Science.gov

Sample records for risk-informed design methods

  1. Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

  2. An Example of Risk Informed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banke, Rick; Grant, Warren; Wilson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    NASA Engineering requested a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to compare the difference in the risk of Loss of Crew (LOC) and Loss of Mission (LOM) between different designs of a fluid assembly. They were concerned that the configuration favored by the design team was more susceptible to leakage than a second proposed design, but realized that a quantitative analysis to compare the risks between the two designs might strengthen their argument. The analysis showed that while the second design did help improve the probability of LOC, it did not help from a probability of LOM perspective. This drove the analysis team to propose a minor design change that would drive the probability of LOM down considerably. The analysis also demonstrated that there was another major risk driver that was not immediately obvious from a typical engineering study of the design and was therefore unexpected. None of the proposed alternatives were addressing this risk. This type of trade study demonstrates the importance of performing a PRA in order to completely understand a system's design. It allows managers to use risk as another one of the commodities (e.g., mass, cost, schedule, fault tolerance) that can be traded early in the design of a new system.

  3. Risk Informed Design as Part of the Systems Engineering Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, George

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of Risk Informed Design (RID) as an important feature of the systems engineering process. RID is based on the principle that risk is a design commodity such as mass, volume, cost or power. It also reviews Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as it is used in the product life cycle in the development of NASA's Constellation Program.

  4. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

    2003-01-29

    OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

  5. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Riley, Tom; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  6. Risk Informed Design and Analysis Criteria for Nuclear Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael W.

    2015-06-17

    Target performance can be achieved by defining design basis ground motion from results of a probabilistic seismic hazards assessment, and introducing known levels of conservatism in the design above the DBE. ASCE 4, 43, DOE-STD-1020 defined the DBE at 4x10-4 and introduce only slight levels of conservatism in response. ASCE 4, 43, DOE-STD-1020 assume code capacities shoot for about 98% NEP. There is a need to have a uniform target (98% NEP) for code developers (ACI, AISC, etc.) to aim for. In considering strengthening options, one must also consider cost/risk reduction achieved.

  7. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-08-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  8. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed

  9. Safety margins estimation method considering uncertainties within the risk-informed decision-making framework

    SciTech Connect

    Martorell, S.; Nebot, Y.; Vilanueva, J. F.; Carlos, S.; Serradell, V.

    2006-07-01

    The adoption by regulators of the risk-informed decision-making philosophy has opened the debate on the role of the deterministic and probabilistic approaches to support regulatory matters of concern to NPP safety (e.g. safety margins, core damage frequency, etc.). However, the typical separation of the application fields does not imply that both methods cannot benefit from each other. On the contrary, there is a growing interest nowadays aimed at developing methods for using probabilistic safety analysis results into requirements and assumptions in deterministic analysis and vice versa. Thus, it appears an interesting challenge for the technical community aimed at combining best estimate thermal-hydraulic codes with probabilistic techniques to produce an effective and feasible technology, which should provide more realistic, complete and logical measure of reactor safety. This paper proposes a new unified framework to estimate safety margins using a best estimate thermal-hydraulic code with help of data and models from a level 1 LPSA (low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment - PSA) and considering simultaneously the uncertainty associated to both probabilistic and thermal-hydraulic codes. It is also presented an application example that demonstrates the performance and significance of the method and the relevance of the results achieved to the safety of nuclear power plants. (authors)

  10. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

  11. A Design Heritage-Based Forecasting Methodology for Risk Informed Management of Advanced Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maggio, Gaspare; Fragola, Joseph R.

    1999-01-01

    The development of next generation systems often carries with it the promise of improved performance, greater reliability, and reduced operational costs. These expectations arise from the use of novel designs, new materials, advanced integration and production technologies intended for functionality replacing the previous generation. However, the novelty of these nascent technologies is accompanied by lack of operational experience and, in many cases, no actual testing as well. Therefore some of the enthusiasm surrounding most new technologies may be due to inflated aspirations from lack of knowledge rather than actual future expectations. This paper proposes a design heritage approach for improved reliability forecasting of advanced system components. The basis of the design heritage approach is to relate advanced system components to similar designs currently in operation. The demonstrated performance of these components could then be used to forecast the expected performance and reliability of comparable advanced technology components. In this approach the greater the divergence of the advanced component designs from the current systems the higher the uncertainty that accompanies the associated failure estimates. Designers of advanced systems are faced with many difficult decisions. One of the most common and more difficult types of these decisions are those related to the choice between design alternatives. In the past decision-makers have found these decisions to be extremely difficult to make because they often involve the trade-off between a known performing fielded design and a promising paper design. When it comes to expected reliability performance the paper design always looks better because it is on paper and it addresses all the know failure modes of the fielded design. On the other hand there is a long, and sometimes very difficult road, between the promise of a paper design and its fulfillment; with the possibility that sometimes the reliability

  12. Cyber-Informed Engineering: The Need for a New Risk Informed and Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Joseph Daniel; Anderson, Robert Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Current engineering and risk management methodologies do not contain the foundational assumptions required to address the intelligent adversary’s capabilities in malevolent cyber attacks. Current methodologies focus on equipment failures or human error as initiating events for a hazard, while cyber attacks use the functionality of a trusted system to perform operations outside of the intended design and without the operator’s knowledge. These threats can by-pass or manipulate traditionally engineered safety barriers and present false information, invalidating the fundamental basis of a safety analysis. Cyber threats must be fundamentally analyzed from a completely new perspective where neither equipment nor human operation can be fully trusted. A new risk analysis and design methodology needs to be developed to address this rapidly evolving threatscape.

  13. Nine steps to risk-informed wellhead protection and management: Methods and application to the Burgberg Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, W.; Enzenhoefer, R.; Bunk, T.

    2013-12-01

    Wellhead protection zones are commonly delineated via advective travel time analysis without considering any aspects of model uncertainty. In the past decade, research efforts produced quantifiable risk-based safety margins for protection zones. They are based on well vulnerability criteria (e.g., travel times, exposure times, peak concentrations) cast into a probabilistic setting, i.e., they consider model and parameter uncertainty. Practitioners still refrain from applying these new techniques for mainly three reasons. (1) They fear the possibly cost-intensive additional areal demand of probabilistic safety margins, (2) probabilistic approaches are allegedly complex, not readily available, and consume huge computing resources, and (3) uncertainty bounds are fuzzy, whereas final decisions are binary. The primary goal of this study is to show that these reservations are unjustified. We present a straightforward and computationally affordable framework based on a novel combination of well-known tools (e.g., MODFLOW, PEST, Monte Carlo). This framework provides risk-informed decision support for robust and transparent wellhead delineation under uncertainty. Thus, probabilistic risk-informed wellhead protection is possible with methods readily available for practitioners. As vivid proof of concept, we illustrate our key points on a pumped karstic well catchment, located in Germany. In the case study, we show that reliability levels can be increased by re-allocating the existing delineated area at no increase in delineated area. This is achieved by simply swapping delineated low-risk areas against previously non-delineated high-risk areas. Also, we show that further improvements may often be available at only low additional delineation area. Depending on the context, increases or reductions of delineated area directly translate to costs and benefits, if the land is priced, or if land owners need to be compensated for land use restrictions.

  14. Avoiding Cancer Risk Information

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Amber S.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Howell, Jennifer L.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Waters, Erika A.; Orom, Heather; Shepperd, James A.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Perceived risk for health problems such as cancer is a central construct in many models of health decision making and a target for behavior change interventions. However, some portion of the population actively avoids cancer risk information. The prevalence of, explanations for, and consequences of such avoidance are not well understood. OBJECTIVE We examined the prevalence and demographic and psychosocial correlates of cancer risk information avoidance preference in a nationally representative sample. We also examined whether avoidance of cancer risk information corresponds with avoidance of cancer screening. RESULTS Based on our representative sample, 39% of the population indicated that they agreed or strongly agreed that they would “rather not know [their] chance of getting cancer.” This preference was stronger among older participants, female participants, and participants with lower levels of education. Preferring to avoid cancer risk information was stronger among participants who agreed with the beliefs that everything causes cancer, that there’s not much one can do to prevent cancer, and that there are too many recommendations to follow. Finally, the preference to avoid cancer risk information was associated with lower levels of screening for colon cancer. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that cancer risk information avoidance is a multi-determined phenomenon that is associated with demographic characteristics and psychosocial individual differences and also relates to engagement in cancer screening. PMID:26560410

  15. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  16. Considering medical risk information and communicating values: A mixed-method study of women’s choice in prenatal testing

    PubMed Central

    Tenhunen, Henni; Torkki, Paulus; Heinonen, Seppo; Lillrank, Paul; Stefanovic, Vedran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays, an important decision for pregnant women is whether to undergo prenatal testing for aneuploidies and which tests to uptake. We investigate the factors influencing women’s choices between non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and invasive prenatal tests in pregnancies with elevated a priori risk of fetal aneuploidies. Methodology This is a mixed-method study. We used medical data (1st Jan 2015-31st Dec 2015) about women participating in further testing at Fetomaternal Medical Center at Helsinki University Hospital and employed Chi-square tests and ANOVA to compare the groups of women choosing different methods. Multinomial logistic regressions revealed the significant clinical factors influencing women’s choice. We explored the underlying values, beliefs, attitudes and other psychosocial factors that affect women’s choice by interviewing women with the Theory of Planned Behavior framework. The semi-structured interview data were processed by thematic analysis. Results Statistical data indicated that gestational age and counseling day were strong factors influencing women’s choice. Interview data revealed that women’s values and moral principles on pregnancy and childbirth chiefly determined the choices. Behavioral beliefs (e.g. safety and accuracy) and perceived choice control (e.g. easiness, rapidness and convenience) were also important and the major trade-offs happened between these constructs. Discussion Values are the determinants of women’s choice. Service availability and convenience are strong factors. Medical risk status in this choice context is not highly influential. Choice aids can be developed by helping women to identify their leading values in prenatal testing and by providing lists of value-matching test options and attributes. PMID:28355226

  17. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902, Am. M004) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley E. Ritterbusch, et. al.

    2003-01-29

    OAK-B135 Research under this project addresses the barriers to long term use of nuclear-generated electricity in the United States. It was agreed that a very basic and significant change to the current method of design and regulation was needed. That is, it was believed that the cost reduction goal could not be met by fixing the current system (i.e., an evolutionary approach) and a new, more advanced approach for this project would be needed. It is believed that a completely new design and regulatory process would have to be developed--a ''clean sheet of paper'' approach. This new approach would start with risk-based methods, would establish probabilistic design criteria, and would implement defense-in-depth only when necessary (1) to meet public policy issues (e.g., use of a containment building no matter how low the probability of a large release is) and (2) to address uncertainties in probabilistic methods and equipment performance. This new approach is significantly different from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current risk-informed program for operating plants. For our new approach, risk-based methods are the primary means for assuring plant safety, whereas in the NRC's current approach, defense-in-depth remains the primary means of assuring safety. The primary accomplishments in the first year--Phase 1 were (1) the establishment of a new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework, (2) the establishment of the preliminary version of the new, highly risk-informed design process, (3) core damage frequency predictions showing that, based on new, lower pipe rupture probabilities, the design of the emergency core cooling system equipment can be simplified without reducing plant safety, and (4) the initial development of methods for including uncertainties in a new integrated structures-systems design model. Under the new regulatory framework, options for the use of ''design basis accidents'' were evaluated. It is expected that design basis

  18. Progress toward risk informed regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    For the last several years, the NRC, with encouragement from the industry, has been moving in the direction of risk informed regulation. This is consistent with the regulatory principle of efficiency, formally adopted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1991, which requires that regulatory activities be consistent with the degree of risk reduction they achieve. Probabilistic risk analysis has become the tool of choice for selecting the best of several alternatives. Closely related to risk informed regulation is the development of performance based rules. Such rules focus on the end result to be achieved. They do not specify the process, but instead establish the goals to be reached and how the achievement of those goals is to be judged. The inspection and enforcement activity is based on whether or not the goals have been met. The author goes on to offer comments on the history of the development of this process and its probable development in the future. He also addresses some issues which must be resolved or at least acknowledged. The success of risk informed regulation ultimately depends on having sufficiently reliable data to allow quantification of regulatory alternatives in terms of relative risk. Perhaps the area of human reliability and organizational performance has the greatest potential for improvement in reactor safety. The ability to model human performance is significantly less developed that the ability to model mechanical or electrical systems. The move toward risk informed, performance based regulation provides an unusual, perhaps unique, opportunity to establish a more rational, more effective basis for regulation.

  19. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  20. Communicating risk information and warnings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mileti, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Major advances have occurred over the last 20 years about how to effectively communicate risk information and warnings to the public. These lessons have been hard won. Knowledge has mounted on the finding from social scientific studies of risk communication failures, successes and those which fell somewhere in between. Moreover, the last 2 decades have borne witness to the brith, cultivation, and blossoming of information sharing between those physical scientists who discover new information about risk and those communcation scientists who trace its diffusion and then measure pbulic reaction. 

  1. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuxen, L.

    1990-12-31

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  2. NASA Risk-Informed Decision Making Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon; Stamatelatos, Michael; Maggio, Gaspare; Everett, Christopher; Youngblood, Robert; Rutledge, Peter; Benjamin, Allan; Williams, Rodney; Smith, Curtis; Guarro, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    This handbook provides guidance for conducting risk-informed decision making in the context of NASA risk management (RM), with a focus on the types of direction-setting key decisions that are characteristic of the NASA program and project life cycles, and which produce derived requirements in accordance with existing systems engineering practices that flow down through the NASA organizational hierarchy. The guidance in this handbook is not meant to be prescriptive. Instead, it is meant to be general enough, and contain a sufficient diversity of examples, to enable the reader to adapt the methods as needed to the particular decision problems that he or she faces. The handbook highlights major issues to consider when making decisions in the presence of potentially significant uncertainty, so that the user is better able to recognize and avoid pitfalls that might otherwise be experienced.

  3. Parameter Plane Design Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Th usr a toente aninteer a thca sms b esta 1 Fp-ocsing 2. Enter P1 values, lwgt, ldig - > 9 Table I give us proper values. Table 1. PARAMETER TABLE...necessary and identify by block number) In this thesis a control systems analysis package is developed using parameter plane methods. It is an interactive...designer is able to choose values of the parameters which provide a good compromise between cost and dynamic behavior. 20 Distribution Availability of

  4. TU-EF-204-09: A Preliminary Method of Risk-Informed Optimization of Tube Current Modulation for Dose Reduction in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y; Liu, B; Kalra, M; Caracappa, P; Liu, T; Li, X; Xu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: X-rays from CT scans can increase cancer risk to patients. Lifetime Attributable Risk of Cancer Incidence for adult patients has been investigated and shown to decrease as patient age. However, a new risk model shows an increasing risk trend for several radiosensitive organs for middle age patients. This study investigates the feasibility of a general method for optimizing tube current modulation (TCM) functions to minimize risk by reducing radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients. Methods: Organ-based TCM has been investigated in literature for eye lens dose and breast dose. Adopting the concept in organ-based TCM, this study seeks to find an optimized tube current for minimal total risk to breasts and lungs by reducing dose to these organs. The contributions of each CT view to organ dose are determined through simulations of CT scan view-by-view using a GPU-based fast Monte Carlo code, ARCHER. A Linear Programming problem is established for tube current optimization, with Monte Carlo results as weighting factors at each view. A pre-determined dose is used as upper dose boundary, and tube current of each view is optimized to minimize the total risk. Results: An optimized tube current is found to minimize the total risk of lungs and breasts: compared to fixed current, the risk is reduced by 13%, with breast dose reduced by 38% and lung dose reduced by 7%. The average tube current is maintained during optimization to maintain image quality. In addition, dose to other organs in chest region is slightly affected, with relative change in dose smaller than 10%. Conclusion: Optimized tube current plans can be generated to minimize cancer risk to lungs and breasts while maintaining image quality. In the future, various risk models and greater number of projections per rotation will be simulated on phantoms of different gender and age. National Institutes of Health R01EB015478.

  5. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  6. RISK-INFORMED SAFETY MARGIN CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nam Dinh; Ronaldo Szilard

    2009-07-01

    The concept of safety margins has served as a fundamental principle in the design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defined as the minimum distance between a system’s “loading” and its “capacity”, plant design and operation is predicated on ensuring an adequate safety margin for safety-significant parameters (e.g., fuel cladding temperature, containment pressure, etc.) is provided over the spectrum of anticipated plant operating, transient and accident conditions. To meet the anticipated challenges associated with extending the operational lifetimes of the current fleet of operating NPPs, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a collaboration to conduct coordinated research to identify and address the technological challenges and opportunities that likely would affect the safe and economic operation of the existing NPP fleet over the postulated long-term time horizons. In this paper we describe a framework for developing and implementing a Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to evaluate and manage changes in plant safety margins over long time horizons.

  7. Risk-Informed Assessment Methodology Development and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Sung Goo Chi; Seok Jeong Park; Chul Jin Choi; Ritterbusch, S.E.; Jacob, M.C.

    2002-07-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company (WEC) has been working with Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) on a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project through a collaborative agreement established for the domestic NERI program. The project deals with Risk-Informed Assessment (RIA) of regulatory and design requirements of future nuclear power plants. An objective of the RIA project is to develop a risk-informed design process, which focuses on identifying and incorporating advanced features into future nuclear power plants (NPPs) that would meet risk goals in a cost-effective manner. The RIA design methodology is proposed to accomplish this objective. This paper discusses the development of this methodology and demonstrates its application in the design of plant systems for future NPPs. Advanced conceptual plant systems consisting of an advanced Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and Emergency Feedwater System (EFWS) for a NPP were developed and the risk-informed design process was exercised to demonstrate the viability and feasibility of the RIA design methodology. Best estimate Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analyses were performed to validate the PSA success criteria for the NPP. The results of the analyses show that the PSA success criteria can be met using the advanced conceptual systems and that the RIA design methodology is a viable and appropriate means of designing key features of risk-significant NPP systems. (authors)

  8. Communicating genetic risk information within families: a review.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Mel; Dancyger, Caroline; Michie, Susan

    2010-12-01

    This review of family communication of genetic risk information addresses questions of what the functions and influences on communication are; what, who and how family members are told about genetic risk information; what the impact for counsellee, relative and relationships are; whether there are differences by gender and condition; and what theories and methodologies are used. A systematic search strategy identified peer-reviewed journal articles published 1985-2009 using a mixture of methodologies. A Narrative Synthesis was used to extract and summarise data relevant to the research questions. This review identified 33 articles which found a consistent pattern of findings that communication about genetic risk within families is influenced by individual beliefs about the desirability of communicating genetic risk and by closeness of relationships within the family. None of the studies directly investigated the impact of communication on counsellees or their families, differences according to gender of counsellee or by condition nor alternative methods of communication with relatives. The findings mainly apply to late onset conditions such as Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The most frequently used theory was Family Systems Theory and methods were generally qualitative. This review points to multifactorial influences on who is communicated with in families and what they are told about genetic risk information. Further research is required to investigate the impact of genetic risk information on family systems and differences between genders and conditions.

  9. Method for Design Rotation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    desirability of a rotation as a function of the set of planar angles. Criteria for the symmetry of the design (such as the same set of factor levels for...P is -1. Hence there is no theoretical problem in obtaining rotations of a design; there are only the practical questions Why rotate a design? And...star points, which can be represented in a shorthand notation by the permutations of (±1,0, "’" , 0), and (c) factorial points, which are a two- level

  10. Aircraft digital control design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Parsons, E.; Tashker, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Variations in design methods for aircraft digital flight control are evaluated and compared. The methods fall into two categories; those where the design is done in the continuous domain (or s plane) and those where the design is done in the discrete domain (or z plane). Design method fidelity is evaluated by examining closed loop root movement and the frequency response of the discretely controlled continuous aircraft. It was found that all methods provided acceptable performance for sample rates greater than 10 cps except the uncompensated s plane design method which was acceptable above 20 cps. A design procedure based on optimal control methods was proposed that provided the best fidelity at very slow sample rates and required no design iterations for changing sample rates.

  11. Risk-Informed Safety Assurance and Probabilistic Assessment of Mission-Critical Software-Intensive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarro, Sergio B.

    2010-01-01

    This report validates and documents the detailed features and practical application of the framework for software intensive digital systems risk assessment and risk-informed safety assurance presented in the NASA PRA Procedures Guide for Managers and Practitioner. This framework, called herein the "Context-based Software Risk Model" (CSRM), enables the assessment of the contribution of software and software-intensive digital systems to overall system risk, in a manner which is entirely compatible and integrated with the format of a "standard" Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), as currently documented and applied for NASA missions and applications. The CSRM also provides a risk-informed path and criteria for conducting organized and systematic digital system and software testing so that, within this risk-informed paradigm, the achievement of a quantitatively defined level of safety and mission success assurance may be targeted and demonstrated. The framework is based on the concept of context-dependent software risk scenarios and on the modeling of such scenarios via the use of traditional PRA techniques - i.e., event trees and fault trees - in combination with more advanced modeling devices such as the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) or other dynamic logic-modeling representations. The scenarios can be synthesized and quantified in a conditional logic and probabilistic formulation. The application of the CSRM method documented in this report refers to the MiniAERCam system designed and developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  12. Risk-informed Maintenance for Non-coherent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a systematic and comprehensive methodology to evaluate risks associated with a complex engineered technological entity. The information provided by PSA has been increasingly implemented for regulatory purposes but rarely used in providing information for operation and maintenance activities. As one of the key parts in PSA, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) attempts to model and analyze failure processes of engineering and biological systems. The fault trees are composed of logic diagrams that display the state of the system and are constructed using graphical design techniques. Risk Importance Measures (RIMs) are information that can be obtained from both qualitative and quantitative aspects of FTA. Components within a system can be ranked with respect to each specific criterion defined by each RIM. Through a RIM, a ranking of the components or basic events can be obtained and provide valuable information for risk-informed decision making. Various RIMs have been applied in various applications. In order to provide a thorough understanding of RIMs and interpret the results, they are categorized with respect to risk significance (RS) and safety significance (SS) in this thesis. This has also tied them into different maintenance activities. When RIMs are used for maintenance purposes, it is called risk-informed maintenance. On the other hand, the majority of work produced on the FTA method has been concentrated on failure logic diagrams restricted to the direct or implied use of AND and OR operators. Such systems are considered as coherent systems. However, the NOT logic can also contribute to the information produced by PSA. The importance analysis of non-coherent systems is rather limited, even though the field has received more and more attention over the years. The non-coherent systems introduce difficulties in both qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fault tree compared with the coherent systems. In this thesis, a set

  13. DSSTox EPA Integrated Risk Information System Structure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database was developed and is maintained by EPA's Office of Research and Developement, National Center for Environmental Assessment. IRIS is a database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. The information in IRIS is intended for those without extensive training in toxicology, but with some knowledge of sciences. IRIS chemical files contain descriptive and quantitative information in oral reference doses and inhalation reference concentrations and hazard identification, oral slope factors, and oral and inhalation unit risks for carcinogenic effects.

  14. Stochastic Methods for Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelz, Richard B.; Ogot, Madara

    1998-01-01

    The global stochastic optimization method, simulated annealing (SA), was adapted and applied to various problems in aircraft design. The research was aimed at overcoming the problem of finding an optimal design in a space with multiple minima and roughness ubiquitous to numerically generated nonlinear objective functions. SA was modified to reduce the number of objective function evaluations for an optimal design, historically the main criticism of stochastic methods. SA was applied to many CFD/MDO problems including: low sonic-boom bodies, minimum drag on supersonic fore-bodies, minimum drag on supersonic aeroelastic fore-bodies, minimum drag on HSCT aeroelastic wings, FLOPS preliminary design code, another preliminary aircraft design study with vortex lattice aerodynamics, HSR complete aircraft aerodynamics. In every case, SA provided a simple, robust and reliable optimization method which found optimal designs in order 100 objective function evaluations. Perhaps most importantly, from this academic/industrial project, technology has been successfully transferred; this method is the method of choice for optimization problems at Northrop Grumman.

  15. Design method of supercavitating pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, V.; Likhachev, D.; Li, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of effective supercavitating (SC) pump is solved, and optimum load distribution along the radius of the blade is found taking into account clearance, degree of cavitation development, influence of finite number of blades, and centrifugal forces. Sufficient accuracy can be obtained using the equivalent flat SC-grid for design of any SC-mechanisms, applying the “grid effect” coefficient and substituting the skewed flow calculated for grids of flat plates with the infinite attached cavitation caverns. This article gives the universal design method and provides an example of SC-pump design.

  16. A historical perspective of risk-informed regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.L.

    1996-12-01

    In Federal studies, the process of using risk information is described as having two general components: (1) risk assessment - the application of credible scientific principles and statistical methods to develop estimates of the likely effects of natural phenomena and human factors and the characterization of these estimates in a form appropriate for the intended audience (e.g., agency decisionmakers, public); and (2) risk management - the process of weighing policy alternatives and selecting the most appropriate regulatory action, integrating the results of risk assessment with engineering data with social, economic, and political concerns to reach a decision. This paper discusses largely the second component.

  17. Incorporating cancer risk information into general practice: a qualitative study using focus groups with health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Silarova, Barbora; Ward, Alison; Youell, Jane; Muir, Kenneth R; Campbell, Jackie; Warcaba, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Background It is estimated that approximately 40% of all cases of cancer are attributable to lifestyle factors. Providing people with personalised information about their future risk of cancer may help promote behaviour change. Aim To explore the views of health professionals on incorporating personalised cancer risk information, based on lifestyle factors, into general practice. Design and setting Qualitative study using data from six focus groups with a total of 24 general practice health professionals from the NHS Nene Clinical Commissioning Group in England. Method The focus groups were guided by a schedule covering current provision of lifestyle advice relating to cancer and views on incorporating personalised cancer risk information. Data were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and then analysed using thematic analysis. Results Providing lifestyle advice was viewed as a core activity within general practice but the influence of lifestyle on cancer risk was rarely discussed. The word ‘cancer’ was seen as a potentially powerful motivator for lifestyle change but the fact that it could generate health anxiety was also recognised. Most focus group participants felt that a numerical risk estimate was more likely to influence behaviour than generic advice. All felt that general practice should provide this information, but there was a clear need for additional resources for it to be offered widely. Conclusion Study participants were in support of providing personalised cancer risk information in general practice. The findings highlight a number of potential benefits and challenges that will inform the future development of interventions in general practice to promote behaviour change for cancer prevention. PMID:28193618

  18. RISK-INFORMED BALANCING OF SAFETY, NONPROLIFERATION, AND ECONOMICS FOR THE SFR

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, George; Driscoll, Michael; Golay, Michael; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Aldmir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Lineberry, Michael

    2011-10-20

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards

  19. Fatalistic responses to different types of genetic risk information: exploring the role of self-malleability.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Liesbeth; Henneman, Lidewij; De Vet, Riekie; Knol, Dirk; Marteau, Theresa; Timmermans, Danielle

    2010-02-01

    Providing people with genetic risk information may induce a sense of fatalism, the belief that little can be done to reduce the risk. We postulated that fatalism is a function of health risk information and individual differences in self-perception. DNA-based risk information was hypothesised to generate more fatalism than risk information based on family history or non-genetic risk information. Moreover, people who view themselves as more rather than less able to change self-attributes were hypothesised to respond least fatalistically. Factor analyses in separate samples were used to construct a five-item 'Malleability of self' measure. Predictive validity of the measure was tested using a within-subjects analogue design. Participants responded to three scenario vignettes in which they were informed of an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In Scenario 1, risk was ascertained by DNA testing, family history and cholesterol testing; in Scenario 2, it was ascertained by family history and cholesterol testing; in Scenario 3, risk was ascertained by cholesterol testing alone. Scenario 1 was associated with least perceived control over cholesterol level and CVD risk. People who viewed themselves as more able to change self-attributes experienced more control in all three scenarios.

  20. Analyses to support development of risk-informed separation distances for hydrogen codes and standards.

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Houf, William G.; Fluer, Inc., Paso Robels, CA; Fluer, Larry; Middleton, Bobby

    2009-03-01

    The development of a set of safety codes and standards for hydrogen facilities is necessary to ensure they are designed and operated safely. To help ensure that a hydrogen facility meets an acceptable level of risk, code and standard development organizations are tilizing risk-informed concepts in developing hydrogen codes and standards.

  1. Should the model for risk-informed regulation be game theory rather than decision theory?

    PubMed

    Bier, Vicki M; Lin, Shi-Woei

    2013-02-01

    Risk analysts frequently view the regulation of risks as being largely a matter of decision theory. According to this view, risk analysis methods provide information on the likelihood and severity of various possible outcomes; this information should then be assessed using a decision-theoretic approach (such as cost/benefit analysis) to determine whether the risks are acceptable, and whether additional regulation is warranted. However, this view ignores the fact that in many industries (particularly industries that are technologically sophisticated and employ specialized risk and safety experts), risk analyses may be done by regulated firms, not by the regulator. Moreover, those firms may have more knowledge about the levels of safety at their own facilities than the regulator does. This creates a situation in which the regulated firm has both the opportunity-and often also the motive-to provide inaccurate (in particular, favorably biased) risk information to the regulator, and hence the regulator has reason to doubt the accuracy of the risk information provided by regulated parties. Researchers have argued that decision theory is capable of dealing with many such strategic interactions as well as game theory can. This is especially true in two-player, two-stage games in which the follower has a unique best strategy in response to the leader's strategy, as appears to be the case in the situation analyzed in this article. However, even in such cases, we agree with Cox that game-theoretic methods and concepts can still be useful. In particular, the tools of mechanism design, and especially the revelation principle, can simplify the analysis of such games because the revelation principle provides rigorous assurance that it is sufficient to analyze only games in which licensees truthfully report their risk levels, making the problem more manageable. Without that, it would generally be necessary to consider much more complicated forms of strategic behavior (including

  2. Experimental design methods for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Keskin Gündoğdu, Tuğba; Deniz, İrem; Çalışkan, Gülizar; Şahin, Erdem Sefa; Azbar, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Experimental design is a form of process analysis in which certain factors are selected to obtain the desired responses of interest. It may also be used for the determination of the effects of various independent factors on a dependent factor. The bioengineering discipline includes many different areas of scientific interest, and each study area is affected and governed by many different factors. Briefly analyzing the important factors and selecting an experimental design for optimization are very effective tools for the design of any bioprocess under question. This review summarizes experimental design methods that can be used to investigate various factors relating to bioengineering processes. The experimental methods generally used in bioengineering are as follows: full factorial design, fractional factorial design, Plackett-Burman design, Taguchi design, Box-Behnken design and central composite design. These design methods are briefly introduced, and then the application of these design methods to study different bioengineering processes is analyzed.

  3. Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis (CRIDA): A novel practical guidance for Climate Resilient Investments and Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeuken, Ad; Mendoza, Guillermo; Matthews, John; Ray, Patrick; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Gilroy, Kristin; Olsen, Rolf; Kucharski, John; Stakhiv, Gene; Cushing, Janet; Brown, Casey

    2016-04-01

    over time. They are part of the Dutch adaptive planning approach Adaptive Delta Management, executed and develop by the Dutch Delta program. Both decision scaling and adaptation pathways have been piloted in studies worldwide. The objective of CRIDA is to mainstream effective climate adaptation for professional water managers. The CRIDA publication, due in april 2016, follows the generic water design planning design cycle. At each step, CRIDA describes stepwise guidance for incorporating climate robustness: problem definition, stress test, alternatives formulation and recommendation, evaluation and selection. In the presentation the origin, goal, steps and practical tools available at each step of CRIDA will be explained. In two other abstracts ("Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis: A Hypothetical Application to the Waas Region" by Gilroy et al., "The Application of Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis to the Ioland Water Treatment Plant in Lusaka, Zambia, by Kucharski et al.), the application of CRIDA to cases is explained

  4. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  5. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  6. Algebraic Methods to Design Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    group theory are employed to investigate the theory of their construction methods leading to new families of these arrays and some generalizations...sequences and arrays with desirable correlation properties. The methods used are very algebraic and number theoretic. Many new families of sequences...context of optical quantum computing, we prove that infinite families of anticirculant block weighing matrices can be obtained from generic weighing

  7. Design for validation, based on formal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.

    1990-01-01

    Validation of ultra-reliable systems decomposes into two subproblems: (1) quantification of probability of system failure due to physical failure; (2) establishing that Design Errors are not present. Methods of design, testing, and analysis of ultra-reliable software are discussed. It is concluded that a design-for-validation based on formal methods is needed for the digital flight control systems problem, and also that formal methods will play a major role in the development of future high reliability digital systems.

  8. Design Methods for Clinical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Blum, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a brief introduction to the techniques, methods and tools used to implement clinical systems. It begins with a taxonomy of software systems, describes the classic approach to development, provides some guidelines for the planning and management of software projects, and finishes with a guide to further reading. The conclusions are that there is no single right way to develop software, that most decisions are based upon judgment built from experience, and that there are tools that can automate some of the better understood tasks.

  9. Approaches to cancer assessment in EPA's Integrated Risk Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlhaus, Martin W.; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Hogan, Karen A.; Kopylev, Leonid; Schlosser, Paul M.; Kadry, Abdel-Razak

    2011-07-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program develops assessments of health effects that may result from chronic exposure to chemicals in the environment. The IRIS database contains more than 540 assessments. When supported by available data, IRIS assessments provide quantitative analyses of carcinogenic effects. Since publication of EPA's 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, IRIS cancer assessments have implemented new approaches recommended in these guidelines and expanded the use of complex scientific methods to perform quantitative dose-response assessments. Two case studies of the application of the mode of action framework from the 2005 Cancer Guidelines are presented in this paper. The first is a case study of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, as an example of a chemical with a mutagenic mode of carcinogenic action thus warranting the application of age-dependent adjustment factors for early-life exposure; the second is a case study of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, as an example of a chemical with a carcinogenic action consistent with a nonlinear extrapolation approach. The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to quantify interindividual variability and account for human parameter uncertainty as part of a quantitative cancer assessment is illustrated using a case study involving probabilistic PBPK modeling for dichloromethane. We also discuss statistical issues in assessing trends and model fit for tumor dose-response data, analysis of the combined risk from multiple types of tumors, and application of life-table methods for using human data to derive cancer risk estimates. These issues reflect the complexity and challenges faced in assessing the carcinogenic risks from exposure to environmental chemicals, and provide a view of the current trends in IRIS carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  10. Methods for combinatorial and parallel library design.

    PubMed

    Schnur, Dora M; Beno, Brett R; Tebben, Andrew J; Cavallaro, Cullen

    2011-01-01

    Diversity has historically played a critical role in design of combinatorial libraries, screening sets and corporate collections for lead discovery. Large library design dominated the field in the 1990s with methods ranging anywhere from purely arbitrary through property based reagent selection to product based approaches. In recent years, however, there has been a downward trend in library size. This was due to increased information about the desirable targets gleaned from the genomics revolution and to the ever growing availability of target protein structures from crystallography and homology modeling. Creation of libraries directed toward families of receptors such as GPCRs, kinases, nuclear hormone receptors, proteases, etc., replaced the generation of libraries based primarily on diversity while single target focused library design has remained an important objective. Concurrently, computing grids and cpu clusters have facilitated the development of structure based tools that screen hundreds of thousands of molecules. Smaller "smarter" combinatorial and focused parallel libraries replaced those early un-focused large libraries in the twenty-first century drug design paradigm. While diversity still plays a role in lead discovery, the focus of current library design methods has shifted to receptor based methods, scaffold hopping/bio-isostere searching, and a much needed emphasis on synthetic feasibility. Methods such as "privileged substructures based design" and pharmacophore based design still are important methods for parallel and small combinatorial library design. This chapter discusses some of the possible design methods and presents examples where they are available.

  11. Risk-informed radioactive waste classification and reclassification.

    PubMed

    Croff, Allen G

    2006-11-01

    Radioactive waste classification systems have been developed to allow wastes having similar hazards to be grouped for purposes of storage, treatment, packaging, transportation, and/or disposal. As recommended in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' Report No. 139, Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes, a preferred classification system would be based primarily on the health risks to the public that arise from waste disposal and secondarily on other attributes such as the near-term practicalities of managing a waste, i.e., the waste classification system would be risk informed. The current U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed because key definitions--especially that of high-level waste--are based on the source of the waste instead of its inherent characteristics related to risk. A second important reason for concluding the existing U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed is there are no general principles or provisions for exempting materials from being classified as radioactive waste which would then allow management without regard to its radioactivity. This paper elaborates the current system for classifying and reclassifying radioactive wastes in the United States, analyzes the extent to which the system is risk informed and the ramifications of its not being so, and provides observations on potential future direction of efforts to address shortcomings in the U.S. radioactive waste classification system as of 2004.

  12. Applications of a transonic wing design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Smith, Leigh A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for designing wings and airfoils at transonic speeds using a predictor/corrector approach was developed. The procedure iterates between an aerodynamic code, which predicts the flow about a given geometry, and the design module, which compares the calculated and target pressure distributions and modifies the geometry using an algorithm that relates differences in pressure to a change in surface curvature. The modular nature of the design method makes it relatively simple to couple it to any analysis method. The iterative approach allows the design process and aerodynamic analysis to converge in parallel, significantly reducing the time required to reach a final design. Viscous and static aeroelastic effects can also be accounted for during the design or as a post-design correction. Results from several pilot design codes indicated that the method accurately reproduced pressure distributions as well as the coordinates of a given airfoil or wing by modifying an initial contour. The codes were applied to supercritical as well as conventional airfoils, forward- and aft-swept transport wings, and moderate-to-highly swept fighter wings. The design method was found to be robust and efficient, even for cases having fairly strong shocks.

  13. Impeller blade design method for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, W.; Kirschner, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The design of a centrifugal impeller with blades that are aerodynamically efficient, easy to manufacture, and mechanically sound is discussed. The blade design method described here satisfies the first two criteria and with a judicious choice of certain variables will also satisfy stress considerations. The blade shape is generated by specifying surface velocity distributions and consists of straight-line elements that connect points at hub and shroud. The method may be used to design radially elemented and backward-swept blades. The background, a brief account of the theory, and a sample design are described.

  14. Model reduction methods for control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunipace, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    Several different model reduction methods are developed and detailed implementation information is provided for those methods. Command files to implement the model reduction methods in a proprietary control law analysis and design package are presented. A comparison and discussion of the various reduction techniques is included.

  15. Mixed Methods Research Designs in Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, William E.; Creswell, John W.; Clark, Vicki L. Plano; Petska, Kelly S.; Creswell, David J.

    2005-01-01

    With the increased popularity of qualitative research, researchers in counseling psychology are expanding their methodologies to include mixed methods designs. These designs involve the collection, analysis, and integration of quantitative and qualitative data in a single or multiphase study. This article presents an overview of mixed methods…

  16. Airbreathing hypersonic vehicle design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Mary Kae; Petley, Dennis H.; Hunt, James L.; Martin, John G.

    1996-01-01

    The design, analysis, and optimization of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles requires analyses involving many highly coupled disciplines at levels of accuracy exceeding those traditionally considered in a conceptual or preliminary-level design. Discipline analysis methods including propulsion, structures, thermal management, geometry, aerodynamics, performance, synthesis, sizing, closure, and cost are discussed. Also, the on-going integration of these methods into a working environment, known as HOLIST, is described.

  17. Iterative methods for design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Yoon, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for design sensitivity analysis, using an iterative-method reanalysis of the structure generated by a small perturbation in the design variable; a forward-difference scheme is then employed to obtain the approximate sensitivity. Algorithms are developed for displacement and stress sensitivity, as well as for eignevalues and eigenvector sensitivity, and the iterative schemes are modified so that the coefficient matrices are constant and therefore decomposed only once.

  18. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated

  19. Preliminary aerothermodynamic design method for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.; Petrie, S. L.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary design methods are presented for vehicle aerothermodynamics. Predictions are made for Shuttle orbiter, a Mach 6 transport vehicle and a high-speed missile configuration. Rapid and accurate methods are discussed for obtaining aerodynamic coefficients and heat transfer rates for laminar and turbulent flows for vehicles at high angles of attack and hypersonic Mach numbers.

  20. Multidisciplinary Optimization Methods for Aircraft Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Altus, Steve; Braun, Robert; Gage, Peter; Sobieski, Ian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a research program aimed at improved methods for multidisciplinary design and optimization of large-scale aeronautical systems. The research involves new approaches to system decomposition, interdisciplinary communication, and methods of exploiting coarse-grained parallelism for analysis and optimization. A new architecture, that involves a tight coupling between optimization and analysis, is intended to improve efficiency while simplifying the structure of multidisciplinary, computation-intensive design problems involving many analysis disciplines and perhaps hundreds of design variables. Work in two areas is described here: system decomposition using compatibility constraints to simplify the analysis structure and take advantage of coarse-grained parallelism; and collaborative optimization, a decomposition of the optimization process to permit parallel design and to simplify interdisciplinary communication requirements.

  1. Multidisciplinary Optimization Methods for Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Weston, R. P.; Zang, T. A.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) methodology and two applications of this methodology to the preliminary design phase are presented. These applications are being undertaken to improve, develop, validate and demonstrate MDO methods. Each is presented to illustrate different aspects of this methodology. The first application is an MDO preliminary design problem for defining the geometry and structure of an aerospike nozzle of a linear aerospike rocket engine. The second application demonstrates the use of the Framework for Interdisciplinary Design Optimization (FIDO), which is a computational environment system, by solving a preliminary design problem for a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The two sample problems illustrate the advantages to performing preliminary design with an MDO process.

  2. Analysis Method for Quantifying Vehicle Design Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fimognari, Peter; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Lee, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses a method for using Design Structure Matrices (DSM), coupled with high-level tools representing important life-cycle parameters, to comprehensively conceptualize a flight/ground space transportation system design by dealing with such variables as performance, up-front costs, downstream operations costs, and reliability. This approach also weighs operational approaches based on their effect on upstream design variables so that it is possible to readily, yet defensively, establish linkages between operations and these upstream variables. To avoid the large range of problems that have defeated previous methods of dealing with the complex problems of transportation design, and to cut down the inefficient use of resources, the method described in the document identifies those areas that are of sufficient promise and that provide a higher grade of analysis for those issues, as well as the linkages at issue between operations and other factors. Ultimately, the system is designed to save resources and time, and allows for the evolution of operable space transportation system technology, and design and conceptual system approach targets.

  3. Axisymmetric inlet minimum weight design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1995-01-01

    An analytical method for determining the minimum weight design of an axisymmetric supersonic inlet has been developed. The goal of this method development project was to improve the ability to predict the weight of high-speed inlets in conceptual and preliminary design. The initial model was developed using information that was available from inlet conceptual design tools (e.g., the inlet internal and external geometries and pressure distributions). Stiffened shell construction was assumed. Mass properties were computed by analyzing a parametric cubic curve representation of the inlet geometry. Design loads and stresses were developed at analysis stations along the length of the inlet. The equivalent minimum structural thicknesses for both shell and frame structures required to support the maximum loads produced by various load conditions were then determined. Preliminary results indicated that inlet hammershock pressures produced the critical design load condition for a significant portion of the inlet. By improving the accuracy of inlet weight predictions, the method will improve the fidelity of propulsion and vehicle design studies and increase the accuracy of weight versus cost studies.

  4. Optimization methods applied to hybrid vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoghue, J. F.; Burghart, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    The use of optimization methods as an effective design tool in the design of hybrid vehicle propulsion systems is demonstrated. Optimization techniques were used to select values for three design parameters (battery weight, heat engine power rating and power split between the two on-board energy sources) such that various measures of vehicle performance (acquisition cost, life cycle cost and petroleum consumption) were optimized. The apporach produced designs which were often significant improvements over hybrid designs already reported on in the literature. The principal conclusions are as follows. First, it was found that the strategy used to split the required power between the two on-board energy sources can have a significant effect on life cycle cost and petroleum consumption. Second, the optimization program should be constructed so that performance measures and design variables can be easily changed. Third, the vehicle simulation program has a significant effect on the computer run time of the overall optimization program; run time can be significantly reduced by proper design of the types of trips the vehicle takes in a one year period. Fourth, care must be taken in designing the cost and constraint expressions which are used in the optimization so that they are relatively smooth functions of the design variables. Fifth, proper handling of constraints on battery weight and heat engine rating, variables which must be large enough to meet power demands, is particularly important for the success of an optimization study. Finally, the principal conclusion is that optimization methods provide a practical tool for carrying out the design of a hybrid vehicle propulsion system.

  5. Computer-Aided Drug Design Methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbo; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2017-01-01

    Computational approaches are useful tools to interpret and guide experiments to expedite the antibiotic drug design process. Structure-based drug design (SBDD) and ligand-based drug design (LBDD) are the two general types of computer-aided drug design (CADD) approaches in existence. SBDD methods analyze macromolecular target 3-dimensional structural information, typically of proteins or RNA, to identify key sites and interactions that are important for their respective biological functions. Such information can then be utilized to design antibiotic drugs that can compete with essential interactions involving the target and thus interrupt the biological pathways essential for survival of the microorganism(s). LBDD methods focus on known antibiotic ligands for a target to establish a relationship between their physiochemical properties and antibiotic activities, referred to as a structure-activity relationship (SAR), information that can be used for optimization of known drugs or guide the design of new drugs with improved activity. In this chapter, standard CADD protocols for both SBDD and LBDD will be presented with a special focus on methodologies and targets routinely studied in our laboratory for antibiotic drug discoveries.

