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Sample records for rituximab-associated b-cell defects

  1. Four cases of rituximab-associated melanoma.

    PubMed

    Velter, Charles; Pagès, Cécile; Schneider, Pierre; Osio, Amélie; Brice, Pauline; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-08-01

    Biological agents have transformed the management of inflammatory and proliferative disorders. Safety issues have been raised, particularly the increased risk of opportunistic infections and secondary cancers. We report four cases of melanoma worsening or occurring after rituximab treatment for associated B-cell lymphoma, and discuss the accountability of the molecule in this process. In three cases, melanoma was diagnosed before or at the same time as a B-cell lymphoma treated with rituximab associated with chemotherapy and we observed rapid metastatic progression. In the last case, melanoma appeared after 5 years treatment with rituximab for a follicular lymphoma. Although it is premature to conclude on the role of rituximab in melanoma, careful follow-up and registration of such cases are important to gain further insight on this topic.

  2. Defective B cell tolerance in adenosine deaminase deficiency is corrected by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Morbach, Henner; Brigida, Immacolata; Ng, Yen-Shing; Aiuti, Alessandro; Meffre, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene defects are among the most common causes of SCID. Restoration of purine metabolism and immune functions can be achieved by enzyme replacement therapy, or more effectively by bone marrow transplant or HSC gene therapy (HSC-GT). However, autoimmune complications and autoantibody production, including anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs), frequently occur in ADA-SCID patients after treatment. To assess whether ADA deficiency affects the establishment of B cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells of ADA-SCID patients before and after HSC-GT. We found that before HSC-GT, new emigrant/transitional and mature naive B cells from ADA-SCID patients contained more autoreactive and ANA-expressing clones, indicative of defective central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We further observed impaired B cell receptor (BCR) and TLR functions in B cells after ADA inhibition, which may underlie the defects in B cell tolerance. Strikingly, after HSC-GT, ADA-SCID patients displayed quasi-normal early B cell tolerance checkpoints, as evidenced by restored removal of developing autoreactive and ANA-expressing B cells. Hence, ADA plays an essential role in controlling autoreactive B cell counterselection by regulating BCR and TLR functions.

  3. Transgenic Mice Expressing Dominant Negative Bright Exhibit Defects in B1 B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Jamee C.; Ferrell, Scott; Miner, Cathrine; Oldham, Athenia L.; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Webb, Carol F.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor Bright up-regulates immunoglobulin heavy chain production from select variable region promoters and requires Bright dimerization, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) and the Btk substrate, TFII-I for this activity. Defects in Btk cause X-linked immunodeficiency disease in mice and man. Btk-deficient mice exhibit decreased serum IgM production, B cell developmental blocks, absence of peritoneal B1 cells, and subnormal immune responses against antigens, including phosphorylcholine, which confer protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative (DN) Bright share similarities with Btk-deficient mice, including decreased serum IgM, poor anti-phosphorylcholine responses, and slightly reduced numbers of mature B cells. Although DN Bright mice developed B1 B cells, these were functionally deficient in immunoglobulin secretion. These data suggest a mechanistic explanation for the abnormal responses to phosphorylcholine observed in Btk-deficient mice, and indicate that Bright functions in a subset of Btk-dependent pathways in vivo, particularly those responses dominated by B1 B cells. PMID:18981111

  4. Defects of B Cell Terminal Differentiation in Patients with Type-1 Kabuki Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, Andrew W.; Saal, Howard M.; Burrow, Thomas A.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Shchelochkov, Oleg; Khandelwal, Pooja; Xie, Changchun; Bleesing, Jack; Filipovich, Lisa; Risma, Kimberly; Assa’ad, Amal H.; Roehrs, Phillip A.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a complex multi-system developmental disorder associated with mutation of genes encoding histone-modifying proteins. In addition to craniofacial, intellectual, and cardiac defects, KS is also characterized by humoral immune deficiency and autoimmune disease, yet no detailed molecular characterization of the KS-associated immune phenotype has previously been reported. Objective To characterize the humoral immune defects found in KS patients with KMT2D mutations. Methods We comprehensively characterize B cell function in a cohort (N = 13) of patients with KS (ages 4 months to 27 years). Results Three-quarters (77%) of the cohort had a detectable heterozygous KMT2D mutations (50% nonsense, 20% splice site, 30% missense), and 70% of the reported mutations are novel. Amongst the patients with KMT2D mutations (KMT2DMut/+), hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in all but one individual, with IgA deficiency affecting 90% of patients and a deficiency in at least one other isoform seen in 40% of patients. Total memory (CD27+) and class-switched memory B cells (IgM−) were significantly reduced in KMT2DMut/+ patients compared to controls (p-values < 0.001). KMT2DMut/+ patients also had significantly reduced rates of somatic hypermutation in IgG (p value = 0.003), but not IgA or IgM heavy chain sequences. Impaired terminal differentiation was noted in KMT2DMut/+ primary B cells. Autoimmune pathology was observed in patients with missense mutations affecting the SET domain and its adjacent domains. Conclusions In patients with KS, autosomal dominant KMT2D mutations are associated with the dysregulation of terminal B cell differentiation leading to humoral immune deficiency and in some cases autoimmunity. All patients with KS should undergo serial clinical immune evaluations. Clinical Implications KMT2DMut/+ Kabuki syndrome causes IgA deficiency in nearly all patients, although additional humoral defects (memory B cell deficiency, Ig

  5. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells contain anomalous Lyn tyrosine kinase, a putative contribution to defective apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Contri, Antonella; Brunati, Anna Maria; Trentin, Livio; Cabrelle, Anna; Miorin, Marta; Cesaro, Luca; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Zambello, Renato; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Donella-Deana, Arianna

    2005-01-01

    B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a neoplastic disorder characterized by accumulation of B lymphocytes due to uncontrolled growth and resistance to apoptosis. Analysis of B cells freshly isolated from 40 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia demonstrated that the Src kinase Lyn, the switch molecule that couples the B cell receptor to downstream signaling, displays anomalous properties. Lyn is remarkably overexpressed at the protein level in leukemic cells as compared with normal B lymphocytes, with a substantial aliquot of the kinase anomalously present in the cytosol. Whereas in normal B lymphocytes Lyn activation is dependent on B cell–receptor stimulation, in resting malignant cells, the constitutive activity of the kinase accounts for high basal protein tyrosine phosphorylation and low responsiveness to IgM ligation. Addition of the Lyn inhibitors PP2 and SU6656 to leukemic cell cultures restores cell apoptosis, and treatment of malignant cells with drugs that induce cell apoptosis decreases both activity and amount of the tyrosine kinase. These findings suggest a direct correlation between high basal Lyn activity and defects in the induction of apoptosis in leukemic cells. They also support a critical role for Lyn in B-CLL pathogenesis and identify this tyrosine kinase as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:15650771

  6. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0)) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Mutator Mice Confer Respiration Defects and B-Cell Lymphoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ0) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan. PMID:23418460

  8. B-cell activation with CD40L or CpG measures the function of B-cell subsets and identifies specific defects in immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Emiliano; Farroni, Chiara; Cascioli, Simona; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Giorda, Ezio; Piano Mortari, Eva; Leonardi, Lucia; Scarselli, Alessia; Valentini, Diletta; Cancrini, Caterina; Duse, Marzia; Grimsholm, Ola; Carsetti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Around 65% of primary immunodeficiencies are antibody deficiencies. Functional tests are useful tools to study B-cell functions in vitro. However, no accepted guidelines for performing and evaluating functional tests have been issued yet. Here, we report our experience on the study of B-cell functions in infancy and throughout childhood. We show that T-independent stimulation with CpG measures proliferation and differentiation potential of memory B cells. Switched memory B cells respond better than IgM memory B cells. On the other hand, CD40L, a T-dependent stimulus, does not induce plasma cell differentiation, but causes proliferation of naïve and memory B cells. During childhood, the production of plasmablasts in response to CpG increases with age mirroring the development of memory B cells. The response to CD40L does not change with age. In patients with selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD), we observed that switched memory B cells are reduced due to the absence of IgA memory B cells. In agreement, IgA plasma cells are not generated in response to CpG. Unexpectedly, B cells from SIgAD patients show a reduced proliferative response to CD40L. Our results demonstrate that functional tests are an important tool to assess the functions of the humoral immune system.

  9. An intrinsic B cell defect is required for the production of autoantibodies in the lpr model of murine systemic autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.S.; Katagiri, T.; Katagiri, K.; Morris, S.C.; Cohen, P.L.; Eisenberg, R.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Mice homozygous for the gene lpr develop marked lymphadenopathy and a spectrum of autoantibodies closely resembling that of human systemic lupus erythematosus. The unusual T cell phenotype of the expanded lymphocyte population and the T-dependence of several antibodies in this strain have suggested that primary T cell abnormalities underlie the autoimmune syndrome. Using double chimeras, we now show that expression of the lpr gene in B cells is absolutely necessary for autoantibody production. Combinations of anti-Thy 1.2 + C' treated bone marrow from congenic strains of C57BL/6 mice, differing only at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) and lpr loci, were transferred into lethally irradiated B6/lpr mice. Double chimerism was documented by allotype-specific surface IgD and IgM immunofluorescence assay of peripheral blood and by allotype-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for total IgM in serum. Despite the presence of both +/+ and lpr B cells, IgM and IgG2a anti-chromatin as well as IgM anti-IgG were entirely the products of lpr B cells. Total serum IgG2a and IgG1 were also dominated by the lpr phenotype but not to the same extent. A similar experiment using B6/lpr-Igha recipients confirmed these findings. Additional experiments in which B6/lpr recipients were infused with ratios of donor bone marrow favoring B6.C20 +/+ over B6/lpr showed that even though +/+ B cells were overrepresented, autoantibodies were only of the lpr allotype. In addition, in the presence of lpr B cells, normal B cells showed little response to an exogenous, T cell-dependent antigen. The data thus indicate that lpr B cells manifest an intrinsic abnormality which is essential for autoantibody production in the lpr model.

  10. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  11. Impaired Antibody-mediated Protection and Defective IgA B-Cell Memory in Experimental Infection of Adults with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Maximillian S.; Jozwik, Agnieszka; Makris, Spyridon; Dunning, Jake; Paras, Allan; DeVincenzo, John P.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Wrammert, Jens; Openshaw, Peter J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Despite relative antigenic stability, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) reinfects throughout life. After more than 40 years of research, no effective human vaccine exists and correlates of protection remain poorly defined. Most current vaccine candidates seek to induce high levels of RSV-specific serum neutralizing antibodies, which are associated with reduced RSV-related hospitalization rates in observational studies but may not actually prevent infection. Objectives: To characterize correlates of protection from infection and the generation of RSV-specific humoral memory to promote effective vaccine development. Methods: We inoculated 61 healthy adults with live RSV and studied protection from infection by serum and mucosal antibody. We analyzed RSV-specific peripheral blood plasmablast and memory B-cell frequencies and antibody longevity. Measurements and Main Results: Despite moderately high levels of preexisting serum antibody, 34 (56%) became infected, of whom 23 (68%) developed symptomatic colds. Prior RSV-specific nasal IgA correlated significantly more strongly with protection from polymerase chain reaction–confirmed infection than serum neutralizing antibody. Increases in virus-specific antibody titers were variable and transient in infected subjects but correlated with plasmablasts that peaked around Day 10. During convalescence, only IgG (and no IgA) RSV-specific memory B cells were detectable in peripheral blood. This contrasted with natural influenza infection, in which virus-specific IgA memory B cells were readily recovered. Conclusions: This observed specific defect in IgA memory may partly explain the ability of RSV to cause recurrent symptomatic infections. If so, vaccines able to induce durable RSV-specific IgA responses may be more protective than those generating systemic antibody alone. PMID:25730467

  12. T-cell defect in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas involves expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Azzaoui, Imane; Uhel, Fabrice; Rossille, Delphine; Pangault, Celine; Dulong, Joelle; Le Priol, Jerome; Lamy, Thierry; Houot, Roch; Le Gouill, Steven; Cartron, Guillaume; Godmer, Pascal; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Milpied, Noel; Damaj, Gandhi; Tarte, Karin; Fest, Thierry; Roussel, Mikael

    2016-08-25

    In diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the number of circulating monocytes and neutrophils represents an independent prognostic factor. These cell subsets include monocytic and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M- and G-MDSCs) defined by their ability to suppress T-cell responses. MDSCs are a heterogeneous population described in inflammatory and infectious diseases and in numerous tumors including multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and DLBCL. However, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. We broadly assessed the presence and mechanisms of suppression of MDSC subsets in DLBCL. First, a myeloid suppressive signature was identified by gene expression profiling in DLBCL peripheral blood. Accordingly, we identified, in a cohort of 66 DLBCL patients, an increase in circulating G-MDSC (Lin(neg)HLA-DR(neg)CD33(pos)CD11b(pos)) and M-MDSC (CD14(pos)HLA-DR(low)) counts. Interestingly, only M-MDSC number was correlated with the International Prognostic Index, event-free survival, and number of circulating Tregs. Furthermore, T-cell proliferation was restored after monocyte depletion. Myeloid-dependent T-cell suppression was attributed to a release of interleukin-10 and S100A12 and increased PD-L1 expression. In summary, we identified expanded MDSC subsets in DLBCL, as well as new mechanisms of immunosuppression in DLBCL.

  13. Graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. IV. B cell functional defect associated with a depletion of splenic colony-forming units in marrow of graft-versus-host-reactive mice

    SciTech Connect

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1986-02-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether a functional B cell defect occurred in the bone marrow of mice experiencing a GVH reaction (GVHBM). GVH reactions were induced in AxCBA F1 adult mice by an injection of A strain lymphoid cells. The GVH reaction was confirmed by immunosuppression and thymus histology. At various intervals after GVH induction, GVHBM was tested for its ability to restore B cell function in adult thymectomized irradiated mice reconstituted with normal thymocytes. GVHBM cells obtained seven days after GVH induction restored but slightly the plaque forming cell (PFC) response to sheep erythrocytes and the mitogen response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GVHBM cells obtained 10 days or later failed to reconstitute the PFC or LPS responses. GVHBM cells suppressed neither the T or B cell function of normal spleen cells nor the LPS mitogen response of normal bone marrow cells. In addition, the splenic colony-forming units (CFU-s) in GVHBM were slightly decreased by day 10 after GVH induction and markedly depressed by day 22 after GVH induction. These results suggest that the GVH reaction may affect two different events in B cell differentiation. The early decrease in functional B cells that occurs before there is any change in the CFU-s population suggests a direct effect on B cell production, whereas the later absence of functional B cells could be due to the marked decline in stem cell production (CFU-s).

  14. B-cell tolerance and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Tsubata, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Self-reactive B cells are tolerized at various stages of B-cell development and differentiation, including the immature B-cell stage (central tolerance) and the germinal center (GC) B-cell stage, and B-cell tolerance involves various mechanisms such as deletion, anergy, and receptor editing. Self-reactive B cells generated by random immunoglobulin variable gene rearrangements are tolerized by central tolerance and anergy in the periphery, and these processes involve apoptosis regulated by Bim, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, and regulation of B-cell signaling by various phosphatases, including SHIP-1 and SHP-1. Self-reactive B cells generated by somatic mutations during GC reaction are also eliminated. Fas is not directly involved in this process but prevents persistence of GC reaction that allows generation of less stringently regulated B cells, including self-reactive B cells. Defects in self-tolerance preferentially cause lupus-like disease with production of anti-nuclear antibodies, probably due to the presence of a large potential B-cell repertoire reactive to nucleic acids and the presence of nucleic acid-induced activation mechanisms in various immune cells, including B cells and dendritic cells. A feed-forward loop composed of anti-nuclear antibodies produced by B cells and type 1 interferons secreted from nucleic acid-activated dendritic cells plays a crucial role in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Regulation of T15 Idiotype Dominance. I. Mice Expressing the xid Immune Defect Provide Normal Help to T15(+) B Cell Precursors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Quintans, J., Z. S. Quan, and Miguel A. Arias. 1982. Mice v/ith the xid defect have helper cells for T15 idiotype dominant anti- phosphorylcholine primary...and socondary plaque-forming cell responses. J. Exp. Mod. 155:1245. REFERENCES 1. Kohlef, H. 1975. The responsa to phosphorylcholine : dissecting...associated with the immune response o( inbred mice to phosphorylcholine . Eur. J. Immunol. 2:319. 4. Cosenza, H., and H. Köhler. 1972. Specific

  16. B cell helper assays.

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  17. Restoring balance to B cells in ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luning Prak, Eline T

    2012-06-01

    It is paradoxical that immunodeficiency disorders are associated with autoimmunity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, a cause of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is a case in point. In this issue of the JCI, Sauer and colleagues investigate the B cell defects in ADA-deficient patients. They demonstrate that ADA patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy had B cell tolerance checkpoint defects. Remarkably, gene therapy with a retrovirus that expresses ADA resulted in the apparent correction of these defects, with normalization of peripheral B cell autoantibody frequencies. In vitro, agents that either block ADA or overexpress adenosine resulted in altered B cell receptor and TLR signaling. Collectively, these data implicate a B cell-intrinsic mechanism for alterations in B cell tolerance in the setting of partial ADA deficiency that is corrected by gene therapy.

  18. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  19. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  20. Memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kometani, Kohei; Ise, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    The immune system can remember a previously experienced pathogen and can evoke an enhanced response to reinfection that depends on memory lymphocyte populations. Recent advances in tracking antigen-experienced memory B cells have revealed the existence of distinct classes of cells that have considerable functional differences. Some of these differences seem to be determined by the stimulation history during memory cell formation. To induce rapid recall antibody responses, the contributions of other types of cells, such as memory T follicular helper cells, have also now begun to be appreciated. In this Review, we discuss these and other recent advances in our understanding of memory B cells, focusing on the underlying mechanisms that are required for rapid and effective recall antibody responses.

  1. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  2. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  3. Memory B cells in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Anita S.; Sciammas, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on the humoral response to allografts has focused on circulating serum antibodies and the long-lived plasma cells that produce these antibodies. In contrast, the interrogation of the quiescent memory B cell compartment is technically more challenging and thus has not been incorporated into the clinical diagnostic or prognostic toolkit. In this review, we discuss new technologies that have allowed this heretofore enigmatic subset of B cells to be identified at quiescence and during a recall response. These technologies in experimental models are providing new insights into memory B cell heterogeneity with respect to their phenotype, cellular function and the antibodies they produce. Similar technologies are also allowing for the identification of comparable memory alloreactive B cells in transplant recipients. While much of the focus in transplant immunology has been on controlling the alloreactive B cell population, long-term transplant patient survival is critically dependent on protection by pathogen-specific memory B cells. Techniques are also available that allow the interrogation of memory B cell response to pathogen re-encounter. Thus we are poised in our ability toinvestigate how immunosuppression affects allo- as well as pathogen-specific memory B cells, and reason that these investigation can yield new insights that will be beneficial for graft as well as patient survival. PMID:25525921

  4. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  5. Retinoic Acid Signaling in B Cells Is Required for the Generation of an Effective T-Independent Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ellen; Ortiz, Carla; Pantazi, Eirini; Bailey, Charlotte S.; Lord, Graham M.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Elgueta, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the balance of inflammation and tolerance in T cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that RA facilitates IgA isotype switching in B cells in vivo. However, it is unclear whether RA has a direct effect on T-independent B cell responses in vivo. To address this question, we generated a mouse model where RA signaling is specifically silenced in the B cell lineage. This was achieved through the overexpression of a dominant negative receptor α for RA (dnRARα) in the B cell lineage. In this model, we found a dramatic reduction in marginal zone (MZ) B cells and accumulation of transitional 2 B cells in the spleen. We also observed a reduction in B1 B cells in the peritoneum with a defect in the T-independent B cell response against 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl. This was not a result of inhibited development of B cells in the bone marrow, but likely the result of both defective expression of S1P1 in MZ B cells and a defect in the development of MZ and B1 B cells. This suggests that RARα expression in B cells is important for B cell frequency in the MZ and peritoneum, which is crucial for the generation of T-independent humoral responses. PMID:28066447

  6. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  7. Memory B Cells and Pneumococcal Antibody After Splenectomy1

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstrom, Heather; Bussel, James; Lim, Lony C.-L.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Splenectomized patients are susceptible to bloodstream infections with encapsulated bacteria, potentially due to loss of blood filtering but also defective production of anticarbohydrate Ab. Recent studies propose that a lack of Ab is related to reduced numbers of IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells found after splenectomy. To test this, we analyzed CD27+ memory B cell subsets, IgG, and IgM pneumococcal Ab responses in 26 vaccinated splenectomized subjects in comparison to memory B cell subsets and Ab responses in healthy controls. As shown previously, the splenectomized autoimmune subjects had fewer total, isotype switched, and IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells as compared with controls, but there was no difference in memory B cells subsets between controls and splenectomized subjects with spherocytosis. There was no difference between the geometric mean IgG Ab response between normal controls and splenectomized subjects (p = 0.51; p = 0.81). Control subjects produced more IgM Ab than splenectomized autoimmune subjects (p = 0.01) but the same levels as subjects with spherocytosis (p = 0.15.) There was no correlation between memory B cell subsets and IgG or IgM Ab responses for controls or splenectomized subjects. These data suggest that splenectomy alone may not be the sole reason for loss of memory B cells and reduced IgM antipneumococcal Ab. Because subjects with autoimmunity had splenectomy at a significantly older age than participants with spherocytosis, these data suggest that an age-related loss of extra splenic sites necessary for the maintenance or function of memory B cells may lead to impaired immunity in these subjects. PMID:18714044

  8. Increased STAT3 phosphorylation on CD27(+) B-cells from common variable immunodeficiency disease patients.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Antonio; Pons, Jaume; Lanio, Nallibe; Cunill, Vanesa; Frontera, Guillem; Crespí, Catalina; Matamoros, Núria; Ferrer, Joana M

    2015-12-01

    Maturation and differentiation of B-cells are driven by T-cells' help through IL-21/STAT3 axis in GC centers or through extrafollicular pathways, in a T-independent manner. B-cell differentiation is defective in common variable immunodeficiency disease (CVID) patients. We investigated if IL-21/STAT3 axis alterations could influence B-cell fate. We activated purified CVID B-cells with surrogate T-dependent (anti-CD40), T-independent (TLR-9 ligand) stimuli or through B-cell receptor engagement (anti-IgM) with or without IL-21. IL-21 mediated STAT3 activation was greater on CD27(-) than CD27(+) B-cells depending on the stimulus. IL-21 alone induced STAT3 phosphorylation (pSTAT3) only on CD27(-) B-cells and IL-21 induced higher pSTAT3 levels on CD27(-) than CD27(+) B-cells after anti-IgM or anti-CD40 activation. CVID CD27(+) B-cells showed selective STAT3 hyperphosphorylation after activation with anti-IgM or anti-CD40 alone and anti-IgM, anti-CD40 or ODN combined with IL-21. Increased STAT3 activation during immune responses could result in B-cell differentiation defects in CVID.

  9. Memory B cells: total recall.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tri Giang; Tangye, Stuart G

    2017-03-28

    Immunological memory is a cornerstone of adaptive immune responses in higher vertebrates. The remarkable ability to generate memory cells following Ag exposure, in the context of natural infection or immunization, provides long-lived protection against infectious diseases, often for the hosts' lifetime. Indeed, the generation of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells underpins the success of most vaccines. The concept of immunological memory is not new-it was first proposed nearly 2500 years ago. While our understanding of the complexities of humoral and cell-mediated memory continues to evolve, important aspects of this process remain unresolved. Here, we will provide an overview of recent advances in B-cell memory in mice and humans, and in health and disease.

  10. Increased B cell proliferation and reduced Ig production in DREAM transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Savignac, Magali; Mellström, Britt; Bébin, Anne-Gaëlle; Oliveros, Juan C; Delpy, Laurent; Pinaud, Eric; Naranjo, Jose R

    2010-12-15

    DREAM/KChIP-3 is a calcium-dependent transcriptional repressor highly expressed in immune cells. Transgenic mice expressing a dominant active DREAM mutant show reduced serum Ig levels. In vitro assays show that reduced Ig secretion is an intrinsic defect of transgenic B cells that occurs without impairment in plasma cell differentiation, class switch recombination, or Ig transcription. Surprisingly, transgenic B cells show an accelerated entry in cell division. Transcriptomic analysis of transgenic B cells revealed that hyperproliferative B cell response could be correlated with a reduced expression of Klf9, a cell-cycle regulator. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the defect in Ig production is associated with reduced translation rather than with increased protein degradation. Importantly, transgenic B cells showed reduced expression of the Eif4g3 gene, which encodes a protein related to protein translation. Our results disclose, to our knowledge, a novel function of DREAM in proliferation and Ig synthesis in B lymphocytes.

  11. Mediation of transitional B cell maturation in the absence of functional Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Shalini; Dhar, Atika; Varanasi, Vineeth; Mukherjee, Tapas; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Basak, Soumen; Bal, Vineeta; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit

    2017-04-05

    X-linked immune-deficient (Xid) mice, carrying a mutation in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), have multiple B cell lineage differentiation defects. We now show that, while Xid mice showed only mild reduction in the frequency of the late transitional (T2) stage of peripheral B cells, the defect became severe when the Xid genotype was combined with either a CD40-null, a TCRbeta-null or an MHC class II (MHCII)-null genotype. Purified Xid T1 and T2 B cells survived poorly in vitro compared to wild-type (WT) cells. BAFF rescued WT but not Xid T1 and T2 B cells from death in culture, while CD40 ligation equivalently rescued both. Xid transitional B cells ex vivo showed low levels of the p100 protein substrate for non-canonical NF-kappaB signalling. In vitro, CD40 ligation induced equivalent activation of the canonical but not of the non-canonical NF-kappaB pathway in Xid and WT T1 and T2 B cells. CD40 ligation efficiently rescued p100-null T1 B cells from neglect-induced death in vitro. These data indicate that CD40-mediated signals, likely from CD4 T cells, can mediate peripheral transitional B cell maturation independent of Btk and the non-canonical NF-kappaB pathway, and thus contribute to the understanding of the complexities of peripheral B cell maturation.

  12. Mediation of transitional B cell maturation in the absence of functional Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Shalini; Dhar, Atika; Varanasi, Vineeth; Mukherjee, Tapas; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Basak, Soumen; Bal, Vineeta; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit

    2017-01-01

    X-linked immune-deficient (Xid) mice, carrying a mutation in Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk), have multiple B cell lineage differentiation defects. We now show that, while Xid mice showed only mild reduction in the frequency of the late transitional (T2) stage of peripheral B cells, the defect became severe when the Xid genotype was combined with either a CD40-null, a TCRbeta-null or an MHC class II (MHCII)-null genotype. Purified Xid T1 and T2 B cells survived poorly in vitro compared to wild-type (WT) cells. BAFF rescued WT but not Xid T1 and T2 B cells from death in culture, while CD40 ligation equivalently rescued both. Xid transitional B cells ex vivo showed low levels of the p100 protein substrate for non-canonical NF-kappaB signalling. In vitro, CD40 ligation induced equivalent activation of the canonical but not of the non-canonical NF-kappaB pathway in Xid and WT T1 and T2 B cells. CD40 ligation efficiently rescued p100-null T1 B cells from neglect-induced death in vitro. These data indicate that CD40-mediated signals, likely from CD4 T cells, can mediate peripheral transitional B cell maturation independent of Btk and the non-canonical NF-kappaB pathway, and thus contribute to the understanding of the complexities of peripheral B cell maturation. PMID:28378771

  13. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-05-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  14. Induction of polyclonal B cell activation and differentiation by the AIDS retrovirus (HTLV-III/LAV)

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, S.E.; Schnittman, S.M.; Lane, H.C.; Folks, T.; Koenig, S.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    The immune systems of individuals infected with HTLV-III/LAV are characterized by a profound defect in cellular immunity together with paradoxical polyclonal B cell activation. The present study examined the direct effects of HTLV-III/LAV on B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells from healthy donors were incubated with a variety of HTLV-III/LAV isolates for 1 h and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was measured at multiple time points. Responses ranged from 9000-28,000 cpm and peaked on day 4. This B cell activation was not enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2 to culture, was not synergistic with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, was not modulated by the addition of T lymphocytes to culture, and was not associated with B cell transformation. Supernatant Ig could first be detected in virus-activated cultures at day 4, plateaued by day 8, and yielded a mean of 12,500 ng IgG+IgM/ml/50,000 B cells. Thus, HTLV-III/LAV is a potent T cell independent B cell mitogen capable of inducing B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation comparable in magnitude to that of the most potent B cell activators. This biological property of HTLV-III/LAV may help explain the profound polyclonal B cell activation observed in patients with AIDS and may provide investigators with another probe for investigating the mechanisms of B cell activation.

  15. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masahiko; Kusunoki, Hideki; Mochida, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Mizuochi, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:21789042

  16. B Cell Immunity in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Gonca E.; Claas, Frans H. J.; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of B cells to alloimmune responses is gradually being understood in more detail. We now know that B cells can perpetuate alloimmune responses in multiple ways: (i) differentiation into antibody-producing plasma cells; (ii) sustaining long-term humoral immune memory; (iii) serving as antigen-presenting cells; (iv) organizing the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs; and (v) secreting pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cross-talk between B cells and T cells in the course of immune responses forms the basis of these diverse functions. In the setting of organ transplantation, focus has gradually shifted from T cells to B cells, with an increased notion that B cells are more than mere precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. In this review, we discuss the various roles of B cells in the generation of alloimmune responses beyond antibody production, as well as possibilities to specifically interfere with B cell activation. PMID:28119695

  17. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Rationale for B cell targeting in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    B cells are central pathogenic players in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and multiple other autoinmune diseases through antibody production as well as antibody independent functiona. At the same time, B cells are known to play important regulatory functions that may protect against autoimmune manifestations. Yet, the functional role of different B cell populations and their contribution to disease remain to be understood. The advent of agents that specifically target B cells, in particular anti-CD20 and ant-BLyS antibodies, have demonstrated the efficacy of this approach for the treatment of human autoimmunity. The analysis of patients treated with these and other B cell agents provide a unique opportunity to understand the correlates of clinical response and the significance of different B cell subsets. Here we discuss this information and how it could be used to better understand SLE and improve the rational design of B cell directed therapies in this disease. PMID:24763533

  19. Cyclin D3 is selectively required for proliferative expansion of germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Cato, Matthew H; Chintalapati, Suresh K; Yau, Irene W; Omori, Sidne A; Rickert, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    The generation of robust T-cell-dependent humoral immune responses requires the formation and expansion of germinal center structures within the follicular regions of the secondary lymphoid tissues. B-cell proliferation in the germinal center drives ongoing antigen-dependent selection and the generation of high-affinity class-switched plasma and memory B cells. However, the mechanisms regulating B-cell proliferation within this microenvironment are largely unknown. Here, we report that cyclin D3 is uniquely required for germinal center progression. Ccnd3(-/-) mice exhibit a B-cell-intrinsic defect in germinal center maturation and fail to generate an affinity-matured IgG response. We determined that the defect resulted from failed proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells. Mechanistically, sustained expression of cyclin D3 was found to be regulated at the level of protein stability and controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3 in a cyclic AMP-protein kinase A-dependent manner. The specific defect in proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells in Ccnd3(-/-) mice defines an underappreciated step in germinal center progression and solidifies a role for cyclin D3 in the immune response, and as a potential therapeutic target for germinal center-derived B-cell malignancies.

  20. Differing Requirements for MALT1 Function in Peripheral B Cell Survival and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peishan; Zhu, Zilu; Hachmann, Janna; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Salvesen, Guy; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, formation of the germinal center (GC) is essential for the generation of high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. The canonical NF-κB pathway has been implicated in the initiation of GC reaction, and defects in this pathway have been linked to immune deficiencies. The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in regulating NF-κB activation upon triggering of Ag receptors. Although previous studies have reported that MALT1 deficiency abrogates the GC response, the relative contribution of B cells and T cells to the defective phenotype remains unclear. We used chimeric mouse models to demonstrate that MALT1 function is required in B cells for GC formation. This role is restricted to BCR signaling where MALT1 is critical for B cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, the proapoptotic signal transmitted in the absence of MALT1 is dominant to the prosurvival effects of T cell-derived stimuli. In addition to GC B cell differentiation, MALT1 is required for plasma cell differentiation, but not mitogenic responses. Lastly, we show that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 can partially rescue the GC phenotype in MALT1-deficient animals by prolonging the lifespan of BCR-activated B cells, but plasma cell differentiation and Ab production remain defective. Thus, our data uncover previously unappreciated aspects of MALT1 function in B cells and highlight its importance in humoral immunity.

  1. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The selective radiosensitivity of sIgM >> sIgD marginal zone B cells is associated with the selective loss of B cell function. The simultaneous restoration of impaired function and recovery of these cells with time supports this premise. B cell recovery, delayed one week after irradiation, is in progress at two weeks, and virtually complete by three weeks. XID mice reveal similar recovery kinetics although there are fewer recovering cells and these bear reduced levels of Ia. This observation represents additional evidence that xid B cells are distinct from those of normal mice. The simultaneous loss, and concurrent recovery, of sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness in irradiated mice suggests the existence of a unique B cell subpopulation possessing both phenotypes. Additional support for this hypothesis is provided by demonstrating that splenocytes, depleted of IgD{sup +} cells adoptively reconstitute this response in XID mice. The peritoneal B cell pool, which, compared to the spleen, consist of increased numbers of sIgM >> sIgD B cells, is shown to be a source of radiosensitive B cells that are TI-2 responsive. These observations represent additional evidence for an association between sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness.

  2. Role of MYC in B Cell Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Korać, Petra; Dotlić, Snježana; Matulić, Maja; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Dominis, Mara

    2017-04-04

    B cell lymphomas mainly arise from different developmental stages of B cells in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid tissue. There are a number of signaling pathways that affect the initiation and development of B cell lymphomagenesis. The functions of several key proteins that represent branching points of signaling networks are changed because of their aberrant expression, degradation, and/or accumulation, and those events determine the fate of the affected B cells. One of the most influential transcription factors, commonly associated with unfavorable prognosis for patients with B cell lymphoma, is nuclear phosphoprotein MYC. During B cell lymphomagenesis, oncogenic MYC variant is deregulated through various mechanisms, such as gene translocation, gene amplification, and epigenetic deregulation of its expression. Owing to alterations of downstream signaling cascades, MYC-overexpressing neoplastic B cells proliferate rapidly, avoid apoptosis, and become unresponsive to most conventional treatments. This review will summarize the roles of MYC in B cell development and oncogenesis, as well as its significance for current B cell lymphoma classification. We compared communication networks within transformed B cells in different lymphomas affected by overexpressed MYC and conducted a meta-analysis concerning the association of MYC with tumor prognosis in different patient populations.

