapy at enrollment was associated with higher rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, or both in the last week of life (14% v 2%; adjusted risk difference 10.5%, 95% confidence interval 5.0% to 15.5%) and late hospice referrals (54% v 37%; 13.6%, 3.6% to 23.6%) but no difference in survival (hazard ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 1.38). Patients receiving palliative chemotherapy were more likely to die in an intensive care unit (11% v 2%; adjusted risk difference 6.1%, 1.1% to 11.1%) and less likely to die at home (47% v 66%; -10.8%, -1.0% to -20.6%), compared with those who were not. Patients receiving palliative chemotherapy were also less likely to die in their preferred place, compared with those who were not (65% v 80%; adjusted risk difference -9.4%, -0.8% to -18.1%). The use of chemotherapy in terminally ill cancer patients in the last months of life was associated with an increased risk of undergoing cardiopulmonary

  9. Non-invasive quantification of tumor vascular architecture during docetaxel-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mahéo, Karine; Chevalier, Stephan; Vibet, Sophie; Bougnoux, Philippe; Richard, Serge; Serrière, Sophie; Bleuzen, Aurore; Tranquart, François; Goupille, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    New ultrasound parameters, potentially predictive of tumor response to chemotherapy, were sought after analyzing details of vascular architecture of mammary tumors during chemotherapy. Tumor-bearing rats were separated into untreated or docetaxel-treated group (6 mg/kg/week). Power Doppler Index and vascular contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) reference endpoints (Peak, area under the curve (AUC), blood flow) were evaluated at the beginning (W (0)), and after 2 and 6 weeks of docetaxel treatment (W (+2) and W (+6)). An improved CEUS image analysis, taking advantage of individual pixel intensity, was developed to quantify large, medium, and small vessels of tumors. Standard immunohistochemistry validated this new methodology analyzing tumor vascular architecture. In rats, there was an enrichment of vascularization with large vessels during tumor growth indicative of a vascular adjustment to tumor size. Docetaxel stopped tumor growth, and showed a sequential effect on vascular parameters. After an initial enrichment in larger vessels (by threefold) at W (+2), docetaxel led to a diminution of vascular parameters at W (+6) (-46 % for peak, -55 % for AUC -31 % compared to W (0)) and a vascular remodeling in favor of small vessels. One of the CEUS parameters measured before chemotherapy, the so-called global contrast-enhanced pixels density, was predictive of rat tumor response to treatment (r = 0.80; p < 0.01). The method was then applied in a clinical setting to detect changes of vascular architecture during chemotherapy of human breast carcinoma. The docetaxel chemotherapy of breast carcinomas induced a similar sequential effect, with vessel enlargement after two cycles of docetaxel treatment and an antiangiogenic effect after six cycles. Such vascular remodeling was not noticed when patients were treated with 5-fluorouracil-epirubicin-cyclophosphamide. Taken together, the sharpened analysis of CEUS pixel intensity presented here strengthened the monitoring of breast

  10. Quality of reporting of chemotherapy compliance in randomized controlled trials of breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Altwairgi, Abdullah K; Alfakeeh, Ali H; Hopman, Wilma M; Parulekar, Wendy R

    2015-06-01

    The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement requires detailed reporting of interventions for randomized controlled trials. We hypothesized that there was variable reporting of chemotherapy compliance in published randomized controlled trials in breast cancer, and therefore surveyed the literature to assess this parameter and determine the study characteristics associated with reporting quality. Published Phase III randomized controlled trials (January 2005-December 2011; English language) evaluating chemotherapy in breast cancer were identified through a systematic literature search. Articles scored 1 point each for reporting of the four measures: number of chemotherapy cycles, dose modification, early treatment discontinuation and relative dose intensity. Logistic regression identified study characteristics associated with reporting quality score of ≥ 2. Of the 115 eligible randomized controlled trials, 79 (69%) were published in high-impact journals, 66 (57%) were published since 2008, 43 (37%) reported advanced-stage disease and 37 (32%) were industry sponsored. Relative dose intensity, number of cycles, dose modification and early treatment discontinuation were reported in 70 (61%), 53 (46%), 65 (57%) and 81 (70%) articles, respectively. Eighty-two (71%) articles showed a quality score of ≥ 2; 25 (22%) articles reported all four compliance measures. Articles published since 2008 (P = 0.035) and those reporting advanced-stage disease (P < 0.001) showed significantly higher quality of compliance. Our results demonstrate variable reporting of chemotherapy compliance in published randomized controlled trials with a modest improvement noted in recent years. Incorporating standards for reporting chemotherapy compliance in scientific guidelines or the journal peer review process may decrease the variability and improve the quality of reporting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  11. Irinotecan (CPT-11) chemotherapy alters intestinal microbiota in tumour bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Dieleman, Levinus A; Ketabi, Ali; Bibova, Ilona; Sawyer, Michael B; Xue, Hongyu; Field, Catherine J; Baracos, Vickie E; Gänzle, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota mediate toxicity of irinotecan (CPT-11) cancer therapies and cause systemic infection after CPT-11-induced loss of barrier function. The intestinal microbiota and their functions are thus potential targets for treatment to mitigate CPT-11 toxicity. However, microbiota changes during CPT-11 therapy remain poorly described. This study analysed changes in intestinal microbiota induced by CPT-11 chemotherapy. Qualitative and quantitative taxonomic analyses, and functional analyses were combined to characterize intestinal microbiota during CPT-11-based chemotherapy, and in presence or absence of oral glutamine, a treatment known to reduce CPT-11 toxicity. In the first set of experiments tumour-bearing rats received a dose-intensive CPT-11 regimen (125 mg kg(-1)×3 days), with or without oral glutamine bolus (0.75 g kg(-1)). In a subsequent more clinically-oriented chemotherapy regimen, rats received two cycles of CPT-11 (50 mg kg(-1)) followed by 5-flurouracil (50 mg kg(-1)). The analysis of fecal samples over time demonstrated that tumours changed the composition of intestinal microbiota, increasing the abundance of clostrridial clusters I, XI, and Enterobacteriaceae. CPT-11 chemotherapy increased cecal Clostridium cluster XI and Enterobacteriaceae, particularly after the dose-intensive therapy. Glutamine treatment prevented the reduced abundance of major bacterial groups after CPT-11 administration; i.e. total bacteria, Clostridium cluster VI, and the Bacteroides-group. Virulence factor/toxin genes of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile were not detected in the cecal microbiota. In conclusion, both colon cancer implantation and CPT-11-based chemotherapies disrupted the intestinal microbiota. Oral glutamine partially mitigated CPT-11 toxicity and induced temporary changes of the intestinal microbiota.

  12. Olaparib combined with chemotherapy for recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer: a randomised phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Oza, Amit M; Cibula, David; Benzaquen, Ana Oaknin; Poole, Christopher; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Sonke, Gabe S; Colombo, Nicoletta; Špaček, Jiří; Vuylsteke, Peter; Hirte, Holger; Mahner, Sven; Plante, Marie; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Mackay, Helen; Rowbottom, Jacqui; Lowe, Elizabeth S; Dougherty, Brian; Barrett, J Carl; Friedlander, Michael

    2015-01-01

    into the study, of whom 162 were eligible and were randomly assigned to the two treatment groups (81 to the olaparib plus chemotherapy group and 81 to the chemotherapy alone group). Of these randomised patients, 156 were treated in the combination phase (81 in the olaparib plus chemotherapy group and 75 in the chemotherapy alone group) and 121 continued to the maintenance or no further treatment phase (66 in the olaparib plus chemotherapy group and 55 in the chemotherapy alone group). BRCA mutation status was known for 107 patients (either at baseline or determined retrospectively): 41 (38%) of 107 had a BRCA mutation (20 in the olaparib plus chemotherapy group and 21 in the chemotherapy alone group). Progression-free survival was significantly longer in the olaparib plus chemotherapy group (median 12.2 months [95% CI 9.7-15.0]) than in the chemotherapy alone group (median 9.6 months [95% CI 9.1-9.7) (HR 0.51 [95% CI 0.34-0.77]; p=0.0012), especially in patients with BRCA mutations (HR 0.21 [0.08-0.55]; p=0.0015). In the combination phase, adverse events that were reported at least 10% more frequently with olaparib plus chemotherapy than with chemotherapy alone were alopecia (60 [74%] of 81 vs 44 [59%] of 75), nausea (56 [69%] vs 43 [57%]), neutropenia (40 [49%] vs 29 [39%]), diarrhoea (34 [42%] vs 20 [27%]), headache (27 [33%] vs seven [9%]), peripheral neuropathy (25 [31%] vs 14 [19%]), and dyspepsia (21 [26%] vs 9 [12%]); most were of mild-to-moderate intensity. The most common grade 3 or higher adverse events during the combination phase were neutropenia (in 35 [43%] of 81 patients in the olaparib plus chemotherapy group vs 26 [35%] of 75 in the chemotherapy alone group) and anaemia (seven [9%] vs five [7%]). Serious adverse events were reported in 12 (15%) of 81 patients in the olaparib plus chemotherapy group and 16 of 75 (21%) patients in the chemotherapy alone group. Olaparib plus paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by maintenance monotherapy significantly

  13. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Sexual and Fertility Changes in Women

    MedlinePlus

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Sexual and Fertility Changes in Women “Talk with your doctor before you start treatment. Ask how chemotherapy could affect your ability ...

  14. Chemotherapy and Sex: Is Sexual Activity OK during Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... OK during treatment? Is it safe to have sex with my husband while undergoing chemotherapy? Answers from ... best to discuss any concerns about chemotherapy and sex with your doctor, who's familiar with your individual ...

  15. Presurgical chemotherapy compared with immediate surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for nonmetastatic osteosarcoma: Pediatric Oncology Group Study POG-8651.

    PubMed

    Goorin, Allen M; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J; Devidas, Meenakshi; Gebhardt, Mark C; Ayala, Alberto G; Harris, Michael B; Helman, Lee J; Grier, Holcombe E; Link, Michael P

    2003-04-15

    Successful therapeutic interventions to prevent disease progression in patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma have included surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy. Presurgical chemotherapy has been advocated for these patients because of putative improvement in event-free survival (EFS). The advantages of presurgical chemotherapy include early administration of systemic chemotherapy, shrinkage of primary tumor, and pathologic identification of risk groups. The theoretic disadvantage is that it exposes a large tumor burden to marginally effective chemotherapy. The contribution of chemotherapy and surgery timing has not been tested rigorously. Between 1986 and 1993, we conducted a prospective trial in patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma who were assigned randomly to immediate surgery or presurgical chemotherapy. Except for the timing of surgery (week 0 or 10), patients received 44 weeks of identical combination chemotherapy that included high-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, doxorubicin, cisplatin, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin. One hundred six patients were enrolled onto this study. Six were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 100 patients, 45 were randomly assigned to immediate chemotherapy, and 55 were randomly assigned to immediate surgery. Sixty-seven patients remain disease-free. At 5 years, the projected EFS +/- SE is 65% +/- 6% (69% +/- 8% for immediate surgery and 61% +/- 8% for presurgical chemotherapy; P =.8). The treatment arms had similar incidence of limb salvage (55% for immediate surgery and 50% for presurgical chemotherapy). Chemotherapy was effective in both treatment groups. There was no advantage in EFS for patients given presurgical chemotherapy.

  16. A retrospective review of antiemetic use for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric oncology patients at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Aseeri, Mohammed; Mukhtar, Amnah; Al Khansa, Sara; Elimam, Nagla; Jastaniah, Wasil

    2013-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are the most dreaded and distressing side effects for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. These side effects have a significant impact on the patients' quality of life and can interfere with their ability to receive intensive chemotherapy regimens. With the recent advances in antiemetic pharmacotherapy and supportive care, the current treatments for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, when used appropriately, have become highly effective in mitigating these adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice involving antiemetic treatment in newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients at our center. This was a retrospective cohort study of newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients who were less than 14 years of age receiving their first cycle of inpatient chemotherapy. The data abstracted included the following: age, gender, type of cancer, chemotherapy regimen, emetogenic risk and level, prescribed prophylactic antiemetic regimen, incidence of breakthrough emesis, and breakthrough antiemetic medications used. Emetogenic risk was classified based on published guidelines into low, moderate, or high emetogenic chemotherapy, and a scoring system to determine the emetogenic level of combined chemotherapy agents was followed to monitor the efficacy of the antiemetic regimens. Clinical effectiveness was assessed based on breakthrough emesis. A total of 49 patients were eligible for the study. High emetogenic chemotherapy was administered in 28/49 (57.1%) and moderate emetogenic chemotherapy was administered in 21/49 (42.9%) patients. Only 10/49 (20.4%) received appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis, whereas 39/49 (79.6%) received inadequate antiemetic prophylaxis; 14/49 (28.6%) patients experienced breakthrough emesis. Breakthrough emesis occurred in 11/28 (39.3%) patients receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy and 3/21 (14.3%) patients receiving moderate emetogenic chemotherapy. The use

  17. Glossodynia after radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, G.D.; Marino, G.G.; Shumway, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have decreased the mortality rates of cancer patients, but the morbidity associated with oral complications is high in many cases. A pretreatment oral evaluation and institution of a preventive care program reduce oral symptoms such as glossodynia considerably. When oral symptoms are minimized, the dentist can improve the patient's quality of life.40 references.