  6. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  7. Standardized Radiation Shield Design Methods: 2005 HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Research committed by the Langley Research Center through 1995 resulting in the HZETRN code provides the current basis for shield design methods according to NASA STD-3000 (2005). With this new prominence, the database, basic numerical procedures, and algorithms are being re-examined with new methods of verification and validation being implemented to capture a well defined algorithm for engineering design processes to be used in this early development phase of the Bush initiative. This process provides the methodology to transform the 1995 HZETRN research code into the 2005 HZETRN engineering code to be available for these early design processes. In this paper, we will review the basic derivations including new corrections to the codes to insure improved numerical stability and provide benchmarks for code verification.

  8. An optimisation method for complex product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ni; Yi, Wenqing; Bi, Zhuming; Kong, Haipeng; Gong, Guanghong

    2013-11-01

    Designing a complex product such as an aircraft usually requires both qualitative and quantitative data and reasoning. To assist the design process, a critical issue is how to represent qualitative data and utilise it in the optimisation. In this study, a new method is proposed for the optimal design of complex products: to make the full use of available data, information and knowledge, qualitative reasoning is integrated into the optimisation process. The transformation and fusion of qualitative and qualitative data are achieved via the fuzzy sets theory and a cloud model. To shorten the design process, parallel computing is implemented to solve the formulated optimisation problems. A parallel adaptive hybrid algorithm (PAHA) has been proposed. The performance of the new algorithm has been verified by a comparison with the results from PAHA and two other existing algorithms. Further, PAHA has been applied to determine the shape parameters of an aircraft model for aerodynamic optimisation purpose.

  9. Risky business: risk information and the moderating effect of message frame and past behaviour on women's perceptions of the Human Papillomavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gainforth, Heather L; Latimer, Amy E

    2012-09-01

    The effect of response cost information, message framing and past behaviour on women's coping appraisal and motivation to be vaccinated against the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) were investigated using a 2 Frame × 2 Response Cost × 2 Pap Status design. Women (N = 286) read one of four messages about the vaccine. Women who received high-risk information perceived the vaccine as having higher response cost and were less motivated to be vaccinated compared to women who received low-risk information. The deleterious effects of risk information on specific aspects of women's coping appraisal may be mitigated by appropriately framed messages.

  10. Statistical Methods in Algorithm Design and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weide, Bruce W.

    The use of statistical methods in the design and analysis of discrete algorithms is explored. The introductory chapter contains a literature survey and background material on probability theory. In Chapter 2, probabilistic approximation algorithms are discussed with the goal of exposing and correcting some oversights in previous work. Chapter 3…

  11. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. (Technical Monitor); Parrott, T. (Technical Monitor); Jones, M. (Technical Monitor); Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Beer, B.; Seybert, A. F.; Tathavadekar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to design, build and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of full scale engines provides not only cost-savings, but also an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing multiple tests. To use scale model treatment as a design tool, the impedance of the sub-scale liner must be known with confidence. This study was aimed at developing impedance measurement methods for high frequencies. A normal incidence impedance tube method that extends the upper frequency range to 25,000 Hz. without grazing flow effects was evaluated. The free field method was investigated as a potential high frequency technique. The potential of the two-microphone in-situ impedance measurement method was evaluated in the presence of grazing flow. Difficulties in achieving the high frequency goals were encountered in all methods. Results of developing a time-domain finite difference resonator impedance model indicated that a re-interpretation of the empirical fluid mechanical models used in the frequency domain model for nonlinear resistance and mass reactance may be required. A scale model treatment design that could be tested on the Universal Propulsion Simulator vehicle was proposed.

  12. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  13. A novel method to design flexible URAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Haitao; Liu, Liren; Yang, Qingguo

    2007-05-01

    Aperture patterns play a vital role in coded aperture imaging (CAI) applications. In recent years, many approaches were presented to design optimum or near-optimum aperture patterns. Uniformly redundant arrays (URAs) are, undoubtedly, the most successful for constant sidelobe of their periodic autocorrelation function. Unfortunately, the existing methods can only be used to design URAs with a limited number of array sizes and fixed autocorrelation sidelobe-to-peak ratios. In this paper, we present a novel method to design more flexible URAs. Our approach is based on a searching program driven by DIRECT, a global optimization algorithm. We transform the design question to a mathematical model, based on the DIRECT algorithm, which is advantageous for computer implementation. By changing determinative conditions, we obtain two kinds of types of URAs, including the filled URAs which can be constructed by existing methods and the sparse URAs which have never been mentioned by other authors as far as we know. Finally, we carry out an experiment to demonstrate the imaging performance of the sparse URAs.

  14. Optimization methods for alternative energy system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Michael Henry

    An electric vehicle heating system and a solar thermal coffee dryer are presented as case studies in alternative energy system design optimization. Design optimization tools are compared using these case studies, including linear programming, integer programming, and fuzzy integer programming. Although most decision variables in the designs of alternative energy systems are generally discrete (e.g., numbers of photovoltaic modules, thermal panels, layers of glazing in windows), the literature shows that the optimization methods used historically for design utilize continuous decision variables. Integer programming, used to find the optimal investment in conservation measures as a function of life cycle cost of an electric vehicle heating system, is compared to linear programming, demonstrating the importance of accounting for the discrete nature of design variables. The electric vehicle study shows that conservation methods similar to those used in building design, that reduce the overall UA of a 22 ft. electric shuttle bus from 488 to 202 (Btu/hr-F), can eliminate the need for fossil fuel heating systems when operating in the northeast United States. Fuzzy integer programming is presented as a means of accounting for imprecise design constraints such as being environmentally friendly in the optimization process. The solar thermal coffee dryer study focuses on a deep-bed design using unglazed thermal collectors (UTC). Experimental data from parchment coffee drying are gathered, including drying constants and equilibrium moisture. In this case, fuzzy linear programming is presented as a means of optimizing experimental procedures to produce the most information under imprecise constraints. Graphical optimization is used to show that for every 1 m2 deep-bed dryer, of 0.4 m depth, a UTC array consisting of 5, 1.1 m 2 panels, and a photovoltaic array consisting of 1, 0.25 m 2 panels produces the most dry coffee per dollar invested in the system. In general this study

  15. Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2014-08-19

    A method of designing an injectate to be used in a waterflooding operation is disclosed. One aspect includes specifying data representative of chemical characteristics of a liquid hydrocarbon, a connate, and a reservoir rock, of a subterranean reservoir. Charged species at an interface of the liquid hydrocarbon are determined based on the specified data by evaluating at least one chemical reaction. Charged species at an interface of the reservoir rock are determined based on the specified data by evaluating at least one chemical reaction. An extent of surface complexation between the charged species at the interfaces of the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock is determined by evaluating at least one surface complexation reaction. The injectate is designed and is operable to decrease the extent of surface complexation between the charged species at interfaces of the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock. Other methods, apparatus, and systems are disclosed.

  16. Materials Reliability Program: Risk-Informed Revision of ASME Section XI Appendix G - Proof of Concept (MRP-143)

    SciTech Connect

    B. Bishop; et al

    2005-03-30

    This study indicates that risk-informed methods can be used to significantly relax the current ASME and NRC Appendix G requirements while still maintaining satisfactory levels of reactor vessel structural integrity. This relaxation in Appendix G requirements directly translates into significant improvements in operational flexibility.

  17. Evolutionary optimization methods for accelerator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poklonskiy, Alexey A.

    Many problems from the fields of accelerator physics and beam theory can be formulated as optimization problems and, as such, solved using optimization methods. Despite growing efficiency of the optimization methods, the adoption of modern optimization techniques in these fields is rather limited. Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) form a relatively new and actively developed optimization methods family. They possess many attractive features such as: ease of the implementation, modest requirements on the objective function, a good tolerance to noise, robustness, and the ability to perform a global search efficiently. In this work we study the application of EAs to problems from accelerator physics and beam theory. We review the most commonly used methods of unconstrained optimization and describe the GATool, evolutionary algorithm and the software package, used in this work, in detail. Then we use a set of test problems to assess its performance in terms of computational resources, quality of the obtained result, and the tradeoff between them. We justify the choice of GATool as a heuristic method to generate cutoff values for the COSY-GO rigorous global optimization package for the COSY Infinity scientific computing package. We design the model of their mutual interaction and demonstrate that the quality of the result obtained by GATool increases as the information about the search domain is refined, which supports the usefulness of this model. We Giscuss GATool's performance on the problems suffering from static and dynamic noise and study useful strategies of GATool parameter tuning for these and other difficult problems. We review the challenges of constrained optimization with EAs and methods commonly used to overcome them. We describe REPA, a new constrained optimization method based on repairing, in exquisite detail, including the properties of its two repairing techniques: REFIND and REPROPT. We assess REPROPT's performance on the standard constrained

  18. Quality by design compliant analytical method validation.

    PubMed

    Rozet, E; Ziemons, E; Marini, R D; Boulanger, B; Hubert, Ph

    2012-01-03

    The concept of quality by design (QbD) has recently been adopted for the development of pharmaceutical processes to ensure a predefined product quality. Focus on applying the QbD concept to analytical methods has increased as it is fully integrated within pharmaceutical processes and especially in the process control strategy. In addition, there is the need to switch from the traditional checklist implementation of method validation requirements to a method validation approach that should provide a high level of assurance of method reliability in order to adequately measure the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the drug product. The intended purpose of analytical methods is directly related to the final decision that will be made with the results generated by these methods under study. The final aim for quantitative impurity assays is to correctly declare a substance or a product as compliant with respect to the corresponding product specifications. For content assays, the aim is similar: making the correct decision about product compliance with respect to their specification limits. It is for these reasons that the fitness of these methods should be defined, as they are key elements of the analytical target profile (ATP). Therefore, validation criteria, corresponding acceptance limits, and method validation decision approaches should be settled in accordance with the final use of these analytical procedures. This work proposes a general methodology to achieve this in order to align method validation within the QbD framework and philosophy. β-Expectation tolerance intervals are implemented to decide about the validity of analytical methods. The proposed methodology is also applied to the validation of analytical procedures dedicated to the quantification of impurities or active product ingredients (API) in drug substances or drug products, and its applicability is illustrated with two case studies.

  19. Methods for structural design at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, A. M.; Jones, W. E., Jr.; Leimbach, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure which can be used to design elevated temperature structures is discussed. The desired goal is to have the same confidence in the structural integrity at elevated temperature as the factor of safety gives on mechanical loads at room temperature. Methods of design and analysis for creep, creep rupture, and creep buckling are presented. Example problems are included to illustrate the analytical methods. Creep data for some common structural materials are presented. Appendix B is description, user's manual, and listing for the creep analysis program. The program predicts time to a given creep or to creep rupture for a material subjected to a specified stress-temperature-time spectrum. Fatigue at elevated temperature is discussed. Methods of analysis for high stress-low cycle fatigue, fatigue below the creep range, and fatigue in the creep range are included. The interaction of thermal fatigue and mechanical loads is considered, and a detailed approach to fatigue analysis is given for structures operating below the creep range.

  20. Design analysis, robust methods, and stress classification

    SciTech Connect

    Bees, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This special edition publication volume is comprised of papers presented at the 1993 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, July 25--29, 1993 in Denver, Colorado. The papers were prepared for presentations in technical sessions developed under the auspices of the PVPD Committees on Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, Operations Applications and Components. The topics included are: Analysis of Pressure Vessels and Components; Expansion Joints; Robust Methods; Stress Classification; and Non-Linear Analysis. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  1. Block designs in method transfer experiments.

    PubMed

    Altan, Stan; Shoung, Jyh-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Method transfer is a part of the pharmaceutical development process in which an analytical (chemical) procedure developed in one laboratory (typically the research laboratory) is about to be adopted by one or more recipient laboratories (production or commercial operations). The objective is to show that the recipient laboratory is capable of performing the procedure in an acceptable manner. In the course of carrying out a method transfer, other questions may arise related to fixed or random factors of interest, such as analyst, apparatus, batch, supplier of analytical reagents, and so forth. Estimates of reproducibility and repeatability may also be of interest. This article focuses on the application of various block designs that have been found useful in the comprehensive study of method transfer beyond the laboratory effect alone. An equivalence approach to the comparison of laboratories can still be carried out on either the least squares means or subject-specific means of the laboratories to justify a method transfer or to compare analytical methods.

  2. Computational and design methods for advanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Gabriel C.

    This dissertation merges the optical design and computational aspects of imaging systems to create novel devices that solve engineering problems in optical science and attempts to expand the solution space available to the optical designer. This dissertation is divided into two parts: the first discusses a new active illumination depth sensing modality, while the second part discusses a passive illumination system called plenoptic, or lightfield, imaging. The new depth sensing modality introduced in part one is called depth through controlled aberration. This technique illuminates a target with a known, aberrated projected pattern and takes an image using a traditional, unmodified imaging system. Knowing how the added aberration in the projected pattern changes as a function of depth, we are able to quantitatively determine depth of a series of points from the camera. A major advantage this method permits is the ability for illumination and imaging axes to be coincident. Plenoptic cameras capture both spatial and angular data simultaneously. This dissertation present a new set of parameters that permit the design and comparison of plenoptic devices outside the traditionally published plenoptic 1.0 and plenoptic 2.0 configurations. Additionally, a series of engineering advancements are presented, including full system raytraces of raw plenoptic images, Zernike compression techniques of raw image files, and non-uniform lenslet arrays to compensate for plenoptic system aberrations. Finally, a new snapshot imaging spectrometer is proposed based off the plenoptic configuration.

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  4. Using web-based familial risk information for diabetes prevention: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that family history information may be effective in motivating people to adopt health promoting behaviour. The aim was to determine if diabetic familial risk information by using a web-based tool leads to improved self-reported risk-reducing behaviour among individuals with a diabetic family history, without causing false reassurance among those without a family history. Methods An online sample of 1,174 healthy adults aged 35–65 years with a BMI ≥ 25 was randomized into two groups receiving an online diabetes risk assessment. Both arms received general tailored diabetes prevention information, whilst the intervention arm also received familial risk information after completing a detailed family history questionnaire. Separate analysis was performed for four groups (family history group: 286 control versus 288 intervention group; no family history: 269 control versus 266 intervention group). Primary outcomes were self-reported behavioural outcomes: fat intake, physical activity, and attitudes towards diabetes testing. Secondary outcomes were illness and risk perceptions. Results For individuals at familial risk there was no overall intervention effect on risk-reducing behaviour after three months, except for a decrease in self-reported saturated fat intake among low-educated individuals (Beta (b) -1.01, 95% CI −2.01 to 0.00). Familial risk information resulted in a decrease of diabetes risk worries (b −0.21, -0.40 to −0.03). For individuals without family history no effect was found on risk-reducing behaviour and perceived risk. A detailed family history assessment resulted in a greater percentage of individuals reporting a familial risk for diabetes compared to a simple enquiry. Conclusions Web-based familial risk information reduced worry related to diabetes risk and decreased saturated fat intake of those at greatest need of preventative care. However, the intervention was not effective for the total study population on

  5. Effects of personalized colorectal cancer risk information on laypersons’ interest in colorectal cancer screening: the importance of individual differences

    PubMed Central

    Han, Paul K.J.; Duarte, Christine W.; Daggett, Susannah; Siewers, Andrea; Killam, Bill; Smith, Kahsi A.; Freedman, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate how personalized quantitative colorectal cancer (CRC) risk information affects laypersons’ interest in CRC screening, and to explore factors influencing these effects. Methods An online pre-post experiment was conducted in which a convenience sample (N=578) of laypersons, aged >50, were provided quantitative personalized estimates of lifetime CRC risk, calculated by the National Cancer Institute Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT). Self-reported interest in CRC screening was measured immediately before and after CCRAT use; sociodemographic characteristics and prior CRC screening history were also assessed. Multivariable analyses assessed participants’ change in interest in screening, and subgroup differences in this change. Results Personalized CRC risk information had no overall effect on CRC screening interest, but significant subgroup differences were observed. Change in screening interest was greater among individuals with recent screening (p=.015), higher model-estimated cancer risk (p=.0002), and lower baseline interest (p<.0001), with individuals at highest baseline interest demonstrating negative (not neutral) change in interest. Conclusion Effects of quantitative personalized CRC risk information on laypersons’ interest in CRC screening differ among individuals depending on prior screening history, estimated cancer risk, and baseline screening interest. Practice implications Personalized cancer risk information has personalized effects—increasing and decreasing screening interest in different individuals. PMID:26227576

  6. A structural design decomposition method utilizing substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A new method of design decomposition for structural analysis and optimization is described. For this method, the structure is divided into substructures where each substructure has its structural response described by a structural-response subproblem, and its structural sizing determined from a structural-sizing subproblem. The structural responses of substructures that have rigid body modes when separated from the remainder of the structure are further decomposed into displacements that have no rigid body components, and a set of rigid body modes. The structural-response subproblems are linked together through forces determined within a structural-sizing coordination subproblem which also determines the magnitude of any rigid body displacements. Structural-sizing subproblems having constraints local to the substructures are linked together through penalty terms that are determined by a structural-sizing coordination subproblem. All the substructure structural-response subproblems are totally decoupled from each other, as are all the substructure structural-sizing subproblems, thus there is significant potential for use of parallel solution methods for these subproblems.

  7. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  8. Geometric methods for optimal sensor design.

    PubMed

    Belabbas, M-A

    2016-01-01

    The Kalman-Bucy filter is the optimal estimator of the state of a linear dynamical system from sensor measurements. Because its performance is limited by the sensors to which it is paired, it is natural to seek optimal sensors. The resulting optimization problem is however non-convex. Therefore, many ad hoc methods have been used over the years to design sensors in fields ranging from engineering to biology to economics. We show in this paper how to obtain optimal sensors for the Kalman filter. Precisely, we provide a structural equation that characterizes optimal sensors. We furthermore provide a gradient algorithm and prove its convergence to the optimal sensor. This optimal sensor yields the lowest possible estimation error for measurements with a fixed signal-to-noise ratio. The results of the paper are proved by reducing the optimal sensor problem to an optimization problem on a Grassmannian manifold and proving that the function to be minimized is a Morse function with a unique minimum. The results presented here also apply to the dual problem of optimal actuator design.

  9. Research and Design of Rootkit Detection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Leian; Yin, Zuanxing; Shen, Yuli; Lin, Haitao; Wang, Hongjiang

    Rootkit is one of the most important issues of network communication systems, which is related to the security and privacy of Internet users. Because of the existence of the back door of the operating system, a hacker can use rootkit to attack and invade other people's computers and thus he can capture passwords and message traffic to and from these computers easily. With the development of the rootkit technology, its applications are more and more extensive and it becomes increasingly difficult to detect it. In addition, for various reasons such as trade secrets, being difficult to be developed, and so on, the rootkit detection technology information and effective tools are still relatively scarce. In this paper, based on the in-depth analysis of the rootkit detection technology, a new kind of the rootkit detection structure is designed and a new method (software), X-Anti, is proposed. Test results show that software designed based on structure proposed is much more efficient than any other rootkit detection software.

  10. Geometric methods for optimal sensor design

    PubMed Central

    Belabbas, M.-A.

    2016-01-01

    The Kalman–Bucy filter is the optimal estimator of the state of a linear dynamical system from sensor measurements. Because its performance is limited by the sensors to which it is paired, it is natural to seek optimal sensors. The resulting optimization problem is however non-convex. Therefore, many ad hoc methods have been used over the years to design sensors in fields ranging from engineering to biology to economics. We show in this paper how to obtain optimal sensors for the Kalman filter. Precisely, we provide a structural equation that characterizes optimal sensors. We furthermore provide a gradient algorithm and prove its convergence to the optimal sensor. This optimal sensor yields the lowest possible estimation error for measurements with a fixed signal-to-noise ratio. The results of the paper are proved by reducing the optimal sensor problem to an optimization problem on a Grassmannian manifold and proving that the function to be minimized is a Morse function with a unique minimum. The results presented here also apply to the dual problem of optimal actuator design. PMID:26997885

  11. Background risk information to assist in risk management decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O.; White, R.K.; Miller, D.B.

    1992-10-01

    The evaluation of the need for remedial activities at hazardous waste sites requires quantification of risks of adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem resulting from the presence of chemical and radioactive substances at these sites. The health risks from exposure to these substances are in addition to risks encountered because of the virtually unavoidable exposure to naturally occurring chemicals and radioactive materials that are present in air, water, soil, building materials, and food products. To provide a frame of reference for interpreting risks quantified for hazardous waste sites, it is useful to identify the relative magnitude of risks of both a voluntary and involuntary nature that are ubiquitous throughout east Tennessee. In addition to discussing risks from the ubiquitous presence of background carcinogens in the east Tennessee environment, this report also presents risks resulting from common, everyday activities. Such information should, not be used to discount or trivialize risks from hazardous waste contamination, but rather, to create a sensitivity to general risk issues, thus providing a context for better interpretation of risk information.

  12. Defining resilience within a risk-informed assessment framework

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Garill A.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Holter, Gregory M.; Bass, Robert B.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-08-01

    The concept of resilience is the subject of considerable discussion in academic, business, and governmental circles. The United States Department of Homeland Security for one has emphasised the need to consider resilience in safeguarding critical infrastructure and key resources. The concept of resilience is complex, multidimensional, and defined differently by different stakeholders. The authors contend that there is a benefit in moving from discussing resilience as an abstraction to defining resilience as a measurable characteristic of a system. This paper proposes defining resilience measures using elements of a traditional risk assessment framework to help clarify the concept of resilience and as a way to provide non-traditional risk information. The authors show various, diverse dimensions of resilience can be quantitatively defined in a common risk assessment framework based on the concept of loss of service. This allows the comparison of options for improving the resilience of infrastructure and presents a means to perform cost-benefit analysis. This paper discusses definitions and key aspects of resilience, presents equations for the risk of loss of infrastructure function that incorporate four key aspects of resilience that could prevent or mitigate that loss, describes proposed resilience factor definitions based on those risk impacts, and provides an example that illustrates how resilience factors would be calculated using a hypothetical scenario.

  13. Setting risk-informed environmental standards for Bacillus anthracis spores.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Gurian, Patrick L; Ward, Nicholas F Dudley

    2010-10-01

    In many cases, human health risk from biological agents is associated with aerosol exposures. Because air concentrations decline rapidly after a release, it may be necessary to use concentrations found in other environmental media to infer future or past aerosol exposures. This article presents an approach for linking environmental concentrations of Bacillus. anthracis (B. anthracis) spores on walls, floors, ventilation system filters, and in human nasal passages with human health risk from exposure to B. anthracis spores. This approach is then used to calculate example values of risk-informed concentration standards for both retrospective risk mitigation (e.g., prophylactic antibiotics) and prospective risk mitigation (e.g., environmental clean up and reoccupancy). A large number of assumptions are required to calculate these values, and the resulting values have large uncertainties associated with them. The values calculated here suggest that documenting compliance with risks in the range of 10(-4) to 10(-6) would be challenging for small diameter (respirable) spore particles. For less stringent risk targets and for releases of larger diameter particles (which are less respirable and hence less hazardous), environmental sampling would be more promising.

  14. Neural method of spatiotemporal filter design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostakowski, Jaroslaw

    1997-10-01

    There is a lot of applications in medical imaging, computer vision, and the communications, where the video processing is critical. Although many techniques have been successfully developed for the filtering of the still-images, significantly fewer techniques have been proposed for the filtering of noisy image sequences. In this paper the novel approach to spatio- temporal filtering design is proposed. The multilayer perceptrons and functional-link nets are used for the 3D filtering. The spatio-temporal patterns are creating from real motion video images. The neural networks learn these patterns. The perceptrons with different number of layers and neurons in each layer are tested. Also, the different input functions in functional- link net are searched. The practical examples of the filtering are shown and compared with traditional (non-neural) spatio-temporal methods. The results are very interesting and the neural spatio-temporal filters seems to be very efficient tool for video noise reduction.

  15. Educating Instructional Designers: Different Methods for Different Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Gordon; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Suggests new methods of teaching instructional design based on literature reviews of other design fields including engineering, architecture, interior design, media design, and medicine. Methods discussed include public presentations, visiting experts, competitions, artifacts, case studies, design studios, and internships and apprenticeships.…

  16. Adjoint methods for aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    A model inverse design problem is used to investigate the effect of flow discontinuities on the optimization process. The optimization involves finding the cross-sectional area distribution of a duct that produces velocities that closely match a targeted velocity distribution. Quasi-one-dimensional flow theory is used, and the target is chosen to have a shock wave in its distribution. The objective function which quantifies the difference between the targeted and calculated velocity distributions may become non-smooth due to the interaction between the shock and the discretization of the flowfield. This paper offers two techniques to resolve the resulting problems for the optimization algorithms. The first, shock-fitting, involves careful integration of the objective function through the shock wave. The second, coordinate straining with shock penalty, uses a coordinate transformation to align the calculated shock with the target and then adds a penalty proportional to the square of the distance between the shocks. The techniques are tested using several popular sensitivity and optimization methods, including finite-differences, and direct and adjoint discrete sensitivity methods. Two optimization strategies, Gauss-Newton and sequential quadratic programming (SQP), are used to drive the objective function to a minimum.

  17. Game Methodology for Design Methods and Tools Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Lahonde, Nathalie; Omhover, Jean-françois

    2014-01-01

    Design process optimisation and intelligence are the key words of today's scientific community. A proliferation of methods has made design a convoluted area. Designers are usually afraid of selecting one method/tool over another and even expert designers may not necessarily know which method is the best to use in which circumstances. This…

  18. The Application of Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis to the Ioland Water Treatment Plant in Lusaka, Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, John; Tkach, Mark; Olszewski, Jennifer; Chaudhry, Rabia; Mendoza, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    This presentation demonstrates the application of Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis (CRIDA) at Zambia's principal water treatment facility, The Iolanda Water Treatment Plant. The water treatment plant is prone to unacceptable failures during periods of low hydropower production at the Kafue Gorge Dam Hydroelectric Power Plant. The case study explores approaches of increasing the water treatment plant's ability to deliver acceptable levels of service under the range of current and potential future climate states. The objective of the study is to investigate alternative investments to build system resilience that might have been informed by the CRIDA process, and to evaluate the extra resource requirements by a bilateral donor agency to implement the CRIDA process. The case study begins with an assessment of the water treatment plant's vulnerability to climate change. It does so by following general principals described in "Confronting Climate Uncertainty in Water Resource Planning and Project Design: the Decision Tree Framework". By utilizing relatively simple bootstrapping methods a range of possible future climate states is generated while avoiding the use of more complex and costly downscaling methodologies; that are beyond the budget and technical capacity of many teams. The resulting climate vulnerabilities and uncertainty in the climate states that produce them are analyzed as part of a "Level of Concern" analysis. CRIDA principals are then applied to this Level of Concern analysis in order to arrive at a set of actionable water management decisions. The principal goals of water resource management is to transform variable, uncertain hydrology into dependable services (e.g. water supply, flood risk reduction, ecosystem benefits, hydropower production, etc…). Traditional approaches to climate adaptation require the generation of predicted future climate states but do little guide decision makers how this information should impact decision making. In

  19. Translating Vision into Design: A Method for Conceptual Design Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Joyce E.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks for engineers is the definition of design solutions that will satisfy high-level strategic visions and objectives. Even more challenging is the need to demonstrate how a particular design solution supports the high-level vision. This paper describes a process and set of system engineering tools that have been used at the Johnson Space Center to analyze and decompose high-level objectives for future human missions into design requirements that can be used to develop alternative concepts for vehicles, habitats, and other systems. Analysis and design studies of alternative concepts and approaches are used to develop recommendations for strategic investments in research and technology that support the NASA Integrated Space Plan. In addition to a description of system engineering tools, this paper includes a discussion of collaborative design practices for human exploration mission architecture studies used at the Johnson Space Center.

  20. Analyses in support of risk-informed natural gas vehicle maintenance facility codes and standards :

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Blaylock, Myra L.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Horne, Douglas B.

    2014-03-01

    Safety standards development for maintenance facilities of liquid and compressed gas fueled large-scale vehicles is required to ensure proper facility design and operation envelopes. Standard development organizations are utilizing risk-informed concepts to develop natural gas vehicle (NGV) codes and standards so that maintenance facilities meet acceptable risk levels. The present report summarizes Phase I work for existing NGV repair facility code requirements and highlights inconsistencies that need quantitative analysis into their effectiveness. A Hazardous and Operability study was performed to identify key scenarios of interest. Finally, scenario analyses were performed using detailed simulations and modeling to estimate the overpressure hazards from HAZOP defined scenarios. The results from Phase I will be used to identify significant risk contributors at NGV maintenance facilities, and are expected to form the basis for follow-on quantitative risk analysis work to address specific code requirements and identify effective accident prevention and mitigation strategies.

  1. Using Software Design Methods in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Monica

    2006-01-01

    The phrase "software design" is not one that arouses the interest of many CALL practitioners, particularly those from a humanities background. However, software design essentials are simply logical ways of going about designing a system. The fundamentals include modularity, anticipation of change, generality and an incremental approach. While CALL…

  2. An Efficient Inverse Aerodynamic Design Method For Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics based design methods are maturing to the point that they are beginning to be used in the aircraft design process. Many design methods however have demonstrated deficiencies in the leading edge region of airfoil sections. The objective of the present research is to develop an efficient inverse design method which is valid in the leading edge region. The new design method is a streamline curvature method, and a new technique is presented for modeling the variation of the streamline curvature normal to the surface. The new design method allows the surface coordinates to move normal to the surface, and has been incorporated into the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. The accuracy and efficiency of the design method is demonstrated using both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design cases.

  3. Global optimization methods for engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Jasbir S.

    1990-01-01

    The problem is to find a global minimum for the Problem P. Necessary and sufficient conditions are available for local optimality. However, global solution can be assured only under the assumption of convexity of the problem. If the constraint set S is compact and the cost function is continuous on it, existence of a global minimum is guaranteed. However, in view of the fact that no global optimality conditions are available, a global solution can be found only by an exhaustive search to satisfy Inequality. The exhaustive search can be organized in such a way that the entire design space need not be searched for the solution. This way the computational burden is reduced somewhat. It is concluded that zooming algorithm for global optimizations appears to be a good alternative to stochastic methods. More testing is needed; a general, robust, and efficient local minimizer is required. IDESIGN was used in all numerical calculations which is based on a sequential quadratic programming algorithm, and since feasible set keeps on shrinking, a good algorithm to find an initial feasible point is required. Such algorithms need to be developed and evaluated.

  4. Alternative methods for the design of jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Leake, R. J.; Basso, R.; Gejji, R.; Maloney, A.; Seshadri, V.

    1976-01-01

    Various alternatives to linear quadratic design methods for jet engine control systems are discussed. The main alternatives are classified into two broad categories: nonlinear global mathematical programming methods and linear local multivariable frequency domain methods. Specific studies within these categories include model reduction, the eigenvalue locus method, the inverse Nyquist method, polynomial design, dynamic programming, and conjugate gradient approaches.

  5. Demystifying Mixed Methods Research Design: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruth, Gail D.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods research evolved in response to the observed limitations of both quantitative and qualitative designs and is a more complex method. The purpose of this paper was to examine mixed methods research in an attempt to demystify the design thereby allowing those less familiar with its design an opportunity to utilize it in future research.…

  6. Analyzing disease recurrence with missing at risk information.

    PubMed

    Štupnik, Tomaž; Pohar Perme, Maja

    2016-03-30

    When analyzing time to disease recurrence, we sometimes need to work with data where all the recurrences are recorded, but no information is available on the possible deaths. This may occur when studying diseases of benign nature where patients are only seen at disease recurrences or in poorly-designed registries of benign diseases or medical device implantations without sufficient patient identifiers to obtain their dead/alive status at a later date. When the average time to disease recurrence is long enough in comparison with the expected survival of the patients, statistical analysis of such data can be significantly biased. Under the assumption that the expected survival of an individual is not influenced by the disease itself, general population mortality tables may be used to remove this bias. We show why the intuitive solution of simply imputing the patient's expected survival time does not give unbiased estimates of the usual quantities of interest in survival analysis and further explain that cumulative incidence function analysis does not require additional assumptions on general population mortality. We provide an alternative framework that allows unbiased estimation and introduce two new approaches: an iterative imputation method and a mortality adjusted at risk function. Their properties are carefully studied, with the results supported by simulations and illustrated on a real-world example.

  7. Computational Methods Applied to Rational Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, David

    2016-01-01

    Due to the synergic relationship between medical chemistry, bioinformatics and molecular simulation, the development of new accurate computational tools for small molecules drug design has been rising over the last years. The main result is the increased number of publications where computational techniques such as molecular docking, de novo design as well as virtual screening have been used to estimate the binding mode, site and energy of novel small molecules. In this work I review some tools, which enable the study of biological systems at the atomistic level, providing relevant information and thereby, enhancing the process of rational drug design.

  8. Computational Methods Applied to Rational Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, David

    2016-01-01

    Due to the synergic relationship between medical chemistry, bioinformatics and molecular simulation, the development of new accurate computational tools for small molecules drug design has been rising over the last years. The main result is the increased number of publications where computational techniques such as molecular docking, de novo design as well as virtual screening have been used to estimate the binding mode, site and energy of novel small molecules. In this work I review some tools, which enable the study of biological systems at the atomistic level, providing relevant information and thereby, enhancing the process of rational drug design. PMID:27708723

  9. Insight into the Earthquake Risk Information Seeking Behavior of the Victims: Evidence from Songyuan, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shasha; Zhai, Guofang; Zhou, Shutian; Fan, Chenjing; Wu, Yunqing; Ren, Chongqiang

    2017-01-01

    Efficient risk communication is a vital way to reduce the vulnerability of individuals when facing emergency risks, especially regarding earthquakes. Efficient risk communication aims at improving the supply of risk information and fulfilling the need for risk information by individuals. Therefore, an investigation into individual-level information seeking behavior within earthquake risk contexts is very important for improved earthquake risk communication. However, at present there are very few studies that have explored the behavior of individuals seeking earthquake risk information. Under the guidance of the Risk Information Seeking and Processing model as well as relevant practical findings using the structural equation model, this study attempts to explore the main determinants of an individual’s earthquake risk information seeking behavior, and to validate the mediator effect of information need during the seeking process. A questionnaire-based survey of 918 valid respondents in Songyuan, China, who had been hit by a small earthquake swarm, was used to provide practical evidence for this study. Results indicated that information need played a noteworthy role in the earthquake risk information seeking process, and was detected both as an immediate predictor and as a mediator. Informational subjective norms drive the seeking behavior on earthquake risk information through both direct and indirect approaches. Perceived information gathering capacity, negative affective responses and risk perception have an indirect effect on earthquake risk information seeking behavior via information need. The implications for theory and practice regarding risk communication are discussed and concluded. PMID:28272359

  10. 77 FR 58590 - Determining Technical Adequacy of Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Risk-Informed License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Determining Technical Adequacy of Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Risk-Informed License...: LWR Edition,'' Section 19.1, ``Determining the Technical Adequacy of Probabilistic Risk Assessment for... Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Risk-Informed License Amendment Requests After Initial Fuel Load''...

  11. The Work Design Method for Human Friendly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Narumi; Sasaki, Masatoshi; Ichikawa, Masami

    In order to realize “the product life cycle with respect for human nature". we ought to make work design so that work environment should be configured to be sound in mind and body, with due consideration of not only physical but also mental factors from the viewpoint of workers. The former includes too heavy work, unreasonable working posture, local fatigue of the body, the safety, and working comfort, and the latter includes work motivation, work worthiness, stress, etc. For the purpose of evaluating the degree of working comfort and safety at human-oriented production lines, we acknowledged, for the work design, the effectiveness of the work designing technique with working time variation duly considered. And, we formulated a model for a mental factor experienced by workers from the degree of working delays. This study covers a work design technique we developed with the effect of the factor as the value of evaluation.

  12. Supersonic biplane design via adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui

    In developing the next generation supersonic transport airplane, two major challenges must be resolved. The fuel efficiency must be significantly improved, and the sonic boom propagating to the ground must be dramatically reduced. Both of these objectives can be achieved by reducing the shockwaves formed in supersonic flight. The Busemann biplane is famous for using favorable shockwave interaction to achieve nearly shock-free supersonic flight at its design Mach number. Its performance at off-design Mach numbers, however, can be very poor. This dissertation studies the performance of supersonic biplane airfoils at design and off-design conditions. The choked flow and flow-hysteresis phenomena of these biplanes are studied. These effects are due to finite thickness of the airfoils and non-uniqueness of the solution to the Euler equations, creating over an order of magnitude more wave drag than that predicted by supersonic thin airfoil theory. As a result, the off-design performance is the major barrier to the practical use of supersonic biplanes. The main contribution of this work is to drastically improve the off-design performance of supersonic biplanes by using an adjoint based aerodynamic optimization technique. The Busemann biplane is used as the baseline design, and its shape is altered to achieve optimal wave drags in series of Mach numbers ranging from 1.1 to 1.7, during both acceleration and deceleration conditions. The optimized biplane airfoils dramatically reduces the effects of the choked flow and flow-hysteresis phenomena, while maintaining a certain degree of favorable shockwave interaction effects at the design Mach number. Compared to a diamond shaped single airfoil of the same total thickness, the wave drag of our optimized biplane is lower at almost all Mach numbers, and is significantly lower at the design Mach number. In addition, by performing a Navier-Stokes solution for the optimized airfoil, it is verified that the optimized biplane improves

  13. A method for nonlinear optimization with discrete design variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Gregory R.; Vanderplaats, Garret N.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for the solution of nonlinear discrete optimization problems. The applicability of discrete optimization to engineering design is discussed, and several standard structural optimization problems are solved using discrete design variables. The method uses approximation techniques to create subproblems suitable for linear mixed-integer programming methods. The method employs existing software for continuous optimization and integer programming.

  14. JASMINE design and method of data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Gouda, Naoteru; Yano, Taihei; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Niwa, Yoshito

    2008-07-01

    Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared Exploration (JASMINE) aims to construct a map of the Galactic bulge with 10 μ arc sec accuracy. We use z-band CCD for avoiding dust absorption, and observe about 10 × 20 degrees area around the Galactic bulge region. Because the stellar density is very high, each FOVs can be combined with high accuracy. With 5 years observation, we will construct 10 μ arc sec accurate map. In this poster, I will show the observation strategy, design of JASMINE hardware, reduction scheme, and error budget. We also construct simulation software named JASMINE Simulator. We also show the simulation results and design of software.

  15. Methods for library-scale computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lucas B; Huber, Thaddaus R; Snow, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    Faced with a protein engineering challenge, a contemporary researcher can choose from myriad design strategies. Library-scale computational protein design (LCPD) is a hybrid method suitable for the engineering of improved protein variants with diverse sequences. This chapter discusses the background and merits of several practical LCPD techniques. First, LCPD methods suitable for delocalized protein design are presented in the context of example design calculations for cellobiohydrolase II. Second, localized design methods are discussed in the context of an example design calculation intended to shift the substrate specificity of a ketol-acid reductoisomerase Rossmann domain from NADPH to NADH.

  16. The application of mixed methods designs to trauma research.

    PubMed

    Creswell, John W; Zhang, Wanqing

    2009-12-01

    Despite the use of quantitative and qualitative data in trauma research and therapy, mixed methods studies in this field have not been analyzed to help researchers designing investigations. This discussion begins by reviewing four core characteristics of mixed methods research in the social and human sciences. Combining these characteristics, the authors focus on four select mixed methods designs that are applicable in trauma research. These designs are defined and their essential elements noted. Applying these designs to trauma research, a search was conducted to locate mixed methods trauma studies. From this search, one sample study was selected, and its characteristics of mixed methods procedures noted. Finally, drawing on other mixed methods designs available, several follow-up mixed methods studies were described for this sample study, enabling trauma researchers to view design options for applying mixed methods research in trauma investigations.

  17. Lithography aware overlay metrology target design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myungjun; Smith, Mark D.; Lee, Joonseuk; Jung, Mirim; Lee, Honggoo; Kim, Youngsik; Han, Sangjun; Adel, Michael E.; Lee, Kangsan; Lee, Dohwa; Choi, Dongsub; Liu, Zephyr; Itzkovich, Tal; Levinski, Vladimir; Levy, Ady

    2016-03-01

    We present a metrology target design (MTD) framework based on co-optimizing lithography and metrology performance. The overlay metrology performance is strongly related to the target design and optimizing the target under different process variations in a high NA optical lithography tool and measurement conditions in a metrology tool becomes critical for sub-20nm nodes. The lithography performance can be quantified by device matching and printability metrics, while accuracy and precision metrics are used to quantify the metrology performance. Based on using these metrics, we demonstrate how the optimized target can improve target printability while maintaining the good metrology performance for rotated dipole illumination used for printing a sub-100nm diagonal feature in a memory active layer. The remaining challenges and the existing tradeoff between metrology and lithography performance are explored with the metrology target designer's perspective. The proposed target design framework is completely general and can be used to optimize targets for different lithography conditions. The results from our analysis are both physically sensible and in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. A comparison of digital flight control design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Parsons, E.; Tashker, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Many variations in design methods for aircraft digital flight control have been proposed in the literature. In general, the methods fall into two categories: those where the design is done in the continuous domain (or s-plane), and those where the design is done in the discrete domain (or z-plane). This paper evaluates several variations of each category and compares them for various flight control modes of the Langley TCV Boeing 737 aircraft. Design method fidelity is evaluated by examining closed loop root movement and the frequency response of the discretely controlled continuous aircraft. It was found that all methods provided acceptable performance for sample rates greater than 10 cps except the 'uncompensated s-plane design' method which was acceptable above 20 cps. A design procedure based on optimal control methods was proposed that provided the best fidelity at very slow sample rates and required no design iterations for changing sample rates.

  19. Probabilistic Methods for Structural Design and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a formal method to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of a multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the material behavior level where primitive variables with their respective scatter ranges are used to describe behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate the uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from this method demonstrate, that it is mature and that it can be used to probabilistically evaluate turbine engine structural components. It may be inferred from the results that the method is suitable for probabilistically predicting the remaining life in aging or in deteriorating structures, for making strategic projections and plans, and for achieving better, cheaper, faster products that give competitive advantages in world markets.

  20. A comparison of methods currently used in inclusive design.

    PubMed

    Goodman-Deane, Joy; Ward, James; Hosking, Ian; Clarkson, P John

    2014-07-01

    Inclusive design has unique challenges because it aims to improve usability for a wide range of users. This typically includes people with lower levels of ability, as well as mainstream users. This paper examines the effectiveness of two methods that are used in inclusive design: user trials and exclusion calculations (an inclusive design inspection method). A study examined three autoinjectors using both methods (n=30 for the user trials). The usability issues identified by each method are compared and the effectiveness of the methods is discussed. The study found that each method identified different kinds of issues, all of which are important for inclusive design. We therefore conclude that a combination of methods should be used in inclusive design rather than relying on a single method. Recommendations are also given for how the individual methods can be used more effectively in this context.

  1. Soft computing methods in design of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, K. J.; Berke, L.; Vary, A.; Sharma, S.

    1995-01-01

    Soft computing techniques of neural networks and genetic algorithms are used in the design of superalloys. The cyclic oxidation attack parameter K(sub a), generated from tests at NASA Lewis Research Center, is modeled as a function of the superalloy chemistry and test temperature using a neural network. This model is then used in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain an optimized superalloy composition resulting in low K(sub a) values.

  2. Soft Computing Methods in Design of Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, K. J.; Berke, L.; Vary, A.; Sharma, S.

    1996-01-01

    Soft computing techniques of neural networks and genetic algorithms are used in the design of superalloys. The cyclic oxidation attack parameter K(sub a), generated from tests at NASA Lewis Research Center, is modelled as a function of the superalloy chemistry and test temperature using a neural network. This model is then used in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain an optimized superalloy composition resulting in low K(sub a) values.

  3. Computational Methods for Design, Control and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    34scenario" that applies to channel flows ( Poiseuille flows , Couette flow ) and pipe flows . Over the past 75 years many complex "transition theories" have... Simulation of Turbulent Flows , Springer Verlag, 2005. Additional Publications Supported by this Grant 1. J. Borggaard and T. Iliescu, Approximate Deconvolution...rigorous analysis of design algorithms that combine numerical simulation codes, approximate sensitivity calculations and optimization codes. The fundamental

  4. An overview of very high level software design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asdjodi, Maryam; Hooper, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Very High Level design methods emphasize automatic transfer of requirements to formal design specifications, and/or may concentrate on automatic transformation of formal design specifications that include some semantic information of the system into machine executable form. Very high level design methods range from general domain independent methods to approaches implementable for specific applications or domains. Applying AI techniques, abstract programming methods, domain heuristics, software engineering tools, library-based programming and other methods different approaches for higher level software design are being developed. Though one finds that a given approach does not always fall exactly in any specific class, this paper provides a classification for very high level design methods including examples for each class. These methods are analyzed and compared based on their basic approaches, strengths and feasibility for future expansion toward automatic development of software systems.