  3. Decreased somatic hypermutation induces an impaired peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M.; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Delmotte, Fabien R.; Yamakawa, Natsuko; Glauzy, Salome; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Kinnunen, Tuure; Menard, Laurence; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Bruneau, Julie; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Kracker, Sven; Kaneko, Hideo; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Patients with mutations in AICDA, which encodes activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), display an impaired peripheral B cell tolerance. AID mediates class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells, but the mechanism by which AID prevents the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in blood is unclear. Here, we analyzed B cell tolerance in AID-deficient patients, patients with autosomal dominant AID mutations (AD-AID), asymptomatic AICDA heterozygotes (AID+/–), and patients with uracil N-glycosylase (UNG) deficiency, which impairs CSR but not SHM. The low frequency of autoreactive mature naive B cells in UNG-deficient patients resembled that of healthy subjects, revealing that impaired CSR does not interfere with the peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint. In contrast, we observed decreased frequencies of SHM in memory B cells from AD-AID patients and AID+/– subjects, who were unable to prevent the accumulation of autoreactive mature naive B cells. In addition, the individuals with AICDA mutations, but not UNG-deficient patients, displayed Tregs with defective suppressive capacity that correlated with increases in circulating T follicular helper cells and enhanced cytokine production. We conclude that SHM, but not CSR, regulates peripheral B cell tolerance through the production of mutated antibodies that clear antigens and prevent sustained interleukin secretions that interfere with Treg function. PMID:27701145

  4. Decreased somatic hypermutation induces an impaired peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Delmotte, Fabien R; Yamakawa, Natsuko; Glauzy, Salome; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Kinnunen, Tuure; Menard, Laurence; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Bruneau, Julie; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; van der Burg, Mirjam; Kuijpers, Taco W; Kracker, Sven; Kaneko, Hideo; Sekinaka, Yujin; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Patients with mutations in AICDA, which encodes activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), display an impaired peripheral B cell tolerance. AID mediates class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells, but the mechanism by which AID prevents the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in blood is unclear. Here, we analyzed B cell tolerance in AID-deficient patients, patients with autosomal dominant AID mutations (AD-AID), asymptomatic AICDA heterozygotes (AID+/-), and patients with uracil N-glycosylase (UNG) deficiency, which impairs CSR but not SHM. The low frequency of autoreactive mature naive B cells in UNG-deficient patients resembled that of healthy subjects, revealing that impaired CSR does not interfere with the peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint. In contrast, we observed decreased frequencies of SHM in memory B cells from AD-AID patients and AID+/- subjects, who were unable to prevent the accumulation of autoreactive mature naive B cells. In addition, the individuals with AICDA mutations, but not UNG-deficient patients, displayed Tregs with defective suppressive capacity that correlated with increases in circulating T follicular helper cells and enhanced cytokine production. We conclude that SHM, but not CSR, regulates peripheral B cell tolerance through the production of mutated antibodies that clear antigens and prevent sustained interleukin secretions that interfere with Treg function.

  5. Accumulation of peripheral autoreactive B cells in the absence of functional human regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, Tuure; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Morbach, Henner; Choi, Jinyoung; Kim, Sangtaek; Craft, Joseph; Mayer, Lloyd; Cancrini, Caterina; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in the forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) gene, which encodes a transcription factor critical for Treg function, result in a severe autoimmune disorder and the production of various autoantibodies in mice and in IPEX (immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) patients. However, it is unknown whether Tregs normally suppress autoreactive B cells. To investigate a role for Tregs in maintaining human B-cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells isolated from IPEX patients. Characteristics and reactivity of antibodies expressed by new emigrant/transitional B cells from IPEX patients were similar to those from healthy donors, demonstrating that defective Treg function does not impact central B-cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from IPEX patients often expressed autoreactive antibodies, suggesting an important role for Tregs in maintaining peripheral B-cell tolerance. T cells displayed an activated phenotype in IPEX patients, including their Treg-like cells, and showed up-regulation of CD40L, PD-1, and inducibl T-cell costimulator (ICOS), which may favor the accumulation of autoreactive mature naive B cells in these patients. Hence, our data demonstrate an essential role for Tregs in the establishment and the maintenance of peripheral B-cell tolerance in humans. PMID:23223361

  6. Reduced numbers of switched memory B cells with high terminal differentiation potential in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carsetti, Rita; Valentini, Diletta; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Marasco, Emiliano; Giustini, Ferruccio; Bartuli, Andrea; Villani, Alberto; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2015-03-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have increased susceptibility to infections and a high frequency of leukemia and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that immunodeficiency and immune dysfunction are integral parts of the syndrome. A reduction in B-cell numbers has been reported, associated with moderate immunodeficiency and normal immunoglobulin levels. Here, we compared B-cell populations of 19 children with DS with those in healthy age-matched controls. We found that all steps of peripheral B-cell development are altered in DS, with a more severe defect during the later stages of B-cell development. Transitional and mature-naïve B-cell numbers are reduced by 50% whereas switched memory B cells represent 10-15% of the numbers in age-matched controls. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced, but all other immunoglobulin isotypes were in the normal range. The frequency of switched memory B cells specific for vaccine antigens was significantly lower in affected children than in their equivalently vaccinated siblings. In vitro switched memory B cells of patients with DS have an increased ability to differentiate into antibody-forming cells in response to TLR9 signals. Tailored vaccination schedules increasing the number of switched memory B cells may improve protection and reduce the risk of death from infection in DS.

  7. A case of immunodeficiency with decreased serum IgA levels and impaired polyclonal B cell differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakano, T; Hosokawa, A; Horino, N; Hyodo, S; Kishi, T; Suzawa, T; Kittaka, E; Sakura, N; Usui, T

    1983-09-01

    We report a patient with low serum IgA levels and persistent pulmonary infection. In spite of the normal contents of serum IgG and IgM, the patient had a deficiency for plasma cell differentiation of all major classes of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM). Cross culture systems between normal T or B cells and the patient's T or B cells showed a defect of both T and B cell function.

  8. Selection of natural autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies produced by CD5+ B1 B cells include anti-thymocyte autoantibody (ATA). Transgenic mice bearing the Ig-μ heavy chain of a prototypic ATA, V(H)3609Vκ21c, demonstrated a critical requirement for self-antigen in the accumulation of ATA B cells and production of high levels of serum ATA. Further work with ATA-μκ transgenic mice revealed that, while development of most B cells were blocked at an immature stage in spleen, some mature ATA B cells were present. ATA-μκ transgenic mice with varying levels of Thy-1 autoantigen showed a clear relationship between BCR crosslinking and B cell fate, with low levels generating marginal zone ATA B cells and complete antigen absence allowing maturation to follicular ATA B cells. Finally, different fates of developing ATA B cells encountering high levels self-antigen may be accounted for by variations in the response of newly formed B cells arising from foetal and adult development.

  9. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  10. Impaired expression of p66Shc, a novel regulator of B-cell survival, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Nagaja; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sozzi, Elisa; Ferro, Micol; Giommoni, Nico; Finetti, Francesca; De Falco, Giulia; Cencini, Emanuele; Raspadori, Donatella; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Lauria, Francesco; Forconi, Francesco; Baldari, Cosima T

    2010-05-06

    Intrinsic apoptosis defects underlie to a large extent the extended survival of malignant B cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we show that the Shc family adapter p66Shc uncouples the B-cell receptor (BCR) from the Erk- and Akt-dependent survival pathways, thereby enhancing B-cell apoptosis. p66Shc expression was found to be profoundly impaired in CLL B cells compared with normal peripheral B cells. Moreover, significant differences in p66Shc expression were observed in patients with favorable or unfavorable prognosis, based on the mutational status of IGHV genes, with the lowest expression in the unfavorable prognosis group. Analysis of the expression of genes implicated in apoptosis defects of CLL showed an alteration in the balance of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family in patients with CLL. Reconstitution experiments in CLL B cells, together with data obtained on B cells from p66Shc(-/-) mice, showed that p66Shc expression correlates with a bias in the Bcl-2 family toward proapoptotic members. The data identify p66Shc as a novel regulator of B-cell apoptosis which attenuates BCR-dependent survival signals and modulates Bcl-2 family expression. They moreover provide evidence that the p66Shc expression defect in CLL B cells may be causal to the imbalance toward the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members in these cells.

  11. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  12. 604 Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of B Cells in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Berrón-Ruiz, Laura; Martínez, Dolores Mogica; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Herrera, Gabriela López; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary antibody deficiency characterized by a decrease in antibody production and low or normal B cell numbers. To elucidate the clinical and immunological heterogeneity of this condition, we studied 13 patients diagnosed with CVID, examined the status of B-cell maturation in patients with CVID by analyzing IgD/CD27 expression, and we analyze the in vitro B cell differentiation to plasma cells. Methods T, B and NK cell populations was analyzed by flow citometry, expression of CD27 marker was determined to define B cell subsets; we also assessed molecules important for B cell proliferation and differentiation, such as TNFRSF13B (TACI), inducible costimulator (ICOS), CD154, CD20, ICOSL and BAFFR. For B cell differentiation assays, total PBMCs were cultured with CpG alone, or with SAC Cowan, Pokweed and CpG; flow cytometric analysis of plasmablast generation was perfomed after 7 days of culture. Results Reduced numbers of T and B cells was observed in CVID patients, this reduction was more prominent in adults than in children. One group of 8 patients showed a significant reduction in IgD+CD27+ memory B cells while 3 patients had similar percentage than the healthy control group. The IgD-CD27+ memory B cell population was low in 10 patients (<12%); while it was similar to the healthy control group in 2 of the patients. BAFFR expression in B cells was reduced in 4 patients. Finally, the differentiation to plasmablasts was reduced in patients, stimulation with CpG induced 18.5% of plasmablasts (SD = 12.5%) whereas it was 24% (SD = 8.3%) in healthy controls. Conclusions These results suggest that a combined defect in T and B cells may account for CVID, at least in some patients. On the other hand, the complete analysis of markers important for B proliferation and differentiation such as ICOS, CD40, CD154 and TACI can be a useful tool for understanding this heterogeneous disease. B cells from CVID patients fail to

  13. Regulatory B cells in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Rui, Ke; Wang, Shengjun; Lu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    B cells are generally considered to be positive regulators of the immune response because of their capability to produce antibodies, including autoantibodies. The production of antibodies facilitates optimal CD4+ T-cell activation because B cells serve as antigen-presenting cells and exert other modulatory functions in immune responses. However, certain B cells can also negatively regulate the immune response by producing regulatory cytokines and directly interacting with pathogenic T cells via cell-to-cell contact. These types of B cells are defined as regulatory B (Breg) cells. The regulatory function of Breg cells has been demonstrated in mouse models of inflammation, cancer, transplantation, and particularly in autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the recent advances that lead to the understanding of the development and function of Breg cells and the implications of B cells in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23292280

  14. Mechanistic insights into the impairment of memory B cells and antibody production in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Aberle, Judith H; Stiasny, Karin; Kundi, Michael; Heinz, Franz X

    2013-04-01

    It is well established that immunologic memory generated early in life can be maintained into old age and mediate robust anamnestic antibody responses. Little is known, however, about the initiation of memory B cells in the elderly. We have conducted a prospective analysis of the quantities and functionalities of antigen-specific B cell responses and its association with the functional helper CD4(+)T cell responses. The ability of naïve B cells from old (60-80 years) and young (20-31 years) humans to establish functional memory was examined following primary and booster vaccination with an inactivated-virus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis. Our data show that the number of antigen-specific memory B cells generated during primary vaccination was ~3-fold lower in old than in young individuals. The maintenance and booster responsiveness of these memory B cells were not compromised, as evidenced by similar increases in specific memory B cell frequencies upon revaccination in old and young adults. In contrast, the Ab response mediated per memory B cell after revaccination was dramatically diminished in the elderly. Also, antigen-specific IL-2-positive CD4(+)T cell responses were strongly reduced in the elderly and displayed an excellent correlation with Ab titres. The data suggest that the dramatically lower antibody response in the elderly could only partially be accounted for by the reduced B cell numbers and was strongly correlated with profound functional defects in CD4 help.

  15. Epigenetic Control of B Cell Development and B-Cell-Related Immune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-06-01

    B lymphocytes are generally recognized as the essential component of humoral immunity and also a regulator of innate immunity. The development of B cells is precisely regulated by a variety of factors via different mechanisms, including cytokine/cytokine receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA, play critical roles in establishing B cell lineage-specific gene expression profiles to define and sustain B cell identity and function. Epigenetic modifications are also sensitive to external stimuli and might bridge genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis or control of B-cell-related immune disorders, such as autoimmune diseases, lymphoma, and leukemia. Better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms for regulating B cell development and involving B cell abnormal differentiation and function will shed light on the design of new therapeutic approaches to B-cell-related diseases, and potential candidates of epigenetic modulators may be identified to target epigenetic pathways to prevent or treat B cell disorders. We summarize the relevance of epigenetic marks and landscapes in the stages of B cell development, discuss the interaction of the transcriptional networks and epigenetic changes, and review the involvement of epigenetic risk in the pathogenesis of B-cell-related diseases. Understanding how specific epigenetic alterations contribute to the development of B-cell-related autoimmunity and malignancies is instrumental to control B cell disorders.

  16. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.; Lussier, A.M.; Lee, S.K.; Appel, M.C.; Woodland, R.T.

    1988-09-15

    We have previously shown that low doses of ionizing radiation selectively impair a functionally defined B cell subpopulation. Normal mice, after exposure to 200 rad of ionizing radiation, have normal or near normal splenic plaque-forming cell responses to thymus-independent type 1 Ag, but reduced responses to thymus-independent type 2 Ag. Here, we confirm and extend the original findings by using hapten-specific serum RIA to demonstrate this differential radiosensitivity is systemic. We also examined splenocytes stained with a panel of lymphocyte surface Ag by FACS analysis to determine if these functional changes are accompanied by a physical alteration of the B cell pool of irradiated mice. Single-parameter FACS analyses demonstrate a diminution in both B cell number and the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression within the surviving B cell pool after irradiation. In contrast, T cells are relatively radioresistant as the relative percentage of T cells in the irradiated splenocyte pool increases, whereas the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression remains constant. Multiparameter FACS analyses indicate that B cells with the sIgM much greater than sIgD phenotype are more radiosensitive than B cells of the sIgM much less than sIgD phenotype. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of splenic sections stained with anti-IgM or anti-IgD reveal the enhanced radiosensitivity of marginal zone B cells.

  17. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  18. The early history of B cells.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Max D

    2015-03-01

    The separate development of functionally intertwined lineages of lymphocytes known as B cells and T cells is now recognized as a fundamental organizing principle of the adaptive immune system in all vertebrates. Immunologists strive to define the different sublineages of the clonally diverse B cells and T cells, how they interact with each other and how they interact with innate lymphoid cells and other elements of the innate immune system to counter infections, cancer and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. On the 50th anniversary of the recognition of B cells as a discrete cell lineage, this Timeline article recounts some of the milestones marking the development of the concept that B cells are a functionally and developmentally distinct arm of the adaptive immune system.

  19. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  20. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  1. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Curtis J.; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E.; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV12, or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRASV12-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation — a common feature of aging — has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis. PMID:26551682

  2. IRF4 is a suppressor of c-Myc induced B cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Simanta; Ma, Shibin; Trinh, Long; Eudy, James; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Joshi, Shantaram S; Lu, Runqing

    2011-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) is a critical transcriptional regulator in B cell development and function. We have previously shown that IRF4, together with IRF8, orchestrates pre-B cell development by limiting pre-B cell expansion and by promoting pre-B cell differentiation. Here, we report that IRF4 suppresses c-Myc induced leukemia in EμMyc mice. Our results show that c-Myc induced leukemia was greatly accelerated in the IRF4 heterozygous mice (IRF4(+/-)Myc); the average age of mortality in the IRF4(+/-)Myc mice was only 7 to 8 weeks but was 20 weeks in the control mice. Our results show that IRF4(+/-)Myc leukemic cells were derived from large pre-B cells and were hyperproliferative and resistant to apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that the majority of IRF4(+/-)Myc leukemic cells inactivated the wild-type IRF4 allele and contained defects in Arf-p53 tumor suppressor pathway. p27(kip) is part of the molecular circuitry that controls pre-B cell expansion. Our results show that expression of p27(kip) was lost in the IRF4(+/-)Myc leukemic cells and reconstitution of IRF4 expression in those cells induced p27(kip) and inhibited their expansion. Thus, IRF4 functions as a classical tumor suppressor to inhibit c-Myc induced B cell leukemia in EμMyc mice.

  3. Dysregulation of B Cell Repertoire Formation in Myasthenia Gravis Patients Revealed through Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vander Heiden, Jason A; Stathopoulos, Panos; Zhou, Julian Q; Chen, Luan; Gilbert, Tamara J; Bolen, Christopher R; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Broering, Teresa J; Vigneault, Francois; Nowak, Richard J; Kleinstein, Steven H; O'Connor, Kevin C

    2017-02-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypical B cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting 20-50 people per 100,000. The majority of patients fall into two clinically distinguishable types based on whether they produce autoantibodies targeting the acetylcholine receptor (AChR-MG) or muscle specific kinase (MuSK-MG). The autoantibodies are pathogenic, but whether their generation is associated with broader defects in the B cell repertoire is unknown. To address this question, we performed deep sequencing of the BCR repertoire of AChR-MG, MuSK-MG, and healthy subjects to generate ∼518,000 unique VH and VL sequences from sorted naive and memory B cell populations. AChR-MG and MuSK-MG subjects displayed distinct gene segment usage biases in both VH and VL sequences within the naive and memory compartments. The memory compartment of AChR-MG was further characterized by reduced positive selection of somatic mutations in the VH CDR and altered VH CDR3 physicochemical properties. The VL repertoire of MuSK-MG was specifically characterized by reduced V-J segment distance in recombined sequences, suggesting diminished VL receptor editing during B cell development. Our results identify large-scale abnormalities in both the naive and memory B cell repertoires. Particular abnormalities were unique to either AChR-MG or MuSK-MG, indicating that the repertoires reflect the distinct properties of the subtypes. These repertoire abnormalities are consistent with previously observed defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in MG, thereby offering additional insight regarding the impact of tolerance defects on peripheral autoimmune repertoires. These collective findings point toward a deformed B cell repertoire as a fundamental component of MG.

  4. Optimising B-cell depletion in autoimmune disease: is obinutuzumab the answer?

    PubMed

    Reddy, Venkat; Dahal, Lekh N; Cragg, Mark S; Leandro, Maria

    2016-08-01

    In Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), B-cell depletion therapy using rituximab results in variable clinical responses between individuals, which likely relates to variable B-cell depletion in the presence of immune defects. Outcomes in clinical trials with other type I anti-CD20 mAbs, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab, are comparable to rituximab. A mechanistically different type II mAb, obinutuzumab (OBZ), with greater capacity for B-cell depletion, has recently entered clinical trials in SLE. Here we consider whether type II anti-CD20 mAbs will provide mechanistic advantages to overcome the disease-related immune defects in autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  5. Nonrandon X chromosome inactivation in B cells from carriers of X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E.; Lavoie, A.; Briggs, C.; Brown, P.; Guerra, C.; Puck, J.M.

    1988-05-01

    X chromosome-linked sever combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by markedly reduced numbers of T cells, the absence of proliferative responses to mitogens, and hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells. To determine if the failure of the B cells to produce immunoglobulin might be due to expression of the XSCID gene defect in B-lineage cells as well as T cells, the authors analyzed patterns of X chromosome inactivation in B cells from nine obligate carriers of this disorder. A series of somatic cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X chromosome was produced from Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated B cells from each woman. To distinguish between the two X chromosome, the hybrids from each woman were analyzed using an X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism for which the woman in question was heterozygous. In all obligate carriers of XSCID, the B-cell hybrids demonstrated preferential use of a single X chromosome, the nonmutant X, as the active X. To determine if the small number of B-cell hybrids that contained the mutant X were derived from an immature subset of B cells, lymphocytes from three carriers were separated into surface IgM positive and surface IgM negative B cells prior to exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and production of B-cell hybrids. The results demonstrated normal random X chromosome inactivation in B-cell hybrids derived from the less mature surface IgM positive B cells. These results suggest that the XSCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as T cells and is required during B-cell maturation.

  6. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G.; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host. PMID:27868108

  7. Receptor Dissociation and B-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is one of the most abundant receptors on the surface of B cells with roughly 100,000-200,000 copies per cell. Signaling through the BCR is crucial for the activation and differentiation of B cells. Unlike other receptors, the BCR can be activated by a large set of structurally different ligands, but the molecular mechanism of BCR activation is still a matter of controversy. Although dominant for a long time, the cross-link model (CLM) of BCR activation is not supported by recent studies of the nanoscale organization of the BCR on the surface of resting B cells. In contrast to the prediction of CLM, the numerous BCR complexes on these cells are not randomly distributed monomers but rather form oligomers which reside within membrane confinements. This finding is more in line with the dissociation activation model (DAM), wherein B-cell activation is accompanied by an opening of the auto-inhibited BCR oligomers instead of a cross-linking of the BCR monomers. In this review, we discuss in detail the new findings and their implications for BCR signaling.

  8. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  9. A methyl-deficient diet modifies early B cell development.

    PubMed

    Kurogi, Toshiaki; Inoue, Hiroko; Guo, Yun; Nobukiyo, Asako; Nohara, Keiko; Kanno, Masamoto

    2012-01-01

    A functional methyl group donor is essential for the epigenetic regulation of all biological events due to the importance of DNA methylation and histone methylation as an epigenetic marker. However, the epigenetic alterations in the immune system due to methyl donor deficiency are not well known. In this study, we tried to address this question by studying the lymphocyte development and DNA methylation changes caused by a methyl-deficient diet (MDD). We fed one group of C57BL/6J mice with a methyl-sufficient diet (MSD) and the other group with an MDD for 5 months. Flow cytometry analyses of their immune systems showed a decrease in B220+ IgM+ (immature B) cells and an increase in B220+ IgM- (pro/pre-B) cells in the bone marrow of mice fed an MDD. By means of an in vitro OP9 coculture system, we recognized that this B220+ IgM- cell fraction from the MDD has an intrinsic developmental defect. When we quantitatively measured the mRNA expression levels of transcription factors and recombination machinery related to B cell development in the B220+ IgM- cell fraction of their bone marrow, we found that ADA, EBF1, DNTT and Pax5 mRNA expression levels were significantly downregulated in mice fed with an MDD. In addition, there was a drastic decrease in histone methylation profile H3K4me3 in the Pax5 and EBF1 promoters in these B220+ IgM- B cells. However, CpG-DNA methylation profiles had not changed and this revealed that these two promoters are demethylated even under an MSD condition. We also found changed expression levels of the Polycomb group genes (mel18, bmi1, Pc1, Pc2, Ring1A, Ring1B, Ph1) on semi-quantitative RT-PCR. These results indicate that under an MDD condition, early B cell development in bone marrow is easily affected by epigenetic alterations.

  10. Transitional B cells are the target of negative selection in the B cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    B lymphocytes recognize antigen through membrane-bound antigen- receptors, membrane IgM and IgD (mIgM and mIgD). Binding to foreign antigens initiates a cascade of biochemical events that lead to activation and differentiation. In contrast, binding to self-antigens leads to death or to inactivation. It is commonly believed that the B cells acquire the ability to discriminate between self and nonself in the early phases of development. We report here that immature B cells, which have just emerged from the mIgMneg, B220pos pool, are not deleted upon binding of self-antigen. In vivo, developing B cells become sensitive to tolerance induction in a relatively late window of differentiation, when they are in transition from the immature (HSAbright, B220dull) to the mature (HSAdull, B220bright) stage. In the transitional B cells, early markers of differentiation such as Pgp1 (CD44) and ThB reach the highest level of expression, while the expression of CD23 and mIgD, late markers of differentiation, and expression of class II MHC, progressively increases. Most of the transitional B cells, but only few of the mature and of the immature B cells, express the fas antigen, while mature B cells, but not immature and transitional B cells, express bcl-2 protein. mIgM is present in low amounts in immature B cells, reaches the highest level of expression in transitional B cells and is down-regulated in mature resting B cells, where it is coexpressed with mIgD. The high expression of mIgM, the presence of the fas antigen and the absence of bcl-2 protein is compatible with the high sensitivity of transitional B cells to negative selection. In vitro, immature B cells die rapidly by apoptosis after cross-linking of mIgM. This result, combined with the resistance of immature B cells to elimination in vivo, suggests that early in development the stroma cell microenvironment modulates signals transduced through mIgM. The functional and phenotypic division of IgMpos bone marrow B cells in

  11. Alloantigen presentation by B cells: analysis of the requirement for B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J L; Cunningham, A C; Kirby, J A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model for investigation of the functional implications of B-cell activation for antigen presentation. Mixed lymphocyte cultures were used to assess the ability of freshly isolated B cells, mitogen-activated B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell lines to stimulate the activation and proliferation of allogeneic T cells under a variety of experimental conditions. It was found that resting B cells presented antigen poorly, while activated cells were highly immunogenic. Paraformaldehyde fixation completely eliminated antigen presentation by resting B cells, despite constitutive expression of class II MHC antigens. However, fixation had little effect on antigen presentation by activated B cells that expressed B7-1 and B7-2 in addition to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Arrest of B-cell activation by serial fixation after treatment with F(ab')2 fragments of goat anti-human IgM produced cells with variable antigen-presenting capacity. Optimal antigen presentation was observed for cells fixed 72 hr after the initiation of B-cell activation. Although both B7-1 and B7-2 antigen expression increased after B-cell activation, it was found that the rate of T-cell proliferation correlated most closely with B7-2 expression. Stimulation of T cells by fixed activated B lymphocytes could be blocked by antibodies directed at class II MHC molecules, indicating involvement of the T-cell antigen receptor. In addition, T-cell proliferation was inhibited by antibodies specific for B7-1 and B7-2 and by the fusion protein CTLA4-Ig, demonstrating a requirement for CD28 signal transduction. The sole requirement of B7 family expression for antigen presentation by B lymphocytes was shown by demonstration of T-cell stimulation by fixed resting B cells in the presence of CD28 antibody as a source of artificial costimulation. PMID:8550066

  12. B cell suppression in primary glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Hofstra, Julia M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2014-03-01

    Membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and minimal change disease (MCD) are the most common causes of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. For many years prednisone, alkylating agents, and calcineurin inhibitors have been the standard of therapy for these patients. More effective or better tolerated treatment modalities are needed. B cell targeted therapy was recently introduced in clinical practice. In this review, we briefly summarize the current standard therapy and discuss the efficacy of B cell targeted therapy in primary glomerular diseases. Observational, short-term studies suggest that rituximab is effective and comparable to standard therapy in maintaining remissions in patients with frequently relapsing or steroid-dependent MCD or FSGS. In contrast, response is limited in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Rituximab also induces remissions in patients with membranous nephropathy. Controlled clinical trials on kidney endpoints are urgently needed to position B cell targeted therapy in clinical practice.

  13. B-cell reconstitution for SCID: should a conditioning regimen be used in SCID treatment?

    PubMed

    Haddad, Elie; Leroy, Sandrine; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has resulted in life-saving sustained T-cell reconstitution in many infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), but correction of B-cell function has been more problematic. At the annual meeting of the Primary Immunodeficiency Treatment Consortium held in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 27, 2012, a debate was held regarding the use of pretransplantation conditioning versus no pretransplantation conditioning in an effort to address this problem. Reviews of the literature were made by both debaters, and there was agreement that there was a higher rate of B-cell chimerism and a lower number of patients who required ongoing immunoglobulin replacement therapy in centers that used pretransplantation conditioning. However, there were still patients who required immunoglobulin replacement in those centers, and therefore pretransplantation conditioning did not guarantee development of B-cell function. Dr Rebecca H. Buckley presented data on B-cell function according to the molecular defect of the patient, and showed that patients with IL-7 receptor α, ADA, and CD3 chain gene mutations can have normal B-cell function after transplantation with only host B cells. Dr Elie Haddad presented a statistical analysis of B-cell function in published reports and showed that only a conditioning regimen that contained busulfan was significantly associated with better B-cell function after transplantation. The question is whether the risk of immediate and long-term toxicity with use of busulfan is justified, particularly in patients with SCID with DNA repair defects and in very young newborns with SCID who will be detected by using newborn screening.

  14. Ubiquitin-mediated fluctuations in MHC class II facilitate efficient germinal center B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Simon J.; Ersching, Jonatan; Ishido, Satoshi; Victora, Gabriel D.; Shin, Jeoung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation occurs in germinal centers (GCs) through iterative rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection. Selection involves B cells competing for T cell help based on the amount of antigen they capture and present on their MHC class II (MHCII) proteins. How GC B cells are able to rapidly and repeatedly transition between mutating their B cell receptor genes and then being selected shortly after is not known. We report that MHCII surface levels and degradation are dynamically regulated in GC B cells. Through ectopic expression of a photoconvertible MHCII-mKikGR chimeric gene, we found that individual GC B cells differed in the rates of MHCII protein turnover. Fluctuations in surface MHCII levels were dependent on ubiquitination and the E3 ligase March1. Increases in March1 expression in centroblasts correlated with decreases in surface MHCII levels, whereas CD83 expression in centrocytes helped to stabilize MHCII at that stage. Defects in MHCII ubiquitination caused GC B cells to accumulate greater amounts of a specific peptide–MHCII (pMHCII), suggesting that MHCII turnover facilitates the replacement of old complexes. We propose that pMHCII complexes are periodically targeted for degradation in centroblasts to favor the presentation of recently acquired antigens, thereby promoting the fidelity and efficiency of selection. PMID:27162138

  15. Mitogen-stimulated phospholipid synthesis in normal and immune-deficient human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, M.M.; Yokoyama, W.M.; Ashman, R.F.

    1986-04-15

    Eight patients with common variable panhypogammaglobulinemia were shown in the in vitro Ig biosynthesis assay to have defective B cell responses to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Phospholipid synthesis was assessed in the B cell plus monocyte fraction (MB) and irradiated T cells (T*) of patients and paired normal controls. Cell populations were studied separately and in the four possible combinations (1:1), with and without PWM, to reveal the effect of cell interactions. At 16 to 20 hr the mean stimulation index (SI) +/- standard error for MB cells alone was 1.01 +/- 0.02 for eight patients and 0.99 +/- 0.02 for the paired normals; the T* cell SI was 1.25 +/- 0.04 for patients and 1.28 +/- 0.05 for normals. Combinations of normal MB cells with normal T* cells showed significantly higher SI when compared with the combinations of normal MB cells with patient T* cells (p less than 0.005). However, the combination of patient MB cells with patient T* cells and the combination of patient MB cells with normal T* cells were not significantly different in SI (0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Isolation of patient and normal B cells, T* cells, and monocytes after the choline pulse showed that patient B cells gave a higher SI with normal T* help than with patient T* help. Of greatest interest is the finding that patient B cells that were defective in PWM-stimulated Ig production nevertheless showed a phospholipid synthesis response to PWM in the normal range, suggesting that the maturation defect in these B cells occurs later than the phospholipid synthesis acceleration step, or on a different pathway.

  16. Rituximab-Associated Inflammatory Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Christina; Harris, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare disease of the immunosuppression that results from neurotropic invasion of the JC virus which leads to demyelination of oligodendrocytes. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), on the other hand, is a condition of inflammation that develops as the immune system reconstitutes. This case report describes a case of a 35-year-old HIV-negative male who presented with three weeks of right lower extremity paresthesias as well as right upper extremity apraxia. He was diagnosed with PML complicated by IRIS secondary to Rituximab, which he had completed four months prior to presentation. Despite the condition's poor prognosis, the patient recovered with only minor deficits. PMID:27965904

  17. Targeting B cells with biologics in SLE

    PubMed Central

    La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field The use of biologics as immune modulators in several autoimmune diseases has provided new tools to the physician's therapeutic armamentiarium and has led to improved patients' outcomes and quality of life. By producing autoantibodies, B cells in SLE are key players in the pathogenesis of the disease and in its clinical manifestations. Therefore, biologics that target B cells in SLE aims at reducing the activity of these cells for the induction of remissions and/or amelioration of disease activity, reduction of organ involvement, and limitation of the complications and side effects caused by immunosuppressive therapies. Areas covered in this review This review describes the past and current clinical trials with B cell-targeted biologics in SLE, to provide a historical perspective and the state-of-the-art on the topic. What the reader will gain We will review how the disappointment in the field from promising agents has been instrumental in providing valuable lessons leading to an improved design of new trials that are now giving encouraging results Take home message In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the use of B cell-based biologics in clinical trials has shown both disappointment and promise PMID:20919800

  18. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Freedman, Brett; Porter, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Otto, Michael; Schneewind, Olaf; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe’s success as a human pathogen. PMID:27711145

  19. Memory B cell subpopulations in the aged.

    PubMed

    Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Aquino, Alessandra; Bulati, Matteo; Di Lorenzo, Gabriele; Listì, Florinda; Vitello, Salvatore; Lio, Domenico; Candore, Giuseppina; Clesi, Gioacchino; Caruso, Calogero

    2006-01-01

    The literature on immunosenescence has focused mainly on T cell impairment. With the aim of gaining insight into B cell immunosenescence, the authors investigated the serum IgD levels in 24 young and 21 old people and analyzed their relationship with the number of CD19+CD27+ memory cells. Serum IgD were quantified by the use of radial immunodiffusion and the lymphocyte population CD19+CD27+ was identified by a FACScan flow cytometer. Serum IgD levels were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) in old subjects, and the percentage of CD19+CD27+ lymphocytes were significantly increased (p = 0.01) in old subjects. Finally, a significant negative correlation was found (p = 0.01) between serum concentrations of IgD and CD19+CD27+. The present results show that the levels of IgD are negatively age-related to the amount of B memory cells. This suggests that the B repertoire available to respond to new antigenic challenges is decreased in the elderly. In fact, many memory IgD- B cells fill immunologic space, and the number of naïve IgD+ B cells is dramatically decreased. Therefore, these preliminary results suggest that a decrease of naïve IgD+CD27- B cells and a concomitant increase of memory IgD-CD27+ B cells could represent hallmarks of B immunosenescence, might provide biomarkers related to the lifespan of humans, and could be useful for the evaluation of antiaging treatments.

  20. Comparative In Vitro Immune Stimulation Analysis of Primary Human B Cells and B Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Van Belle, Kristien; Herman, Jean; Boon, Louis; Waer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    B cell specific immunomodulatory drugs still remain an unmet medical need. Utilisation of validated simplified in vitro models would allow readily obtaining new insights in the complexity of B cell regulation. For this purpose we investigated which human B lymphocyte stimulation assays may be ideally suited to investigate new B lymphocyte immunosuppressants. Primary polyclonal human B cells underwent in vitro stimulation and their proliferation, production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and of cytokines, and expression of cell surface molecules were analysed using various stimuli. ODN2006, a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, was the most potent general B cell stimulus. Subsequently, we investigated on which human B cell lines ODN2006 evoked the broadest immunostimulatory effects. The Namalwa cell line proved to be the most responsive upon TLR9 stimulation and hence may serve as a relevant, homogeneous, and stable B cell model in an in vitro phenotypic assay for the discovery of new targets and inhibitors of the B cell activation processes. As for the read-out for such screening assay, it is proposed that the expression of activation and costimulatory surface markers reliably reflects B lymphocyte activation. PMID:28116319

  1. Bruton's tyrosine kinase--an integral protein of B cell development that also has an essential role in the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    López-Herrera, Gabriela; Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; González-Serrano, Maria Edith; Berrón-Ruiz, Laura; Rodríguez-Alba, Juan Carlos; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2014-02-01

    Btk is the protein affected in XLA, a disease identified as a B cell differentiation defect. Btk is crucial for B cell differentiation and activation, but its role in other cells is not fully understood. This review focuses on the function of Btk in monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets and the receptors and signaling cascades in such cells with which Btk is associated.