  18. The 20th International Congress of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P A

    1997-09-01

    Over 4,000 participants from all over the world attended the 20th International Congress of Chemotherapy (ICC) between 29th June-3rd July, 1997, in Sydney. Anti-infective and cancer chemotherapy were discussed in a wide context, with presentations being made on new products, compounds in development and current clinical approaches. Inevitably in a congress of this size, there were many sessions running concurrently (usually nine), with several simultaneous poster sessions as well. A common theme currently at many chemotherapy congresses is the growth of resistance to existing agents, and the ICC was no exception. Resistance to Gram-positive cocci is a particular problem, and many sessions were devoted to this subject. This report attempts to highlight just some of the aspects of antibacterial chemotherapy presented at the meeting. New fluoroquinolones formed a major topic that attracted a number of poster sessions and symposia, continuing a trend seen in recent years. The streptogramins offer an alternative approach to combating Gram-positive infections, and a symposium was devoted to these compounds.

  19. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nerve Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Nerve Changes “My fingers and toes felt numb and tingly. It was hard to button shirts. I got help from my wife. To keep from getting cuts, I always wore shoes.” u.s. Department of health anD human services national ...

  20. Sarcopenia and chemotherapy-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Maria Cecília Monteiro Dela; Laviano, Alessandro; Pimentel, Gustavo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This narrative review focuses on the role of sarcopenia and chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients. Consistent evidence shows that sarcopenia in cancer patients leads to decreased overall survival by influencing treatment discontinuation and dose reduction. Therefore, sarcopenia should be considered a robust prognostic factor of negative outcome as well as a determinant of increased healthcare costs. PMID:28076611

  1. Targeting Mechanisms of Resistance to Taxane-Based Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    chemotherapy resistance and uncover mechanisms or pathways suitable for targeting with the objective of improving tumor responses to chemotherapy. Gene ...excluding possible ischemia-related genes , the expression of 53 genes were significantly altered after chemotherapy. Several cytokines were...to identified 33 significantly-altered genes . IL8 was not only shown to be activated after chemotherapy but also have higher expression levels in the

  2. Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion to Treat Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Peter; Kumar, Aashish J; Muppuri, Rudram; Chakrabortty, Shushovan

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy, which manifests as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and numbness in the hands and feet. Numerous chemoprotective agents and treatments have been used with limited success to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. We report a case in which a patient presenting with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy received an IV lidocaine infusion over the course of 60 minutes with complete symptomatic pain relief for a prolonged period of 2 weeks.

  3. STUDIES ON CHEMOTHERAPY AND SERODIAGNOSIS FOR CLONORCHIS SINENSIS INFECTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS, *SERODIAGNOSIS, PARASITIC DISEASES , CHEMOTHERAPY, PARASITIC DISEASES , DOSAGE, TOXICITY, BODY WEIGHT, PATHOLOGY, MORTALITY RATE, HEMATOLOGY, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, BIOASSAY, JAPAN.

  4. Conditioned Emotional Distress in Women Receiving Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated whether women undergoing outpatient chemotherapy for breast cancer can develop classically conditioned emotional distress. Patients' responses to a distinctive stimulus were assessed in a location not associated with chemotherapy administration. Results supported hypothesis that pairing a distinctive stimulus with chemotherapy would…

  5. Taste Alteration in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sözeri, Elif; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is aimed to determine factors that affect conditions of patients receiving chemotherapy in terms of experienced taste alteration. Materials and Methods In this descriptive study, 184 patients receiving chemotherapy were included in the sample. Data were collected during the period of December 2013 to May 2014 using “Patient Characteristics Identification Form” and “Chemotherapy-induced Taste Alteration Scale (CiTAS).” The data were analyzed using SPSS 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA) statistical software in terms of number, percentage, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis H test. Results The mean age of the patients was 55.5±11.8 and 57.1% of them were female. The clinical diagnosis of the patients were most frequently breast cancer (n=46), colorectal cancer (n=45), and lung cancer (n=25). Furthermore, 37.5% of the patients were in clinical stage II; 15.8% of the patients received paclitaxel+herceptin and 14.1% received gemcitabine+cisplatin chemotherapy protocols. Data demonstrated significant differences in mean scores (p<0.05) taken from “Decline in Basic Taste” and “Phantogeusia and Parageusia” subscales with patients with or without xerostomia. There were significant differences in the average scores of the subscales between those with and without a sore mouth “Discomfort” and “General taste alterations” (p<0.05). Conclusion It has been established that patients receiving chemotherapy experience substantial alteration in taste by exposure of different subscales of CiTAS. Analysis of scores collected from different subscales of CiTAS with respect to sociodemographic and pathological differences showed that patients with xerostomia and sore mouth experienced more severe taste alterations.

  6. Analysis of the influence of parenteral cancer chemotherapy on the health condition of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Mansur; Madej-Czerwonka, Barbara; Jastrzębska-Jamrogiewicz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study The present study was aimed at estimating the prevalence of oral complications in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Material and methods The study was conducted on a group of 58 patients treated with chemotherapy (study group). The control group consisted of 30 healthy patients. Dental status and oral mucosa were examined using the criteria of the National Cancer Institute Toxicity Criteria Scale. The levels of stimulated and unstimulated saliva flow were analysed. Results In the group of patients treated with chemotherapy, 59% of patients had inflammatory changes of the soft tissues of the mouth, such as erythema, erosions, or ulcers, which were discovered during dental examination. Such changes occurred in only 10% of patients in the control group. Six of the patients treated with chemotherapy reported pain with intensity was so severe that it caused swallowing difficulties. Patients in the study group frequently complained about the presence of dry mouth, taste disturbances, nausea, and vomiting. These symptoms occurred in 70% of patients undergoing oncological treatment. In both stimulated and unstimulated saliva secretion, the rates were significantly lower in patients from the research group, when compared to the control group. PMID:26199575

  7. [High-dose chemotherapy as a strategy to overcome drug resistance in solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Selle, Frédéric; Gligorov, Joseph; Soares, Daniele G; Lotz, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The concept of high-doses chemotherapy was developed in the 1980s based on in vitro scientific observations. Exposure of tumor cells to increasing concentrations of alkylating agents resulted in increased cell death in a strong dose-response manner. Moreover, the acquired resistance of tumor cells could be overcome by dose intensification. In clinic, dose intensification of alkylating agents resulted in increased therapeutic responses, however associated with significant hematological toxicity. Following the development of autologous stem cells transplantation harvesting from peripheral blood, the high-doses of chemotherapy, initially associated with marked toxic effects, could be more easily tolerated. As a result, the approach was evaluated in different types of solid tumors, including breast, ovarian and germ cell tumors, small cell lung carcinoma, soft tissue sarcomas and Ewing sarcoma. To date, high-doses chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cells support is only used as a salvage therapy to treat poor prognosis germ cell tumors patients with chemo-sensitive disease. Regarding breast and ovarian cancer, high-doses chemotherapy should be considered only in the context of clinical trials. However, intensive therapy as an approach to overcome resistance to standard treatments is still relevant. Numerous efforts are still ongoing to identify novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments to improve patients' responses.

  8. Molecular-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hung-Yang; Yeh, Kun-Huei

    2014-07-01

    The prognosis of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor despite therapeutic advances in recent decades. Several recent positive phase III trials established the efficacy of second-line chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer in prolonging overall survival. However, malnutrition and poor performance of AGC in late stages usually preclude such patients from intensive treatment. Many targeted-therapies failed to show a significant survival benefit in AGC, but have regained attention after the positive result of ramucirumab was announced last year. Among all targeted agents, only trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) protein, has been proven as having survival benefit by addition to first-line chemotherapy. Herein we reported a patient who benefited from adding trastuzumab to the same second-line combination chemotherapy (paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin) upon progression of bulky liver metastases. At least five months of progression-free survival were achieved without any additional toxicity. We also reviewed literature of molecularly-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer, including several large phase III trials (REGARD, GRANITE-1, EXPAND, and REAL-3) published in 2013-2014.

  9. Prognostic nutritional index before adjuvant chemotherapy predicts chemotherapy compliance and survival among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy after the complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now the standard of care. To improve survival, it is important to identify risk factors for the continuation of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed chemotherapy compliance and magnitude of the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of data from 106 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of an oral tegafur agent (OT) or platinum-based chemotherapy (PB). The correlations between the PNI values and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were then evaluated. Results In the PB group, the percentage of patients who completed the four planned cycles of chemotherapy was not correlated with the PNI. In the OT group, however, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who completed the planned chemotherapy according to the PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy. The RFS of patients with a PNI <50 before adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly poorer than that of the patients with a PNI ≥50. A multivariate analysis showed that nodal metastasis and PNI before chemotherapy were independent predictors of the RFS. However, PNI before surgery was not a predictor of the RFS. In the subgroup analysis, PNI before chemotherapy was independent predictor of the RFS in the OT group (P=0.019), but not in the PB group (P=0.095). Conclusion The PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy influenced the treatment compliance with the planned chemotherapy in the OT group, but not the PB group. In addition, a low PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a poor RFS in a multivariate analysis, especially in the OT group. PMID:26504397

  10. [Epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with nosocomial pneumonia. S-3 Guideline of the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, the German Society for Infectious Diseases, the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology, the German Respiratory Society and the Paul-Ehrlich-Society for Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, K; Abele-Horn, M; Andreas, S; Bauer, T; von Baum, H; Deja, M; Ewig, S; Gastmeier, P; Gatermann, S; Gerlach, H; Grabein, B; Höffken, G; Kern, W V; Kramme, E; Lange, C; Lorenz, J; Mayer, K; Nachtigall, I; Pletz, M; Rohde, G; Rosseau, S; Schaaf, B; Schaumann, R; Schreiter, D; Schütte, H; Seifert, H; Sitter, H; Spies, C; Welte, T

    2012-12-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia (HAP) is a frequent complication of hospital care. Most data are available on ventilator-associated pneumonia. However infections on general wards are also increasing. A central issue are infections with multi drug resistant (MDR) pathogens which are difficult to treat particularly in the empirical setting potentially leading to inappropriate use of antimicrobial therapy. This guideline was compiled by an interdisciplinary group on the basis of a systematic literature review. Recommendations are made according to GRADE giving guidance for the diagnosis and therapy of HAP on the basis of quality of evidence and benefit/risk ratio. The guideline has two parts. First an update on epidemiology, spectrum of pathogens and antiinfectives is provided. In the second part recommendations for the management of diagnosis and treatment are given. Proper microbiologic work up is emphasized for knowledge of the local patterns of microbiology and drug susceptibility. Moreover this is the optimal basis for deescalation in the individual patient. The intensity of antimicrobial therapy is guided by the risk of infections with MDR. Structured deescalation concepts and strict limitation of treatment duration should lead to reduced selection pressure.

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Galaal, Khadra; Al Moundhri, Mansour; Bryant, Andrew; Lopes, Alberto D; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-05-15

    Approximately 13% of women diagnosed with endometrial cancer present with advanced stage disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III/IV). The standard treatment of advanced endometrial cancer consists of cytoreductive surgery followed by radiation therapy, or chemotherapy, or both. There is currently little agreement about which adjuvant treatment is the safest and most effective. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy or chemoradiation, and to determine which chemotherapy agents are most effective in women presenting with advanced endometrial cancer (FIGO stage III/IV). We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Collaborative Review Group's Trial Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 10 2013), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to November 2013. Also we searched electronic clinical trial registries for ongoing trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adjuvant chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy or chemoradiation in women with FIGO stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Two review authors selected trials, extracted data, and assessed trials for risk of bias. Where necessary, we contacted trial investigators for relevant, unpublished data. We pooled data using the random-effects model in Review Manager (RevMan) software. We included four multicentre RCTs involving 1269 women with primary FIGO stage III/IV endometrial cancer. We considered the trials to be at low to moderate risk of bias. All participants received primary cytoreductive surgery. Two trials, evaluating 620 women (83% stage III, 17% stage IV), compared adjuvant chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy; one trial evaluating 552 women (88% stage III, 12% stage IV) compared two chemotherapy regimens (cisplatin/doxorubicin/paclitaxel (CDP) versus cisplatin/doxorubicin (CD) treatment) in women who had all undergone adjuvant radiotherapy; and one trial contributed no data

  12. Assessment of oral complications in children receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    El-Housseiny, Azza A; Saleh, Susan M; El-Masry, Ashraf A; Allam, Amany A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the early oral complications in pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy. An interview and oral examination was conducted on 150 pediatric cancer patients receiving standard dose chemotherapy. Results showed that oral pain and dry mouth were the most frequent patients' complaints. The prevalences of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis and oral infections were relatively high. The chemotherapeutic antimetabolites were the most frequently associated with oral complications than other types of chemotherapy. The present results indicate that the oral complications among patients receiving chemotherapy are common.