  5. Placement and Format of Risk Information on Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Websites.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Helen W; O'Donoghue, Amie C; Rupert, Douglas J; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Aikin, Kathryn J

    2017-02-01

    We investigated whether the location and format of risk information on branded prescription drug websites influence consumers' knowledge and perceptions of the drug's risks. Participants (Internet panelists with high cholesterol [n = 2,609] or seasonal allergies [n = 2,637]) were randomly assigned to view a website promoting a fictitious prescription drug for their condition. The website presented risk information at the bottom of the homepage, or at the bottom of the homepage with a signal above indicating that the risk information was located below, or on a linked secondary page. We also varied the format of risk information (paragraph, checklist, bulleted list, highlighted box). Participants then answered questions on risk recall and perceptions. Participants recalled fewer drug risks when the risks were placed on a secondary page. The signal had little effect, and risk information format did not affect outcomes. The location of risk information on prescription drug websites can affect consumer knowledge of drug risks; however, signals and special formatting may not be necessary for websites to adequately inform consumers about drug risks. We recommend that prescription drug websites maintain risk information on their homepages to achieve "fair balance" as required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  6. Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2016-12-13

    A method of recovering a liquid hydrocarbon using an injectate includes recovering the liquid hydrocarbon through primary extraction. Physico-chemical data representative of electrostatic interactions between the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock are measured. At least one additive of the injectate is selected based on the physico-chemical data. The method includes recovering the liquid hydrocarbon from the reservoir rock through secondary extraction using the injectate.

  7. The Triton: Design concepts and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Singer, Michael; Vanryn, Percy; Brown, Rhonda; Tella, Gustavo; Harvey, Bob

    1992-01-01

    During the design of the C & P Aerospace Triton, a few problems were encountered that necessitated changes in the configuration. After the initial concept phase, the aspect ratio was increased from 7 to 7.6 to produce a greater lift to drag ratio (L/D = 13) which satisfied the horsepower requirements (118 hp using the Lycoming O-235 engine). The initial concept had a wing planform area of 134 sq. ft. Detailed wing sizing analysis enlarged the planform area to 150 sq. ft., without changing its layout or location. The most significant changes, however, were made just prior to inboard profile design. The fuselage external diameter was reduced from 54 to 50 inches to reduce drag to meet the desired cruise speed of 120 knots. Also, the nose was extended 6 inches to accommodate landing gear placement. Without the extension, the nosewheel received an unacceptable percentage (25 percent) of the landing weight. The final change in the configuration was made in accordance with the stability and control analysis. In order to reduce the static margin from 20 to 13 percent, the horizontal tail area was reduced from 32.02 to 25.0 sq. ft. The Triton meets all the specifications set forth in the design criteria. If time permitted another iteration of the calculations, two significant changes would be made. The vertical stabilizer area would be reduced to decrease the aircraft lateral stability slope since the current value was too high in relation to the directional stability slope. Also, the aileron size would be decreased to reduce the roll rate below the current 106 deg/second. Doing so would allow greater flap area (increasing CL(sub max)) and thus reduce the overall wing area. C & P would also recalculate the horsepower and drag values to further validate the 120 knot cruising speed.

  8. Research and Methods for Simulation Design: State of the Art

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    designers. Designers may use this review to identify methods to aid the training-device design process and individuals who manage research programs...maximum training effectiveness at a given cost. The methods should apply to the concept-formulation phase’of the training-device development process ...design process . Finally, individuals who manage research programs may use this information to set priorities for future research efforts. viii RESEARCH

  9. A survey on methods of design features identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowik, C.; Kalinowski, K.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W.

    2015-11-01

    It is widely accepted that design features are one of the most attractive integration method of most fields of engineering activities such as a design modelling, process planning or production scheduling. One of the most important tasks which are realized in the integration process of design and planning functions is a design translation meant as design data mapping into data which are important from process planning needs point of view, it is manufacturing data. A design geometrical shape translation process can be realized with application one of the following strategies: (i) designing with previously prepared design features library also known as DBF method it is design by feature, (ii) interactive design features recognition IFR, (iii) automatic design features recognition AFR. In case of the DBF method design geometrical shape is created with design features. There are two basic approaches for design modelling in DBF method it is classic in which a part design is modelled from beginning to end with application design features previously stored in a design features data base and hybrid where part is partially created with standard predefined CAD system tools and the rest with suitable design features. Automatic feature recognition consist in an autonomic searching of a product model represented with a specific design representation method in order to find those model features which might be potentially recognized as design features, manufacturing features, etc. This approach needs the searching algorithm to be prepared. The searching algorithm should allow carrying on the whole recognition process without a user supervision. Currently there are lots of AFR methods. These methods need the product model to be represented with B-Rep representation most often, CSG rarely, wireframe very rarely. In the IFR method potential features are being recognized by a user. This process is most often realized by a user who points out those surfaces which seem to belong to a

  10. A flexible layout design method for passive micromixers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongbo; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Yongshun; Gao, Qingyong; Wu, Yihui

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses a flexible layout design method of passive micromixers based on the topology optimization of fluidic flows. Being different from the trial and error method, this method obtains the detailed layout of a passive micromixer according to the desired mixing performance by solving a topology optimization problem. Therefore, the dependence on the experience of the designer is weaken, when this method is used to design a passive micromixer with acceptable mixing performance. Several design disciplines for the passive micromixers are considered to demonstrate the flexibility of the layout design method for passive micromixers. These design disciplines include the approximation of the real 3D micromixer, the manufacturing feasibility, the spacial periodic design, and effects of the Péclet number and Reynolds number on the designs obtained by this layout design method. The capability of this design method is validated by several comparisons performed between the obtained layouts and the optimized designs in the recently published literatures, where the values of the mixing measurement is improved up to 40.4% for one cycle of the micromixer.

  11. Comparison of Traditional Design Nonlinear Programming Optimization and Stochastic Methods for Structural Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2010-01-01

    Structural design generated by traditional method, optimization method and the stochastic design concept are compared. In the traditional method, the constraints are manipulated to obtain the design and weight is back calculated. In design optimization, the weight of a structure becomes the merit function with constraints imposed on failure modes and an optimization algorithm is used to generate the solution. Stochastic design concept accounts for uncertainties in loads, material properties, and other parameters and solution is obtained by solving a design optimization problem for a specified reliability. Acceptable solutions were produced by all the three methods. The variation in the weight calculated by the methods was modest. Some variation was noticed in designs calculated by the methods. The variation may be attributed to structural indeterminacy. It is prudent to develop design by all three methods prior to its fabrication. The traditional design method can be improved when the simplified sensitivities of the behavior constraint is used. Such sensitivity can reduce design calculations and may have a potential to unify the traditional and optimization methods. Weight versus reliabilitytraced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the graph corresponded to mean valued design. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure. Weight can be reduced to a small value for a most failure-prone design. Probabilistic modeling of load and material properties remained a challenge.

  12. Preliminary design method for deployable spacecraft beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Cassapakis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    There is currently considerable interest in low-cost, lightweight, compactly packageable deployable elements for various future missions involving small spacecraft. These elements must also have a simple and reliable deployment scheme and possess zero or very small free-play. Although most small spacecraft do not experience large disturbances, very low stiffness appendages or free-play can couple with even small disturbances and lead to unacceptably large attitude errors which may involve the introduction of a flexible-body control system. A class of structures referred to as 'rigidized structures' offers significant promise in providing deployable elements that will meet these needs for small spacecraft. The purpose of this paper is to introduce several rigidizable concepts and to develop a design methodology which permits a rational comparison of these elements to be made with alternate concepts.

  13. Design Methods and Optimization for Morphing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides a summary of accomplishments made during this research effort. The major accomplishments are in three areas. The first is the use of a multiobjective optimization strategy to help identify potential morphing features that uses an existing aircraft sizing code to predict the weight, size and performance of several fixed-geometry aircraft that are Pareto-optimal based upon on two competing aircraft performance objectives. The second area has been titled morphing as an independent variable and formulates the sizing of a morphing aircraft as an optimization problem in which the amount of geometric morphing for various aircraft parameters are included as design variables. This second effort consumed most of the overall effort on the project. The third area involved a more detailed sizing study of a commercial transport aircraft that would incorporate a morphing wing to possibly enable transatlantic point-to-point passenger service.

  14. Method for designing and controlling compliant gripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanu, A. R.; Besnea, D.; Avram, M.; Ciobanu, R.

    2016-08-01

    The compliant grippers are useful for high accuracy grasping of small objects with adaptive control of contact points along the active surfaces of the fingers. The spatial trajectories of the elements become a must, due to the development of MEMS. The paper presents the solution for the compliant gripper designed by the authors, so the planar and spatial movements are discussed. At the beginning of the process, the gripper could work as passive one just for the moment when it has to reach out the object surface. The forces provided by the elements have to avoid the damage. As part of the system, the camera is taken picture of the object, in order to facilitate the positioning of the system. When the contact is established, the mechanism is acting as an active gripper by using an electrical stepper motor, which has controlled movement.

  15. Achieving a Risk-Informed Decision-Making Environment at NASA: The Emphasis of NASA's Risk Management Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the evolution of risk management (RM) at NASA. The aim of the RM approach at NASA is to promote an approach that is heuristic, proactive, and coherent across all of NASA. Risk Informed Decision Making (RIDM) is a decision making process that uses a diverse set of performance measures along with other considerations within a deliberative process to inform decision making. RIDM is invoked for key decisions such as architecture and design decisions, make-buy decisions, and budget reallocation. The RIDM process and how it relates to the continuous Risk Management (CRM) process is reviewed.

  16. Conceptual design of clean processes: Tools and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hurme, M.

    1996-12-31

    Design tools available for implementing clean design into practice are discussed. The application areas together with the methods of comparison of clean process alternatives are presented. Environmental principles are becoming increasingly important in the whole life cycle of products from design, manufacturing and marketing to disposal. The hinder of implementing clean technology in design has been the necessity to apply it in all phases of design starting from the beginning, since it deals with the major selections made in the conceptual process design. Therefore both a modified design approach and new tools are needed for process design to make the application of clean technology practical. The first item; extended process design methodologies has been presented by Hurme, Douglas, Rossiter and Klee, Hilaly and Sikdar. The aim of this paper is to discuss the latter topic; the process design tools which assist in implementing clean principles into process design. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. A Tutorial on Probablilistic Risk Assessement and its Role in Risk-Informed Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews risk assessment and its role in risk-informed decision making. It includes information on probabilistic risk assessment, typical risk management process, origins of risk matrix, performance measures, performance objectives and Bayes theorem.

  18. Analytical techniques for instrument design - matrix methods

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    We take the traditional Cooper-Nathans approach, as has been applied for many years for steady-state triple-axis spectrometers, and consider its generalisation to other inelastic scattering spectrometers. This involves a number of simple manipulations of exponentials of quadratic forms. In particular, we discuss a toolbox of matrix manipulations that can be performed on the 6- dimensional Cooper-Nathans matrix: diagonalisation (Moller-Nielsen method), coordinate changes e.g. from ({Delta}k{sub I},{Delta}k{sub F} to {Delta}E, {Delta}Q & 2 dummy variables), integration of one or more variables (e.g. over such dummy variables), integration subject to linear constraints (e.g. Bragg`s Law for analysers), inversion to give the variance-covariance matrix, and so on. We show how these tools can be combined to solve a number of important problems, within the narrow-band limit and the gaussian approximation. We will argue that a generalised program that can handle multiple different spectrometers could (and should) be written in parallel to the Monte-Carlo packages that are becoming available. We will also discuss the complementarity between detailed Monte-Carlo calculations and the approach presented here. In particular, Monte-Carlo methods traditionally simulate the real experiment as performed in practice, given a model scattering law, while the Cooper-Nathans method asks the inverse question: given that a neutron turns up in a particular spectrometer configuration (e.g. angle and time of flight), what is the probability distribution of possible scattering events at the sample? The Monte-Carlo approach could be applied in the same spirit to this question.

  19. Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis: A Hypothetical Application to the Waas Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilroy, Kristin; Mens, Marjolein; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Jeuken, Ad

    2016-04-01

    More frequent and intense hydrologic events under climate change are expected to enhance water security and flood risk management challenges worldwide. Traditional planning approaches must be adapted to address climate change and develop solutions with an appropriate level of robustness and flexibility. The Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis (CRIDA) method is a novel planning approach embodying a suite of complementary methods, including decision scaling and adaptation pathways. Decision scaling offers a bottom-up approach to assess risk and tailors the complexity of the analysis to the problem at hand and the available capacity. Through adaptation pathway,s an array of future strategies towards climate robustness are developed, ranging in flexibility and immediacy of investments. Flexible pathways include transfer points to other strategies to ensure that the system can be adapted if future conditions vary from those expected. CRIDA combines these two approaches in a stakeholder driven process which guides decision makers through the planning and decision process, taking into account how the confidence in the available science, the consequences in the system, and the capacity of institutions should influence strategy selection. In this presentation, we will explain the CRIDA method and compare it to existing planning processes, such as the US Army Corps of Engineers Principles and Guidelines as well as Integrated Water Resources Management Planning. Then, we will apply the approach to a hypothetical case study for the Waas Region, a large downstream river basin facing rapid development threatened by increased flood risks. Through the case study, we will demonstrate how a stakeholder driven process can be used to evaluate system robustness to climate change; develop adaptation pathways for multiple objectives and criteria; and illustrate how varying levels of confidence, consequences, and capacity would play a role in the decision making process, specifically

  20. Study on Communication System of Social Risk Information on Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hidekazu Yoshikawa; Toshio Sugiman; Yasunaga Wakabayashi; Hiroshi Shimoda; Mika Terado; Mariko Akimoto; Yoshihiko Nagasato

    2004-07-01

    As a new risk communication method for the construction of effective knowledge bases about 'safety and non-anxiety for nuclear energy', a study on new communication method of social risk information by means of electronic communication has been started, by noticing rapid expansion of internet usage in the society. The purpose of this research is to enhance the public acceptance to nuclear power in Japan by the following two aspects. The first is to develop the mutual communication system among the working persons involved in both the operation and maintenance activities for nuclear power plant, by which they will exchange their daily experiences to improve the safety conscious activities to foster 'safety culture' attitude. The other is the development of an effective risk communication system between nuclear society and the general publics about the hot issues of 'what are the concerned involved in the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste?' and 'what should we do to have social consensus to deal with this issue in future'. The authors' research plan for the above purpose is summarized as shown in Table 1. As the first step of the authors' three year research project which started from August 2003, social investigation by questionnaires by internet and postal mail, have been just recently conducted on their risk perception for the nuclear power for the people engaged in nuclear business and women in the metropolitan area, respectively, in order to obtain the relevant information on how and what should be considered for constructing effective risk communication methods of social risk information between the people within nuclear industries and the general public in society. Although there need to be discussed, the contrasting risk images as shown in Fig.1, can be depicted between the nuclear people and general public these days in Japan, from the results of the social investigation. As the conclusion of the authors' study thus far conducted, the

  1. HEALTHY study rationale, design and methods

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The HEALTHY primary prevention trial was designed and implemented in response to the growing numbers of children and adolescents being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The objective was to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Modifiable risk factors measured were indicators of adiposity and glycemic dysregulation: body mass index ≥85th percentile, fasting glucose ≥5.55 mmol l-1 (100 mg per 100 ml) and fasting insulin ≥180 pmol l-1 (30 μU ml-1). A series of pilot studies established the feasibility of performing data collection procedures and tested the development of an intervention consisting of four integrated components: (1) changes in the quantity and nutritional quality of food and beverage offerings throughout the total school food environment; (2) physical education class lesson plans and accompanying equipment to increase both participation and number of minutes spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; (3) brief classroom activities and family outreach vehicles to increase knowledge, enhance decision-making skills and support and reinforce youth in accomplishing goals; and (4) communications and social marketing strategies to enhance and promote changes through messages, images, events and activities. Expert study staff provided training, assistance, materials and guidance for school faculty and staff to implement the intervention components. A cohort of students were enrolled in sixth grade and followed to end of eighth grade. They attended a health screening data collection at baseline and end of study that involved measurement of height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference and a fasting blood draw. Height and weight were also collected at the end of the seventh grade. The study was conducted in 42 middle schools, six at each of seven locations across the country, with 21 schools randomized to receive the intervention and 21 to act as controls (data collection activities only). Middle school was the unit of sample size and

  2. System and method of designing models in a feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Gosink, Luke C.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Sego, Landon H.

    2017-02-14

    A method and system for designing models is disclosed. The method includes selecting a plurality of models for modeling a common event of interest. The method further includes aggregating the results of the models and analyzing each model compared to the aggregate result to obtain comparative information. The method also includes providing the information back to the plurality of models to design more accurate models through a feedback loop.

  3. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Designation of noise description methods... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.9 Designation of noise description methods. For purposes of this part, the...

  4. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designation of noise description methods... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.9 Designation of noise description methods. For purposes of this part, the...

  5. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Designation of noise description methods... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.9 Designation of noise description methods. For purposes of this part, the...

  6. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Designation of noise description methods... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.9 Designation of noise description methods. For purposes of this part, the...

  7. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Designation of noise description methods... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.9 Designation of noise description methods. For purposes of this part, the...

  8. What Can Mixed Methods Designs Offer Professional Development Program Evaluators?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Victoria; Nevin, Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe the benefits and pitfalls of mixed methods designs. They argue that mixed methods designs may be preferred when evaluating professional development programs for p-K-12 education given the new call for accountability in making data-driven decisions. They summarize and critique the studies in terms of limitations…

  9. Probabilistic Methods for Uncertainty Propagation Applied to Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Lin, Hong-Zong; Khalessi, Mohammad R.

    2002-01-01

    Three methods of probabilistic uncertainty propagation and quantification (the method of moments, Monte Carlo simulation, and a nongradient simulation search method) are applied to an aircraft analysis and conceptual design program to demonstrate design under uncertainty. The chosen example problems appear to have discontinuous design spaces and thus these examples pose difficulties for many popular methods of uncertainty propagation and quantification. However, specific implementation features of the first and third methods chosen for use in this study enable successful propagation of small uncertainties through the program. Input uncertainties in two configuration design variables are considered. Uncertainties in aircraft weight are computed. The effects of specifying required levels of constraint satisfaction with specified levels of input uncertainty are also demonstrated. The results show, as expected, that the designs under uncertainty are typically heavier and more conservative than those in which no input uncertainties exist.

  10. Expanding color design methods for architecture and allied disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, Harold E.

    2002-06-01

    The color design processes of visual artists, architects, designers, and theoreticians included in this presentation reflect the practical role of color in architecture. What the color design professional brings to the architectural design team is an expertise and rich sensibility made up of a broad awareness and a finely tuned visual perception. This includes a knowledge of design and its history, expertise with industrial color materials and their methods of application, an awareness of design context and cultural identity, a background in physiology and psychology as it relates to human welfare, and an ability to problem-solve and respond creatively to design concepts with innovative ideas. The broadening of the definition of the colorists's role in architectural design provides architects, artists and designers with significant opportunities for continued professional and educational development.

  11. Risk informed resource allocation policy: safety can save costs.

    PubMed

    Pasman, H J

    2000-01-07

    During economic doldrums, decision making on investments for safety is even more difficult than it already is when funds are abundant. This paper attempts to offer some guidance. After stating the present challenge to prevention of losses in the process industries, the systematic approach of quantified risk assessment is briefly reviewed and improvements in the methodology are mentioned. In addition, attention is given to the use of a risk matrix to survey a plant and to derive a plan of action. Subsequently, the reduction of risk is reviewed. Measures for prevention, protection, and mitigation are discussed. The organization of safety has become at least as important as technical safety of equipment and standards. It is reflected in the introduction of a safety management system. Furthermore, the design process in a pro-active approach is described and the concept of inherent safety is briefly addressed. The concept of Layer of Protection Analysis is explained and also the reason why it is relevant to provide a cost-benefit analysis. Finally, after comments regarding the cost of accidents, the basics of costing and profitability are summarized and a way is suggested to apply this approach to risk-reducing measures. An example is provided on how a selection can be made from a number of alternatives.

  12. A simple inverse design method for pump turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Junlian; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Dezhong; Wei, Xianzhu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a simple inverse design method is proposed for pump turbine. The main point of this method is that the blade loading distribution is first extracted from an existing model and then applied in the new design. As an example, the blade loading distribution of the runner designed with head 200m, was analyzed. And then, the combination of the extracted blade loading and a meridional passage suitable for 500m head is applied to design a new runner project. After CFD and model test, it is shown that the new runner performs very well in terms of efficiency and cavitation. Therefore, as an alternative, the inverse design method can be extended to other design applications.

  13. Design methods for fault-tolerant finite state machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjan, Shailesh; Frenzel, James F.

    1993-01-01

    VLSI electronic circuits are increasingly being used in space-borne applications where high levels of radiation may induce faults, known as single event upsets. In this paper we review the classical methods of designing fault tolerant digital systems, with an emphasis on those methods which are particularly suitable for VLSI-implementation of finite state machines. Four methods are presented and will be compared in terms of design complexity, circuit size, and estimated circuit delay.

  14. REVIEW OF PROPOSED METHODOLOGY FOR A RISK- INFORMED RELAXATION TO ASME SECTION XI APPENDIX G

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Terry L; Kirk, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The current regulations, as set forth by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), to insure that light-water nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) maintain their structural integrity when subjected to planned normal reactor startup (heat-up) and shut-down (cool-down) transients are specified in Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50, which incorporates by reference Appendix G to Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code. The technical basis for these regulations are now recognized by the technical community as being conservative and some plants are finding it increasingly difficult to comply with the current regulations. Consequently, the nuclear industry has developed, and submitted to the ASME Code for approval, an alternative risk-informed methodology that reduces the conservatism and is consistent with the methods previously used to develop a risk-informed revision to the regulations for accidental transients such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS). The objective of the alternative methodology is to provide a relaxation to the current regulations which will provide more operational flexibility, particularly for reactor pressure vessels with relatively high irradiation levels and radiation sensitive materials, while continuing to provide reasonable assurance of adequate protection to public health and safety. The NRC and its contractor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have recently performed an independent review of the industry proposed methodology. The NRC / ORNL review consisted of performing probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses for a matrix of cool-down and heat-up rates, permutated over various reactor geometries and characteristics, each at multiple levels of embrittlement, including 60 effective full power years (EFPY) and beyond, for various postulated flaw characterizations. The objective of this review is to quantify the risk of a reactor vessel experiencing non-ductile fracture, and possible

  15. Framework for modeling high-impact, low-frequency power grid events to support risk-informed decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramany, Arun; Unwin, Stephen D.; Coles, Garill A.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Millard, David W.; Yao, Juan; Glantz, Cliff S.; Gourisetti, Sri N. G.

    2016-06-25

    Natural and man-made hazardous events resulting in loss of grid infrastructure assets challenge the security and resilience of the electric power grid. However, the planning and allocation of appropriate contingency resources for such events requires an understanding of their likelihood and the extent of their potential impact. Where these events are of low likelihood, a risk-informed perspective on planning can be difficult, as the statistical basis needed to directly estimate the probabilities and consequences of their occurrence does not exist. Because risk-informed decisions rely on such knowledge, a basis for modeling the risk associated with high-impact, low-frequency events (HILFs) is essential. Insights from such a model indicate where resources are most rationally and effectively expended. A risk-informed realization of designing and maintaining a grid resilient to HILFs will demand consideration of a spectrum of hazards/threats to infrastructure integrity, an understanding of their likelihoods of occurrence, treatment of the fragilities of critical assets to the stressors induced by such events, and through modeling grid network topology, the extent of damage associated with these scenarios. The model resulting from integration of these elements will allow sensitivity assessments based on optional risk management strategies, such as alternative pooling, staging and logistic strategies, and emergency contingency planning. This study is focused on the development of an end-to-end HILF risk-assessment framework. Such a framework is intended to provide the conceptual and overarching technical basis for the development of HILF risk models that can inform decision-makers across numerous stakeholder groups in directing resources optimally towards the management of risks to operational continuity.

  16. System Design Support by Optimization Method Using Stochastic Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Katsuhito; Ishikawa, Yoshio

    We proposed the new optimization method based on stochastic process. The characteristics of this method are to obtain the approximate solution of the optimum solution as an expected value. In numerical calculation, a kind of Monte Carlo method is used to obtain the solution because of stochastic process. Then, it can obtain the probability distribution of the design variable because it is generated in the probability that design variables were in proportion to the evaluation function value. This probability distribution shows the influence of design variables on the evaluation function value. This probability distribution is the information which is very useful for the system design. In this paper, it is shown the proposed method is useful for not only the optimization but also the system design. The flight trajectory optimization problem for the hang-glider is shown as an example of the numerical calculation.

  17. Inviscid transonic wing design using inverse methods in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gally, Thomas A.; Carlson, Leland A.

    1987-01-01

    An inverse wing design method has been developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  18. Tabu search method with random moves for globally optimal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Nanfang

    1992-09-01

    Optimum engineering design problems are usually formulated as non-convex optimization problems of continuous variables. Because of the absence of convexity structure, they can have multiple minima, and global optimization becomes difficult. Traditional methods of optimization, such as penalty methods, can often be trapped at a local optimum. The tabu search method with random moves to solve approximately these problems is introduced. Its reliability and efficiency are examined with the help of standard test functions. By the analysis of the implementations, it is seen that this method is easy to use, and no derivative information is necessary. It outperforms the random search method and composite genetic algorithm. In particular, it is applied to minimum weight design examples of a three-bar truss, coil springs, a Z-section and a channel section. For the channel section, the optimal design using the tabu search method with random moves saved 26.14 percent over the weight of the SUMT method.

  19. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  20. Robust Multivariable Controller Design via Implicit Model-Following Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    HD-Ri38 309 ROBUST MULTIVARIABLE CONTROLLER DESIGN VIA IMPLICIT 1/4 MODEL-FOLLOWING METHODS(U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH SCHOOL...aaS. a%. 1 .111 I Q~ 18 0 ROBUST MULTIVARIABLE CONTROLLER DESIGN -~ :VIA IMPLICIT MODEL-FOLLOWING METHODS ’.% THESIS , AFIT/GE/EE/83D-48 William G... CONTROLLER DESIGN VIA IMPLICIT MODEL-FOLLOWING METHODS THESIS AFIT/GE/EE/83D-48 William G. Miller Capt USAF ,. Approved for pubi release; distribution

  1. Design Method for EPS Control System Based on KANSEI Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Yumi; Itoh, Hideaki; Ozaki, Fuminori; Nakamura, Takenobu; Kawaji, Shigeyasu

    Recently, it has been identified that a KANSEI engineering plays an important role in functional design developing for realizing highly sophisticated products. However, in practical development methods, we design products and optimise the design trial and error, which indecates that we depend on the skill set of experts. In this paper, we focus on an automobile electric power steering (EPS) for which a functional design is required. First, the KANSEI structure is determined on the basis of the steering feeling of an experienced driver, and an EPS control design based on this KANSEI structure is proposed. Then, the EPS control parameters are adjusted in accordance with the KANSEI index. Finally, by assessing the experimental results obtained from the driver, the effectiveness of the proposed design method is verified.

  2. Stabilizing State-Feedback Design via the Moving Horizon Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    aide if necessary and identify by block number) Stabilizing control design; linear time varying systems; fixed depth horizon; index optimization methods...dual system. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an reverse side If necessary and Identify by block number) Li _ A stabilizing control design for general linear...Apprvyed for pb~ ~~* 14 ~dl Stri but ion uni imit Oe, ABSTRACT A stabilizing control design for general linear time vary- invariant systems through

  3. An artificial viscosity method for the design of supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical technique is presented for the design of two-dimensional supercritical wing sections with low wave drag. The method is a design mode of the analysis code H which gives excellent agreement with experimental results and is widely used in the aircraft industry. Topics covered include the partial differential equations of transonic flow, the computational procedure and results; the design procedure; a convergence theorem; and description of the code.

  4. Single-Case Designs and Qualitative Methods: Applying a Mixed Methods Research Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, John H.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Summerville, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual paper is to describe a design that mixes single-case (sometimes referred to as single-subject) and qualitative methods, hereafter referred to as a single-case mixed methods design (SCD-MM). Minimal attention has been given to the topic of applying qualitative methods to SCD work in the literature. These two…

  5. New directions for Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods in optimum design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, Prabhat

    1989-01-01

    Developments and applications of artificial intelligence (AI) methods in the design of structural systems is reviewed. Principal shortcomings in the current approach are emphasized, and the need for some degree of formalism in the development environment for such design tools is underscored. Emphasis is placed on efforts to integrate algorithmic computations in expert systems.

  6. Two-Method Planned Missing Designs for Longitudinal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnier-Villarreal, Mauricio; Rhemtulla, Mijke; Little, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    We examine longitudinal extensions of the two-method measurement design, which uses planned missingness to optimize cost-efficiency and validity of hard-to-measure constructs. These designs use a combination of two measures: a "gold standard" that is highly valid but expensive to administer, and an inexpensive (e.g., survey-based)…

  7. Numerical methods for aerothermodynamic design of hypersonic space transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanie, K. M.; Brenneis, A.; Eberle, A.; Heiss, S.

    1993-04-01

    The requirement of the design process of hypersonic vehicles to predict flow past entire configurations with wings, fins, flaps, and propulsion system represents one of the major challenges for aerothermodynamics. In this context computational fluid dynamics has come up as a powerful tool to support the experimental work. A couple of numerical methods developed at MBB designed to fulfill the needs of the design process are described. The governing equations and fundamental details of the solution methods are shortly reviewed. Results are given for both geometrically simple test cases and realistic hypersonic configurations. Since there is still a considerable lack of experience for hypersonic flow calculations an extensive testing and verification is essential. This verification is done by comparison of results with experimental data and other numerical methods. The results presented prove that the methods used are robust, flexible, and accurate enough to fulfill the strong needs of the design process.

  8. Investigating the Use of Design Methods by Capstone Design Students at Clemson University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. Stuart; Summers, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a preliminary study to understand the attitude of engineering students regarding the use of design methods in projects to identify the factors either affecting or influencing the use of these methods by novice engineers. A senior undergraduate capstone design course at Clemson University, consisting of approximately fifty…

  9. Design method for four-reflector type beam waveguide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betsudan, S.; Katagi, T.; Urasaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed is a method for the design of four reflector type beam waveguide feed systems, comprised of a conical horn and 4 focused reflectors, which are used widely as the primary reflector systems for communications satellite Earth station antennas. The design parameters for these systems are clarified, the relations between each parameter are brought out based on the beam mode development, and the independent design parameters are specified. The characteristics of these systems, namely spillover loss, crosspolarization components, and frequency characteristics, and their relation to the design parameters, are also shown. It is also indicated that design parameters which decide the dimensions of the conical horn or the shape of the focused reflectors can be unerringly established once the design standard for the system has been selected as either: (1) minimizing the crosspolarization component by keeping the spillover loss to within acceptable limits, or (2) minimizing the spillover loss by maintaining the crossover components below an acceptable level and the independent design parameters, such as the respective sizes of the focused reflectors and the distances between the focussed reflectors, etc., have been established according to mechanical restrictions. A sample design is also shown. In addition to being able to clarify the effects of each of the design parameters on the system and improving insight into these systems, the efficiency of these systems will also be increased with this design method.

  10. New knowledge network evaluation method for design rationale management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Shikai; Zhan, Hongfei; Liu, Jihong; Wang, Kuan; Jiang, Hao; Zhou, Jingtao

    2015-01-01

    Current design rationale (DR) systems have not demonstrated the value of the approach in practice since little attention is put to the evaluation method of DR knowledge. To systematize knowledge management process for future computer-aided DR applications, a prerequisite is to provide the measure for the DR knowledge. In this paper, a new knowledge network evaluation method for DR management is presented. The method characterizes the DR knowledge value from four perspectives, namely, the design rationale structure scale, association knowledge and reasoning ability, degree of design justification support and degree of knowledge representation conciseness. The DR knowledge comprehensive value is also measured by the proposed method. To validate the proposed method, different style of DR knowledge network and the performance of the proposed measure are discussed. The evaluation method has been applied in two realistic design cases and compared with the structural measures. The research proposes the DR knowledge evaluation method which can provide object metric and selection basis for the DR knowledge reuse during the product design process. In addition, the method is proved to be more effective guidance and support for the application and management of DR knowledge.

  11. Approximate method of designing a two-element airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abzalilov, D. F.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2011-09-01

    An approximate method is proposed for designing a two-element airfoil. The method is based on reducing an inverse boundary-value problem in a doubly connected domain to a problem in a singly connected domain located on a multisheet Riemann surface. The essence of the method is replacement of channels between the airfoil elements by channels of flow suction and blowing. The shape of these channels asymptotically tends to the annular shape of channels passing to infinity on the second sheet of the Riemann surface. The proposed method can be extended to designing multielement airfoils.

  12. Risk-informed regulation and safety management of nuclear power plants--on the prevention of severe accidents.

    PubMed

    Himanen, Risto; Julin, Ari; Jänkälä, Kalle; Holmberg, Jan-Erik; Virolainen, Reino

    2012-11-01

    There are four operating nuclear power plant (NPP) units in Finland. The Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) power company has two 840 MWe BWR units supplied by Asea-Atom at the Olkiluoto site. The Fortum corporation (formerly IVO) has two 500 MWe VVER 440/213 units at the Loviisa site. In addition, a 1600 MWe European Pressurized Water Reactor supplied by AREVA NP (formerly the Framatome ANP--Siemens AG Consortium) is under construction at the Olkiluoto site. Recently, the Finnish Parliament ratified the government Decision in Principle that the utilities' applications to build two new NPP units are in line with the total good of the society. The Finnish utilities, Fenno power company, and TVO company are in progress of qualifying the type of the new nuclear builds. In Finland, risk-informed applications are formally integrated in the regulatory process of NPPs that are already in the early design phase and these are to run through the construction and operation phases all through the entire plant service time. A plant-specific full-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is required for each NPP. PRAs shall cover internal events, area events (fires, floods), and external events such as harsh weather conditions and seismic events in all operating modes. Special attention is devoted to the use of various risk-informed PRA applications in the licensing of Olkiluoto 3 NPP.

  13. A comparison of methods for DPLL loop filter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre, S.; Hurd, W. J.; Kumar, R.; Statman, J.

    1986-01-01

    Four design methodologies for loop filters for a class of digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs) are presented. The first design maps an optimum analog filter into the digital domain; the second approach designs a filter that minimizes in discrete time weighted combination of the variance of the phase error due to noise and the sum square of the deterministic phase error component; the third method uses Kalman filter estimation theory to design a filter composed of a least squares fading memory estimator and a predictor. The last design relies on classical theory, including rules for the design of compensators. Linear analysis is used throughout the article to compare different designs, and includes stability, steady state performance and transient behavior of the loops. Design methodology is not critical when the loop update rate can be made high relative to loop bandwidth, as the performance approaches that of continuous time. For low update rates, however, the miminization method is significantly superior to the other methods.

  14. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  15. Novel parameter-based flexure bearing design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoedo, Simon; Thebaud, Edouard; Gschwendtner, Michael; White, David

    2016-06-01

    A parameter study was carried out on the design variables of a flexure bearing to be used in a Stirling engine with a fixed axial displacement and a fixed outer diameter. A design method was developed in order to assist identification of the optimum bearing configuration. This was achieved through a parameter study of the bearing carried out with ANSYS®. The parameters varied were the number and the width of the arms, the thickness of the bearing, the eccentricity, the size of the starting and ending holes, and the turn angle of the spiral. Comparison was made between the different designs in terms of axial and radial stiffness, the natural frequency, and the maximum induced stresses. Moreover, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was compared to theoretical results for a given design. The results led to a graphical design method which assists the selection of flexure bearing geometrical parameters based on pre-determined geometric and material constraints.

  16. XML-based product information processing method for product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen Yu

    2012-01-01

    Design knowledge of modern mechatronics product is based on information processing as the center of the knowledge-intensive engineering, thus product design innovation is essentially the knowledge and information processing innovation. Analysis of the role of mechatronics product design knowledge and information management features, a unified model of XML-based product information processing method is proposed. Information processing model of product design includes functional knowledge, structural knowledge and their relationships. For the expression of product function element, product structure element, product mapping relationship between function and structure based on the XML model are proposed. The information processing of a parallel friction roller is given as an example, which demonstrates that this method is obviously helpful for knowledge-based design system and product innovation.

  17. XML-based product information processing method for product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen Yu

    2011-12-01

    Design knowledge of modern mechatronics product is based on information processing as the center of the knowledge-intensive engineering, thus product design innovation is essentially the knowledge and information processing innovation. Analysis of the role of mechatronics product design knowledge and information management features, a unified model of XML-based product information processing method is proposed. Information processing model of product design includes functional knowledge, structural knowledge and their relationships. For the expression of product function element, product structure element, product mapping relationship between function and structure based on the XML model are proposed. The information processing of a parallel friction roller is given as an example, which demonstrates that this method is obviously helpful for knowledge-based design system and product innovation.

  18. Examining trust factors in online food risk information: The case of unpasteurized or 'raw' milk.

    PubMed

    Sillence, Elizabeth; Hardy, Claire; Medeiros, Lydia C; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    The internet has become an increasingly important way of communicating with consumers about food risk information. However, relatively little is known about how consumers evaluate and come to trust the information they encounter online. Using the example of unpasteurized or raw milk this paper presents two studies exploring the trust factors associated with online information about the risks and benefits of raw milk consumption. In the first study, eye-tracking data was collected from 33 pasteurised milk consumers whilst they viewed six different milk related websites. A descriptive analysis of the eye-tracking data was conducted to explore viewing patterns. Reports revealed the importance of images as a way of capturing initial attention and foregrounding other features and highlighted the significance of introductory text within a homepage. In the second, qualitative study, 41 consumers, some of whom drank raw milk, viewed a selection of milk related websites before participating in either a group discussion or interview. Seventeen of the participants also took part in a follow up telephone interview 2 weeks later. The qualitative data supports the importance of good design whilst noting that balance, authorship agenda, the nature of evidence and personal relevance were also key factors affecting consumers trust judgements. The results of both studies provide support for a staged approach to online trust in which consumers engage in a more rapid, heuristic assessment of a site before moving on to a more in-depth evaluation of the information available. Findings are discussed in relation to the development of trustworthy online food safety resources.

  19. A Bright Future for Evolutionary Methods in Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Le, Tu C; Winkler, David A

    2015-08-01

    Most medicinal chemists understand that chemical space is extremely large, essentially infinite. Although high-throughput experimental methods allow exploration of drug-like space more rapidly, they are still insufficient to fully exploit the opportunities that such large chemical space offers. Evolutionary methods can synergistically blend automated synthesis and characterization methods with computational design to identify promising regions of chemical space more efficiently. We describe how evolutionary methods are implemented, and provide examples of published drug development research in which these methods have generated molecules with increased efficacy. We anticipate that evolutionary methods will play an important role in future drug discovery.

  20. On design methods for bolted joints in composite aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireman, Tomas; Nyman, Tonny; Hellbom, Kurt

    The problems related to the determination of the load distribution in a multirow fastener joint using the finite element method are discussed. Both simple and more advanced design methods used at Saab Military Aircraft are presented. The stress distributions obtained with an analytically based method and an FE-based method are compared. Results from failure predictions with a simple analytically based method and the more advanced FE-based method of multi-fastener tension and shear loaded test specimens are compared with experiments. Finally, complicating factors such as three-dimensional effects caused by secondary bending and fastener bending are discussed and suggestions for future research are given.

  1. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the nonimaging SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-09-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We show an extension of the SMS method to diffractive surfaces. Using this method, diffractive kinoform surfaces are calculated simultaneously and through a direct method, i. e. it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, only N/2 surfaces are needed to perfectly couple N one parameter wavefronts. Wavefronts of different wavelengths can also be coupled, hence chromatic aberration can be corrected in SMS-based systems. This method can be used by combining and calculating simultaneously both reflective, refractive and diffractive surfaces, through direct calculation of phase and refractive/reflective profiles. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  2. The Design with Intent Method: a design tool for influencing user behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lockton, Dan; Harrison, David; Stanton, Neville A

    2010-05-01

    Using product and system design to influence user behaviour offers potential for improving performance and reducing user error, yet little guidance is available at the concept generation stage for design teams briefed with influencing user behaviour. This article presents the Design with Intent Method, an innovation tool for designers working in this area, illustrated via application to an everyday human-technology interaction problem: reducing the likelihood of a customer leaving his or her card in an automatic teller machine. The example application results in a range of feasible design concepts which are comparable to existing developments in ATM design, demonstrating that the method has potential for development and application as part of a user-centred design process.

  3. INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR THE OPTIMIZATION OF GRAVITY STORM SEWER DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new method for optimizing the design of urban storm sewer systems. Previous efforts to optimize gravity sewers have met with limited success because classical optimization methods require that the problem be well behaved, e.g. describ...

  4. Designing, Teaching, and Evaluating Two Complementary Mixed Methods Research Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching mixed methods research is difficult. This longitudinal explanatory study examined how two classes were designed, taught, and evaluated. Curriculum, Research, and Teaching (EDCS-606) and Mixed Methods Research (EDCS-780) used a research proposal generation process to highlight the importance of the purpose, research question and…

  5. Tradeoff methods in multiobjective insensitive design of airplane control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Giesy, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The latest results of an ongoing study of computer-aided design of airplane control systems are given. Constrained minimization algorithms are used, with the design objectives in the constraint vector. The concept of Pareto optimiality is briefly reviewed. It is shown how an experienced designer can use it to find designs which are well-balanced in all objectives. Then the problem of finding designs which are insensitive to uncertainty in system parameters are discussed, introducing a probabilistic vector definition of sensitivity which is consistent with the deterministic Pareto optimal problem. Insensitivity is important in any practical design, but it is particularly important in the design of feedback control systems, since it is considered to be the most important distinctive property of feedback control. Methods of tradeoff between deterministic and stochastic-insensitive (SI) design are described, and tradeoff design results are presented for the example of the a Shuttle lateral stability augmentation system. This example is used because careful studies have been made of the uncertainty in Shuttle aerodynamics. Finally, since accurate statistics of uncertain parameters are usually not available, the effects of crude statistical models on SI designs are examined.

  6. Comparison of Optimal Design Methods in Inverse Problems.

    PubMed

    Banks, H T; Holm, Kathleen; Kappel, Franz

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criteria with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model [13], the standard harmonic oscillator model [13] and a popular glucose regulation model [16, 19, 29].

  7. Computer method for design of acoustic liners for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A design package is presented for the specification of acoustic liners for turbofans. An estimate of the noise generation was made based on modifications of existing noise correlations, for which the inputs are basic fan aerodynamic design variables. The method does not predict multiple pure tones. A target attenuation spectrum was calculated which was the difference between the estimated generation spectrum and a flat annoyance-weighted goal attenuated spectrum. The target spectrum was combined with a knowledge of acoustic liner performance as a function of the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. The liner design method at present is limited to annular duct configurations. The detailed structure of the liner was specified by combining the required impedance (which is a result of the previous step) with a mathematical model relating impedance to the detailed structure. The design procedure was developed for a liner constructed of perforated sheet placed over honeycomb backing cavities. A sample calculation was carried through in order to demonstrate the design procedure, and experimental results presented show good agreement with the calculated results of the method.

  8. An Integrated Optimization Design Method Based on Surrogate Modeling Applied to Diverging Duct Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Lu; Qiushi, Li; Shaobin, Li

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an integrated optimization design method in which uniform design, response surface methodology and genetic algorithm are used in combination. In detail, uniform design is used to select the experimental sampling points in the experimental domain and the system performance is evaluated by means of computational fluid dynamics to construct a database. After that, response surface methodology is employed to generate a surrogate mathematical model relating the optimization objective and the design variables. Subsequently, genetic algorithm is adopted and applied to the surrogate model to acquire the optimal solution in the case of satisfying some constraints. The method has been applied to the optimization design of an axisymmetric diverging duct, dealing with three design variables including one qualitative variable and two quantitative variables. The method of modeling and optimization design performs well in improving the duct aerodynamic performance and can be also applied to wider fields of mechanical design and seen as a useful tool for engineering designers, by reducing the design time and computation consumption.