  2. Early B Cell Progenitors Deficient for GON4L Fail To Differentiate Due to a Block in Mitotic Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jennifer Y; Goodfellow, Renee X; Colgan, Diana F; Colgan, John D

    2017-04-05

    B cell development in Justy mutant mice is blocked due to a precursor mRNA splicing defect that depletes the protein GON4-like (GON4L) in B cell progenitors. Genetic and biochemical studies have suggested that GON4L is a transcriptional regulator that coordinates cell division with differentiation, but its role in B cell development is unknown. To understand the function of GON4L, we characterized B cell differentiation, cell cycle control, and mitotic gene expression in GON4L-deficient B cell progenitors from Justy mice. We found that these cells established key aspects of the transcription factor network that guides B cell development and proliferation and rearranged the IgH gene locus. However, despite intact IL-7 signaling, GON4L-deficient pro-B cell stage precursors failed to undergo a characteristic IL-7-dependent proliferative burst. These cells also failed to upregulate genes required for mitotic division, including those encoding the G1/S cyclin D3 and E2F transcription factors and their targets. Additionally, GON4L-deficient B cell progenitors displayed defects in DNA synthesis and passage through the G1/S transition, contained fragmented DNA, and underwent apoptosis. These phenotypes were not suppressed by transgenic expression of prosurvival factors. However, transgenic expression of cyclin D3 or other regulators of the G1/S transition restored pro-B cell development from Justy progenitor cells, suggesting that GON4L acts at the beginning of the cell cycle. Together, our findings indicate that GON4L is essential for cell cycle progression and division during the early stages of B cell development.

  3. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro. PMID:6787164

  4. Progenitors for Ly-1 B cells are distinct from progenitors for other B cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Data from previous multiparameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis and sorting studies define a subset of murine B cells that expresses the Ly-1 surface determinant in conjunction with IgM, IgD, Ia, and other typical B cell markers. These Ly-1 B cells are physically and functionally distinct. They express more IgM and less IgD than most other B cells; they are not normally found in lymph node or bone marrow; they are always present at low frequencies (1-5%) in normal spleens, and, as we show here, they comprise about half of the B cells (10-20% of total cells) recovered from the peritoneal cavity in normal mice. Furthermore, most of the commonly studied IgM autoantibodies in normal and autoimmune mice are produced by these Ly-1 B cells, even though they seldom produce antibodies to exogenous antigens such as trinitrophenyl-Ficoll or trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Cell transfer studies presented here demonstrate that the progenitors of Ly-1 B cells are different from the progenitors of the predominant B cell populations in spleen and lymph node. In these studies, we used FACS analysis and functional assays to characterize donor-derived (allotype-marked) B cells present in lethally irradiated recipients 1-2 mo after transfer. Surprisingly, adult bone marrow cells typically used to reconstitute B cells in irradiated recipients selectively failed to reconstitute the Ly-1 B subset. Liver, spleen, and bone marrow cells from young mice, in contrast, reconstituted all B cells (including Ly-1 B), and peritoneal "washout" cells (PerC) from adult mice uniquely reconstituted Ly-1 B. Bone marrow did not block Ly- 1 B development, since PerC and newborn liver still gave rise to Ly-1 B when jointly transferred with marrow. These findings tentatively assign Ly-1 B to a distinct developmental lineage originating from progenitors that inhabit the same locations as other B cell progenitors in young animals, but move to unique location(s) in adults. PMID

  5. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  6. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  7. Tissue-specific DNA demethylation is required for proper B-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Orlanski, Shari; Labi, Verena; Reizel, Yitzhak; Spiro, Adam; Lichtenstein, Michal; Levin-Klein, Rena; Koralov, Sergei B.; Skversky, Yael; Rajewsky, Klaus; Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2016-01-01

    There is ample evidence that somatic cell differentiation during development is accompanied by extensive DNA demethylation of specific sites that vary between cell types. Although the mechanism of this process has not yet been elucidated, it is likely to involve the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC by Tet enzymes. We show that a Tet2/Tet3 conditional knockout at early stages of B-cell development largely prevents lineage-specific programmed demethylation events. This lack of demethylation affects the expression of nearby B-cell lineage genes by impairing enhancer activity, thus causing defects in B-cell differentiation and function. Thus, tissue-specific DNA demethylation appears to be necessary for proper somatic cell development in vivo. PMID:27091986

  8. A critical role for the protein kinase PKK in the maintenance of recirculating mature B cells and the development of B1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Pulvino, Mary; Sanz, Ignacio; Ryan, Daniel; Ryan, Charlotte; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Poligone, Brian; Pentland, Alice P; Ritchlin, Christopher; Zhao, Jiyong

    2016-04-01

    Protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) regulates NF-κB activation and is required for the survival of certain lymphoma cells. Mice lacking PKK die soon after birth, and previous studies suggest that the role of PKK in B cell development might be context dependent. We have generated a mouse strain harboring conditional null alleles for PKK and a Cre-recombinase transgene under the control of the endogenous CD19 promoter. In the present study, we show that knockout of PKK in B cells results in the reduction of long-lived recirculating mature B cell population in lymph nodes and bone marrow as well as a decrease in peritoneal B1 cells, while PKK deficiency has no apparent effect on early B cell development in bone marrow or the development of follicular and marginal zone B cells in the spleen. In addition, we demonstrate that PKK-deficient B cells display defective proliferation and survival responses to stimulation of B cell receptor (BCR), which may underlie the reduction of recirculating mature B cells in PKK mutant mice. Consistently, BCR-mediated NF-κB activation, known to be required for the survival of activated but not resting B cells, is attenuated in PKK-deficient B cells. Thus, our results reveal a critical role of PKK in the maintenance of recirculating mature B cells as well as the development of B1 cells in mice.

  9. Memory B Cells of Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Florian; Shlomchik, Mark

    2017-01-30

    Wecomprehensively review memory B cells (MBCs), covering the definition of MBC and their identities and subsets, how MBCs are generated, where they are localized, how they are maintained, and how they are reactivated. Whereas naive B cells adopt multiple fates upon stimulation, MBCs are more restricted in their responses. Evolving work reveals that the MBC compartment in mice and humans consists of distinct subpopulations with differing effector functions. We discuss the various approaches to define subsets and subset-specific roles. A major theme is the need to both deliver faster effector function upon reexposure and readapt to antigenically variant pathogens while avoiding burnout, which would be the result if all MBCs generated only terminal effector function. We discuss cell-intrinsic differences in gene expression and signaling that underlie differences in function between MBCs and naive B cells and among MBC subsets and how this leads to memory responses. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  10. Curative drug treatment of trypanosomosis leads to the restoration of B-cell lymphopoiesis and splenic B-cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Cnops, J; Bockstal, V; De Trez, C; Miquel, M C; Radwanska, M; Magez, S

    2015-09-01

    African trypanosomosis is a parasitic disease affecting both humans (sleeping sickness) and animals (nagana). In murine trypanosomosis, the B-cell compartment is rapidly destroyed after infection. In addition, B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow is abrogated, B-cell subsets in the spleen are irreversibly depleted, and B-cell memory is destroyed. Here, we investigated the effect of cure of infection on the B-cell compartment. Suramin and diminazene aceturate were used in this study as these drugs exhibit different modes of uptake and different mechanisms of trypanocidal action. Curative drug treatment of trypanosomosis infection led to the re-initiation of B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow, and to the repopulation of splenic B-cell subsets, independent of the drug used. Neither of these drugs by itself induced measurable effects on B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow or B-cell homoeostasis in the spleen in healthy, naïve animals.

  11. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  12. Silencing miR-146a influences B cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JunMei; Jia, Ge; Liu, Qun; Hu, Jue; Yan, Mei; Yang, BaiFeng; Yang, Huan; Zhou, WenBin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of immune homeostasis as patients with aberrant microRNA expression appeared to be more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. We recently found that miR-146a was up-regulated in activated B cells in response to rat acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit 97-116 peptide, and this up-regulation was significantly attenuated by AntagomiR-146a. Our data also demonstrated that silencing miR-146a with its inhibitor AntagomiR-146a effectively ameliorated clinical myasthenic symptoms in mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, multiple defects were observed after miR-146a was knocked down in B cells, including decreased anti-R97-116 antibody production and class switching, reduced numbers of plasma cells, memory B cells and B-1 cells, and weakened activation of B cells. Previously, miR-146a has been identified as a nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene and predicted to base pair with the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) genes to regulate the immune response. However, our study proved that miR-146a inhibition had no effect on the expression of TRAF6 and IRAK1 in B cells. This result suggests that the function of miR-146a in B cells does not involve these two target molecules. We conclude that silencing miR-146a exerts its therapeutic effects by influencing the B-cell functions that contribute to the autoimmune pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis.

  13. PKK deficiency in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle lupus mice.

    PubMed

    Oleksyn, D; Zhao, J; Vosoughi, A; Zhao, J C; Misra, R; Pentland, A P; Ryan, D; Anolik, J; Ritchlin, C; Looney, J; Anandarajah, A P; Schwartz, G; Calvi, L M; Georger, M; Mohan, C; Sanz, I; Chen, L

    2017-03-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can result in damage to multiple organs. It is well documented that B cells play a critical role in the development of the disease. We previously showed that protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) is required for B1 cell development as well as for the survival of recirculating mature B cells and B-lymphoma cells. Here, we investigated the role of PKK in lupus development in a lupus mouse model. We demonstrate that the conditional deletion of PKK in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle1Sle3 mice. The loss of PKK in Sle mice resulted in the amelioration of multiple classical lupus-associated phenotypes and histologic features of lupus nephritis, including marked reduction in the levels of serum autoantibodies, proteinuria, spleen size, peritoneal B-1 cell population and the number of activated CD4 T cells. In addition, the abundance of autoreactive plasma cells normally seen in Sle lupus mice was also significantly decreased in the PKK-deficient Sle mice. Sle B cells deficient in PKK display defective proliferation responses to BCR and LPS stimulation. Consistently, B cell receptor-mediated NF-κB activation, which is required for the survival of activated B cells, was impaired in the PKK-deficient B cells. Taken together, our work uncovers a critical role of PKK in lupus development and suggests that targeting the PKK-mediated pathway may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for lupus treatment.

  14. B-cell deficiency and severe autoimmunity caused by deficiency of protein kinase C δ.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Klaver, Stefanie; Ban, Sol A; Emminger, Wolfgang; Prengemann, Nina Kathrin; Garncarz, Wojciech; Müllauer, Leonhard; Kain, Renate; Boztug, Heidrun; Heitger, Andreas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Eitelberger, Franz; Seidel, Markus G; Holter, Wolfgang; Pollak, Arnold; Pickl, Winfried F; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Boztug, Kaan

    2013-04-18

    Primary B-cell disorders comprise a heterogeneous group of inherited immunodeficiencies, often associated with autoimmunity causing significant morbidity. The underlying genetic etiology remains elusive in the majority of patients. In this study, we investigated a patient from a consanguineous family suffering from recurrent infections and severe lupuslike autoimmunity. Immunophenotyping revealed progressive decrease of CD19(+) B cells, a defective class switch indicated by low numbers of IgM- and IgG-memory B cells, as well as increased numbers of CD21(low) B cells. Combined homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a biallelic splice-site mutation in protein C kinase δ (PRKCD), causing the absence of the corresponding protein product. Consequently, phosphorylation of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate was decreased, and mRNA levels of nuclear factor interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-6 were increased. Our study uncovers human PRKCD deficiency as a novel cause of common variable immunodeficiency-like B-cell deficiency with severe autoimmunity.

  15. The role of complement receptor positive and complement receptor negative B cells in the primary and secondary immune response to thymus independent type 2 and thymus dependent antigens.

    PubMed

    Lindsten, T; Yaffe, L J; Thompson, C B; Guelde, G; Berning, A; Scher, I; Kenny, J J

    1985-05-01

    Both complement receptor positive (CR+) and complement receptor negative (CR-) B cells have been shown to be involved in the primary immune response to PC-Hy (phosphocholine conjugated hemocyanin), a thymus dependent (TD) antigen which preferentially induces antibody secretion in Lyb-5+ B cells during a primary adoptive transfer assay. CR+ and CR- B cells also responded in a primary adoptive transfer assay to TNP-Ficoll, a thymus independent type 2 (TI-2) antigen which activates only Lyb-5+ B cells. When the secondary immune response to PC-Hy and TNP-Ficoll were analyzed, it was found that most of the immune memory to both antigens was present in the CR- B cell subset. The CR- B cell subset also dominated the secondary immune response to PC-Hy in immune defective (CBA/N X DBA/2N)F1 male mice. These data indicate that CR- B cells dominate the memory response in both the Lyb-5+ and Lyb-5- B cell subsets of normal and xid immune defective mice and suggest that Lyb-5+ and Lyb-5- B cells can be subdivided into CR+ and CR- subsets.

  16. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G.; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  17. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  18. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-01-01

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE+ B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE+ germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE+ GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21238.001 PMID:27935477

  19. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-12-09

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE(+) B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE(+) germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE(+) GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses.

  20. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... t k e P Types of Cancer Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  1. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junxin; Sun, Wenji; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Page, Carly; Younger, Kenisha M.; Tiper, Irina V.; Frieman, Matthew; Kimball, Amy S.; Webb, Tonya J.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:24955247

  2. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  3. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  4. Age-related alterations of the CD19 complex and memory B cells in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seckin, Ayse Nazli; Ozdemir, Hulya; Ceylan, Ayca; Artac, Hasibe

    2017-02-14

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a high incidence of recurrent respiratory tract infections, leukaemia and autoimmune disorders, suggesting immune dysfunction. The present study evaluated the role of the CD19 complex and memory B cells in the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency in children with DS. The expression levels (median fluorescein intensity-MFI) of CD19, CD21 and CD81 molecules on the surface of B cells and memory B cell subsets were studied in 37 patients and 39 healthy controls. Twenty-nine of the DS group had congenital cardiac disease. The B cell count was significantly low in children with DS compared with healthy age-matched controls for all three age groups (under 2 years; 2-6 years and older than 6 years). The MFI of CD19 was reduced in all the age groups, whereas that of CD21 was increased in those older than 2 years with DS. The expression level of CD81 was significantly increased in those older than 6 years. Age-related changes were also detected in memory B cell subsets. The frequency of CD27(+)IgD(+)IgM(+) natural effector B cells was reduced in children with DS who had needed hospitalisation admission due to infections. The observed intrinsic defects in B cells may be responsible for the increased susceptibility of children with DS to severe respiratory tract infections.

  5. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Mariano G.; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R.; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P.; Elemento, Olivier; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Melnick, Ari M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands. PMID:27482887

  6. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  7. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  8. iNKT and memory B-cell alterations in HHV-8 multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Sbihi, Zineb; Dossier, Antoine; Boutboul, David; Galicier, Lionel; Parizot, Christophe; Emarre, Amandine; Hoareau, Bénédicte; Dupin, Nicolas; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Oudin, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Agbalika, Félix; Autran, Brigitte; Oksenhendler, Eric; Carcelain, Guislaine

    2017-02-16

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is the causative agent of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), a life-threatening, virally induced B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. HHV-8 is a B-lymphotropic γ-herpesvirus closely related to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate-like T cells that play a role in antiviral immunity, specifically in controlling viral replication in EBV-infected B cells. Decline of iNKT cells is associated with age or HIV infection, both situations associated with HHV-8-related diseases. We analyzed iNKT cells in both blood (n = 26) and spleen (n = 9) samples from 32 patients with HHV-8 MCD and compared them with patients with KS (n = 24) and healthy donors (n = 29). We determined that both circulating and splenic iNKT cell frequencies were markedly decreased in patients with HHV-8 MCD and were undetectable in 6 of them. Moreover, iNKT cells from patients with HHV-8 MCD displayed a proliferative defect after stimulation with α-galactosylceramide. These iNKT cell alterations were associated with an imbalance in B-cell subsets, including a significant decrease in memory B cells, particularly of marginal zone (MZ) B cells. Coculture experiments revealed that the decrease in iNKT cells contributed to the alterations in the B-cell subset distribution. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the complex interactions between HHV-8 and immune cells that cause HHV-8-related MCD.

  9. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  10. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors.

  11. TIM-1 signaling is required for maintenance and induction of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, M Y; Ding, Q; Brooks, C R; Xiao, S; Workman, C J; Vignali, D A A; Ueno, T; Padera, R F; Kuchroo, V K; Najafian, N; Rothstein, D M

    2015-04-01

    Apart from their role in humoral immunity, B cells can exhibit IL-10-dependent regulatory activity (Bregs). These regulatory subpopulations have been shown to inhibit inflammation and allograft rejection. However, our understanding of Bregs has been hampered by their rarity, lack of a specific marker, and poor insight into their induction and maintenance. We previously demonstrated that T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-1 (TIM-1) identifies over 70% of IL-10-producing B cells, irrespective of other markers. We now show that TIM-1 is the primary receptor responsible for Breg induction by apoptotic cells (ACs). However, B cells that express a mutant form of TIM-1 lacking the mucin domain (TIM-1(Δmucin) ) exhibit decreased phosphatidylserine binding and are unable to produce IL-10 in response to ACs or by specific ligation with anti-TIM-1. TIM-1(Δmucin) mice also exhibit accelerated allograft rejection, which appears to be due in part to their defect in both baseline and induced IL-10(+) Bregs, since a single transfer of WT TIM-1(+) B cells can restore long-term graft survival. These data suggest that TIM-1 signaling plays a direct role in Breg maintenance and induction both under physiological conditions (in response to ACs) and in response to therapy through TIM-1 ligation. Moreover, they directly demonstrate that the mucin domain regulates TIM-1 signaling.

  12. B-cell activation in HIV infection: relationship of spontaneous immunoglobulin secretion to various immunological parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuma, H; Litwin, S; Zolla-Pazner, S

    1988-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals spontaneously secrete elevated levels of IgG, IgM and IgD. This increased level of synthesis and secretion is similar in HIV-infected subjects with no or few symptoms, in ARC patients and in AIDS patients. Thus, abnormal B-cell activation is characteristic of patients with mild as well as severe manifestations of HIV infection. The level of spontaneous cellular secretion of IgG, IgM and IgD correlates with serum levels of these isotypes. Levels of spontaneous cellular secretion of IgG and IgM correlate negatively with the percentage but not with the absolute number of T4-positive cells and correlate positively with the percentage but not with the absolute number of T8-positive cells. The data suggest that the proportional distribution of these T-cell subsets is a critical factor in the B-cell dysregulation leading to overproduction of IgG and IgM. On the other hand, spontaneous IgD secretion correlates with neither the percent nor the absolute number of T4 or T8 cells suggesting that the increase of IgD-secretion by B cells is independent of the T-cell defects. The data imply that more than one mechanism underlies the B-cell activation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:3260155

  13. ADAR1 is vital for B cell lineage development in the mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Goldberg, Sanja; Vax, Einav; Amariglio, Ninette

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 is the master editor of the transcriptome, catalyzing the conversion of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I). RNA transcripts fold into a variety of secondary structures including long intramolecular RNA duplexes that are the major substrate of ADAR1. Most A-to-I editing sites occur within RNA duplexes formed by complementary pairing of inverted retrotransposable elements interspersed within noncoding regions of transcripts. This catalytic activity of ADAR1 most likely prevents the abnormal activation of cytosolic nucleic acid sensors by self-dsRNAs. Homozygous disruption of mouse Adar is embryonic lethal due to a toxic type-I interferons response and correspondingly biallelic missense mutations in human ADAR1 cause a severe congenital interferonopathy. Here, we report that Cd19-Cre-mediated Adar gene ablation in the mouse causes a significant defect in the final stages of B cell development with an almost complete absence of newly formed immature and CD23+ mature recirculating B cells in the BM. Adar ablation in pre-B cells induced upregulation of typical interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and apoptosis upon further maturation. ADAR1 deficiency also inhibited the in vitro, IL-7-mediated, differentiation of BM-derived B cell precursors. In summary, ADAR1 is required, non-redundantly, for normal B lymphopoiesis in the BM and peripheral maintenance. PMID:27494846

  14. Impaired B cell function during viral infections due to PTEN-mediated inhibition of the PI3K pathway.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Andrew; Wemlinger, Scott M; Rudra, Pratyaydipta; Santiago, Mario L; van Dyk, Linda F; Cambier, John C

    2017-04-03

    Transient suppression of B cell function often accompanies acute viral infection. However, the molecular signaling circuitry that enforces this hyporesponsiveness is undefined. In this study, experiments identify up-regulation of the inositol phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) as primarily responsible for defects in B lymphocyte migration and antibody responses that accompany acute viral infection. B cells from mice acutely infected with gammaherpesvirus 68 are defective in BCR- and CXCR4-mediated activation of the PI3K pathway, and this, we show, is associated with increased PTEN expression. This viral infection-induced PTEN overexpression appears responsible for the suppression of antibody responses observed in infected mice because PTEN deficiency or expression of a constitutively active PI3K rescued function of B cells in infected mice. Conversely, induced overexpression of PTEN in B cells in uninfected mice led to suppression of antibody responses. Finally, we demonstrate that PTEN up-regulation is a common mechanism by which infection induces suppression of antibody responses. Collectively, these findings identify a novel role for PTEN during infection and identify regulation of the PI3K pathway, a mechanism previously shown to silence autoreactive B cells, as a key physiological target to control antibody responses.

  15. Loss-of-function of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) causes a B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome in humans.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Niemela, Julie E; Rangel-Santos, Andreia; Zhang, Mingchang; Pittaluga, Stefania; Stoddard, Jennifer L; Hussey, Ashleigh A; Evbuomwan, Moses O; Priel, Debra A Long; Kuhns, Douglas B; Park, C Lucy; Fleisher, Thomas A; Uzel, Gulbu; Oliveira, João B

    2013-04-18

    Defective lymphocyte apoptosis results in chronic lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly associated with autoimmune phenomena. The prototype for human apoptosis disorders is the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is caused by mutations in the FAS apoptotic pathway. Recently, patients with an ALPS-like disease called RAS-associated autoimmune leukoproliferative disorder, in which somatic mutations in NRAS or KRAS are found, also were described. Despite this progress, many patients with ALPS-like disease remain undefined genetically. We identified a homozygous, loss-of-function mutation in PRKCD (PKCδ) in a patient who presented with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoantibodies, elevated immunoglobulins and natural killer dysfunction associated with chronic, low-grade Epstein-Barr virus infection. This mutation markedly decreased protein expression and resulted in ex vivo B-cell hyperproliferation, a phenotype similar to that of the PKCδ knockout mouse. Lymph nodes showed intense follicular hyperplasia, also mirroring the mouse model. Immunophenotyping of circulating lymphocytes demonstrated expansion of CD5+CD20+ B cells. Knockdown of PKCδ in normal mononuclear cells recapitulated the B-cell hyperproliferative phenotype in vitro. Reconstitution of PKCδ in patient-derived EBV-transformed B-cell lines partially restored phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell death. In summary, homozygous PRKCD mutation results in B-cell hyperproliferation and defective apoptosis with consequent lymphocyte accumulation and autoantibody production in humans, and disrupts natural killer cell function.

  16. Loss-of-function of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) causes a B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Niemela, Julie E.; Rangel-Santos, Andreia; Zhang, Mingchang; Pittaluga, Stefania; Stoddard, Jennifer L.; Hussey, Ashleigh A.; Evbuomwan, Moses O.; Priel, Debra A. Long; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Park, C. Lucy; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Uzel, Gulbu

    2013-01-01

    Defective lymphocyte apoptosis results in chronic lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly associated with autoimmune phenomena. The prototype for human apoptosis disorders is the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is caused by mutations in the FAS apoptotic pathway. Recently, patients with an ALPS-like disease called RAS-associated autoimmune leukoproliferative disorder, in which somatic mutations in NRAS or KRAS are found, also were described. Despite this progress, many patients with ALPS-like disease remain undefined genetically. We identified a homozygous, loss-of-function mutation in PRKCD (PKCδ) in a patient who presented with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoantibodies, elevated immunoglobulins and natural killer dysfunction associated with chronic, low-grade Epstein-Barr virus infection. This mutation markedly decreased protein expression and resulted in ex vivo B-cell hyperproliferation, a phenotype similar to that of the PKCδ knockout mouse. Lymph nodes showed intense follicular hyperplasia, also mirroring the mouse model. Immunophenotyping of circulating lymphocytes demonstrated expansion of CD5+CD20+ B cells. Knockdown of PKCδ in normal mononuclear cells recapitulated the B-cell hyperproliferative phenotype in vitro. Reconstitution of PKCδ in patient-derived EBV-transformed B-cell lines partially restored phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate–induced cell death. In summary, homozygous PRKCD mutation results in B-cell hyperproliferation and defective apoptosis with consequent lymphocyte accumulation and autoantibody production in humans, and disrupts natural killer cell function. PMID:23430113

  17. FcR-Like 2 Inhibition of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tanisha A.; Haga, Christopher L.; Ehrhardt, Götz R. A.; Davis, Randall S.; Cooper, Max D.

    2017-01-01

    FcR-like (FCRL) 2 is a transmembrane protein with immunomodulatory potential that is preferentially expressed by memory B cells in humans. It has two consensus ITIMs in addition to a putative ITAM sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. We have confirmed the cellular distribution of FCRL2 and analyzed its functional potential to show that coligation with the BCR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its ITIM motifs and subsequent Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 recruitment to facilitate inhibition of BCR signaling. Mutational analysis indicates that the tyrosine residues in both inhibitory motifs of FCRL2 are required for complete inhibition of BCR signaling, whereas tyrosines in the putative activation motif are dispensable for signal modulation. These findings suggest a negative immunomodulatory function for FCRL2 in the regulation of memory B cells. PMID:21068405

  18. Chronic active B-cell-receptor signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Eric; Ngo, Vu N; Lenz, Georg; Tolar, Pavel; Young, Ryan M; Romesser, Paul B; Kohlhammer, Holger; Lamy, Laurence; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Johnson, Nathalie A; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Wilson, Wyndham H; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Pierce, Susan K; Staudt, Louis M

    2010-01-07

    A role for B-cell-receptor (BCR) signalling in lymphomagenesis has been inferred by studying immunoglobulin genes in human lymphomas and by engineering mouse models, but genetic and functional evidence for its oncogenic role in human lymphomas is needed. Here we describe a form of 'chronic active' BCR signalling that is required for cell survival in the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The signalling adaptor CARD11 is required for constitutive NF-kappaB pathway activity and survival in ABC DLBCL. Roughly 10% of ABC DLBCLs have mutant CARD11 isoforms that activate NF-kappaB, but the mechanism that engages wild-type CARD11 in other ABC DLBCLs was unknown. An RNA interference genetic screen revealed that a BCR signalling component, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, is essential for the survival of ABC DLBCLs with wild-type CARD11. In addition, knockdown of proximal BCR subunits (IgM, Ig-kappa, CD79A and CD79B) killed ABC DLBCLs with wild-type CARD11 but not other lymphomas. The BCRs in these ABC DLBCLs formed prominent clusters in the plasma membrane with low diffusion, similarly to BCRs in antigen-stimulated normal B cells. Somatic mutations affecting the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signalling modules of CD79B and CD79A were detected frequently in ABC DLBCL biopsy samples but rarely in other DLBCLs and never in Burkitt's lymphoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In 18% of ABC DLBCLs, one functionally critical residue of CD79B, the first ITAM tyrosine, was mutated. These mutations increased surface BCR expression and attenuated Lyn kinase, a feedback inhibitor of BCR signalling. These findings establish chronic active BCR signalling as a new pathogenetic mechanism in ABC DLBCL, suggesting several therapeutic strategies.

  19. Transitional B cells: step by step towards immune competence.

    PubMed

    Chung, James B; Silverman, Michael; Monroe, John G

    2003-06-01

    Transitional B cells mark the crucial link between bone-marrow (BM) immature and peripheral mature B cells. Examination reveals unexpected heterogeneity, consisting of contiguous subsets with phenotypic and functional differences. Data point to the late transitional B-cell stage as a crucial juncture at which developing B cells gain access to splenic follicles, become responsive to T-cell help and lose sensitivity to negative selection, characterizing the immature B-cell response to B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling in vitro and in vivo. The biological and molecular processes directing maturation through this stage are becoming clearer through biochemical studies and murine models deficient in various components of the BCR signaling pathway.

  20. RP105-Negative B Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Koarada, Syuichi; Tada, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease characterized by B cells producing autoantibodies against nuclear proteins and DNA, especially anti-double-strand DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. RP105 (CD180), the toll-like receptor- (TLR-) associated molecule, is expressed on normal B cells. However, RP105-negative B cells increase in peripheral blood from patients with active SLE. RP105 may regulate B-cell activation, and RP105-negative B cells produce autoantibodies and take part in pathophysiology of SLE. It is possible that targeting RP105-negative B cells is one of the treatments of SLE. In this paper, we discuss the RP105 biology and clinical significance in SLE. PMID:21941580

  1. The PI3K pathway in B cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jellusova, Julia; Rickert, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    B cell growth and proliferation is tightly regulated by signaling through the B cell receptor and by other membrane bound receptors responding to different cytokines. The PI3K signaling pathway has been shown to play a crucial role in B cell activation, differentiation and survival. Activated B cells undergo metabolic reprograming in response to changing energetic and biosynthetic demands. B cells also need to be able to coordinate metabolic activity and proliferation with nutrient availability. The PI3K signaling network has been implicated in regulating nutrient acquisition, utilization and biosynthesis, thus integrating receptor-mediated signaling with cell metabolism. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge about metabolic changes induced in activated B cells, strategies to adapt to metabolic stress and the role of PI3K signaling in these processes.

  2. Innate response activator B cells: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells are a subset of B-1a derived B cells that produce the growth factors granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and IL-3. In mouse models of sepsis and pneumonia, B-1a B cells residing in serosal sites recognize bacteria, migrate to the spleen or lung, and differentiate to IRA B cells that then contribute to the host response by amplifying inflammation and producing polyreactive IgM. In atherosclerosis, IRA B cells accumulate in the spleen, where they promote extramedullary hematopoiesis and activate classical dendritic cells. In this review, we focus on the ontogeny and function of IRA B cells in acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:25957266

  3. Distinct processing of the pre-B cell receptor and the B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sharon; Haimovich, Joseph; Hollander, Nurit

    2013-06-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that while oligosaccharide moieties of μ heavy chains in the B-cell receptor (BCR) are of the complex type as expected, those of the pre-BCR on the surface of pre-B cells contain oligosaccharide moieties of the high-mannose type only. This is unique, because high-mannose glycans are generally restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum and not presented on the surface of mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the processing of the unusually glycosylated μ heavy chains in pre-B cells. We demonstrate that the pre-BCR reaches the cell surface by a non-conventional brefeldin A-sensitive monensin-insensitive transport pathway. Although pre-BCR complexes consist of μ heavy chains with high-mannose oligosaccharide moieties, they are stably expressed in the plasma membrane and demonstrate turnover rates similar to those of the BCR. Thus, rapid internalization cannot account for their low surface expression, as previously postulated. Rather, we demonstrate that the low pre-BCR abundance in the plasma membrane results, at least in part, from insufficient production of surrogate light chains, which appears to be a limiting factor in pre-BCR expression.

  4. B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas with Plasmacytic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Charles M; Smith, Lauren B

    2016-03-01

    B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation are a diverse group of entities with extremely variable morphologic features. Diagnostic challenges can arise in differentiating lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma from marginal zone lymphoma and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. In addition, plasmablastic lymphomas can be difficult to distinguish from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or other high-grade lymphomas. Judicious use of immunohistochemical studies and molecular testing can assist in appropriate classification.

  5. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-02-02

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens.

  6. Relevant B Cell Epitopes in Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The 3-dimensional structure of an allergen defines the accessible parts on the surface of the molecule or epitopes that interact with antibodies. Mapping the antigenic determinants for IgE antibody binding has been pursued through strategies based on the use of overlapping synthetic peptides, recombinant allergenic fragments or unfolded allergens. These approaches led to the identification of mostly linear epitopes and are useful for food allergens that undergo digestion or food processing. For inhaled allergens, conformational epitopes appear to be the primary targets of IgE responses. Knowledge of the molecular structure of allergens alone and in complex with antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding is important to understand the immune recognition of B cell-antigenic determinants on allergens and the design of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy. Starting with the molecular cloning and expression of allergens, and with the advent of X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we have been able to visualize conformational epitopes on allergens. PMID:19940500

  7. Auto-reactive B cells in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    In order to understand how the natural occurrence of autoreactive B cells is controlled in normal individuals, and how self reactive B cells can escape this control during diverse clinical situations, many different transgenic mice have been generated expressing self reactive antibodies. In this review, we focus our attention on disease-associated self reactive transgenic models which show the variety of the tolerization mechanisms. The same transgenic lines are also used to analyse the effects of the autoimmune genetic background on the self reactive B cell fate, as well as to study the influence of infectious agents on the behaviour of the auto-reactive transgenic B cells.

  8. Transcriptional networks in developing and mature B cells.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Patrick; Rolink, Antonius G

    2005-06-01

    The development of B cells from haematopoietic stem cells proceeds along a highly ordered, yet flexible, pathway. At multiple steps along this pathway, cells are instructed by transcription factors on how to further differentiate, and several check-points have been identified. These check-points are initial commitment to lymphocytic progenitors, specification of pre-B cells, entry to the peripheral B-cell pool, maturation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells. At each of these regulatory nodes, there are transcriptional networks that control the outcome, and much progress has recently been made in dissecting these networks. This article reviews our current understanding of this exciting field.

  9. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  10. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  11. Immune complex formation and in situ B-cell clonal expansion in human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Kinloch, Andrew; Henderson, Scott G; Shaaya, Mark; Chong, Anita S; Clark, Marcus R; Awad, Issam A

    2014-07-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) represent clusters of dilated vascular channels, predisposing to hemorrhagic stroke and seizures. They are associated with defective blood brain barrier, hemorrhages of different ages and a robust inflammatory cell infiltrate. We report for the first time evidence of co-localized IgG and complement membrane attack complexes in CCM lesions. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells are aggregated with CD20(+) B-cells. And IgG repertoire analyses demonstrate in situ B-cell clonal expansion and antigen-driven affinity maturation in CCMs. These results suggest an organ-intrinsic adaptive immune response in CCMs that should be further characterized as a potential therapeutic target.

  12. B cell receptor-mediated internalization of salmonella: a novel pathway for autonomous B cell activation and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S Marieke

    2009-06-15

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and secretion of anti-Salmonella Ab by the Salmonella-specific B cells. In addition, BCR-mediated internalization leads to efficient Ag delivery to the MHC class II Ag-loading compartments, even though Salmonella remains vital intracellularly in primary B cells. Consequently, BCR-mediated bacterial uptake induces efficient CD4(+) T cell help, which boosts Salmonella-specific Ab production. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella by B cells is superior over extracellular Ag extraction to induce rapid and specific humoral immune responses and efficiently combat infection.