  13. Chemotherapy with cetuximab versus chemotherapy alone for chemotherapy-naive advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zu-Yao; Liu, Li; Mao, Chen; Wu, Xin-Yin; Huang, Ya-Fang; Hu, Xue-Feng; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2014-11-17

    In advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the effectiveness of standard cytotoxic chemotherapy seems to have reached a 'plateau', and there is a continuous need for new treatments to further improve the prognosis. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody targeted at the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling pathway. Basically, it is designed to inhibit the growth and metastasis among other biological processes of cancer. In combination with chemotherapy, it has been evaluated as a first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC in some randomised controlled trials (RCTs), with inconsistent results. To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy plus cetuximab, compared with chemotherapy alone, for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously untreated with chemotherapy or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted drugs. We systematically searched the Cochrane Lung Cancer Review Group's Specialized Register (from inception to 17 December 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE (accessed through PubMed, 1966 to 17 December 2013), EMBASE (1980 to 17 December 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (from inception to 17 December 2013), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (from inception to 17 December 2013). We also handsearched the proceedings related to lung cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology and European Society of Medical Oncology (2000 to 17 December 2013). We checked the reference lists of all eligible primary studies and review articles for additional potentially eligible studies. Eligible studies were RCTs that compared chemotherapy plus cetuximab with the same chemotherapy alone, in advanced NSCLC, previously untreated with chemotherapy or EGFR-targeted drugs, and measured at least one of the following: overall survival, progression-free survival, one-year survival rate, objective response rate

  14. Assessment of chemotherapy-associated nephrotoxicity in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Skinner, R; Pearson, A D; Coulthard, M G; Skillen, A W; Hodson, A W; Goldfinch, M E; Gibb, I; Craft, A W

    1991-01-01

    Assessment of the toxicity caused by chemotherapy in children with cancer has become more important as the number of long-term survivors has continued to increase. It is vital to monitor both acute life-threatening adverse effects and long-term toxicity that may impair the child's development and cause permanent morbidity. Renal damage may follow treatment with cytotoxic drugs, especially cisplatin or ifosfamide, and lead to glomerular, proximal tubular or distal tubular impairment or to any combination of these. Greater understanding of nephrotoxicity and of its prevention may enable the use of more intensive schedules or of higher doses of potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapy. However, the evaluation of cytotoxic drug-induced nephrotoxicity has frequently depended mainly on measurement of the plasma creatinine concentration, which may remain normal despite substantial glomerular impairment or severe tubular dysfunction. Detailed assessment of nephrotoxicity depends on an understanding of normal renal physiology and requires evaluation of all aspects of function. A comprehensive but simple investigatory protocol that enables assessment of the nature and severity of nephrotoxicity in children is described, which can be performed without admission to hospital. Glomerular function is assessed by measurement of the glomerular filtration rate from the plasma clearance of [51Cr]-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ([51Cr]-EDTA). Proximal nephron function is evaluated in three ways: by measurement of the concentration of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, glucose and urate in blood and urine along with calculations of their fractional excretion and of the renal threshold for phosphate; by determination of the excretion in urine of low-molecular-weight proteins (e.g. retinol-binding protein); and by investigation of urinary bicarbonate excretion in patients who are acidotic. Distal nephron function is initially investigated by examination of the concentration (osmolality) and

  15. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  16. Chemotherapy in head and neck osteosarcoma: Adjuvant chemotherapy improves overall survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, YiMing; Gokavarapu, Sandhya; Shen, QingCheng; Liu, Feng; Cao, Wei; Ling, YueHua; Ji, Tong

    2017-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone malignancy presenting uncommonly in head and neck sites. Surgery is mainstay in treatment. However; trials show an improved survival with addition of chemotherapy in the treatment of extremity osteosarcoma. The head and neck osteosarcomas(HNOs) were excluded in these trials because of atypical presentation and disease course. Further; sufficient numbers were not possible for a trial. We present the largest retrospective study from single institute investigating the role of chemotherapy in the management of HNOs. The retrospective cohort of HNOs treated from 2007 to 2015 of a tertiary hospital were charted. The therapeutic and prognostic factors were analyzed for overall survival(OS), disease free survival(DFS), local control(LC) and metastasis(MT) in univariate and multivariate analysis. The minimum and median period of follow up was 12months and 56.04months respectively. There was a total of 157 patients definitively treated with surgery in the time period. 7 patients had positive margins and all were maxillary or skull base tumors. The multivariate cox regression showed significance of tumor site(p=0.034), margin status (p=0.006), chemotherapy(p=0.025), histological subtype(p=0.012) as predictors of overall survival. The margin status(p=0.002), Radiotherapy(p=0.005) were significant predictors for local recurrence. The age and histology subtype(p=0.058) were borderline significant predictors of metastasis(p=0.065). The KM method for OS of different chemotherapy groups(p=0.013), and survival with and without chemotherapy(p=0.007) was significant. The OS was significantly better with adjuvant chemotherapy among various treatment plans(p=0.034). Adjuvant chemotherapy improved OS while adjuvant radiotherapy improved local control of HNOs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Meihua; Liu, Wenwen; Shen, Youqing

    2011-10-30

    Nanosystems with unique physical and biological properties have been extensively explored for cancer targeted intracellular delivery of small-molecular chemotherapeutic drugs to increase their therapeutic efficacies and to minimize their side effects. A large number of anticancer drugs are DNA-toxins that bind nuclear DNA or its associated enzymes to exert their cytotoxicity to cancer cells. After entering tumor cells, they need to be further delivered to the nucleus for actions. Herein, we discuss the biological barriers and summarize recent progress of nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy, emphasizing strategies that appear useful for design of vehicles capable of delivering drugs to the nucleus, particularly for in vivo applications. The existing obstacles or problems that need to be overcome before successful applications of nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy are also discussed.

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-04-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is an established standard for resectable muscle-invasive bladder cancer, a disease with a pattern of predominantly distant and early recurrences. Pathologic complete remission appears to be an intermediate surrogate for survival when employing combination chemotherapy. Moreover, baseline host and tumor tissue studies may enable the discovery of biomarkers predictive of activity. The neoadjuvant setting also provides a window of opportunity to evaluate novel biologic agents or rational combinations of biologic agents to obtain a signal of biologic activity. The residual tumor after neoadjuvant therapy may be exploited to study the mechanism of action and resistance. Cisplatin-ineligible patients warrant the evaluation of tolerable neoadjuvant regimens. Given that bladder cancer is characterized by initial localized presentation in the vast majority of cases, the paradigm of neoadjuvant therapy may expedite the development of novel systemic agents.

  19. [Effectiveness of scalp cooling in chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Poder, Thomas G; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2011-10-01

    The main objectives of this literature review are to determine if scalp cooling is efficient and safe, if there are side effects and if the patients' quality of life improves. In terms of effectiveness, scalp cooling seems to get good performance in its aim to prevent hair loss in patients receiving chemotherapy. The weighted average results of all identified studies indicate that this technology allows for 63.5% of patients to have a good preservation of their hair. In studies with a group of control, the weighted rates of good preservation of the hair are 50.6% with scalp cooling and 16.3% without. From the standpoint of safety technology, the main risk is that of scalp metastases. However, no study has successfully demonstrated a statistically significant difference between groups of patients receiving chemotherapy with or without scalp cooling.

  20. Side effects of chemotherapy in musculoskeletal oncology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Romantini, Matteo; Angelini, Andrea; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in medical and orthopedic oncology, radiation therapy and single- or multiple-agent perioperative chemotherapy are currently applied as an essential part of the multidisciplinary treatment to improve disease-free and overall survival of patients with primary and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumors. However, these treatments have led to unwanted complications. A better understanding of the effects of various antineoplastic agents on bone, soft tissue, and organs may provide the basis for the more efficacious use of antiproliferative drugs when fracture healing or allograft incorporation is required. This knowledge may also provide a rationale for concurrent treatment with drugs that protect against or compensate for adverse effects in osseous repair resulting from chemotherapy.

  1. Global chemotherapy development for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuto; Mizrak Kaya, Dilsa; Shimodaira, Yusuke; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2017-03-01

    To combat the dismal mortality rates from metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC), new drugs and treatment strategies are needed. Today, metastatic GAC is predominantly treated by empiric chemotherapy. Combination of two cytotoxic agents has become commonplace in North America, Europe, and Asia. Human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) overexpression (protein or gene copy numbers) has resulted in the addition of trastuzumab in the first-line chemotherapy combination in patients whose tumor is HER2 positive. The addition of trastuzumab in this select population has provided a modest survival advantage. In this review we trace the global development of systemic therapy in patients with metastatic GAC and ponder what lies in the future.

  2. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  3. Computed tomography of osteosarcoma after intraarterial chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirkhoda, A.; Jaffe, N.; Wallace, S.; Ayala, A.; Lindell, M.M.; Zornoza, J.

    1985-01-01

    The response to intraarterial cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDP) chemotherapy was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) in 33 patients with pathologically proved osteosarcoma of the long or flat bones. Twenty-one of the 33 patients had a CT scan before chemotherapy was started. In the other 12 patients, a CT scan was obtained after at least two courses of treatment, and additional studies were performed during the course of therapy. In those patients responding to treatment, the posttherapy scan revealed a remarkable decrease or complete disappearance of the associated soft-tissue mass and clear reestablishment of the fat planes between the muscle bundles that had been obscured. There was sharp definition of the peripheral margins of the calcified healing neoplasm, and the calcification in the healing tumor could be differentiated easily from that of the original bone neoplasm. CT was more accurate than conventional studies in detecting healing process and diagnosis of remission.

  4. A New mouthwash for Chemotherapy Induced Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Soleymanpoor, Leyla; Ehsani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a disturbing side-effect of chemotherapy that disturbs patients and causes difficulties in patient’s drinking, eating and talking, and may results in infection and bleeding. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Yarrow distillate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial study was conducted during 2013. The study population consisted of all cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced oral stomatitis referred to Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had two-part; a demographic part and another part recording the severity of the stomatitis at the first, seventh, and 14th days of the intervention based on a WHO criteria checklist in 2005. In this study, 56 patients diagnosed with cancer were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups in similar blocks according to their stomatitis severity. The experimental group gargled 15 mL of a routine solution mixed with Yarrow distillate 4 times a day for 14 days while the control group gargled 15 mL of routine solution. The severity of stomatitis was assessed at the beginning of the intervention, and then after 7 and 14 days of the study. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Friedman tests using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: At first, the median score of stomatitis in the experimental group was 2.50 that significantly reduced to 1 and 0 in days 7 and 14 of the intervention, respectively (P value < 0.001). However, in the control group, the median score of stomatitis was 2.50, which significantly increased to 3 in days 7 and 14 (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: Yarrow distillate-contained solution reduced stomatitis severity more than the routine solution. Therefore, we suggest using it in patients with chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. PMID:25699281

  5. Chemotherapy and biotherapy-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Van Gerpen, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Nearly all chemotherapy and biotherapy drugs used in cancer treatment today can cause hypersensitivity reactions. Certain groups of drugs frequently associated with these reactions include the asparaginases, taxanes, platinum compounds, epipodophyllotoxins, and the monoclonal antibodies. Recognizing and managing hypersensitivity reactions are critical when caring for patients receiving these drugs because the reactions are potentially life-threatening. A thorough understanding of the drugs is necessary to assist the nurse in prevention, early recognition, and timely management.

  6. False positive tumor markers: elevation in patients with breast cancer on FAC-type chemotherapy and correlation with the development of hand-foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tyshler, L B; Longton, G M; Ellis, G K; Livingston, R B

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer patients on dose-intensive chemotherapy often have elevated tumor markers during the course of treatment. Our objective was to estimate the incidence of a "false positive" tumor marker screen and to determine whether hand-foot epithelial damage was correlated. Data from 53 patients with high risk primary breast cancer who had undergone adjuvant or neoadjuvant 5FU-containing chemotherapy (FAC or FAC plus G-CSF) for 3 to 12 months were reviewed. The relationship between tumor marker elevation and disease recurrence, regimen intensity, and the occurrence of hand-foot syndrome was examined. Thirty-three of the 53 patients had elevated tumor markers in the absence of recurrent disease. The false positive rate was higher in patients who underwent FAC plus G-CSF chemotherapy than in patients who underwent FAC chemotherapy (92% vs 55%, p = .01). A false positive marker screen was associated with the occurrence of hand-foot syndrome even when the effect of regimen was accounted for by stratification (p = .01). Tumor marker screening of breast cancer patients on this type of adjuvant chemotherapy has poor specificity for recurrent malignancy. These data suggest tumor marker elevation may be an indicator of epithelial toxicity during chemotherapy, manifested clinically as hand-foot syndrome.

  7. Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki Woong; Lim, Do Hoon; Yi, Eun Sang; Choi, Young Bae; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Ji Hye; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Joung, Yoo Sook; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the effectiveness of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in improving the survival of patients with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors while reducing the risks of late adverse effects from radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods For young children (< 3 years old), tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was administered after six cycles of induction chemotherapy. RT was deferred until after 3 years of age unless the tumor showed relapse or progression. For older patients (> 3 years old), RT including reduced-dose craniospinal RT (23.4 or 30.6 Gy) was administered either after two cycles of induction chemotherapy or after surgery, and tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was administered after six cycles of induction chemotherapy. Results A total of 13 patients (five young and eight older) were enrolled from November 2004 to June 2012. Eight patients, including all five young patients, had metastatic disease at diagnosis. Six patients (four young and two older) experienced progression before initiation of RT, and seven were able to proceed to HDCT/auto-SCT without progression during induction treatment. Three of six patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent HDCT/auto-SCT as salvage treatment. All five young patients died from disease progression. However, four of the eight older patients remain progression-freewith a median follow-up period of 64 months (range, 39 to 108 months). Treatment-related late toxicities were acceptable. Conclusion The required dose of craniospinal RT might be reduced in older patients if the intensity of chemotherapy is increased. However, early administration of RT should be considered to prevent early progression in young patients. PMID:27034140

  8. Adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer: A sequential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Kwon, Janice . E-mail: Janice.kwon@lhsc.on.ca; D'Souza, David; Gawlik, Christine; Stitt, Larry; Whiston, Frances; Nascu, Patricia; Wong, Eugene; Carey, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiotherapy for women with advanced endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective cohort study of women with Stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (350 mg/m{sup 2}) every 3 weeks, followed sequentially by external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (45 Gy), followed by an additional two cycles of chemotherapy. Para-aortic RT and/or HDR vault brachytherapy (BT) were added at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Thirty-three patients (median age, 63 years) received treatment between April 2002 and June 2005. Median follow-up was 21 months. Stage distribution was as follows: IIIA (21%), IIIC (70%), IVB (9%). Combination chemotherapy was successfully administered to 30 patients (91%) and 25 patients (76%), before and after RT respectively. Nine patients (27%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxicities. All patients completed pelvic RT; 19 (58%) received standard 4-field RT and 14 (42%) received intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Ten (30%) received extended field radiation. Four patients (12%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 RT toxicities. Six (18%) patients developed chronic RT toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Two-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 55%. There was only one pelvic relapse (3%). Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with combination chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer was well tolerated. This protocol may be suitable for further evaluation in a clinical trial.