  9. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC

  10. Developing Conceptual Hypersonic Airbreathing Engines Using Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlemann, Shelly M.; Robinson, Jeffrey S.; Martin, John G.; Leonard, Charles P.; Taylor, Lawrence W.; Kamhawi, Hilmi

    2000-01-01

    Designing a hypersonic vehicle is a complicated process due to the multi-disciplinary synergy that is required. The greatest challenge involves propulsion-airframe integration. In the past, a two-dimensional flowpath was generated based on the engine performance required for a proposed mission. A three-dimensional CAD geometry was produced from the two-dimensional flowpath for aerodynamic analysis, structural design, and packaging. The aerodynamics, engine performance, and mass properties arc inputs to the vehicle performance tool to determine if the mission goals were met. If the mission goals were not met, then a flowpath and vehicle redesign would begin. This design process might have to be performed several times to produce a "closed" vehicle. This paper will describe an attempt to design a hypersonic cruise vehicle propulsion flowpath using a Design of' Experiments method to reduce the resources necessary to produce a conceptual design with fewer iterations of the design cycle. These methods also allow for more flexible mission analysis and incorporation of additional design constraints at any point. A design system was developed using an object-based software package that would quickly generate each flowpath in the study given the values of the geometric independent variables. These flowpath geometries were put into a hypersonic propulsion code and the engine performance was generated. The propulsion results were loaded into statistical software to produce regression equations that were combined with an aerodynamic database to optimize the flowpath at the vehicle performance level. For this example, the design process was executed twice. The first pass was a cursory look at the independent variables selected to determine which variables are the most important and to test all of the inputs to the optimization process. The second cycle is a more in-depth study with more cases and higher order equations representing the design space.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF DATA VARIABILITY AND UNCERTAINTY: HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENTS IN THE INTEGRATED RISK INFORMATION SYSTEM (IRIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to a Congressional directive contained in HR 106-379 regarding EPA's appropriations for FY2000, EPA has undertaken an evaluation of the characterization of data variability and uncertainty in its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health effects information dat...

  12. Fault Management in an Objectives-Based/Risk-Informed View of Safety and Mission Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Theme of this talk: (1) Net-benefit of activities and decisions derives from objectives (and their priority) -- similarly: need for integration, value of technology/capability. (2) Risk is a lack of confidence that objectives will be met. (2a) Risk-informed decision making requires objectives. (3) Consideration of objectives is central to recent guidance.

  13. The Effect of Genetic Risk Information and Health Risk Assessment on Compliance with Preventive Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberg, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Results from a study of 82 males provide no statistical support and limited encouragement that genetic risk information may motivate persons to make positive changes in preventive health behaviors. Health risk assessments were used to identify subjects at risk for coronary heart disease or lung cancer because of genetic factors. (IAH)

  14. 75 FR 25239 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for... Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or...

  15. 77 FR 41784 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for... or email. The http://www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means...

  16. 75 FR 76982 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for... Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or...

  17. 77 FR 20817 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for....regulations.gov or email. The http://www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system,...

  18. DSSTox EPA Integrated Risk Information System Structure-Index Locator File: SDF File and Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database was developed and is maintained by EPA's Office of Research and Developement, National Center for Environmental Assessment. IRIS is a database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances fou...

  19. A decentralized linear quadratic control design method for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A decentralized suboptimal linear quadratic control design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized control design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the design of reduced-order controllers for flexible structures. The procedure starts with a definition of the continuum structure to be controlled. An evaluation model of finite dimension is obtained by the finite element method. Then, the finite element model is decomposed into several substructures by using a natural decomposition called substructuring decomposition. Each substructure, at this point, still has too large a dimension and must be reduced to a size that is Riccati-solvable. Model reduction of each substructure can be performed by using any existing model reduction method, e.g., modal truncation, balanced reduction, Krylov model reduction, or mixed-mode method. Then, based on the reduced substructure model, a subcontroller is designed by an LQ optimal control method for each substructure independently. After all subcontrollers are designed, a controller synthesis method called substructural controller synthesis is employed to synthesize all subcontrollers into a global controller. The assembling scheme used is the same as that employed for the structure matrices. Finally, a controller reduction scheme, called the equivalent impulse response energy controller (EIREC) reduction algorithm, is used to reduce the global controller to a reasonable size for implementation. The EIREC reduced controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has the property of matching low-frequency moments and low-frequency power moments. An advantage of the substructural controller synthesis method is that it relieves the computational burden associated with dimensionality. Besides that, the SCS design scheme is also a highly adaptable controller synthesis method for structures with varying configuration, or varying mass

  20. A method for the design of transonic flexible wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leigh Ann; Campbell, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Methodology was developed for designing airfoils and wings at transonic speeds which includes a technique that can account for static aeroelastic deflections. This procedure is capable of designing either supercritical or more conventional airfoil sections. Methods for including viscous effects are also illustrated and are shown to give accurate results. The methodology developed is an interactive system containing three major parts. A design module was developed which modifies airfoil sections to achieve a desired pressure distribution. This design module works in conjunction with an aerodynamic analysis module, which for this study is a small perturbation transonic flow code. Additionally, an aeroelastic module is included which determines the wing deformation due to the calculated aerodynamic loads. Because of the modular nature of the method, it can be easily coupled with any aerodynamic analysis code.

  1. Rotordynamics and Design Methods of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of supporting a turbocharger rotor on air foil bearings is investigated based upon predicted rotordynamic stability, load accommodations, and stress considerations. It is demonstrated that foil bearings offer a plausible replacement for oil-lubricated bearings in diesel truck turbochargers. Also, two different rotor configurations are analyzed and the design is chosen which best optimizes the desired performance characteristics. The method of designing machinery for foil bearing use and the assumptions made are discussed.

  2. ERSYS-SPP access method subsystem design specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weise, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The STARAN special purpose processor (SPP) is a machine allowing the same operation to be performed on up to 512 different data elements simultaneously. In the ERSYS system, it is to be attached to a 4341 plug compatible machine (PCM) to do certain existing algorithms and, at a later date, to perform other to be specified algorithms. That part of the interface between the 4341 PCM and the SPP located in the 4341 PCM is known as the SPP access method (SPPAM). Access to the SPPAM will be obtained by use of the NQUEUE and DQUEUE commands. The subsystem design specification is to incorporate all applicable design considerations from the ERSYS system design specification and the Level B requirements documents relating to the SPPAM. It is intended as a basis for the preliminary design review and will expand into the subsystem detailed design specification.

  3. Mixed methods research design for pragmatic psychoanalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Jane G; Clemence, A Jill; Stevens, Jennifer L

    2011-10-01

    Calls for more rigorous psychoanalytic studies have increased over the past decade. The field has been divided by those who assert that psychoanalysis is properly a hermeneutic endeavor and those who see it as a science. A comparable debate is found in research methodology, where qualitative and quantitative methods have often been seen as occupying orthogonal positions. Recently, Mixed Methods Research (MMR) has emerged as a viable "third community" of research, pursuing a pragmatic approach to research endeavors through integrating qualitative and quantitative procedures in a single study design. Mixed Methods Research designs and the terminology associated with this emerging approach are explained, after which the methodology is explored as a potential integrative approach to a psychoanalytic human science. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods are reviewed, as well as how they may be used in Mixed Methods Research to study complex human phenomena.

  4. Design of large Francis turbine using optimal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, E.; Bornard, L.; Tomas, L.; Liu, J.; Couston, M.

    2012-11-01

    Among a high number of Francis turbine references all over the world, covering the whole market range of heads, Alstom has especially been involved in the development and equipment of the largest power plants in the world : Three Gorges (China -32×767 MW - 61 to 113 m), Itaipu (Brazil- 20x750 MW - 98.7m to 127m) and Xiangjiaba (China - 8x812 MW - 82.5m to 113.6m - in erection). Many new projects are under study to equip new power plants with Francis turbines in order to answer an increasing demand of renewable energy. In this context, Alstom Hydro is carrying out many developments to answer those needs, especially for jumbo units such the planned 1GW type units in China. The turbine design for such units requires specific care by using the state of the art in computation methods and the latest technologies in model testing as well as the maximum feedback from operation of Jumbo plants already in operation. We present in this paper how a large Francis turbine can be designed using specific design methods, including the global and local optimization methods. The design of the spiral case, the tandem cascade profiles, the runner and the draft tube are designed with optimization loops involving a blade design tool, an automatic meshing software and a Navier-Stokes solver, piloted by a genetic algorithm. These automated optimization methods, presented in different papers over the last decade, are nowadays widely used, thanks to the growing computation capacity of the HPC clusters: the intensive use of such optimization methods at the turbine design stage allows to reach very high level of performances, while the hydraulic flow characteristics are carefully studied over the whole water passage to avoid any unexpected hydraulic phenomena.

  5. Design of an explosive detection system using Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Adame, Pablo Luis; Medina-Castro, Diego; Rodriguez-Ibarra, Johanna Lizbeth; Salas-Luevano, Miguel Angel; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2016-11-01

    Regardless the motivation terrorism is the most important risk for the national security in many countries. Attacks with explosives are the most common method used by terrorists. Therefore several procedures to detect explosives are utilized; among these methods are the use of neutrons and photons. In this study the Monte Carlo method an explosive detection system using a (241)AmBe neutron source was designed. In the design light water, paraffin, polyethylene, and graphite were used as moderators. In the work the explosive RDX was used and the induced gamma rays due to neutron capture in the explosive was estimated using NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors. When light water is used as moderator and HPGe as the detector the system has the best performance allowing distinguishing between the explosive and urea. For the final design the Ambient dose equivalent for neutrons and photons were estimated along the radial and axial axis.

  6. Computational methods of robust controller design for aerodynamic flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The development of Riccati iteration, a tool for the design and analysis of linear control systems is examined. First, Riccati iteration is applied to the problem of pole placement and order reduction in two-time scale control systems. Order reduction, yielding a good approximation to the original system, is demonstrated using a 16th order linear model of a turbofan engine. Next, a numerical method for solving the Riccati equation is presented and demonstrated for a set of eighth order random examples. A literature review of robust controller design methods follows which includes a number of methods for reducing the trajectory and performance index sensitivity in linear regulators. Lastly, robust controller design for large parameter variations is discussed.

  7. Improved method for transonic airfoil design-by-optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method for use of optimization techniques in transonic airfoil design is demonstrated. FLO6QNM incorporates a modified quasi-Newton optimization package, and is shown to be more reliable and efficient than the method developed previously at NASA-Ames, which used the COPES/CONMIN optimization program. The design codes are compared on a series of test cases with known solutions, and the effects of problem scaling, proximity of initial point to solution, and objective function precision are studied. In contrast to the older method, well-converged solutions are shown to be attainable in the context of engineering design using computational fluid dynamics tools, a new result. The improvements are due to better performance by the optimization routine and to the use of problem-adaptive finite difference step sizes for gradient evaluation.

  8. Inverse design of airfoils using a flexible membrane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinsurat, Kamon

    The Modified Garabedian Mc-Fadden (MGM) method is used to inversely design airfoils. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) for Non-Uniform Grids was developed to discretize the MGM equation for numerical solving. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) for Non-Uniform Grids has the advantage of being used flexibly with an unstructured grids airfoil. The commercial software FLUENT is being used as the flow solver. Several conditions are set in FLUENT such as subsonic inviscid flow, subsonic viscous flow, transonic inviscid flow, and transonic viscous flow to test the inverse design code for each condition. A moving grid program is used to create a mesh for new airfoils prior to importing meshes into FLUENT for the analysis of flows. For validation, an iterative process is used so the Cp distribution of the initial airfoil, the NACA0011, achieves the Cp distribution of the target airfoil, the NACA2315, for the subsonic inviscid case at M=0.2. Three other cases were carried out to validate the code. After the code validations, the inverse design method was used to design a shock free airfoil in the transonic condition and to design a separation free airfoil at a high angle of attack in the subsonic condition.

  9. An uncertain multidisciplinary design optimization method using interval convex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangyi; Luo, Zhen; Sun, Guangyong; Zhang, Nong

    2013-06-01

    This article proposes an uncertain multi-objective multidisciplinary design optimization methodology, which employs the interval model to represent the uncertainties of uncertain-but-bounded parameters. The interval number programming method is applied to transform each uncertain objective function into two deterministic objective functions, and a satisfaction degree of intervals is used to convert both the uncertain inequality and equality constraints to deterministic inequality constraints. In doing so, an unconstrained deterministic optimization problem will be constructed in association with the penalty function method. The design will be finally formulated as a nested three-loop optimization, a class of highly challenging problems in the area of engineering design optimization. An advanced hierarchical optimization scheme is developed to solve the proposed optimization problem based on the multidisciplinary feasible strategy, which is a well-studied method able to reduce the dimensions of multidisciplinary design optimization problems by using the design variables as independent optimization variables. In the hierarchical optimization system, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II, sequential quadratic programming method and Gauss-Seidel iterative approach are applied to the outer, middle and inner loops of the optimization problem, respectively. Typical numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  10. Exploration of Advanced Probabilistic and Stochastic Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of the three year research effort was to explore advanced, non-deterministic aerospace system design methods that may have relevance to designers and analysts. The research pursued emerging areas in design methodology and leverage current fundamental research in the area of design decision-making, probabilistic modeling, and optimization. The specific focus of the three year investigation was oriented toward methods to identify and analyze emerging aircraft technologies in a consistent and complete manner, and to explore means to make optimal decisions based on this knowledge in a probabilistic environment. The research efforts were classified into two main areas. First, Task A of the grant has had the objective of conducting research into the relative merits of possible approaches that account for both multiple criteria and uncertainty in design decision-making. In particular, in the final year of research, the focus was on the comparison and contrasting between three methods researched. Specifically, these three are the Joint Probabilistic Decision-Making (JPDM) technique, Physical Programming, and Dempster-Shafer (D-S) theory. The next element of the research, as contained in Task B, was focused upon exploration of the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) methodology developed at ASDL, especially with regards to identification of research needs in the baseline method through implementation exercises. The end result of Task B was the documentation of the evolution of the method with time and a technology transfer to the sponsor regarding the method, such that an initial capability for execution could be obtained by the sponsor. Specifically, the results of year 3 efforts were the creation of a detailed tutorial for implementing the TIES method. Within the tutorial package, templates and detailed examples were created for learning and understanding the details of each step. For both research tasks, sample files and

  11. Review of SMS design methods and real-world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dross, Oliver; Mohedano, Ruben; Benitez, Pablo; Minano, Juan Carlos; Chaves, Julio; Blen, Jose; Hernandez, Maikel; Munoz, Fernando

    2004-09-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surfaces design method (SMS), proprietary technology of Light Prescription Innovators (LPI), was developed in the early 1990's as a two dimensional method. The first embodiments had either linear or rotational symmetry and found applications in photovoltaic concentrators, illumination optics and optical communications. SMS designed devices perform close to the thermodynamic limit and are compact and simple; features that are especially beneficial in applications with today's high brightness LEDs. The method was extended to 3D "free form" geometries in 1999 that perfectly couple two incoming with two outgoing wavefronts. SMS 3D controls the light emitted by an extended light source much better than single free form surface designs, while reaching very high efficiencies. This has enabled the SMS method to be applied to automotive head lamps, one of the toughest lighting tasks in any application, where high efficiency and small size are required. This article will briefly review the characteristics of both the 2D and 3D methods and will present novel optical solutions that have been developed and manufactured to meet real world problems. These include various ultra compact LED collimators, solar concentrators and highly efficient LED low and high beam headlamp designs.

  12. Evaluation of Methods for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodiyalam, Srinivas

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Langley Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) method evaluation study seeks to arrive at a set of guidelines for using promising MDO methods by accumulating and analyzing computational data for such methods. The data are collected by conducting a series of reproducible experiments. This report documents all computational experiments conducted in Phase I of the study. This report is a companion to the paper titled Initial Results of an MDO Method Evaluation Study by N. M. Alexandrov and S. Kodiyalam (AIAA-98-4884).

  13. A PDE Sensitivity Equation Method for Optimal Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1996-01-01

    The use of gradient based optimization algorithms in inverse design is well established as a practical approach to aerodynamic design. A typical procedure uses a simulation scheme to evaluate the objective function (from the approximate states) and its gradient, then passes this information to an optimization algorithm. Once the simulation scheme (CFD flow solver) has been selected and used to provide approximate function evaluations, there are several possible approaches to the problem of computing gradients. One popular method is to differentiate the simulation scheme and compute design sensitivities that are then used to obtain gradients. Although this black-box approach has many advantages in shape optimization problems, one must compute mesh sensitivities in order to compute the design sensitivity. In this paper, we present an alternative approach using the PDE sensitivity equation to develop algorithms for computing gradients. This approach has the advantage that mesh sensitivities need not be computed. Moreover, when it is possible to use the CFD scheme for both the forward problem and the sensitivity equation, then there are computational advantages. An apparent disadvantage of this approach is that it does not always produce consistent derivatives. However, for a proper combination of discretization schemes, one can show asymptotic consistency under mesh refinement, which is often sufficient to guarantee convergence of the optimal design algorithm. In particular, we show that when asymptotically consistent schemes are combined with a trust-region optimization algorithm, the resulting optimal design method converges. We denote this approach as the sensitivity equation method. The sensitivity equation method is presented, convergence results are given and the approach is illustrated on two optimal design problems involving shocks.

  14. Taguchi method of experimental design in materials education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the Taguchi Method of experimental design as applied to Materials Science will be discussed. This is a fractional factorial method that employs the minimum number of experimental trials for the information obtained. The analysis is also very simple to use and teach, which is quite advantageous in the classroom. In addition, the Taguchi loss function can be easily incorporated to emphasize that improvements in reproducibility are often at least as important as optimization of the response. The disadvantages of the Taguchi Method include the fact that factor interactions are normally not accounted for, there are zero degrees of freedom if all of the possible factors are used, and randomization is normally not used to prevent environmental biasing. In spite of these disadvantages it is felt that the Taguchi Method is extremely useful for both teaching experimental design and as a research tool, as will be shown with a number of brief examples.

  15. A Simple Method for High-Lift Propeller Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael; Borer, Nick; German, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method for designing propellers that are placed upstream of the leading edge of a wing in order to augment lift. Because the primary purpose of these "high-lift propellers" is to increase lift rather than produce thrust, these props are best viewed as a form of high-lift device; consequently, they should be designed differently than traditional propellers. We present a theory that describes how these props can be designed to provide a relatively uniform axial velocity increase, which is hypothesized to be advantageous for lift augmentation based on a literature survey. Computational modeling indicates that such propellers can generate the same average induced axial velocity while consuming less power and producing less thrust than conventional propeller designs. For an example problem based on specifications for NASA's Scalable Convergent Electric Propulsion Technology and Operations Research (SCEPTOR) flight demonstrator, a propeller designed with the new method requires approximately 15% less power and produces approximately 11% less thrust than one designed for minimum induced loss. Higher-order modeling and/or wind tunnel testing are needed to verify the predicted performance.

  16. System Synthesis in Preliminary Aircraft Design using Statistical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaurentis, Daniel; Mavris, Dimitri N.; Schrage, Daniel P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper documents an approach to conceptual and preliminary aircraft design in which system synthesis is achieved using statistical methods, specifically design of experiments (DOE) and response surface methodology (RSM). These methods are employed in order to more efficiently search the design space for optimum configurations. In particular, a methodology incorporating three uses of these techniques is presented. First, response surface equations are formed which represent aerodynamic analyses, in the form of regression polynomials, which are more sophisticated than generally available in early design stages. Next, a regression equation for an overall evaluation criterion is constructed for the purpose of constrained optimization at the system level. This optimization, though achieved in a innovative way, is still traditional in that it is a point design solution. The methodology put forward here remedies this by introducing uncertainty into the problem, resulting a solutions which are probabilistic in nature. DOE/RSM is used for the third time in this setting. The process is demonstrated through a detailed aero-propulsion optimization of a high speed civil transport. Fundamental goals of the methodology, then, are to introduce higher fidelity disciplinary analyses to the conceptual aircraft synthesis and provide a roadmap for transitioning from point solutions to probabalistic designs (and eventually robust ones).

  17. An interdisciplinary heuristic evaluation method for universal building design.

    PubMed

    Afacan, Yasemin; Erbug, Cigdem

    2009-07-01

    This study highlights how heuristic evaluation as a usability evaluation method can feed into current building design practice to conform to universal design principles. It provides a definition of universal usability that is applicable to an architectural design context. It takes the seven universal design principles as a set of heuristics and applies an iterative sequence of heuristic evaluation in a shopping mall, aiming to achieve a cost-effective evaluation process. The evaluation was composed of three consecutive sessions. First, five evaluators from different professions were interviewed regarding the construction drawings in terms of universal design principles. Then, each evaluator was asked to perform the predefined task scenarios. In subsequent interviews, the evaluators were asked to re-analyze the construction drawings. The results showed that heuristic evaluation could successfully integrate universal usability into current building design practice in two ways: (i) it promoted an iterative evaluation process combined with multi-sessions rather than relying on one evaluator and on one evaluation session to find the maximum number of usability problems, and (ii) it highlighted the necessity of an interdisciplinary ad hoc committee regarding the heuristic abilities of each profession. A multi-session and interdisciplinary heuristic evaluation method can save both the project budget and the required time, while ensuring a reduced error rate for the universal usage of the built environments.

  18. Function combined method for design innovation of children's bike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Qiu, Tingting; Chen, Huijuan

    2013-03-01

    As children mature, bike products for children in the market develop at the same time, and the conditions are frequently updated. Certain problems occur when using a bike, such as cycle overlapping, repeating function, and short life cycle, which go against the principles of energy conservation and the environmental protection intensive design concept. In this paper, a rational multi-function method of design through functional superposition, transformation, and technical implementation is proposed. An organic combination of frog-style scooter and children's tricycle is developed using the multi-function method. From the ergonomic perspective, the paper elaborates on the body size of children aged 5 to 12 and effectively extracts data for a multi-function children's bike, which can be used for gliding and riding. By inverting the body, parts can be interchanged between the handles and the pedals of the bike. Finally, the paper provides a detailed analysis of the components and structural design, body material, and processing technology of the bike. The study of Industrial Product Innovation Design provides an effective design method to solve the bicycle problems, extends the function problems, improves the product market situation, and enhances the energy saving feature while implementing intensive product development effectively at the same time.

  19. Molecular library design using multi-objective optimization methods.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Christos A; Kannas, Christos C

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening technology have enabled the synthesis and screening of large molecular libraries for the purposes of drug discovery. Contrary to initial expectations, the increase in screening library size, typically combined with an emphasis on compound structural diversity, did not result in a comparable increase in the number of promising hits found. In an effort to improve the likelihood of discovering hits with greater optimization potential, more recent approaches attempt to incorporate additional knowledge to the library design process to effectively guide the search. Multi-objective optimization methods capable of taking into account several chemical and biological criteria have been used to design collections of compounds satisfying simultaneously multiple pharmaceutically relevant objectives. In this chapter, we present our efforts to implement a multi-objective optimization method, MEGALib, custom-designed to the library design problem. The method exploits existing knowledge, e.g. from previous biological screening experiments, to identify and profile molecular fragments used subsequently to design compounds compromising the various objectives.

  20. Comparison of optimal design methods in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, K.; Kappel, F.

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric-based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher information matrix. A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criterion with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009 Mathematical and Experimental Modeling of Physical and Biological Processes (Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC)), the standard harmonic oscillator model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009) and a popular glucose regulation model (Bergman R N, Ider Y Z, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1979 Am. J. Physiol. 236 E667-77 De Gaetano A and Arino O 2000 J. Math. Biol. 40 136-68 Toffolo G, Bergman R N, Finegood D T, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1980 Diabetes 29 979-90).

  1. New Methods and Transducer Designs for Ultrasonic Diagnostics and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybyanets, A. N.; Naumenko, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.; Khokhlova, V. A.

    Recent advances in the field of physical acoustics, imaging technologies, piezoelectric materials, and ultrasonic transducer design have led to emerging of novel methods and apparatus for ultrasonic diagnostics, therapy and body aesthetics. The paper presents the results on development and experimental study of different high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. Technological peculiarities of the HIFU transducer design as well as theoretical and numerical models of such transducers and the corresponding HIFU fields are discussed. Several HIFU transducers of different design have been fabricated using different advanced piezoelectric materials. Acoustic field measurements for those transducers have been performed using a calibrated fiber optic hydrophone and an ultrasonic measurement system (UMS). The results of ex vivo experiments with different tissues as well as in vivo experiments with blood vessels are presented that prove the efficacy, safety and selectivity of the developed HIFU transducers and methods.

  2. New displacement-based methods for optimal truss topology design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin P.; Ben-Tal, Aharon; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    Two alternate methods for maximum stiffness truss topology design are presented. The ground structure approach is used, and the problem is formulated in terms of displacements and bar areas. This large, nonconvex optimization problem can be solved by a simultaneous analysis and design approach. Alternatively, an equivalent, unconstrained, and convex problem in the displacements only can be formulated, and this problem can be solved by a nonsmooth, steepest descent algorithm. In both methods, the explicit solving of the equilibrium equations and the assembly of the global stiffness matrix are circumvented. A large number of examples have been studied, showing the attractive features of topology design as well as exposing interesting features of optimal topologies.

  3. Multi-objective optimization methods in drug design.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Christos A; Brown, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Drug discovery is a challenging multi-objective problem where numerous pharmaceutically important objectives need to be adequately satisfied for a solution to be found. The problem is characterized by vast, complex solution spaces further perplexed by the presence of conflicting objectives. Multi-objective optimization methods, designed specifically to address such problems, have been introduced to the drug discovery field over a decade ago and have steadily gained in acceptance ever since. This paper reviews the latest multi-objective methods and applications reported in the literature, specifically in quantitative structure–activity modeling, docking, de novo design and library design. Further, the paper reports on related developments in drug discovery research and advances in the multi-objective optimization field.

  4. Database design using NIAM (Nijssen Information Analysis Method) modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    The Nissjen Information Analysis Method (NIAM) is an information modeling technique based on semantics and founded in set theory. A NIAM information model is a graphical representation of the information requirements for some universe of discourse. Information models facilitate data integration and communication within an organization about data semantics. An information model is sometimes referred to as the semantic model or the conceptual schema. It helps in the logical and physical design and implementation of databases. NIAM information modeling is used at Sandia National Laboratories to design and implement relational databases containing engineering information which meet the users' information requirements. The paper focuses on the design of one database which satisfied the data needs of four disjoint but closely related applications. The applications as they existed before did not talk to each other even though they stored much of the same data redundantly. NIAM was used to determine the information requirements and design the integrated database. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Obtaining Valid Response Rates: Considerations beyond the Tailored Design Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Judy Y.; Hubbard, Susan M.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the use of the tailored design method (TDM) to achieve high survey response in two separate studies of the dissemination of Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs). Findings from these two studies identify six factors may have influenced nonresponse, and show that use of TDM does not, in itself, guarantee a high response rate. (SLD)

  6. Designs and Methods in School Improvement Research: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldhoff, Tobias; Radisch, Falk; Bischof, Linda Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on challenges faced by longitudinal quantitative analyses of school improvement processes and offers a systematic literature review of current papers that use longitudinal analyses. In this context, the authors assessed designs and methods that are used to analyze the relation between school…

  7. Impact design methods for ceramic components in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1991-01-01

    Methods currently under development to design ceramic turbine components with improved impact resistance are presented. Two different modes of impact damage are identified and characterized, i.e., structural damage and local damage. The entire computation is incorporated into the EPIC computer code. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating instrumented plate impact and particle impact tests.

  8. Using Propensity Score Methods to Approximate Factorial Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is through Monte Carlo simulation to compare several propensity score methods in approximating factorial experimental design and identify best approaches in reducing bias and mean square error of parameter estimates of the main and interaction effects of two factors. Previous studies focused more on unbiased estimates of…

  9. Transient Analysis Method for HEMi Sabot Structural Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Transient analysis method for HEMi sabot structural design F.C. Wong DRDC Valcartier Defence R&D Canada – Valcartier Technical Note DRDC Valcartier......that can withstand the high g- forces generated by the expanding gas and the inertia of the penetrator. This document discusses the finite element

  10. A Mixed Methods Investigation of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social and Health Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Jiao, Qun G.

    2007-01-01

    A sequential design utilizing identical samples was used to classify mixed methods studies via a two-dimensional model, wherein sampling designs were grouped according to the time orientation of each study's components and the relationship of the qualitative and quantitative samples. A quantitative analysis of 121 studies representing nine fields…

  11. Supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamic methods for aircraft design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Abel O.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology employed in engineering codes to predict aerodynamic characteristics over arbitrary supersonic/hypersonic configurations is considered. Engineering codes use a combination of simplified methods, based on geometrical impact angle and freestream conditions, to compute pressure distribution over the vehicle's surface in an efficient and timely manner. These approximate methods are valid for both hypersonic (Mach greater than 4) and lower speeds (Mach down to 2). It is concluded that the proposed methodology enables the user to obtain reasonable estimates of vehicle performance and engineering methods are valuable in the design process of these type of vehicles.

  12. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  13. Guidance for using mixed methods design in nursing practice research.

    PubMed

    Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Newman, David; Dyess, Susan; Piyakong, Duangporn; Liehr, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    The mixed methods approach purposefully combines both quantitative and qualitative techniques, enabling a multi-faceted understanding of nursing phenomena. The purpose of this article is to introduce three mixed methods designs (parallel; sequential; conversion) and highlight interpretive processes that occur with the synthesis of qualitative and quantitative findings. Real world examples of research studies conducted by the authors will demonstrate the processes leading to the merger of data. The examples include: research questions; data collection procedures and analysis with a focus on synthesizing findings. Based on experience with mixed methods studied, the authors introduce two synthesis patterns (complementary; contrasting), considering application for practice and implications for research.

  14. Application of optical diffraction method in designing phase plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ze-Min; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Lv, Feng-Nian; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Xing-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Continuous phase plate (CPP), which has a function of beam shaping in laser systems, is one kind of important diffractive optics. Based on the Fourier transform of the Gerchberg-Saxton (G-S) algorithm for designing CPP, we proposed an optical diffraction method according to the real system conditions. A thin lens can complete the Fourier transform of the input signal and the inverse propagation of light can be implemented in a program. Using both of the two functions can realize the iteration process to calculate the near-field distribution of light and the far-field repeatedly, which is similar to the G-S algorithm. The results show that using the optical diffraction method can design a CPP for a complicated laser system, and make the CPP have abilities of beam shaping and phase compensation for the phase aberration of the system. The method can improve the adaptation of the phase plate in systems with phase aberrations.

  15. Tuning Parameters in Heuristics by Using Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arin, Arif; Rabadi, Ghaith; Unal, Resit

    2010-01-01

    With the growing complexity of today's large scale problems, it has become more difficult to find optimal solutions by using exact mathematical methods. The need to find near-optimal solutions in an acceptable time frame requires heuristic approaches. In many cases, however, most heuristics have several parameters that need to be "tuned" before they can reach good results. The problem then turns into "finding best parameter setting" for the heuristics to solve the problems efficiently and timely. One-Factor-At-a-Time (OFAT) approach for parameter tuning neglects the interactions between parameters. Design of Experiments (DOE) tools can be instead employed to tune the parameters more effectively. In this paper, we seek the best parameter setting for a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to solve the single machine total weighted tardiness problem in which n jobs must be scheduled on a single machine without preemption, and the objective is to minimize the total weighted tardiness. Benchmark instances for the problem are available in the literature. To fine tune the GA parameters in the most efficient way, we compare multiple DOE models including 2-level (2k ) full factorial design, orthogonal array design, central composite design, D-optimal design and signal-to-noise (SIN) ratios. In each DOE method, a mathematical model is created using regression analysis, and solved to obtain the best parameter setting. After verification runs using the tuned parameter setting, the preliminary results for optimal solutions of multiple instances were found efficiently.

  16. Non-contact electromagnetic exciter design with linear control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Xiong, Xianzhi; Xu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    A non-contact type force actuator is necessary for studying the dynamic performance of a high-speed spindle system owing to its high-speed operating conditions. A non-contact electromagnetic exciter is designed for identifying the dynamic coefficients of journal bearings in high-speed grinding spindles. A linear force control method is developed based on PID controller. The influence of amplitude and frequency of current, misalignment and rotational speed on magnetic field and excitation force is investigated based on two-dimensional finite element analysis. The electromagnetic excitation force is measured with the auxiliary coils and calibrated by load cells. The design is validated by the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental investigations show that the proposed design can accurately generate linear excitation force with sufficiently large amplitude and higher signal to noise ratio. Moreover, the fluctuations in force amplitude are reduced to a greater extent with the designed linear control method even when the air gap changes due to the rotor vibration at high-speed conditions. Besides, it is possible to apply various types of excitations: constant, synchronous, and non-synchronous excitation forces based on the proposed linear control method. This exciter can be used as linear-force exciting and controlling system for dynamic performance study of different high-speed rotor-bearing systems.

  17. Novel TMS coils designed using an inverse boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos Sánchez, Clemente; María Guerrero Rodriguez, Jose; Quirós Olozábal, Ángel; Blanco-Navarro, David

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new method to design TMS coils is presented. It is based on the inclusion of the concept of stream function of a quasi-static electric current into a boundary element method. The proposed TMS coil design approach is a powerful technique to produce stimulators of arbitrary shape, and remarkably versatile as it permits the prototyping of many different performance requirements and constraints. To illustrate the power of this approach, it has been used for the design of TMS coils wound on rectangular flat, spherical and hemispherical surfaces, subjected to different constraints, such as minimum stored magnetic energy or power dissipation. The performances of such coils have been additionally described; and the torque experienced by each stimulator in the presence of a main magnetic static field have theoretically found in order to study the prospect of using them to perform TMS and fMRI concurrently. The obtained results show that described method is an efficient tool for the design of TMS stimulators, which can be applied to a wide range of coil geometries and performance requirements.

  18. Optimal pulse design in quantum control: A unified computational method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jr-Shin; Ruths, Justin; Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Many key aspects of control of quantum systems involve manipulating a large quantum ensemble exhibiting variation in the value of parameters characterizing the system dynamics. Developing electromagnetic pulses to produce a desired evolution in the presence of such variation is a fundamental and challenging problem in this research area. We present such robust pulse designs as an optimal control problem of a continuum of bilinear systems with a common control function. We map this control problem of infinite dimension to a problem of polynomial approximation employing tools from geometric control theory. We then adopt this new notion and develop a unified computational method for optimal pulse design using ideas from pseudospectral approximations, by which a continuous-time optimal control problem of pulse design can be discretized to a constrained optimization problem with spectral accuracy. Furthermore, this is a highly flexible and efficient numerical method that requires low order of discretization and yields inherently smooth solutions. We demonstrate this method by designing effective broadband π/2 and π pulses with reduced rf energy and pulse duration, which show significant sensitivity enhancement at the edge of the spectrum over conventional pulses in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy experiments. PMID:21245345

  19. Design method of coaxial reflex hollow beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiake; Xu, Jia; Fu, Yuegang; He, Wenjun; Zhu, Qifan

    2016-10-01

    In view of the light energy loss in central obscuration of coaxial reflex optical system, the design method of a kind of hollow beam generator is introduced. First of all, according to the geometrical parameter and obscuration ratio of front-end coaxial reflex optical system, calculate the required physical dimension of hollow beam, and get the beam expanding rate of the hollow beam generator according to the parameters of the light source. Choose the better enlargement ratio of initial expanding system using the relational expression of beam expanding rate and beam expanding rate of initial system; the traditional design method of the reflex optical system is used to design the initial optical system, and then the position of rotation axis of the hollow beam generator can be obtained through the rotation axis translation formula. Intercept the initial system bus bar using the rotation axis after the translation, and rotate the bus bar around the rotation axis for 360°, so that two working faces of the hollow beam generator can be got. The hollow beam generator designed by this method can get the hollow beam that matches the front-end coaxial reflex optical system, improving the energy utilization ratio of beam and effectively reducing the back scattering of transmission system.

  20. Material Design, Selection, and Manufacturing Methods for System Sustainment

    SciTech Connect

    David Sowder, Jim Lula, Curtis Marshall

    2010-02-18

    This paper describes a material selection and validation process proven to be successful for manufacturing high-reliability long-life product. The National Secure Manufacturing Center business unit of the Kansas City Plant (herein called KCP) designs and manufactures complex electrical and mechanical components used in extreme environments. The material manufacturing heritage is founded in the systems design to manufacturing practices that support the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA). Material Engineers at KCP work with the systems designers to recommend materials, develop test methods, perform analytical analysis of test data, define cradle to grave needs, present final selection and fielding. The KCP material engineers typically will maintain cost control by utilizing commercial products when possible, but have the resources and to develop and produce unique formulations as necessary. This approach is currently being used to mature technologies to manufacture materials with improved characteristics using nano-composite filler materials that will enhance system design and production. For some products the engineers plan and carry out science-based life-cycle material surveillance processes. Recent examples of the approach include refurbished manufacturing of the high voltage power supplies for cockpit displays in operational aircraft; dry film lubricant application to improve bearing life for guided munitions gyroscope gimbals, ceramic substrate design for electrical circuit manufacturing, and tailored polymeric materials for various systems. The following examples show evidence of KCP concurrent design-to-manufacturing techniques used to achieve system solutions that satisfy or exceed demanding requirements.

  1. Rays inserting method (RIM) to design dielectric optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskhiri, Mohammad Mahdi; Khalaj Amirhosseini, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a novel approach, called Rays Inserted Method (RIM), is introduced to design dielectric optical devices. In this approach, some rays are inserted between two ends of desired device and then the refractive index of the points along the route of rays are obtained. The validity of the introduced approach is verified by designing three types of optical devices, i.e. power splitter, bend, and flat lens. The results are confirmed with numerical simulations by the means of FDTD scheme at the frequency of 100 GHz.

  2. Design of transonic compressor cascades using hodograph method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zuoyi; Guo, Jingrong

    1991-01-01

    The use of the Hodograph Method in the design of a transonic compressor cascade is discussed. The design of the flow mode in the transonic compressor cascade must be as follows: the flow in the nozzle part should be uniform and smooth; the location of the sonic line should be reasonable; and the aerodynamic character of the flow canal in the subsonic region should be met. The rate through cascade may be determined by the velocity distribution in the subsonic region (i.e., by the numerical solution of the Chaplygin equation). The supersonic sections A'C' and AD are determined by the analytical solution of the Mixed-Type Hodograph equation.

  3. The characterization of kerogen-analytical limitations and method design

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    Methods suitable for high resolution total molecular characterization of kerogens and other polymeric SOM are necessary for a quantitative understanding of hydrocarbon maturation and migration phenomena in addition to being a requirement for a systematic understanding of kerogen based fuel utilization. Gas chromatographic methods, in conjunction with analytical pyrolysis methods, have proven successful in the rapid superficial characterization of kerogen pyrolysates. Most applications involve qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the relative concentration of aliphatic, aromatic, or oxygen-containing species in a kerogen pyrolysate. More recently, the use of alkylated polystyrene internal standards has allowed the direct determination of parameters related to the abundance of, for example, normal alkyl groups or single ring aromatic species in kerogens. The future of methods of this type for improved kerogen typing is critically discussed. The conceptual design and feasibility of methods suitable for the more complete characterization of complex geopolymers on the molecular level is discussed with practical examples.

  4. 78 FR 22349 - Guidance on the Treatment of Uncertainties Associated With PRA in Risk-Informed Decisionmaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... COMMISSION Guidance on the Treatment of Uncertainties Associated With PRA in Risk-Informed Decisionmaking..., Revision 1, ``Guidance on the Treatment of Uncertainties Associated with PRA in Risk-Informed... INFORMATION: NUREG-1855, Revision 1, Guidance on the Treatment of Uncertainties Associated with PRA in...

  5. Integrating Climate and Risk-Informed Science to Support Critical Decisions

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-10

    The PNNL Environmental Health and Remediation Sector stewards several decision support capabilities to integrate climate- and risk-informed science to support critical decisions. Utilizing our expertise in risk and decision analysis, integrated Earth systems modeling, and remote sensing and geoinformatics, PNNL is influencing the way science informs high level decisions at national, regional and local scales to protect and preserve our most critical assets.

  6. Integrating Climate and Risk-Informed Science to Support Critical Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-27

    The PNNL Environmental Health and Remediation Sector stewards several decision support capabilities to integrate climate- and risk-informed science to support critical decisions. Utilizing our expertise in risk and decision analysis, integrated Earth systems modeling, and remote sensing and geoinformatics, PNNL is influencing the way science informs high level decisions at national, regional and local scales to protect and preserve our most critical assets.

  7. Application of the CSCM method to the design of wedge cavities. [Conservative Supra Characteristic Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Nystrom, G. A.; Bardina, J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the conservative supra characteristic method (CSCM) to predict the flow around two-dimensional slot injection cooled cavities in hypersonic flow. Seven different numerical solutions are presented that model three different experimental designs. The calculations manifest outer flow conditions including the effects of nozzle/lip geometry, angle of attack, nozzle inlet conditions, boundary and shear layer growth and turbulance on the surrounding flow. The calculations were performed for analysis prior to wind tunnel testing for sensitivity studies early in the design process. Qualitative and quantitative understanding of the flows for each of the cavity designs and design recommendations are provided. The present paper demonstrates the ability of numerical schemes, such as the CSCM method, to play a significant role in the design process.

  8. Unified computational method for design of fluid loop systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masao

    1991-12-01

    Various kinds of empirical formulas of Nusselt numbers, fanning friction factors, and pressure loss coefficients were collected and reviewed with the object of constructing a common basis of design calculations of pumped fluid loop systems. The practical expressions obtained after numerical modifications are listed in tables with identification numbers corresponding to configurations of the flow passages. Design procedure of a cold plate and of a space radiator are clearly shown in a series of mathematical relations coupled with a number of detailed expressions which are put in the tables in order of numerical computations. Weight estimate models and several pump characteristics are given in the tables as a result of data regression. A unified computational method based upon the above procedure is presented for preliminary design analyses of a fluid loop system consisting of cold plates, plane radiators, mechanical pumps, valves, and so on.

  9. A simple design method of negative refractive index metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Wangju; Choi, Jaeick

    2009-11-01

    We propose a very simple design method of negative refractive index (NRI) materials that can overcome some drawbacks of conventional resonant-type NRI materials. The proposed NRI materials consist of single or double metallic patterns printed on a dielectric substrate. Our metamaterials (MTMs) show two properties that are different from other types of MTMs in obtaining effective negative values of permittivity ( ɛ) and permeability ( μ) simultaneously; the geometrical outlines of the metallic patterns are not confined within any specific shape, and the metallic patterns are printed on only one side of the dielectric substrate. Therefore, they are very easy to design and fabricate using common printed circuit board (PCB) technology according to the appropriate application. Excellent agreement between the experiment and prediction data ensures the validity of our design approach.

  10. A Requirements-Driven Optimization Method for Acoustic Treatment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic treatment designers have long been able to target specific noise sources inside turbofan engines. Facesheet porosity and cavity depth are key design variables of perforate-over-honeycomb liners that determine levels of noise suppression as well as the frequencies at which suppression occurs. Layers of these structures can be combined to create a robust attenuation spectrum that covers a wide range of frequencies. Looking to the future, rapidly-emerging additive manufacturing technologies are enabling new liners with multiple degrees of freedom, and new adaptive liners with variable impedance are showing promise. More than ever, there is greater flexibility and freedom in liner design. Subject to practical considerations, liner design variables may be manipulated to achieve a target attenuation spectrum. But characteristics of the ideal attenuation spectrum can be difficult to know. Many multidisciplinary system effects govern how engine noise sources contribute to community noise. Given a hardwall fan noise source to be suppressed, and using an analytical certification noise model to compute a community noise measure of merit, the optimal attenuation spectrum can be derived using multidisciplinary systems analysis methods. The subject of this paper is an analytical method that derives the ideal target attenuation spectrum that minimizes noise perceived by observers on the ground.

  11. National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network: Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Christopher R.; Schable, Barbara A.; Onorato, Ida M.

    2002-01-01

    The National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network was established in 1996 to perform a 5-year, prospective study of the usefulness of genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to tuberculosis control programs. Seven sentinel sites identified all new cases of tuberculosis, collected information on patients and contacts, and obtained patient isolates. Seven genotyping laboratories performed DNA fingerprinting analysis by the international standard IS6110 method. BioImage Whole Band Analyzer software was used to analyze patterns, and distinct patterns were assigned unique designations. Isolates with six or fewer bands on IS6110 patterns were also spoligotyped. Patient data and genotyping designations were entered in a relational database and merged with selected variables from the national surveillance database. In two related databases, we compiled the results of routine contact investigations and the results of investigations of the relationships of patients who had isolates with matching genotypes. We describe the methods used in the study. PMID:12453342

  12. Optical design and active optics methods in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2013-03-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deformable optical surface analytical investigations are carried out with one of the various facets of elasticity theory: small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, weakly conical shell theory. The resulting thickness distribution and associated bending force boundaries can be refined further with finite element analysis.

  13. Helicopter flight-control design using an H(2) method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1991-01-01

    Rate-command and attitude-command flight-control designs for a UH-60 helicopter in hover are presented and were synthesized using an H(2) method. Using weight functions, this method allows the direct shaping of the singular values of the sensitivity, complementary sensitivity, and control input transfer-function matrices to give acceptable feedback properties. The designs were implemented on the Vertical Motion Simulator, and four low-speed hover tasks were used to evaluate the control system characteristics. The pilot comments from the accel-decel, bob-up, hovering turn, and side-step tasks indicated good decoupling and quick response characteristics. However, an underlying roll PIO tendency was found to exist away from the hover condition, which was caused by a flap regressing mode with insufficient damping.