  13. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  14. Gata3 restrains B cell proliferation and cooperates with p18INK4c to repress B cell lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiqin; Chan, Ho Lam; Bai, Feng; Ma, Jinshan; Scott, Alexandria; Robbins, David J.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Zhu, Ping; Pei, Xin-Hai

    2016-01-01

    GATA3, a lineage specifier, controls lymphoid cell differentiation and its function in T cell commitment and development has been extensively studied. GATA3 promotes T cell specification by repressing B cell potential in pro T cells and decreased GATA3 expression is essential for early B cell commitment. Inherited genetic variation in GATA3 has been associated with lymphoma susceptibility. However, it remains elusive how the loss of function of GATA3 promotes B cell development and induces B cell lymphomas. In this study, we found that haploid loss of Gata3 by heterozygous germline deletion increased B cell populations in the bone marrow (BM) and spleen, and decreased CD4 T cell populations in the thymus, confirming that Gata3 promotes T and suppresses B cell development. We discovered that haploid loss of Gata3 reduced thymocyte proliferation with induction of p18Ink4c (p18), an inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, but enhanced B cell proliferation in the BM and spleen independent of p18. Loss of p18 partially restored Gata3 deficient thymocyte proliferation, but further stimulated Gata3 deficient B cell proliferation in the BM and spleen. Furthermore, we discovered that haploid loss of Gata3 in p18 deficient mice led to the development of B cell lymphomas that were capable of rapidly regenerating tumors when transplanted into immunocompromised mice. These results indicate that Gata3 deficiency promotes B cell differentiation and proliferation, and cooperates with p18 loss to induce B cell lymphomas. This study, for the first time, reveals that Gata3 is a tumor suppressor specifically in B cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:27588406

  15. Reduced Levels of Hspa9 Attenuates Stat5 Activation in Mouse B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Kilannin; Tibbitts, Justin F.; Shao, Jin; Liu, Tuoen; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    HSPA9 is located on chromosome 5q31.2 in humans, a region that is commonly deleted in patients with myeloid malignancies [del(5q)], including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). HSPA9 expression is reduced by 50% in patients with del(5q)-associated MDS, consistent with haploinsufficient levels. Zebrafish mutants and knockdown studies in human and mouse cells have implicated a role for HSPA9 in hematopoiesis. To comprehensively evaluate the effects of Hspa9 haploinsufficiency on hematopoiesis, we generated an Hspa9 knockout mouse model. While homozygous knockout of Hspa9 is embryonic lethal, mice with heterozygous deletion of Hspa9 (Hspa9+/−) are viable and have a 50% reduction in Hspa9 expression. Hspa9+/− mice have normal basal hematopoiesis and do not develop MDS. However, Hspa9+/− mice have a cell- intrinsic reduction in bone marrow CFU-PreB colony formation without alterations in the number of B-cell progenitors in vivo, consistent with a functional defect in Hspa9+/− B-cell progenitors. We further reduced Hspa9 expression (<50%) using RNAi and observe reduced B-cell progenitors in vivo, indicating that appropriate levels (≥50%) of Hspa9 are required for normal B- lymphopoiesis in vivo. Knockdown of Hspa9 in an IL-7 dependent mouse B-cell line reduced Stat5 phosphorylation following IL-7 receptor stimulation, supporting a role for Hspa9 in Stat5 signaling in B-cells. Collectively, these data implicate a role for Hspa9 in B-lymphopoiesis and Stat5 activation downstream of IL-7 signaling. PMID:25550197

  16. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Sun, Zhiguo; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; El-Naccache, Darine W.; Singh, Rajnish K.; Sahu, Sushil K.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein) is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition) during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27463802

  17. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  18. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Regulates B Cell Number and Activation-Induced B Cell Proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Yang, Yinhua; Golech, Susanne; Katz, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Weng, Nan-ping

    2008-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a transcription factor and functions in regulating cell differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle. Although Klf4 is expressed in lymphocytes, its function in lymphocytes is unknown. In this study, we report that the levels of Klf4 expression were low in pro-B cells and continuously increased in pre-B and in mature B cells. Upon activation, Klf4 was rapidly decreased in mature B cells after 2 h of activation. A modest decrease in numbers of pre-B cells in bone marrow and mature B cells in spleen was observed in Klf4-deficient mice. In the absence of Klf4, fewer B cells entered the S phase of the cell cycle and completed cell division in response to the engagement of BCR and/or CD40 in vitro. Furthermore, the delay in entering the cell cycle is associated with decreased expression of cyclin D2 in B cells that lack Klf4 expression. We then demonstrated that Klf4 directly bound to the promoter of cyclin D2 and regulated its expression. These findings demonstrate that Klf4 regulates B cell number and activation-induced B cell proliferation through directly acting on the promoter of cyclin D2. PMID:17878366

  19. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  20. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells.

  1. B Cells: The Old New Players in Reproductive Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Franziska; Schumacher, Anne; Costa, Serban-Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive immunology research has long focused on T cell responses to paternal antigens and tolerance mechanisms supporting fetal well-being. The participation of B cells herein was not widely studied. Because of the fascinating immunological uniqueness of pregnancy, it is however to be expected that such pleiotropic cells play a considerable role. In fact, on the one hand B cells contribute toward pregnancy tolerance by secreting the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 but on the other hand can seriously harm pregnancy because of their capacity of producing autoantibodies. As for protective B cells, new evidences in mouse models arise suggesting that IL-10 producing B cells, the so-called B10 cells, help in maintaining tolerance toward semi-allogenic fetal antigens. They may be also important to fight danger signals at the fetal-maternal interface as, e.g., in the case of infections with the aim to restore the disrupted fetal tolerance. In human pregnancies, IL-10 producing B cells increase with pregnancy onset but not in the case of spontaneous abortions. In vitro, they are able to suppress TNF-α production by T cells from pregnant individuals. Their generation and functionality will be discussed throughout this review article. B cells can be deleterious to pregnancy as well. Aberrant B cell compartment is associated with obstetric pathologies. In particular, the capacity of B2 cells to produce specific autoantibodies or of B-1a B cells to secrete natural autoantibodies that can turn autoreactive will be discussed herein. PMID:25002862

  2. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P < 0.0001), but no significant correlation existed between EBV DNA levels in whole blood and enriched B-cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  3. Essential role for B cells in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Robert R; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Parsons, Ronald; Vivek, Kumar; Mustafa, Moiz M; Noorchashm, Hooman; Naji, Ali

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes are the primary targets of immunotherapy in clinical transplantation. However, B lymphocytes are detrimental to graft survival by virtue of their capacity to present antigen to T cells via the indirect pathway of allorecognition and the generation of donor specific alloantibody. Furthermore, the long-term survival of organ allografts remains challenged by chronic rejection, a process in which activated B cells have been found to play a significant role. Therefore, the achievement of transplantation tolerance will likely require induction of both T and B cell tolerance to alloantigens. Moreover, human and animal investigations have shown that subsets of B cells, Transitional and Regulatory, are inherently tolerogenic. Developing therapeutic strategies that exploit these populations may be key to achieving transplantation tolerance. In this review we describe the current evidence for the essential role of B cells in transplant tolerance and discuss emerging B cell directed strategies to achieve allograft tolerance. PMID:21982511

  4. B cells and Autoantibodies: Complex Roles in CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ankeny, Daniel P.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that traumatic injury to the brain or spinal cord activates B lymphocytes, culminating in the production of antibodies specific for antigens found within and outside the central nervous system (CNS). In this article, we summarize what is known about the effects of CNS injury on B cells. We outline the potential mechanisms for CNS trauma-induced B cell activation and discuss the potential consequences of these injury-induced B cell responses. Based on recent data, we hypothesize that a subset of autoimmune B cell responses initiated by CNS injury are pathogenic and that targeted inhibition of B cells could improve recovery in brain and spinal cord injured patients. PMID:20691635

  5. PLCgamma2 regulates Bcl-2 levels and is required for survival rather than differentiation of marginal zone and follicular B cells.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sarah E; Vigorito, Elena; McAdam, Simon; Reynolds, Helen M; Caraux, Anouk; Colucci, Francesco; Turner, Martin

    2004-08-01

    B cells from phospholipase C (PLC)gamma2-deficient mice express reduced levels of the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 and show a defect in the development of transitional T3 and marginal zone (MZ) B cells that reflects reduced B cell survival. Introduction of a bcl-2 transgene restored the numbers of MZ, T3 and follicular B cells in PLCgamma2(-/-) mice. Restricting the B cell repertoire in PLCgamma2-deficient mice by the introduction of a BCR transgene resulted in a striking reduction in the number of IgM-positive B cells and a paucity of IgD-expressing cells in the spleen which was also rescued by the bcl-2 transgene. BCR-stimulated ERK and IkappaBalpha phosphorylation were PLCgamma2 dependent, while calcium flux was reduced, but not abrogated, in the absence of PLCgamma2, suggesting an ancillary role for PLCgamma1. The bcl-2 transgene rescued development of PLCgamma2(-/-) B cells and serum IgM levels but did not restore BCR-mediated signaling, proliferation or serum IgG3 levels. These data suggest that PLCgamma2 performs a critical role in B cell development through regulation of survival rather than differentiation.

  6. The regulation and activation of lupus-associated B cells.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michele L; Hondowicz, Brian D; Wharton, Gina N; Adair, Brigette S; Metzgar, Michele H; Alexander, Shawn T; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) B cells are regulated in non-autoimmune mice. While some are deleted or undergo receptor editing, a population of anti-dsDNA (VH3H9/V lambda 1) B cells that emigrate into the periphery has also been identified. These cells have an altered phenotype relative to normal B cells in that they have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B-cell interface in the spleen. This phenotype may be the consequence of immature B cells encountering antigen in the absence of T-cell help. When provided with T-cell help, the anti-dsDNA B cells differentiate into antibody-forming cells. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, the VH3H9/V lambda 1 anti-dsDNA B cells populate the B-cell follicle and by 12 weeks of age produce serum autoantibodies. The early event of anti-dsDNA B-cell follicular entry, in the absence of autoantibody production, is dependent upon CD4(+) T cells. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice may be regulated by the counterbalancing effect of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells. Consistent with this model, we have demonstrated that T(reg) cells are able to prevent autoantibody production induced by T-cell help. Additional studies are aimed at investigating the mechanisms of this suppression as well as probing the impact of distinct forms of T-cell-dependent and -independent activation on anti-dsDNA B cells.

  7. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  8. The rap GTPases regulate B cell morphology, immune-synapse formation, and signaling by particulate B cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Zabetian, Saba; Brugger, Hayley; Weber, Michele; Lei, Victor; Dang-Lawson, May; Tse, Kathy W K; Santamaria, Rene; Batista, Facundo D; Gold, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocytes spread and extend membrane processes when searching for antigens and form immune synapses upon contacting cells that display antigens on their surface. Although these dynamic morphological changes facilitate B cell activation, the signaling pathways underlying these processes are not fully understood. We found that activation of the Rap GTPases was essential for these changes in B cell morphology. Rap activation was important for B cell receptor (BCR)- and lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-induced spreading, for BCR-induced immune-synapse formation, and for particulate BCR ligands to induce localized F-actin assembly and membrane-process extension. Rap activation and F-actin assembly were also required for optimal BCR signaling in response to particulate antigens but not soluble antigens. Thus by controlling B cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization, Rap might play a key role in the activation of B cells by particulate and cell-associated antigens.

  9. The growth of B cell receptor microcluster is a universal response of B cells encountering antigens with different motion features.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhengpeng; Liu, Wanli

    2012-07-01

    B lymphocyte cell senses and acquires foreign antigens through clonal distributed B cell receptors (BCRs) expressed on the surface of plasma membrane. The presentation formats of antigens are quite diverse. Based on their Brownian diffusion mobility, there are three forms: free mobile soluble antigens, lateral mobile membrane bound antigens, and fixed immobile antigens. Here, using high resolution high speed live cell imaging approaches, we provide evidence that BCR microclusters are formed on the surface of B cells shortly after B cell's encountering of antigens with each format of motion features. Through high speed live cell imaging, we determine that these BCR microclusters show dynamic growth feature and by doing so function as the basic platforms for B cells to acquire the antigens. We propose that the formation and dynamic growth of BCR microcluster is a universal mechanism for B cell to response to antigens with diverse motion features.

  10. Integrin-mediated interactions between B cells and follicular dendritic cells influence germinal center B cell fitness1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Rodda, Lauren; Bannard, Oliver; Cyster, Jason G.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-ligand interactions between germinal center (GC) B cells and antigen-presenting follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) have been suggested to play central roles during GC responses but their in vivo requirement has not been directly tested. Here we show that while integrins αLβ2 and α4β1 are highly expressed and functional on mouse GC B cells, removal of single integrins or their ligands had little effect on B cell participation in the GC response. Combined β2-integrin deficiency and α4-integrin blockade also did not affect the GC response against a particulate antigen. However, the combined integrin deficiency did cause B cells to be outcompeted in splenic GC responses against a soluble protein antigen and in mesenteric lymph node GC responses against gut-derived antigens. Similar findings were made for β2-deficient B cells in mice lacking VCAM1 on FDCs. The reduced fitness of the GC B cells did not appear to be due to decreased antigen acquisition, proliferation rates or pAKT levels. In summary, our findings provide evidence that αLβ2 and α4β1 play overlapping and context-dependent roles in supporting interactions with FDCs that can augment the fitness of responding GC B cells. We also find that mouse GC B cells upregulate αvβ3 and adhere to vitronectin and milk fat globule EGF-factor-8 protein. Integrin β3-deficient B cells contributed in a slightly exaggerated manner to GC responses suggesting this integrin has a regulatory function in GC B cells. PMID:24740506

  11. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  12. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  13. Circulating clonotypic B cells in classic Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard J; Gocke, Christopher D; Kasamon, Yvette L; Miller, Carole B; Perkins, Brandy; Barber, James P; Vala, Milada S; Gerber, Jonathan M; Gellert, Lan L; Siedner, Mark; Lemas, M Victor; Brennan, Sarah; Ambinder, Richard F; Matsui, William

    2009-06-04

    Although Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells are B lymphoid cells, they are unlike any normal cells of that lineage. Moreover, the limited proliferative potential of HRS cells belies the clinical aggressiveness of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). More than 20 years ago, the L428 HL cell line was reported to contain a small population of phenotypic B cells that appeared responsible for the continued generation of HRS cells. This observation, however, has never been corroborated, and such clonotypic B cells have never been documented in HL patients. We found that both the L428 and KM-H2 HL cell lines contained rare B-cell subpopulations responsible for the generation and maintenance of the predominant HRS cell population. The B cells within the HL cell lines expressed immunoglobulin light chain, the memory B-cell antigen CD27, and the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Clonal CD27(+)ALDH(high) B cells, sharing immunoglobulin gene rearrangements with lymph node HRS cells, were also detected in the blood of most newly diagnosed HL patients regardless of stage. Although the clinical significance of circulating clonotypic B cells in HL remains unclear, these data suggest they may be the initiating cells for HL.

  14. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anupam; Sindhava, Vishal; Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction.

  15. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  16. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  17. The emerging role of estrogen in B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ladikou, Eleni-Eirini; Kassi, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence implicates a role of estrogens in hematological malignancies. We reviewed current knowledge on the emerging role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in normal B-cell function, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B-cell lymphoma. Data support that (1) normal human peripheral blood cells (mononuclear cells, total lymphocytes, T as well as B lymphocytes, and NK cells) express both estrogen receptor subtypes (ERα and ERβ), (2) B-cell malignancies express mainly ERβ while selective ERβ agonists inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis, (3) estrogens regulate, via an ER-mediated pathway, gene expression of cyclins, kinases, bcl-2 proto-oncogene, activation-induced deaminase (AID), and transcription factors, associated with changes in BCR signaling and B cell tumorigenesis. In conclusion, estrogen receptors play an important role in normal B-cell function and B-cell tumorigenesis; however, further investigations are required to delineate the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in the etiopathogenesis and therapy of B-cell malignancies.

  18. Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De Vita, S; Gasparotto, D; Pivetta, B; Vukosavljevic, T; Zagonel, V; Carbone, A; Boiocchi, M

    1997-05-01

    Several groups have emphasized the likely implication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a fraction of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Since only a minority of patients with HCV infection and monoclonal mixed cryoglobulinaemia develop overt lymphoma, the identification of predisposing factors has relevant clinical implications. The replication error phenotype (RER+), as revealed by widespread microsatellite instability, is caused by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes, and has been frequently disclosed in subsets of B-cell lymphomas with underlying infection and chronic inflammation. We therefore investigated the occurrence of the RER+ phenotype in a series of eight consecutive B-cell NHLs in patients with chronic infection by HCV. A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was used to analyse an extended panel of 15 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite instability was not observed in six tumour samples in any locus; the two remaining cases showed instability at only one locus. Therefore genetic instability by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes should not represent the general mechanism predisposing to overt lymphoma in HCV-infected patients. Although a clearer definition of HCV-related B-cell disorders should better address future studies on genetic instability in larger series, we recommend additional oncogenetic pathways as the target of further research.

  19. The p35 human invariant chain in transgenic mice restores mature B cells in the absence of endogenous CD74.

    PubMed

    Genève, Laetitia; Ménard, Catherine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii; CD74) has pleiotropic functions and Ii-deficient mice show defects in MHC class II (MHC II) transport and B cell maturation. In humans, but not in mice, a minor Iip35 isoform of unknown function includes an endoplasmic reticulum-retention motif that is masked upon binding of MHC II molecules. To gain further insight into the roles of Ii in B cell homeostasis, we generated Iip35 transgenic mice (Tgp35) and bred these with mice deficient for Ii (Tgp35/mIiKO). Iip35 was shown to compete with mIi for the binding to I-A(b) . In addition, classical endosomal degradation products (p20/p10) and the class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) fragment were detected. Moreover, Iip35 favored the formation of compact peptide-MHC II complexes in the Tgp35/mIiKO mice. I-A(b) levels were restored at the plasma membrane of mature B cells but Iip35 affected the fine conformation of MHC II molecules as judged by the increased reactivity of the AF6-120.1 antibody in permeabilized cells. However, the human Iip35 cannot fully replace the endogenous Ii. Indeed, most immature B cells in the bone marrow and spleen of transgenic mice had reduced surface expression of MHC II molecules, demonstrating a dominant-negative effect of Iip35 in Tgp35 mice. Interestingly, while maturation to follicular B cells was normal, Iip35 expression appeared to reduce the proportions of marginal zone B cells. These results emphasize the importance of Ii in B cell homeostasis and suggest that Iip35 could have regulatory functions.

  20. [The role of IRA B cells in selected inflammatory processes].

    PubMed

    Zasada, Magdalena; Rutkowska-Zapała, Magdalena; Lenart, Marzena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-03-16

    The first report about the discovery of new, previously unknown immune cells named IRA B cells (innate response activator B cells) appeared in 2012. So far, their presence has been verified in both mice and humans. However, IRA B cells belong to the family of B lymphocytes and have a number of characteristics unique to this group of cells. IRA B cells are formed from activated B1a lymphocytes after their contact with a pathogen. B1a lymphocytes mainly reside within body cavities. Activated by the pathogen, they move on into secondary lymphoid organs (spleen, lymph nodes) where they differentiate into IRA B cells. IRA B cells are a rich source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF can stimulate IRA B cells in an autocrine manner for the secretion of intracellular stocks of immunoglobulin M (IgM), which can facilitate pathogens' phagocytosis by neutrophils. GM-CSF also stimulates neutrophils into active phagocytosis. Rapid eradication of the pathogen can prevent the development of an excessive inflammatory response, which can be dangerous for the organism. Until now the involvement of IRA B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia has been proven, as well as their role in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. There is research in progress on the possibility of increasing the number of IRA B cells, for example by intravenous supply of modified immunoglobulins. It is necessary to characterize human IRA B cells and to determine their role in the functioning of the immune system.

  1. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis.

  2. PDK1 regulates B cell differentiation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Baracho, Gisele V; Cato, Matthew H; Zhu, Zilu; Jaren, Olav R; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Rickert, Robert C

    2014-07-01

    Successful B cell differentiation and prevention of cell transformation depends on balanced and fine-tuned activation of cellular signaling pathways. The phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway has emerged as a major regulator of B lymphocyte homeostasis and function. Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) is the pivotal node in the PI3K pathway, regulating the stability and activity of downstream AGC kinases (including Akt, RSK, S6K, SGK, and PKC). Although the importance of PI3K activity in B cell differentiation is well documented, the role of PDK1 and other downstream effectors is underexplored. Here we used inducible and stage-specific gene targeting approaches to elucidate the role of PDK1 in early and peripheral B cell differentiation. PDK1 ablation enhanced cell cycle entry and apoptosis of IL-7-dependent pro-B cells, blocking Ig synthesis and B cell maturation. PDK1 also was essential for the survival and activation of peripheral B cells via regulation of PKC and Akt-dependent downstream effectors, such as GSK3α/β and Foxo1. We found that PDK1 deletion strongly impaired B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, but IL-4 costimulation was sufficient to restore BCR-induced proliferation. IL-4 also normalized PKCβ activation and hexokinase II expression in BCR-stimulated cells, suggesting that this signaling pathway can act independent of PDK1 to support B cell growth. In summary, our results demonstrate that PDK1 is indispensable for B cell survival, proliferation, and growth regulation.

  3. Transitional B Cells in Early Human B Cell Development – Time to Revisit the Paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Victoria G.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Townsend, Catherine L.; Lu, Grace H. C.; O’Hare, Joselli Silva; Mozeika, Alexander; Coolen, Anthonius C. C.; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, the cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood, and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDRH3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small, and only the size of the CDRH3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages. PMID:27994589

  4. Vav3 modulates B cell receptor responses by regulating phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Inabe, Kazunori; Ishiai, Masamichi; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Freshney, Norman; Downward, Julian; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2002-01-21

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Vav3, a new member of the Vav family proteins, participates in B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling, we have generated a B cell line deficient in Vav3. Here we report that Vav3 influences phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) function through Rac1 in that phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation was attenuated by loss of Vav3 or by expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1. The functional interaction between PI3K and Rac1 was also demonstrated by increased PI3K activity in the presence of GTP-bound Rac1. In addition, we show that defects of calcium mobilization and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Vav3-deficient cells are relieved by deletion of a PIP3 hydrolyzing enzyme, SH2 domain-containing inositol polyphosphate 5'-phosphatase (SHIP). Hence, our results suggest a role for Vav3 in regulating the B cell responses by promoting the sustained production of PIP3 and thereby calcium flux.

  5. Vav3 Modulates B Cell Receptor Responses by Regulating Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Inabe, Kazunori; Ishiai, Masamichi; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Freshney, Norman; Downward, Julian; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Vav3, a new member of the Vav family proteins, participates in B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling, we have generated a B cell line deficient in Vav3. Here we report that Vav3 influences phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) function through Rac1 in that phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation was attenuated by loss of Vav3 or by expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1. The functional interaction between PI3K and Rac1 was also demonstrated by increased PI3K activity in the presence of GTP-bound Rac1. In addition, we show that defects of calcium mobilization and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Vav3-deficient cells are relieved by deletion of a PIP3 hydrolyzing enzyme, SH2 domain-containing inositol polyphosphate 5′-phosphatase (SHIP). Hence, our results suggest a role for Vav3 in regulating the B cell responses by promoting the sustained production of PIP3 and thereby calcium flux. PMID:11805146

  6. Interleukin-35 Induces Regulatory B Cells that Suppress CNS Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M.; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Dolinska, Monika; Sergeey, Yuri V.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 10-producing regulatory B-cells (Breg-cells) suppress autoimmune diseases while aberrant elevation of Breg-cells prevents sterilizing immunity, promotes carcinogenesis and cancer metastasis by converting resting CD4+ T-cells to regulatory T-cells (Tregs). It is therefore of interest to discover factors that induce Breg-cells. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg-cells in-vivo and promotes their conversion to a unique Breg subset that produces IL-35 (IL-35+Breg). Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from uveitis and mice lacking IL-35 or defective in IL-35-signaling produced less Breg-cells and developed severe uveitis. Ex-vivo generated Breg-cells also suppressed uveitis by inhibiting pathogenic Th17/Th1 while promoting Tregs expansion. We further show that IL-35 induced the conversion of human B-cells into Breg-cells and suppressed uveitis by activating STAT1/STAT3 through IL-35-Receptor comprising IL-12Rβ2/IL-27Rα subunits. Discovery that IL-35 converts human B-cells into Breg-cells, allows ex-vivo production of autologous Breg-cells for immunotherapy and investigating Breg/IL-35+Breg cells roles in autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:24743305

  7. Immunoinhibitory adapter protein Src homology domain 3 lymphocyte protein 2 (SLy2) regulates actin dynamics and B cell spreading.

    PubMed

    von Holleben, Max; Gohla, Antje; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Iritani, Brian M; Beer-Hammer, Sandra

    2011-04-15

    Appropriate B cell activation is essential for adaptive immunity. In contrast to the molecular mechanisms that regulate positive signaling in immune responses, the counterbalancing negative regulatory pathways remain insufficiently understood. The Src homology domain 3 (SH3)-containing adapter protein SH3 lymphocyte protein 2 (SLy2, also known as hematopoietic adapter-containing SH3 and sterile α-motif (SAM) domains 1; HACS1) is strongly up-regulated upon B cell activation and functions as an endogenous immunoinhibitor in vivo, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of SLy2 function have been elusive. We have generated transgenic mice overexpressing SLy2 in B and T cells and have studied the biological effects of elevated SLy2 levels in Jurkat and HeLa cells. Our results demonstrate that SLy2 induces Rac1-dependent membrane ruffle formation and regulates cell spreading and polarization and that the SLy2 SH3 domain is essential for these effects. Using immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, we provide evidence that the actin nucleation-promoting factor cortactin is an SH3 domain-directed interaction partner of SLy2. Consistent with an important role of SLy2 for actin cytoskeletal reorganization, we further show that SLy2-transgenic B cells are severely defective in cell spreading. Together, our findings extend our mechanistic understanding of the immunoinhibitory roles of SLy2 in vivo and suggest that the physiological up-regulation of SLy2 observed upon B cell activation functions to counteract excessive B cell spreading.

  8. Seeking help: B cells adapting to flu variability.

    PubMed

    van der Most, Robbert G; Roman, François P; Innis, Bruce; Hanon, Emmanuel; Vaughn, David W; Gillard, Paul; Walravens, Karl; Wettendorff, Martine

    2014-07-23

    The study of influenza vaccines has revealed potential interactions between preexisting immunological memory and antigenic context and/or adjuvantation. In the face of antigenic diversity, the process of generating B cell adaptability is driven by cross-reactive CD4 memory cells, such as T follicular helper cells from previous infections or vaccinations. Although such "helped" B cells are capable of adapting to variant antigens, lack of CD4 help could lead to a suboptimal antibody response. Collectively, this indicates an interplay between CD4 T cells, adjuvant, and B cell adaptability.

  9. B cell-helping functions of gut microbial metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang H

    2016-09-23

    Commensal microflora profoundly affects the host immune system. It has long been observed that commensal bacteria enhance antibody production in the host by producing antigens for B cell receptors (BCR) and ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLR). We recently reported that the microbial metabolites short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) regulate the metabolism and gene expression in B cells to promote antibody production (Kim et al. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses. Cell Host & Microbe. 2016; 20(2):202-14). The B-cell helping function of SCFAs and its implication in the host immune system are discussed in this article.

  10. B cell-helping functions of gut microbial metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang H.

    2016-01-01

    Commensal microflora profoundly affects the host immune system. It has long been observed that commensal bacteria enhance antibody production in the host by producing antigens for B cell receptors (BCR) and ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLR). We recently reported that the microbial metabolites short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) regulate the metabolism and gene expression in B cells to promote antibody production (Kim et al. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses. Cell Host & Microbe. 2016; 20(2):202-14). The B-cell helping function of SCFAs and its implication in the host immune system are discussed in this article. PMID:28357321

  11. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  12. B Cell Development in the Bone Marrow Is Regulated by Homeostatic Feedback Exerted by Mature B Cells.

    PubMed

    Shahaf, Gitit; Zisman-Rozen, Simona; Benhamou, David; Melamed, Doron; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment.

  13. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  14. The Eμ enhancer region influences H chain expression and B cell fate without impacting IgVH repertoire and immune response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Marie; Garot, Armand; Bender, Sébastien; Carrion, Claire; Rouaud, Pauline; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The IgH intronic enhancer region Eμ is a combination of both a 220-bp core enhancer element and two 310-350-bp flanking scaffold/matrix attachment regions named MARsEμ. In the mouse, deletion of the core-enhancer Eμ element mainly affects VDJ recombination with minor effects on class switch recombination. We carried out endogenous deletion of the full-length Eμ region (core plus MARsEμ) in the mouse genome to study VH gene repertoire and IgH expression in developing B-lineage cells. Despite a severe defect in VDJ recombination with partial blockade at the pro-B cell stage, Eμ deletion (core or full length) did not affect VH gene usage. Deletion of this regulatory region induced both a decrease of pre-B cell and newly formed B cell compartments and a strong orientation toward the marginal zone B cell subset. Because Igμ H chain expression was decreased in Eμ-deficient pre-B cells, we propose that modification of B cell homeostasis in deficient animals was caused by "weak" pre-B cell and BCR expression. Besides imbalances in B cell compartments, Ag-specific Ab responses were not impaired in animals carrying the Eμ deletion. In addition to its role in VDJ recombination, our study points out that the full-length Eμ region does not influence VH segment usage but ensures efficient Igμ-chain expression required for strong signaling through pre-B cells and newly formed BCRs and thus participates in B cell inflow and fate.

  15. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  16. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  17. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  18. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  19. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on B-cell leukemias and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... sufficient evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In 2003, VA recognized ...

  20. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Andreas; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Hagedorn, Peter H.; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7), and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6), respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as “guilt by association”. By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations. PMID:26394393

  1. Antagonism of B cell enhancer networks by STAT5 drives leukemia and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, Casey D S; Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M; Willette, Mark J L; Henzler, Christine M; Frietze, Seth; Yang, Rendong; Schjerven, Hilde; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Ramsey, Laura B; Hubbard, Gregory; Wells, Andrew D; Kuiper, Roland P; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Müschen, Markus; Kornblau, Steven M; Farrar, Michael A

    2017-04-03

    The transcription factor STAT5 has a critical role in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). How STAT5 mediates this effect is unclear. Here we found that activation of STAT5 worked together with defects in signaling components of the precursor to the B cell antigen receptor (pre-BCR), including defects in BLNK, BTK, PKCβ, NF-κB1 and IKAROS, to initiate B-ALL. STAT5 antagonized the transcription factors NF-κB and IKAROS by opposing regulation of shared target genes. Super-enhancers showed enrichment for STAT5 binding and were associated with an opposing network of transcription factors, including PAX5, EBF1, PU.1, IRF4 and IKAROS. Patients with a high ratio of active STAT5 to NF-κB or IKAROS had more-aggressive disease. Our studies indicate that an imbalance of two opposing transcriptional programs drives B-ALL and suggest that restoring the balance of these pathways might inhibit B-ALL.

  2. Identification of autoreactive B cells with labeled nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Gies, Vincent; Wagner, Alain; Seifert, Cécile; Guffroy, Aurélien; Fauny, Jean-D; Knapp, Anne-M; Pasquali, Jean-L; Martin, Thierry; Dumortier, Hélène; Korganow, Anne-S; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2017-04-04

    The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has not been completely elucidated yet, and only a few specific treatments have been developed so far. In autoimmune diseases mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, the specific detection and analysis of autoreactive B cells is crucial for a better understanding of the physiopathology. Biological characterization of these cells may help to define new therapeutic targets. Very few techniques allowing the precise detection of autoreactive B cells have been described so far. Herein we propose a new flow cytometry technique for specific detection of anti-nucleosome B cells, which secrete autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus, using labeled nucleosomes. We produced different fluorochrome-labeled nucleosomes, characterized them, and finally tested them in flow cytometry. Nucleosomes labeled via the cysteines present in H3 histone specifically bind to autoreactive B cells in the anti-DNA transgenic B6.56R mice model. The present work validates the use of fluorochrome-labeled nucleosomes via cysteines to identify anti-nucleosome B cells and offers new opportunities for the description of autoreactive B cell phenotype.

  3. The role of B cells in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kraaij, Marina D; van Laar, Jacob M

    2008-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective disease characterized by features of autoimmunity, vasculopathy, inflammation, and fibrosis. The disease typically starts with Raynaud’s phenomenon, followed by skin thickening in the extremities due to inflammation and fibrosis. Fibrosis results from excessive collagen production by fibroblasts, which constitutes the final common pathway of complex cellular interactions including B cells. Several studies have indicated that B cells may play a role in SSc. Lesional skin infiltrates from SSc patients consist of a variety of cells, including eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Autoantibodies of several specificities are present in the serum of SSc patients of which antitopoisomerase 1 is the most common, and evidence has been gathered for a potential pathogenic role of some autoantibodies, eg, anti-PDGF antibodies. The blood of SSc patients contains an increased proportion of naïve B cells but a decreased proportion of memory B cells. Furthermore, serum levels of interleukin-6, an important pro-inflammatory cytokine, have been shown to correlate with skin fibrosis. Animal models of SSc have provided more in-depth information on the role of B lymphocytes, eg, through disruption of B cell function. In this review we will discuss the evidence that B cells are involved in the pathogenesis of SSc. PMID:19707370

  4. Transcriptional analysis of the B cell germinal center reaction

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Keller, Jeffrey L.; Haddad, Joseph; Miljkovic, Vladan; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    The germinal center (GC) reaction is crucial for T cell-dependent immune responses and is targeted by B cell lymphomagenesis. Here we analyzed the transcriptional changes that occur in B cells during GC transit (naïve B cells → centroblasts → centrocytes → memory B cells) by gene expression profiling. Naïve B cells, characterized by the expression of cell cycle-inhibitory and antiapoptotic genes, become centroblasts by inducing an atypical proliferation program lacking c-Myc expression, switching to a proapoptotic program, and down-regulating cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion receptors. The transition from GC to memory cells is characterized by a return to a phenotype similar to that of naïve cells except for an apoptotic program primed for both death and survival and for changes in the expression of cell surface receptors including IL-2 receptor β. These results provide insights into the dynamics of the GC reaction and represent the basis for the analysis of B cell malignancies. PMID:12604779

  5. B cells enhance early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Weinstein, Jason S.; Delano, Matthew J.; Cuenca, Alex G.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Wynn, James L.; Lee, Pui Y.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Efron, Philip A.; Akira, Shizuo; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbes activate pattern recognition receptors to initiate adaptive immunity. T cells affect early innate inflammatory responses to viral infection, but both activation and suppression have been demonstrated. We identify a novel role for B cells in the early innate immune response during bacterial sepsis. We demonstrate that Rag1−/− mice display deficient early inflammatory responses and reduced survival during sepsis. Interestingly, B cell–deficient or anti-CD20 B cell–depleted mice, but not α/β T cell–deficient mice, display decreased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and reduced survival after sepsis. Both treatment of B cell–deficient mice with serum from wild-type (WT) mice and repletion of Rag1−/− mice with B cells improves sepsis survival, suggesting antibody-independent and antibody-dependent roles for B cells in the outcome to sepsis. During sepsis, marginal zone and follicular B cells are activated through type I interferon (IFN-I) receptor (IFN-α/β receptor [IFNAR]), and repleting Rag1−/− mice with WT, but not IFNAR−/−, B cells improves IFN-I–dependent and –independent early cytokine responses. Repleting B cell–deficient mice with the IFN-I–dependent chemokine, CXCL10 was also sufficient to improve sepsis survival. This study identifies a novel role for IFN-I–activated B cells in protective early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis. PMID:21746813

  6. Gsk3 is a metabolic checkpoint regulator in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jellusova, Julia; Cato, Matthew H; Apgar, John R; Ramezani-Rad, Parham; Leung, Charlotte R; Chen, Cindi; Richardson, Adam D; Conner, Elaine M; Benschop, Robert J; Woodgett, James R; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-03-01

    B cells predominate in a quiescent state until an antigen is encountered, which results in rapid growth, proliferation and differentiation of the B cells. These distinct cell states are probably accompanied by differing metabolic needs, yet little is known about the metabolic control of B cell fate. Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (Gsk3) is a metabolic sensor that promotes the survival of naive recirculating B cells by restricting cell mass accumulation. In antigen-driven responses, Gsk3 was selectively required for regulation of B cell size, mitochondrial biogenesis, glycolysis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in a manner mediated by the co-stimulatory receptor CD40. Gsk3 was required to prevent metabolic collapse and ROS-induced apoptosis after glucose became limiting, functioning in part by repressing growth dependent on the myelocytomatosis oncoprotein c-Myc. Notably, we found that Gsk3 was required for the generation and maintenance of germinal center B cells, which require high glycolytic activity to support growth and proliferation in a hypoxic microenvironment.