  9. Predicting early post-chemotherapy adverse events in patients with hematological malignancies: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiaoming; Lei, Fang; Zhang, Haifeng; Lu, Hua; Zhu, Yan; Tang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model that predicts the definite adverse events following chemotherapy in patients with hematological malignancies (HMs). This is a retrospective cohort study including 1157 cases with HMs. Firstly, we screened and verified the independent risk factors associated with post-chemotherapy adverse events by both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis using 70 % of randomly selected cases (training set). Secondly, we proposed a mathematical model based on those selected factors. The calibration and discrimination of the model were assessed by Hosmer-Lemeshow (H-L) test and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, respectively. Lastly, the predicative power of this model was further tested in the remaining 30 % of cases (validation set). Our statistical analysis indicated that liver dysfunction (OR = 2.164), active infection (OR = 3.619), coagulation abnormalities (OR = 4.614), intensity of chemotherapy (OR = 10.001), acute leukemia (OR = 2.185), and obesity (OR = 1.604) were independent risk factors for post-chemotherapy adverse events in HM patients (all P < 0.05). Based on the verified risk factors, a predictive model was proposed. This model had good discrimination and calibration. When 0.648 was selected as the cutoff point, the sensitivity and specificity of this predictive model in validation sets was 72.7 and 87.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, this proposed model's positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and consistency rate were 87.3, 73.0 and 80.0 %, respectively. Our study indicated that this six risk factor-based mathematical model is accurate and sufficient enough to predict definite post-chemotherapy adverse events in a HM patient and it may aid clinicians to optimize treatment for a HM patient.

  10. Predictive modeling of the outcomes of chemotherapy-induced (febrile) neutropenia prophylaxis with biosimilar filgrastim (MONITOR-GCSF study)

    PubMed Central

    Aapro, M.; Ludwig, H.; Bokemeyer, C.; Gascón, P.; Boccadoro, M.; Denhaerynck, K.; Krendyukov, A.; Gorray, M.; MacDonald, K.; Abraham, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk models of chemotherapy-induced (CIN) and febrile neutropenia (FN) have to date focused on determinants measured at the start of chemotherapy. We extended this static approach with a dynamic approach of CIN/FN risk modeling at the start of each cycle. Design We applied predictive modeling using multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of CIN/FN episodes and related hospitalizations and chemotherapy disturbances (CIN/FN consequences) in analyses at the patient (‘ever’ during the whole period of chemotherapy) and cycle-level (during a given chemotherapy cycle). Statistical dependence of cycle data being ‘nested’ under patients was managed using generalized estimation equations. Predictive performance of each model was evaluated using bootstrapped c concordance statistics. Results Static patient-level risk models of ‘ever’ experiencing CIN/FN adverse events and consequences during a planned chemotherapy regimen included predictors related to history, risk factors, and prophylaxis initiation and intensity. Dynamic cycle-level risk models of experiencing CIN/FN adverse events and consequences in an upcoming cycle included predictors related to history, risk factors, and prophylaxis initiation and intensity; as well as prophylaxis duration, CIN/FN in prior cycle, and treatment center characteristics. Conclusion(s) These ‘real-world evidence’ models provide clinicians with the ability to anticipate CIN/FN adverse events and their consequences at the start of a chemotherapy line (static models); and, innovatively, to assess risk of CIN/FN adverse events and their consequences at the start of each cycle (dynamic models). This enables individualized patient treatment and is consistent with the EORTC recommendation to re-appraise CIN/FN risk at the start of each cycle. Prophylaxis intensity (under-, correctly-, or over-prophylacted relative to current EORTC guidelines) is a major determinant. Under-prophylaxis is clinically

  11. Pathophysiology of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Starobova, Hana; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is a common, dose-dependent adverse effect of several antineoplastics. It can lead to detrimental dose reductions and discontinuation of treatment, and severely affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Clinically, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy presents as deficits in sensory, motor, and autonomic function which develop in a glove and stocking distribution due to preferential effects on longer axons. The pathophysiological processes are multi-factorial and involve oxidative stress, apoptotic mechanisms, altered calcium homeostasis, axon degeneration and membrane remodeling as well as immune processes and neuroinflammation. This review focusses on the commonly used antineoplastic substances oxaliplatin, cisplatin, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel which interfere with the cancer cell cycle—leading to cell death and tumor degradation—and cause severe acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. We discuss drug mechanism of action and pharmacokinetic disposition relevant to the development of peripheral neuropathy, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, emerging insight into genetic susceptibilities as well as current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment approaches. PMID:28620280

  12. Managing oral chemotherapy: the healthcare practitioner's role.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2007-05-01

    [corrected] Management of the side effect profiles of the new oral cancer chemotherapeutic agents differs from those of traditional oral chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. The healthcare practitioner's role in counseling and managing these toxicities as well as methods for assessing and promoting adherence is reviewed. Many side effects from traditional oral cancer chemotherapeutic agents are the result of their effects on healthy cells as well as cancer cells. The side effects from the novel targeted therapies differ from those of traditional chemotherapy. Managing side effects and patient self-administration in non-traditional settings without supervision may affect patient adherence, especially with the newer agents. Social and psychological factors also can affect adherence. Various methods are available to assess adherence, including obtaining prescription refill histories and performing pill counts. Counseling patients, asking patients to keep a diary of doses and side effects, and following up with patients at clinic visits or through telephone contact are all methods that promote adherence. Patient education should address the proper dose, frequency, timing with respect to food and other medications, what to do if a dose is missed, side effects to anticipate, and what to do if side effects occur. Healthcare practitioners play an important role in educating patients regarding potential side effects to oral chemotherapy and assessing and promoting adherence to the treatment regimen.

  13. Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanisms in Advanced Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalal, Bhuvanesh Sukhlal; Upadhya, Dinesh; Pai, Vinitha Ramanath

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:28382191

  14. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  15. [Buccal manifestations in patients submitted to chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Hespanhol, Fernando Luiz; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; Teixeira, Henrique Guilherme de Castro; Falabella, Márcio Eduardo Vieira; Assis, Neuza Maria de Souza Picorelli

    2010-06-01

    Several changes in the oral cavity due to chemotherapy can be observed and can lead to important systemic complications, increasing the time of the patient in hospital and the costs of the treatment as well as affect the quality of life of the patients. The aim of this study was to assess the oral manifestation in patients treated with chemotherapy according to sex, age and tumor type. Data was collected in an oncology hospital in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais State, from patients' records that were submitted to oncologic treatment. It was possible to verify that mucositis, associated or not to other type of lesions, was the most common lesion in both sex of all ages (15.5%). Xerostomia and other lesions, such as Candida infection and aphthous lesions, were also present. It is possible to improve the quality of life of the patient during and after anti-neoplastic therapies through a protocol of odontological assistance that includes changes of the oral environment previous to chemotherapy such as profilaxis, caries removal, treatment of periodontal and periapical lesions, oral hygiene instructions, diet orientation and laser therapy. It is very important the insertion of the dentist in the oncologic medical team for the early diagnosis of the oral manifestation and follow-up during treatment time.

  16. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  17. Bone marrow osteoblast vulnerability to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gencheva, Marieta; Hare, Ian; Kurian, Susan; Fortney, Jim; Piktel, Debbie; Wysolmerski, Robert; Gibson, Laura F

    2013-06-01

    Osteoblasts are a major component of the bone marrow microenvironment, which provide support for hematopoietic cell development. Functional disruption of any element of the bone marrow niche, including osteoblasts, can potentially impair hematopoiesis. We have studied the effect of two widely used drugs with different mechanisms of action, etoposide (VP16) and melphalan, on murine osteoblasts at distinct stages of maturation. VP16 and melphalan delayed maturation of preosteoblasts and altered CXCL12 protein levels, a key regulator of hematopoietic cell homing to the bone marrow. Sublethal concentrations of VP16 and melphalan also decreased the levels of several transcripts which contribute to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) including osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), and collagen 1A1 (Col1a1). The impact of chemotherapy on message and protein levels for some targets was not always aligned, suggesting differential responses at the transcription and translation or protein stability levels. As one of the main functions of a mature osteoblast is to synthesize ECM of a defined composition, disruption of the ratio of its components may be one mechanism by which chemotherapy affects the ability of osteoblasts to support hematopoietic recovery coincident with altered marrow architecture. Collectively, these observations suggest that the osteoblast compartment of the marrow hematopoietic niche is vulnerable to functional dysregulation by damage imposed by agents frequently used in clinical settings. Understanding the mechanistic underpinning of chemotherapy-induced changes on the hematopoietic support capacity of the marrow microenvironment may contribute to improved strategies to optimize patient recovery post-transplantation.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced acute psychosis in a patient with malignant germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Puangthong, Umamon; Pongpirul, Krit

    2015-04-09

    A 25-year-old Thai woman with ovarian germ cell tumour presented with behavioural changes after receiving an intensive dose of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, for a relapse. Her initial symptoms of mood fluctuation and insomnia were noticed while hospitalised for the third cycle, and became more severe. She was very irritable, highly distracted and forgetful. She exhibited flights of ideas and hyperactivity, including compulsive shopping. She also had paranoid ideations, auditory hallucinations, and thoughts of being wealthy and close to the prime minister. She was not depressed. She was diagnosed with axis I psychotic disorder not otherwise specified. The incremental dosage of olanzapine from 5 to 20 mg/day was given but failed to control her psychotic symptoms during the first week, and was therefore switched to risperidone. At 4 mg/day, her symptoms were dramatically controlled. This novel evidence suggests the rare possibility of an association between chemotherapy and the development of psychotic attacks.

  19. Retrospective analysis of systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition for the treatment of malignant small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Jay; Gupta, Rohan; Ensor, Joe; Raghav, Kanwal; Fogelman, David; Wolff, Robert A; Fisch, Michael; Overman, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Malignant small bowel obstruction (MSBO) that does not resolve with conservative measures frequently leaves few treatment options other than palliative care. This single-institution retrospective study assesses the outcomes of a more aggressive approach-concurrent systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-in the treatment of MSBO. The MD Anderson pharmacy database was queried to identify patients who received concurrent systemic chemotherapy and TPN between 2005 and 2013. Only patients with MSBO secondary to peritoneal carcinomatosis requiring TPN for ≥8 days were included. Survival and multivariate analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models. The study included 82 patients. MSBO resolution was observed in 10 patients. Radiographic assessments showed a response to chemotherapy in 19 patients; 6 of these patients experienced MSBO resolution. Patients spent an average of 38% of their remaining lives hospitalized, and 28% of patients required admission to the intensive care unit. In multivariate modeling, radiographic response to chemotherapy correlated with MSBO resolution (odds ratio [OR] 6.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68-27.85, P = 0.007). Median overall survival (OS) was 3.1 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 12.6%. Radiographic response to chemotherapy (HR 0.30; 95% CI, 0.16-0.56, P < 0.001), and initiation of new chemotherapy during TPN (HR 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33-0.94, P = 0.026) independently predicted for longer OS. Concurrent treatment with systemic chemotherapy and TPN for persistent MSBO results in low efficacy and a high morbidity and mortality, and thus should not represent a standard approach. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [The Clinical Utility of Pegfilgrastim in Combination with Adjuvant FEC(100)and TC Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Yanai, Hirotsugu; Endo, Kayoko; Matsumoto, Mayumi; Kon, Masanori; Sugie, Tomoharu

    2016-09-01

    More than 20%of breast cancer patients who undergo myelosuppressive chemotherapy involving FEC(100) or TC experience febrile neutropenia(FN), and pegfilgrastim is commonly recommended as the primary prophylaxis. Delays and/or dose-reductions in chemotherapy should be avoided as much as possible to maximize the clinical benefits of these adjuvant chemotherapies. This study assessed the relative dose intensity(RDI), efficacy, and safety of pegfilgrastim in patients with breast cancer. The incidence of FN was also evaluated. Twenty-six patients with breast cancer undergoing FEC(100)or TC were included in this retrospective study. Of the 26 patients, 19 patients who underwent FEC(100)and 7 patients who underwent TC received 3.6 mg of pegfilgrastim 24 hours after administration of the myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Four and 14 patients who underwent FEC(100)achieved 85-99% and 100% RDI, respectively. All 7 patients who underwent TC achieved 100% RDI. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events, as assessed using the CTCAE, were observed in 11 patients who underwent FEC(100): 2 patients experienced leukocytopenia, 7 experienced neutropenia, 1 experienced thrombocytopenia, and 1 experienced FN. Four patients who underwent TC experienced Grade 3 and 4 adverse events: 1 patient each experienced bone pain, neutropenia, anemia, and FN. Pegfilgrastim can reduce the incidence of FN and maintain RDI in patients with breast cancer undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

  1. [Influence of cancer chemotherapy on conjunctival epithelium and goblet cells].

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Jurowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of different types of chemotherapy schemes administered in lung, breast and bowel cancer on conjunctival epithelium and goblet cells morphology. 36 patients (72 eyes) were enrolled to the study. Patients were divided into three groups depending on type of cancer and chemotherapy: group I - patients diagnosed with non- small cells lung cancer treated with PE schema (cisplatin, etoposide), group II - with breast cancer treated with FAC schema (fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide), group Ill - bowel cancer treated with FU/LV schema (fluorouracil, leucovorin). Examinations were performed before chemotherapy and after Il'th, IV'th, VI'th chemotherapy cycle. Conjuntival specimen were obtained with exfoliative cytology, stained with PAS and hematoxyline. Statistically significant deterioration of conjunctival epithelium and goblet cells in all the groups in each time of examination (p<0.001) was observed. Alterations were aggravated with duration of chemotherapy. Before chemotherapy all the patients had normal epithelium and goblet cells (grade 0 or 1 according to the Nelson's scale). Conjunctival cells status gradually deteriorated and altered from the normal glandular epithelium to the squamous cells epithelium through the process of squamous metaplasia. In further chemotherapy cycles each patient (1,0 fraction) had abnormal morphology of epithelium and goblet cells (grade 2 or 3 of Nelson's scale). Chemotherapy induces squamous metaplasia of epithelium and the reduction of number of conjunctival goblet cells. This abnormalities were time dependent and increased with duration of chemotherapy and were not depended on type of chemotherapy scheme.