  14. Preliminary demonstration of a robust controller design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative computational procedures for obtaining a feedback control law which yields a control signal based on measurable quantitites are evaluated. The three methods evaluated are: (1) the standard linear quadratic regulator design model; (2) minimization of the norm of the feedback matrix, k via nonlinear programming subject to the constraint that the closed loop eigenvalues be in a specified domain in the complex plane; and (3) maximize the angles between the closed loop eigenvectors in combination with minimizing the norm of K also via the constrained nonlinear programming. The third or robust design method was chosen to yield a closed loop system whose eigenvalues are insensitive to small changes in the A and B matrices. The relationship between orthogonality of closed loop eigenvectors and the sensitivity of closed loop eigenvalues is described. Computer programs are described.

  15. Design and implementation of visualization methods for the CHANGES Spatial Decision Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristal, Irina; van Westen, Cees; Bakker, Wim; Greiving, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The CHANGES Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) is a web-based system aimed for risk assessment and the evaluation of optimal risk reduction alternatives at local level as a decision support tool in long-term natural risk management. The SDSS use multidimensional information, integrating thematic, spatial, temporal and documentary data. The role of visualization in this context becomes of vital importance for efficiently representing each dimension. This multidimensional aspect of the required for the system risk information, combined with the diversity of the end-users imposes the use of sophisticated visualization methods and tools. The key goal of the present work is to exploit efficiently the large amount of data in relation to the needs of the end-user, utilizing proper visualization techniques. Three main tasks have been accomplished for this purpose: categorization of the end-users, the definition of system's modules and the data definition. The graphical representation of the data and the visualization tools were designed to be relevant to the data type and the purpose of the analysis. Depending on the end-users category, each user should have access to different modules of the system and thus, to the proper visualization environment. The technologies used for the development of the visualization component combine the latest and most innovative open source JavaScript frameworks, such as OpenLayers 2.13.1, ExtJS 4 and GeoExt 2. Moreover, the model-view-controller (MVC) pattern is used in order to ensure flexibility of the system at the implementation level. Using the above technologies, the visualization techniques implemented so far offer interactive map navigation, querying and comparison tools. The map comparison tools are of great importance within the SDSS and include the following: swiping tool for comparison of different data of the same location; raster subtraction for comparison of the same phenomena varying in time; linked views for comparison

  16. Libration Orbit Mission Design: Applications of Numerical & Dynamical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor); Folta, David; Beckman, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Sun-Earth libration point orbits serve as excellent locations for scientific investigations. These orbits are often selected to minimize environmental disturbances and maximize observing efficiency. Trajectory design in support of libration orbits is ever more challenging as more complex missions are envisioned in the next decade. Trajectory design software must be further enabled to incorporate better understanding of the libration orbit solution space and thus improve the efficiency and expand the capabilities of current approaches. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently supporting multiple libration missions. This end-to-end support consists of mission operations, trajectory design, and control. It also includes algorithm and software development. The recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Constellation-X missions are examples of the use of improved numerical methods for attaining constrained orbital parameters and controlling their dynamical evolution at the collinear libration points. This paper presents a history of libration point missions, a brief description of the numerical and dynamical design techniques including software used, and a sample of future GSFC mission designs.

  17. Synthesis of aircraft structures using integrated design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Goetz, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic research is reported to develop and validate methods for structural sizing of an airframe designed with the use of composite materials and active controls. This research program includes procedures for computing aeroelastic loads, static and dynamic aeroelasticity, analysis and synthesis of active controls, and optimization techniques. Development of the methods is concerned with the most effective ways of integrating and sequencing the procedures in order to generate structural sizing and the associated active control system, which is optimal with respect to a given merit function constrained by strength and aeroelasticity requirements.

  18. Computational methods for drug design and discovery: focus on China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mingyue; Liu, Xian; Xu, Yuan; Li, Honglin; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang

    2013-10-01

    In the past decades, China's computational drug design and discovery research has experienced fast development through various novel methodologies. Application of these methods spans a wide range, from drug target identification to hit discovery and lead optimization. In this review, we firstly provide an overview of China's status in this field and briefly analyze the possible reasons for this rapid advancement. The methodology development is then outlined. For each selected method, a short background precedes an assessment of the method with respect to the needs of drug discovery, and, in particular, work from China is highlighted. Furthermore, several successful applications of these methods are illustrated. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of current major challenges and future directions of the field.

  19. Evaluation of Methods for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodiyalam, Srinivas; Yuan, Charles; Sobieski, Jaroslaw (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new MDO method, BLISS, and two different variants of the method, BLISS/RS and BLISS/S, have been implemented using iSIGHT's scripting language and evaluated in this report on multidisciplinary problems. All of these methods are based on decomposing a modular system optimization system into several subtasks optimization, that may be executed concurrently, and the system optimization that coordinates the subtasks optimization. The BLISS method and its variants are well suited for exploiting the concurrent processing capabilities in a multiprocessor machine. Several steps, including the local sensitivity analysis, local optimization, response surfaces construction and updates are all ideally suited for concurrent processing. Needless to mention, such algorithms that can effectively exploit the concurrent processing capabilities of the compute servers will be a key requirement for solving large-scale industrial design problems, such as the automotive vehicle problem detailed in Section 3.4.

  20. Application of an optimization method to high performance propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. C.; Stefko, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The application of an optimization method to determine the propeller blade twist distribution which maximizes propeller efficiency is presented. The optimization employs a previously developed method which has been improved to include the effects of blade drag, camber and thickness. Before the optimization portion of the computer code is used, comparisons of calculated propeller efficiencies and power coefficients are made with experimental data for one NACA propeller at Mach numbers in the range of 0.24 to 0.50 and another NACA propeller at a Mach number of 0.71 to validate the propeller aerodynamic analysis portion of the computer code. Then comparisons of calculated propeller efficiencies for the optimized and the original propellers show the benefits of the optimization method in improving propeller performance. This method can be applied to the aerodynamic design of propellers having straight, swept, or nonplanar propeller blades.

  1. Gradient-based optimum aerodynamic design using adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei

    2002-09-01

    Continuous adjoint methods and optimal control theory are applied to a pressure-matching inverse design problem of quasi 1-D nozzle flows. Pontryagin's Minimum Principle is used to derive the adjoint system and the reduced gradient of the cost functional. The properties of adjoint variables at the sonic throat and the shock location are studied, revealing a log-arithmic singularity at the sonic throat and continuity at the shock location. A numerical method, based on the Steger-Warming flux-vector-splitting scheme, is proposed to solve the adjoint equations. This scheme can finely resolve the singularity at the sonic throat. A non-uniform grid, with points clustered near the throat region, can resolve it even better. The analytical solutions to the adjoint equations are also constructed via Green's function approach for the purpose of comparing the numerical results. The pressure-matching inverse design is then conducted for a nozzle parameterized by a single geometric parameter. In the second part, the adjoint methods are applied to the problem of minimizing drag coefficient, at fixed lift coefficient, for 2-D transonic airfoil flows. Reduced gradients of several functionals are derived through application of a Lagrange Multiplier Theorem. The adjoint system is carefully studied including the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions at the far-field boundary. A super-reduced design formulation is also explored by treating the angle of attack as an additional state; super-reduced gradients can be constructed either by solving adjoint equations with non-local boundary conditions or by a direct Lagrange multiplier method. In this way, the constrained optimization reduces to an unconstrained design problem. Numerical methods based on Jameson's finite volume scheme are employed to solve the adjoint equations. The same grid system generated from an efficient hyperbolic grid generator are adopted in both the Euler flow solver and the adjoint solver. Several

  2. Achieving integration in mixed methods designs-principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Fetters, Michael D; Curry, Leslie A; Creswell, John W

    2013-12-01

    Mixed methods research offers powerful tools for investigating complex processes and systems in health and health care. This article describes integration principles and practices at three levels in mixed methods research and provides illustrative examples. Integration at the study design level occurs through three basic mixed method designs-exploratory sequential, explanatory sequential, and convergent-and through four advanced frameworks-multistage, intervention, case study, and participatory. Integration at the methods level occurs through four approaches. In connecting, one database links to the other through sampling. With building, one database informs the data collection approach of the other. When merging, the two databases are brought together for analysis. With embedding, data collection and analysis link at multiple points. Integration at the interpretation and reporting level occurs through narrative, data transformation, and joint display. The fit of integration describes the extent the qualitative and quantitative findings cohere. Understanding these principles and practices of integration can help health services researchers leverage the strengths of mixed methods.

  3. Design Methods for Load-bearing Elements from Crosslaminated Timber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilguts, A.; Serdjuks, D.; Goremikins, V.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-laminated timber is an environmentally friendly material, which possesses a decreased level of anisotropy in comparison with the solid and glued timber. Cross-laminated timber could be used for load-bearing walls and slabs of multi-storey timber buildings as well as decking structures of pedestrian and road bridges. Design methods of cross-laminated timber elements subjected to bending and compression with bending were considered. The presented methods were experimentally validated and verified by FEM. Two cross-laminated timber slabs were tested at the action of static load. Pine wood was chosen as a board's material. Freely supported beam with the span equal to 1.9 m, which was loaded by the uniformly distributed load, was a design scheme of the considered plates. The width of the plates was equal to 1 m. The considered cross-laminated timber plates were analysed by FEM method. The comparison of stresses acting in the edge fibres of the plate and the maximum vertical displacements shows that both considered methods can be used for engineering calculations. The difference between the results obtained experimentally and analytically is within the limits from 2 to 31%. The difference in results obtained by effective strength and stiffness and transformed sections methods was not significant.

  4. A design method for constellation of lifting reentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yu; Kun, Liu

    2017-03-01

    As the reachable domain of a single lifting reentry vehicle is not large enough to cover the whole globe in a short time, which is disadvantageous to responsive operation, it is of great significance to study on how to construct a constellation of several lifting reentry vehicles to responsively reach any point of the globe. This paper addresses a design method for such a constellation. Firstly, an approach for calculating the reachable domain of a single lifting reentry vehicle is given, using the combination of Gauss Pseudospectral Method and SQP method. Based on that, the entire reachable domain taking the limit of responsive time into consideration is simplified reasonably to reduce the complexity of the problem. Secondly, a Streets-of-Coverage (SOC) method is used to design the constellation and the parameters of the constellation are optimized through simple analysis and comparison. Lastly, a point coverage simulation method is utilized to verify the correctness of the optimization result. The verified result shows that 6 lifting reentry vehicles whose maximum lift-to-drag ratio is 1.7 can reach nearly any point on the earth's surface between -50° and 50° in less than 90 minutes.

  5. Development of quality-by-design analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Frederick G; Kord, Alireza S

    2011-03-01

    Quality-by-design (QbD) is a systematic approach to drug development, which begins with predefined objectives, and uses science and risk management approaches to gain product and process understanding and ultimately process control. The concept of QbD can be extended to analytical methods. QbD mandates the definition of a goal for the method, and emphasizes thorough evaluation and scouting of alternative methods in a systematic way to obtain optimal method performance. Candidate methods are then carefully assessed in a structured manner for risks, and are challenged to determine if robustness and ruggedness criteria are satisfied. As a result of these studies, the method performance can be understood and improved if necessary, and a control strategy can be defined to manage risk and ensure the method performs as desired when validated and deployed. In this review, the current state of analytical QbD in the industry is detailed with examples of the application of analytical QbD principles to a range of analytical methods, including high-performance liquid chromatography, Karl Fischer titration for moisture content, vibrational spectroscopy for chemical identification, quantitative color measurement, and trace analysis for genotoxic impurities.

  6. Towards Robust Designs Via Multiple-Objective Optimization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man Mohan, Rai

    2006-01-01

    evolutionary method (DE) is first used to solve a relatively difficult problem in extended surface heat transfer wherein optimal fin geometries are obtained for different safe operating base temperatures. The objective of maximizing the safe operating base temperature range is in direct conflict with the objective of maximizing fin heat transfer. This problem is a good example of achieving robustness in the context of changing operating conditions. The evolutionary method is then used to design a turbine airfoil; the two objectives being reduced sensitivity of the pressure distribution to small changes in the airfoil shape and the maximization of the trailing edge wedge angle with the consequent increase in airfoil thickness and strength. This is a relevant example of achieving robustness to manufacturing tolerances and wear and tear in the presence of other objectives.

  7. Analytical methods for gravity-assist tour design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strange, Nathan J.

    This dissertation develops analytical methods for the design of gravity-assist space- craft trajectories. Such trajectories are commonly employed by planetary science missions to reach Mercury or the Outer Planets. They may also be used at the Outer Planets for the design of science tours with multiple flybys of those planets' moons. Recent work has also shown applicability to new missions concepts such as NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission. This work is based in the theory of patched conics. This document applies rigor to the concept of pumping (i.e. using gravity assists to change orbital energy) and cranking (i.e. using gravity assists to change inclination) to develop several analytic relations with pump and crank angles. In addition, transformations are developed between pump angle, crank angle, and v-infinity magnitude to classical orbit elements. These transformations are then used to describe the limits on orbits achievable via gravity assists of a planet or moon. This is then extended to develop analytic relations for all possible ballistic gravity-assist transfers and one type of propulsive transfer, v-infinity leveraging transfers. The results in this dissertation complement existing numerical methods for the design of these trajectories by providing methods that can guide numerical searches to find promising trajectories and even, in some cases, replace numerical searches altogether. In addition, results from new techniques presented in this dissertation such as Tisserand Graphs, the V-Infinity Globe, and Non-Tangent V-Infinty Leveraging provide additional insight into the structure of the gravity-assist trajectory design problem.

  8. Design of time interval generator based on hybrid counting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Wang, Zhaoqi; Lu, Houbing; Chen, Lian; Jin, Ge

    2016-10-01

    Time Interval Generators (TIGs) are frequently used for the characterizations or timing operations of instruments in particle physics experiments. Though some "off-the-shelf" TIGs can be employed, the necessity of a custom test system or control system makes the TIGs, being implemented in a programmable device desirable. Nowadays, the feasibility of using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to implement particle physics instrumentation has been validated in the design of Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) for precise time measurement. The FPGA-TDC technique is based on the architectures of Tapped Delay Line (TDL), whose delay cells are down to few tens of picosecond. In this case, FPGA-based TIGs with high delay step are preferable allowing the implementation of customized particle physics instrumentations and other utilities on the same FPGA device. A hybrid counting method for designing TIGs with both high resolution and wide range is presented in this paper. The combination of two different counting methods realizing an integratable TIG is described in detail. A specially designed multiplexer for tap selection is emphatically introduced. The special structure of the multiplexer is devised for minimizing the different additional delays caused by the unpredictable routings from different taps to the output. A Kintex-7 FPGA is used for the hybrid counting-based implementation of a TIG, providing a resolution up to 11 ps and an interval range up to 8 s.

  9. Sequence design in lattice models by graph theoretical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeev, B. S.; Patra, S. M.; Vishveshwara, S.

    2001-01-01

    A general strategy has been developed based on graph theoretical methods, for finding amino acid sequences that take up a desired conformation as the native state. This problem of inverse design has been addressed by assigning topological indices for the monomer sites (vertices) of the polymer on a 3×3×3 cubic lattice. This is a simple design strategy, which takes into account only the topology of the target protein and identifies the best sequence for a given composition. The procedure allows the design of a good sequence for a target native state by assigning weights for the vertices on a lattice site in a given conformation. It is seen across a variety of conformations that the predicted sequences perform well both in sequence and in conformation space, in identifying the target conformation as native state for a fixed composition of amino acids. Although the method is tested in the framework of the HP model [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] it can be used in any context if proper potential functions are available, since the procedure derives unique weights for all the sites (vertices, nodes) of the polymer chain of a chosen conformation (graph).

  10. Optimization design of thumbspica splint using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tz-How; Feng, Chi-Kung; Gung, Yih-Wen; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2006-12-01

    De Quervain's tenosynovitis is often observed on repetitive flexion of the thumb. In the clinical setting, the conservative treatment is usually an applied thumbspica splint to immobilize the thumb. However, the traditional thumbspica splint is bulky and heavy. Thus, this study used the finite element (FE) method to remove redundant material in order to reduce the splint's weight and increase ventilation. An FE model of a thumbspica splint was constructed using ANSYS9.0 software. A maximum lateral thumb pinch force of 98 N was used as the input loading condition for the FE model. This study implemented topology optimization and design optimization to seek the optimal thickness and shape of the splint. This new design was manufactured and compared with the traditional thumbspica splint. Ten thumbspica splints were tested in a materials testing system, and statistically analyzed using an independent t test. The optimal thickness of the thumbspica splint was 3.2 mm. The new design is not significantly different from the traditional splint in the immobilization effect. However, the volume of this new design has been reduced by about 35%. This study produced a new thumbspica splint shape with less volume, but had a similar immobilization effect compared to the traditional shape. In a clinical setting, this result can be used by the occupational therapist as a reference for manufacturing lighter thumbspica splints for patients with de Quervain's tenosynovitis.

  11. Modified method to improve the design of Petlyuk distillation columns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A response surface analysis was performed to study the effect of the composition and feeding thermal conditions of ternary mixtures on the number of theoretical stages and the energy consumption of Petlyuk columns. A modification of the pre-design algorithm was necessary for this purpose. Results The modified algorithm provided feasible results in 100% of the studied cases, compared with only 8.89% for the current algorithm. The proposed algorithm allowed us to attain the desired separations, despite the type of mixture and the operating conditions in the feed stream, something that was not possible with the traditional pre-design method. The results showed that the type of mixture had great influence on the number of stages and on energy consumption. A higher number of stages and a lower consumption of energy were attained with mixtures rich in the light component, while higher energy consumption occurred when the mixture was rich in the heavy component. Conclusions The proposed strategy expands the search of an optimal design of Petlyuk columns within a feasible region, which allow us to find a feasible design that meets output specifications and low thermal loads. PMID:25061476

  12. A Probabilistic Design Method Applied to Smart Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1995-01-01

    A probabilistic design method is described and demonstrated using a smart composite wing. Probabilistic structural design incorporates naturally occurring uncertainties including those in constituent (fiber/matrix) material properties, fabrication variables, structure geometry and control-related parameters. Probabilistic sensitivity factors are computed to identify those parameters that have a great influence on a specific structural reliability. Two performance criteria are used to demonstrate this design methodology. The first criterion requires that the actuated angle at the wing tip be bounded by upper and lower limits at a specified reliability. The second criterion requires that the probability of ply damage due to random impact load be smaller than an assigned value. When the relationship between reliability improvement and the sensitivity factors is assessed, the results show that a reduction in the scatter of the random variable with the largest sensitivity factor (absolute value) provides the lowest failure probability. An increase in the mean of the random variable with a negative sensitivity factor will reduce the failure probability. Therefore, the design can be improved by controlling or selecting distribution parameters associated with random variables. This can be implemented during the manufacturing process to obtain maximum benefit with minimum alterations.

  13. Optimal experimental design with the sigma point method.

    PubMed

    Schenkendorf, R; Kremling, A; Mangold, M

    2009-01-01

    Using mathematical models for a quantitative description of dynamical systems requires the identification of uncertain parameters by minimising the difference between simulation and measurement. Owing to the measurement noise also, the estimated parameters possess an uncertainty expressed by their variances. To obtain highly predictive models, very precise parameters are needed. The optimal experimental design (OED) as a numerical optimisation method is used to reduce the parameter uncertainty by minimising the parameter variances iteratively. A frequently applied method to define a cost function for OED is based on the inverse of the Fisher information matrix. The application of this traditional method has at least two shortcomings for models that are nonlinear in their parameters: (i) it gives only a lower bound of the parameter variances and (ii) the bias of the estimator is neglected. Here, the authors show that by applying the sigma point (SP) method a better approximation of characteristic values of the parameter statistics can be obtained, which has a direct benefit on OED. An additional advantage of the SP method is that it can also be used to investigate the influence of the parameter uncertainties on the simulation results. The SP method is demonstrated for the example of a widely used biological model.

  14. Statistical Methods for Rapid Aerothermal Analysis and Design Technology: Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePriest, Douglas; Morgan, Carolyn

    2003-01-01

    The cost and safety goals for NASA s next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) will require that rapid high-fidelity aerothermodynamic design tools be used early in the design cycle. To meet these requirements, it is desirable to identify adequate statistical models that quantify and improve the accuracy, extend the applicability, and enable combined analyses using existing prediction tools. The initial research work focused on establishing suitable candidate models for these purposes. The second phase is focused on assessing the performance of these models to accurately predict the heat rate for a given candidate data set. This validation work compared models and methods that may be useful in predicting the heat rate.

  15. A Generic Method for Design of Oligomer-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brännström, Kristoffer; Lindhagen-Persson, Malin; Gharibyan, Anna L.; Iakovleva, Irina; Vestling, Monika; Sellin, Mikael E.; Brännström, Thomas; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla; Forsgren, Lars; Olofsson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies that preferentially and specifically target pathological oligomeric protein and peptide assemblies, as opposed to their monomeric and amyloid counterparts, provide therapeutic and diagnostic opportunities for protein misfolding diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular properties associated with oligomer-specific antibodies are not well understood, and this limits targeted design and development. We present here a generic method that enables the design and optimisation of oligomer-specific antibodies. The method takes a two-step approach where discrimination between oligomers and fibrils is first accomplished through identification of cryptic epitopes exclusively buried within the structure of the fibrillar form. The second step discriminates between monomers and oligomers based on differences in avidity. We show here that a simple divalent mode of interaction, as within e.g. the IgG isotype, can increase the binding strength of the antibody up to 1500 times compared to its monovalent counterpart. We expose how the ability to bind oligomers is affected by the monovalent affinity and the turnover rate of the binding and, importantly, also how oligomer specificity is only valid within a specific concentration range. We provide an example of the method by creating and characterising a spectrum of different monoclonal antibodies against both the Aβ peptide and α-synuclein that are associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, respectively. The approach is however generic, does not require identification of oligomer-specific architectures, and is, in essence, applicable to all polypeptides that form oligomeric and fibrillar assemblies. PMID:24618582

  16. Design of braided composite tubes by numerical analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Akihiro; Maekawa, Zenichiro; Nakai, Asami; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    1995-11-01

    Conventional composite laminates have very poor strength through thickness and as a result are limited in their application for structural parts with complex shape. In this paper, the design for braided composite tube was proposed. The concept of analysis model which involved from micro model to macro model was presented. This method was applied to predict bending rigidity and initial fracture stress under bending load of the braided tube. The proposed analytical procedure can be included as a unit in CAE system for braided composites.

  17. Methods to Design and Synthesize Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Houzong; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have become a promising targeted therapy strategy that combines the specificity, favorable pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of antibodies with the destructive potential of highly potent drugs. One of the biggest challenges in the development of ADCs is the application of suitable linkers for conjugating drugs to antibodies. Recently, the design and synthesis of linkers are making great progress. In this review, we present the methods that are currently used to synthesize antibody-drug conjugates by using thiols, amines, alcohols, aldehydes and azides. PMID:26848651

  18. A novel observer design method for neural mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xian; Miao, Dong-Kai; Gao, Qing; Xu, Shi-Yun

    2015-09-01

    Neural mass models can simulate the generation of electroencephalography (EEG) signals with different rhythms, and therefore the observation of the states of these models plays a significant role in brain research. The structure of neural mass models is special in that they can be expressed as Lurie systems. The developed techniques in Lurie system theory are applicable to these models. We here provide a new observer design method for neural mass models by transforming these models and the corresponding error systems into nonlinear systems with Lurie form. The purpose is to establish appropriate conditions which ensure the convergence of the estimation error. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by numerical simulations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61473245, 61004050, and 51207144).

  19. A Method of Trajectory Design for Manned Asteroids Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Q. B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, Z. F.; Han, W. H.; Dong, X.

    2014-11-01

    A trajectory optimization method of the nuclear propulsion manned asteroids exploration is presented. In the case of launching between 2035 and 2065, based on the Lambert transfer orbit, the phases of departure from and return to the Earth are searched at first. Then the optimal flight trajectory in the feasible regions is selected by pruning the flight sequences. Setting the nuclear propulsion flight plan as propel-coast-propel, and taking the minimal mass of aircraft departure as the index, the nuclear propulsion flight trajectory is separately optimized using a hybrid method. With the initial value of the optimized local parameters of each three phases, the global parameters are jointedly optimized. At last, the minimal departure mass trajectory design result is given.

  20. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... for Air Pollution Measurement Systems, Volume I,'' EPA/600/R-94/038a and ``Quality Assurance Handbook for Air Pollution Measurement Systems, Volume II, Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Program'' EPA-454/B... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New...

  1. Performance enhancement of a pump impeller using optimal design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seok-Yun; Kim, Chul-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Moon; Yoon, Joon-Yong; Jang, Choon-Man

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of a regenerative pump to increase its efficiency using optimal design method. Two design parameters which define the shape of the pump impeller, are introduced and analyzed. Pump performance is evaluated by numerical simulation and design of experiments(DOE). To analyze three-dimensional flow field in the pump, general analysis code, CFX, is used in the present work. Shear stress turbulence model is employed to estimate the eddy viscosity. Experimental apparatus with an open-loop facility is set up for measuring the pump performance. Pump performance, efficiency and pressure, obtained from numerical simulation are validated by comparison with the results of experiments. Throughout the shape optimization of the pump impeller at the operating flow condition, the pump efficiency is successfully increased by 3 percent compared to the reference pump. It is noted that the pressure increase of the optimum pump is mainly caused by higher momentum force generated inside blade passage due to the optimal blade shape. Comparisons of pump internal flow on the reference and optimum pump are also investigated and discussed in detail.

  2. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  3. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  4. FIRE SAFETY IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: A RISK-INFORMED AND PERFORMANCE-BASED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    AZARM,M.A.; TRAVIS,R.J.

    1999-11-14

    The consideration of risk in regulatory decision-making has long been a part of NRC's policy and practice. Initially, these considerations were qualitative and were based on risk insights. The early regulations relied on good practices, past insights, and accepted standards. As a result, most NRC regulations were prescriptive and were applied uniformly to all areas within the regulatory scope. Risk technology is changing regulations by prioritizing the areas within regulatory scope based on risk, thereby focusing on the risk-important areas. Performance technology, on the other hand, is changing the regulations by allowing requirements to be adjusted based on the specific performance expected and manifested, rather than a prior prescriptive requirement. Consistent with the objectives of risk-informed and performance-based regulatory requirements, BNL evaluated the feasibility of applying risk- and performance-technologies to modifying NRC's current regulations on fire protection for nuclear power plants. This feasibility study entailed several case studies (trial applications). This paper describes the results of two of them. Besides the case studies, the paper discusses an overall evaluation of methodologies for fire-risk analysis to support the risk-informed regulation. It identifies some current shortcomings and proposes some near-term solutions.

  5. Developing an Approach to Prioritize River Restoration using Data Extracted from Flood Risk Information System Databases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimal, S.; Tarboton, D. G.; Band, L. E.; Duncan, J. M.; Lovette, J. P.; Corzo, G.; Miles, B.

    2015-12-01

    Prioritizing river restoration requires information on river geometry. In many states in the US detailed river geometry has been collected for floodplain mapping and is available in Flood Risk Information Systems (FRIS). In particular, North Carolina has, for its 100 Counties, developed a database of numerous HEC-RAS models which are available through its Flood Risk Information System (FRIS). These models that include over 260 variables were developed and updated by numerous contractors. They contain detailed surveyed or LiDAR derived cross-sections and modeled flood extents for different extreme event return periods. In this work, over 4700 HEC-RAS models' data was integrated and upscaled to utilize detailed cross-section information and 100-year modelled flood extent information to enable river restoration prioritization for the entire state of North Carolina. We developed procedures to extract geomorphic properties such as entrenchment ratio, incision ratio, etc. from these models. Entrenchment ratio quantifies the vertical containment of rivers and thereby their vulnerability to flooding and incision ratio quantifies the depth per unit width. A map of entrenchment ratio for the whole state was derived by linking these model results to a geodatabase. A ranking of highly entrenched counties enabling prioritization for flood allowance and mitigation was obtained. The results were shared through HydroShare and web maps developed for their visualization using Google Maps Engine API.

  6. An analytical filter design method for guided wave phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for designing a spatial filter that processes the data from an array of two-dimensional guided wave transducers. An inverse problem is defined where the spatial filter coefficients are determined in such a way that a prescribed beam shape, i.e., a desired array output is best approximated in the least-squares sense. Taking advantage of the 2π-periodicity of the generated wave field, Fourier-series representation is used to derive closed-form expressions for the constituting matrix elements. Special cases in which the desired array output is an ideal delta function and a gate function are considered in a more explicit way. Numerical simulations are performed to examine the performance of the filters designed by the proposed method. It is shown that the proposed filters can significantly improve the beam quality in general. Most notable is that the proposed method does not compromise between the main lobe width and the sidelobe levels; i.e. a narrow main lobe and low sidelobes are simultaneously achieved. It is also shown that the proposed filter can compensate the effects of nonuniform directivity and sensitivity of array elements by explicitly taking these into account in the formulation. From an example of detecting two separate targets, how much the angular resolution can be improved as compared to the conventional delay-and-sum filter is quantitatively illustrated. Lamb wave based imaging of localized defects in an elastic plate using a circular array is also presented as an example of practical applications.

  7. Formal methods in the design of Ada 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guaspari, David

    1995-01-01

    Formal, mathematical methods are most useful when applied early in the design and implementation of a software system--that, at least, is the familiar refrain. I will report on a modest effort to apply formal methods at the earliest possible stage, namely, in the design of the Ada 95 programming language itself. This talk is an 'experience report' that provides brief case studies illustrating the kinds of problems we worked on, how we approached them, and the extent (if any) to which the results proved useful. It also derives some lessons and suggestions for those undertaking future projects of this kind. Ada 95 is the first revision of the standard for the Ada programming language. The revision began in 1988, when the Ada Joint Programming Office first asked the Ada Board to recommend a plan for revising the Ada standard. The first step in the revision was to solicit criticisms of Ada 83. A set of requirements for the new language standard, based on those criticisms, was published in 1990. A small design team, the Mapping Revision Team (MRT), became exclusively responsible for revising the language standard to satisfy those requirements. The MRT, from Intermetrics, is led by S. Tucker Taft. The work of the MRT was regularly subject to independent review and criticism by a committee of distinguished Reviewers and by several advisory teams--for example, the two User/Implementor teams, each consisting of an industrial user (attempting to make significant use of the new language on a realistic application) and a compiler vendor (undertaking, experimentally, to modify its current implementation in order to provide the necessary new features). One novel decision established the Language Precision Team (LPT), which investigated language proposals from a mathematical point of view. The LPT applied formal mathematical analysis to help improve the design of Ada 95 (e.g., by clarifying the language proposals) and to help promote its acceptance (e.g., by identifying a

  8. PARTIAL RESTRAINING FORCE INTRODUCTION METHOD FOR DESIGNING CONSTRUCTION COUNTERMESURE ON ΔB METHOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Taku; Imanishi, Hajime; Chiba, Noriyuki; Ito, Takao

    Landslide or slope failure is a three-dimensional movement phenomenon, thus a three-dimensional treatment makes it easier to understand stability. The ΔB method (simplified three-dimensional slope stability analysis method) is based on the limit equilibrium method and equals to an approximate three-dimensional slope stability analysis that extends two-dimensional cross-section stability analysis results to assess stability. This analysis can be conducted using conventional spreadsheets or two-dimensional slope stability computational software. This paper describes the concept of the partial restraining force in-troduction method for designing construction countermeasures using the distribution of the restraining force found along survey lines, which is based on the distribution of survey line safety factors derived from the above-stated analysis. This paper also presents the transverse distributive method of restraining force used for planning ground stabilizing on the basis of the example analysis.

  9. Basic research on design analysis methods for rotorcraft vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanagud, S.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a method for identifying physically plausible finite element system models of airframe structures from test data. The assumed models were based on linear elastic behavior with general (nonproportional) damping. Physical plausibility of the identified system matrices was insured by restricting the identification process to designated physical parameters only and not simply to the elements of the system matrices themselves. For example, in a large finite element model the identified parameters might be restricted to the moduli for each of the different materials used in the structure. In the case of damping, a restricted set of damping values might be assigned to finite elements based on the material type and on the fabrication processes used. In this case, different damping values might be associated with riveted, bolted and bonded elements. The method itself is developed first, and several approaches are outlined for computing the identified parameter values. The method is applied first to a simple structure for which the 'measured' response is actually synthesized from an assumed model. Both stiffness and damping parameter values are accurately identified. The true test, however, is the application to a full-scale airframe structure. In this case, a NASTRAN model and actual measured modal parameters formed the basis for the identification of a restricted set of physically plausible stiffness and damping parameters.

  10. Basic research on design analysis methods for rotorcraft vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a method for identifying physically plausible finite element system models of airframe structures from test data. The assumed models were based on linear elastic behavior with general (nonproportional) damping. Physical plausibility of the identified system matrices was insured by restricting the identification process to designated physical parameters only and not simply to the elements of the system matrices themselves. For example, in a large finite element model the identified parameters might be restricted to the moduli for each of the different materials used in the structure. In the case of damping, a restricted set of damping values might be assigned to finite elements based on the material type and on the fabrication processes used. In this case, different damping values might be associated with riveted, bolted and bonded elements. The method itself is developed first, and several approaches are outlined for computing the identified parameter values. The method is applied first to a simple structure for which the 'measured' response is actually synthesized from an assumed model. Both stiffness and damping parameter values are accurately identified. The true test, however, is the application to a full-scale airframe structure. In this case, a NASTRAN model and actual measured modal parameters formed the basis for the identification of a restricted set of physically plausible stiffness and damping parameters.

  11. Designing arrays for modern high-resolution methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F.U.

    1987-10-01

    A bearing estimation study of seismic wavefields propagating from a strongly heterogeneous media shows that with the high-resolution MUSIC algorithm the bias of the direction estimate can be reduced by adopting a smaller aperture sub-array. Further, on this sub-array, the bias of the MUSIC algorithm is less than those of the MLM and Bartlett methods. On the full array, the performance for the three different methods are comparable. Improvement in bearing estimation in MUSIC with a reduced aperture might be attributed to increased signal coherency in the array. For methods with less resolution, the improved signal coherency in the smaller array is possible being offset by severe loss of resolution and the presence of weak secondary sources. Building upon the characteristics of real seismic wavefields, a design language has been developed to generate, modify, and test other arrays. Eigenstructures of wavefields and arrays have been studied empirically by simulation of a variety of realistic signals. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  12. On the feasibility of a transient dynamic design analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, George J.; Cunniff, Patrick F.

    1992-04-01

    This Annual Report summarizes the progress that was made during the first year of the two-year grant from the Office of Naval Research. The dynamic behavior of structures subjected to mechanical shock loading provides a continuing problem for design engineers concerned with shipboard foundations supporting critical equipment. There are two particular problems associated with shock response that are currently under investigation. The first topic explores the possibilities of developing a transient design analysis method that does not degrade the current level of the Navy's shock-proofness requirements for heavy shipboard equipment. The second topic examines the prospects of developing scaling rules for the shock response of simple internal equipment of submarines subjected to various attack situations. This effort has been divided into two tasks: chemical explosive scaling for a given hull; and scaling of equipment response across different hull sizes. The computer is used as a surrogate shock machine for these studies. Hence, the results of the research can provide trends, ideas, suggestions, and scaling rules to the Navy. In using these results, the shock-hardening program should use measured data rather than calculated data.

  13. Inflammation and Exercise (INFLAME): study rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Angela; Mikus, Catherine; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Distefano, Brandy; Priest, Elisa L.; Sinclair, Erin; Earnest, Conrad P.; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The INFLAME study is designed to determine the effect of exercise training on elevated high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP) concentrations in initially sedentary women and men. Methods INFLAME will recruit 170 healthy, sedentary women and men with elevated CRP (≥2.0 mg/L) to be randomized to either an exercise group or non-exercise control group. Exercising individuals will participate in four months of supervised aerobic exercise with a total energy expenditure of 16 kcal • kg−1 • week−1 (KKW). Exercise intensity will be 60–80% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max). Outcome The primary outcome will be change in plasma CRP concentration. Secondary outcomes include visceral adiposity, the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, and heart rate variability (HRV) in order to examine potential biological mechanisms whereby exercise might affect CRP concentrations. Summary INFLAME will help us understand the effects of moderate to vigorous exercise on CRP concentrations in sedentary individuals. To our knowledge this will be the largest training study specifically designed to examine the effect of exercise on CRP concentrations. This study has the potential to influence therapeutic applications since CRP measurement is becoming an important clinical measurement in Coronary Heart Disease risk assessment. This study will also contribute to the limited body of literature examining the effect of exercise on the variables of visceral adiposity, cytokines, and heart rate variability. PMID:18024231

  14. Design of composite laminates by a Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chin; Springer, George S.

    1993-01-01

    A Monte Carlo procedure was developed for optimizing symmetric fiber reinforced composite laminates such that the weight is minimum and the Tsai-Wu strength failure criterion is satisfied in each ply. The laminate may consist of several materials including an idealized core, and may be subjected to several sets of combined in-plane and bending loads. The procedure yields the number of plies, the fiber orientation, and the material of each ply and the material and thickness of the core. A user friendly computer code was written for performing the numerical calculations. Laminates optimized by the code were compared to laminates resulting from existing optimization methods. These comparisons showed that the present Monte Carlo procedure is a useful and efficient tool for the design of composite laminates.

  15. A Design Method for FES Bone Health Therapy in SCI

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Brian; Shippen, James; Armengol, Monica; Gibbons, Robin; Holderbaum, William; Harwin, William

    2016-01-01

    FES assisted activities such as standing, walking, cycling and rowing induce forces within the leg bones and have been proposed to reduce osteoporosis in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, details of the applied mechanical stimulus for osteogenesis is often not reported. Typically, comparisons of bone density results are made after costly and time consuming clinical trials. These studies have produced inconsistent results and are subject to sample size variations. Here we propose a design process that may be used to predict the clinical outcome based on biomechanical simulation and mechano-biology. This method may allow candidate therapies to be optimized and quantitatively compared. To illustrate the approach we have used data obtained from a rower with complete paraplegia using the RowStim (III) system. PMID:28078075

  16. Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Hampton, Shawn D.

    2016-08-23

    Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods are described. According to one aspect, an information processing system includes working memory comprising a semantic graph which comprises a plurality of abstractions, wherein the abstractions individually include an individual which is defined according to an ontology and a reasoning system comprising a plurality of reasoning modules which are configured to process different abstractions of the semantic graph, wherein a first of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a first classification type of the ontology and a second of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a second classification type of the ontology, wherein the first and second classification types are different.

  17. Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Hampton, Shawn D.

    2015-08-18

    Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods are described. According to one aspect, an information processing system includes working memory comprising a semantic graph which comprises a plurality of abstractions, wherein the abstractions individually include an individual which is defined according to an ontology and a reasoning system comprising a plurality of reasoning modules which are configured to process different abstractions of the semantic graph, wherein a first of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a first classification type of the ontology and a second of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a second classification type of the ontology, wherein the first and second classification types are different.

  18. Design method of water jet pump towards high cavitation performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L. L.; Che, B. X.; Hu, L. J.; Wu, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    As one of the crucial components for power supply, the propulsion system is of great significance to the advance speed, noise performances, stabilities and other associated critical performances of underwater vehicles. Developing towards much higher advance speed, the underwater vehicles make more critical demands on the performances of the propulsion system. Basically, the increased advance speed requires the significantly raised rotation speed of the propulsion system, which would result in the deteriorated cavitation performances and consequently limit the thrust and efficiency of the whole system. Compared with the traditional propeller, the water jet pump offers more favourite cavitation, propulsion efficiency and other associated performances. The present research focuses on the cavitation performances of the waterjet pump blade profile in expectation of enlarging its advantages in high-speed vehicle propulsion. Based on the specifications of a certain underwater vehicle, the design method of the waterjet blade with high cavitation performances was investigated in terms of numerical simulation.

  19. Development of impact design methods for ceramic gas turbine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact damage prediction methods are being developed to aid in the design of ceramic gas turbine engine components with improved impact resistance. Two impact damage modes were characterized: local, near the impact site, and structural, usually fast fracture away from the impact site. Local damage to Si3N4 impacted by Si3N4 spherical projectiles consists of ring and/or radial cracks around the impact point. In a mechanistic model being developed, impact damage is characterized as microcrack nucleation and propagation. The extent of damage is measured as volume fraction of microcracks. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating late impact tests. Structural failure is caused by tensile stress during impact exceeding material strength. The EPIC3 code was successfully used to predict blade structural failures in different size particle impacts on radial and axial blades.

  20. Computational methods in metabolic engineering for strain design.

    PubMed

    Long, Matthew R; Ong, Wai Kit; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic engineering uses genetic approaches to control microbial metabolism to produce desired compounds. Computational tools can identify new biological routes to chemicals and the changes needed in host metabolism to improve chemical production. Recent computational efforts have focused on exploring what compounds can be made biologically using native, heterologous, and/or enzymes with broad specificity. Additionally, computational methods have been developed to suggest different types of genetic modifications (e.g. gene deletion/addition or up/down regulation), as well as suggest strategies meeting different criteria (e.g. high yield, high productivity, or substrate co-utilization). Strategies to improve the runtime performances have also been developed, which allow for more complex metabolic engineering strategies to be identified. Future incorporation of kinetic considerations will further improve strain design algorithms.

  1. Unique Method for Generating Design Earthquake Time Histories

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Spears

    2008-07-01

    A method has been developed which takes a seed earthquake time history and modifies it to produce given design response spectra. It is a multi-step process with an initial scaling step and then multiple refinement steps. It is unique in the fact that both the acceleration and displacement response spectra are considered when performing the fit (which primarily improves the low frequency acceleration response spectrum accuracy). Additionally, no matrix inversion is needed. The features include encouraging the code acceleration, velocity, and displacement ratios and attempting to fit the pseudo velocity response spectrum. Also, “smoothing” is done to transition the modified time history to the seed time history at its start and end. This is done in the time history regions below a cumulative energy of 5% and above a cumulative energy of 95%. Finally, the modified acceleration, velocity, and displacement time histories are adjusted to start and end with an amplitude of zero (using Fourier transform techniques for integration).

  2. Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Greitzer, Frank L; Hampton, Shawn D

    2014-03-04

    Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods are described. According to one aspect, an information processing system includes working memory comprising a semantic graph which comprises a plurality of abstractions, wherein the abstractions individually include an individual which is defined according to an ontology and a reasoning system comprising a plurality of reasoning modules which are configured to process different abstractions of the semantic graph, wherein a first of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a first classification type of the ontology and a second of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a second classification type of the ontology, wherein the first and second classification types are different.

  3. When the Details Matter – Sensitivities in PRA Calculations That Could Affect Risk-Informed Decision-Making

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Nathan O. Siu

    2010-06-01

    As the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) continues its efforts to increase its use of risk information in decision making, the detailed, quantitative results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations are coming under increased scrutiny. Where once analysts and users were not overly concerned with figure of merit variations that were less than an order of magnitude, now factors of two or even less can spark heated debate regarding modeling approaches and assumptions. The philosophical and policy-related aspects of this situation are well-recognized by the PRA community. On the other hand, the technical implications for PRA methods and modeling have not been as widely discussed. This paper illustrates the potential numerical effects of choices as to the details of models and methods for parameter estimation with three examples: 1) the selection of the time period data for parameter estimation, and issues related to component boundary and failure mode definitions; 2) the selection of alternative diffuse prior distributions, including the constrained noninformative prior distribution, in Bayesian parameter estimation; and 3) the impact of uncertainty in calculations for recovery of offsite power.

  4. The Method of Complex Characteristics for Design of Transonic Compressors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bledsoe, Margaret Randolph

    We calculate shockless transonic flows past two -dimensional cascades of airfoils characterized by a prescribed speed distribution. The approach is to find solutions of the partial differential equation (c('2)-u('2)) (PHI)(,xx) - 2uv (PHI)(,xy) + (c('2)-v('2)) (PHI)(,yy) = 0 by the method of complex characteristics. Here (PHI) is the velocity potential, so (DEL)(PHI) = (u,v), and c is the local speed of sound. Our method consists in noting that the coefficients of the equation are analytic, so that we can use analytic continuation, conformal mapping, and a spectral method in the hodograph plane to determine the flow. After complex extension we obtain canonical equations for (PHI) and for the stream function (psi) as well as an explicit map from the hodograph plane to complex characteristic coordinates. In the subsonic case, a new coordinate system is defined in which the flow region corresponds to the interior of an ellipse. We construct special solutions of the flow equations in these coordinates by solving characteristic initial value problems in the ellipse with initial data defined by the complete system of Chebyshev polynomials. The condition (psi) = 0 on the boundary of the ellipse is used to determine the series representation of (PHI) and (psi). The map from the ellipse to the complex flow coordinates is found from data specifying the speed q as a function of the arc length s. The transonic problem for shockless flow becomes well posed after appropriate modifications of this procedure. The nonlinearity of the problem is handled by an iterative method that determines the boundary value problem in the ellipse and the map function in sequence. We have implemented this method as a computer code to design two-dimensional cascades of shockless compressor airfoils with gap-to-chord ratios as low as .5 and supersonic zones on both the upper and lower surfaces. The method may be extended to solve more general boundary value problems for second order partial

  5. Rationale, design and methods of the CASHMERE study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Tabassome; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Gompel, Anne; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Laurent, Stéphane; Thuillez, Christian; Zannad, Faiez; Bernaud, Corine; Jaillon, Patrice

    2004-02-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement is a noninvasive method used for quantification of early stage of atherosclerosis. Data suggest that the combination of statin and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) might be useful in reducing the early progression of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. The main aim of the study is to compare the effects of 12-month therapy with atorvastatin (80 mg/day), HRT (oral 17beta-estradiol 1 or 2 mg/day, plus cyclic dydrogesterone 10 mg) alone and their combination vs. placebo on the progression of carotid IMT by using a high-definition echotracking device. The secondary objectives are to assess the effects of the treatments vs. placebo on arterial stiffness, lipid profile and C-reactive protein. The CASHMERE trial is an European randomized study with a 2 x 2-factorial design, double blinded for atorvastatin and prospective randomized, open blinded endpoint evaluation (PROBE) method applied to HRT. The investigators can adjust the dose of estradiol at any time during follow-up if necessary. A total of 800 postmenopausal women with mild hypercholesterolemia and with no previous history of cardiovascular disease will be included and followed up by their physicians [general practitioners (GPs) or gynecologists] for 1 year. The CASHMERE trial is the first randomized clinical trial to examine the effects of a statin alone or combined with HRT on the structure and the function of carotid artery as early markers of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women with mild hypercholesterolemia. The results are expected for 2007.