  7. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  8. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  9. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some ...

  10. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-05-08

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  11. New B-cell Lymphomas in the Setting of a Previous Rare Breast Implant–Associated B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Alison; Wang, Wei; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a follow-up of a patient who underwent right-sided subtotal mastectomy and placement of right-sided saline implant in 1968 for a phyllodes tumor and then in 2012 was diagnosed with a rare B-cell type lymphoma of the right breast. In 2015, she was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involvement of the left breast and left leg and experienced subsequent self-regression of leg lesions without therapy. PMID:27975038

  12. Kidins220/ARMS binds to the B cell antigen receptor and regulates B cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Gina J.; Janowska, Iga; Prutek, Fabiola; Hobeika, Elias; Satapathy, Annyesha; Sprenger, Adrian; Plum, Thomas; Seidl, Maximilian; Dengjel, Jörn; Reth, Michael; Cesca, Fabrizia; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling is critical for B cell development and activation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a protein kinase D–interacting substrate of 220 kD (Kidins220)/ankyrin repeat–rich membrane-spanning protein (ARMS) as a novel interaction partner of resting and stimulated BCR. Upon BCR stimulation, the interaction increases in a Src kinase–independent manner. By knocking down Kidins220 in a B cell line and generating a conditional B cell–specific Kidins220 knockout (B-KO) mouse strain, we show that Kidins220 couples the BCR to PLCγ2, Ca2+, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling. Consequently, BCR-mediated B cell activation was reduced in vitro and in vivo upon Kidins220 deletion. Furthermore, B cell development was impaired at stages where pre-BCR or BCR signaling is required. Most strikingly, λ light chain–positive B cells were reduced sixfold in the B-KO mice, genetically placing Kidins220 in the PLCγ2 pathway. Thus, our data indicate that Kidins220 positively regulates pre-BCR and BCR functioning. PMID:26324445

  13. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  14. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  15. Building Classifier Ensembles for B-Cell Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes in target antigens is a critical step in epitope-driven vaccine design, immunodiagnostic tests, and antibody production. B-cell epitopes could be linear, i.e., a contiguous amino acid sequence fragment of an antigen, or conformational, i.e., amino acids that are often not contiguous in the primary sequence but appear in close proximity within the folded 3D antigen structure. Numerous computational methods have been proposed for predicting both types of B-cell epitopes. However, the development of tools for reliably predicting B-cell epitopes remains a major challenge in immunoinformatics. Classifier ensembles a promising approach for combining a set of classifiers such that the overall performance of the resulting ensemble is better than the predictive performance of the best individual classifier. In this chapter, we show how to build a classifier ensemble for improved prediction of linear B-cell epitopes. The method can be easily adapted to build classifier ensembles for predicting conformational epitopes. PMID:25048130

  16. Regulation of germinal center B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Garcia-Ibanez, Laura; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2016-03-01

    Germinal centers (GC) are the main sites where antigen-activated B-cell clones expand and undergo immunoglobulin gene hypermutation and selection. Iterations of this process will lead to affinity maturation, replicating Darwinian evolution on the cellular level. GC B-cell selection can lead to four different outcomes: further expansion and evolution, apoptosis (non-selection), or output from the GC with differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells. T-helper cells in GC have been shown to have a central role in regulating B-cell selection by sensing the density of major histocompatibility complex (MHC):peptide antigen complexes. Antigen is provided on follicular dendritic cells in the form of immune complex. Antibody on these immune complexes regulates antigen accessibility by shielding antigen from B-cell receptor access. Replacement of antibody on immune complexes by antibody generated from GC-derived plasma cell output will gradually reduce the availability of antigen. This antibody feedback can lead to a situation where a slow rise in selection stringency caused by a changing environment leads to directional evolution toward higher affinity antibody.

  17. TRAF3 deficiency promotes metabolic reprogramming in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W.; Wallis, Alicia M.; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte survival. B cell-specific TRAF3 deficiency results in enhanced viability and is associated with development of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We show that TRAF3 deficiency led to induction of two proteins important for glucose metabolism, Glut1 and Hexokinase 2 (HXK2). This was associated with increased glucose uptake. In the absence of TRAF3, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were increased in B cells without changes in mitochondrial mass or reactive oxygen species. Chemical inhibition of glucose metabolism or glucose deprivation substantially attenuated the enhanced survival of TRAF3-deficient B cells, with a decrease in the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. Changes in Glut1 and Mcl-1 levels, glucose uptake and B cell number in the absence of TRAF3 were all dependent upon NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK). These results indicate that TRAF3 deficiency suffices to metabolically reprogram B cells, a finding that improves our understanding of the role of TRAF3 as a tumor suppressor, and suggests potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27752131

  18. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  19. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after marrow transplantation. I. T-cell and B-cell deficiencies in patients with and without chronic graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, L.G.; Seigneuret, M.C.; Storb, R.F.; Witherspoon, R.P.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with aplastic anemia or acute leukemia were treated by marrow grafts from HLA-identical donors after conditioning with high doses of cyclophosphamide and/or today body irradiation. They were studied between 4 and 63 mo (median 14.2) after transplantation. Seventeen patients had chronic graft-versus-host disease (C-GVHD) and 7 were healthy. They were studied for defects in their T- and B-cell function using and indirect hemolytic plaque assay for Ig production after 6 days of culture in the presence of pokeweek mitogen. T or B cells from the patients with or without C-GVHD were cocultured with T or B cells from their HLA-identical marrow donors or unrelated normal controls. Intrinsic B-cell defects, lack of helper T-cell activity, and suppressor T-cell activity were more frequently found in patients with C-GVHD than in healthy patients. Fifteen of the 17 patients with C-GVHD showed on or more defects in their T-and B-cell function compared to only 3 of the 7 patients without C-GVHD. None of the healthy controls, including the marrow donors, showed defects in their T- and B-cell functions. These in vitro findings may be helpful in assessing the process of immune reconstitution and the immunologic aberration found after human marrow transplantation.

  20. Transcriptional Control of Early T and B Cell Developmental Choices

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2014-01-01

    T and B cells share a common somatic gene rearrangement mechanism for assembling the genes that code for their antigen receptors and developmental pathways with many parallels. Shared usage of basic helix-loop-helix E proteins as transcriptional drivers underlies these common features. However, the transcription factor networks in which these E proteins are embedded are different both in membership and in architecture for T and B cell gene regulatory programs. These differences permit lineage commitment decisions to be made in different hierarchical orders. Furthermore, in a contrast to B-cell gene networks, the T-cell gene network architecture for effector differentiation is sufficiently modular so that E protein inputs can be removed. Complete “T-cell-like” effector differentiation can proceed without T-cell receptor rearrangement or selection when E proteins are neutralized, yielding natural killer and other innate lymphoid cells. PMID:24471430

  1. How do viruses trick B-cells into becoming lymphomas?

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman, Ethel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Since the discovery of EBV in Burkitt lymphoma 50 years ago, only one other virus, namely KSHV/HHV-8, has been confirmed to be a direct cause of B cell lymphoma. Here we will review the evidence for EBV and KSHV as causal lymphoma agents. Recent findings A deeper understanding of specific mechanisms by which EBV and KSHV cause B cell lymphomas has been acquired over the past years, in particular with respect to viral protein interactions with host cell pathways, microRNA functions. Specific therapies based on knowledge of viral functions are beginning to be evaluated, mostly in pre-clinical models. Summary Understanding the causal associations of specific infections agents with certain B cell lymphomas has allowed more accurate diagnosis and classification. A deeper knowledge of the specific mechanisms of transformation is essential to begin assessing whether virus-targeted treatment modalities may be used in the future. PMID:24886824

  2. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  3. A perspective on B-cell-targeting therapy for SLE

    PubMed Central

    Looney, R. John; Anolik, Jennifer; Sanz, Inaki

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, large controlled trials have tested several new agents for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Unfortunately, none of these trials has met its primary outcome. This does not mean progress has not been made. In fact, a great deal has been learned about doing clinical trials in lupus and about the biological and clinical effects of the drugs being tested. Many of these drugs were designed to target B cells directly, e.g., rituximab, belimumab, epratuzumab, and transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor–immunoglobulin (TACI–Ig). The enthusiasm for targeting B cells derives from substantial evidence showing the critical role of B cells in murine models of SLE, as well promising results from multiple open trials with rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes B cells (Martin and Chan in Immunity 20(5):517–527, 2004; Sobel et al. in J Exp Med 173:1441–1449, 1991; Silverman and Weisman in Arthritis Rheum 48:1484–1492, 2003; Silverman in Arthritis Rheum 52(4):1342, 2005; Shlomchik et al. in Nat Rev Immunol 1:147–153, 2001; Looney et al. in Arthritis Rheum 50:2580–2589, 2004; Lu et al. in Arthritis Rheum 61(4):482–487, 2009; Saito et al. in Lupus 12(10):798–800, 2003; van Vollenhoven et al. in Scand J Rheumatol 33(6):423–427, 2004; Sfikakis et al. Arthritis Rheum 52(2):501–513, 2005). Why have the controlled trials of B-cell-targeting therapies failed to demonstrate efficacy? Were there flaws in design or execution of these trials? Or, were promising animal studies and open trials misleading, as so often happens? This perspective discusses the current state of B-cell-targeting therapies for human lupus and the future development of these therapies. PMID:19669389

  4. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  5. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  6. The nanoscale spatial organization of B-cell receptors on immunoglobulin M- and G-expressing human B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinmin; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Brzostowski, Joseph; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Pierce, Susan K

    2017-02-15

    B-cell activation is initiated by the binding of antigen to the B-cell receptor (BCR). Here we used dSTORM superresolution imaging to characterize the nanoscale spatial organization of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG BCRs on the surfaces of resting and antigen--activated human peripheral blood B-cells. We provide insights into both the fundamental process of antigen-driven BCR clustering and differences in the spatial organization of IgM and IgG BCRs that may contribute to the characteristic differences in the responses of naive and memory B-cells to antigen. We provide evidence that although both IgM and IgG BCRs reside in highly heterogeneous protein islands that vary in size and number of BCR single-molecule localizations, both resting and activated B-cells intrinsically maintain a high -frequency of single isolated BCR localizations, which likely represent BCR monomers. IgG BCRs are more clustered than IgM BCRs on resting cells and form larger protein islands after antigen activation. Small, dense BCR clusters likely formed via protein-protein interactions are present on the surface of resting cells, and antigen activation induces these to come together to form less dense, larger islands, a process likely governed, at least in part, by protein-lipid interactions.

  7. BCA-1, A B-cell chemoattractant signal, is constantly expressed in cutaneous lymphoproliferative B-cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Manuelli, C; Pimpinelli, N; Bianchi, B; Orlando, C; Mavilia, C; Cappugi, P; Maggi, E; Giannotti, B; Santucci, M

    2003-07-01

    We analysed the immunophenotypic and molecular expression of BCA-1 (B-cell-specific chemokine) and CXCR5 (BCA-1 receptor) in normal skin and different cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL); cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma (PCBCL)), with the aim of investigating their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of cutaneous B-cell disorders. BCA-1 and CXCR5 were constantly expressed in CBCL and PCBCL, but not in normal skin and CTCL. BCA-1 and CXCR5 were constantly coexpressed by CD22+ B-cells, while CD35+ follicular dendritic cells coexpressed BCA-1 in PCBCL cells only. In low grade CBCL, as compared with high grade CBCL, the intensity of CXCR5 expression on neoplastic CD22+ cells was lower than that of BCA-1. The image analysis of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products showed a significant quantitative difference between PCBCL/low grade CBCL and high grade CBCL. The above findings, although only observed in a small series of patients, are in keeping with findings in MALT gastric and gastric MALT lymphomas, adding further evidence of the close similarities between CBCL and MALT lymphomas.

  8. Primary B-cell malignant lymphoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Canver, C C

    1993-10-01

    A 52-year-old asymptomatic man was evaluated for two right lung lesions discovered on a chest roentgenogram during a routine physical examination. A computed tomographic scan revealed the absence of mediastinal nodal involvement. Guided-needle aspiration cytology was inconclusive. A subsequent right thoracotomy was necessary to perform biopsy of these masses, which proved to be B-cell malignant lymphomas of the lung. This case represents a rare example of a primary low-grade B-cell pulmonary lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, with its distinct clinicopathologic features.

  9. Activation of B cells by non-canonical helper signals.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Andrea; Cols, Montserrat; Puga, Irene

    2012-09-01

    Cognate interaction between T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is essential for the production of high-affinity antibodies against microbes, and for the establishment of long-term immunological memory. Growing evidence shows that--in addition to presenting antigens to T and B cells--macrophages, dendritic cells and other cells of the innate immune system provide activating signals to B cells, as well as survival signals to antibody-secreting plasma cells. Here, we discuss how these innate immune cells contribute to the induction of highly diversified and temporally sustained antibody responses, both systemically and at mucosal sites of antigen entry.

  10. Membrane phenotypic studies in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C S; Limbert, H J; MacKarill, I D; Roberts, B E

    1985-01-01

    A total of 398 cases of B cell lymphoproliferative disease were phenotypically characterised by membrane mouse red blood cell (MRBC) receptor, surface immunoglobulin, common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (CALLA), and FMC7 and T1 monoclonal antibody studies. Relations between chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), prolymphocytic leukaemia (PLL), and "prolymphocytoid" CLL variants were examined with particular reference to the expression of FMC7. In addition, the reactivity of TU1 monoclonal antibody with B cell disorders was established. The results suggest that despite some heterogeneity most cases may be characterised by their phenotypic patterns and that these investigations provide a reproducible basis for classification. PMID:2413082

  11. A Literature Revision in Primary Cutaneous B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Selva, R La; Violetti, S Alberti; Delfino, C; Grandi, V; Cicchelli, S; Tomasini, C; Fierro, M T; Berti, E; Pimpinelli, N; Quaglino, P

    2017-01-01

    The term “Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma” (PCBCL) comprehends a variety of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a clonal proliferation of B-cells primarily involving the skin. The absence of evident extra-cutaneous disease must be confirmed after six-month follow-up in order to exclude a nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with secondary cutaneous involvement, which may have a completely different clinical behavior and prognosis. In this article, we have summarized the clinico-pathological features of main types of PCBCL and we outline the guidelines for management based on a review of the available literature.

  12. Expression of the p66Shc protein adaptor is regulated by the activator of transcription STAT4 in normal and chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Capitani, Nagaja; Frezzato, Federica; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2016-01-01

    p66Shc attenuates mitogenic, prosurvival and chemotactic signaling and promotes apoptosis in lymphocytes. Consistently, p66Shc deficiency contributes to the survival and trafficking abnormalities of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells. The mechanism of p66shc silencing in CLL B cells is methylation-independent, at variance with other cancer cell types. Here we identify STAT4 as a novel transcriptional regulator of p66Shc in B cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter gene assays showed that STAT4 binds to and activates the p66shc promoter. Silencing or overexpression of STAT4 resulted in a co-modulation of p66Shc. IL-12-dependent STAT4 activation caused a coordinate increase in STAT4 and p66Shc expression, which correlated with enhanced B cell apoptosis. Treatment with the STAT4 inhibitor lisofylline reverted partly this effect, suggesting that STAT4 phosphorylation is not essential for but enhances p66shc transcription. Additionally, we demonstrate that CLL B lymphocytes have a STAT4 expression defect which partly accounts for their p66Shc deficiency, as supported by reconstitution experiments. Finally, we show that p66Shc participates in a positive feedback loop to promote STAT4 expression. These results provide new insights into the mechanism of p66Shc expression in B cells and its defect in CLL, identifying the STAT4/IL-12 pathway as a potential therapeutic target in this neoplasia. PMID:27494881

  13. SLP65 deficiency results in perpetual V(D)J recombinase activity in pre-B-lymphoblastic leukemia and B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, M; Feldhahn, N; Liedtke, S; Jumaa, H; Siebert, R; Müschen, M

    2006-08-24

    Perpetual V(D)J recombinase activity involving multiple DNA double-strand break events in B-cell lineage leukemia and lymphoma cells may introduce secondary genetic aberrations leading towards malignant progression. Here, we investigated defective negative feedback signaling through the (pre-) B-cell receptor as a possible reason for deregulated V(D)J recombinase activity in B-cell malignancy. On studying 28 cases of pre-B-lymphoblastic leukemia and 27 B-cell lymphomas, expression of the (pre-) B-cell receptor-related linker molecule SLP65 (SH2 domain-containing lymphocyte protein of 65 kDa) was found to be defective in seven and five cases, respectively. SLP65 deficiency correlates with RAG1/2 expression and unremitting V(H) gene rearrangement activity. Reconstitution of SLP65 expression in SLP65-deficient leukemia and lymphoma cells results in downregulation of RAG1/2 expression and prevents both de novo V(H)-DJ(H) rearrangements and secondary V(H) replacement. We conclude that iterative V(H) gene rearrangement represents a frequent feature in B-lymphoid malignancy, which can be attributed to SLP65 deficiency in many cases.

  14. S1P3 confers differential S1P migration by autoreactive and non-autoreactive immature B cells and is required for normal B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Erin E.; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During B cell development, immature B cell fate is determined by whether the B cell antigen receptor is engaged in the bone marrow. Immature B cells that are non-autoreactive continue maturation and emigrate from the marrow whereas autoreactive immature B cells remain and are tolerized. However, the microenvironment where these events occur and the chemoattractants responsible for immature B cell trafficking within and out of the bone marrow remain largely undefined. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a chemoattractant that directs lymphocyte trafficking and thymocyte egress and in this study we investigated whether S1P contributed to B cell development, egress and positioning within the bone marrow. Our findings show that immature B cells are chemotactic towards S1P but that this response is dependent on antigen receptor specificity: non-autoreactive, but not autoreactive, immature B cells migrate towards S1P and are shown to require S1P3 receptor for this response. Despite this response, S1P3 is shown not to facilitate immature B cell egress but is required for normal B cell development including the positioning of transitional B cells within bone marrow sinusoids. These data indicate that S1P3 signaling directs immature B cells to a bone marrow microenvironment important for both tolerance induction and maturation. PMID:20039302

  15. Deficiency of MALT1 paracaspase activity results in unbalanced regulatory and effector T and B cell responses leading to multiorgan inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bornancin, Frédéric; Renner, Florian; Touil, Ratiba; Sic, Heiko; Kolb, Yeter; Touil-Allaoui, Ismahane; Rush, James S; Smith, Paul A; Bigaud, Marc; Junker-Walker, Ursula; Burkhart, Christoph; Dawson, Janet; Niwa, Satoru; Katopodis, Andreas; Nuesslein-Hildesheim, Barbara; Weckbecker, Gisbert; Zenke, Gerhard; Kinzel, Bernd; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Brenner, Dirk; Brüstle, Anne; St Paul, Michael; Zamurovic, Natasa; McCoy, Kathy D; Rolink, Antonius; Régnier, Catherine H; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S; Patel, Dhavalkumar D; Calzascia, Thomas

    2015-04-15

    The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in immune receptor-driven signaling pathways leading to NF-κB activation. MALT1 promotes signaling by acting as a scaffold, recruiting downstream signaling proteins, as well as by proteolytic cleavage of multiple substrates. However, the relative contributions of these two different activities to T and B cell function are not well understood. To investigate how MALT1 proteolytic activity contributes to overall immune cell regulation, we generated MALT1 protease-deficient mice (Malt1(PD/PD)) and compared their phenotype with that of MALT1 knockout animals (Malt1(-/-)). Malt1(PD/PD) mice displayed defects in multiple cell types including marginal zone B cells, B1 B cells, IL-10-producing B cells, regulatory T cells, and mature T and B cells. In general, immune defects were more pronounced in Malt1(-/-) animals. Both mouse lines showed abrogated B cell responses upon immunization with T-dependent and T-independent Ags. In vitro, inactivation of MALT1 protease activity caused reduced stimulation-induced T cell proliferation, impaired IL-2 and TNF-α production, as well as defective Th17 differentiation. Consequently, Malt1(PD/PD) mice were protected in a Th17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model. Surprisingly, Malt1(PD/PD) animals developed a multiorgan inflammatory pathology, characterized by Th1 and Th2/0 responses and enhanced IgG1 and IgE levels, which was delayed by wild-type regulatory T cell reconstitution. We therefore propose that the pathology characterizing Malt1(PD/PD) animals arises from an immune imbalance featuring pathogenic Th1- and Th2/0-skewed effector responses and reduced immunosuppressive compartments. These data uncover a previously unappreciated key function of MALT1 protease activity in immune homeostasis and underline its relevance in human health and disease.

  16. Primary central nervous system B cell lymphoma with features intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liuyan; Li, Zhimin; Finn, Laura E; Personnet, David A; Edenfield, Brandy; Foran, James M; Jaeckle, Kurt A; Reimer, Ronald; Menke, David M; Ketterling, Rhett P; Tun, Han W

    2012-01-01

    B cell lymphoma with features intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma (DLBCL/BL) is a new lymphoma entity which is recognized in the current World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2008). We report a case of a primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) with findings consistent with DLBCL/BL. It is characterized by a very aggressive clinical course, and a widespread multifocal involvement of the CNS. Our case shows that a DLBCL/BL can manifest in the CNS alone without any systemic involvement. PMID:22295149

  17. Pathophysiology of B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Taubenheim, Nadine; Peron, Sophie; Fischer, Alain

    2007-01-01

    B-cell intrinsic immunoglobulin class switch recombination (Ig-CSR) deficiencies, previously termed hyper-IgM syndromes, are genetically determined conditions characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM levels and an absence or very low levels of IgG, IgA, and IgE. As a function of the molecular mechanism, the defective CSR is variably associated to a defect in the generation of somatic hypermutations (SHMs) in the Ig variable region. The study of Ig-CSR deficiencies contributed to a better delineation of the mechanisms underlying CSR and SHM, the major events of antigen-triggered antibody maturation. Four Ig-CSR deficiency phenotypes have been so far reported: the description of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency (Ig-CSR deficiency 1), caused by recessive mutations of AICDA gene, characterized by a defect in CSR and SHM, clearly established the role of AID in the induction of the Ig gene rearrangements underlying CSR and SHM. A CSR-specific function of AID has, however, been detected by the observation of a selective CSR defect caused by mutations affecting the C-terminus of AID. Ig-CSR deficiency 2 is the consequence of uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) deficiency. Because UNG, a molecule of the base excision repair machinery, removes uracils from DNA and AID deaminates cytosines into uracils, that observation indicates that the AID-UNG pathway directly targets DNA of switch regions from the Ig heavy-chain locus to induce the CSR process. Ig-CSR deficiencies 3 and 4 are characterized by a selective CSR defect resulting from blocks at distinct steps of CSR. A further understanding of the CSR machinery is expected from their molecular definition.

  18. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression in human B-cell precursors is essential for central B-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M.; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D.; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme mediating class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B-cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B-cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B-cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells. PMID:26546282

  19. New Insights into Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalpadakis, Christina; Pangalis, Gerassimos A.; Sachanas, Sotirios; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P.; Kyriakaki, Stavroula; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Koulieris, Efstathios; Moschogiannis, Maria; Yiakoumis, Xanthi; Tsirkinidis, Pantelis; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Levidou, Georgia; Papadaki, Helen A.; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Angelopoulou, Maria K.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a premalignant condition characterized by the presence of less than 5000/μL circulating clonal B cells in otherwise healthy individuals. Three subcategories have been identified according to the immunophenotypic features: CLL-like, CD5(+) atypical, and CD5(−) MBL. CLL-like MBL is by far the most frequent and best studied category and further divided in low-count [LC] and high-count [HC] MBL, based on a cutoff value of 500/μL clonal B cells. LC-MBL typically remains stable and probably does not represent a truly premalignant condition, but rather an age-related immune senescence. On the other hand, HC-MBL is closely related to CLL-Rai0, bearing similar immunogenetic profile, and is associated with an annual risk of progression to CLL requiring therapy at a rate of 1.1%. Currently there are no reproducible factors for evaluating the risk of progression to CLL. CD5(−) MBL is characterized by an immunophenotype consistent with marginal zone origin and displays many similarities with marginal zone lymphomas (MZL), mainly the splenic MZL. The cutoff value of 5000/μL clonal B cells cannot probably be applied in CD5(−) MBL, requiring a new definition to describe those cases. PMID:25295254

  20. Cord blood transplants for SCID: better B-cell engraftment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan-Yin; Roberts, Robert Lloyd; Moore, Theodore B; Stiehm, E Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Despite successful T-cell engraftment in transplanted patients, B-cell function is not always achieved; up to 58% of patients require immunoglobulin therapy after receiving haploidentical transplants. We report 2 half-sibling males with X-linked γ-chain SCID treated with different sources of stem cells. Sibling 1 was transplanted with T-cell-depleted haploidentical maternal bone marrow and sibling 2 was transplanted with 7/8 human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated umbilical cord blood. Both patients received pretransplant conditioning and posttransplant graft-versus-host-disease prophylaxis. B-cell engraftment and function was achieved in sibling 1 but not in sibling 2. This disparate result is consistent with a review of 19 other SCID children who received cord blood transplants. B-cell function, as indicated by no need for immunoglobulin therapy, was restored in 42% of patients given haploidentical transplants and in 68% of patients given matched unrelated donor transplants compared with 80% of patients given cord blood transplants. Cord blood is an alternative source of stem cells for transplantation in children with SCID and has a higher likelihood of B-cell reconstitution.

  1. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen.

  2. Likelihood-Based Inference of B Cell Clonal Families

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Duncan K.

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system depends on a highly diverse collection of antibody-making B cells. B cell receptor sequence diversity is generated by a random recombination process called “rearrangement” forming progenitor B cells, then a Darwinian process of lineage diversification and selection called “affinity maturation.” The resulting receptors can be sequenced in high throughput for research and diagnostics. Such a collection of sequences contains a mixture of various lineages, each of which may be quite numerous, or may consist of only a single member. As a step to understanding the process and result of this diversification, one may wish to reconstruct lineage membership, i.e. to cluster sampled sequences according to which came from the same rearrangement events. We call this clustering problem “clonal family inference.” In this paper we describe and validate a likelihood-based framework for clonal family inference based on a multi-hidden Markov Model (multi-HMM) framework for B cell receptor sequences. We describe an agglomerative algorithm to find a maximum likelihood clustering, two approximate algorithms with various trade-offs of speed versus accuracy, and a third, fast algorithm for finding specific lineages. We show that under simulation these algorithms greatly improve upon existing clonal family inference methods, and that they also give significantly different clusters than previous methods when applied to two real data sets. PMID:27749910

  3. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-06-10

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. This includes: (1) Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment. This activity is the restart of hotwork in B-Cell to size reduce the remainder of Tank 119 and other miscellaneous pieces of equipment into sizes that can be loaded into a grout container. This activity also includes the process of preparing the containers for shipment from the cell. The specific activities and procedures used are detailed in a table. (2) Load and Ship Low-Level Waste. This activity covers the process of taking a grouted LLW container from B-Cell and loading it into the cask in the REC airlock and Cask Handling Area (CHA) for shipment to the LLBG. The detailed activities and procedures for this part of cell cleanout are included in second table.

  4. Unraveling the warp and weft of B cell fate.

    PubMed

    Stadanlick, Jason E; Cancro, Michael P

    2006-09-01

    Two recent Immunity articles (Enzler et al., 2006; Sasaki et al., 2006) probe the roles of Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) pathways in survival and differentiation mediated by B cell activation factor of the TNF family (BAFF).

  5. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  6. B cell hyperactivity and abnormalities in T cell markers and immunoregulatory function in a patient with nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Zabay, J M; De La Concha, E G; Ludeña, C; Lozano, C; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Bootello, A; Gonzalezporqué, P

    1982-01-01

    We describe a 2 year old girl with nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency, who had low blood T cell numbers and T lymphocyte blastogenic response to mitogens, hypergammaglobulinaemia, high titres of antibodies to many common antigens, various autoantibodies, a monoclonal IgM-kappa protein, an increased frequency of mature Ig containing blood B cells and a high production of Ig in vitro in unstimulated cultures. E rosetting cells showed faint or no immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibodies directed against T cell membrane antigens. In vitro Ig production in response to pokeweed mitogen was defective, and no T cell helper or suppressor activity was observed. It is suggested that the immunoregulatory deficiency might have caused the B cell hyperactivity. PMID:6819909

  7. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5(f/f)). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Ectopic germinal centers, BAFF and anti-B-cell therapy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Ragheb, Samia; Le Panse, Rozen; Lisak, Robert P

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by antibodies directed to molecules of the endplate of the neuromuscular junction. B cells play a major role in MG disease since they produce the pathogenic antibodies and therapies targeting B cells are effective. The aim of this article was to review the role of B cells in myasthenia gravis. We will first describe what we know about B cells in this disease and examine the involvement of the B cells in the thymus of MG patients. We will detail the role of factors associated with B-cell function such as BAFF. Finally, we will discuss the effects of therapy targeting B cells.

  9. Formalin-treated bacteria as selective B cell mitogens: results in primary and acquired immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, M C; Pucillo, L P; Fiorilli, M; Aiuti, F; Banck, G; Forsgren, A

    1981-01-01

    The mitogenic activity of the formalin-treated bacterial strains Branhamella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with primary immunodeficiencies, acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and in umbilical cord blood lymphocytes. The bacteria selectively stimulated B cells, as demonstrated by the finding of a normal de novo DNA synthesis in children with a T cell defect and of an absent response in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and severe combined immunodeficiency. A decreased mitogenic activity was exerted on PBL from four out of seven adults with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (CVH). In B-CLL the mitogenic activity was normal while in T-ALL it was decreased. Umbilical cord blood lymphocytes responded better than PBL from adults. The selective stimulative ability of the bacteria for B lymphocytes is expressed when PBL are cultured together with the formalin-treated bacteria for 48 to 72 hr. PMID:6976247

  10. Germinal center B cells recognize antigen through a specialized immune synapse architecture

    PubMed Central

    Nowosad, Carla R.; Spillane, Katelyn M.; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    B cell activation is regulated by B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling and antigen internalization in immune synapses. Using large-scale imaging across B cell subsets, we show that in contrast to naive and memory B cells, which gathered antigen towards the synapse center before internalization, germinal center (GC) B cells extracted antigen by a distinct pathway using small peripheral clusters. Both naive and GC B cell synapses required proximal BCR signaling, but GC cells signaled less through the protein kinase C-β (PKC-β)–NF-κB pathway and produced stronger tugging forces on the BCR, thereby more stringently regulating antigen binding. Consequently, GC B cells extracted antigen with better affinity discrimination than naive B cells, suggesting that specialized biomechanical patterns in B cell synapses regulate T-cell dependent selection of high-affinity B cells in GCs. PMID:27183103

  11. Germinal Center B-Cell-Associated Nuclear Protein (GANP) Involved in RNA Metabolism for B Cell Maturation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, N; Maeda, K

    2016-01-01

    Germinal center B-cell-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is upregulated in germinal center B cells against T-cell-dependent antigens in mice and humans. In mice, GANP depletion in B cells impairs antibody affinity maturation. Conversely, its transgenic overexpression augments the generation of high-affinity antigen-specific B cells. GANP associates with AID in the cytoplasm, shepherds AID into the nucleus, and augments its access to the rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region of the genome in B cells, thereby precipitating the somatic hypermutation of V region genes. GANP is also upregulated in human CD4(+) T cells and is associated with APOBEC3G (A3G). GANP interacts with A3G and escorts it to the virion cores to potentiate its antiretroviral activity by inactivating HIV-1 genomic cDNA. Thus, GANP is characterized as a cofactor associated with AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminase family molecules in generating diversity of the IgV region of the genome and genetic alterations of exogenously introduced viral targets. GANP, encoded by human chromosome 21, as well as its mouse equivalent on chromosome 10, contains a region homologous to Saccharomyces Sac3 that was characterized as a component of the transcription/export 2 (TREX-2) complex and was predicted to be involved in RNA export and metabolism in mammalian cells. The metabolism of RNA during its maturation, from the transcription site at the chromosome within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translation apparatus, needs to be elaborated with regard to acquired and innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on GANP as a component of TREX-2 in mammalian cells.

  12. Molecular footprints of a germinal center derivation of human IgM+(IgD+)CD27+ B cells and the dynamics of memory B cell generation.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Marc; Küppers, Ralf

    2009-11-23

    The origin of IgM(+)CD27(+) B lymphocytes with mutated IgV genes, which account for approximately 20% of human peripheral blood (PB) B cells, is controversially discussed. A generation in a primary diversification pathway, in T cell-independent immune responses, or in T cell-dependent germinal center (GC) reactions has been proposed. We show here that IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) and IgM(+)IgD(-/low)CD27(+) B cell subsets carry, like class-switched memory B cells, mutations in the Bcl6 gene as a genetic trait of a GC experience. Moreover, the identification of PB IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells clonally related to GC-derived IgG(+) memory B cells with shared and distinct IgV gene mutations demonstrates the GC origin also of the former subset. These findings provide genetic evidence for a GC derivation of somatically mutated IgM(+) B cells and indicate that adult humans harbor a large population of IgM(+)IgD(+) post-GC memory B cells. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that a highly diverse and often very large population of memory B cells is generated from a given GC B cell clone, and that (preferentially IgM) memory B cells are generated already early in the GC reaction. This provides novel insights into the dynamics of GC reactions and the generation of a memory B cell repertoire.