  2. Efficacy of granulocyte colony stimulating factor as a secondary prophylaxis along with full-dose chemotherapy following a prior cycle of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Seema; Singh, Pankaj K; Bhatt, Madan L B; Pant, Mohan C; Gupta, Rajeev; Negi, Mahendra P S

    2010-10-01

    Secondary prophylaxis with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is recommended where patients have experienced febrile neutropenia in an earlier chemotherapy cycle and for whom the maintenance of chemotherapy dose intensity is important; or where febrile neutropenia has not occurred but prolonged neutropenia is causing excessive dose delay or reduction, where maintenance of dose intensity is important. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of G-CSF as secondary prophylaxis when used along with full dose moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy following a prior cycle with febrile-neutropenia. Fifty-two patients aged 22-75 years with febrile neutropenia that required intravenous antibiotics following moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy were included. These patients received the next cycle of the same chemotherapy regime without dose modification but with support of filgrastim 24 h after completion of chemotherapy (300 μg/day/subcutaneously (s.c.) for weight < 60 kg, 480 μg/day/s.c. for weight > 60 kg, for at least 10 consecutive days), patients in whom neutropenia was associated with a life-threatening infection and those who developed prolonged myelosuppression were excluded. The use of the hematopoietic growth factor G-CSF was shown to shorten the neutrophil recovery time, resulting in significant reduction of incidence of febrile neutropenia, hospitalization and use of broad spectrum antibiotics. There was no drug related death or adverse events associated with either cycle. In conclusion, recombinant human G-CSF is effective and relatively safe as a secondary prophylaxis with full dose chemotherapy in patients who develop febrile neutropenia following prior cycles of moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy.

  3. Role of Chemotherapy and Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Vipin; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy using the taxanes, docetaxel and cabazitaxel, remains an important therapeutic option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, despite the survival benefits afforded by these agents, the survival increments are modest and resistance occurs universally. Efforts to overcome resistance to docetaxel by combining with biologic agents have heretofore been unsuccessful. Indeed, resistance to these taxanes is also associated with cross-resistance to the antiandrogen drugs, abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy in metastatic CRPC and the potential role of emerging regimens and agents in varying clinical phases of development. PMID:27773999

  4. Perioperative systemic chemotherapy in peritoneal carcinomatosis of lymph node positive colorectal cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, A M; Mehta, A M; Boot, H; van Leerdam, M E; Hauptmann, M; Aalbers, A G; Verwaal, V J

    2014-04-01

    Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) is the preferred treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) of colorectal carcinoma. Patients with positive lymph node status have worse survival after CRS-HIPEC, which is probably due to higher rates of systemic failure. In this study, we analysed the effect of administration and timing of systemic chemotherapy on the outcome of lymph node positive colorectal carcinoma patients treated with CRS-HIPEC. A prospective database was reviewed to identify lymph node positive patients with PC treated with CRS-HIPEC within 1 year after primary tumour diagnosis between 2004 and 2012. Medical history of the patients was studied for the administration of perioperative systemic chemotherapy and follow-up. Outcome parameters were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and pattern of recurrence. Seventy-three patients treated with CRS-HIPEC for PC from lymph node positive colorectal carcinoma were identified. Fourteen patients received pre-CRS-HIPEC chemotherapy only, 32 patients underwent post-CRS-HIPEC chemotherapy only, 9 patients received chemotherapy both pre- and post-CRS-HIPEC and 16 patients did not receive any systemic chemotherapy. Of the 47 patients who did not receive pre-CRS-HIPEC chemotherapy, 11 (23%) did not receive any chemotherapy due to major postoperative complications. PFS and OS were significantly higher in patients who received systemic chemotherapy (PFS: median 15 versus 4 months, P = 0.024; OS: median 30 versus 14 months, P = 0.015), although this difference was attenuated after adjustment for major complications. Different chemotherapy timings did not differ significantly in either survival or recurrence patterns. In patients with PC from lymph node positive colorectal carcinoma, perioperative systemic chemotherapy is associated with increased OS and PFS, although this difference may be partly explained by the occurrence of major postoperative complication

  5. Self-reported taste and smell changes during cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bernhardson, Britt-Marie; Tishelman, Carol; Rutqvist, Lars E

    2008-03-01

    This study explores the prevalence of self-reported taste and smell changes (TSCs) during chemotherapy and relationships between TSCs and demographic and clinical factors. Consecutive patients who had received chemotherapy for > or =6 weeks at 11 outpatient chemotherapy units completed a questionnaire developed for this survey. Seventy-five percent of the 518 participants reported TSCs, with TSCs more prevalent among women and younger patients. After adjustment for age and sex, we found that patients reporting TSCs more often reported: previous smell changes, less responsibility for cooking, concurrent medication, higher educational levels, and being on sick leave. Participants reporting oral problems, nausea, appetite loss, and depressed mood more frequently reported TSCs. Diagnosis and type of chemotherapy regimen did not predict TSCs. TSCs were found to be common during cancer chemotherapy and were related to sociodemographic rather than clinical factors. TSCs were also found to be closely related to many other side effects of chemotherapy.

  6. Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting--prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kynan; Cain, Michael; Nowak, Anna K

    2007-09-01

    Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting are among the most feared consequences of cancer treatment. Recent developments in drug treatment make the goal of no nausea or vomiting during chemotherapy realistic. In this article we review the pathogenesis and management of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. Regimens to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting are guided by the emetogenic potential of the chemotherapeutic agents used. Combined prophylactic therapy targets different pathways, improving the efficacy of prevention and treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. General practitioners have an important role in patients undergoing chemotherapy by reinforcing the importance of prophylactic treatment and administering rescue treatment for patients with breakthrough or prolonged nausea and vomiting postchemotherapy.

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    PubMed Central

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  8. Clonal Evolution of Chemotherapy-resistant Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Faltas, Bishoy M.; Prandi, Davide; Tagawa, Scott T.; Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.; Sternberg, Cora; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Robinson, Brian; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Beltran, Himisha; Demichelis, Francesca; Rubin, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant urothelial carcinoma (UC) has no uniformly curative therapy. Understanding how selective pressure from chemotherapy directs UC’s evolution and shapes its clonal architecture is a central biological question with clinical implications. To address this question, we performed whole-exome sequencing and clonality analysis of 72 UCs including 16 matched sets of primary and advanced tumors prospectively collected before and after chemotherapy. Our analysis provided several insights: (i) chemotherapy-treated UC is characterized by intra-patient mutational heterogeneity and the majority of mutations are not shared, (ii) both branching evolution and metastatic spread are very early events in the natural history of UC; (iii) chemotherapy-treated UC is enriched with clonal mutations involving L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and integrin signaling pathways; (iv) APOBEC induced-mutagenesis is clonally-enriched in chemotherapy-treated UC and continues to shape UC’s evolution throughout its lifetime. PMID:27749842

  9. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects.

  10. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects. PMID:22619512

  11. Bone marrow osteoblast vulnerability to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gencheva, Marieta; Hare, Ian; Kurian, Susan; Fortney, Jim; Piktel, Debbie; Wysolmerski, Robert; Gibson, Laura F.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoblasts are a major component of the bone marrow microenvironment which provide support for hematopoietic cell development. Functional disruption of any element of the bone marrow niche, including osteoblasts, can potentially impair hematopoiesis. We have studied the effect of two widely used drugs with different mechanisms of action, etoposide (VP16) and melphalan, on murine osteoblasts at distinct stages of maturation. VP16 and melphalan delayed maturation of preosteoblasts and altered CXCL12 protein levels, a key regulator of hematopoietic cell homing to the bone marrow. Sublethal concentrations of VP16 and melphalan also decreased the levels of several transcripts which contribute to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) including osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN) and collagen 1A1 (Col1a1). The impact of chemotherapy on message and protein levels for some targets was not always aligned, suggesting differential responses at the transcription and translation or protein stability levels. Since one of the main functions of a mature osteoblast is to synthesize ECM of a defined composition, disruption of the ratio of its components may be one mechanism by which chemotherapy affects the ability of osteoblasts to support hematopoietic recovery coincident with altered marrow architecture. Collectively, these observations suggest that the osteoblast compartment of the marrow hematopoietic niche is vulnerable to functional dysregulation by damage imposed by agents frequently used in clinical settings. Understanding the mechanistic underpinning of chemotherapy-induced changes on the hematopoietic support capacity of the marrow microenvironment may contribute to improved strategies to optimize patient recovery post-transplantation. PMID:23551534

  12. Gastric carcinoma: curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Hernández, J F; Ernesto de Obaldía Castillo, G; Ramírez Ortega, C; Frías Mendivil, M; Pardo, M

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study of gastric adenocarcinoma treated with surgery as curative attempt was performed at the Oncology Service, in the Hospital Regional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE. Morbidity and mortality of the surgical procedures were evaluated, the significance of several risk factors and the survival impact of adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC). In the period from 1975 to 1991 a total of 483 new cases were seen. In only 54 patients (11.2%) was it possible to undertake a curative resection. The patients were assigned to three groups of treatment: surgery alone (14 cases), surgery + 5-FU (19 cases), and surgery + 5-FU+MMC (21 cases). Three different types of surgical techniques are regularly performed in our service for gastric cancer treatment: Billroth II distal gastrectomy, total gastrectomy with Roux-En-Y reconstruction, and esophagogastrectomy with esophagogastrostomy. Surgical morbidity and mortality was low, with 9% of duodenal stump fistulas and 27% with partial stenosis of esophagojejunostomy; the operative mortality was zero. Chemotherapy toxicity was transient and low, no related deaths were recorded. The prognostic factors associated significantly with survival were lymph node status and tumor penetration. The histologic differentiation as well as the tumor location and type of surgery had no significance. The estimated 5-year survival of the patients treated with surgery alone was 62%, while that of the patients treated with surgery plus chemotherapy was 38%. These groups were not comparable, however, because of important differences in their prognostic factors. The groups treated with 5-FU alone or in combination with MMC had no survival difference between them.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.S.; Dundas, S.; Holdsworth, C.D.

    1987-08-01

    We report a case of intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patient also had small bowel bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic insufficiency. Lymphatic ectasia as a histological feature has been described previously in association with postradiotherapy malabsorption, but radiation-induced lymphangiectasia producing clinical manifestations has hitherto not been reported. Replacement of dietary long-chain fats with medium-chain triglycerides, pancreatic enzyme supplements, and a short course of oxytetracycline, resulted in dramatic clinical improvement. The possibility of intestinal lymphangiectasia should be borne in mind in patients with postradiotherapy malabsorption. A low serum albumin and lymphocyte count should draw attention to this possibility.

  14. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; Higano, Celestia S; Iversen, Peter; Bhattacharya, Suman; Carles, Joan; Chowdhury, Simon; Davis, Ian D; de Bono, Johann S; Evans, Christopher P; Fizazi, Karim; Joshua, Anthony M; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kimura, Go; Mainwaring, Paul; Mansbach, Harry; Miller, Kurt; Noonberg, Sarah B; Perabo, Frank; Phung, De; Saad, Fred; Scher, Howard I; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Venner, Peter M; Tombal, Bertrand

    2014-07-31

    Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have not received chemotherapy, in whom the disease has progressed despite androgen-deprivation therapy. In this double-blind, phase 3 study, we randomly assigned 1717 patients to receive either enzalutamide (at a dose of 160 mg) or placebo once daily. The coprimary end points were radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival. The study was stopped after a planned interim analysis, conducted when 540 deaths had been reported, showed a benefit of the active treatment. The rate of radiographic progression-free survival at 12 months was 65% among patients treated with enzalutamide, as compared with 14% among patients receiving placebo (81% risk reduction; hazard ratio in the enzalutamide group, 0.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15 to 0.23; P<0.001). A total of 626 patients (72%) in the enzalutamide group, as compared with 532 patients (63%) in the placebo group, were alive at the data-cutoff date (29% reduction in the risk of death; hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84; P<0.001). The benefit of enzalutamide was shown with respect to all secondary end points, including the time until the initiation of cytotoxic chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.35), the time until the first skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Fatigue and hypertension were the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy

  15. Targeting DNA topoisomerase II in cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Recent molecular studies have greatly expanded the biological contexts where Top2 plays critical roles, including DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation. Although the biological functions of Top2 are important for insuring genomic integrity, the ability to interfere with Top2 and generate enzyme mediated DNA damage is an effective strategy for cancer chemotherapy. The molecular tools that have allowed understanding the biological functions of Top2 are also being applied to understanding the details of drug action. These studies promise a more refined ability to target Top2 as an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:19377506

  16. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  17. Electrophysiological Biomarkers of Chemotherapy-related Cognitive Impairment and Recovery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-01

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Effects of Chemotherapy; Mild Cognitive Impairment; Multiple Myeloma; Non-hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoid Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Chemotherapy for oral and maxillofacial tumors: an update.