  6. Analysis of health impact inputs to the US Department of Energy's risk information system

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Strenge, D.L.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of completing a survey of environmental problems, referred to as the Environmental Survey, at their facilities across the country. The DOE Risk Information System (RIS) is being used to prioritize these environmental problems identified in the Environmental Survey's findings. This report contains a discussion of site-specific public health risk parameters and the rationale for their inclusion in the RIS. These parameters are based on computed potential impacts obtained with the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS). MEPAS is a computer-based methodology for evaluating the potential exposures resulting from multimedia environmental transport of hazardous materials. This report has three related objectives: document the role of MEPAS in the RIS framework, report the results of the analysis of alternative risk parameters that led to the current RIS risk parameters, and describe analysis of uncertainties in the risk-related parameters. 20 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Design optimization methods for genomic DNA tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bertone, Paul; Trifonov, Valery; Rozowsky, Joel S.; Schubert, Falk; Emanuelsson, Olof; Karro, John; Kao, Ming-Yang; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A recent development in microarray research entails the unbiased coverage, or tiling, of genomic DNA for the large-scale identification of transcribed sequences and regulatory elements. A central issue in designing tiling arrays is that of arriving at a single-copy tile path, as significant sequence cross-hybridization can result from the presence of non-unique probes on the array. Due to the fragmentation of genomic DNA caused by the widespread distribution of repetitive elements, the problem of obtaining adequate sequence coverage increases with the sizes of subsequence tiles that are to be included in the design. This becomes increasingly problematic when considering complex eukaryotic genomes that contain many thousands of interspersed repeats. The general problem of sequence tiling can be framed as finding an optimal partitioning of non-repetitive subsequences over a prescribed range of tile sizes, on a DNA sequence comprising repetitive and non-repetitive regions. Exact solutions to the tiling problem become computationally infeasible when applied to large genomes, but successive optimizations are developed that allow their practical implementation. These include an efficient method for determining the degree of similarity of many oligonucleotide sequences over large genomes, and two algorithms for finding an optimal tile path composed of longer sequence tiles. The first algorithm, a dynamic programming approach, finds an optimal tiling in linear time and space; the second applies a heuristic search to reduce the space complexity to a constant requirement. A Web resource has also been developed, accessible at http://tiling.gersteinlab.org, to generate optimal tile paths from user-provided DNA sequences. PMID:16365382

  8. Visual Narrative Research Methods as Performance in Industrial Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Laurel H.; McDonagh, Deana

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses teaching empathic research methodology as performance. The authors describe their collaboration in an activity to help undergraduate industrial design students learn empathy for others when designing products for use by diverse or underrepresented people. The authors propose that an industrial design curriculum would benefit…

  9. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC): Integrated Treatment of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Youngblood

    2010-10-01

    The concept of “margin” has a long history in nuclear licensing and in the codification of good engineering practices. However, some traditional applications of “margin” have been carried out for surrogate scenarios (such as design basis scenarios), without regard to the actual frequencies of those scenarios, and have been carried out with in a systematically conservative fashion. This means that the effectiveness of the application of the margin concept is determined in part by the original choice of surrogates, and is limited in any case by the degree of conservatism imposed on the evaluation. In the RISMC project, which is part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), we are developing a risk-informed characterization of safety margin. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system response. For example, the probabilistic load spectrum will reflect the frequency of challenges of a particular severity. Such a characterization is required if decision-making is to be informed optimally. However, in order to enable the quantification of probabilistic load spectra, existing analysis capability needs to be extended. Accordingly, the INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability whose design will allow for much more efficient parameter uncertainty analysis, and will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin.

  10. A New Approach to Comparing Several Equating Methods in the Context of the NEAT Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design involves missing data that are missing by design. Three equating methods that can be used with a NEAT design are the frequency estimation equipercentile equating method, the chain equipercentile equating method, and the item-response-theory observed-score-equating method. We suggest an…

  11. Pseudo-Sibship Methods in the Case-Parents Design

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhaoxia; Deng, Li

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that complex traits are likely determined by multiple loci, with each of which contributes a weak to moderate individual effect. Although extensive literature exists on multi-locus analysis of unrelated subjects, there are relatively fewer strategies for jointly analyzing multiple loci using family data. Here we address this issue by evaluating two pseudo-sibship methods: the 1:1 matching, which matches each affected offspring to the pseudo sibling formed by the alleles not transmitted to the affected offspring; the exhaustive matching, which matches each affected offspring to the pseudo siblings formed by all the other possible combinations of parental alleles. We prove that the two matching strategies use exactly and approximately the same amount of information from data under additive and multiplicative genetic models, respectively. Using numerical calculations under a variety of models and testing assumptions, we show that compared to the exhaustive matching, the 1:1 matching has comparable asymptotic power in detecting multiplicative / additive effects in single-locus analysis and main effects in multi-locus analysis, and it allows association testing of multiple linked loci. These results pave the way for many existing multi-locus analysis methods developed for the case-control (or matched case-control) design to be applied to case-parents data with minor modifications. As an example, with the 1:1 matching, we applied an L1 regularized regression to a Crohn’s disease dataset. Using the multiple loci selected by our approach, we obtained an order-of-magnitude decrease in p-value and an 18.9% increase in prediction accuracy when comparing to using the most significant individual locus. PMID:21953439

  12. A decision-based perspective for the design of methods for systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mistree, Farrokh; Muster, Douglas; Shupe, Jon A.; Allen, Janet K.

    1989-01-01

    Organization of material, a definition of decision based design, a hierarchy of decision based design, the decision support problem technique, a conceptual model design that can be manufactured and maintained, meta-design, computer-based design, action learning, and the characteristics of decisions are among the topics covered.

  13. Design and methods of the national Vietnam veterans longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Schlenger, William E; Corry, Nida H; Kulka, Richard A; Williams, Christianna S; Henn-Haase, Clare; Marmar, Charles R

    2015-09-01

    The National Vietnam Veterans Longitudinal Study (NVVLS) is the second assessment of a representative cohort of US veterans who served during the Vietnam War era, either in Vietnam or elsewhere. The cohort was initially surveyed in the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS) from 1984 to 1988 to assess the prevalence, incidence, and effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other post-war problems. The NVVLS sought to re-interview the cohort to assess the long-term course of PTSD. NVVLS data collection began July 3, 2012 and ended May 17, 2013, comprising three components: a mailed health questionnaire, a telephone health survey interview, and, for a probability sample of theater Veterans, a clinical diagnostic telephone interview administered by licensed psychologists. Excluding decedents, 78.8% completed the questionnaire and/or telephone survey, and 55.0% of selected living veterans participated in the clinical interview. This report provides a description of the NVVLS design and methods. Together, the NVVRS and NVVLS constitute a nationally representative longitudinal study of Vietnam veterans, and extend the NVVRS as a critical resource for scientific and policy analyses for Vietnam veterans, with policy relevance for Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

  14. An entropy method for floodplain monitoring network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, E.; Yan, K.; Alfonso, L.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Napolitano, F.; Russo, F.; Bates, Paul D.

    2012-09-01

    In recent years an increasing number of flood-related fatalities has highlighted the necessity of improving flood risk management to reduce human and economic losses. In this framework, monitoring of flood-prone areas is a key factor for building a resilient environment. In this paper a method for designing a floodplain monitoring network is presented. A redundant network of cheap wireless sensors (GridStix) measuring water depth is considered over a reach of the River Dee (UK), with sensors placed both in the channel and in the floodplain. Through a Three Objective Optimization Problem (TOOP) the best layouts of sensors are evaluated, minimizing their redundancy, maximizing their joint information content and maximizing the accuracy of the observations. A simple raster-based inundation model (LISFLOOD-FP) is used to generate a synthetic GridStix data set of water stages. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) that is used for hydraulic model building is the globally and freely available SRTM DEM.

  15. The design method of a dam on gravel stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, W.B.; Wu, S.J.; Huang, C.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Due to the intense requirements of electricity and water supply in the past decades, large number of dams, reservoirs and mobile barrages have been completed in Taiwan. These hydraulic structures almost occupied all the sound rock foundations with little overburdens. This indicates that the future ones have to face the situation of high overburdens. Special considerations should be taken to overcome the difficulties of water tight requirement and stability of structures. A case study is presented in this paper. It is a dam built for the purpose of hydropower generation and water supply, and is constructed on a gravel stream with 40 m of overburdens. Design method of this dam is discussed in this paper. Curtain grouting is performed in this dam to reduce the high permeability of gravel to an acceptable level. Caissons are chosen to be the structural foundations in this case study to support heavy loads of the dam and to reduce the difficulty of curtain grouting. Another problem for a dam built on gravel stream is the damage of abrasion and erosion to the stilling basin slabs, the sluice way aprons and the spillway aprons. Discussions on the abrasion-erosion resistant materials are also given in this paper.

  16. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  17. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  18. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, H.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  19. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure contraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  20. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure constraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  1. Inside multi-disciplinary design in medical informatics: experiences from the use of an argumentative design method.

    PubMed

    Sjøberg, C; Timpka, T

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study using an argumentation-based design method (Argumentative Design) in the development of clinical software systems. The method, which requires visualization of the underlying design goals, the specific needs-for-change, and the probable consequences of the alternative design measures, caused previously implicit argument structures to be exposed and discussed. This uncovering of hidden agendas also revealed previously implicit coalitions and organizational influences on the design process. Implications for software development practices in medical informatics are discussed.

  2. Overview: Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    There are a number of helicopter design problems that are well suited to applications of numerical design optimization techniques. Adequate implementation of this technology will provide high pay-offs. There are a number of numerical optimization programs available, and there are many excellent response/performance analysis programs developed or being developed. But integration of these programs in a form that is usable in the design phase should be recognized as important. It is also necessary to attract the attention of engineers engaged in the development of analysis capabilities and to make them aware that analysis capabilities are much more powerful if integrated into design oriented codes. Frequently, the shortcoming of analysis capabilities are revealed by coupling them with an optimization code. Most of the published work has addressed problems in preliminary system design, rotor system/blade design or airframe design. Very few published results were found in acoustics, aerodynamics and control system design. Currently major efforts are focused on vibration reduction, and aerodynamics/acoustics applications appear to be growing fast. The development of a computer program system to integrate the multiple disciplines required in helicopter design with numerical optimization technique is needed. Activities in Britain, Germany and Poland are identified, but no published results from France, Italy, the USSR or Japan were found.

  3. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) Methods: Their Synergy with Computer Technology in Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1998-01-01

    The paper identifies speed, agility, human interface, generation of sensitivity information, task decomposition, and data transmission (including storage) as important attributes for a computer environment to have in order to support engineering design effectively. It is argued that when examined in terms of these attributes the presently available environment can be shown to be inadequate a radical improvement is needed, and it may be achieved by combining new methods that have recently emerged from multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) with massively parallel processing computer technology. The caveat is that, for successful use of that technology in engineering computing, new paradigms for computing will have to be developed - specifically, innovative algorithms that are intrinsically parallel so that their performance scales up linearly with the number of processors. It may be speculated that the idea of simulating a complex behavior by interaction of a large number of very simple models may be an inspiration for the above algorithms, the cellular automata are an example. Because of the long lead time needed to develop and mature new paradigms, development should be now, even though the widespread availability of massively parallel processing is still a few years away.

  4. Multidisciplinary Design Optimisation (MDO) Methods: Their Synergy with Computer Technology in the Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1999-01-01

    The paper identifies speed, agility, human interface, generation of sensitivity information, task decomposition, and data transmission (including storage) as important attributes for a computer environment to have in order to support engineering design effectively. It is argued that when examined in terms of these attributes the presently available environment can be shown to be inadequate. A radical improvement is needed, and it may be achieved by combining new methods that have recently emerged from multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) with massively parallel processing computer technology. The caveat is that, for successful use of that technology in engineering computing, new paradigms for computing will have to be developed - specifically, innovative algorithms that are intrinsically parallel so that their performance scales up linearly with the number of processors. It may be speculated that the idea of simulating a complex behaviour by interaction of a large number of very simple models may be an inspiration for the above algorithms; the cellular automata are an example. Because of the long lead time needed to develop and mature new paradigms, development should begin now, even though the widespread availability of massively parallel processing is still a few years away.

  5. Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network: design, methods and recruitment experience.

    PubMed

    Parker, Corette B; Hogue, Carol J R; Koch, Matthew A; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Thorsten, Vanessa R; Dudley, Donald J; Silver, Robert M; Coustan, Donald; Saade, George R; Conway, Deborah; Varner, Michael W; Stoll, Barbara; Pinar, Halit; Bukowski, Radek; Carpenter, Marshall; Goldenberg, Robert

    2011-09-01

    The Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network (SCRN) has conducted a multisite, population-based, case-control study, with prospective enrollment of stillbirths and livebirths at the time of delivery. This paper describes the general design, methods and recruitment experience. The SCRN attempted to enroll all stillbirths and a representative sample of livebirths occurring to residents of pre-defined geographical catchment areas delivering at 59 hospitals associated with five clinical sites. Livebirths <32 weeks gestation and women of African descent were oversampled. The recruitment hospitals were chosen to ensure access to at least 90% of all stillbirths and livebirths to residents of the catchment areas. Participants underwent a standardised protocol including maternal interview, medical record abstraction, placental pathology, biospecimen testing and, in stillbirths, post-mortem examination. Recruitment began in March 2006 and was completed in September 2008 with 663 women with a stillbirth and 1932 women with a livebirth enrolled, representing 69% and 63%, respectively, of the women identified. Additional surveillance for stillbirths continued until June 2009 and a follow-up of the case-control study participants was completed in December 2009. Among consenting women, there were high consent rates for the various study components. For the women with stillbirths, 95% agreed to a maternal interview, chart abstraction and a placental pathological examination; 91% of the women with a livebirth agreed to all of these components. Additionally, 84% of the women with stillbirths agreed to a fetal post-mortem examination. This comprehensive study is poised to systematically study a wide range of potential causes of, and risk factors for, stillbirths and to better understand the scope and incidence of the problem.

  6. Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network: Design, Methods and Recruitment Experience

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Corette B.; Hogue, Carol J. Rowland; Koch, Matthew A.; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma; Thorsten, Vanessa R.; Dudley, Donald J.; Silver, Robert M.; Coustan, Donald; Saade, George R.; Conway, Deborah; Varner, Michael W.; Stoll, Barbara; Pinar, Halit; Bukowski, Radek; Carpenter, Marshall; Goldenberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network (SCRN) has conducted a multisite, population-based, case-control study, with prospective enrollment of stillbirths and live births at the time of delivery. This paper describes the general design, methods, and recruitment experience. The SCRN attempted to enroll all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births occurring to residents of pre-defined geographic catchment areas delivering at 59 hospitals associated with five clinical sites. Live births <32 weeks gestation and women of African descent were oversampled. The recruitment hospitals were chosen to ensure access to at least 90% of all stillbirths and live births to residents of the catchment areas. Participants underwent a standardized protocol including maternal interview, medical record abstraction, placental pathology, biospecimen testing, and, in stillbirths, postmortem examination. Recruitment began in March 2006 and was completed in September 2008 with 663 women with a stillbirth and 1932 women with a live birth enrolled, representing 69% and 63%, respectively, of the women identified. Additional surveillance for stillbirth continued through June 2009 and a follow-up of the case-control study participants was completed in December 2009. Among consenting women, there were high consent rates for the various study components. For the women with stillbirth, 95% agreed to maternal interview, chart abstraction, and placental pathologic examination; 91% of the women with live birth agreed to all of these components. Additionally, 84% of the women with stillbirth agreed to a fetal postmortem examination. This comprehensive study is poised to systematically study a wide range of potential causes of, and risk factors for, stillbirth and to better understand the scope and incidence of the problem. PMID:21819424

  7. METHODS FOR INTEGRATING ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS INTO CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN DECISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to postulate a means by which an engineer could routinely include environmental considerations in day-to-day conceptual design problems; a means that could easily integrate with existing design processes, and thus avoid massive retr...

  8. Analysis and Design Methods for Nonlinear Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    entitled "Design of Nonlinear PID Controllers ." In this paper it is demonstrated that the extended linearization approach can be applied to standard...Sciences and Systems, Baltimore, Maryland, pp. 675-680, 1987. [3] WJ. Rugh, "Design of Nonlinear PID Controllers ," AIChE Journa Vol. 33, No. 10, pp. 1738

  9. Preliminary design of pseudo satellites: Basic methods and feasibility criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    Analytical models of weight and energy balances, aerodynamic models, and solar irradiance models to perform pseudo-satellite preliminary design are presented. Feasibility criteria are determined in accordance with the aim of preliminary design dependent on mission scenario and type of payload.

  10. Teaching Improvement Model Designed with DEA Method and Management Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoneri, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This study uses student evaluation of teachers to design a teaching improvement matrix based on teaching efficiency and performance by combining management matrix and data envelopment analysis. This matrix is designed to formulate suggestions to improve teaching. The research sample consists of 42 classes of freshmen following a course of English…

  11. Developing Baby Bag Design by Using Kansei Engineering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janari, D.; Rakhmawati, A.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer's preferences and market demand are essential factors for product's success. Thus, in achieving its success, a product should have design that could fulfill consumer's expectation. Purpose of this research is accomplishing baby bag product as stipulated by Kansei. The results that represent Kanseiwords are; neat, unique, comfortable, safe, modern, gentle, elegant, antique, attractive, simple, spacious, creative, colorful, durable, stylish, smooth and strong. Identification value on significance of correlation for durable attribute is 0,000 < 0,005, which means significant to baby's bag. While the value of coefficient regression is 0,812 < 0,005, which means that durable attribute insignificant to baby's bag.The result of the baby's bag final design selectionbased on the questionnaire 3 is resulting the combination of all design. Space for clothes, diaper's space, shoulder grip, side grip, bottle's heater pocket and bottle's pocket are derived from design 1. Top grip, space for clothes, shoulder grip, and side grip are derived from design 2.Others design that were taken are, spaces for clothes from design 3, diaper's space and clothes’ space from design 4.

  12. Methods for Reachability-based Hybrid Controller Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-10

    and air traffic management . First, we provide several design techniques and synthesis algorithms for deterministic reachability problems formulated...as motivated by application scenar- ios arising in autonomous vehicle control and air traffic management . First, we provide several design techniques...and in taking time from their busy schedules to offer their valuable comments and suggestions during my qualifying examination. It is Professor

  13. Categorisation of visualisation methods to support the design of Human-Computer Interaction Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Katie; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    During the design of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, the creation of visual artefacts forms an important part of design. On one hand producing a visual artefact has a number of advantages: it helps designers to externalise their thought and acts as a common language between different stakeholders. On the other hand, if an inappropriate visualisation method is employed it could hinder the design process. To support the design of HCI systems, this paper reviews the categorisation of visualisation methods used in HCI. A keyword search is conducted to identify a) current HCI design methods, b) approaches of selecting these methods. The resulting design methods are filtered to create a list of just visualisation methods. These are then categorised using the approaches identified in (b). As a result 23 HCI visualisation methods are identified and categorised in 5 selection approaches (The Recipient, Primary Purpose, Visual Archetype, Interaction Type, and The Design Process).

  14. Development of Combinatorial Methods for Alloy Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Santella, Michael L

    2005-07-01

    The primary goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive methodology for designing and optimizing metallic alloys by combinatorial principles. Because conventional techniques for alloy preparation are unavoidably restrictive in the range of alloy composition that can be examined, combinatorial methods promise to significantly reduce the time, energy, and expense needed for alloy design. Combinatorial methods can be developed not only to optimize existing alloys, but to explore and develop new ones as well. The scientific approach involved fabricating an alloy specimen with a continuous distribution of binary and ternary alloy compositions across its surface--an ''alloy library''--and then using spatially resolved probing techniques to characterize its structure, composition, and relevant properties. The three specific objectives of the project were: (1) to devise means by which simple test specimens with a library of alloy compositions spanning the range interest can be produced; (2) to assess how well the properties of the combinatorial specimen reproduce those of the conventionally processed alloys; and (3) to devise screening tools which can be used to rapidly assess the important properties of the alloys. As proof of principle, the methodology was applied to the Fe-Ni-Cr ternary alloy system that constitutes many commercially important materials such as stainless steels and the H-series and C-series heat and corrosion resistant casting alloys. Three different techniques were developed for making alloy libraries: (1) vapor deposition of discrete thin films on an appropriate substrate and then alloying them together by solid-state diffusion; (2) co-deposition of the alloying elements from three separate magnetron sputtering sources onto an inert substrate; and (3) localized melting of thin films with a focused electron-beam welding system. Each of the techniques was found to have its own advantages and disadvantages. A new and very powerful technique for

  15. A new method for designing dual foil electron beam forming systems. I. Introduction, concept of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrich, Przemysław

    2016-05-01

    In Part I of this work existing methods and problems in dual foil electron beam forming system design are presented. On this basis, a new method of designing these systems is introduced. The motivation behind this work is to eliminate the shortcomings of the existing design methods and improve overall efficiency of the dual foil design process. The existing methods are based on approximate analytical models applied in an unrealistically simplified geometry. Designing a dual foil system with these methods is a rather labor intensive task as corrections to account for the effects not included in the analytical models have to be calculated separately and accounted for in an iterative procedure. To eliminate these drawbacks, the new design method is based entirely on Monte Carlo modeling in a realistic geometry and using physics models that include all relevant processes. In our approach, an optimal configuration of the dual foil system is found by means of a systematic, automatized scan of the system performance in function of parameters of the foils. The new method, while being computationally intensive, minimizes the involvement of the designer and considerably shortens the overall design time. The results are of high quality as all the relevant physics and geometry details are naturally accounted for. To demonstrate the feasibility of practical implementation of the new method, specialized software tools were developed and applied to solve a real life design problem, as described in Part II of this work.

  16. Burgers or tofu? Eating between two worlds: risk information seeking and processing during dietary acculturation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to examine what factors might motivate Chinese international students, the fastest growing ethnic student group in the United States, to seek and process information about potential health risks from eating American-style food. This goal was accomplished by applying the Risk Information Seeking and Processing (RISP) model to this study. An online 2 (severity: high vs. low) × 2 (coping strategies: present vs. absent) between-subjects experiment was conducted via Qualtrics to evaluate the effects of the manipulated variables on the dependent variables of interest as well as various relationships proposed in the RISP model. A convenience sample of 635 participants was recruited online. Data were analyzed primarily using structural equation modeling (SEM) in AMOS 21.0 with maximum likelihood estimation. The final conceptual model has a good model fit to the data given the sample size. The results showed that although the experimentally manipulated variables failed to cause any significant differences in individuals' perceived severity and self-efficacy, this study largely supported the RISP model's propositions about the sociopsychological factors that explain individual variations in information seeking and processing. More specifically, the findings indicated a prominent role of informational subjective norms and affective responses (both negative and positive emotions) in predicting individuals' information seeking and processing. Future implications and limitations are also discussed.

  17. A risk-informed decision framework for setting environmental windows for dredging projects.

    PubMed

    Suedel, Burton C; Kim, Jongbum; Clarke, Douglas G; Linkov, Igor

    2008-09-15

    Sediment dredging is necessary to sustain navigation infrastructure in ports and harbor areas. In the United States alone between 250 and 300 million cubic yards of sediment are dredged annually. Dredging activities may cause stress on aquatic biota by locally increasing turbidity and suspended sediment concentrations, physically disturbing habitat by elevated sedimentation rates, interfering in migratory behaviors, and hydraulically entraining bottom dwelling organisms. Environmental windows are a management practice used to alleviate such stresses on resident and transient biota by placing temporal restrictions on the conduct of dredging operations. Adherence to environmental windows can significantly inflate costs for project sponsors and local stakeholders. Since their inception following passage of NEPA in 1969 the process for setting environmental windows has not followed structured procedures and represents an example of the difficulty inherent in achieving a balance between biological resource protection and cost-effective construction and maintenance of navigation infrastructure. Recent developments in the fields of risk assessment for non-chemical stressors as well as experience in implementing structured risk-informed decision-making tools for sediment and natural resource management are summarized in this paper in relation to setting environmental windows. Combining risk assessment and multi-criteria decision analysis allows development of a framework for an objective process consistent with recommendations by the National Academy of Sciences for setting environmental windows. A hypothetical application of the framework for protection of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in San Francisco Bay is discussed.

  18. Inconsistencies in reporting risk information: a pilot analysis of online news coverage of West Nile Virus.

    PubMed

    Birnbrauer, Kristina; Frohlich, Dennis Owen; Treise, Debbie

    2015-08-11

    West Nile Virus (WNV) has been reported as one of the worst epidemics in US history. This study sought to understand how WNV news stories were framed and how risk information was portrayed from its 1999 arrival in the US through the year 2012. The authors conducted a quantitative content analysis of online news articles obtained through Google News (N = 428). The results of this analysis were compared to the CDC's ArboNET surveillance system. The following story frames were identified in this study: action, conflict, consequence, new evidence, reassurance and uncertainty, with the action frame appearing most frequently. Risk was communicated quantitatively without context in the majority of articles, and only in 2006, the year with the third-highest reported deaths, was risk reported with statistical accuracy. The results from the analysis indicated that at-risk communities were potentially under-informed as accurate risks were not communicated. This study offers evidence about how disease outbreaks are covered in relation to actual disease surveillance data.

  19. Background risk information to assist in risk management decision making. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O.; White, R.K.; Miller, D.B.

    1992-10-01

    The evaluation of the need for remedial activities at hazardous waste sites requires quantification of risks of adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem resulting from the presence of chemical and radioactive substances at these sites. The health risks from exposure to these substances are in addition to risks encountered because of the virtually unavoidable exposure to naturally occurring chemicals and radioactive materials that are present in air, water, soil, building materials, and food products. To provide a frame of reference for interpreting risks quantified for hazardous waste sites, it is useful to identify the relative magnitude of risks of both a voluntary and involuntary nature that are ubiquitous throughout east Tennessee. In addition to discussing risks from the ubiquitous presence of background carcinogens in the east Tennessee environment, this report also presents risks resulting from common, everyday activities. Such information should, not be used to discount or trivialize risks from hazardous waste contamination, but rather, to create a sensitivity to general risk issues, thus providing a context for better interpretation of risk information.

  20. Risk-Informed Decision Making: Application to Technology Development Alternative Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon; Maggio, Gaspare; Everett, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    NASA NPR 8000.4A, Agency Risk Management Procedural Requirements, defines risk management in terms of two complementary processes: Risk-informed Decision Making (RIDM) and Continuous Risk Management (CRM). The RIDM process is used to inform decision making by emphasizing proper use of risk analysis to make decisions that impact all mission execution domains (e.g., safety, technical, cost, and schedule) for program/projects and mission support organizations. The RIDM process supports the selection of an alternative prior to program commitment. The CRM process is used to manage risk associated with the implementation of the selected alternative. The two processes work together to foster proactive risk management at NASA. The Office of Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA Headquarters has developed a technical handbook to provide guidance for implementing the RIDM process in the context of NASA risk management and systems engineering. This paper summarizes the key concepts and procedures of the RIDM process as presented in the handbook, and also illustrates how the RIDM process can be applied to the selection of technology investments as NASA's new technology development programs are initiated.

  1. Nine steps to risk-informed wellhead protection and management: a case study.

    PubMed

    Enzenhoefer, R; Bunk, T; Nowak, W

    2014-09-01

    Wellhead-protection zones are commonly delineated on the basis of advective travel-time analysis without considering any aspects of model uncertainty. In the past decade, research efforts have produced quantifiable risk-based safety margins for protection zones. These margins are based on well-vulnerability criteria (e.g., travel times, exposure times, peak concentrations) and take model and parameter uncertainty into account. There are three main reasons why practitioners still refrain from applying these new techniques. (1) They fear the additional areal demand of probabilistic safety margins; (2) probabilistic approaches are allegedly complex, not readily available and require huge computing resources, and (3) uncertainty bounds are fuzzy, whereas final decisions are binary. The primary goal of this paper is to show that these reservations are unjustified. We present a straightforward, computationally affordable framework that offers risk-informed decision support for robust and transparent wellhead delineation under uncertainty. We show that reliability levels can be increased by exchanging delineated low-risk areas for previously nondelineated high-risk areas. We also show that further improvements may often be available with only little additional delineated area. As proof of our concept, we illustrate our key points with the example of a pumped karstic well catchment, located in Germany.

  2. Application of optimization methods to helicopter rotor blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Walsh, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades with constraints on multiple coupled flap-lag natural frequencies, autorotational inertia, and centrifugal stress is presented. Optimum designs are obtained for blades with both rectangular and tapered planforms and are compared within a reference blade. The effects of higher-frequency constraints and stress constraints on the optimum blade designs are assessed. The results indicate that there is an increase in blade weight and a significant change in the design variable distributions with an increase in the number of frequency constraints. The inclusion of stress constraints has different effects on the wall thickness distributions of rectangular and tapered blades, but tends to increase the magnitude of the nonstructural segment weight distributions for both blade types.

  3. Third order TRANSPORT with MAD (Methodical Accelerator Design) input

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.

    1988-09-20

    This paper describes computer-aided design codes for particle accelerators. Among the topics discussed are: input beam description; parameters and algebraic expressions; the physical elements; beam lines; operations; and third-order transfer matrix. (LSP)

  4. An On-Board Diagnosis Logic and Its Design Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Satoshi; Fusaoka, Akira

    In this paper, we propose a design methodology for on-board diagnosis engine of embedded systems. A boolean function for diagnosis circuit can be mechanically designed from the system dynamics given by the linear differential equation if it is observable, and also if the relation is given between the set of abnormal physical parameters and the faulty part. The size of diagnosis circuit is not so large that it can be implemented in FPGA or fabricated in a simple chip.

  5. Development of panel methods for subsonic analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs, developed for subsonic inviscid analysis and design are described. The first solves arbitrary mixed analysis design problems for multielement airfoils in two dimensional flow. The second calculates the pressure distribution for arbitrary lifting or nonlifting three dimensional configurations. In each program, inviscid flow is modelled by using distributed source doublet singularities on configuration surface panels. Numerical formulations and representative solutions are presented for the programs.

  6. Aircraft design for mission performance using nonlinear multiobjective optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dovi, Augustine R.; Wrenn, Gregory A.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique which converts a constrained optimization problem to an unconstrained one where conflicting figures of merit may be simultaneously considered was combined with a complex mission analysis system. The method is compared with existing single and multiobjective optimization methods. A primary benefit from this new method for multiobjective optimization is the elimination of separate optimizations for each objective, which is required by some optimization methods. A typical wide body transport aircraft is used for the comparative studies.

  7. A Preliminary Rubric Design to Evaluate Mixed Methods Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    With the increase in frequency of the use of mixed methods, both in research publications and in externally funded grants there are increasing calls for a set of standards to assess the quality of mixed methods research. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to conduct a multi-phase analysis to create a preliminary rubric to evaluate mixed…

  8. Approximation methods for combined thermal/structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Shore, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    Two approximation concepts for combined thermal/structural design are evaluated. The first concept is an approximate thermal analysis based on the first derivatives of structural temperatures with respect to design variables. Two commonly used first-order Taylor series expansions are examined. The direct and reciprocal expansions are special members of a general family of approximations, and for some conditions other members of that family of approximations are more accurate. Several examples are used to compare the accuracy of the different expansions. The second approximation concept is the use of critical time points for combined thermal and stress analyses of structures with transient loading conditions. Significant time savings are realized by identifying critical time points and performing the stress analysis for those points only. The design of an insulated panel which is exposed to transient heating conditions is discussed.

  9. A design method for an intuitive web site

    SciTech Connect

    Quinniey, M.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Baca, B.G.; Forsythe, J.C.; Grose, E.

    1999-11-03

    The paper describes a methodology for designing a web site for human factor engineers that is applicable for designing a web site for a group of people. Many web pages on the World Wide Web are not organized in a format that allows a user to efficiently find information. Often the information and hypertext links on web pages are not organized into intuitive groups. Intuition implies that a person is able to use their knowledge of a paradigm to solve a problem. Intuitive groups are categories that allow web page users to find information by using their intuition or mental models of categories. In order to improve the human factors engineers efficiency for finding information on the World Wide Web, research was performed to develop a web site that serves as a tool for finding information effectively. The paper describes a methodology for designing a web site for a group of people who perform similar task in an organization.

  10. Statistical Methods for Rapid Aerothermal Analysis and Design Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Carolyn; DePriest, Douglas; Thompson, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The cost and safety goals for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) will require that rapid high-fidelity aerothermodynamic design tools be used early in the design cycle. To meet these requirements, it is desirable to establish statistical models that quantify and improve the accuracy, extend the applicability, and enable combined analyses using existing prediction tools. The research work was focused on establishing the suitable mathematical/statistical models for these purposes. It is anticipated that the resulting models can be incorporated into a software tool to provide rapid, variable-fidelity, aerothermal environments to predict heating along an arbitrary trajectory. This work will support development of an integrated design tool to perform automated thermal protection system (TPS) sizing and material selection.

  11. A method for designing robust multivariable feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milich, David Albert; Athans, Michael; Valavani, Lena; Stein, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the synthesis of linear, time-invariant (LTI) controllers for multivariable LTI systems. The aim is to achieve stability and performance robustness of the feedback system in the presence of multiple unstructured uncertainty blocks; i.e., to satisfy a frequency-domain inequality in terms of the structured singular value. The design technique is referred to as the Causality Recovery Methodology (CRM). Starting with an initial (nominally) stabilizing compensator, the CRM produces a closed-loop system whose performance-robustness is at least as good as, and hopefully superior to, that of the original design. The robustness improvement is obtained by solving an infinite-dimensional, convex optimization program. A finite-dimensional implementation of the CRM was developed, and it was applied to a multivariate design example.

  12. Multiple methods integration for structural mechanics analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new research area of multiple methods integration is proposed for joining diverse methods of structural mechanics analysis which interact with one another. Three categories of multiple methods are defined: those in which a physical interface are well defined; those in which a physical interface is not well-defined, but selected; and those in which the interface is a mathematical transformation. Two fundamental integration procedures are presented that can be extended to integrate various methods (e.g., finite elements, Rayleigh Ritz, Galerkin, and integral methods) with one another. Since the finite element method will likely be the major method to be integrated, its enhanced robustness under element distortion is also examined and a new robust shell element is demonstrated.

  13. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  14. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  15. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  16. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  17. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  18. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 1; Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    For the preliminary design and the off-design performance analysis of axial flow turbines, a pair of intermediate level-of-fidelity computer codes, TD2-2 (design; reference 1) and AXOD (off-design; reference 2), are being evaluated for use in turbine design and performance prediction of the modern high performance aircraft engines. TD2-2 employs a streamline curvature method for design, while AXOD approaches the flow analysis with an equal radius-height domain decomposition strategy. Both methods resolve only the flows in the annulus region while modeling the impact introduced by the blade rows. The mathematical formulations and derivations involved in both methods are documented in references 3, 4 for TD2-2) and in reference 5 (for AXOD). The focus of this paper is to discuss the fundamental issues of applicability and compatibility of the two codes as a pair of companion pieces, to perform preliminary design and off-design analysis for modern aircraft engine turbines. Two validation cases for the design and the off-design prediction using TD2-2 and AXOD conducted on two existing high efficiency turbines, developed and tested in the NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (GE-E3) Program, the High Pressure Turbine (HPT; two stages, air cooled) and the Low Pressure Turbine (LPT; five stages, un-cooled), are provided in support of the analysis and discussion presented in this paper.

  19. Advanced 3D inverse method for designing turbomachine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, T.

    1995-10-01

    To meet the goal of 60% plant-cycle efficiency or better set in the ATS Program for baseload utility scale power generation, several critical technologies need to be developed. One such need is the improvement of component efficiencies. This work addresses the issue of improving the performance of turbo-machine components in gas turbines through the development of an advanced three-dimensional and viscous blade design system. This technology is needed to replace some elements in current design systems that are based on outdated technology.

  20. [Drug design ideas and methods of Chinese herb prescriptions].

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun-guo; Liu, Jian-xun

    2015-09-01

    The new drug of Chinese herbal prescription, which is the best carrier for the syndrome differentiation and treatment of Chinese medicine and is the main form of the new drug research and development, plays a very important role in the new drug research and development. Although there are many sources of the prescriptions, whether it can become a new drug, the necessity, rationality and science of the prescriptions are the key to develop the new drug. In this article, aiming at the key issues in prescriptions design, the source, classification, composition design of new drug of Chinese herbal prescriptions are discussed, and provide a useful reference for research and development of new drugs.

  1. Active Learning Methods and Technology: Strategies for Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coorey, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The demands in higher education are on the rise. Charged with teaching more content, increased class sizes and engaging students, educators face numerous challenges. In design education, educators are often torn between the teaching of technology and the teaching of theory. Learning the formal concepts of hierarchy, contrast and space provide the…

  2. A Prospective Method to Guide Small Molecule Drug Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    At present, small molecule drug design follows a retrospective path when considering what analogs are to be made around a current hit or lead molecule with the focus often on identifying a compound with higher intrinsic potency. What this approach overlooks is the simultaneous need to also improve the physicochemical (PC) and pharmacokinetic (PK)…

  3. Library Design Analysis Using Post-Occupancy Evaluation Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Dennis C.; Stewart, Sharon L.

    1995-01-01

    Presents findings of a user-based study of the interior of Rodger's Science and Engineering Library at the University of Alabama. Compared facility evaluations from faculty, library staff, and graduate and undergraduate students. Features evaluated include: acoustics, aesthetics, book stacks, design, finishes/materials, furniture, lighting,…

  4. Design component method for sensitivity analysis of built-up structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung K.; Seong, Hwai G.

    1986-01-01

    A 'design component method' that provides a unified and systematic organization of design sensitivity analysis for built-up structures is developed and implemented. Both conventional design variables, such as thickness and cross-sectional area, and shape design variables of components of built-up structures are considered. It is shown that design of components of built-up structures can be characterized and system design sensitivity expressions obtained by simply adding contributions from each component. The method leads to a systematic organization of computations for design sensitivity analysis that is similar to the way in which computations are organized within a finite element code.

  5. Overview of control design methods for smart structural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Vittal S.; Sana, Sridhar

    2001-08-01

    Smart structures are a result of effective integration of control system design and signal processing with the structural systems to maximally utilize the new advances in materials for structures, actuation and sensing to obtain the best performance for the application at hand. The research in smart structures is constantly driving towards attaining self adaptive and diagnostic capabilities that biological systems possess. This has been manifested in the number of successful applications in many areas of engineering such as aerospace, civil and automotive systems. Instrumental in the development of such systems are smart materials such as piezo-electric, shape memory alloys, electrostrictive, magnetostrictive and fiber-optic materials and various composite materials for use as actuators, sensors and structural members. The need for development of control systems that maximally utilize the smart actuators and sensing materials to design highly distributed and highly adaptable controllers has spurred research in the area of smart structural modeling, identification, actuator/sensor design and placement, control systems design such as adaptive and robust controllers with new tools such a neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, linear matrix inequalities and electronics for controller implementation such as analog electronics, micro controllers, digital signal processors (DSPs) and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) such field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and Multichip modules (MCMs) etc. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the state of control in smart structures. Different aspects of the development of smart structures such as applications, technology and theoretical advances especially in the area of control systems design and implementation will be covered.

  6. Optimal reliability design method for remote solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwapaet, Nuchida

    A unique optimal reliability design algorithm is developed for remote communication systems. The algorithm deals with either minimizing an unavailability of the system within a fixed cost or minimizing the cost of the system with an unavailability constraint. The unavailability of the system is a function of three possible failure occurrences: individual component breakdown, solar energy deficiency (loss of load probability), and satellite/radio transmission loss. The three mathematical models of component failure, solar power failure, transmission failure are combined and formulated as a nonlinear programming optimization problem with binary decision variables, such as number and type (or size) of photovoltaic modules, batteries, radios, antennas, and controllers. Three possible failures are identified and integrated in computer algorithm to generate the parameters for the optimization algorithm. The optimization algorithm is implemented with a branch-and-bound technique solution in MS Excel Solver. The algorithm is applied to a case study design for an actual system that will be set up in remote mountainous areas of Peru. The automated algorithm is verified with independent calculations. The optimal results from minimizing the unavailability of the system with the cost constraint case and minimizing the total cost of the system with the unavailability constraint case are consistent with each other. The tradeoff feature in the algorithm allows designers to observe results of 'what-if' scenarios of relaxing constraint bounds, thus obtaining the most benefit from the optimization process. An example of this approach applied to an existing communication system in the Andes shows dramatic improvement in reliability for little increase in cost. The algorithm is a real design tool, unlike other existing simulation design tools. The algorithm should be useful for other stochastic systems where component reliability, random supply and demand, and communication are

  7. Consumers' Kansei Needs Clustering Method for Product Emotional Design Based on Numerical Design Structure Matrix and Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deng-kai; Gu, Rong; Gu, Yu-feng; Yu, Sui-huai

    2016-01-01

    Consumers' Kansei needs reflect their perception about a product and always consist of a large number of adjectives. Reducing the dimension complexity of these needs to extract primary words not only enables the target product to be explicitly positioned, but also provides a convenient design basis for designers engaging in design work. Accordingly, this study employs a numerical design structure matrix (NDSM) by parameterizing a conventional DSM and integrating genetic algorithms to find optimum Kansei clusters. A four-point scale method is applied to assign link weights of every two Kansei adjectives as values of cells when constructing an NDSM. Genetic algorithms are used to cluster the Kansei NDSM and find optimum clusters. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented. The details of the proposed approach are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter for Kansei needs clustering. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for clustering Kansei needs adjectives in product emotional design. PMID:27630709

  8. Consumers' Kansei Needs Clustering Method for Product Emotional Design Based on Numerical Design Structure Matrix and Genetic Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Pu; Chen, Deng-Kai; Gu, Rong; Gu, Yu-Feng; Yu, Sui-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Consumers' Kansei needs reflect their perception about a product and always consist of a large number of adjectives. Reducing the dimension complexity of these needs to extract primary words not only enables the target product to be explicitly positioned, but also provides a convenient design basis for designers engaging in design work. Accordingly, this study employs a numerical design structure matrix (NDSM) by parameterizing a conventional DSM and integrating genetic algorithms to find optimum Kansei clusters. A four-point scale method is applied to assign link weights of every two Kansei adjectives as values of cells when constructing an NDSM. Genetic algorithms are used to cluster the Kansei NDSM and find optimum clusters. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented. The details of the proposed approach are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter for Kansei needs clustering. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for clustering Kansei needs adjectives in product emotional design.

  9. Use of epidemiologic data in Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Persad, Amanda S.; Cooper, Glinda S.

    2008-11-15

    In human health risk assessment, information from epidemiologic studies is typically utilized in the hazard identification step of the risk assessment paradigm. However, in the assessment of many chemicals by the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), epidemiologic data, both observational and experimental, have also been used in the derivation of toxicological risk estimates (i.e., reference doses [RfD], reference concentrations [RfC], oral cancer slope factors [CSF] and inhalation unit risks [IUR]). Of the 545 health assessments posted on the IRIS database as of June 2007, 44 assessments derived non-cancer or cancer risk estimates based on human data. RfD and RfC calculations were based on a spectrum of endpoints from changes in enzyme activity to specific neurological or dermal effects. There are 12 assessments with IURs based on human data, two assessments that extrapolated human inhalation data to derive CSFs and one that used human data to directly derive a CSF. Lung or respiratory cancer is the most common endpoint for cancer assessments based on human data. To date, only one chemical, benzene, has utilized human data for derivation of all three quantitative risk estimates (i.e., RfC, RfD, and dose-response modeling for cancer assessment). Through examples from the IRIS database, this paper will demonstrate how epidemiologic data have been used in IRIS assessments for both adding to the body of evidence in the hazard identification process and in the quantification of risk estimates in the dose-response component of the risk assessment paradigm.