  13. The Epigenetic basis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanwen; Melnick, Ari

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of DLBCL is strongly linked to perturbation of epigenetic mechanisms. The germinal center (GC) B-cells from which DLBCLs arise are prone to instability in their cytosine methylation patterns. DLBCLs inherit this epigenetic instability and display variable degrees of epigenetic heterogeneity. Greater epigenetic heterogeneity is linked with poor clinical outcome. Somatic mutations of histone modifying proteins have also emerged as a hallmark of DLBCL. The effect of these somatic mutations may be to disrupt epigenetic switches that control the GC phenotype and “lock in” certain oncogenic features of GC B-cells resulting in malignant transformation. DNA methyltransferase and histone methyltransferase inhibitors are emerging as viable therapeutic approaches to erase aberrant epigenetic programming, suppress DLBCL growth and overcome chemotherapy resistance. This review will discuss these recent advances and their therapeutic implications. PMID:25805588

  14. Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma Exhibiting Endobronchial Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Midori; Fukuda, Minoru; Horio, Kensuke; Suyama, Takayuki; Kitazaki, Takeshi; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Fukuda, Masaaki; Shigematsu, Kazuto; Nakamura, Yoichi; Honda, Takuya; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL) is one of the subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We experienced a rare case of PMLBCL that exhibited endobronchial involvement. A 33-year-old Japanese female with the chief complaints of epigastralgia, back pain, and nausea visited a primary care hospital. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen demonstrated a bulky mass in the left anterior mediastinum, multiple pulmonary nodules, axillary lymph node swelling, and a pancreatic tumor. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed a white-tinged irregularly shaped endobronchial tumor accompanied by capillary vessel dilation in the left upper lobar bronchus. Taken together, these findings resulted in a diagnosis of PMLBCL. PMID:27803409

  15. 324 Facility B-cell quality process plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-07-29

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. These include: Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment; Load and Ship Low-Level Waste; Remove and Size Reduce the 1B Rack; Collect Dispersible Material from Cell Floor; Remove and Size Reduce the 2A Rack; Size Reduce the 1A Rack; Load and Ship Mixed Waste to PUREX Tunnels; and Move Spent Fuel to A-Cell;

  16. Epigenetic Impact on EBV Associated B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Robertson, Erle S.; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications leading to either transcriptional repression or activation, play an indispensable role in the development of human cancers. Epidemiological study revealed that approximately 20% of all human cancers are associated with tumor viruses. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the first human tumor virus, demonstrates frequent epigenetic alterations on both viral and host genomes in associated cancers—both of epithelial and lymphoid origin. The cell type-dependent different EBV latent gene expression patterns appear to be determined by the cellular epigenetic machinery and similarly viral oncoproteins recruit epigenetic regulators in order to deregulate the cellular gene expression profile resulting in several human cancers. This review elucidates the epigenetic consequences of EBV–host interactions during development of multiple EBV-induced B-cell lymphomas, which may lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic interventions against EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas by alteration of reversible patho-epigenetic markings. PMID:27886133

  17. The 3BP2 Adapter Protein Is Required for Optimal B-Cell Activation and Thymus-Independent Type 2 Humoral Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Grace; Dimitriou, Ioannis D.; La Rose, Jose; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Yeh, Wen-Chen; Doody, Gina; Turner, Martin; Gommerman, Jennifer; Rottapel, Robert

    2007-01-01

    3BP2 is a pleckstrin homology domain- and Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing adapter protein that is mutated in the rare human bone disorder cherubism and which has also been implicated in immunoreceptor signaling. However, a function for this protein has yet to be established. Here we show that mice lacking 3BP2 exhibited a perturbation in the peritoneal B1 and splenic marginal-zone B-cell compartments and diminished thymus-independent type 2 antigen response. 3BP2−/− B cells demonstrated a proliferation defect in response to antigen receptor cross-linking and a heightened sensitivity to B-cell receptor-induced death via a caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pathway. We show that 3BP2 binds via its SH2 domain to the CD19 signaling complex and is required for optimum Syk phosphorylation and calcium flux. PMID:17283041

  18. B-Cell Lymphoma in the Tricuspid Valve

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ali C; Limback, Joseph; Loya, Raul; Ramirez, Ashley; Valente, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma can involve any organ or tissue that contains lymphoid tissue and the heart is no exception. A few prior case reports have described lymphoma encasing a coronary artery or involving one or more cardiac valves. We present a rare case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the tricuspid valve and right coronary artery diagnosed on coronary CT angiography. The clinical and imaging characteristics of cardiac lymphoma are discussed. PMID:28097081

  19. B-Cell Lymphoma in the Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Agha, Ali C; Limback, Joseph; Loya, Raul; Ramirez, Ashley; Valente, Michael; Burt, Jeremy

    2016-12-16

    Lymphoma can involve any organ or tissue that contains lymphoid tissue and the heart is no exception. A few prior case reports have described lymphoma encasing a coronary artery or involving one or more cardiac valves. We present a rare case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the tricuspid valve and right coronary artery diagnosed on coronary CT angiography. The clinical and imaging characteristics of cardiac lymphoma are discussed.

  20. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  1. Bcipep: A database of B-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sudipto; Bhasin, Manoj; Raghava, Gajendra PS

    2005-01-01

    Background Bcipep is a database of experimentally determined linear B-cell epitopes of varying immunogenicity collected from literature and other publicly available databases. Results The current version of Bcipep database contains 3031 entries that include 763 immunodominant, 1797 immunogenic and 471 null-immunogenic epitopes. It covers a wide range of pathogenic organisms like viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi. The database provides a set of tools for the analysis and extraction of data that includes keyword search, peptide mapping and BLAST search. It also provides hyperlinks to various databases such as GenBank, PDB, SWISS-PROT and MHCBN. Conclusion A comprehensive database of B-cell epitopes called Bcipep has been developed that covers information on epitopes from a wide range of pathogens. The Bcipep will be source of information for investigators involved in peptide-based vaccine design, disease diagnosis and research in allergy. It should also be a promising data source for the development and evaluation of methods for prediction of B-cell epitopes. The database is available at . PMID:15921533

  2. Interleukin 7 independent development of human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Prieyl, J A; LeBien, T W

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) commitment and differentiation into lymphoid lineage cells proceed through a series of developmentally restricted progenitor compartments. A complete understanding of this process, and how it differs from HSC commitment and differentiation into cells of the myeloid/erythroid lineages, requires the development of model systems that support HSC commitment to the lymphoid lineages. We now describe a human bone marrow stromal cell culture that preferentially supports commitment and differentiation of human HSC to CD19+ B-lineage cells. Fluorescence activated cell sorterpurified CD34++/lineage-cells were isolated from fetal bone marrow and cultured on human fetal bone marrow stromal cells in serum-free conditions containing no exogenous cytokines. Over a period of 3 weeks, CD34++/lineage- cells underwent commitment, differentiation, and expansion into the B lineage. Progressive changes included: loss of CD34, acquisition of and graded increases in the level of cell surface CD19, and appearance of immature B cells expressing mu/kappa or mu/lambda cell surface Ig receptors. The tempo and phenotype of B-cell development was not influenced by the addition of IL-7 (10 ng/ml), or by the addition of goat anti-IL-7 neutralizing antibody. These results indicate a profound difference between mouse and human in the requirement for IL-7 in normal B-cell development, and provide an experimental system to identify and characterize human bone marrow stromal cell-derived molecules crucial for human B lymphopoiesis. PMID:8816803

  3. Akt and mTOR in B Cell Activation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Limon, Jose J; Fruman, David A

    2012-01-01

    Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for B cell proliferation and survival. PI3K signaling also controls key aspects of B cell differentiation. Upon engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR), PI3K activation promotes Ca(2+) mobilization and activation of NFκB-dependent transcription, events which are essential for B cell proliferation. PI3K also initiates a distinct signaling pathway involving the Akt and mTOR serine/threonine kinases. It has been generally assumed that activation of Akt and mTOR downstream of PI3K is essential for B cell function. However, Akt and mTOR have complex roles in B cell fate decisions and suppression of this pathway can enhance certain B cell responses while repressing others. In this review we will discuss genetic and pharmacological studies of Akt and mTOR function in normal B cells, and in malignancies of B cell origin.

  4. Humoral immune responses and CD27+ B cells in children with DiGeorge syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome).

    PubMed

    Finocchi, A; Di Cesare, S; Romiti, M L; Capponi, C; Rossi, P; Carsetti, R; Cancrini, C

    2006-08-01

    The spectrum of T-cell abnormalities in 22q11.2 syndrome is quite broad, ranging from profound and life threatening to non-existent defects. Humoral abnormalities have been described in some of these patients, although no data are currently available on their phenotypical and functional B cell subsets. The purpose of this study was to investigate humoral immune function in a cohort of 13 children with DiGeorge syndrome by immunophenotyping B and by analysing their functionality in vivo. Humoral immunity was assessed by serum immunoglobulin evaluation, IgG subclasses determination, and testing of specific antibody titers to recall antigens. B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and the relevant percentage of membrane surface expression of CD27, IgM, IgD was evaluated. In our cohort, one of 13 children (7.7%) had a complete IgA deficiency, four of 13 (30.7%) had minor immunoglobulin abnormalities, and five (38%) had an impaired production of specific antibodies. Five of 13 children (38%) had recurrent infections. Interestingly, peripheral CD27+ B cells were reduced in our patients as compared with age-matched healthy controls, and this decrement was statistically significant for IgM+ IgD+ CD27+ B cells. Immunoglobulin abnormalities were associated with the occurrence of recurrent infections. We conclude that a significant proportion of patients with DiGeorge syndrome have defective humoral immunity, which may represent an additional pathogenic mechanism underlying the increased susceptibility to infections. Whether the decreased CD27+ B-cell subset might be one of the defects that contribute to impaired humoral immunity, and to susceptibility to infection remains to be elucidated.

  5. T cell-derived B cell growth and differentiation factors. Dichotomy between the responsiveness of B cells from adult and neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    In these studies we have determined the molecular weights of B cell growth factor (BCGF) (less than 20,000), and B cell differentiation factors (BCDF) that induce immunoglobulin M (IgM) secretion (BCDF mu) (30-60,000) and IgG secretion (BCDF gamma) (less than 20,000). Thus, the molecular weight of BCDF mu is distinct from that of BCGF and BCDF gamma; BCGF and BCDF gamma cannot be distinguished. In addition, BCGF, BCDF mu, and BCDF gamma are distinguishable by their presence or absence in different supernatants from a panel of mitogen-induced T cell clones. These results suggest that the three lymphokines are different. This conclusion is supported by their differential biological effect on B cells from adult and neonatal mice. Thus, treatment with anti-Ig induces B cells from adult mice to proliferate and this proliferation is sustained by BCGF. In contrast, even in the presence of BCGF, anti-Ig does not induce B cells from neonatal mice to proliferate. However, BCDF mu and BCDF gamma induce IgM and IgG secretion in B cells, respectively, from both adult and neonatal mice. Thus, mature B cells can both clonally expand and differentiate in response to anti-Ig, BCGF, and BCDF, whereas immature B cells can only differentiate. The poor response of neonatal B cells to anti-Ig and BCGF may partially explain the relative immunoincompetence of immature B cells. PMID:6600488

  6. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Almeida, Julia; Nieto, Wendy G; Teodosio, Cristina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Arancha; Romero, Alfonso; López, Antonio; Fernandez-Navarro, Paulino; Vega, Tomas; Perez-Andres, Martin; Valent, Peter; Jäger, Ulrich; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.Little is known about the distribution of normal lymphoid cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood (PB) of subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). In our study, we compared the absolute number of PB lymphoid cells and their subpopulations in 95 MBL cases with normal lymphocyte counts vs. 617 age-/sex-matched non-MBL healthy subjects (controls), using highly sensitive flow cytometry. MBL cases showed significantly reduced numbers of normal circulating B-cells, at the expense of immature and naive B-cells; in addition, CD4+CD8+ double-positive T-cells and CD8+ T-cells were significantly lower and higher vs. controls, respectively. Moreover, most normal B-cell subsets were significantly decreased in PB at >1% MBL-counts, vs. "low-count" MBL cases, and lower amounts of immature/naive B-cells were detected in biclonal (particularly in cases with coexisting CLL-like- and non-CLL-like B-cell clones) vs. monoclonal MBL subjects. In summary, our results show imbalanced (reduced) absolute numbers of recently produced normal circulating B-cells (e.g., immature and naıve B-cells) in MBL, which becomes more pronounced as the MBL cell count increases.

  7. Splenic B cells and antigen-specific B cells process anti-Ig in a similar manner

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.D.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1989-06-01

    B lymphocytes can process and present antigen to T cells. However, the fate of native antigen after its binding to specific B cells, i.e., the intracellular events involved in the processing and recycling of the antigenic fragments to the cell surface for antigen presentation, are not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that murine B cells degrade anti-Ig molecules bound to their surface and release acid soluble fragments into the supernatant. We also demonstrate that the kinetics of this process are identical for anti-mu, anti-delta, and anti-light chain antibodies, indicating that both surface IgM and surface IgD are equally effective in binding antigen and directing its processing. We also describe the effects of azide, chloroquine, and irradiation on this process. To extend these studies to the processing of specifically bound antigen, we demonstrate that highly purified trinitrophenyl antigen-binding cells degrade anti-Ig molecules with the same kinetics as unpurified splenic B cells. Thus, this purified population provides a suitable model system for the analysis of antigen degradation by antigen-specific cells.

  8. Clonal B cells in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia exhibit functional features of chronic active B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, K V; Vogel, R; Ziegler, C; Altan-Bonnet, G; Velardi, E; Calafiore, M; Dogan, A; Arcila, M; Patel, M; Knapp, K; Mallek, C; Hunter, Z R; Treon, S P; van den Brink, M R M; Palomba, M L

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) characterized by immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and the medullary expansion of clonal lymphoplasmacytic cells. Neoplastic transformation has been partially attributed to hyperactive MYD88 signaling, secondary to the MYD88 L265P mutation, occurring in the majority of WM patients. Nevertheless, the presence of chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, a feature of multiple IgM+ B-NHL, remains a subject of speculation in WM. Here, we interrogated the BCR signaling capacity of primary WM cells by utilizing multiparametric phosphoflow cytometry and found heightened basal phosphorylation of BCR-related signaling proteins, and augmented phosphoresponses on surface IgM (sIgM) crosslinking, compared with normal B cells. In support of those findings we observed high sIgM expression and loss of phosphatase activity in WM cells, which could both lead to signaling potentiation in clonal cells. Finally, led by the high-signaling heterogeneity among WM samples, we generated patient-specific phosphosignatures, which subclassified patients into a ‘high' and a ‘healthy-like' signaling group, with the second corresponding to patients with a more indolent clinical phenotype. These findings support the presence of chronic active BCR signaling in WM while providing a link between differential BCR signaling utilization and distinct clinical WM subgroups. PMID:26867669

  9. Addition of an Indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase Inhibitor to B cell Depletion Therapy Blocks Autoreactive B Cell Activation and Recurrence of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, Elizabeth; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Objective Define the role indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) plays in driving pathogenic B cells responses leading to arthritis and determine if inhibitors of the IDO pathway can be used in conjunction with B cell depletion therapy to prevent the re-emergence of autoantibodies and arthritis following reconstitution of the B cell repertoire. Methods Immunoglobulin transgenic mice were treated with the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-tryptophan (1MT) and followed for the extent of autoreactive B cell activation. Arthritic mice (K/BxN) were treated with B cell depletion therapy alone or in combination with 1MT. Mice were followed for the presence of autoantibody secreting cells, inflammatory cytokines, and joint inflammation. Results 1MT did not affect the initial activation or survival of autoreactive B cells, but did inhibit their ability to differentiate into autoantibody secreting cells. Treatment with anti-CD20 depleted the B cell repertoire and attenuated arthritis symptoms; however, arthritis symptoms rapidly returned as B cells repopulated the repertoire. Administration of 1MT prior to B cell repopulation prevented the production of autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and flare in arthritis symptoms. Conclusion IDO activity is essential for the differentiation of autoreactive B cells into antibody secreting cells, but is not necessary for their initial stages of activation. Addition of 1MT to B cell depletion therapy prevents the differentiation of autoantibody secreting cells and recurrence of autoimmune arthritis following reconstitution of the B cell repertoire. These data suggest that IDO inhibitors could be used in conjunction with B cell depletion as an effective co-therapeutic strategy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22294267

  10. Optimization of a human IgG B-cell ELISpot assay for the analysis of vaccine-induced B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Maja; Kesa, Gun; Netterlid, Eva; Buisman, Anne-Marie; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2013-05-31

    B-cell responses after infection or vaccination are often measured as serum titers of antigen-specific antibodies. Since this does not address the aspect of memory B-cell activity, it may not give a complete picture of the B-cell response. Analysis of memory B cells by ELISpot is therefore an important complement to conventional serology. B-cell ELISpot was developed more than 25 years ago and many assay protocols/reagents would benefit from optimization. We therefore aimed at developing an optimized B-cell ELISpot for the analysis of vaccine-induced human IgG-secreting memory B cells. A protocol was developed based on new monoclonal antibodies to human IgG and biotin-avidin amplification to increase the sensitivity. After comparison of various compounds commonly used to in vitro-activate memory B cells for ELISpot analysis, the TLR agonist R848 plus interleukin (IL)-2 was selected as the most efficient activator combination. The new protocol was subsequently compared to an established protocol, previously used in vaccine studies, based on polyclonal antibodies without biotin avidin amplification and activation of memory B-cells using a mix of antigen, CpG, IL-2 and IL-10. The new protocol displayed significantly better detection sensitivity, shortened the incubation time needed for the activation of memory B cells and reduced the amount of antigen required for the assay. The functionality of the new protocol was confirmed by analyzing specific memory B cells to five different antigens, induced in a limited number of subjects vaccinated against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. The limited number of subjects did not allow for a direct comparison with other vaccine studies. Optimization of the B-cell ELISpot will facilitate an improved analysis of IgG-secreting B cells in vaccine studies.

  11. LRRK1 is critical in the regulation of B-cell responses and CARMA1-dependent NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Keiko; Baba, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Hisaaki; Kang, Sujin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Yoshida, Yuji; Maeda, Yohei; Sarashina-Kida, Hana; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiro; Hayama, Yoshitomo; Kinehara, Yuhei; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takamatsu, Hyota; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B-cell activation and humoral immunity. In this study, we discovered a critical function of leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1) in BCR-mediated immune responses. Lrrk1−/− mice exhibited altered B1a-cell development and basal immunoglobulin production. In addition, these mice failed to produce IgG3 antibody in response to T cell–independent type 2 antigen due to defects in IgG3 class-switch recombination. Concomitantly, B cells lacking LRRK1 exhibited a profound defect in proliferation and survival upon BCR stimulation, which correlated with impaired BCR-mediated NF-κB activation and reduced expression of NF-κB target genes including Bcl-xL, cyclin D2, and NFATc1/αA. Furthermore, LRRK1 physically interacted and potently synergized with CARMA1 to enhance NF-κB activation. Our results reveal a critical role of LRRK1 in NF-κB signaling in B cells and the humoral immune response. PMID:27166870

  12. Regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: from mouse models to clinical research.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and in clinical research using human samples.

  13. Unraveling Effector Functions of B Cells During Infection: The Hidden World Beyond Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Misra, Ravi S.; Wojciechowski, Wojciech; Lund, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies made by B cells are critically important for immune protection to a variety of infectious agents. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that B cells do more than make antibodies and that B cells can both enhance and suppress immune responses. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that B cells modulate cellular immune responses by antibody dependent and independent mechanisms. Although we have a good understanding of the roles played by antibody-secreting effector B cells during immune responses, we know very little about the Ab independent “effector” functions of B cells in either health or disease. Given the recent data suggesting that B cells may contribute to autoimmune disease pathogenesis via an antibody independent mechanism and the increasing use of B cell depletion therapy in autoimmune patients, investigators are beginning to reassess the multiple roles for B cells during immune responses. In this article, we review data describing how B cells mediate protection to pathogens independently of antibody production. In particular, we will focus on the role that B cells play in facilitating dendritic cell and T cell interactions in lymph nodes, the importance of antigen-presenting B cells in sustaining effector T cell and T follicular helper responses to pathogens and the relevance of cytokine-producing effector and regulatory B cells in immune responses. PMID:22394173

  14. CD47 limits antibody dependent phagocytosis against non-malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Sandra; Turman, Sean; Lekstrom, Kristen; Wilson, Susan; Herbst, Ronald; Wang, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of CD47 in protecting malignant B cells from antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Combined treatment of anti-CD47 and -CD20 antibodies synergistically augment elimination of tumor B cells in xenograft mouse models. This has led to the development of novel reagents that can potentially enhance killing of malignant B cells in patients. B cell depleting therapy is also a promising treatment for autoimmune patients. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether or not CD47 protects non-malignant B cells from ADCP. We show that CD47 is expressed on all B cells in mice, with the highest level on plasma cells in bone marrow and spleen. Although its expression is dispensable for B cell development in mice, CD47 on B cells limits antibody mediated phagocytosis. B cell depletion following in vivo anti-CD19 treatment is more efficient in CD47-/- mice than in wild type mice. In vitro, both naïve and activated B cells from CD47-/- mice are more sensitive to ADCP than wild type B cells. Lastly, we show in an ADCP assay that blocking CD47 can enhance anti-CD19 antibody mediated phagocytosis of wild type B cells. These results suggest that in addition to its already demonstrated benefit in cancer, targeting CD47 may be used as an adjunct in combination with B cell depletion antibodies for treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. CD22 is required for formation of memory B cell precursors within germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Craig P.; Draves, Kevin E.

    2017-01-01

    CD22 is a BCR co-receptor that regulates B cell signaling, proliferation and survival and is required for T cell-independent Ab responses. To investigate the role of CD22 during T cell-dependent (TD) Ab responses and memory B cell formation, we analyzed Ag-specific B cell responses generated by wild-type (WT) or CD22-/- B cells following immunization with a TD Ag. CD22-/- B cells mounted normal early Ab responses yet failed to generate either memory B cells or long-lived plasma cells, whereas WT B cells formed both populations. Surprisingly, B cell expansion and germinal center (GC) differentiation were comparable between WT and CD22-/- B cells. CD22-/- B cells, however, were significantly less capable of generating a population of CXCR4hiCD38hi GC B cells, which we propose represent memory B cell precursors within GCs. These results demonstrate a novel role for CD22 during TD humoral responses evident during primary GC formation and underscore that CD22 functions not only during B cell maturation but also during responses to both TD and T cell-independent antigens. PMID:28346517

  16. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4). Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA) resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  17. Nivolumab With or Without Varlilumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; ALK-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Atypical Burkitt/Burkitt-Like Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated With Chronic Inflammation; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Elderly; Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Mucocutaneous Ulcer; Germinal Center B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; High-Grade B-Cell Lymphoma With MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 Rearrangements; Human Herpesvirus-8-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC-Negative B-Cell Lymphoma With 11q Aberration Resembling Burkitt Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Leg Type; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Skin Ulcer; Small Intestinal B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  18. Lung B cells promote early pathogen dissemination and hasten death from inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, M; Delgado, C; Condon, T V; Riches, D W; Lenz, L L

    2012-07-01

    Sampling of mucosal antigens regulates immune responses but may also promote dissemination of mucosal pathogens. Lung dendritic cells (LDCs) capture antigens and traffic them to lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs) dependent on the chemokine receptor CCR7 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7). LDCs also capture lung pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis (BA). However, we show here that the initial traffic of BA spores from lungs to LDLNs is largely independent of LDCs and CCR7, occurring instead in association with B cells. BA spores rapidly bound B cells in lungs and cultured mouse and human B cells. Binding was independent of the B-cell receptor (BCR). B cells instilled in the lungs trafficked to LDLNs and BA spore traffic to LDLNs was impaired by B-cell deficiency. Depletion of B cells also delayed death of mice receiving a lethal BA infection. These results suggest that mucosal B cells traffic BA, and possibly other antigens, from lungs to LDLNs.

  19. Distinct functions for the transcription factor Foxo1 at various stages of B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Hart S; Baracho, Gisele V; Omori, Sidne A; Bruckner, Shane; Arden, Karen C; Castrillon, Diego H; DePinho, Ronald A; Rickert, Robert C

    2008-12-01

    The transcription factors Foxo1, Foxo3 and Foxo4 modulate cell fate 'decisions' in diverse systems. Here we show that Foxo1-dependent gene expression was critical at many stages of B cell differentiation. Early deletion of Foxo1 caused a substantial block at the pro-B cell stage due to a failure to express interleukin 7 receptor-alpha. Foxo1 inactivation in late pro-B cells resulted in an arrest at the pre-B cell stage due to lower expression of the recombination-activating genes Rag1 and Rag2. Deletion of Foxo1 in peripheral B cells led to fewer lymph node B cells due to lower expression of L-selectin and failed class-switch recombination due to impaired upregulation of the gene encoding activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Thus, Foxo1 regulates a transcriptional program that is essential for early B cell development and peripheral B cell function.

  20. Essential Role for Survivin in the Proliferative Expansion of Progenitor and Mature B Cells.

    PubMed

    Miletic, Ana V; Jellusova, Julia; Cato, Matthew H; Lee, Charlotte R; Baracho, Gisele V; Conway, Edward M; Rickert, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins and a biomarker of poor prognosis in aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In addition to its role in inhibition of apoptosis, survivin also regulates mitosis. In this article, we show that deletion of survivin during early B cell development results in a complete block at the cycling pre-B stage. In the periphery, B cell homeostasis is not affected, but survivin-deficient B cells are unable to mount humoral responses. Correspondingly, we show that survivin is required for cell division in response to mitogenic stimulation. Thus, survivin is essential for proliferation of B cell progenitors and activated mature B cells, but is dispensable for B cell survival. Moreover, a small-molecule inhibitor of survivin strongly impaired the growth of representative B lymphoma lines in vitro, supporting the validity of survivin as an attractive therapeutic target for high-grade B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  1. MicroRNAs, Major Players in B Cells Homeostasis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Danger, Richard; Braza, Faouzi; Giral, Magali; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    As a main actor in humoral immunity, B cells participate in various antibody-related disorders. However, a deeper understanding of B-cell differentiation and function is needed in order to decipher their immune-modulatory roles, notably with the recent highlighting of regulatory B cells. microRNAs (miRNAs), key factors in various biological and pathological processes, have been shown to be essential for B-cell homeostasis, and therefore understanding their participation in B-cell biology could help identify biomarkers and contribute toward curing B-cell-related immune disorders. This review aims to report studies casting light on the roles played by miRNAs in B-cell lineage and function and B-cell-related immune pathologies. PMID:24653724

  2. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-12-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naïve T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity.

  3. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  4. B cells modulate systemic responses to Pneumocystis murina lung infection and protect on-demand hematopoiesis via T cell-independent innate mechanisms when type I interferon signaling is absent.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Teri R; Dobrinen, Erin; Kochetkova, Irina; Meissner, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    HIV infection results in a complex immunodeficiency due to loss of CD4(+) T cells, impaired type I interferon (IFN) responses, and B cell dysfunctions causing susceptibility to opportunistic infections such as Pneumocystis murina pneumonia and unexplained comorbidities, including bone marrow dysfunctions. Type I IFNs and B cells critically contribute to immunity to Pneumocystis lung infection. We recently also identified B cells as supporters of on-demand hematopoiesis following Pneumocystis infection that would otherwise be hampered due to systemic immune effects initiated in the context of a defective type I IFN system. While studying the role of type I IFNs in immunity to Pneumocystis infection, we discovered that mice lacking both lymphocytes and type I IFN receptor (IFrag(-/-)) developed progressive bone marrow failure following infection, while lymphocyte-competent type I IFN receptor-deficient mice (IFNAR(-/-)) showed transient bone marrow depression and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Lymphocyte reconstitution of lymphocyte-deficient IFrag(-/-) mice pointed to B cells as a key player in bone marrow protection. Here we define how B cells protect on-demand hematopoiesis following Pneumocystis lung infection in our model. We demonstrate that adoptive transfer of B cells into IFrag(-/-) mice protects early hematopoietic progenitor activity during systemic responses to Pneumocystis infection, thus promoting replenishment of depleted bone marrow cells. This activity is independent of CD4(+) T cell help and B cell receptor specificity and does not require B cell migration to bone marrow. Furthermore, we show that B cells protect on-demand hematopoiesis in part by induction of interleukin-10 (IL-10)- and IL-27-mediated mechanisms. Thus, our data demonstrate an important immune modulatory role of B cells during Pneumocystis lung infection that complement the modulatory role of type I IFNs to prevent systemic complications.

  5. Primary non-hodgkin B cell lymphoma in a man.

    PubMed

    Alhabshi, Sh M I; Ismail, Z; Arasaratnam, Sh A

    2011-03-01

    Malignant breast lymphoma is a rare condition and primary breast lymphoma is extremely rare in the male population. We present a case of a 26-year-old man (transgender) who presented with a large palpable mass in the right breast. This mass was rapidly growing in size associated with right axillary lymphadenopathy. Ultrasound and MRI findings were consistent with BIRADS IV lesion which was suspicious of malignancy. Core biopsy was performed and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of primary non Hodgkin B cell lymphoma of the breast.

  6. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  7. [Effect of Ikaros in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ying; Bai, Hai

    2015-08-01

    The Ikaros - a DNA-binding zinc finger protein, acting as a regulator of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, is crucial for regulating the development and function of the immune system and acting as a master regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. Function-loss mutations of IKZF1, gene encoding Ikaros are frequent in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and are associated with a poor prognosis. This review briefly summarizes the available data regarding the structure and function of Ikaros, the role of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B-ALL, and its regulation mechanism.

  8. [Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with massive pulmonary lesions].

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Asumi; Hashino, Satoshi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Takahata, Mutsumi; Okada, Kohei; Kahata, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Natsuko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kanako; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2010-05-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea on effort. Neither computed tomography scan nor chest X-ray film detected any specific findings that could explain hypoxemia. Since (67)Ga scintigraphy showed abnormal uptake in the bilateral lungs, transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) was performed. The TBLB specimen was diagnosed as intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). There was no involvement of any other organ considered typical of IVLBCL. In cases showing clinical findings such as hypoxia despite mild pulmonary radiographic changes, a definitive diagnosis should be made using methods such as TBLB with consideration given to the possibility of IVLBCL.

  9. Anti-CDR3 Therapy for B-Cell Malignancies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Medical Material Ft Detrick, MD 21702-5012 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) USAMRAA 11...1-5 in the report). The "Tomlinson" human antibody phage library will be used to pan for antibodies that bind these target CDR3s and not the parent...Supporting Data……………………………………………………………………… 16 3 INTRODUCTION: In the US the incidence of newly diagnosed B-cell leukemias

  10. Subepithelial B cells in the human palatine tonsil. II. Functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Dono, M; Zupo, S; Augliera, A; Burgio, V L; Massara, R; Melagrana, A; Costa, M; Grossi, C E; Chiorazzi, N; Ferrarini, M

    1996-09-01

    This study investigates the main functional features of subepithelial (SE) B cells and compares them with those of purified germinal center (GC) and follicular mantle (FM) B cells isolated from the same tonsils. Unlike FM B cells, SE B cells failed to produce polyspecific antibodies in vitro; unlike GC B cells, SE B cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and failed to undergo spontaneous apoptosis in vitro. The most striking function of SE B cells was their ability to produce IgM antibodies to T cell-independent type-2 (TI-2) (but not to TI-1) antigens (Ag). These antibodies could not be detected when both FM and GC B cells were stimulated with TI-2 Ag in vitro. Moreover, B cells isolated from peripheral blood were unable to mount a response to TI-2 Ag. The latter finding is consistent with the observation that B cells with the phenotypic features of SE B cells were virtually absent in the peripheral blood and emphasizes the notion that SE B cells belong to a subset of non-recirculating B cells. SE B cells were by far superior to FM B cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) stimulation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, although they were not as efficient as dendritic cells (DC). In order to stimulate T cells efficiently, SE B cells had to be exposed to anti-mu antibody, a treatment which induced expression of activation markers such as CD80, CD86, CD69 and CD39, usually absent in resting SE B cells. CD80 and CD86 molecules expressed by SE B cells participated in the chain of events required to promote the proliferation of allogeneic T cells as demonstrated by inhibition tests with the appropriate mAb. The expression of CD80 and CD86 by anti-mu-treated SE B cells was not, however, the sole explanation for their good antigen presenting capacities since the exposure of FM B cells to anti-mu antibody also induced expression of these surface structures. Nevertheless, these cells failed to become good MLR stimulators. Collectively, the above data contribute further to the

  11. B-cell activation in cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) by FIP-virus-induced B-cell differentiation/survival factors.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Azuma, Natsuko; Hashida, Yoshikiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that antibody overproduction plays a role in the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). However, only a few studies on the B-cell activation mechanism after FIP virus (FIPV) infection have been reported. The present study shows that: (1) the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cells was higher in cats with FIP than in SPF cats, (2) the albumin-to-globulin ratio has negative correlation with the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cell, (3) cells strongly expressing mRNA of the plasma cell master gene, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1), were increased in peripheral blood in cats with FIP, (4) mRNA expression of B-cell differentiation/survival factors, IL-6, CD40 ligand, and B-cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), was enhanced in macrophages in cats with FIP, and (5) mRNAs of these B-cell differentiation/survival factors were overexpressed in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE)-induced macrophages. These data suggest that virus-infected macrophages overproduce B-cell differentiation/survival factors, and these factors act on B-cells and promote B-cell differentiation into plasma cells in FIPV-infected cats.

  12. Spontaneous follicular exclusion of SHP1-deficient B cells is conditional on the presence of competitor wild-type B cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K N; Hsu, C W; Griffin, C T; Goodnow, C C; Cyster, J G

    1998-03-16

    Engagement of antigen receptors on mature B lymphocytes is known to block cell entry into lymphoid follicles and promote accumulation in T cell zones, yet the molecular basis for this change in cell distribution is not understood. Previous studies have shown that follicular exclusion requires a threshold level of antigen receptor engagement combined with occupancy of follicles by B cells without equivalent receptor engagement. The possibility has been raised that follicular composition affects B cell positioning by altering the amount of available antigen and the degree of receptor occupancy. Here we show that follicular composition affects migration of mature B cells under conditions that are independent of antigen receptor occupancy. B cells deficient in the negative regulatory protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP1, which have elevated intracellular signaling by the B cell receptor, are shown to accumulate in the T zone in the absence of their specific antigen. Follicular exclusion of SHP1-deficient B cells was found to be conditional on the presence of excess B cells that lack elevated intracellular signaling, and was not due to a failure of SHP-1-deficient cells to mature and express the follicle-homing chemokine receptor Burkitt's lymphoma receptor 1. These findings strongly suggest that signals that are negatively regulated by SHP1 promote B cell localization in T cell zones by reducing competitiveness for follicular entry, and provide further evidence that follicular composition influences the positioning of antigen-engaged B cells.

  13. Isolation and characterization of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein specific B cell from immortalized human naïve B cell library.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zehua; Lu, Shiqiang; Yang, Zheng; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Meiyun

    2017-01-10

    With the recent development of single B cell cloning techniques, an increasing number of HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated since 2009. However, knowledge regarding HIV-1-specific B cells in vivo is limited. In this study, an HIV-1-specific B cell line has been established using healthy PBMC donors by the highly efficient EBV transformation method to generate immortalized human naïve B cell libraries. The enrichment of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells was observed after four rounds of cell panning with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. An HIV-1 envelope-specific stable B cell line (LCL-P4) was generated. Although this cell line acquired a lymphoblastic phenotype, no expression was observed for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme responsible for initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in B cells. This study describes a method that enables fast isolation of HIV-1-specific B cells, and this approach may extend to isolating other B cell-specific antigens for further experiments.