    PubMed

    Eid, Ahmed; Li, Shuang; Garza, Rodolfo; Wong, Mark E

    2014-05-01

    Surgery is the primary intervention in oral and maxillofacial tumors and under ideal circumstances is curative. There is no evidence to support the use of induction or adjuvant chemotherapy in initial therapy of early stage tumors. Locally advanced tumors, non-resectable tumors as well as recurrence in early stage disease, need a multi-modality therapeutic approach involving chemotherapy. Palliative chemotherapy plays an important role in the treatment patients with metastatic oral and maxillofacial tumors. Chemotherapy and targeted agents plays an important role in the treatment of patients with rare oral and maxillofacial tumors such as sarcomas, lymphomas, and giant cell tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Timing of chemotherapy and surgery in a murine osteosarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Bell, R S; Roth, Y F; Gebhardt, M C; Bell, D F; Rosenberg, A E; Mankin, H J; Suit, H D

    1988-10-01

    The sequential use of chemotherapy and surgery in the treatment of osteosarcoma developed in an empirical fashion without the benefit of investigations in animal models. The MGH-OGS murine osteosarcoma is a transplantable tumor that resembles the human disease with respect to histology, local invasiveness, metastatic characteristics, tumor ploidy, and its response to chemotherapy. We have used this tumor model to investigate the efficacy of preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative chemotherapy on the development of pulmonary metastases in three different experimental protocols. In each experimental design, perioperative chemotherapy demonstrated a significant advantage in preventing systemic relapse.

  20. Case mix and charges for inpatient and outpatient chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Joanna; Henderson, Mary; Malbon, Alan; Bergman, Andrew; Come, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Case mix and charges for chemotherapy treatment were examined by an analysis of the inpatient discharges for DRG 410 (chemotherapy) from eight teaching hospitals and of outpatient visits from two teaching hospitals. Discharges for ovarian cancer were the most common and the least expensive, costing $1,600 or half as much as the most costly, less common conditions (leukemia and testicle cancer). Diagnosis explained 13 percent of the inpatient charge variation; metastasis explained less than 1 percent. Outpatient chemotherapy overlapped with inpatient among only 3 of the 10 most common diagnoses. The implication is that the two settings are complementary with regard to chemotherapy administration. PMID:10312189

  1. Adjuvant regional chemotherapy and systemic chemotherapy versus systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer: a multicentre randomised controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Nordlinger, Bernard; Rougier, Philippe; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Debois, Muriel; Wils, Jaques; Ollier, Jean-Claude; Grobost, Olivier; Lasser, Philippe; Wals, Jacob; Lacourt, Jerome; Seitz, Jean-François; Guimares dos Santos, Jose; Bleiberg, Harry; Mackiewickz, Rémy; Conroy, Thierry; Bouché, Olivier; Morin, Thierry; Baila, Liliana; van Cutsem, Eric; Bedenne, Laurent

    2005-07-01

    Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy can improve overall survival and reduce the incidence of distant metastases for patients with advanced colon cancer. This study aimed to investigate whether regional chemotherapy (given by intraperitoneal or intraportal methods) combined with systemic chemotherapy was more effective than was systemic chemotherapy alone in terms of survival and recurrence for patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. The study also compared systemic chemotherapy with fluorouracil and folinic acid with that of fluorouracil and levamisole. During surgery, 753 patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to systemic chemotherapy alone (379 with fluorouracil and folinic acid, and 374 with fluorouracil and levamisole), and 748 to postoperative regional chemotherapy with fluorouracil followed by systemic chemotherapy with fluorouracil and folinic acid (n=368) or with fluorouracil and levamisole (n=380). Regional chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally (n=415) or intraportally (n=235) according to institution. The primary endpoint was 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints were 5-year disease-free survival and toxic effects. Analyses were by intention to treat. Median follow-up was 6.8 years (range 0.0-10.1). 5-year overall survival was 72.3% (95% CI 69.0-75.6) for patients assigned regional and systemic chemotherapy, compared with 72.0% (68.7-75.3) for those assigned systemic chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.97 [0.81-1.15], p=0.69). 5-year overall survival for all patients assigned fluorouracil and levamisole was 72.0% (68.7-75.2) compared with 72.3% (69.0-75.6) for all those assigned fluorouracil and folinic acid (HR 0.98 [0.82-1.17], p=0.81). The hazard ratios for 5-year disease-free survival were 0.94 (0.80-1.10) for regional versus non-regional treatment, and 0.92 (0.79-1.08) for all fluorouracil and levamisole versus fluorouracil and folinic acid. Grade 3-4 toxic effects were low in all groups. Fluorouracil

  2. [Two Cases of Effective Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Liver Metastases of Colon Cancer Resistant to Systemic Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Date, Yusaku; Hisaka, Toru; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Nakayama, Goichi; Akashi, Masanori; Kawahara, Ryuichi; Sakai, Hisamune; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yasunaga, Masafumi; Uchida, Shinji; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Koji; Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Miwa, Keisuke; Akagi, Yoshito

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old man underwent right hemicolectomy for ascending colon cancer with liver metastases. Postoperative systemic chemotherapy did not reduce the metastases, and therefore, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAI) was administered. The metastases decreased in size after 26 rounds of therapy, and the patient underwent resection. He is recurrence-free 63 months after the primary operation. A 57-year-old man underwent Hartmann's operation for sigmoid colon cancer with liver metastases. He underwent hepatic left lobe resection after metastases reduction by systemic chemotherapy. However, multiple liver metastases were detected 2 months later. Because the disease progressed despite the administration of systemic chemotherapy, HAI was utilized instead. The metastases decreased in size remarkably, and resection was performed. The patient is surviving 52 months after the primary operation while being continuously treated with HAI, resection, and systemic chemotherapy for re-recurrence. HAI is a potential alternative treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases resistant to systemic chemotherapy.

  3. Chemotherapy versus Hypomethylating Agents for the Treatment of Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Motabi, Ibraheem H; Ghobadi, Armin; Liu, Jingxia; Schroeder, Mark; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockler-Goldstein, Keith E; Uy, Geoffrey L; Vij, Ravi; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). For patients with relapsed disease after transplantation, intensive chemotherapy followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or a second allo-SCT may result in a durable response in some patients. High-intensity chemotherapy and less aggressive therapy with hypomethylating agents (HAs) with and without DLI are often used for relapse after allo-SCT. Here we compared the treatment outcomes of intensive chemotherapy with that of HAs in relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT. Patients who had received a second SCT within 90 days of the relapse date were excluded. The primary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were complete remission (CR) rate and progression-free survival (PFS). One hundred patients were included: 73 patients received chemotherapy and 27 patients received an HA. Fifty-six percent of patients in the chemotherapy group and 33% of patients in the HA group received at least 1 DLI after treatment. Treatment with chemotherapy resulted in a higher ORR (51% versus 19%, P = .004) and a higher CR rate (40% versus 7%, P = .002). The median OS (6 versus 3.9 months, P = .01) and PFS (4.9 versus 3.8 months, P = .02) were longer in the chemotherapy group. Similar benefit of chemotherapy over HAs was maintained in all treatment outcomes after controlling for the use of DLI. The use of chemotherapy followed by DLI offered the greatest benefit (ORR, 68%; CR, 59%, 1-year OS, 44%; and median OS, 9.8 months). In conclusion, in our hands, with limited numbers, the use of more conventional salvage chemotherapy, with DLI when possible, for the treatment of relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT is associated with better outcomes than nonchemotherapy (HA) options.

  4. Neurologic complications of chemotherapy and other newer and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Soffietti, Riccardo; Trevisan, Elisa; Rudà, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of conventional cytototxic agents as well as those from monoclonal antibodies and targeted therapies are increasingly observed in patients with cancer. The major categories are represented by alkylating agents (platinum compounds, ifosfamide, procarbazine, thiotepa), mitotic spindle inhibitors (vinca alkaloids, taxanes, etoposide, teniposide), proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib), antibiotics, antimetabolites, thalidomide, lenalidomide, topoisomerase inhibitors, interferon-α, hormones, bevacizumab, trastuzumab, and small tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of a number of chemotherapeutic drugs and often represents a critical factor limiting an adequate dose-intensity of chemotherapy. Regarding the central nervous system (CNS), it is vulnerable to many forms of toxicity from chemotherapeutic agents, including encephalopathy syndromes and confusional states, seizures, headache, cerebrovascular complications, visual loss, cerebellar syndromes, and myelopathy. For a given drug, the occurrence of CNS toxicity depends on several factors, including the total dose, route of administration, presence of structural brain lesions, exposure to prior or concurrent irradiation, and interactions with other drugs. However, many of the neurotoxic reactions are rare and idiosyncratic, and remain unpredictable. Several forms of neuroprotection and rehabilitation are being investigated. Last, the so-called "chemobrain" is an emerging issue, as it is a model of a subtle of and long-lasting damage to neuronal structures from some antineoplastic agents. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors associated with sleep quality in the elderly receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mansano-Schlosser, Thalyta Cristina; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2012-01-01

    to evaluate the characteristics of sleep and the factors associated with the quality of sleep in elderly patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy treatment. cross-sectional study with 140 elderly patients (51.2% female, average age 69.8 years) with stage III or stage IV cancer (67.9%), undertaken in a university hospital in the state of São Paulo in 2010. The following instruments were used: sociodemographic and clinical characterization questionnaire, validated by specialists; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; Piper Fatigue Scale-reviewed; and a scale for the subjective measurement of pain. the majority of the elderly (62.9%) had a score compatible with poor sleep quality. On average, the duration of sleep was 388.0 minutes, latency was 44.6 minutes and efficiency of 83.8%. Through multiple logistic regression analysis, an increase of 21% in the probability of having poor sleep quality was observed for each single-point increase in the intensity of the pain. nursing interventions aiming to promote better sleep quality for elderly patients with cancer must include measures for pain control.

  6. Intensive Intervention in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2015-01-01

    Students who demonstrate persistent mathematics difficulties and whose performance is severely below grade level require "intensive intervention". Intensive intervention is an individualized approach to instruction that is more demanding and concentrated than Tier 2 intervention efforts. We present the elements of intensive intervention…

  7. Neuroendocrine differentiation is an independent prognostic factor in chemotherapy-treated nonsmall cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schleusener, J T; Tazelaar, H D; Jung, S H; Cha, S S; Cera, P J; Myers, J L; Creagan, E T; Goldberg, R M; Marschke, R F

    1996-04-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation can be identified in 10-30% of patients with nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) by immunohistochemical or electron microscopic techniques. However, its clinical significance is not well established. Tumors from 107 patients with Stage IIIA, IIIB, and IV NSCLC treated with cisplatin/etoposide with or without hydrazine in the North Central Cancer Treatment Group and Mayo Clinic protocols were analyzed immunohistochemically with antibodies to chromogranin A (CGA), Leu 7 (CD 57), and synaptophysin (SY). These results were compared with clinical outcomes. Keratin AE1/AE3, used as a control, was positive in 99.1% of cases; 34.6% had positive staining for at least 1 neuroendocrine marker, and 11.3% had positive staining for 2 or more markers. CGA was positive in 4.7%, Leu 7 in 18.7%, and SY in 24.3% of cases. A significant increase in survival was seen in patients with tumors expressing any one neuroendocrine marker or any combination of neuroendocrine markers (P < or = 0.01). There was no correlation between the presence of neuroendocrine differentiation and either response to chemotherapy or time to disease progression (P > 0.3), nor was there any correlation between chemotherapy response, time to progression, or survival with staining intensity or percent of cells positive per case. Neuroendocrine differentiation may be of prognostic significance in patients with advanced stage NSCLC treated with chemotherapy.

  8. Newly diagnosed lung cancer patients' preferences for and beliefs about physical activity prior to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Kristina H; Vallance, Jeff; Walker, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    Physical activity has been found to have a number of benefits for lung cancer patients yet very little information is available concerning physical activity beliefs and preferences for this population. The purpose of the study was to explore physical activity programming and counseling preferences and beliefs about physical activity in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. A total of 43 new diagnosed lung cancer patients completed a researcher-administered survey prior to commencing chemotherapy. Results indicated that only 7 participants (17%) reported meeting public health recommendations for physical activity yet the majority of participants (n = 28) indicated interest or possible interest in physical activity counseling. Many participants also indicated interest or possible interest in an exercise program (n = 29) for lung cancer survivors, preferring it to start during chemotherapy (n = 20), for it to be home based (n = 21), and moderate in intensity (n = 22). The most common behavioral belief (advantage) of physical activity was to build/maintain strength (n = 26) and the most common control belief (barrier) was fatigue (n = 11). These data suggest that physical activity counseling and programming may be well received by newly diagnosed lung cancer patients. Information about physical activity and programming preferences and beliefs from this study may be useful for the design of optimal physical activity interventions for lung cancer patients.

  9. A childhood chemotherapy protocol improves overall survival among adults with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhong-jun; Chen, Xiao-qin; Geng, Qi-rong; Wang, Wei-da; Wang, Liang; Lu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    A broadly accepted standard treatment for adult T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) has not yet been defined. To address that issue, we retrospectively compared three chemotherapy regimens used to treat 110 adult patients with newly diagnosed T-LBL. These included two adult regimens (ECOG2993 and hyper-CVAD) and a childhood regimen (BFM-90). These intensive drug regimens are mainly used to treat childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. They included induction, consolidation, and maintenance chemotherapy protocols and were administered over the course of 2 years. Seventy-five patients (80%) achieved a complete remission (CR). Within a median follow-up time of 31 months (range: 5–152 months), the 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 47.7% (95% CI, 35.0–69.8%) and 45.7% (95% CI, 27.6–56.6%), respectively. Shorter survival was associated with age > 40 years, poor ECOG PS and bone marrow involvement. Elevated lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level, Ann Arbor stage and International Prognostic Index (IPI) score had no prognostic value. The childhood chemotherapy regimen improved CR and the overall survival rate more than the adult regimen in patients aged < 40 years. PMID:27150061

  10. Residual Tumor Cells That Drive Disease Relapse after Chemotherapy Do Not Have Enhanced Tumor Initiating Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Ganapati V.; de la Cruz, Cecile; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yanyan; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro; Jackson, Erica L.