  10. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  11. Study of Fuze Structure and Reliability Design Based on the Direct Search Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhang; Ning, Wang

    2017-03-01

    Redundant design is one of the important methods to improve the reliability of the system, but mutual coupling of multiple factors is often involved in the design. In my study, Direct Search Method is introduced into the optimum redundancy configuration for design optimization, in which, the reliability, cost, structural weight and other factors can be taken into account simultaneously, and the redundant allocation and reliability design of aircraft critical system are computed. The results show that this method is convenient and workable, and applicable to the redundancy configurations and optimization of various designs upon appropriate modifications. And this method has a good practical value.

  12. Design and ergonomics. Methods for integrating ergonomics at hand tool design stage.

    PubMed

    Marsot, Jacques; Claudon, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    As a marked increase in the number of musculoskeletal disorders was noted in many industrialized countries and more specifically in companies that require the use of hand tools, the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) launched in 1999 a research project on the topic of integrating ergonomics into hand tool design, and more particularly to a design of a boning knife. After a brief recall of the difficulties of integrating ergonomics at the design stage, the present paper shows how 3 design methodological tools--Functional Analysis, Quality Function Deployment and TRIZ--have been applied to the design of a boning knife. Implementation of these tools enabled us to demonstrate the extent to which they are capable of responding to the difficulties of integrating ergonomics into product design.

  13. Synthesis of calculational methods for design and analysis of radiation shields for nuclear rocket systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Disney, R. K.; Jordan, T. A.; Soltesz, R. G.; Woodsum, H. C.

    1969-01-01

    Eight computer programs make up a nine volume synthesis containing two design methods for nuclear rocket radiation shields. The first design method is appropriate for parametric and preliminary studies, while the second accomplishes the verification of a final nuclear rocket reactor design.

  14. Grouping design method of catadioptric projection objective for deep ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhen; Li, Yanqiu; Mao, Shanshan

    2017-02-01

    Choosing an adequate initial design for optimization plays an important role in obtaining high-quality deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithographic objectives. In this paper, the grouping design method is extended to acquire initial configurations of catadioptric projection objective for DUV lithography. In this method, an objective system is first divided into several lens groups. The initial configuration of each lens group is then determined by adjusting and optimizing existing lens design according to respective design requirements. Finally, the lens groups are connected into a feasible initial objective system. Grouping design allocates the complexity of designing a whole system to each of the lens groups, which significantly simplifies the design process. A two-mirror design form serves as an example for illustrating the grouping design principles to this type of system. In addition, it is demonstrated that different initial designs can be generated by changing the design form of each individual lens group.

  15. Applications of Genetic Methods to NASA Design and Operations Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip D.

    1996-01-01

    We review four recent NASA-funded applications in which evolutionary/genetic methods are important. In the process we survey: the kinds of problems being solved today with these methods; techniques and tools used; problems encountered; and areas where research is needed. The presentation slides are annotated briefly at the top of each page.

  16. Designing a Science Methods Course for Early Childhood Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerson, Valarie L.

    2004-01-01

    Preparing early childhood (K-3) teachers to teach science presents special challenges for the science methods instructor. Early childhood preservice teachers typically come to the methods classroom with little science content knowledge; they also lack confidence in their own abilities to teach science. This paper presents a theoretical background,…

  17. How to Combine Objectives and Methods of Evaluation in Iterative ILE Design: Lessons Learned from Designing Ambre-Add

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogry, S.; Jean-Daubias, S.; Guin, N.

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with evaluating an interactive learning environment (ILE) during the iterative-design process. Various aspects of the system must be assessed and a number of evaluation methods are available. In designing the ILE Ambre-add, several techniques were combined to test and refine the system. In particular, we point out the merits of…

  18. A hybrid nonlinear programming method for design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Solutions to engineering design problems formulated as nonlinear programming (NLP) problems usually require the use of more than one optimization technique. Moreover, the interaction between the user (analysis/synthesis) program and the NLP system can lead to interface, scaling, or convergence problems. An NLP solution system is presented that seeks to solve these problems by providing a programming system to ease the user-system interface. A simple set of rules is used to select an optimization technique or to switch from one technique to another in an attempt to detect, diagnose, and solve some potential problems. Numerical examples involving finite element based optimal design of space trusses and rotor bearing systems are used to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology.

  19. New Methods for Design and Computation of Freeform Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-09

    as a partial differential equation(PDE) of second order with nonstandard boundary conditions. The solution to this PDE problem is a scalar function...the exact solution with any a priori given accuracy. By contrast with other approaches the solution obtained with our approach does not depend on ad hoc...strategy for constructing weak solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations arising in design problems involving freeform optical surfaces[10

  20. Design Method of Fault Detector for Injection Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Kiyoshi; Saeki, Masami

    An injection unit is considered as a speed control system utilizing a reaction-force sensor. Our purpose is to design a fault detector that detects and isolates actuator and sensor faults under the condition that the system is disturbed by a reaction force. First described is the fault detector's general structure. In this system, a disturbance observer that estimates the reaction force is designed for the speed control system in order to obtain the residual signals, and then post-filters that separate the specific frequency elements from the residual signals are applied in order to generate the decision signals. Next, we describe a fault detector designed specifically for a model of the injection unit. It is shown that the disturbance imposed on the decision variables can be made significantly small by appropriate adjustments to the observer bandwidth, and that most of the sensor faults and actuator faults can be detected and some of them can be isolated in the frequency domain by setting the frequency characteristics of the post-filters appropriately. Our result is verified by experiments for an actual injection unit.

  1. Advanced Control and Protection system Design Methods for Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J; Wilson Jr, Thomas L; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2012-06-01

    The project supported the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in identifying and evaluating the regulatory implications concerning the control and protection systems proposed for use in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP, using modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology, is to provide commercial industries with electricity and high-temperature process heat for industrial processes such as hydrogen production. Process heat temperatures range from 700 to 950 C, and for the upper range of these operation temperatures, the modular HTGR is sometimes referred to as the Very High Temperature Reactor or VHTR. Initial NGNP designs are for operation in the lower temperature range. The defining safety characteristic of the modular HTGR is that its primary defense against serious accidents is to be achieved through its inherent properties of the fuel and core. Because of its strong negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and the capability of the fuel to withstand high temperatures, fast-acting active safety systems or prompt operator actions should not be required to prevent significant fuel failure and fission product release. The plant is designed such that its inherent features should provide adequate protection despite operational errors or equipment failure. Figure 1 shows an example modular HTGR layout (prismatic core version), where its inlet coolant enters the reactor vessel at the bottom, traversing up the sides to the top plenum, down-flow through an annular core, and exiting from the lower plenum (hot duct). This research provided NRC staff with (a) insights and knowledge about the control and protection systems for the NGNP and VHTR, (b) information on the technologies/approaches under consideration for use in the reactor and process heat applications, (c) guidelines for the design of highly integrated control rooms, (d) consideration for modeling of control and protection system designs for

  2. Reducing Design Risk Using Robust Design Methods: A Dual Response Surface Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Yeniay, Ozgur; Lepsch, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Space transportation system conceptual design is a multidisciplinary process containing considerable element of risk. Risk here is defined as the variability in the estimated (output) performance characteristic of interest resulting from the uncertainties in the values of several disciplinary design and/or operational parameters. Uncertainties from one discipline (and/or subsystem) may propagate to another, through linking parameters and the final system output may have a significant accumulation of risk. This variability can result in significant deviations from the expected performance. Therefore, an estimate of variability (which is called design risk in this study) together with the expected performance characteristic value (e.g. mean empty weight) is necessary for multidisciplinary optimization for a robust design. Robust design in this study is defined as a solution that minimizes variability subject to a constraint on mean performance characteristics. Even though multidisciplinary design optimization has gained wide attention and applications, the treatment of uncertainties to quantify and analyze design risk has received little attention. This research effort explores the dual response surface approach to quantify variability (risk) in critical performance characteristics (such as weight) during conceptual design.

  3. Object-oriented design of preconditioned iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bruaset, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    In this talk the author discusses how object-oriented programming techniques can be used to develop a flexible software package for preconditioned iterative methods. The ideas described have been used to implement the linear algebra part of Diffpack, which is a collection of C++ class libraries that provides high-level tools for the solution of partial differential equations. In particular, this software package is aimed at rapid development of PDE-based numerical simulators, primarily using finite element methods.

  4. Structural topology design of container ship based on knowledge-based engineering and level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jin-ju; Wang, De-yu; Shi, Qi-qi

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge-Based Engineering (KBE) is introduced into the ship structural design in this paper. From the implementation of KBE, the design solutions for both Rules Design Method (RDM) and Interpolation Design Method (IDM) are generated. The corresponding Finite Element (FE) models are generated. Topological design of the longitudinal structures is studied where the Gaussian Process (GP) is employed to build the surrogate model for FE analysis. Multi-objective optimization methods inspired by Pareto Front are used to reduce the design tank weight and outer surface area simultaneously. Additionally, an enhanced Level Set Method (LSM) which employs implicit algorithm is applied to the topological design of typical bracket plate which is used extensively in ship structures. Two different sets of boundary conditions are considered. The proposed methods show satisfactory efficiency and accuracy.

  5. Risk-informed criticality analysis as applied to waste packages subject to a subsurface igneous intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Darby Suzan

    branches of an event. This method of applying PRA techniques to criticality safety is demonstrated using the example of waste packages in an underground geologic repository during a volcanic event. It is concluded that the current design does not provide adequate subcritical assurance, and recommended that future design modifications focus on mitigating chemical degradation of fuel and metals.

  6. Category's analysis and operational project capacity method of transformation in design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obednina, S. V.; Bystrova, T. Y.

    2015-10-01

    The method of transformation is attracting widespread interest in fields such contemporary design. However, in theory of design little attention has been paid to a categorical status of the term "transformation". This paper presents the conceptual analysis of transformation based on the theory of form employed in the influential essays by Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. In the present work the transformation as a method of shaping design has been explored as well as potential application of this term in design has been demonstrated.

  7. Genetic-evolution-based optimization methods for engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. S.; Pan, T. S.; Dhingra, A. K.; Venkayya, V. B.; Kumar, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the applicability of a biological model, based on genetic evolution, for engineering design optimization. Algorithms embodying the ideas of reproduction, crossover, and mutation are developed and applied to solve different types of structural optimization problems. Both continuous and discrete variable optimization problems are solved. A two-bay truss for maximum fundamental frequency is considered to demonstrate the continuous variable case. The selection of locations of actuators in an actively controlled structure, for minimum energy dissipation, is considered to illustrate the discrete variable case.

  8. Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Insights into Design and Analysis Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieber, Eli

    2009-01-01

    This article describes and discusses issues related to research design and data analysis in the mixing of qualitative and quantitative methods. It is increasingly desirable to use multiple methods in research, but questions arise as to how best to design and analyze the data generated by mixed methods projects. I offer a conceptualization for such…

  9. A Proposed Model of Retransformed Qualitative Data within a Mixed Methods Research Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Most models of mixed methods research design provide equal emphasis of qualitative and quantitative data analyses and interpretation. Other models stress one method more than the other. The present article is a discourse about the investigator's decision to employ a mixed method design to examine special education teachers' advocacy and…

  10. Computer control of large accelerators design concepts and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.; Gormley, M.

    1984-05-01

    Unlike most of the specialities treated in this volume, control system design is still an art, not a science. These lectures are an attempt to produce a primer for prospective practitioners of this art. A large modern accelerator requires a comprehensive control system for commissioning, machine studies and day-to-day operation. Faced with the requirement to design a control system for such a machine, the control system architect has a bewildering array of technical devices and techniques at his disposal, and it is our aim in the following chapters to lead him through the characteristics of the problems he will have to face and the practical alternatives available for solving them. We emphasize good system architecture using commercially available hardware and software components, but in addition we discuss the actual control strategies which are to be implemented since it is at the point of deciding what facilities shall be available that the complexity of the control system and its cost are implicitly decided. 19 references.

  11. Flight critical system design guidelines and validation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, H. M.; Lupton, A. O.; Holden, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts being expended at NASA-Langley to define a validation methodology, techniques for comparing advanced systems concepts, and design guidelines for characterizing fault tolerant digital avionics are described with an emphasis on the capabilities of AIRLAB, an environmentally controlled laboratory. AIRLAB has VAX 11/750 and 11/780 computers with an aggregate of 22 Mb memory and over 650 Mb storage, interconnected at 256 kbaud. An additional computer is programmed to emulate digital devices. Ongoing work is easily accessed at user stations by either chronological or key word indexing. The CARE III program aids in analyzing the capabilities of test systems to recover from faults. An additional code, the semi-Markov unreliability program (SURE) generates upper and lower reliability bounds. The AIRLAB facility is mainly dedicated to research on designs of digital flight-critical systems which must have acceptable reliability before incorporation into aircraft control systems. The digital systems would be too costly to submit to a full battery of flight tests and must be initially examined with the AIRLAB simulation capabilities.

  12. AI/OR computational model for integrating qualitative and quantitative design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agogino, Alice M.; Bradley, Stephen R.; Cagan, Jonathan; Jain, Pramod; Michelena, Nestor

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework for integrating qualitative and numerical computational methods for optimally-directed design is described. The theory is presented as a computational model and features of implementations are summarized where appropriate. To demonstrate the versatility of the methodology we focus on four seemingly disparate aspects of the design process and their interaction: (1) conceptual design, (2) qualitative optimal design, (3) design innovation, and (4) numerical global optimization.

  13. Cathodic protection design using the regression and correlation method

    SciTech Connect

    Niembro, A.M.; Ortiz, E.L.G.

    1997-09-01

    A computerized statistical method which calculates the current demand requirement based on potential measurements for cathodic protection systems is introduced. The method uses the regression and correlation analysis of statistical measurements of current and potentials of the piping network. This approach involves four steps: field potential measurements, statistical determination of the current required to achieve full protection, installation of more cathodic protection capacity with distributed anodes around the plant and examination of the protection potentials. The procedure is described and recommendations for the improvement of the existing and new cathodic protection systems are given.

  14. A design method for minimizing sensitivity to plant parameter variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadass, Z.; Powell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for minimizing the sensitivity of multivariable systems to parameter variations. The variable parameters are considered as random variables and their effect is included in a quadratic performance index. The performance index is a weighted sum of the state and control covariances that stem from both the random system disturbances and the parameter uncertainties. The numerical solution of the problem is described and application of the method to several initially sensitive tracking systems is discussed. The sensitivity factor of reduction was typically 2 or 3 over a system based on random system noise only, and yet resulted in state RMS increases of only about a factor of two.

  15. Weighing health benefit and health risk information when consuming sport-caught fish.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Barbara A; A Connelly, Nancy; Sheeshka, Judy; Patterson, Jacqueline

    2003-12-01

    Fish consumers may incur benefits and risks from eating fish. Health advisories issued by states, tribes, and other entities typically include advice about how to limit fish consumption or change other behaviors (e.g., fish cleaning or cooking) to reduce health risks from exposure to contaminants. Eating fish, however, may provide health benefits. Risk communicators and fish consumers have suggested the importance of including risk comparison information, as well as health risk-benefit comparisons in health advisory communications. To improve understanding about how anglers fishing in waters affected by health advisories may respond to such risk-risk or risk-benefit information, we surveyed Lake Ontario (NY, USA) anglers. We interviewed by telephone 4,750 anglers, 2,593 of which had fished Lake Ontario in the past 12 months and were sent a detailed mail questionnaire (1,245 responded). We posed questions varying the magnitude of health risks and health benefits to be gained by fish consumption, and varied the population affected by these risks and benefits (anglers, children, women of childbearing age, and unborn children). Respondents were influenced by health benefit and health risk information. When risks were high, most respondents would eat less fish regardless of the benefit level. When risks were low, the magnitude of change in fish consumption was related to level of benefit. Responses differed depending on the question wording order, that is, whether "risks" were posed before "benefits." For a given risk-benefit level, respondents would give different advice to women of childbearing age versus children, with more conservative advice (eat less fish) provided to women of childbearing age. Respondents appeared to be influenced more strongly by risk-risk comparisons (e.g., risks from other foods vs. risks from fish) than by risk-benefit comparisons (e.g., risks from fish vs. benefits from fish). Risk analysts and risk communicators should improve efforts to

  16. Integrated Risk-Informed Decision-Making for an ALMR PRISM

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlheim, Michael David; Belles, Randy; Denning, Richard S.

    2016-05-01

    Decision-making is the process of identifying decision alternatives, assessing those alternatives based on predefined metrics, selecting an alternative (i.e., making a decision), and then implementing that alternative. The generation of decisions requires a structured, coherent process, or a decision-making process. The overall objective for this work is that the generalized framework is adopted into an autonomous decision-making framework and tailored to specific requirements for various applications. In this context, automation is the use of computing resources to make decisions and implement a structured decision-making process with limited or no human intervention. The overriding goal of automation is to replace or supplement human decision makers with reconfigurable decision-making modules that can perform a given set of tasks rationally, consistently, and reliably. Risk-informed decision-making requires a probabilistic assessment of the likelihood of success given the status of the plant/systems and component health, and a deterministic assessment between plant operating parameters and reactor protection parameters to prevent unnecessary trips and challenges to plant safety systems. The probabilistic portion of the decision-making engine of the supervisory control system is based on the control actions associated with an ALMR PRISM. Newly incorporated into the probabilistic models are the prognostic/diagnostic models developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These allow decisions to incorporate the health of components into the decision–making process. Once the control options are identified and ranked based on the likelihood of success, the supervisory control system transmits the options to the deterministic portion of the platform. The deterministic portion of the decision-making engine uses thermal-hydraulic modeling and components for an advanced liquid-metal reactor Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module. The deterministic multi

  17. Computational Methods for Aerodynamic Design (Inverse) and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Airfoils with Given Velocity Distribution in Incompressible Flow," J. Aircraft, Vol. 10, 1973, pp. 651-659. 7. Polito, L., "Un Metodo Esatto -per 11 Progetto...and the Simpson rule. Using a panel arrangement method with properly increased panel deusity in regions with comparatively large rv -variations, use of

  18. The Use of Hermeneutics in a Mixed Methods Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Zweck, Claudia; Paterson, Margo; Pentland, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    Combining methods in a single study is becoming a more common practice because of the limitations of using only one approach to fully address all aspects of a research question. Hermeneutics in this paper is discussed in relation to a large national study that investigated issues influencing the ability of international graduates to work as…

  19. Stochastic Methods in Protective Structure Design: An Integrated Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    189a. Histogram and Probability for Monte Carlo Method .................................... 2 1 9a. Histogram and Probability for Response...Monte Carlo Simulation for ACI Shear and Shear Response .............. 26 1 lb. Static Monte Carlo Simulation for Direct Shear and Shear Response...problem to a wave-propagation, breaching, or penetration problem. A simple Monte- Carlo simulation of the range versus pressure function would

  20. Experimental Evaluation of Design Methods for Hardened Piping Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    prediction capabilities of present day computer methods. The basic pipe elements tested included straight pipes, area changes, elbows , valves, a pump, and...surge tanks. The piping system tested was a closed loop system which contained the following elements: elbows , straight pipes, valves, a pump, and an

  1. Power Analysis for Complex Mediational Designs Using Monte Carlo Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoemmes, Felix; MacKinnon, David P.; Reiser, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Applied researchers often include mediation effects in applications of advanced methods such as latent variable models and linear growth curve models. Guidance on how to estimate statistical power to detect mediation for these models has not yet been addressed in the literature. We describe a general framework for power analyses for complex…

  2. The research progress on Hodograph Method of aerodynamic design at Tsinghua University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zuoyi; Guo, Jingrong

    1991-01-01

    Progress in the use of the Hodograph method of aerodynamic design is discussed. It was found that there are some restricted conditions in the application of Hodograph design to transonic turbine and compressor cascades. The Hodograph method is suitable not only to the transonic turbine cascade but also to the transonic compressor cascade. The three dimensional Hodograph method will be developed after obtaining the basic equation for the three dimensional Hodograph method. As an example of the Hodograph method, the use of the method to design a transonic turbine and compressor cascade is discussed.

  3. Best Estimate Method vs Evaluation Method: a comparison of two techniques in evaluating seismic analysis and design

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, S.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Smith, P.D.

    1980-05-01

    The concept of how two techniques, Best Estimate Method and Evaluation Method, may be applied to the traditional seismic analysis and design of a nuclear power plant is introduced. Only the four links of the seismic analysis and design methodology chain (SMC) - seismic input, soil-structure interaction, major structural response, and subsystem response - are considered. The objective is to evaluate the compounding of conservatisms in the seismic analysis and design of nuclear power plants, to provide guidance for judgments in the SMC, and to concentrate the evaluation on that part of the seismic analysis and design which is familiar to the engineering community. An example applies the effects of three-dimensional excitations on a model of a nuclear power plant structure. The example demonstrates how conservatisms accrue by coupling two links in the SMC and comparing those results to the effects of one link alone. The utility of employing the Best Estimate Method vs the Evaluation Method is also demonstrated.

  4. Comparison of deterministic and Monte Carlo methods in shielding design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D; Oliveira, C

    2005-01-01

    In shielding calculation, deterministic methods have some advantages and also some disadvantages relative to other kind of codes, such as Monte Carlo. The main advantage is the short computer time needed to find solutions while the disadvantages are related to the often-used build-up factor that is extrapolated from high to low energies or with unknown geometrical conditions, which can lead to significant errors in shielding results. The aim of this work is to investigate how good are some deterministic methods to calculating low-energy shielding, using attenuation coefficients and build-up factor corrections. Commercial software MicroShield 5.05 has been used as the deterministic code while MCNP has been used as the Monte Carlo code. Point and cylindrical sources with slab shield have been defined allowing comparison between the capability of both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods in a day-by-day shielding calculation using sensitivity analysis of significant parameters, such as energy and geometrical conditions.

  5. Matching wind turbine rotors and loads: Computational methods for designers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seale, J. B.

    1983-04-01

    A comprehensive method for matching wind energy conversion system (WECS) rotors with the load characteristics of common electrical and mechanical applications was reported. A method was developed to convert the data into useful results: (1) from turbine efficiency and load torque characteristics, turbine power is predicted as a function of windspeed; (2) it is decided how turbine power is to be governed to insure safety of all components; (3) mechanical conversion efficiency comes into play to predict how useful delivered power varies with windspeed; (4) wind statistics are used to predict longterm energy output. Most systems are approximated by a graph and calculator approach. The method leads to energy predictions, and to insight into modeled processes. A computer program provides more sophisticated calculations where a highly unusual system is to be modeled, where accuracy is at a premium, or where error analysis is required. The analysis is fleshed out with in depth case studies for induction generator and inverter utility systems; battery chargers; resistance heaters; positive displacement pumps; including three different load compensation strategies; and centrifugal pumps with unregulated electric power transmission from turbine to pump.

  6. A New Automated Design Method Based on Machine Learning for CMOS Analog Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Behzad; Mirzaei, Abdolreza

    2016-11-01

    A new simulation based automated CMOS analog circuit design method which applies a multi-objective non-Darwinian-type evolutionary algorithm based on Learnable Evolution Model (LEM) is proposed in this article. The multi-objective property of this automated design of CMOS analog circuits is governed by a modified Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA) incorporated in the LEM algorithm presented here. LEM includes a machine learning method such as the decision trees that makes a distinction between high- and low-fitness areas in the design space. The learning process can detect the right directions of the evolution and lead to high steps in the evolution of the individuals. The learning phase shortens the evolution process and makes remarkable reduction in the number of individual evaluations. The expert designer's knowledge on circuit is applied in the design process in order to reduce the design space as well as the design time. The circuit evaluation is made by HSPICE simulator. In order to improve the design accuracy, bsim3v3 CMOS transistor model is adopted in this proposed design method. This proposed design method is tested on three different operational amplifier circuits. The performance of this proposed design method is verified by comparing it with the evolutionary strategy algorithm and other similar methods.

  7. Constructal method to optimize solar thermochemical reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Tescari, S.; Mazet, N.; Neveu, P.

    2010-09-15

    The objective of this study is the geometrical optimization of a thermochemical reactor, which works simultaneously as solar collector and reactor. The heat (concentrated solar radiation) is supplied on a small peripheral surface and has to be dispersed in the entire reactive volume in order to activate the reaction all over the material. A similarity between this study and the point to volume problem analyzed by the constructal approach (Bejan, 2000) is evident. This approach was successfully applied to several domains, for example for the coupled mass and conductive heat transfer (Azoumah et al., 2004). Focusing on solar reactors, this work aims to apply constructal analysis to coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer. As a first step, the chemical reaction is represented by a uniform heat sink inside the material. The objective is to optimize the reactor geometry in order to maximize its efficiency. By using some hypothesis, a simplified solution is found. A parametric study provides the influence of different technical and operating parameters on the maximal efficiency and on the optimal shape. Different reactor designs (filled cylinder, cavity and honeycomb reactors) are compared, in order to determine the most efficient structure according to the operating conditions. Finally, these results are compared with a CFD model in order to validate the assumptions. (author)

  8. Defining Requirements and Related Methods for Designing Sensorized Garments.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Giuseppe; Standoli, Carlo Emilio; Perego, Paolo

    2016-05-26

    Designing smart garments has strong interdisciplinary implications, specifically related to user and technical requirements, but also because of the very different applications they have: medicine, sport and fitness, lifestyle monitoring, workplace and job conditions analysis, etc. This paper aims to discuss some user, textile, and technical issues to be faced in sensorized clothes development. In relation to the user, the main requirements are anthropometric, gender-related, and aesthetical. In terms of these requirements, the user's age, the target application, and fashion trends cannot be ignored, because they determine the compliance with the wearable system. Regarding textile requirements, functional factors-also influencing user comfort-are elasticity and washability, while more technical properties are the stability of the chemical agents' effects for preserving the sensors' efficacy and reliability, and assuring the proper duration of the product for the complete life cycle. From the technical side, the physiological issues are the most important: skin conductance, tolerance, irritation, and the effect of sweat and perspiration are key factors for reliable sensing. Other technical features such as battery size and duration, and the form factor of the sensor collector, should be considered, as they affect aesthetical requirements, which have proven to be crucial, as well as comfort and wearability.

  9. Design methods of multilayer survivability in IP over WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Shin'ichi; Murata, Masayuki; Miyahara, Hideo

    2000-09-01

    IP (Internet Protocol) over WDM networks where IP packets are directly carried on the WDM network is expected to offer an infrastructure for the next generation Internet. For IP over WDM networks, a WDM protection mechanism is expected to provide a highly reliable network (i.e., robustness against the link/node failures). However, conventional IP also provides a reliability mechanism by its routing function. We thus need to treat functional partitioning or functional integration for IP over WDM networks with high reliability. In this paper, we first formulate an optimization problem for designing IP over WDM networks with protection functionalities of WDM networks, by which we can obtain IP over WDM networks with high reliability. Our formulation results in a mixed integer linear problem (MILP). However, it is known that MILP can be solved only for a small number of variables, in our case, nodes and/or wavelengths. We therefore propose two heuristic algorithms, min-hop-first and largest-traffic-first approaches in order to assign the wavelength for backup lightpath. Our results show that the min- hop-first approach takes fewer wavelengths to construct the reliable network, that is, all of lightpaths can be protected using the WDM protection mechanism. However, our largest-traffic- first approach is also a good choice in the sense that the approach can be saved the traffic volume increased at the IP router by the link failure.

  10. Simplified tornado depressurization design methods for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N.M.; Krasnopoler, M.I.

    1983-05-01

    A simplified approach for the calculation of tornado depressurization effects on nuclear power plant structures and components is based on a generic computer depressurization analysis for an arbitrary single volume V connected to the atmosphere by an effective vent area A. For a given tornado depressurization transient, the maximum depressurization ..delta..P of the volume was found to depend on the parameter V/A. The relation between ..delta..P and V/A can be represented by a single monotonically increasing curve for each of the three design-basis tornadoes described in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.76. These curves can be applied to most multiple-volume nuclear power plant structures by considering each volume and its controlling vent area. Where several possible flow areas could be controlling, the maximum value of V/A can be used to estimate a conservative value for ..delta..P. This simplified approach was shown to yield reasonably conservative results when compared to detailed computer calculations of moderately complex geometries. Treatment of severely complicated geometries, heating and ventilation systems, and multiple blowout panel arrangements were found to be beyond the limitations of the simplified analysis.

  11. Defining Requirements and Related Methods for Designing Sensorized Garments

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, Giuseppe; Standoli, Carlo Emilio; Perego, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Designing smart garments has strong interdisciplinary implications, specifically related to user and technical requirements, but also because of the very different applications they have: medicine, sport and fitness, lifestyle monitoring, workplace and job conditions analysis, etc. This paper aims to discuss some user, textile, and technical issues to be faced in sensorized clothes development. In relation to the user, the main requirements are anthropometric, gender-related, and aesthetical. In terms of these requirements, the user’s age, the target application, and fashion trends cannot be ignored, because they determine the compliance with the wearable system. Regarding textile requirements, functional factors—also influencing user comfort—are elasticity and washability, while more technical properties are the stability of the chemical agents’ effects for preserving the sensors’ efficacy and reliability, and assuring the proper duration of the product for the complete life cycle. From the technical side, the physiological issues are the most important: skin conductance, tolerance, irritation, and the effect of sweat and perspiration are key factors for reliable sensing. Other technical features such as battery size and duration, and the form factor of the sensor collector, should be considered, as they affect aesthetical requirements, which have proven to be crucial, as well as comfort and wearability. PMID:27240361

  12. The ZInEP Epidemiology Survey: background, design and methods.

    PubMed

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Müller, Mario; Rodgers, Stephanie; Warnke, Inge; Hengartner, Michael P; Landolt, Karin; Hagenmuller, Florence; Meier, Magali; Tse, Lee-Ting; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Passardi, Marco; Knöpfli, Daniel; Schönfelder, Herdis; Eisele, Jochen; Rüsch, Nicolas; Haker, Helene; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-12-01

    This article introduces the design, sampling, field procedures and instruments used in the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey. This survey is one of six ZInEP projects (Zürcher Impulsprogramm zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung der Psychiatrie, i.e. the "Zurich Program for Sustainable Development of Mental Health Services"). It parallels the longitudinal Zurich Study with a sample comparable in age and gender, and with similar methodology, including identical instruments. Thus, it is aimed at assessing the change of prevalence rates of common mental disorders and the use of professional help and psychiatric sevices. Moreover, the current survey widens the spectrum of topics by including sociopsychiatric questionnaires on stigma, stress related biological measures such as load and cortisol levels, electroencephalographic (EEG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) examinations with various paradigms, and sociophysiological tests. The structure of the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey entails four subprojects: a short telephone screening using the SCL-27 (n of nearly 10,000), a comprehensive face-to-face interview based on the SPIKE (Structured Psychopathological Interview and Rating of the Social Consequences for Epidemiology: the main instrument of the Zurich Study) with a stratified sample (n = 1500), tests in the Center for Neurophysiology and Sociophysiology (n = 227), and a prospective study with up to three follow-up interviews and further measures (n = 157). In sum, the four subprojects of the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey deliver a large interdisciplinary database.

  13. Matching wind turbine rotors and loads: computational methods for designers

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    This report provides a comprehensive method for matching wind energy conversion system (WECS) rotors with the load characteristics of common electrical and mechanical applications. The user must supply: (1) turbine aerodynamic efficiency as a function of tipspeed ratio; (2) mechanical load torque as a function of rotation speed; (3) useful delivered power as a function of incoming mechanical power; (4) site average windspeed and, for maximum accuracy, distribution data. The description of the data includes governing limits consistent with the capacities of components. The report develops, a step-by-step method for converting the data into useful results: (1) from turbine efficiency and load torque characteristics, turbine power is predicted as a function of windspeed; (2) a decision is made how turbine power is to be governed (it may self-govern) to insure safety of all components; (3) mechanical conversion efficiency comes into play to predict how useful delivered power varies with windspeed; (4) wind statistics come into play to predict longterm energy output. Most systems can be approximated by a graph-and-calculator approach: Computer-generated families of coefficient curves provide data for algebraic scaling formulas. The method leads not only to energy predictions, but also to insight into the processes being modeled. Direct use of a computer program provides more sophisticated calculations where a highly unusual system is to be modeled, where accuracy is at a premium, or where error analysis is required. The analysis is fleshed out witn in-depth case studies for induction generator and inverter utility systems; battery chargers; resistance heaters; positive displacement pumps, including three different load-compensation strategies; and centrifugal pumps with unregulated electric power transmission from turbine to pump.

  14. Engineering and Design: Geotechnical Analysis by the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    used it to determine stresses and movements in embank- ments, and Reyes and Deer described its application to analysis of underground openings in rock...36 Hughes, T. J. R. (1987). The Finite Element Reyes , S. F., and Deene, D. K. (1966). “Elastic Method, Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element...SM4), 1,435-1,457. Fernando Dams During the Earthquakes of February Davis, E. H., and Poulos, H. G. (1972). “Rate of Report EERC-73-2, Berkeley, CA

  15. GenStar: A method for de novo drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Sergio H.; Murcko, Mark A.

    1993-02-01

    A novel method, which we call GenStar, has been developed to suggest chemically reasonable structures which fill the active sites of enzymes. The proposed molecules provide good steric contact with the enzyme and exist in low-energy conformations. These structures are composed entirely of sp3 carbons which are grown sequentially, but which can also branch or form rings. User-selected enzyme seed atoms may be used to determine the area in which structure generation begins. Alternatively, GenStar may begin with a predocked `inhibitor core' from which atoms are grown. For each new atom generated by the program, several hundred candidate positions representing a range of reasonable bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles are considered. Each of these candidates is scored, based on a simple enzyme contact model. The selected position is chosen at random from among the highest scoring cases. Duplicate structures may be removed using a variety of criteria. The compounds may be energy minimized and displayed using standard modeling programs. Also, it is possible to analyze the collection of all structures created by GenStar and locate binding motifs for common fragments such as benzene and naphthylene. Tests of the method using HIV protease, FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) and human carbonic anhydrase (HCA-II) demonstrated that structures similar to known potent inhibitors may be generated with GenStar.

  16. Modified Fully Utilized Design (MFUD) Method for Stress and Displacement Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya; Gendy, Atef; Berke, Laszlo; Hopkins, Dale

    1997-01-01

    The traditional fully stressed method performs satisfactorily for stress-limited structural design. When this method is extended to include displacement limitations in addition to stress constraints, it is known as the fully utilized design (FUD). Typically, the FUD produces an overdesign, which is the primary limitation of this otherwise elegant method. We have modified FUD in an attempt to alleviate the limitation. This new method, called the modified fully utilized design (MFUD) method, has been tested successfully on a number of designs that were subjected to multiple loads and had both stress and displacement constraints. The solutions obtained with MFUD compare favorably with the optimum results that can be generated by using nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The MFUD method appears to have alleviated the overdesign condition and offers the simplicity of a direct, fully stressed type of design method that is distinctly different from optimization and optimality criteria formulations. The MFUD method is being developed for practicing engineers who favor traditional design methods rather than methods based on advanced calculus and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The Integrated Force Method (IFM) was found to be the appropriate analysis tool in the development of the MFUD method. In this paper, the MFUD method and its optimality are presented along with a number of illustrative examples.

  17. Co-Designing and Co-Teaching Graduate Qualitative Methods: An Innovative Ethnographic Workshop Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordner, Alissa; Klein, Peter T.; Baiocchi, Gianpaolo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an innovative collaboration between graduate students and a faculty member to co-design and co-teach a graduate-level workshop-style qualitative methods course. The goal of co-designing and co-teaching the course was to involve advanced graduate students in all aspects of designing a syllabus and leading class discussions in…

  18. Matching Learning Style Preferences with Suitable Delivery Methods on Textile Design Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayer, Kate; Studd, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    Textile design is a subject that encompasses both design and technology; aesthetically pleasing patterns and forms must be set within technical parameters to create successful fabrics. When considering education methods in design programmes, identifying the most relevant learning approach is key to creating future successes. Yet are the most…

  19. Design of a Variational Multiscale Method for Turbulent Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    A spectral-element framework is presented for the simulation of subsonic compressible high-Reynolds-number flows. The focus of the work is maximizing the efficiency of the computational schemes to enable unsteady simulations with a large number of spatial and temporal degrees of freedom. A collocation scheme is combined with optimized computational kernels to provide a residual evaluation with computational cost independent of order of accuracy up to 16th order. The optimized residual routines are used to develop a low-memory implicit scheme based on a matrix-free Newton-Krylov method. A preconditioner based on the finite-difference diagonalized ADI scheme is developed which maintains the low memory of the matrix-free implicit solver, while providing improved convergence properties. Emphasis on low memory usage throughout the solver development is leveraged to implement a coupled space-time DG solver which may offer further efficiency gains through adaptivity in both space and time.

  20. A divertor plasma configuration design method for tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong; Xiao, Bing-Jia; Liu, Lei; Yang, Fei; Wang, Yuehang; Qiu, Qinglai

    2016-11-01

    The efficient and safe operation of large fusion devices strongly relies on the plasma configuration inside the vacuum chamber. It is important to construct the proper plasma equilibrium with a desired plasma configuration. In order to construct the target configuration, a shape constraint module has been developed in the tokamak simulation code (TSC), which controls the poloidal flux and the magnetic field at several defined control points. It is used to construct the double null, lower single null, and quasi-snowflake configurations for the required target shape and calculate the required PF coils current. The flexibility and practicability of this method have been verified by the simulated results. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB103000 and 2014GB110003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305216, 11305209, and 11375191), and External Cooperation Program of BIC, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. GJHZ201303).

  1. Application of the MNA design method to a nonlinear turbofan engine. [multivariable Nyquist array method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Using nonlinear digital simulation as a representative model of the dynamic operation of the QCSEE turbofan engine, a feedback control system is designed by variable frequency design techniques. Transfer functions are generated for each of five power level settings covering the range of operation from approach power to full throttle (62.5% to 100% full power). These transfer functions are then used by an interactive control system design synthesis program to provide a closed loop feedback control using the multivariable Nyquist array and extensions to multivariable Bode diagrams and Nichols charts.

  2. Scenario-based design: A method for connecting information system design with public health operations and emergency management

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Turner, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    Responding to public health emergencies requires rapid and accurate assessment of workforce availability under adverse and changing circumstances. However, public health information systems to support resource management during both routine and emergency operations are currently lacking. We applied scenario-based design as an approach to engage public health practitioners in the creation and validation of an information design to support routine and emergency public health activities. Methods: Using semi-structured interviews we identified the information needs and activities of senior public health managers of a large municipal health department during routine and emergency operations. Results: Interview analysis identified twenty-five information needs for public health operations management. The identified information needs were used in conjunction with scenario-based design to create twenty-five scenarios of use and a public health manager persona. Scenarios of use and persona were validated and modified based on follow-up surveys with study participants. Scenarios were used to test and gain feedback on a pilot information system. Conclusion: The method of scenario-based design was applied to represent the resource management needs of senior-level public health managers under routine and disaster settings. Scenario-based design can be a useful tool for engaging public health practitioners in the design process and to validate an information system design. PMID:21807120

  3. Design of Aspirated Compressor Blades Using Three-dimensional Inverse Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, T. Q.; Rooij, M. Van; Larosiliere, L. M.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional viscous inverse method is extended to allow blading design with full interaction between the prescribed pressure-loading distribution and a specified transpiration scheme. Transpiration on blade surfaces and endwalls is implemented as inflow/outflow boundary conditions, and the basic modifications to the method are outlined. This paper focuses on a discussion concerning an application of the method to the design and analysis of a supersonic rotor with aspiration. Results show that an optimum combination of pressure-loading tailoring with surface aspiration can lead to a minimization of the amount of sucked flow required for a net performance improvement at design and off-design operations.

  4. A numerical method for the design and analysis of counter-rotating propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Playle, S. C.; Korkan, K. D.; Von Lavante, E.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method has been developed using the techniques of Lock and Theodorsen as described by Davidson to design and analyze counter-rotating propellers. The design method develops the optimum propeller geometry by calculating the planform and twist distribution for each propeller disk through the use of specific inputs of engine shaft horsepower, diameter, and disk spacing. The analysis method calculates the performance of a given counter-rotating propeller system at any flight condition. Using the NACA four-digit airfoil family, the performance of a counter-rotating propeller design for a given flight condition was investigated in the design and analysis mode.

  5. Application of multidisciplinary optimization methods to the design of a supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, J.-F. M.; Coen, P. G.; Wrenn, Gregory A.; Riley, M. F.; Dovi, Augustine R.; Hall, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    An optimization design method is discussed. This method is based on integrating existing disciplinary analysis and sensitivity analysis techniques by means of generalized sensitivity equations. A generic design system implementing this method is described. The system is being used to design the configuration and internal structure of a supersonic transport wing for optimum performance. This problem combines the disciplines of linear aerodynamics, structures, and performance. Initial results which include the disciplines of aerodynamics and structures in a conventional minimum weight design under static aeroelastic constraints are presented.

  6. Application of multidisciplinary optimization methods to the design of a supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, J.-F. M.; Coen, P. G.; Wrenn, G. A.; Riley, M. F.; Dovi, A. R.; Hall, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    A new optimization based design method is discussed. This method is based on integrating existing disciplinary analysis and sensitivity analysis techniques by means of generalized sensitivity equations. A generic design system implementing this method is described. The system is being used to design the configuration and internal structure of a supersonic transport wing for optimum performance. This problem combines the disciplines of linear aerodynamics, structures, and performance. Initial results which include the disciplines of aerodynamics and structures in a conventional minimum weight design under static aeroelastic constraints are presented.

  7. Launch Vehicle Design and Optimization Methods and Priority for the Advanced Engineering Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Korte, John J.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a research and development program that will improve collaboration among design engineers for launch vehicle conceptual design and provide the infrastructure (methods and framework) necessary to enable that environment. In this paper, three major technical challenges facing the AEE program are identified, and three specific design problems are selected to demonstrate how advanced methods can improve current design activities. References are made to studies that demonstrate these design problems and methods, and these studies will provide the detailed information and check cases to support incorporation of these methods into the AEE. This paper provides background and terminology for discussing the launch vehicle conceptual design problem so that the diverse AEE user community can participate in prioritizing the AEE development effort.

  8. Design method for automotive high-beam LED optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byzov, Egor V.; Moiseev, Mikhail A.; Doskolovich, Leonid L.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2015-09-01

    New analytical method for the calculation of the LED secondary optics for automotive high-beam lamps is presented. Automotive headlamps should illuminate the road and the curb at the distance of 100-150 meters and create a bright, flat, relatively powerful light beam. To generate intensity distribution of this kind we propose to use TIR optical element (collimator working on the total internal reflection principle) with array of microlenses (optical corrector) on the upper surface. TIR part of the optical element enables reflection of the side rays to the front direction and provides a collimated beam which incidents on the microrelief. Microrelief, in its turn, dissipates the light flux in horizontal direction to meet the requirements of the Regulations 112, 113 and to provide well-illuminated area across the road in the far field. As an example, we computed and simulated the optical element with the diameter of 33 millimeters and the height of 22 millimeters. Simulation data shows that three illuminating modules including Cree XP-G2 LED and lens allow generating an appropriate intensity distribution for the class D of UNECE Regulations.

  9. The Use of Qsar and Computational Methods in Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajot, Fania

    The application of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) has significantly impacted the paradigm of drug discovery. Following the successful utilization of linear solvation free-energy relationships (LSERs), numerous 2D- and 3D-QSAR methods have been developed, most of them based on descriptors for hydrophobicity, polarizability, ionic interactions, and hydrogen bonding. QSAR models allow for the calculation of physicochemical properties (e.g., lipophilicity), the prediction of biological activity (or toxicity), as well as the evaluation of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME). In pharmaceutical research, QSAR has a particular interest in the preclinical stages of drug discovery to replace tedious and costly experimentation, to filter large chemical databases, and to select drug candidates. However, to be part of drug discovery and development strategies, QSARs need to meet different criteria (e.g., sufficient predictivity). This chapter describes the foundation of modern QSAR in drug discovery and presents some current challenges and applications for the discovery and optimization of drug candidates

  10. Application of Skeleton Method in Interconnection of Cae Programs Used in Vehicle Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucha, Jozef; Gavačová, Jana; Milesich, Tomáš

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the application of the skeleton method as the main element of interconnection of CAE programs involved in the process of vehicle design. This article focuses on the utilization of the skeleton method for mutual connection of CATIA V5 and ADAMS/CAR. Both programs can be used simultaneously during various stages of vehicle design.