  14. Hepatitis C virus upregulates B-cell receptor signaling: a novel mechanism for HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dai, B; Chen, A Y; Corkum, C P; Peroutka, R J; Landon, A; Houng, S; Muniandy, P A; Zhang, Y; Lehrmann, E; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Steinhardt, J; Shlyak, M; Chen, Q C; Becker, K G; Livak, F; Michalak, T I; Talwani, R; Gartenhaus, R B

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development of B cells and has a critical role in B-cell neoplasia. Increasing evidence indicates an association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma, however, the mechanisms by which HCV causes B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder are still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate the expression of HCV viral proteins in B cells of HCV-infected patients and show that HCV upregulates BCR signaling in human primary B cells. HCV nonstructural protein NS3/4A interacts with CHK2 and downregulates its activity, modulating HuR posttranscriptional regulation of a network of target mRNAs associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Interestingly, the BCR signaling pathway was found to have the largest number of transcripts with increased association with HuR and was upregulated by NS3/4A. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role of NS3/4A in regulation of host BCR signaling during HCV infection, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26434584

  15. Requirement for three signals in B cell responses. II. Analysis of antigen- and Ia-restricted T helper cell-B cell interaction

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have recently reported that resting B cells must receive at least three different signals in a T helper cell (TH)-dependent as well as in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced B cell response (3), i.e., a specific TH signal (that can be bypassed by LPS), a nonspecific TH signal (mediated by Ia or antigen-nonspecific B cell helper factor), and an antigen (hapten) signal. In a system using male (H-Y) antigen- specific cloned TH of C57BL/6 origin and male (or female) B cells, we now confirm and extend these findings by demonstrating that H-Y- specific TH must see both H-Y and Ia determinants on the B cells (and not only on macrophages) to provide the first specific TH signal required for a plaque-forming cell (PFC) response. This signal was interfered with by a monoclonal anti-I-Ab antibody at the B cell level, was not mediated by detectable soluble factors (in contrast to the nonspecific signal also provided by the TH), and could be bypassed by LPS, in which case anti-I-Ab antibody had no effect. However, although the H-Y-specific TH induced a polyclonal PFC response (B cell differentiation) in the apparent absence of an antigen seen by the B cells, significant clonal expansion of PFC precursors occurred only when the B cells also recognized an antigen (hapten). PMID:6980255

  16. Regulatory B cells preferentially accumulate in tumor-draining lymph nodes and promote tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sheila N; Albershardt, Tina C; Iritani, Brian M; Ruddell, Alanna

    2015-07-20

    Our previous studies found that B16-F10 melanoma growth in the rear footpad of immunocompetent mice induces marked B cell accumulation within tumor-draining popliteal lymph nodes (TDLN). This B cell accumulation drives TDLN remodeling that precedes and promotes metastasis, indicating a tumor-promoting role for TDLN B cells. Here we show that phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in mice bearing B16-F10 melanomas identifies preferential accumulation of T2-MZP B cells in the TDLN. Comparison of non-draining LNs and spleens of tumor-bearing mice with LNs and spleens from naïve mice determined that this pattern of B cell accumulation was restricted to the TDLN. B cell-deficient and immunocompetent mice reconstituted with T2-MZP B cells but not with other B cell subsets displayed accelerated tumor growth, demonstrating that T2-MZP B cells possess regulatory activity in tumor-bearing mice. Unlike splenic regulatory B cells, however, these TDLN B cells did not exhibit increased IL-10 production, nor did they promote Treg generation in the TDLN. These findings demonstrate that tumors initially signal via the lymphatic drainage to stimulate the preferential accumulation of T2-MZP regulatory B cells. This local response may be an early and critical step in generating an immunosuppressive environment to permit tumor growth and metastasis.

  17. Germinal center B cells regulate their capability to present antigen by modulation of HLA-DO.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Kim S; Hake, Sandra B; Tobin, Helen M; Chadburn, Amy; Schattner, Elaine J; Denzin, Lisa K

    2002-04-15

    Peptide acquisition by MHC class II molecules is catalyzed by HLA-DM (DM). In B cells, HLA-DO (DO) inhibits or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. We show here that DO protein levels are modulated during B cell differentiation. Remarkably, germinal center (GC) B cells, which have low levels of DO relative to naive and memory B cells, are shown to have enhanced antigen presentation capabilities. DM protein levels also were somewhat reduced in GC B cells; however, the ratio of DM to DO in GC B cells was substantially increased, resulting in more free DM in GC B cells. We conclude that modulation of DM and DO in distinct stages of B cell differentiation represents a mechanism by which B cells regulate their capacity to function as antigen-presenting cells. Efficient antigen presentation in GC B cells would promote GC B cell-T cell interactions that are essential for B cells to survive positive selection in the GC.

  18. Downregulation of FOXP1 is required during germinal center B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Roa, Sergio; Bunting, Karen L.; Aznar, María Angela; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita; Fontán, Lorena; Fresquet, Vicente; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Robles, Eloy F.; De Smedt, Linde; Sagaert, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation and germinal center (GC) formation are dependent on the interplay between BCL6 and other transcriptional regulators. FOXP1 is a transcription factor that regulates early B-cell development, but whether it plays a role in mature B cells is unknown. Analysis of human tonsillar B-cell subpopulations revealed that FOXP1 shows the opposite expression pattern to BCL6, suggesting that FOXP1 regulates the transition from resting follicular B cell to activated GC B cell. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and gene expression assays on B cells indicated that FOXP1 acts as a transcriptional activator and repressor of genes involved in the GC reaction, half of which are also BCL6 targets. To study FOXP1 function in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing human FOXP1 in lymphoid cells. These mice exhibited irregular formation of splenic GCs, showing a modest increase in naïve and marginal-zone B cells and a significant decrease in GC B cells. Furthermore, aberrant expression of FOXP1 impaired transcription of noncoding γ1 germline transcripts and inhibited efficient class switching to the immunoglobulin G1 isotype. These studies show that FOXP1 is physiologically downregulated in GC B cells and that aberrant expression of FOXP1 impairs mechanisms triggered by B-cell activation, potentially contributing to B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:23580662

  19. B cells have distinct roles in host protection against different nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B cells may mediate protective responses against nematode parasites by supporting Th2 cell development and/or by producing antibodies. To examine this, B cell-deficient mice were inoculated with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) or Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp). B cell-deficient and wild type (WT...

  20. Decoupling activation and exhaustion of B cells in spontaneous controllers of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Tong, Neath; Mahan, Alison E.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Alter, Galit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define the impact of chronic viremia and associated immune activation on B-cell exhaustion in HIV infection. Design Progressive HIV infection is marked by B-cell anergy and exhaustion coupled with dramatic hypergammaglobulinemia. Although both upregulation of CD95 and loss of CD21 have been used as markers of infection-associated B-cell dysfunction, little is known regarding the specific profiles of dysfunctional B cells and whether persistent viral replication and its associated immune activation play a central role in driving B-cell dysfunction. Methods Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to define the profile of dysfunctional B cells. The changes in the expression of CD21 and CD95 were tracked on B-cell subpopulations in patients with differential control of viral replication. Results Although the emergence of exhausted, CD21low tissue-like memory B cells followed similar patterns in both progressors and controllers, the frequency of CD21low activated memory B cells was lower in spontaneous controllers. Conclusion Our results suggest that the loss of CD21 and the upregulation of CD95 occur as separate events during the development of B-cell dysfunction. The loss of CD21 is a marker of B-cell exhaustion induced in the absence of appreciable viral replication, whereas the upregulation of CD95 is tightly linked to persistent viral replication and its associated immune activation. Thus, these dysfunctional profiles potentially represent two functionally distinct states within the B-cell compartment. PMID:23135171

  1. Inhibition of demethylase KDM6B sensitizes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohit; Sehgal, Lalit; Havranek, Ondrej; Köhrer, Stefan; Khashab, Tamer; Jain, Neeraj; Burger, Jan A.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Davis, R. Eric; Samaniego, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Histone methylation and demethylation regulate B-cell development, and their deregulation correlates with tumor chemoresistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, limiting cure rates. Since histone methylation status correlates with disease aggressiveness and relapse, we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting histone 3 Lys27 demethylase KDM6B, in vitro, using the small molecule inhibitor GSK-J4. KDM6B is overexpressed in the germinal center B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and higher KDM6B levels are associated with worse survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP. GSK-J4-induced apoptosis was observed in five (SU-DHL-6, OCI-Ly1, Toledo, OCI-Ly8, SU-DHL-8) out of nine germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Treatment with GSK-J4 predominantly resulted in downregulation of B-cell receptor signaling and BCL6. Cell lines expressing high BCL6 levels or CREBBP/EP300 mutations were sensitive to GSK-J4. Our results suggest that B-cell receptor-dependent downregulation of BCL6 is responsible for GSK-J4-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GSK-J4-mediated inhibition of KDM6B sensitizes germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to chemotherapy agents that are currently utilized in treatment regimens for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27742770

  2. B cells as under-appreciated mediators of non-auto-immune inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Nikolajczyk, Barbara S

    2010-06-01

    B lymphocytes play roles in many auto-immune diseases characterized by unresolved inflammation, and B cell ablation is proving to be a relatively safe, effective treatment for such diseases. B cells function, in part, as important sources of regulatory cytokines in auto-immune disease, but B cell cytokines also play roles in other non-auto-immune inflammatory diseases. B cell ablation may therefore benefit inflammatory disease patients in addition to its demonstrated efficacy in auto-immune disease. Current ablation drugs clear both pro- and anti-inflammatory B cell subsets, which may unexpectedly exacerbate some pathologies. This possibility argues that a more thorough understanding of B cell function in human inflammatory disease is required to safely harness the clinical promise of B cell ablation. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and periodontal disease (PD) are two inflammatory diseases characterized by little autoimmunity. These diseases are linked by coincident presentation and alterations in toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent B cell cytokine production, which may identify B cell ablation as a new therapy for co-affected individuals. Further analysis of the role B cells and B cell cytokines play in T2D, PD and other inflammatory diseases is required to justify testing B cell depletion therapies on a broader range of patients.

  3. R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With First-Relapse/Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-03

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  4. JCAR014 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma

  5. Mercury Alters B-Cell Protein Phosphorylation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Nicholas J.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Shin, Namhee; Dombkowski, Alan; Caruso, Joseph A.; Gill, Randal; Rosenspire, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to mercury is suggested to contribute to human immune dysfunction. To shed light on the mechanism we identified changes in the phosphoproteomic profile of the WEHI-231 B cell line after intoxication with Hg2+. These changes were compared to changes in the phosphoproteome that were induced by pervanadate or okadaic acid exposure. Both 250 μM HgCl2 and pervanadate, a known phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, caused an increase in the number of proteins identified after TiO2 affinity selection and LC-MS/MS analysis. Pervanadate treatment had a larger effect than Hg2+ on the number of Scansite motifs which were tyrosine-phosphorylated, 17, and Ingenuity canonical signaling pathways activated, 4 with score > 5.0. However, Hg2+ had a more focused effect, primarily causing tyrosine-phosphorylation in SH2 domains in proteins that are in the B cell receptor signaling pathway. The finding that many of the changes induced by Hg2+ overlap with those of pervanadate, indicates that at high concentrations Hg2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:24224561

  6. Immunoglobulin variable region structure and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kiyoi, H; Naoe, T

    2001-01-01

    The enormous diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) gene sequences encoding the antibody repertoire are formed by the somatic recombination of relatively few genetic elements. In B-lineage malignancies, Ig gene rearrangements have been widely used for determining clonality and cell origin. The recent development of rapid cloning and sequencing techniques has resulted in a substantial accumulation of IgV region sequences at various stages of B-cell development and has revealed stage-specific trends in the use of V, diversity, joining genes, the degree of noncoding nucleotide addition, and the rate of somatic mutations. Furthermore, sequences from B-lineage malignant cells nearly reflect the characteristics of the normal counterpart at each respective stage of development. Alternatively, from the IgV region structure of the malignant cells, it is possible to speculate at which stage of B-cell development the cells were transformed. As the complete nucleotide sequences of the human Ig heavy and Ig light V region loci have now been determined, the study of Ig genetics has entered into the super-information era.

  7. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: beyond B-cells.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Stroopinsky, Dina; Katz, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), employed in treating CD20⁺ lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, appear to have broader functions than just eradicating malignant B-cells and decreasing autoantibody production. Rituximab-induced T-cell inactivation, reported both in-vitro and in-vivo, may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections, observed in patients receiving this therapy. T-cell polarization into a suppressive phenotype, often observed in patients receiving rituximab for autoimmune disorders, was reported to be associated with prolonged remissions. Elimination of B-cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, could play a significant role in induction of these changes. Direct binding of rituximab to a CD20dim T-cell population, inducing its depletion, may contribute to the decreased T-cell activation following rituximab therapy. Further investigation of the complex network through which rituximab and new anti-CD20 MoAbs act, would advance the employment of these agents in different clinical settings.

  8. Childhood B cell lymphomas arising in the mediastinum.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, T F; Lockwood, L; Stevens, R F; Morris-Jones, P H; Lewis, I; DaCosta, P E; Kelsey, A M

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To report the clinical features and pathology of four childhood cases of primary mediastinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of non-lymphoblastic pathology. METHODS--Biopsy material was fixed in formol-saline and routinely processed and stained. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin wax embedded sections using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS--The four patients presented with a large mediastinal mass and symptoms consistent with superior vena cava syndrome secondary to lymphoma. None of the patients had any clinically important disease outside the mediastinum. The four tumours had a histological appearance similar to diffuse large cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with sclerosis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that these tumours were of B cell origin. One patient died from infection during treatment and two patients died with progressive disease. The remaining patient remained well 43 months off all treatment. CONCLUSIONS--These four cases further illustrate the heterogeneity of paediatric large cell lymphomas. Clinically, they seem to be equivalent to the B cell lymphoma of the mediastinum, sclerosing type, that is seen in young (predominantly female) adults. The clinical and biological features of this type of tumour in childhood are largely unknown. Using standard treatment protocols, this tumour seems to have a poor prognosis and its optimal treatment therefore requires further clarification. Images PMID:8331171

  9. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  10. B cell repertoire expansion occurs in meningeal ectopic lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Wang, Sheng-zhi; Sagan, Sharon A.; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic lymphoid tissues (ELT) can be found in multiple sclerosis (MS) and other organ-specific inflammatory conditions. Whether ELT in the meninges of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease exhibit local germinal center (GC) activity remains unknown. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of CNS autoimmunity, we found activation-induced cytidine deaminase, a GC-defining enzyme, in meningeal ELT (mELT) densely populated by B and T cells. To determine GC activity in mELT, we excised meningeal lymphoid aggregates using laser capture microscopy and evaluated B cell repertoires in mELT and secondary lymphoid organs by next-generation immune repertoire sequencing. We found immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region sequences that were unique to mELT and had accumulated functionally relevant somatic mutations, together indicating localized antigen-driven affinity maturation. Our results suggest that B cells in mELT actively participate in CNS autoimmunity, which may be relevant to mELT in MS and ELT in other chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:27942581

  11. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  12. Change you can B(cell)eive in: recent progress confirms a critical role for B cells in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Shannon K.; Liu, Edwin; Cambier, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Here we review extant recent findings regarding the multiple roles of B cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and discuss how autoreactive B cells may become activated by a breach in B cell tolerance, and thereby initiate disease. Finally, we discuss the use of B cell-targeted therapies for treatment of autoimmunity. Recent findings Anti-CD20-specific depletion of B cells prevents and reverses diabetes in humanCD20/non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Correspondingly, in nontransgenic NOD mice B cells are effectively depleted with high dose antimouse CD20 mAbs of varying isotypes, and this also prevents diabetes in more than 60% of the mice when administered early, and significantly delays disease in 15-week-old animals. A separate study revealed that targeting B cells with anti-CD22/cal monoclonal antibody therapy delays diabetes onset in prediabetic NOD mice and restores normoglycemia in new-onset hyperglycemic NOD mice. In humans, a clinical trial of rituximab in new onset type 1 diabetics has yielded promising preliminary findings. Summary B cells are major players in T1D in humans, and clearly essential for disease development in the NOD mouse model of T1D. In this review, we discuss the silencing of autoreactive B cells and how failure of this process may contribute to autoimmunity. Further, we describe the most recent advances in studies of therapeutic effects of B cell depletion in T1D, and provide recent data indicating the diverse functions by which B cells may mediate disease. PMID:19502979

  13. Characterization of tumor-associated B-cell subsets in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gryschok, Luise; Malcher, Joke; Wennhold, Kerstin; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Herbold, Till; Neuhaus, Laura S.; Becker, Hans J.; Fiedler, Anne; Scherwitz, Pascal; Koslowsky, Thomas; Hake, Roland; Stippel, Dirk L.; Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Eidt, Sebastian; Hallek, Michael; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A precise understanding of the mechanisms by which human immune cell subsets affect tumor biology will be critical for successful treatment of cancer using immunotherapeutic approaches. Recent evidence suggests that B cells can both promote and inhibit the development and progression of tumors. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of the B-cell infiltrates in colorectal cancers (CRC) in order to gain further insight into the role of B cells in CRC. Experimental Design: In this study we characterized B-cell subsets in primary tumors (n=38), metastases (n=6) and blood (n=46) of 51 patients with a diagnosis of CRC and blood of 10 healthy controls. B-cell subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry. Results: Peripheral blood of CRC patients contained a higher percentage of memory B cells than that of age-matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the percentage of B cells within tumors was higher than that in the peripheral blood of CRC patients while metastases were typically devoid of tumor-infiltrating B cells. Tumor-associated B cells were enriched for activated and terminally differentiated B cells. Relevant proportions of regulatory B cells could only be detected in advanced cancer and metastases. Conclusion: B cells constitute a significant proportion of the immune infiltrate in CRC. The B-cell infiltrate of primary CRC is characterized by an accumulation of terminally differentiated memory B cells or plasma cells suggestive of a specific immune response against the tumor. However advanced tumors and metastases are also infiltrated by a considerable number of regulatory B cells. PMID:25026291

  14. A Role for TLR Signaling During B Cell Activation in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART+). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART+ and HIV− subjects. However, B cells of HIVART+ subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART+ individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV− subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV− subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART+ individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV− subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART+ subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART+ subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  15. Human innate B cells: a link between host defense and autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Milner, Eric C B; Anolik, Jennifer; Cappione, Amedeo; Sanz, Iñaki

    2005-03-01

    B cells play a variety of immunoregulatory roles through their antigen-presentation ability and through cytokine and chemokine production. Innate immune activation of B cells may play a beneficial role through the generation of natural cross-reactive antibodies, by maintaining B cell memory and by exercising immunomodulatory functions that may provide protection against autoimmunity. In this article, we review human B cell populations and their functional properties, with a particular focus on a population of inherently autoreactive B cells, which seem to play an important physiological role in innate immunity, but which, if selected into adaptive immune responses, appear to become pathogenic agents in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Role of B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mandik-Nayak, Laura; Ridge, Natalie; Fields, Michele; Park, Audrey Y; Erikson, Jan

    2008-12-01

    B cell tolerance to many self-proteins is actively maintained by either purging self-reactive B receptors through clonal deletion and receptor editing, or by functional silencing known as anergy. However, these processes are clearly incomplete as B cell driven autoimmune diseases still occur. The significance of B cells in two such diseases, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, is highlighted by the ameliorative effects of B cell depletion. It remains to be determined, however, whether the key role of the B cell in autoimmune disease is autoantibody production or another antibody-independent function.

  17. Identification of a unique B-cell-stimulating factor produced by a cloned dendritic cell.

    PubMed Central

    Clayberger, C; DeKruyff, R H; Fay, R; Cantor, H

    1985-01-01

    We describe a cloned dendritic cell, clone Den-1, which is a potent accessory cell for some B-cell responses. Clone Den-1 produces a unique lymphokine that induces polyclonal B-cell proliferation in the absence of other costimulators. This clone or factors produced by it also stimulate purified B cells to develop plaque-forming cell responses to type 2 antigens. The effect of this factor(s) on various B-cell populations and its relationship to previously described B-cell-stimulating factors is discussed. Images PMID:3871522

  18. Essential role of MALT1 protease activity in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu; Posvitz-Fejfar, Anita; Rebeaud, Fabien; Guzzardi, Montserrat; Penas, Eva-Maria Murga; Dierlamm, Judith; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M; Thome, Margot

    2009-11-24

    A key element for the development of suitable anti-cancer drugs is the identification of cancer-specific enzymatic activities that can be therapeutically targeted. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue transformation protein 1 (MALT1) is a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, the least curable subtype of DLBCL. Recent data suggest that MALT1 has proteolytic activity, but it is unknown whether this activity is relevant for tumor growth. Here we report that MALT1 is constitutively active in DLBCL lines of the ABC but not the GCB subtype. Inhibition of the MALT1 proteolytic activity led to reduced expression of growth factors and apoptosis inhibitors, and specifically affected the growth and survival of ABC DLBCL lines. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in DLBCL of the ABC subtype, and provide a rationale for the development of pharmacological inhibitors of MALT1 in DLBCL therapy.

  19. The regulatory network of B-cell differentiation: a focused view of early B-cell factor 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Boller, Sören; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies have investigated the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of lineage decision in the hematopoietic system. These efforts led to a model in which extrinsic signals and intrinsic cues establish a permissive chromatin context upon which a regulatory network of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers act to guide the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. These networks include lineage-specific factors that further modify the epigenetic landscape and promote the generation of specific cell types. The process of B lymphopoiesis requires a set of transcription factors, including Ikaros, PU.1, E2A, and FoxO1 to ‘prime’ cis-regulatory regions for subsequent activation by the B-lineage-specific transcription factors EBF1 and Pax-5. The expression of EBF1 is initiated by the combined action of E2A and FoxO1, and it is further enhanced and maintained by several positive feedback loops that include Pax-5 and IL-7 signaling. EBF1 acts in concert with Ikaros, PU.1, Runx1, E2A, FoxO1, and Pax-5 to establish the B cell-specific transcription profile. EBF1 and Pax-5 also collaborate to repress alternative cell fates and lock cells into the B-lineage fate. In addition to the functions of EBF1 in establishing and maintaining B-cell identity, EBF1 is required to coordinate differentiation with cell proliferation and survival. PMID:25123279

  20. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL.

  1. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Difficult Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria S; McCubbin, Mark; Nand, Sucha

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT) 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH, and about 65% are

  2. The role of BLyS/BLyS receptors in anti-chromatin B cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; Alexander, Shawn T; Quinn, William J; Pagán, Antonio J; Metzgar, Michele H; Cancro, Michael P; Erikson, Jan

    2007-04-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), also known as B cell-activating factor, is a key positive regulator of B cell homeostasis, and elevated levels of BLyS have been observed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Given that anti-chromatin auto-antibodies are one of the hallmarks of SLE, we examined the role of BLyS and its receptors in the regulation of anti-chromatin B cells. We demonstrate that exogenous BLyS treatment leads to an increase in B cell numbers, particularly anti-chromatin B cells; yet, their localization in the spleen and auto-antibody production remain unaffected. We also examined transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI), BLyS receptor 3 (BR3) and B cell maturation antigen expression on anti-chromatin B cells before and after receiving T cell help. Interestingly, in the absence of T cell help, TACI expression is greater on immature anti-chromatin B cells compared with immature Tg(-) B cells, whereas BR3 levels are comparable. After receiving T cell help, the anti-chromatin B cells that have differentiated into short-lived plasma cells no longer express BR3 but retain TACI. These data suggest a novel role for TACI in anti-chromatin B cell homeostasis and differentiation.

  3. Regulation and Maintenance of an Adoptive T-Cell Dependent Memory B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Marie; Amado, Inês; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Garcia, Sylvie; Huetz, François; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monoclonal B cells to restore primary and secondary T-cell dependent antibody responses in adoptive immune-deficient hosts. Priming induced B cell activation and expansion, AID expression, antibody production and the generation of IgM+IgG- and IgM-IgG+ antigen-experienced B-cell subsets that persisted in the lymphopenic environment by cell division. Upon secondary transfer and recall the IgM-IgG+ cells responded by the production of antigen-specific IgG while the IgM+ memory cells secreted mainly IgM and little IgG, but generated new B cells expressing germinal center markers. The recall responses were more efficient if the antigenic boost was delayed suggesting that a period of adaptation is necessary before the transferred cells are able to respond. Overall these findings indicate that reconstitution of a functional and complete memory pool requires transfer of all different antigen-experienced B cell subsets. We also found that the size of the memory B cell pool did not rely on the number of the responding naïve B cells, suggesting autonomous homeostatic controls for naïve and memory B cells. By reconstituting a stable memory B cell pool in immune-deficient hosts using a monoclonal high-affinity B cell population we demonstrate the potential value of B cell adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27880797

  4. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  5. Mechanisms of Regulatory B cell Function in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases beyond IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Avijit; Dittel, Bonnie N.

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades it has become clear that in addition to antigen presentation and antibody production B cells play prominent roles in immune regulation. While B cell-derived IL-10 has garnered much attention, B cells also effectively regulate inflammation by a variety of IL-10-independent mechanisms. B cell regulation has been studied in both autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. While collectively called regulatory B cells (Breg), no definitive phenotype has emerged for B cells with regulatory potential. This has made their study challenging and thus unique B cell regulatory mechanisms have emerged in a disease-dependent manner. Thus to harness the therapeutic potential of Breg, further studies are needed to understand how they emerge and are induced to evoke their regulatory activities. PMID:28124981

  6. The Multifaceted Roles of B Cells in Solid Tumors: Emerging Treatment Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Nicole J; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Arnold, Kimberly M; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    The influence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on tumor growth and response to therapy is becoming increasingly apparent. While much work has focused on the role of T cell responses in anti-tumor immunity, the role of B cells in solid tumors is much less understood. Tumor infiltrating B cells have been found in a variety of solid tumors, including breast, ovarian, prostate, melanoma, and colorectal cancer. The function of B cells in solid tumors is controversial, with many studies reporting a pro-tumor effect, while other studies demonstrate a role for B cells in the anti-tumor immune response. In this review, we discuss the prognostic ability of B cells in solid tumors as well as the mechanisms by which B cells can either promote or suppress anti-tumor immunity. Additionally, we review current therapeutic strategies that may target both pro- and anti-tumor B cells.

  7. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  8. Viral Double-Stranded RNA Triggers Ig Class Switching by Activating Upper Respiratory Mucosa B Cells through an Innate TLR3 Pathway Involving BAFF1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A.; Matthews, Allysia J.; Chiu, April; Plebani, Alessandro; He, Bing; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) from IgM to IgG and IgA is crucial for antiviral immunity. Follicular B cells undergo CSR upon engagement of CD40 by CD40 ligand on CD4+ T cells. This T cell-dependent pathway requires 5–7 days, which is too much of a delay to block quickly replicating pathogens. To compensate for this limitation, extrafollicular B cells rapidly undergo CSR through a T cell-independent pathway that involves innate Ag receptors of the TLR family. We found that a subset of upper respiratory mucosa B cells expressed TLR3 and responded to viral dsRNA, a cognate TLR3 ligand. In the presence of dsRNA, mucosal B cells activated NF-κB, a transcription factor critical for CSR. Activation of NF-κB required TRIF (Toll/IL-1R domain-containing protein inducing IFN-β), a canonical TLR3 adapter protein, and caused germline transcription of downstream CH genes as well as expression of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), a DNA-editing enzyme essential for CSR. Subsequent IgG and IgA production was enhanced by BAFF (B cell-activating factor of the TNF family), an innate mediator released by TLR3-expressing mucosal dendritic cells. Indeed, these innate immune cells triggered IgG and IgA responses upon exposure to dsRNA. By showing active TLR3 signaling and ongoing CSR in upper respiratory mucosa B cells from patients with CD40 signaling defects, our findings indicate that viral dsRNA may initiate frontline IgG and IgA responses through an innate TLR3-dependent pathway involving BAFF. PMID:18566393

  9. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  10. [Posterior uveitis caused by highly malignant B cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Held, R; Eckardt, C; Brix, F; Feller, A C

    1989-01-01

    A diagnostic vitrectomy was performed on three patients with posterior uveitis of unknown origin and whose vitrous body was markedly affected. In all cases, cells of high-grade B-cell lymphoma (earlier referred to as reticulum cell sarcoma) were identified by cytological analysis of the specimen. In addition to the ocular findings, one of the three patients showed clinical and radiological evidence of a tumorous mass in the area of the right thalamus at the time of diagnosis. This was interpreted as a cerebral manifestation of the lymphoma. Initially, the other two patients did not show any cerebral involvement. One of them, however, developed clinical symptoms 9 months after diagnosis, which were radiologically verified as tumor infiltration of the cerebellum and the diencephalon. Under radiation therapy, the ocular findings disappeared within a few weeks.

  11. Antiviral B cell and T cell immunity in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Christopher; Openshaw, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of repeated common colds, bronchitis and pneumonia, which often occur unpredictably as epidemics and pandemics. Despite those decimating effects on health and decades of intensive research, treatments remain largely supportive. The only commonly available vaccines are against influenza virus, and even these need improvement. The lung shares some features with other mucosal sites, but preservation of its especially delicate anatomical structures necessitates a fine balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses; well-timed, appropriately placed and tightly regulated T cell and B cell responses are essential for protection from infection and limitation of symptoms, whereas poorly regulated inflammation contributes to tissue damage and disease. Recent advances in understanding adaptive immunity should facilitate vaccine development and reduce the global effect of respiratory viruses.

  12. B-Cell Lymphoma of the Mandible: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Adouani, Ali; Bouguila, Jed; Jeblaoui, Yassine; Ben Aicha, Mehdi; Abdelali, Mouhamed Ali; Hellali, Mouna; Zitouni, Karima; Amani, Landolsi; Issam, Zairi

    2008-01-01

    Summary Introduction The mandible is an infrequent localisation of primary osseous non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. Few cases of mandibular non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) have been reported. Case report A rare condition of primary malignant non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the mandible in 53-year-old man, was reported at the Department of Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery in Charles Nicolle Hospital (Tunis, Tunisia). Histologic and Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination Confirmed a B-Cell lymphoma. Discussion The purpose of this report is to describe this rare case of NHL of the mandible, explore the diagnosis and workup, and discuss treatment strategies. In this localisation, neither the clinical features nor the radiologic appearances are often pathognomonic. Conclusion Particular care must be taken to consider lymphoma in the differential diagnosis because this uncommon lesion can pose significant diagnostic problems and is frequently misdiagnosed. PMID:21892315

  13. B-cell receptor pathway modulators in NHL

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kristie A.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent success of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, idelalisib, in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a number of new agents targeting the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway are in clinical development. In addition, multiple trials combining these agents with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory agents, monoclonal antibodies, or other kinase inhibitors are underway. This review will summarize the current data with the use of single agent and combination therapy with BCR inhibitors in NHL. In addition, commonly encountered as well as serious toxicities and hypothesized resistance mechanisms will be discussed. Lastly, this review will examine the future of these agents and opportunities to maneuver them into the front-line setting in selected NHL subtypes. PMID:26637705

  14. Naturally occurring B-cell autoreactivity: a critical overview.

    PubMed

    Avrameas, Stratis; Ternynck, Therese; Tsonis, Ioannis A; Lymberi, Peggy

    2007-12-01

    In over one century of research in immunology marked progress in the scientific knowledge and the implications derived from it has been made. At the same time several contradictory and seemingly opposing results have been obtained. The term autoimmunity is still conceived by many as a term directly related to an immunopathological state. However, strong evidence exist that not only the immune system is able to recognize self-constituents, but it appears also that this property is essential for homeostasis. Direct or indirect alterations of such self-recognition properties of the immune system may contribute to pathology. In this review, the most recent advances in the field of naturally occurring B-cell autoreactivity in health as well as in disease are presented and discussed.

  15. Lenalidomide in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Catherine; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults. Even if the natural history of DLBCL has been improved with the advent of immunochemotherapy, the survival results obtained with current treatment options clearly indicate that new agents or novel approaches are needed. Lenalidomide (Revlimid, Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, USA), an analogue of thalidomide, is an immunomodulatory drug with pleiotropic mechanisms of action potentially adding to immunochemotherapy. We present here the biological rational for the use of lenalidomide in DLBCL in light of recent advances in the pathophysiology of the disease and the therapeutic results of the most recent trials published in literature or reported in meetings in relapsed/refractory situations as well as in first-line treatment.

  16. [Presence of B cell clones in acute myelomonocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Novoa, Viviana; Nuñez, Neri; Cervellini, Mirta; Starosta, Aida; Carballo, Orlando G

    2010-01-01

    The coexistence of acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the same patient is rare. The majority of the cases correspond to patients that developed acute leukemia during the evolutionary course of a chronic lymphatic leukemia following treatment with chemotherapy drugs. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia concurrent with untreated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in which the use of flow cytometry analysis with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies, allowed the demonstration of different pathological populations and determine immunophenotyping patterns. Published cases of simultaneous chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute leukemia are reviewed. The use of multiparametric flow cytometry to differentiate the populations demonstrates the utility of this technology in the diagnosis of these hematological malignancies.

  17. A primitive cell origin for B-cell precursor ALL?

    PubMed

    Cox, C V; Blair, A

    2005-01-01

    A stem cell origin has been described for both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias. In contrast, childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is thought to arise in committed B-lineage cells. Recently described in vitro and in vivo model systems that support the proliferation and expansion of ALL cells have provided new tools to investigate the cellular targets for the origin of this malignancy. Evidence suggests that some subtypes of childhood ALL have a primitive cell origin and share many immunophenotypic characteristics with normal progenitor cells. These leukemic stem cells may be resistant to current therapeutic strategies designed to kill the bulk ALL cell population and subsequent relapses may arise from this population. More precise definition of these ALL stem cells through combined analyses of antigen expression, genetic lesions, and functionality is essential for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  18. Asian-variant intravascular large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Whitney; Costales, Cristina; Siddiqi, Imran; Mohrbacher, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare and deadly malignancy involving the growth of lymphoma cells within vessel lumina of all organ types. IVLBCL is further divided into the hemophagocytic Asian variant and a classical Western variant. Both variants are difficult to diagnose by imaging, and although diagnostic criteria have been developed to guide workup, histopathological examination remains imperative. Treatment of IVLBCL remains difficult given the high mortality of the disease, but rituximab has emerged as a promising therapeutic option when combined with various cytotoxic regimens. The two main variants of IVLBCL generally manifest in their respective Asian or Western populations, and crossover between ethnicities is rare. We present the second described case of Asian-variant IVLBCL in an African American individual.

  19. TP53 dysfunction in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting-Xun; Young, Ken H; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aberrations of TP53 gene and dysregulation of the TP53 pathway are important in the pathogenesis of many human cancers, including malignant lymphomas, especially for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). By regulating many downstream target genes or molecules, TP53 governs major defenses against tumor growth and promotes cellular DNA repair, apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle arrest, signaling, transcription, immune or inflammatory responses and metabolism. Dysfunction of TP53, including microRNA regulations, copy number alterations of TP53 pathway and TP53 itself, dysregulation of TP53 regulators, and somatic mutations by abnormal TP53 function modes, play an important role in lymphoma generation, progression and invasion. The role of TP53 in DLBCL has been widely explored recently. In this review, we summarized recent advances on different mechanisms of TP53 in DLBCL and new therapeutic approaches to overcome TP53 inactivation.