    2012-01-01

    Although chemotherapy is used to treat most advanced solid tumors, recurrent disease is still the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been the focus of intense research in recent years because they provide a possible explanation for disease relapse. However, the precise role of CSCs in recurrent disease remains poorly understood and surprisingly little attention has been focused on studying the cells responsible for re-initiating tumor growth within the original host after chemotherapy treatment. We utilized both xenograft and genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to characterize the residual tumor cells that survive chemotherapy treatment and go on to cause tumor regrowth, which we refer to as tumor re-initiating cells (TRICs). We set out to determine whether TRICs display characteristics of CSCs, and whether assays used to define CSCs also provide an accurate readout of a cell’s ability to cause tumor recurrence. We did not find consistent enrichment of CSC marker positive cells or enhanced tumor initiating potential in TRICs. However, TRICs from all models do appear to be in EMT, a state that has been linked to chemoresistance in numerous types of cancer. Thus, the standard CSC assays may not accurately reflect a cell’s ability to drive disease recurrence. PMID:23115623

  11. Cancer chemotherapy and cardiac arrhythmias: a review.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Delpón, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity is a potential complication of cancer chemotherapy (CC) that increases the morbidity and mortality of cancer patients. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported as an adverse effect of many chemotherapeutic drugs, including novel targeted therapies. The relationship between chemotherapy and arrhythmias has not been well-established and the proarrhythmogenic mechanisms remain uncertain as they can be the result of a direct electrophysiological effect or of changes in cardiac structure and function, including myocardial ischaemia and heart failure, which create an arrhythmogenic substrate. In this review we summarise available evidence of proarrhythmia induced by CC, discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this adverse effect and emphasise the importance of cardiac monitoring for the early diagnosis, intervention and surveillance of those patients more susceptible to develop proarrhythmia in an attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Oncologists should be fully aware of proarrhythmia and the close collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists would result in a better cardiovascular assessment, risk stratification, cardiac monitoring and treatment during CC and during the follow-up. The final objective is to understand the mechanisms of proarrhythmia and evaluate its real incidence and clinical relevance so as to select the safest and most effective treatment for cancer patients.

  12. Intracellularly Swollen Polypeptide Nanogel Assists Hepatoma Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bo; Huang, Kexin; Ding, Jianxun; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Yu; Liu, Haiyan; Yan, Lesan; Chen, Xuesi

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, chemotherapy is one of the principal modes of treatment for tumor patients. However, the traditional formulations of small molecule drugs show short circulation time, low tumor selectivity, and high toxicity to normal tissues. To address these problems, a facilely prepared, and pH and reduction dual-responsive polypeptide nanogel was prepared for selectively intracellular delivery of chemotherapy drug. As a model drug, doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the nanogel through a sequential dispersion and dialysis technique, resulting in a high drug loading efficiency (DLE) of 96.7 wt.%. The loading nanogel, defined as NG/DOX, exhibited a uniform spherical morphology with a mean hydrodynamic radius of 58.8 nm, pH and reduction dual-triggered DOX release, efficient cell uptake, and cell proliferation inhibition in vitro. Moreover, NG/DOX exhibited improved antitumor efficacy toward H22 hepatoma-bearing BALB/c mouse model compared with free DOX·HCl. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were implemented to further confirm the tumor suppression activity of NG/DOX. Furthermore, the variations of body weight, histopathological morphology, bone marrow cell micronucleus rate, and white blood cell count verified that NG/DOX showed excellent safety in vivo. With these excellent properties in vitro and in vivo, the pH and reduction dual-responsive polypeptide nanogel exhibits great potential for on-demand intracellular delivery of antitumor drug, and holds good prospect for future clinical application. PMID:28255361

  13. Thermotherapy, chemotherapy, and meristem culture in banana.

    PubMed

    Lassois, Ludivine; Lepoivre, Philippe; Swennen, Rony; van den Houwe, Ines; Panis, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Bananas that provide a staple food to the millions of people are adversely affected by several viruses such as Banana bunchy Top Virus (BBTV), Banana Streak Virus (BSV), and Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV). These viruses are known to have a devastating effect on crop production and constraint to the international exchange and conservation of banana germplasm-a cornerstone for breeding new cultivars. The viruses are particularly problematic in vegetative propagated crops, like bananas, because of their transmission in the planting material. Different virus eradication techniques have been developed, such as thermotherapy, chemotherapy, and meristem culture for providing virus-free planting material. Meristem culture proved to be the most effective procedure to eradicate phloem-associated viruses. This method requires isolation of meristematic dome of plant under the aseptic conditions and culture in an appropriate nutrient medium to develop new virus-free plants. Thermotherapy is another widely used virus eradication technique, which is initially carried out on in vivo or in vitro plants and eventually combined with meristem culture technique. The plantlets are initially grown at 28°C day temperature and increase it by 2°C per day until reaches 40°C and the night temperature at 28°C; maintain plants at 40°C for 4 weeks; excise meristem and culture onto the regeneration medium. In chemotherapy technique, antiviral chemical compound Virazole(®) is applied on meristem culture. Combination of these techniques is also applied to improve the eradication rate.

  14. Drug Cocktail Optimization in Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Saskia; Dunkel, Mathias; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Genov, Nikolai; Rong, Wen Wei; Preissner, Robert; Seeger, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Background In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP). Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. Objective The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. Data sources and methods Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. Results We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy. PMID:23236419

  15. [Male fertility after chemotherapy during childhood].

    PubMed

    Aubier, F; Patte, C; de Vathaire, F; Tournade, M F; Oberlin, O; Sakiroglu, O; Lemerle, J

    1995-01-01

    Chemotherapy has considerably improved the prognosis of solid tumours in children, but may have very adverse effects, particularly on fertility. A study was conducted at the Gustave Roussy Institute to identify the toxic effect of chemotherapy on male fertility. At present, 205 patients, treated during childhood have entered the study. Basal FSH-LH have been assayed to assess possible germ cell damage although azoosperia can not be eliminated. Results were normal in 127 patients (62%) and increased basal FSH levels were found in 78 (38%). Endocrine function was not altered: all patients were either impubertal or intrapubertal at diagnosis and subsequently achieved normal puberty. Multivariate analysis revealed an obvious toxic effect of 2 alkylating drugs: cyclophosphamide and procarbazine. No toxic effect was observed for vincristine, dohorubicin or actinomycin D. Age and pubertal status at diagnosis were not correlated with toxic effects. At present, no conclusion for other drugs may be made but results high dose metotrexate are promising. For lomustine and cisplatin, less favourable, though nonsignificant, results have been obtained. Complete recovery is possible several years later.

  16. Tackling pancreatic cancer with metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Marchetti, Paolo

    2017-05-28

    Pancreatic tumours, the majority of which arise from the exocrine pancreas, have recently shown an increasing incidence in western countries. Over the past few years more and more new selective molecules directed against specific cellular targets have become available for cancer therapy, leading to significant improvements. However, despite such advances in therapy, prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains disappointing. Metronomic chemotherapy (MCT), which consists in the administration of continuous, low-dose anticancer drugs, has demonstrated the ability to suppress tumour growth. Thus, it may provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for counteracting the progression of the tumour. Here we discuss evidence arising from preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of MCT in pancreatic cancer. Good results have generally been achieved in preclinical studies, particularly when MCT was combined with standard dose chemotherapy or antinflammatory, antiangiogenic and immunostimolatory agents. The few available clinical experiences, which mainly refer to retrospective data, have reported good tolerability though mild activity of metronomic schedules. Further studies are therefore awaited to confirm both preclinical findings and the preliminary clinical data.

  17. The role of intravitreal chemotherapy for retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Manjandavida, Fairooz P; Shields, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy in retinoblastoma (RB) is widely accepted as the current management tool with an aim of increasing drug availability at the tumor location. Inevitably the effect is several times higher compared to systemic delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and carries less systemic toxicity. Despite tremendous advancement in saving life, eye salvage in advanced RB especially with active vitreous seeds remains a challenge. The hypoxic environment of the vitreous and reduced vitreous concentration of the drugs delivered makes these tumor seeds resistant to chemotherapy. Direct delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs into the vitreous cavity aids to overcome these challenges and is progressively being accepted worldwide. However, intraocular procedure in RB was abandoned due to high risk of extraocular tumor dissemination. Recently, the forbidden therapeutic technique was re-explored and modified for safe use. Although eye salvage rate has tremendously improved after intravitreal chemotherapy (IVitC), retinal toxicity, and vision salvage are yet to be validated. In our preliminary report of intravitreal melphalan in 11 eyes, we reported 100% eye salvage and 0% recurrence with an extended 15 months mean follow-up. In this review, we analyzed published reports on IVitC in RB via PubMed, Medline, and conference proceedings citation index, electronic database search, without language restriction that included case series and reports of humans and experimental animal eyes with RB receiving IVitC. PMID:25827545

  18. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Han

    2015-05-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the elderly. However, elderly patients with CRC tend to be under-presented in clinical trials and undertreated in clinical practice. Advanced age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective therapy in elderly patients with CRC. The best guide about optimal cancer treatment can be provided by comprehensive geriatric assessment. Elderly patients with stage III colon cancer can enjoy the same benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin or capecitabine as younger patients, without a substantial increase in toxicity. With conflicting results of retrospective studies and a lack of data available from randomized studies, combined modality treatment should be used with great caution in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic CRC. For elderly patients who are frail or vulnerable, however, monotherapy or a stop-and-go strategy may be desirable. The use of targeted therapies in older patients with metastatic CRC appears to be promising in view of their better efficacy and toxicity. Treatment should be individualized based on the nature of the disease, the physiologic or functional status, and the patient's preference.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Casali, Paolo G

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is not standard treatment in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). However, when the risk of relapse is high, it is an option for shared decision making with the patient in conditions of uncertainty. This is because available evidence is conflicting, even if several randomized clinical trials have been performed for 4 decades and also have been pooled into meta-analyses. Indeed, available meta-analyses point to a benefit in the 5% to 10% range in terms of survival and distant relapse rate. Some local benefit also was suggested by some trials. Placing chemotherapy in the preoperative setting may help gain a local advantage in terms of the quality of surgical margins or decreased sequelae. This may be done within a personalized approach according to the clinical presentation. Attempts to personalize treatment on the basis of the variegated pathology and molecular biology of STS subgroups are ongoing as well, according to what is done in the medical treatment of advanced STS. Thus, decision making for adjuvant and neoadjuvant indications deserves personalization in clinical research and in clinical practice, taking profit from all multidisciplinary clinical skills available at a sarcoma reference center, though with a degree of subjectivity because of the limitations of available evidence.

  20. Cyclical Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Canellos, George P.; Devita, Vincent T.; Gold, G. Lennard; Chabner, Bruce A.; Schein, Philip S.; Young, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer were treated with the combination of methotrexate 60 mg/M2 and 5-fluorouracil 700 mg/M2 intravenously on the first and eighth days, and cyclophosphamide 100 mg/M2 and prednisone 40 mg/M2 by mouth daily for the first 14 days of a 28-day cycle. The patients had had no previous chemotherapy or extensive radiotherapy and all but two had not responded to hormonal therapy or endocrine ablation. The major metastatic lesions were: lung (12 patients), liver (four patients), bone (four patients), soft tissue (three patients), nodes (two patients). Seventeen of the 25 patients (68%) responded to treatment with seven complete remissions; these included patients suffering metastatic lesions in the lung, nodes, and soft tissue. The overall median duration of response was nine months (range 6-26 months). Toxicity was primarily haematological, but the group received an average of at least 75% of their calculated dose for each monthly cycle. Haematological toxicity was most pronounced in patients with liver dysfunction and bone marrow involvement. Out of eight nonresponders seven died, with a median survival of six months. Only six of 17 responders died, and the median survival in this group will exceed thirteen months. There was no correlation between the length of the metastasis-free interval after previous treatment and subsequent response to chemotherapy. PMID:4818162

  1. WE-D-BRE-04: Modeling Optimal Concurrent Chemotherapy Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J; Deasy, J O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT) has become a more common cancer treatment option with a better tumor control rate for several tumor sites, including head and neck and lung cancer. In this work, possible optimal chemotherapy schedules were investigated by implementing chemotherapy cell-kill into a tumor response model of RT. Methods: The chemotherapy effect has been added into a published model (Jeong et al., PMB (2013) 58:4897), in which the tumor response to RT can be simulated with the effects of hypoxia and proliferation. Based on the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, the temporal concentration of chemotherapy agent was estimated. Log cell-kill was assumed and the cell-kill constant was estimated from the observed increase in local control due to concurrent chemotherapy. For a simplified two cycle CCRT regime, several different starting times and intervals were simulated with conventional RT regime (2Gy/fx, 5fx/wk). The effectiveness of CCRT was evaluated in terms of reduction in radiation dose required for 50% of control to find the optimal chemotherapy schedule. Results: Assuming the typical slope of dose response curve (γ50=2), the observed 10% increase in local control rate was evaluated to be equivalent to an extra RT dose of about 4 Gy, from which the cell-kill rate of chemotherapy was derived to be about 0.35. Best response was obtained when chemotherapy was started at about 3 weeks after RT began. As the interval between two cycles decreases, the efficacy of chemotherapy increases with broader range of optimal starting times. Conclusion: The effect of chemotherapy has been implemented into the resource-conservation tumor response model to investigate CCRT. The results suggest that the concurrent chemotherapy might be more effective when delayed for about 3 weeks, due to lower tumor burden and a larger fraction of proliferating cells after reoxygenation.