  11. CEPIAH: A Method for the Design and Evaluation of Pedagogical Hypermedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trigano, Philippe C.; Giacomini-Pacurar, Ecaterina

    2004-01-01

    CEPIAH is a method and a proposal for a Web-based system to be used to assist teachers in designing multimedia documents and in evaluating their prototypes. The proposed tool integrates two modules: one for the Evaluation of Multimedia Pedagogical and Interactive software (EMPI), and the other, a method for designing pedagogical hypermedia…

  12. A design method for robust stabilizing simple repetitive control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kou; Takenaga, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    The modified repetitive control system is a type of servomechanism for the periodic reference input. That is, the modified repetitive control system follows the periodic reference input with small steady state error, even if a periodic disturbance or uncertainty exists in the plant. Using previously proposed modified repetitive controllers, even if the plants does not includes time-delay, the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have an infinite number of poles. When the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have an infinite number of poles, it is difficult to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic. From the practical point of view, it is desirable that the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic are easily specified. In order to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic easily, the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output are desirable to have a finite number of poles. Yamada et al. proposed the concept of simple repetitive control systems such that the controller works as a modified repetitive controller and the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have a finite number of poles. In addition, Yamada et al. clarified the parametrization of all stabilizing simple repetitive controllers. However the method by Yamada et al. cannot be applied for the plant with uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to propose the parametrization of all robust stabilizing simple repetitive controllers for the plant with uncertainty.

  13. Human Reliability Analysis for Design: Using Reliability Methods for Human Factors Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Laurids Boring

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews the application of human reliability analysis methods to human factors design issues. An application framework is sketched in which aspects of modeling typically found in human reliability analysis are used in a complementary fashion to the existing human factors phases of design and testing. The paper provides best achievable practices for design, testing, and modeling. Such best achievable practices may be used to evaluate and human system interface in the context of design safety certifications.

  14. Interactive design optimization of magnetorheological-brake actuators using the Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Ozan; Gurocak, Hakan

    2011-10-01

    This research explored an optimization method that would automate the process of designing a magnetorheological (MR)-brake but still keep the designer in the loop. MR-brakes apply resistive torque by increasing the viscosity of an MR fluid inside the brake. This electronically controllable brake can provide a very large torque-to-volume ratio, which is very desirable for an actuator. However, the design process is quite complex and time consuming due to many parameters. In this paper, we adapted the popular Taguchi method, widely used in manufacturing, to the problem of designing a complex MR-brake. Unlike other existing methods, this approach can automatically identify the dominant parameters of the design, which reduces the search space and the time it takes to find the best possible design. While automating the search for a solution, it also lets the designer see the dominant parameters and make choices to investigate only their interactions with the design output. The new method was applied for re-designing MR-brakes. It reduced the design time from a week or two down to a few minutes. Also, usability experiments indicated significantly better brake designs by novice users.

  15. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 1: Fracture control design methods. [for space shuttle configuration planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic approach for applying methods for fracture control in the structural components of space vehicles consists of four major steps. The first step is to define the primary load-carrying structural elements and the type of load, environment, and design stress levels acting upon them. The second step is to identify the potential fracture-critical parts by means of a selection logic flow diagram. The third step is to evaluate the safe-life and fail-safe capabilities of the specified part. The last step in the sequence is to apply the control procedures that will prevent damage to the fracture-critical parts. The fracture control methods discussed include fatigue design and analysis methods, methods for preventing crack-like defects, fracture mechanics analysis methods, and nondestructive evaluation methods. An example problem is presented for evaluation of the safe-crack-growth capability of the space shuttle crew compartment skin structure.

  16. Method of glass selection for color correction in optical system design.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Bráulio Fonseca Carneiro; Sasian, Jose; de Sousa, Fabiano Luis; Montes, Amauri Silva

    2012-06-18

    A method of glass selection for the design of optical systems with reduced chromatic aberration is presented. This method is based on the unification of two previously published methods adding new contributions and using a multi-objective approach. This new method makes it possible to select sets of compatible glasses suitable for the design of super-apochromatic optical systems. As an example, we present the selection of compatible glasses and the effective designs for all-refractive optical systems corrected in five spectral bands, with central wavelengths going from 485 nm to 1600 nm.

  17. Supersonic Aerodynamic Design Improvements of an Arrow-Wing HSCT Configuration Using Nonlinear Point Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, Eric R.; Hager, James O.; Agrawal, Shreekant

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the supersonic nonlinear point design optimization efforts at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace under the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. The baseline for these optimization efforts has been the M2.4-7A configuration which represents an arrow-wing technology for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Optimization work on this configuration began in early 1994 and continued into 1996. Initial work focused on optimization of the wing camber and twist on a wing/body configuration and reductions of 3.5 drag counts (Euler) were realized. The next phase of the optimization effort included fuselage camber along with the wing and a drag reduction of 5.0 counts was achieved. Including the effects of the nacelles and diverters into the optimization problem became the next focus where a reduction of 6.6 counts (Euler W/B/N/D) was eventually realized. The final two phases of the effort included a large set of constraints designed to make the final optimized configuration more realistic and they were successful albeit with a loss of performance.

  18. A minimum cost tolerance allocation method for rocket engines and robust rocket engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerth, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    Rocket engine design follows three phases: systems design, parameter design, and tolerance design. Systems design and parameter design are most effectively conducted in a concurrent engineering (CE) environment that utilize methods such as Quality Function Deployment and Taguchi methods. However, tolerance allocation remains an art driven by experience, handbooks, and rules of thumb. It was desirable to develop and optimization approach to tolerancing. The case study engine was the STME gas generator cycle. The design of the major components had been completed and the functional relationship between the component tolerances and system performance had been computed using the Generic Power Balance model. The system performance nominals (thrust, MR, and Isp) and tolerances were already specified, as were an initial set of component tolerances. However, the question was whether there existed an optimal combination of tolerances that would result in the minimum cost without any degradation in system performance.

  19. An inverse method for the aerodynamic design of three-dimensional aircraft engine nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. A.; Cedar, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    A fast, efficient and user friendly inverse design system for 3-D nacelles was developed. The system is a product of a 2-D inverse design method originally developed at NASA-Langley and the CFL3D analysis code which was also developed at NASA-Langley and modified for nacelle analysis. The design system uses a predictor/corrector design approach in which an analysis code is used to calculate the flow field for an initial geometry, the geometry is then modified based on the difference between the calculated and target pressures. A detailed discussion of the design method, the process of linking it to the modified CFL3D solver and its extension to 3-D is presented. This is followed by a number of examples of the use of the design system for the design of both axisymmetric and 3-D nacelles.

  20. A Systematic Composite Service Design Modeling Method Using Graph-Based Theory

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, Arafat Abdulgader Mohammed; Mohamad, Radziah; Aziz, Muhammad Waqar; Zeshan, Furkh

    2015-01-01

    The composite service design modeling is an essential process of the service-oriented software development life cycle, where the candidate services, composite services, operations and their dependencies are required to be identified and specified before their design. However, a systematic service-oriented design modeling method for composite services is still in its infancy as most of the existing approaches provide the modeling of atomic services only. For these reasons, a new method (ComSDM) is proposed in this work for modeling the concept of service-oriented design to increase the reusability and decrease the complexity of system while keeping the service composition considerations in mind. Furthermore, the ComSDM method provides the mathematical representation of the components of service-oriented design using the graph-based theoryto facilitate the design quality measurement. To demonstrate that the ComSDM method is also suitable for composite service design modeling of distributed embedded real-time systems along with enterprise software development, it is implemented in the case study of a smart home. The results of the case study not only check the applicability of ComSDM, but can also be used to validate the complexity and reusability of ComSDM. This also guides the future research towards the design quality measurement such as using the ComSDM method to measure the quality of composite service design in service-oriented software system. PMID:25928358

  1. A systematic composite service design modeling method using graph-based theory.

    PubMed

    Elhag, Arafat Abdulgader Mohammed; Mohamad, Radziah; Aziz, Muhammad Waqar; Zeshan, Furkh

    2015-01-01

    The composite service design modeling is an essential process of the service-oriented software development life cycle, where the candidate services, composite services, operations and their dependencies are required to be identified and specified before their design. However, a systematic service-oriented design modeling method for composite services is still in its infancy as most of the existing approaches provide the modeling of atomic services only. For these reasons, a new method (ComSDM) is proposed in this work for modeling the concept of service-oriented design to increase the reusability and decrease the complexity of system while keeping the service composition considerations in mind. Furthermore, the ComSDM method provides the mathematical representation of the components of service-oriented design using the graph-based theoryto facilitate the design quality measurement. To demonstrate that the ComSDM method is also suitable for composite service design modeling of distributed embedded real-time systems along with enterprise software development, it is implemented in the case study of a smart home. The results of the case study not only check the applicability of ComSDM, but can also be used to validate the complexity and reusability of ComSDM. This also guides the future research towards the design quality measurement such as using the ComSDM method to measure the quality of composite service design in service-oriented software system.

  2. Joint Design Method Based on Internal Structure of 2DOF Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubai, Kazuhiro

    In many cases, control system design is formulated as minimization of some prescribed closed loop performance reflecting a control requirement. Since the closed loop performance is a function of a controlled plant and a controller, the model identification and controller design must interact with each other. This motivates us to consider the model identification and controller design simultaneously. However, most of the previous joint design methods are not applicable to unstable plants because the identified plant model is usually used as the design parameter, i.e. a weighting function in the controller design. On the other hand, we have analyzed the internal structure of 2DOF control system using coprime factorization on RH∞ and shown that two free parameters, K and Q ∈ RH∞, specify tracking performance and feedback performance, respectively. Also, Tay et al. have proposed a parameterization of the plant dynamics by switching the role of the controlled plant and controller, and introduced a free parameter R ∈ RH∞. In this paper, we propose a new joint design strategy based on the identification of R and the design of Q. Since the identified plant parameter R is always stable, the proposed joint design strategy can be applied to wider class than the conventional joint design methods. Moreover, it is known that R is well approximated as a less order model than the plant itself. This leads to the advantage in designing Q with less order. Finally, the usefulness of the proposed method is verified by some simulations and experiments.

  3. A new method for designing dual foil electron beam forming systems. II. Feasibility of practical implementation of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrich, Przemysław

    2016-05-01

    In Part I of this work a new method for designing dual foil electron beam forming systems was introduced. In this method, an optimal configuration of the dual foil system is found by means of a systematic, automatized scan of system performance in function of its parameters. At each point of the scan, Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the off-axis dose profile in water taking into account detailed and complete geometry of the system. The new method, while being computationally intensive, minimizes the involvement of the designer. In this Part II paper, feasibility of practical implementation of the new method is demonstrated. For this, a prototype software tools were developed and applied to solve a real life design problem. It is demonstrated that system optimization can be completed within few hours time using rather moderate computing resources. It is also demonstrated that, perhaps for the first time, the designer can gain deep insight into system behavior, such that the construction can be simultaneously optimized in respect to a number of functional characteristics besides the flatness of the off-axis dose profile. In the presented example, the system is optimized in respect to both, flatness of the off-axis dose profile and the beam transmission. A number of practical issues related to application of the new method as well as its possible extensions are discussed.

  4. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  5. Free-form surface design method for nonaxial-symmetrical reflectors producing arbitrary image patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chung-Yu

    2016-07-01

    A free-form (FF) surface design method is proposed for a nonaxial-symmetrical projector system comprising an FF reflector and a light source. The profile of the reflector is designed using a nonaxial-symmetrical FF (NFF) surface construction method such that each incident ray is directed in such a way as to form a user-specified image pattern on the target region of the image plane. The light ray paths within the projection system are analyzed using an exact analytical model and a skew-ray tracing approach. The validity of the proposed NFF design method is demonstrated by means of ZEMAX simulations. It is shown that the image pattern formed on the target region of the image plane is in good agreement with that specified by the user. The NFF method is mathematically straightforward and easily implemented in computer code. As such, it provides a useful tool for the design and analysis stages of optical systems design.

  6. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    An inverse wing design method was developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  7. A procedural method for the efficient implementation of full-custom VLSI designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belk, P.; Hickey, N.

    1987-01-01

    An imbedded language system for the layout of very large scale integration (VLSI) circuits is examined. It is shown that through the judicious use of this system, a large variety of circuits can be designed with circuit density and performance comparable to traditional full-custom design methods, but with design costs more comparable to semi-custom design methods. The high performance of this methodology is attributable to the flexibility of procedural descriptions of VLSI layouts and to a number of automatic and semi-automatic tools within the system.

  8. An Empirical Comparison of Design/Build and Design/Bid/Build Project Delivery Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    buildings were referred to as master builders. Some of the famous master builders are Abbe Suger who built the Gothic Royal Abbey Church of Saint...delivery method (Songer and Molenaar 1996, Konchar and Sanvido 1998 and Molenaar et al. 1999). Songer and Molenaar (1996) used literature and...used to obtain the final data sample. Figure 8 gives a flowchart outlining the methodology steps. After conducting the literature review (outlined

  9. A Government/Industry Summary of the Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center in 1984 initiated a rotorcraft structural dynamics program, designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), with the objective of establishing the technology base needed by the rotorcraft industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. An assessment of the program showed that the DAMVIBS Program has resulted in notable technical achievements and major changes in industrial design practice, all of which have significantly advanced the industry's capability to use and rely on finite-element-based dynamics analyses during the design process.

  10. Using mixed methods effectively in prevention science: designs, procedures, and examples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanqing; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2014-10-01

    There is growing interest in using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods to generate evidence about the effectiveness of health prevention, services, and intervention programs. With the emerging importance of mixed methods research across the social and health sciences, there has been an increased recognition of the value of using mixed methods for addressing research questions in different disciplines. We illustrate the mixed methods approach in prevention research, showing design procedures used in several published research articles. In this paper, we focused on two commonly used mixed methods designs: concurrent and sequential mixed methods designs. We discuss the types of mixed methods designs, the reasons for, and advantages of using a particular type of design, and the procedures of qualitative and quantitative data collection and integration. The studies reviewed in this paper show that the essence of qualitative research is to explore complex dynamic phenomena in prevention science, and the advantage of using mixed methods is that quantitative data can yield generalizable results and qualitative data can provide extensive insights. However, the emphasis of methodological rigor in a mixed methods application also requires considerable expertise in both qualitative and quantitative methods. Besides the necessary skills and effective interdisciplinary collaboration, this combined approach also requires an open-mindedness and reflection from the involved researchers.

  11. Needs and Opportunities for Uncertainty-Based Multidisciplinary Design Methods for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Kenny, Sean P; Luckring, James M.; Maghami, Peiman; Padula, Sharon L.; Stroud, W. Jefferson

    2002-01-01

    This report consists of a survey of the state of the art in uncertainty-based design together with recommendations for a Base research activity in this area for the NASA Langley Research Center. This report identifies the needs and opportunities for computational and experimental methods that provide accurate, efficient solutions to nondeterministic multidisciplinary aerospace vehicle design problems. Barriers to the adoption of uncertainty-based design methods are identified. and the benefits of the use of such methods are explained. Particular research needs are listed.

  12. Layer-by-layer design method for soft-X-ray multilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Namioka, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    A new design method effective for a nontransparent system has been developed for soft-X-ray multilayers with the aid of graphic representation of the complex amplitude reflectance in a Gaussian plane. The method provides an effective means of attaining the absolute maximum reflectance on a layer-by-layer basis and also gives clear insight into the evolution of the amplitude reflectance on a multilayer as it builds up. An optical criterion is derived for the selection of a proper pair of materials needed for designing a high-reflectance multilayer. Some examples are given to illustrate the usefulness of this design method.

  13. Computer-aided methods in bespoke breast prosthesis design and fabrication.

    PubMed

    Eggbeer, D; Evans, P

    2011-01-01

    This case study presents a method of utilizing computer-aided design technologies to provide bespoke, external breast prostheses. The technique is illustrated through a case study of a mastectomy patient. Photogrammetry methods were used to capture the breast form when supported by a brassiere and the unsupported breast and defect side. Computer-aided design techniques were used to generate a digital prosthesis based upon the supported breast shape and with a fitting surface that matched the defect side. Furthermore, a two-part mould was designed and fabricated using rapid prototyping methods. A colour-matched prosthesis was then fabricated in a gel-based, platinum-cured silicone.

  14. Small Sample Research Designs for Evidence-based Rehabilitation: Issues and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Graham, James E.; Karmarkar, Amol M.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional research methods, including randomized controlled trials, are powerful techniques for determining the efficacy of interventions. These designs, however, have practical limitations when applied to many rehabilitation settings and research questions. Alternative methods are available that can supplement findings from traditional research designs and improve our ability to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for individual patients. The focus on individual patients is an important element of evidenced-based rehabilitation. This paper examines one such alternate approach: small-N research designs. Small-N designs usually focus on ten or fewer participants whose behavior (outcomes) are measured repeatedly and compared over time. The advantages and limitations of various small-N designs are described and illustrated using three examples from the rehabilitation literature. The challenges and opportunities of applying small-N designs to enhance evidence-based rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:22580169

  15. Business Process Design Method Based on Business Event Model for Enterprise Information System Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Komoda, Norihisa

    The traditional business process design methods, in which the usecase is the most typical, have no useful framework to design the activity sequence with. Therefore, the design efficiency and quality vary widely according to the designer’s experience and skill. In this paper, to solve this problem, we propose the business events and their state transition model (a basic business event model) based on the language/action perspective, which is the result in the cognitive science domain. In the business process design, using this model, we decide event occurrence conditions so that every event synchronizes with each other. We also propose the design pattern to decide the event occurrence condition (a business event improvement strategy). Lastly, we apply the business process design method based on the business event model and the business event improvement strategy to the credit card issue process and estimate its effect.

  16. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Aeropropulsion Engines and Solid Modeling/Animation via the Integrated Forced Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grant closure report is organized in the following four chapters: Chapter describes the two research areas Design optimization and Solid mechanics. Ten journal publications are listed in the second chapter. Five highlights is the subject matter of chapter three. CHAPTER 1. The Design Optimization Test Bed CometBoards. CHAPTER 2. Solid Mechanics: Integrated Force Method of Analysis. CHAPTER 3. Five Highlights: Neural Network and Regression Methods Demonstrated in the Design Optimization of a Subsonic Aircraft. Neural Network and Regression Soft Model Extended for PX-300 Aircraft Engine. Engine with Regression and Neural Network Approximators Designed. Cascade Optimization Strategy with Neural network and Regression Approximations Demonstrated on a Preliminary Aircraft Engine Design. Neural Network and Regression Approximations Used in Aircraft Design.

  17. Small sample research designs for evidence-based rehabilitation: issues and methods.

    PubMed

    Graham, James E; Karmarkar, Amol M; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2012-08-01

    Conventional research methods, including randomized controlled trials, are powerful techniques for determining the efficacy of interventions. These designs, however, have practical limitations when applied to many rehabilitation settings and research questions. Alternative methods are available that can supplement findings from traditional research designs and improve our ability to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for individual patients. The focus on individual patients is an important element of evidenced-based rehabilitation. This article examines one such alternate approach: small-N research designs. Small-N designs usually focus on 10 or fewer participants whose behavior (outcomes) are measured repeatedly and compared over time. The advantages and limitations of various small-N designs are described and illustrated using 3 examples from the rehabilitation literature. The challenges and opportunities of applying small-N designs to enhance evidence-based rehabilitation are discussed.

  18. Optimal design of switched reluctance motor using two-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Hak; Jung, Sung-In; Chun, Yon-Do; Kim, Sol; Lee, Ju; Chu, Min-Sik; Hong, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Dong-Hoon

    2002-05-01

    Switched reluctance motor (SRM) has some advantages such as low cost, high torque density, etc., but SRM has essentially high torque ripple due to its salient structure. To apply SRM to the industrial field, we have to minimize torque ripple, which is the weak point of SRM. This article introduces optimal design process of SRM using a numerical method such as two-dimensional (2D) finite element method. The electrical and geometrical design parameters have been adopted as 2D design variables. From this work, we can obtain the optimal design, which minimizes the torque ripple. We also can obtain the optimal design, which maximizes the average torque. Finally, this article presents performance comparison of two optimal designs, the minimized torque ripple, and the maximized average torque.

  19. Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

  20. Direct transfer trajectory design options for interplanetary orbiter missions using an iterative patched conic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvathi, S. P.; Ramanan, R. V.

    2017-04-01

    In a direct interplanetary transfer, the spacecraft moves from a parking orbit of the departure planet to a parking orbit of the arrival planet. The transfer trajectory must be designed such that the specified arrival parking orbit conditions are achieved. For a fixed departure epoch and flight duration, there are four distinct transfer trajectory design options in a direct transfer. The conventional patched conic method, the most widely used analytical trajectory design method, does not identify these design options. An iterative patched conic method that identifies these distinct design options is developed and presented in this paper. This method involves two iterative processes: (i) iteration on the hyperbolic orbit characteristics using an analytical tuning strategy to achieve the hyperbolic excess velocity vector at the patch point, (ii) iteration on the patch points at the sphere of influence. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the conventional and V-infinity tuned patched conic methods. A design analysis tool, based on the proposed method, is developed and tested in various orbiter mission scenarios.

  1. Development of a conceptual flight vehicle design weight estimation method library and documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew S.

    The state of the art in estimating the volumetric size and mass of flight vehicles is held today by an elite group of engineers in the Aerospace Conceptual Design Industry. This is not a skill readily accessible or taught in academia. To estimate flight vehicle mass properties, many aerospace engineering students are encouraged to read the latest design textbooks, learn how to use a few basic statistical equations, and plunge into the details of parametric mass properties analysis. Specifications for and a prototype of a standardized engineering "tool-box" of conceptual and preliminary design weight estimation methods were developed to manage the growing and ever-changing body of weight estimation knowledge. This also bridges the gap in Mass Properties education for aerospace engineering students. The Weight Method Library will also be used as a living document for use by future aerospace students. This "tool-box" consists of a weight estimation method bibliography containing unclassified, open-source literature for conceptual and preliminary flight vehicle design phases. Transport aircraft validation cases have been applied to each entry in the AVD Weight Method Library in order to provide a sense of context and applicability to each method. The weight methodology validation results indicate consensus and agreement of the individual methods. This generic specification of a method library will be applicable for use by other disciplines within the AVD Lab, Post-Graduate design labs, or engineering design professionals.

  2. Design of a Failure Tolerant Flight Control System via Coprime Factorization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Takeharu; Ochi, Yoshimasa

    This paper presents a design method of reconfigurable flight control systems based on the coprime factorization method. The baseline robust control system is designed using the normalized coprime factorization method. The identification method employed is a closed-loop one, which is also based on coprime factorization; therefore, the method is suitable to the robust control system. The ν-gap metric is chosen as a criterion that indicates the effects of failures on stabilizability of the robust control system. The ν-gap metric can be computed using the identified parameters. To illustrate the effectiveness of the control and identification method, a design example and simulation results for the F-18 HARV are shown.

  3. Computer Aided Drug Design for Multi-Target Drug Design: SAR /QSAR, Molecular Docking and Pharmacophore Methods.

    PubMed

    Abdolmaleki, Azizeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B; Ghasemi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Multi-target drugs against particular multiple targets get better protection, resistance profiles and curative influence by cooperative rules of a key beneficial target with resistance behavior and compensatory elements. Computational techniques can assist us in the efforts to design novel drugs (ligands) with a preferred bioactivity outline and alternative bioactive molecules at an early stage. A number of in silico methods have been explored extensively in order to facilitate the investigation of individual target agents and to propose a selective drug. A different, progressively more significant field which is used to predict the bioactivity of chemical compounds is the data mining method. Some of the previously mentioned methods have been investigated for multi-target drug design (MTDD) to find drug leads interact simultaneously with multiple targets. Several cheminformatics methods and structure-based approaches try to extract information from units working cooperatively in a biomolecular system to fulfill their task. To dominate the difficulties of the experimental specification of ligand-target structures, rational methods, namely molecular docking, SAR and QSAR are vital substitutes to obtain knowledge for each structure in atomic insight. These procedures are logically successful for the prediction of binding affinity and have shown promising potential in facilitating MTDD. Here, we review some of the important features of the multi-target therapeutics discoveries using the computational approach, highlighting the SAR, QSAR, docking and pharmacophore methods to discover interactions between drug-target that could be leveraged for curative benefits. A summary of each, followed by examples of its applications in drug design has been provided. Computational efficiency of each method has been represented according to its main strengths and limitations.

  4. Best estimate method versus evaluation method: a comparison of two techniques in evaluating seismic analysis and design. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, S.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Smith, P.D.

    1980-07-01

    The concept of how two techniques, Best Estimate Method and Evaluation Method, may be applied to the tradditional seismic analysis and design of a nuclear power plant is introduced. Only the four links of the seismic analysis and design methodology chain (SMC)--seismic input, soil-structure interaction, major structural response, and subsystem response--are considered. The objective is to evaluate the compounding of conservatisms in the seismic analysis and design of nuclear power plants, to provide guidance for judgments in the SMC, and to concentrate the evaluation on that part of the seismic analysis and design which is familiar to the engineering community. An example applies the effects of three-dimensional excitations on the model of a nuclear power plant structure. The example demonstrates how conservatisms accrue by coupling two links in the SMC and comparing those results to the effects of one link alone. The utility of employing the Best Estimate Method vs the Evauation Method is also demonstrated.

  5. The Importance of Adhering to Details of the Total Design Method (TDM) for Mail Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillman, Don A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The empirical effects of adherence of details of the Total Design Method (TDM) approach to the design of mail surveys is discussed, based on the implementation of a common survey in 11 different states. The results suggest that greater adherence results in higher response, especially in the later stages of the TDM. (BW)

  6. Treatment of Early-Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (TEOSS): Rationale, Design, and Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Jon; Sikich, Linmarie; Findling, Robert L.; Frazier, Jean A.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Hlastala, Stefanie A.; Williams, Emily; Ambler, Denisse; Hunt-Harrison, Tyehimba; Maloney, Ann E.; Ritz, Louise; Anderson, Robert; Hamer, Robert M.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The Treatment of Early Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Study is a publicly funded clinical trial designed to compare the therapeutic benefits, safety, and tolerability of risperidone, olanzapine, and molindone in youths with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The rationale, design, and methods of the Treatment of Early…

  7. A Comparison of Diary Method Variations for Enlightening Form Generation in the Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babapour, Maral; Rehammar, Bjorn; Rahe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents two studies in which an empirical approach was taken to understand and explain form generation and decisions taken in the design process. In particular, the activities addressing aesthetic aspects when exteriorising form ideas in the design process have been the focus of the present study. Diary methods were the starting point…

  8. An Empirical Comparison of Five Linear Equating Methods for the NEAT Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Youngsuk; Mroch, Andrew A.; Kane, Michael T.; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a data base containing the responses of 40,000 candidates to 90 multiple-choice questions was used to mimic data sets for 50-item tests under the "nonequivalent groups with anchor test" (NEAT) design. Using these smaller data sets, we evaluated the performance of five linear equating methods for the NEAT design with five levels of…

  9. Rationale, Design, and Methods of the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollins, Scott; Greenhill, Laurence; Swanson, James; Wigal, Sharon; Abikoff, Howard; McCracken, James; Riddle, Mark; McGough, James; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Tim; Skrobala, Anne; Posner, Kelly; Ghuman, Jaswinder; Davies, Mark; Cunningham, Charles; Bauzo, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the rationale and design of the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS). Method: PATS was a National Institutes of Mental Health-funded, multicenter, randomized, efficacy trial designed to evaluate the short-term (5 weeks) efficacy and long-term (40 weeks) safety of methylphenidate (MPH) in preschoolers with…

  10. Paragogy and Flipped Assessment: Experience of Designing and Running a MOOC on Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yenn; Rofe, J. Simon

    2016-01-01

    This study draws on the authors' first-hand experience of designing, developing and delivering (3Ds) a massive open online course (MOOC) entitled "Understanding Research Methods" since 2014, largely but not exclusively for learners in the humanities and social sciences. The greatest challenge facing us was to design an assessment…

  11. Curiosity and Pedagogy: A Mixed-Methods Study of Student Experiences in the Design Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Korydon H.

    2010-01-01

    Curiosity is often considered the foundation of learning. There is, however, little understanding of how (or if) pedagogy in higher education affects student curiosity, especially in the studio setting of architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture. This study used mixed-methods to investigate curiosity among design students in the…

  12. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Since the project is rapidly nearing conclusion, the status of the tasks outlined in the original proposal are briefly outlined. These tasks include: viscous interation and wake curvature effects; code optimization and design methodology studies; methods for the design of isolated regions; program improvement efforts; and validation, testing, and documentation.

  13. A Typology of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for developing sampling designs in mixed methods research. First, we present sampling schemes that have been associated with quantitative and qualitative research. Second, we discuss sample size considerations and provide sample size recommendations for each of the major research designs for quantitative and…

  14. Connecting Generations: Developing Co-Design Methods for Older Adults and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Bo; Druin, Allison; Fails, Jerry; Massey, Sheri; Golub, Evan; Franckel, Sonia; Schneider, Kiki

    2012-01-01

    As new technologies emerge that can bring older adults together with children, little has been discussed by researchers concerning the design methods used to create these new technologies. Giving both children and older adults a voice in a shared design process comes with many challenges. This paper details an exploratory study focusing on…

  15. A new statistical method for design and analyses of component tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, Mohammad Mehdi; Khounsiavash, Mohsen; Otadi, Mahmood; Mosleh, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    Tolerancing conducted by design engineers to meet customers' needs is a prerequisite for producing high-quality products. Engineers use handbooks to conduct tolerancing. While use of statistical methods for tolerancing is not something new, engineers often use known distributions, including the normal distribution. Yet, if the statistical distribution of the given variable is unknown, a new statistical method will be employed to design tolerance. In this paper, we use generalized lambda distribution for design and analyses component tolerance. We use percentile method (PM) to estimate the distribution parameters. The findings indicated that, when the distribution of the component data is unknown, the proposed method can be used to expedite the design of component tolerance. Moreover, in the case of assembled sets, more extensive tolerance for each component with the same target performance can be utilized.

  16. The DDBD Method In The A-Seismic Design of Anchored Diaphragm Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Manuela, Cecconi; Vincenzo, Pane; Sara, Vecchietti

    2008-07-08

    The development of displacement based approaches for earthquake engineering design appears to be very useful and capable to provide improved reliability by directly comparing computed response and expected structural performance. In particular, the design procedure known as the Direct Displacement Based Design (DDBD) method, which has been developed in structural engineering over the past ten years in the attempt to mitigate some of the deficiencies in current force-based design methods, has been shown to be very effective and promising ([1], [2]). The first attempts of application of the procedure to geotechnical engineering and, in particular, earth retaining structures are discussed in [3], [4] and [5]. However in this field, the outcomes of the research need to be further investigated in many aspects. The paper focuses on the application of the DDBD method to anchored diaphragm walls. The results of the DDBD method are discussed in detail in the paper, and compared to those obtained from conventional pseudo-static analyses.

  17. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. This includes the remedying of a spanwise oscillation problem and the assessment of grid skewness, viscous interaction, and the initial airfoil section on the final design. It was found that, in response to the spanwise oscillation problem that designing at every other spanwise station produced the best results for the cases presented, a smoothly varying grid is especially needed for the accurate design at the wing tip, the boundary layer displacement thicknesses must be included in a successful wing design, the design of high and medium aspect ratio wings is possible with this code, and the final airfoil section designed is fairly independent of the initial section.

  18. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... equivalent methods are identified as follows: EQPM-1013-207, ``Thermo Scientific TEOM 1405-DF Dichotomous... external enclosures, and operated in accordance with the Thermo Scientific TEOM 1405-DF Dichotomous Ambient..., ``Thermo Scientific TEOM 1405-DF Dichotomous Ambient Particular Monitor with FDMS ,'' configured for...

  19. Case Study for Enhanced Accident Tolerance Design Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Koonce, Tony

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant systems, structures, and components (SSCs) needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, reliability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  20. Supercritical blade design on stream surfaces of revolution with an inverse method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E.; Grein, H.-D.

    1991-01-01

    A method to solve the inverse problem of supercritical blade-to-blade flow on stream surfaces of revolution with variable radius and variable stream surface thickness in a relative system is described. Some aspects of shockless design and of leading edge resolution in the numerical procedure are depicted. Some supercritical compressor cascades were designed and their complete flow field results were compared with computations of two different analysis methods.

  1. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Several inverse methods have been compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are presented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  2. Automated divertor target design by adjoint shape sensitivity analysis and a one-shot method

    SciTech Connect

    Dekeyser, W.; Reiter, D.; Baelmans, M.

    2014-12-01

    As magnetic confinement fusion progresses towards the development of first reactor-scale devices, computational tokamak divertor design is a topic of high priority. Presently, edge plasma codes are used in a forward approach, where magnetic field and divertor geometry are manually adjusted to meet design requirements. Due to the complex edge plasma flows and large number of design variables, this method is computationally very demanding. On the other hand, efficient optimization-based design strategies have been developed in computational aerodynamics and fluid mechanics. Such an optimization approach to divertor target shape design is elaborated in the present paper. A general formulation of the design problems is given, and conditions characterizing the optimal designs are formulated. Using a continuous adjoint framework, design sensitivities can be computed at a cost of only two edge plasma simulations, independent of the number of design variables. Furthermore, by using a one-shot method the entire optimization problem can be solved at an equivalent cost of only a few forward simulations. The methodology is applied to target shape design for uniform power load, in simplified edge plasma geometry.

  3. Fast Numerical Methods for the Design of Layered Photonic Structures with Rough Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarevskiy, Nikolay; Braginsky, Leonid; Shklover, Valery; Hafner, Christian; Lawson, John

    2011-01-01

    Modified boundary conditions (MBC) and a multilayer approach (MA) are proposed as fast and efficient numerical methods for the design of 1D photonic structures with rough interfaces. These methods are applicable for the structures, composed of materials with arbitrary permittivity tensor. MBC and MA are numerically validated on different types of interface roughness and permittivities of the constituent materials. The proposed methods can be combined with the 4x4 scattering matrix method as a field solver and an evolutionary strategy as an optimizer. The resulted optimization procedure is fast, accurate, numerically stable and can be used to design structures for various applications.

  4. Development of minimized mixing molecular orbital method for designing organic ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xun; Aoki, Yuriko

    2015-06-15

    Predicting the high spin stability of organic radicals correctly for designing organic ferromagnets remains a significant challenge. We have developed a method with an index (L(min)) for predicting the high spin stability of conjugated organic radicals at the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock level. Unitary transformations were performed for localizing the coefficients of nonbonding molecular orbitals, and subsequently the localized coefficients were used to calculate L(min) that indicates the high spin stability of conjugated organic radicals. This method can be combined with the elongation method to treat huge high spin open-shell systems. Thus, this method is useful for designing organic ferromagnets.

  5. The Tool for Designing Engineering Systems Using a New Optimization Method Based on a Stochastic Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Katsuhito; Ishikawa, Yoshio

    The conventional optimization methods were based on a deterministic approach, since their purpose is to find out an exact solution. However, these methods have initial condition dependence and risk of falling into local solution. In this paper, we propose a new optimization method based on a concept of path integral method used in quantum mechanics. The method obtains a solutions as an expected value (stochastic average) using a stochastic process. The advantages of this method are not to be affected by initial conditions and not to need techniques based on experiences. We applied the new optimization method to a design of the hang glider. In this problem, not only the hang glider design but also its flight trajectory were optimized. The numerical calculation results showed that the method has a sufficient performance.

  6. The value of value of information: best informing research design and prioritization using current methods.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Simon; Karnon, Jon; Willan, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Value of information (VOI) methods have been proposed as a systematic approach to inform optimal research design and prioritization. Four related questions arise that VOI methods could address. (i) Is further research for a health technology assessment (HTA) potentially worthwhile? (ii) Is the cost of a given research design less than its expected value? (iii) What is the optimal research design for an HTA? (iv) How can research funding be best prioritized across alternative HTAs? Following Occam's razor, we consider the usefulness of VOI methods in informing questions 1-4 relative to their simplicity of use. Expected value of perfect information (EVPI) with current information, while simple to calculate, is shown to provide neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition to address question 1, given that what EVPI needs to exceed varies with the cost of research design, which can vary from very large down to negligible. Hence, for any given HTA, EVPI does not discriminate, as it can be large and further research not worthwhile or small and further research worthwhile. In contrast, each of questions 1-4 are shown to be fully addressed (necessary and sufficient) where VOI methods are applied to maximize expected value of sample information (EVSI) minus expected costs across designs. In comparing complexity in use of VOI methods, applying the central limit theorem (CLT) simplifies analysis to enable easy estimation of EVSI and optimal overall research design, and has been shown to outperform bootstrapping, particularly with small samples. Consequently, VOI methods applying the CLT to inform optimal overall research design satisfy Occam's razor in both improving decision making and reducing complexity. Furthermore, they enable consideration of relevant decision contexts, including option value and opportunity cost of delay, time, imperfect implementation and optimal design across jurisdictions. More complex VOI methods such as bootstrapping of the expected value of

  7. RE: Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System -- Comments Submitted for Review by the SAB Workgroup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Submission of comments by the Organic Arsenical Products Task Force on the draft document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

  8. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  9. Seismic design methods for oil and gas transmission pipelines: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Zarea, M.; Akel, S.; Champavere, R.; Betbeder-Matibet, J.; Conoscente, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a comparative study of two main seismic design methods for buried hydrocarbon transmission pipelines are presented. Several aspects of each method are analyzed: description of the assumptions, necessary input parameters and expected results. In addition, a brief parametric study is applied to several configurations (straight pipes and bends), for both travelling waves and permanent ground displacement (fault) effects. Finally, the validity of the methods is verified by analyzing field experience from past earthquakes with these methods.

  10. Validation of published Stirling engine design methods using engine characteristics from the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Four fully disclosed reference engines and five design methods are discussed. So far, the agreement between theory and experiment is about as good for the simpler calculation methods as it is for the more complicated methods, that is, within 20%. For the simpler methods, a one number adjustable constant can be used to reduce the error in predicting power output and efficiency over the entire operating map to less than 10%.

  11. The Impact of Group Technology-Based Shipbuilding Methods on Naval Ship Design and Acquisition Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    7~~ne ~lECOPY THE IMPACT OF GROUP TECHNOLOGY-BASED SHIPBUILDING METHODS ON NAVAL SHIP DESIGN AND ACQUISITION PRACTICES by JOHN SUTHERLAND HEFFRON B...Chairman Departmental Graduate Committee ,. Department of-Ocean Engineering 1* ___•___ _____ _____ THE IMPACT OF GROUP TECHNOLOGY-BASED SHIPBUILDING METHODS...stimulated their se rch for more efficient and productive ship constructio methods. As a result, group technology-based shipbuildi g methods havebeen

  12. Review on applications of 3D inverse design method for pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Junlian; Wang, Dezhong

    2014-05-01

    The 3D inverse design method, which methodology is far superior to the conventional design method that based on geometrical description, is gradually applied in pump blade design. However, no complete description about the method is outlined. Also, there are no general rules available to set the two important input parameters, blade loading distribution and stacking condition. In this sense, the basic theory and the mechanism why the design method can suppress the formation of secondary flow are summarized. And also, several typical pump design cases with different specific speeds ranging from centrifugal pump to axial pump are surveyed. The results indicates that, for centrifugal pump and mixed pump or turbine, the ratio of blade loading on the hub to that on the shroud is more than unit in the fore part of the blade, whereas in the aft part, the ratio is decreased to satisfy the same wrap angle for hub and shroud. And the choice of blade loading type depends on the balancing of efficiency and cavitation. If the cavitation is more weighted, the better choice is aft-loaded, otherwise, the fore-loaded or mid-loaded is preferable to improve the efficiency. The stacking condition, which is an auxiliary to suppress the secondary flow, can have great effect on the jet-wake outflow and the operation range for pump. Ultimately, how to link the design method to modern optimization techniques is illustrated. With the know-how design methodology and the know-how systematic optimization approach, the application of optimization design is promising for engineering. This paper summarizes the 3D inverse design method systematically.

  13. Simple method of designing centralized PI controllers for multivariable systems based on SSGM.

    PubMed

    Dhanya Ram, V; Chidambaram, M

    2015-05-01

    A method is given to design multivariable PI/PID controllers for stable and unstable multivariable systems. The method needs only the steady state gain matrix (SSGM). The method is based on the static decoupler design followed by SISO PI/PID controllers design and combining the resulted decoupler and the diagonal PI(D) controllers as the centralized controllers. The result of the present method is shown to be equivalent to the empirical method proposed by Davison EJ. Multivariable tuning regulators: the feed-forward and robust control of general servo-mechanism problem. IEEE Trans Autom Control 1976;21:35-41. Three simulation examples are given. The performance of the controllers is compared with that of the reported centralized controller based on the multivariable transfer function matrix.

  14. A method of designing smartphone interface based on the extended user's mental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Bian, Jiali; Pan, Juchen; Song, Song

    2017-01-01

    The user's mental model is the core guiding theory of product design, especially practical products. The essence of practical product is a tool which is used by users to meet their needs. Then, the most important feature of a tool is usability. The design method based on the user's mental model provides a series of practical and feasible theoretical guidance for improving the usability of the product according to the user's awareness of things. In this paper, we propose a method of designing smartphone interface based on the extended user's mental model according to further research on user groups. This approach achieves personalized customization of smartphone application interface and enhance application using efficiency.

  15. A new traffic control design method for large networks with signalized intersections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.; Colony, D. C.; Seldner, K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a traffic control design technique for application to large traffic networks with signalized intersections. It is shown that the design method adopts a macroscopic viewpoint to establish a new traffic modelling procedure in which vehicle platoons are subdivided into main stream queues and turning queues. Optimization of the signal splits minimizes queue lengths in the steady state condition and improves traffic flow conditions, from the viewpoint of the traveling public. Finally, an application of the design method to a traffic network with thirty-three signalized intersections is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  16. Design method for a distributed Bragg resonator based evanescent field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischof, David; Kehl, Florian; Michler, Markus

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytic design method for a distributed Bragg resonator based evanescent field sensor. Such sensors can, for example, be used to measure changing refractive indices of the cover medium of a waveguide, as well as molecule adsorption at the sensor surface. For given starting conditions, the presented design method allows the analytical calculation of optimized sensor parameters for quantitative simulation and fabrication. The design process is based on the Fabry-Pérot resonator and analytical solutions of coupled mode theory.

  17. A direct-inverse transonic wing-design method in curvilinear coordinates including viscous-interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Robert R.; Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. A spanwise oscillation problem and proposed remedies are discussed. Test cases are presented which reveal the approximate limits on the wing's aspect ratio and leading edge wing sweep angle for a successful design, and which show the significance of spanwise grid skewness, grid refinement, viscous interaction, the initial airfoil section and Mach number-pressure distribution compatibility on the final design. Furthermore, preliminary results are shown which indicate that it is feasible to successfully design a region of the wing which begins aft of the leading edge and terminates prior to the trailing edge.

  18. Methodology for Risk-informed O&M decision making in power plants

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-06

    •Incorporation of real-time component information using equipment condition assessment (ECA) through the developmentof enhanced risk monitors (ERM) for active components in advanced reactor (AR) and advanced small modular reactor (SMR) designs •We incorporate time-dependent failure probabilities from prognostic health management (PHM) systems to dynamically update the risk metric of interest •This information is used to augment data used for supervisory control and plant-wide coordination of multiple modules by providing the incremental risk incurred due to aging and demands placed on components that support mission requirements.

  19. An analytical sensitivity method for use in integrated aeroservoelastic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    Interdisciplinary analysis capabilities have been developed for aeroservoelastic aircraft and large flexible spacecraft, but the requisite integrated design methods are only beginning to be developed. One integrated design method which has received attention is based on hierarchal problem decompositions, optimization, and design sensitivity analyses. This paper highlights a design sensitivity analysis method for Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) optimal control laws, enabling the use of LQG techniques in the hierarchal design methodology. The LQG sensitivity analysis method calculates the change in the optimal control law and resulting controlled system responses due to changes in fixed design integration parameters using analytical sensitivity equations. Numerical results of a LQG design sensitivity analysis for a realistic aeroservoelastic aircraft example are presented. In this example, the sensitivity of the optimal control law and aircraft response for various parameters such as wing bending natural frequency is determined. The sensitivity results computed from the analytical expressions are used to estimate changes in response resulting from changes in the parameters. Comparisons of the estimates with exact calculated responses show they are reasonably accurate for + or - 15 percent changes in the parameters. Evaluation of the analytical expressions is computationally faster than equivalent finite difference calculations.

  20. An analytical sensitivity method for use in integrated aeroservoelastic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    Interdisciplinary analysis capabilities have been developed for aeroservoelastic aircraft and large flexible spacecraft, but the requisite integrated design methods are only beginning to be developed. One integrated design method which has received attention is based on hierarchal problem decompositions, optimization, and design sensitivity analyses. This paper highlights a design sensitivity analysis method for Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) optimal control laws, enabling the use of LQG techniques in the hierarchal design methodology. The LQG sensitivity analysis method calculates the change in the optimal control law and resulting controlled system responses due to changes in fixed design integration parameters using analytical sensitivity equations. Numerical results of an LQG design sensitivity analysis for a realistic aeroservoelastic aircraft example are presented. In this example, the sensitivity of the optimal control law and aircraft response for various parameters such as wing bending natural frequency is determined. The sensitivity results computed from the analytical expressions are used to estimate changes in response resulting from changes in the parameters. Comparisons of the estimates with exact calculated responses show they are reasonably accurate for + or - 15 percent changes in the parameters. Evaluation of the analytical expressions is computationally faster than equivalent finite difference calculations.