  2. Assessment of quality of life during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gunnars, B; Nygren, P; Glimelius, B

    2001-01-01

    Increasingly more aggressive chemotherapy together with expected small differences between treatments with respect to objective endpoints has heightened awareness about the importance of addressing how patients experience and value the impact that treatment has had on their overall life situation. Assessment of a patient's quality of life (QoL) is now conceptually viewed as an important complement to traditional objective evaluation measures. It was therefore considered important to review the basis for the assessment of this endpoint when The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) performed a systematic overview of chemotherapy effects in several tumour types. The group came to the following conclusions: QoL assessments, mostly by patient self-reporting in questionnaires, have come increasingly into use during the past decade. A number of general, cancer-specific and cancer diagnosis-specific instruments have been developed. There is at present little need for development of new cancer instruments, although specific treatment modalities and tumour types may need new additional modules. A predefined hypothesis should determine the instrument to be used. Since the selection of a QoL instrument in a specific study influences both the results and the conclusions, it is essential to carefully select the instrument or instruments that have the greatest likelihood of identifying relevant differences between treatment alternatives. Interpretation of QoL data is more difficult than interpretation of objective endpoints such as survival time, objective response rates or toxicity. Despite these difficulties, QoL analyses have provided new insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various treatments not provided by traditional end-points. Some palliative treatments seemingly increase patients' QoL despite side-effects or the lack of, or marginal, increases in survival. When using potentially curative chemotherapy, it is not a matter of when the

  3. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Massage in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy reduces serum cortisol and prolactin.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jacqui; Swindell, Ric; Dennis, Michael

    2008-10-01

    The objective is to identify whether single 20 min massage sessions were safe and effective in reducing stress levels of isolated haematological oncology patients. Based on a randomised controlled trial, 39 patients were randomised to aromatherapy, massage or rest (control) arm. The measures were serum cortisol and prolactin levels, quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcome measure was the fall in serum cortisol levels. A significant difference was seen between arms in cortisol (P=0.002) and prolactin (p=0.031) levels from baseline to 30 min post-session. Aromatherapy and massage arms showed a significantly greater drop in cortisol than the rest arm. Only the massage arm had a significantly greater reduction in prolactin then the rest arm. The EORTC QLQ-C30 showed a significant reduction in 'need for rest' for patients in both experimental arms compared with the control arm, whereas the semi-structured interviews identified a universal feeling of relaxation in patients in the experimental arms. This pilot study demonstrated that in isolated haematological oncology patients, a significant reduction in cortisol could be safely achieved through massage, with associated improvement in psychological well-being. The implications are discussed. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  6. Spatial distribution of Schistosoma mansoni infection before and after chemotherapy with two praziquantel doses in a community of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Aline F; Favre, Tereza C; Guimarães, Ricardo J P S; Pereira, Ana P B; Zani, Luciana C; Felipe, Katariny T; Domingues, Ana Lúcia C; Carvalho, Omar S; Barbosa, Constança S; Pieri, Otávio S

    2010-07-01

    Praziquantel chemotherapy has been the focus of the Schistosomiasis Control Program in Brazil for the past two decades. Nevertheless, information on the impact of selective chemotherapy against Schistosoma mansoni infection under the conditions confronted by the health teams in endemic municipalities remains scarce. This paper compares the spatial pattern of infection before and after treatment with either a 40 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg dose of praziquantel by determining the intensity of spatial cluster among patients at 180 and 360 days after treatment. The spatial-temporal distribution of egg-positive patients was analysed in a Geographic Information System using the kernel smoothing technique. While all patients became egg-negative after 21 days, 17.9% and 30.9% reverted to an egg-positive condition after 180 and 360 days, respectively. Both the prevalence and intensity of infection after treatment were significantly lower in the 60 mg/kg than in the 40 mg/kg treatment group. The higher intensity of the kernel in the 40 mg/kg group compared to the 60 mg/kg group, at both 180 and 360 days, reflects the higher number of reverted cases in the lower dose group. Auxiliary, preventive measures to control transmission should be integrated with chemotherapy to achieve a more enduring impact.

  7. Psychosocial reaction patterns to alopecia in female patients with gynecological cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuko; Ishida, Junko; Kiyoko, Kanda

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the psychosocial reactions of female patients with gynecological cancer undergoing chemotherapy and in the process of suffering from alopecia and to examine their nursing support. The target group comprised female patients who had received two or more cycles of chemotherapy, were suffering from alopecia, and were aged 30-65. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews, conducted from the time the patients were informed by their doctors that they might experience alopecia due to chemotherapy to the time they actually experienced alopecia and until they were able to accept the change. Inductive qualitative analysis was employed to close in on the subjective experiences of the cancer patients. The results showed the existence of six phases in the psychosocial reactions in the process of alopecia: phase one was the reaction after the doctor's explanation; phase two was the reaction when the hair starts to fall out; phase three was the reaction when the hair starts to intensely fall out; phase four was the reaction when the hair has completely fallen out; phase five was the reaction to behavior for coping with alopecia; and phase six was the reaction to change in interpersonal human relationships. The results also made it clear that there are five types of reaction patterns as follows: 1) treatment priority interpersonal relationship maintenance type; 2) alopecia agitated interpersonal relationship maintenance type; 3) alopecia agitated interpersonal relationship reduction type; 4) alopecia denial interpersonal relationship reduction type; and 5) alopecia denial treatment interruption type. It is important to find out which of the five types the patients belong to early during treatment and provide support so that nursing intervention that suits each individual can be practiced. The purpose of this study is to make clear the process in which patients receiving chemotherapy come to accept alopecia and to examine evidence-based nursing

  8. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: advice and support for hair loss.

    PubMed

    Roe, Helen

    This article provides insight into the growth cycle of a hair follicle and the potential impact chemotherapy agents can have on this process, which often results in hair loss (alopecia). It explores the psychological consequences of chemotherapy-induced alopecia for an individual as a result of the perceptions of others as well as an individual's perception of his or her self-image. Despite the development of various forms of scalp cooling, chemotherapy-induced alopecia remains a major side effect for patients receiving chemotherapy; however, there have been improvements in wig provision and changing public opinion relating to baldness. Although chemotherapy-induced alopecia affects both males and females and all age groups, this article focuses on the potential impact for patients receiving chemotherapy as a form of treatment for breast cancer. As professionals we need to understand the social significance of hair in relation to a person's outward presentation and social interactions, along with the possible psychological implications of a person losing his or her bodily hair, and not just the head hair. We must aim to minimize the distress alopecia can cause by: ensuring we provide patients with up-to-date verbal and written information to enable them to prepare for losing their hair; helping them to preserve their self-image and minimize the psychological consequences of hair loss while receiving chemotherapy; and preparing them for their hair re-growth following completion of chemotherapy.

  9. [Indications for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vanhaelen, C

    2001-09-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer is undergoing serious transformation. Surgical techniques have evolved, the role of adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy has been confirmed as an essential part of the current treatment of these cancer and new drugs, established in advanced disease are now being introduced in combination schemes of promise in both palliative and adjuvant chemotherapy.

  10. Chemotherapy and Hair Loss: What to Expect during Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... receive. But whether you can maintain a healthy body image after hair loss depends a lot on your attitude and the support of your friends and family. Chemotherapy drugs are ... in your body — including those in your hair roots. Chemotherapy may ...

  11. Pegfilgrastim use during chemotherapy: current and future applications.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Densmore, John J

    2004-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is the most common dose-limiting side effect of cancer chemotherapy. Neutropenia is a serious risk with chemotherapy, associated with infectious complications, use of intravenous antibiotics, hospitalization, and even death. The occurrence of febrile neutropenia can lead to dose reductions and delay in subsequent cycles of chemotherapy that may have a detrimental affect on overall survival and disease-free survival. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) can reduce the duration of severe neutropenia, the incidence of febrile neutropenia, and allow planned dosing and timing of chemotherapy. Filgrastim is a G-CSF that has demonstrated benefit for the treatment and prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN), but its short half-life requires repeated daily subcutaneous injection. Pegfilgrastim is a recombinant G-CSF created by attaching a polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule to the filgrastim protein. Once-per-cycle dosing of pegfilgrastim has been evaluated in clinical trials using myelosuppressive chemotherapy in breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Trials have demonstrated that pegfilgrastim is comparable in safety and efficacy to filgrastim for decreasing the duration of severe neutropenia after chemotherapy in patients with nonmyeloid malignancy. This review will summarize recent clinical trial results and novel uses of pegfilgrastim.

  12. Coping strategies used by hospitalized children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Amanda Mota Pacciulio; Silva-Rodrigues, Fernanda Machado; Sparapani, Valéria de Cássia; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2015-03-01

    To analyze coping strategies used by children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy during hospitalization. This was an exploratory study to analyze qualitative data using an inductive thematic analysis. Semistructured interviews using puppets were conducted with 10 children with cancer, between 7 and 12 years old, who were hospitalized and undergoing chemotherapy. The coping strategies to deal with chemotherapy were: understanding the need for chemotherapy; finding relief for the chemotherapy's side effects and pain; seeking pleasure in nourishment; engaging in entertaining activities and having fun; keeping the hope of cure alive; and finding support in religion. Children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy need to cope with hospitalizations, pain, medication side effects, idle time, and uncertainty regarding the success of treatment. These challenges motivated children to develop their own coping strategies, which were effective while undergoing chemotherapy. By gaining knowledge and further understanding about valid coping strategies during chemotherapy treatment, health professionals can mobilize personal and material resources from the children, health teams, and institutions aiming to potentiate the use of these strategies to make treatments the least traumatic. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Chemotherapy options in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teply, Benjamin A.; Hauke, Ralph J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The treatment landscape for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is evolving, with recent approvals of immune therapy, novel hormonal therapy, and bone-targeted therapy. Chemotherapy remains an essential component of the armamentarium. Herein, we review current chemotherapy options for patients with CRPC and discuss future challenges. Methods: We reviewed literature for chemotherapy agents in prostate cancer, with special attention to the evidence for efficacy of the currently approved agents. We also reviewed emerging data on biomarkers of response to chemotherapy for CRPC. Results: Taxanes, especially docetaxel and cabazitaxel, have first- and second-line indications for CRPC, respectively, with both providing a survival benefit. Multiple attempts to improve on the single agent efficacy of docetaxel with combination therapy have not generally been successful although platinum combinations are used for resistant phenotypes. Reductions in prostate-specific antigen by ≥30% and reductions in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to ≤ 5 are associated with improved survival on chemotherapy. Chemotherapy may continue to be effective therapy for patients with biomarkers that are associated with resistance to androgen-directed therapies (androgen receptor splice variant 7 positivity in CTCs or high CTC heterogeneity). Conclusions: Chemotherapy remains an essential component of CRPC therapy, and biomarkers are being identified to define clinical scenarios where chemotherapy may be the optimal therapy choice. PMID:27843207

  14. Onset of Manic Episode during Chemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jee Hyun; Hwang, Dae-Yong; Park, Doo-Heum; Ryu, Seung-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) induced manic episode in an elderly female without any previous psychiatric history. The patient presented manic symptoms after 4th cycle of 5-FU chemotherapy after surgery of rectal cancer. After cessation of chemotherapy and administration of olanzapine and divalproex sodium, symptoms were subsided within 10 days. PMID:21519541

  15. [Prevention and management of appetite loss during cancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Hideki; Yamada, Mitsugi; Asako, Eri; Kodama, Yukako; Sato, Tsuneo; Nabeya, Yoshihiro

    2014-10-01

    Appetite loss during cancer chemotherapy may lead to malnutrition and a decreased quality of life. To overcome this problem, evidence-based guidelines have been established for chemotherapy-induced emesis and mucositis. However, unsolved issues such as taste alimentation remain. Since the clinical picture of appetite loss is complex, individual management strategies depending on the type of the disease and treatment are required.

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ejlertsen, Bent

    2016-05-01

    these CMF regimens has not been compared within the context of a randomised trial. Shifting from the 77B's classic CMF regimen to the 82B four-weekly IV regimen or the 89B three-weekly IV regimen was associated with a 30% increased risk of a DFS event in a multivariate analysis of a population-based cohort study. Furthermore, the four-weekly regimen used in 82B was associated with a 40% increase in mortality. The strengths of the design include identical selection criteria, uniform and prospective registration of treatment, tumour and patient characteristics. Caution is still required due to the non-experimental design of the comparison. Another finding was a substantial difference in the risk of amenorrhoea; and while 15% of patients aged 40 or younger in 77B had regular menses throughout chemotherapy, the corresponding percentage was 37 in 82B and 47 in 89B. The DBCG in collaboration with a Swedish and a Dutch centre participating in the DBCG trial 89B compared CMF with ovarian ablation in premenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumours. No significant differences were found in DFS or OS in the preplanned analysis, suggesting that the benefits of CMF may, at least in part, be explained by ovarian suppression in premenopausal patients with ER-positive tumours. However, these results are not clinically useful by themselves as other chemotherapy regimens have been more efficacious, and knowledge is still lacking regarding the benefits from adding ovarian suppression to chemotherapy plus tamoxifen. The results from the DBCG 77B and 82C are in accordance with other large adjuvant trials and the EBCTCG meta-analyses. The benefits obtained with any individual anticancer drug are largely determined by the cancer (somatic) genome; and by being a molecular target of anthracyclines, TOP2A aberrations could obviously be associated with cancer drug benefits. In the DBCG 89D, a significant heterogeneity was observed between a beneficial effect on DFS and OS

  17. Study finds low-intensity therapy for Burkitt lymphoma highly effective

    Cancer.gov

    Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates—upwards of 90 percent—following treatment with low-int