  20. Signals from activation of B-cell receptor with anti-IgD can override the stimulatory effects of excess BAFF on mature B cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tue G; Morris, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    The selection and maturation of B-cell clones are critically determined by tonic signals from activated B cell receptors (BCR) and survival signals from BAFF cytokine. These finely tuned and coordinated signals provide a net positive signal that can promote the selection, maturation, proliferation and differentiation of a developing B cell. Stimulation with an anti-IgD antibody can also activate BCR but can lead to depletion and an arrest of mature B-cell development in vivo. It is not known whether survival signals from excess BAFF can override the suppressive effects of treatment with anti-IgD on mature B cells in vivo. Herein, we examined the effects of co-treatment of BAFF and anti-IgD on the mature B-cell compartment and antibody production in vivo by treating mice with either 1mg/kg BAFF or anti-IgD alone or in combination for 3 consecutive days. We found that co-treatment with anti-IgD significantly abrogated these stimulatory effects of BAFF treatment on splenic CD19+ B cells as well as mature CD19+IgD(hi)IgM+ B cells in vivo. Anti-IgD down-regulated the expression of the BCR complex (mIgM, mIgD and CD19) and the BAFF receptor TACI without regard to the presence of BAFF. Anti-IgD treatment also significantly negated BAFF-induced IgM production in vivo. Both BAFF and anti-IgD could individually stimulate IL-10 synthesis in B cells but did not affect one another. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of BCR with an anti-IgD antibody can override the stimulatory effects from excess BAFF on B cell proliferation and antibody production by down-regulating the expression of BCR complex and BAFF receptors.

  1. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a diffuse large B cell lymphoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Savsek, Lina; Opaskar, Tanja Ros

    2016-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoal infection that has, until now, probably been an underestimated cause of encephalitis in patients with hematological malignancies, independent of stem cell or bone marrow transplant. T and B cell depleting regimens are probably an important risk factor for reactivation of a latent toxoplasma infection in these patients. Case report We describe a 62-year-old HIV-negative right-handed Caucasian female with systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma who presented with sudden onset of high fever, headache, altered mental status, ataxia and findings of pancytopenia, a few days after receiving her final, 8th cycle of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy regimen. A progression of lymphoma to the central nervous system was suspected. MRI of the head revealed multiple on T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintense parenchymal lesions with mild surrounding edema, located in both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres that demonstrated moderate gadolinium enhancement. The polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF PCR) was positive for Toxoplasma gondii. The patient was diagnosed with toxoplasmic encephalitis and successfully treated with sulfadiazine, pyrimethamine and folic acid. Due to the need for maintenance therapy with rituximab for lymphoma remission, the patient now continues with secondary prophylaxis of toxoplasmosis. Conclusions With this case report, we wish to emphasize the need to consider cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with hematological malignancies on immunosuppressive therapy when presenting with new neurologic deficits. In such patients, there are numerous differential diagnoses for cerebral toxoplasmosis, and the CNS lymphoma is the most difficult among all to distinguish it from. If left untreated, cerebral toxoplasmosis has a high mortality rate; therefore early recognition and treatment are of essential importance. PMID

  2. Specific and nonspecific B-cell function in the small intestines of patients with Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Geelhaar, Anika; Moos, Verena; Schinnerling, Katina; Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Fenollar, Florence; LaScola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Schneider, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Whipple's disease is a chronic multisystemic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei that is characterized by arthritis, weight loss, and diarrhea. The immunological defects in the duodenal mucosa, the site of major replication of the agent underlying the pathogenesis of Whipple's disease, are poorly understood. Mucosal immunoglobulins are essential for the defense against intestinal pathogens; therefore, we analyzed the B-cell response in duodenal specimens and sera of Whipple's disease patients. Whereas systemic immunoglobulin production was affected only marginally, duodenal biopsy specimens of Whipple's disease patients contained reduced numbers of immunoglobulin-positive plasma cells and secreted less immunoglobulin compared to healthy controls but showed a weak secretory IgA response toward T. whipplei. This T. whipplei-specific intestinal immune response was not observed in controls. Thus, we were able to demonstrate that general mucosal immunoglobulin production in Whipple's disease patients is impaired. However, this deficiency does not completely abolish T. whipplei-specific secretory IgA production that nonetheless does not protect from chronic infection.

  3. A two-scale model for correlation between B cell VDJ usage in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology. The dynamics of the adaptive immune system in zebrafish is similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a two-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in primary and secondary immune reactions in zebrafish and to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in distinct zebrafish. The first scale of the model consists of a generalized NK model to simulate the B cell maturation process in the 10-day primary immune response. The second scale uses a delay ordinary differential equation system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of zebrafish. The generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen mostly possess a single VDJ recombination. The probability that mature B cells in two zebrafish have the same VDJ recombination increases with the B cell population size or the B cell selection intensity and decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The ODE model shows a distribution of correlation in the VDJ usage of the B cell repertoires in two six-month-old zebrafish that is highly similar to that from experiment. This work presents a simple theory to explain the experimentally observed correlation in VDJ usage of distinct zebrafish B cell repertoires after an immune response.

  4. Regulatory B cells contribute to the impaired antitumor immunity in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Jin, Yangqiu; Tian, Yinpu; Zhang, Huiyuan; Wu, Jie; Lu, Wei; Lu, Xiaofen

    2016-05-01

    Multiple factors in the tumor microenvironment were found to inhibit antitumor adaptive immune responses, allowing tumor persistence and growth. In this study, ascites from ovarian cancer patients were collected. We observed that a population of interleukin-10(+) B (IL-10(+) B) cells was preferentially enriched in the ascites. This population was associated with naive B cell phenotype or IgM or class-switched memory B cell phenotypes. The frequencies of IL-10(+) B cells were negatively correlated with the frequencies of interferon gamma-producing (IFN-g(+)) CD8(+) T cells and were positively correlated with the frequencies of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells. To examine whether increased IL-10(+) B cells in ascites could directly result in increased suppression of IFN-g production by CD8(+) T cells, we cocultured CD8(+) T cells with autologous blood B cells or ascitic B cells and found that CD8(+) T cells cocultured with ascitic B cells demonstrated significantly suppressed IFN-g production. This suppression was in part mediated by IL-10 as well as low CD80/CD86 expression, since depletion of IL-10 and stimulation of CD28 partially reverted IL-10(+) B cell-mediated suppression. Together, these data demonstrated an additional regulatory mechanism in the tumor microenvironment, which utilizes IL-10(+) B cells.

  5. IL-4Rα-Associated Antigen Processing by B Cells Promotes Immunity in Nippostrongylus brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hoving, Jennifer C.; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; McSorley, Henry J.; Ndlovu, Hlumani; Bobat, Saeeda; Kimberg, Matti; Kirstein, Frank; Cutler, Anthony J.; DeWals, Benjamin; Cunningham, Adam F.; Brombacher, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In this study, B cell function in protective TH2 immunity against N. brasiliensis infection was investigated. Protection against secondary infection depended on IL-4Rα and IL-13; but not IL-4. Protection did not associate with parasite specific antibody responses. Re-infection of B cell-specific IL-4Rα−/− mice resulted in increased worm burdens compared to control mice, despite their equivalent capacity to control primary infection. Impaired protection correlated with reduced lymphocyte IL-13 production and B cell MHC class II and CD86 surface expression. Adoptive transfer of in vivo N. brasiliensis primed IL-4Rα expressing B cells into naïve BALB/c mice, but not IL-4Rα or IL-13 deficient B cells, conferred protection against primary N. brasiliensis infection. This protection required MHC class II compatibility on B cells suggesting cognate interactions by B cells with CD4+ T cells were important to co-ordinate immunity. Furthermore, the rapid nature of these protective effects by B cells suggested non-BCR mediated mechanisms, such as via Toll Like Receptors, was involved, and this was supported by transfer experiments using antigen pulsed Myd88−/− B cells. These data suggest TLR dependent antigen processing by IL-4Rα-responsive B cells producing IL-13 contribute significantly to CD4+ T cell-mediated protective immunity against N. brasiliensis infection. PMID:24204255

  6. IL-6 contributes to an immune tolerance checkpoint in post germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Wang, Ying-Hua; Diamond, Betty

    2012-02-01

    The generation of a B cell repertoire involves producing and subsequently purging autoreactive B cells. Receptor editing, clonal deletion and anergy are key mechanisms of central B cell tolerance. Somatic mutation of antigen-activated B cells within the germinal center produces a second wave of autoreactivity; but the regulatory mechanisms that operate at this phase of B cell activation are poorly understood. We recently identified a post germinal center tolerance checkpoint, where receptor editing is re-induced to extinguish autoreactivity that is generated by somatic hypermutation. Re-induction of the recombinase genes RAG1 and RAG2 in antigen-activated B cells requires antigen to engage the B cell receptor and IL-7 to signal through the IL-7 receptor. We demonstrate that this process requires IL-6 to upregulate IL-7 receptor expression on post germinal center B cells. Diminishing IL-6 by blocking antibody or haplo-insufficiency leads to reduced expression of the IL-7 receptor and RAG and increased titers of anti-DNA antibodies following immunization with a peptide mimetope of DNA. The dependence on IL-6 to initiate receptor editing is B cell intrinsic. Interestingly, estradiol decreases IL-6 expression thereby increasing the anti-DNA response. Our data reveal a novel regulatory cascade to control post germinal center B cell autoreactivity.

  7. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  8. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R; Archambault, Angela S; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T; Mikesell, Robert J; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H; Wu, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, in part as a result of the success of B cell-depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the CNS have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis. Although B cell Ag presentation was suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support Ag-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHC class II, we reported previously that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole APC. In this study, we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not the addition of soluble MOG-specific Ab, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of Ag-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuroinflammation at later stages of disease.

  9. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients.

  10. The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Willem J.; Kleynhans, Léanie; du Plessis, Nelita; Stanley, Kim; Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Maasdorp, Elizna; Ronacher, Katharina; Chegou, Novel N.; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, Andre G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting. PMID:27050308

  11. B cells populating the multiple sclerosis brain mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Joel N. H.; Yaari, Gur; Vander Heiden, Jason A.; Church, George; Donahue, William F.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Huttner, Anita J.; Laman, Jon D.; Nagra, Rashed M.; Nylander, Alyssa; Pitt, David; Ramanan, Sriram; Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Vigneault, Francois; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Hafler, David A.; O’Connor, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by autoimmune mediated demyelination and neurodegeneration. The CNS of patients with MS harbors expanded clones of antigen-experienced B cells that reside in distinct compartments including the meninges, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and parenchyma. It is not understood whether this immune infiltrate initiates its development in the CNS or in peripheral tissues. B cells in the CSF can exchange with those in peripheral blood, implying that CNS B cells may have access to lymphoid tissue that may be the specific compartment(s) in which CNS resident B cells encounter antigen and experience affinity maturation. In this study, paired tissues were used to determine whether the B cells that populate the CNS mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes (CLNs). High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire demonstrated that clonally expanded B cells were present in both compartments. Founding members of clonal families were more often found in the draining CLNs. More mature clonal family members derived from these founders were observed in the draining CLNs and also in the CNS, including lesions. These data provide new evidence that B cells traffic freely across the tissue barrier with the majority of B cell maturation occurring outside of the CNS in the secondary lymphoid tissue. Our study may aid in further defining the mechanisms of immunomodulatory therapies that either deplete circulating B cells or impact the intrathecal B cell compartment by inhibiting lymphocyte transmigration into the CNS. PMID:25100741

  12. Interleukin 4 induces membrane Thy-1 expression on normal murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Snapper, C M; Hornbeck, P V; Atasoy, U; Pereira, G M; Paul, W E

    1988-01-01

    Thy-1, a cell-surface glycoprotein of undetermined function, is expressed in relatively large amounts on mouse thymocytes, peripheral T cells, and neurons. It is widely used as a marker to distinguish peripheral T cells from B cells in mice. We show here that, in five distinct mouse strains, recombinant interleukin 4 (IL-4/B-cell stimulatory factor 1) strikingly induces membrane expression of Thy-1 on the vast majority of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated normal murine B cells. Thy-1+ B cells are precursors for immunoglobulin-secreting cells. RNA blot analysis indicates that B cells express a Thy-1 mRNA of 1.8 kilobases, the same size as that found in T cells. Cell mixing experiments show that only cells derived from Thy-1.2+ donors express Thy-1.2, indicating that B cells expressing Thy-1 have not passively absorbed the glycoprotein from another cell source. Recombinant interferon-gamma inhibits Thy-1 induction by B cells stimulated with LPS and IL-4. Thy-1 is also induced on B cells that have been stimulated as a result of the specific activation of an IL-4-producing T-helper clone. Anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody inhibits the induction of B-cell Thy-1 in this T-cell-B-cell interaction. Images PMID:2901096

  13. B cells moderate inflammatory progression and enhance bacterial containment upon pulmonary challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John

    2007-06-01

    Though much is known about the function of T lymphocytes in the adaptive immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, comparably little is understood regarding the corresponding role of B lymphocytes. Indicating B cells as components of lymphoid neogenesis during pulmonary tuberculosis, we have identified ectopic germinal centers (GCs) in the lungs of infected mice. B cells in these pulmonary lymphoid aggregates express peanut agglutinin and GL7, two markers of GC B cells, as well as CXCR5, and migrate in response to the lymphoid-associated chemokine CXCL13 ex vivo. CXCL13 is negatively regulated by the presence of B cells, as its production is elevated in lungs of B cell-deficient (B cell(-/-)) mice. Upon aerosol with 100 CFU of M. tuberculosis Erdman, B cell(-/-) mice have exacerbated immunopathology corresponding with elevated pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils. Infected B cell(-/-) mice show increased production of IL-10 in the lungs, whereas IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-10R remain unchanged from wild type. B cell(-/-) mice have enhanced susceptibility to infection when aerogenically challenged with 300 CFU of M. tuberculosis corresponding with elevated bacterial burden in the lungs but not in the spleen or liver. Adoptive transfer of B cells complements the phenotypes of B cell(-/-) mice, confirming a role for B cells in both modulation of the host response and optimal containment of the tubercle bacillus. As components of ectopic GCs, moderators of inflammatory progression, and enhancers of local immunity against bacterial challenge, B cells may have a greater role in the host defense against M. tuberculosis than previously thought.

  14. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression distinguishes two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    All mature B cells coexpress major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, I-A and I-E, which are restriction elements required for antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells. However, the expression of class II during the early stages of B cell development has been unclear. We demonstrate here that there is a difference in the expression of class II during murine B cell development in the fetal liver and adult bone marrow (BM). These differences define two distinct B cell developmental pathways. The Fetal-type (FT) pathway is characterized by pre-B and immature IgM+ B cells generated in the fetal liver which initially lack all class II expression. In contrast, the Adult-type (AT) pathway is typified by B cells developing in the adult BM which express class II molecules from the pre-B cell stage. In vitro stromal cell cultures of sorted fetal liver and adult BM pro-B cells indicated that the difference in I-A expression during B cell development is intrinsic to the progenitors. In addition, we show that FT B cell development is not restricted to the fetal liver but occurs in the peritoneal cavities, spleens, liver, and BM of young mice up to at least 1 mo of age. The AT B cell development begins to emerge after birth but is, however, restricted to the BM environment. These findings indicate that there are two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny, each of which could contribute differentially to the immune repertoire and thus the functions of B cell subsets and lineages. PMID:7913950

  15. Nuclear TRAF3 is a negative regulator of CREB in B cells.

    PubMed

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W; Stunz, Laura L; Hanson, Brett M; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Bishop, Gail A

    2016-01-26

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) regulates signaling through B-lymphocyte receptors, including CD40, BAFF receptor, and Toll-like receptors, and also plays a critical role inhibiting B-cell homoeostatic survival. Consistent with these findings, loss-of-function human TRAF3 mutations are common in B-cell cancers, particularly multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma. B cells of B-cell-specific TRAF3(-/-) mice (B-Traf3(-/-)) display remarkably enhanced survival compared with littermate control (WT) B cells. The mechanism for this abnormal homeostatic survival is poorly understood, a key knowledge gap in selecting optimal treatments for human B-cell cancers with TRAF3 deficiency. We show here for the first time to our knowledge that TRAF3 is a resident nuclear protein that associates with the transcriptional regulator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in both mouse and human B cells. The TRAF-C domain of TRAF3 was necessary and sufficient to localize TRAF3 to the nucleus via a functional nuclear localization signal. CREB protein was elevated in TRAF3(-/-) B cells, without change in mRNA, but with a decrease in CREB ubiquitination. CREB-mediated transcriptional activity was increased in TRAF3-deficient B cells. Consistent with these findings, Mcl-1, an antiapoptotic target of CREB-mediated transcription, was increased in the absence of TRAF3 and enhanced Mcl-1 was suppressed with CREB inhibition. TRAF3-deficient B cells were also preferentially sensitive to survival inhibition with pharmacologic CREB inhibitor. Our results identify a new mechanism by which nuclear TRAF3 regulates B-cell survival via inhibition of CREB stability, information highly relevant to the role of TRAF3 in B-cell malignancies.

  16. Derailed B cell homeostasis in patients with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Hajas, A; Barath, S; Szodoray, P; Nakken, B; Gogolak, P; Szekanecz, Z; Zold, E; Zeher, M; Szegedi, G; Bodolay, E

    2013-07-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disorder, characterized by the presence of antibodies to U1-RNP protein. We aimed to determine phenotypic abnormalities of peripheral B cell subsets in MCTD. Blood samples were obtained from 46 MCTD patients, and 20 controls. Using anti-CD19, anti-CD27, anti-IgD and anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies, the following B cell subsets were identified by flow cytometry: (1) transitional B cells (CD19+CD27-IgD+CD38(high)); (2) naive B cells (CD19+CD27-IgD+CD38(low)); (3) non-switched memory B cells (CD19+CD27+IgD+); (4) switched memory B cells (CD19+CD27+IgD-); (5) double negative (DN) memory B cells (CD19+CD27-IgD-) and (6) plasma cells (CD19+CD27(high)IgD-). The proportion of transitional B cells, naive B cells and DN B lymphocytes was higher in MCTD than in controls. The DN B cells were positive for CD95 surface marker. This memory B cells population showed a close correlation with disease activity. The number of plasma cells was also increased, and there was an association between the number of plasma cells and the anti-U1RNP levels. Cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and corticosteroid treatment decreased the number of DN and CD27(high) B cells. In conclusion, several abnormalities were found in the peripheral B-cell subsets in MCTD, which reinforces the role of derailed humoral autoimmune processes in the pathogenesis.

  17. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-04-15

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  18. Tim-1 is essential for induction and maintenance of IL-10 in regulatory B cells and their regulation of tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Sheng; Brooks, Craig R; Sobel, Raymond A; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2015-02-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain (Tim)-1 identifies IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs). Mice on the C57BL/6 background harboring a loss-of-function Tim-1 mutant showed progressive loss of IL-10 production in B cells and with age developed severe multiorgan tissue inflammation. We demonstrate that Tim-1 expression and signaling in Bregs are required for optimal production of IL-10. B cells with Tim-1 defects have impaired IL-10 production but increased proinflammatory cytokine production, including IL-1 and IL-6. Tim-1-deficient B cells promote Th1 and Th17 responses but inhibit the generation of regulatory T cells (Foxp3(+) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells) and enhance the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mechanistically, Tim-1 on Bregs is required for apoptotic cell (AC) binding to Bregs and for AC-induced IL-10 production in Bregs. Treatment with ACs reduces the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in hosts with wild-type but not Tim-1-deficient Bregs. Collectively, these findings suggest that in addition to serving as a marker for identifying IL-10-producing Bregs, Tim-1 is also critical for maintaining self-tolerance by regulating IL-10 production in Bregs.

  19. V(D)J recombination process and the Pre-B to immature B-cells transition are altered in Fanca−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy Vy; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Firlej, Virginie; Rosselli, Filippo; Aoufouchi, Saïd

    2016-01-01

    B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) must generate a functional B-cell receptor and overcome the negative selection induced by reactivity with autoantigens. Two rounds of DNA recombination are required for the production of functional immunoglobulin heavy (Ig-HCs) and light (LCs) chains necessary for the continuation of B-lymphocyte development in the BM. Both rounds depend on the joint action of recombination activating gene-1 (RAG-1) and RAG-2 endonucleases with the DNA non-homologous end-joining pathway. Loss of the FANC gene leads to the chromosome breakage and cancer predisposition syndrome Fanconi anemia. Because the FANC proteins are involved in certain aspects of the recombination process, we sought to determine the impact of the FANC pathway on the Ig diversification process using Fanca−/− mice. In this work we demonstrated that Fanca−/− animals have a mild B-cell differentiation defect characterized by a specific alteration of the IgM− to IgM+ transition of the B220low B-cell population. Pre-B cells from Fanca−/− mice show evidence of impaired kLC rearrangement at the level of the Vk-Jk junction. Furthermore, Fanca−/− mice showed a skewed Vκ gene usage during formation of the LCs Vk-Jk junctions. Therefore, the Fanca protein appears as a yet unidentified factor involved in the primary diversification of Ig. PMID:27883081

  20. Monozygotic twins discordant for common variable immunodeficiency reveal impaired DNA demethylation during naïve-to-memory B-cell transition

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cortez, Virginia C.; del Pino-Molina, Lucia; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Ciudad, Laura; Gómez-Cabrero, David; Company, Carlos; Urquiza, José M.; Tegnér, Jesper; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos; López-Granados, Eduardo; Ballestar, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the most frequent primary immunodeficiency characterized by loss of B-cell function, depends partly on genetic defects, and epigenetic changes are thought to contribute to its aetiology. Here we perform a high-throughput DNA methylation analysis of this disorder using a pair of CVID-discordant MZ twins and show predominant gain of DNA methylation in CVID B cells with respect to those from the healthy sibling in critical B lymphocyte genes, such as PIK3CD, BCL2L1, RPS6KB2, TCF3 and KCNN4. Individual analysis confirms hypermethylation of these genes. Analysis in naive, unswitched and switched memory B cells in a CVID patient cohort shows impaired ability to demethylate and upregulate these genes in transitioning from naive to memory cells in CVID. Our results not only indicate a role for epigenetic alterations in CVID but also identify relevant DNA methylation changes in B cells that could explain the clinical manifestations of CVID individuals. PMID:26081581

  1. CD19 CAR-targeted T cells induce long-term remission and B Cell Aplasia in an immunocompetent mouse model of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Kloss, Christopher C; Gunset, Gertrude; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Although many adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are induced into remission, most will relapse, underscoring the dire need for novel therapies for this disease. We developed murine CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and an immunocompetent mouse model of B-ALL that recapitulates the disease at genetic, cellular, and pathologic levels. Mouse T cells transduced with an all-murine CD3ζ/CD28-based CAR that is equivalent to the one being used in our clinical trials, eradicate B-ALL in mice and mediate long-term B cell aplasias. In this model, we find that increasing conditioning chemotherapy increases tumor eradication, B cell aplasia, and CAR-modified T cell persistence. Quantification of recipient B lineage cells allowed us to estimate an in vivo effector to endogenous target ratio for B cell aplasia maintenance. In mice exhibiting a dramatic B cell reduction we identified a small population of progenitor B cells in the bone marrow that may serve as a reservoir for long-term CAR-modified T cell stimulation. Lastly, we determine that infusion of CD8+ CAR-modified T cells alone is sufficient to maintain long-term B cell eradication. The mouse model we report here should prove valuable for investigating CAR-based and other therapies for adult B-ALL.

  2. Physiology of B cells in mice with X-linked immunodeficiency. II. Influence of the thymus and mature T cells on B cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sprent, J.; Bruce, J.

    1984-07-01

    Evidence is presented that the in vivo differentiation of B cells expressing X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) is controlled by mature T cells. Normal (C57BL/6 X CBA/J)F1 mice were thymectomized (ATx), heavily irradiated, and reconstituted with CBA/N (xid) or CBA/Ca (nondefective) marrow. In contrast to sham-operated mice, ATx recipients of xid marrow showed an almost total absence of Ig+ B cells in lymph nodes (LN) and thoracic duct lymph at 2 mo post-reconstitution; B cells were markedly reduced in the spleen in some mice but only moderately in others. Addition of mature T cells soon after marrow reconstitution substantially abrogated the B cell depletion. In control experiments with nondefective B cells, the number of B cells developing in ATx irradiated recipients of normal (xid-) marrow cells was not detectably lower than in sham-operated recipients. These data imply that a subset of T-dependent B cells is either missing in normal mice or present in only very small numbers.

  3. Physiology of B cells in mice with X-linked immunodeficiency (xid). III. Disappearance of xid B cells in double bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sprent, J.; Bruce, J.

    1984-09-01

    Evidence is presented that B cells from mice with X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) differentiate at a slower rate than normal B cells. This conclusion stems from studies in which (B6 X CBA/J)F1 mice were heavily irradiated (1,000 rads) and reconstituted with a mixture of T-depleted marrow cells taken from (a) nondefective B6 mice (H-2b) and (b) xid CBA/N or nondefective CBA/Ca mice (both H-2k). With transfer of CBA/Ca plus B6 marrow cells, the irradiated recipients become repopulated with B cells derived from both parental marrow sources; except for an early imbalance (probably reflecting Hh resistance), the degree of chimerism remained relatively stable over a period of more than 6 months. Very different results occurred with transfer of a mixture of xid CBA/N and normal B6 marrow. Within the first 2 months after marrow reconstitution, a low but significant proportion of the B cells in both spleen and lymph nodes were of CBA/N origin. Thereafter the proportion of these cells fell progressively, and by 6-9 months virtually all of the B cells were of B6 origin. This gradual decline in CBA/N-derived cells did not apply to other cell types, i.e., T cells or pluripotential stem cells. Analogous results were obtained with transfer of CBA/N vs. CBA/Ca marrow cells into sublethally irradiated (750 rads) (CBA/N X DBA/2)F1 male vs. female mice. For example, CBA/N-marrow derived B cells differentiated effectively and survived for long periods in F1 male mice (xid----xid) but not in F1 female mice (xid----normal). The finding that xid B cells eventually disappear in the presence of normal B cells strengthens the view that xid B cells are an abnormal population not represented in normal mice.

  4. Impaired selective cytokine production by CD4(+) T cells in Common Variable Immunodeficiency associated with the absence of memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Berrón-Ruiz, Laura; López-Herrera, Gabriela; Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; López-Macías, Constantino; Isibasi, Armando; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda; Bonifaz, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by B cell dysfunction and decreased serum immunoglobulin. CVID patients are classified by the absence or presence of memory B cells. In addition, T cell defects have been demonstrated in only a proportion of CVID patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of CD4(+) T cells from CVID patients and its association with memory B cells. Patients were classified according to their Freiburg groups: group Ia and Ib, with decreased switched memory B cells (<0.4 of PBL), and group II, with normal B cell subsets. Their T cell function was evaluated after stimulation. We observed normal and even increased CD4(+) T cell proliferation in group Ia (p=0.0277). The proliferation positively correlated with the clinical severity score (r=0.4796). We observed lower levels of IL-17A and IL-10 in group Ia (p=0.0177, 0.0109) and Ib (p=0.0009, 0.0084) patients. Group Ib patients also had low levels of IL-13 and IL-9 (p=0.0169, 0.010). Group II patients had similar cytokine production to that of the controls. BAFFR expression was reduced in groups Ia (p=0.0001) and Ib (p=0.0002) and showed an inverse correlation with the severity score (p=0.0262; r=0.5371). ICOS expression was reduced in group Ia (p=0.0364), and PD-1 was increased in group Ib (p=0.0432) patients. This study shows a selective impairment in cytokine production in group Ia patients, which was more extensive than in group Ib patients. The impairment was associated with BAFFR expression in B cells, with ICOS and PD-1 in T cells and, remarkably, with the absence of memory B cells and with the disease severity. Our results suggest that the evaluation of cytokine expression by T cells in combination with the study of B cell memory could be important for understand the pathogenesis of CVID patients.

  5. Selective inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta: modulators of B-cell function with potential for treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases and B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Kamal D.; Gold, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    The delta isoform of the p110 catalytic subunit (p110δ) of phosphoinositide 3-kinase is expressed primarily in hematopoietic cells and plays an essential role in B-cell development and function. Studies employing mice lacking a functional p110δ protein, as well as the use of highly-selective chemical inhibitors of p110δ, have revealed that signaling via p110δ-containing PI3K complexes (PI3Kδ) is critical for B-cell survival, migration, and activation, functioning downstream of key receptors on B cells including the B-cell antigen receptor, chemokine receptors, pro-survival receptors such as BAFF-R and the IL-4 receptor, and co-stimulatory receptors such as CD40 and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Similarly, this PI3K isoform plays a key role in the survival, proliferation, and dissemination of B-cell lymphomas. Herein we summarize studies showing that these processes can be inhibited in vitro and in vivo by small molecule inhibitors of p110δ enzymatic activity, and that these p110δ inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of B-cell malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PI3Kδ also plays a critical role in the activation, proliferation, and tissue homing of self-reactive B cells that contribute to autoimmune diseases, in particular innate-like B-cell populations such as marginal zone (MZ) B cells and B-1 cells that have been strongly linked to autoimmunity. We discuss the potential utility of p110δ inhibitors, either alone or in combination with B-cell depletion, for treating autoimmune diseases such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes. Because PI3Kδ plays a major role in both B-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation and B-cell malignancies, PI3Kδ inhibitors may represent a promising therapeutic approach for treating these diseases. PMID:22936933

  6. Changes in B Cell Populations and Merozoite Surface Protein-1-Specific Memory B Cell Responses after Prolonged Absence of Detectable P. falciparum Infection.

    PubMed

    Ayieko, Cyrus; Maue, Alexander C; Jura, Walter G Z O; Noland, Gregory S; Ayodo, George; Rochford, Rosemary; John, Chandy C

    2013-01-01

    Clinical immunity to malaria declines in the absence of repeated parasite exposure. However, little is known about how B cell populations and antigen-specific memory B cells change in the absence of P. falciparum infection. A successful indoor residual insecticide spraying campaign in a highland area of western Kenya, led to an absence of blood-stage P. falciparum infection between March 2007 and April 2008. We assessed memory B cell responses in 45 adults at the beginning (April 2008) and end (April 2009) of a subsequent 12-month period during which none of the adults had evidence of asymptomatic parasitemia or clinical disease. Antibodies and memory B cells to the 42-kDa portion of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-142) were measured using ELISA and ELISPOT assays, respectively. B cell populations were characterized by flow cytometry. From 2008 to 2009, the prevalence of MSP-142-specific memory B cells (45% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.32) or antibodies (91% vs. 82%, respectively, P = 0.32) did not differ significantly, although specific individuals did change from positive to negative and vice versa, particularly for memory B cells, suggesting possible low-level undetected parasitemia may have occurred in some individuals. The magnitude of MSP-142-specific memory B cells and levels of antibodies to MSP-142 also did not differ from 2008 to 2009 (P>0.10 for both). However, from 2008 to 2009 the proportions of both class-switched atypical (CD19+IgD-CD27-CD21-IgM-) and class-switched activated (CD19+IgD-CD27+CD21-IgM-) memory B cells decreased (both P<0.001). In contrast, class-switched resting classical memory B cells (CD19+IgD-CD27+CD21+IgM-) increased (P<0.001). In this area of seasonal malaria transmission, a one- year absence of detectable P. falciparum infection was not associated with changes in the prevalence or level of MSP-142 specific memory B cells, but was associated with major changes in overall memory B cell subsets.

  7. Aggressive B-cell lymphomas: how many categories do we need?

    PubMed Central

    Said, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphomas are diverse group of neoplasms that arise at different stages of B-cell development and by various mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. The aggressive B-cell lymphomas include many types, subtypes and variants of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (BL), mantle cell lymphoma and its blastoid variant, and B lymphoblastic lymphoma. Differences in histology, cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities, as well as the relationship with the tumor microenvironment, help define characteristic signatures for these neoplasms, and in turn dictate potential therapeutic targets. Rather than survey the entire spectrum of aggressive B-cell lymphomas, this report aims to identify and characterize important clinically aggressive subtypes of DLBCL, and explore the relationship of DLBCL to BL and the gray zone between them (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL). PMID:23154748

  8. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  9. Signaling proteins and transcription factors in normal and malignant early B cell development.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  10. Mechanisms of action of BCL6 during germinal center B cell development.

    PubMed

    Huang, ChuanXin; Melnick, Ari

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional repressor B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) controls a large transcriptional network that is required for the formation and maintenance of germinal centers (GC). GC B cells represent the normal counterpart of most human B-cell lymphomas, which are often characterized by deregulated BCL6 expression or BCL6-mediated pathways. BCL6 suppresses gene transcription largely through recruitment of its co-repressors through its distinct repression domain. Understanding the precise biological roles of each repression domain in normal and malignant B cells is helpful for development of targeted inhibition of BCL6 functions that is emerging as the basis for design of anti-lymphoma therapies. This review focuses on recent progress in the molecular mechanisms of action of BCL6 in B cells and discusses remaining unresolved questions related to how these mechanisms are linked to normal and malignant B cell development.

  11. [B-cell targeted therapy for children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Morbach, H; Girschick, H J

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cytokine-targeted therapies has significantly improved the treatment options of rheumatic diseases; however, some patients are also refractory to these treatment measures. The B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of many rheumatic diseases and B-cell targeted therapies are a promising option as second-line medication for treating patients with a refractory disease course. Randomized controlled trials analyzing the efficacy of B-cell directed therapies for childhood rheumatic diseases have not yet been performed. The use of the B-cell depleting antibody rituximab showed positive results in non-controlled case series of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Patients with a refractory disease course of oligoarticular or polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis might also benefit from B-cell depletion using rituximab. The B cell-targeting therapies for the treatment of childhood rheumatic diseases should be initiated and closely supervised by a pediatric rheumatologist.

  12. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection and circulating IgD+ memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Marianne C; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Fisher, Christopher; Sefe, Delali; Clapson, Margaret; Klein, Nigel; Baxendale, Helen E

    2008-08-15

    Levels of circulating naive and memory B cells were measured in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and control subjects to determine whether the irreversible depletion of memory B cells described in HIV-infected adults occurs in children with HIV infection. Depletion of circulating IgD+ memory B cells was seen in HIV-infected children despite control of the HIV load with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (P =. 04). IgD+ memory B cell percentages did not correlate with CD4+ cell percentages (P =. 027) or disease duration (P =. 026). Naive/transitional and IgD- memory B cell numbers were not affected. Pediatric HIV infection is associated with selective depletion of circulating IgD+ memory B cells despite control of the HIV load with HAART.

  13. Subepithelial B cells in the human palatine tonsil. I. Morphologic, cytochemical and phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Dono, M; Burgio, V L; Tacchetti, C; Favre, A; Augliera, A; Zupo, S; Taborelli, G; Chiorazzi, N; Grossi, C E; Ferrarini, M

    1996-09-01

    This study describes the purification of a subset of tonsillar B cells which share phenotypic, morphologic and cytochemical features with subepithelial (SE) B cells. These cells, which represented the 5-10% of the total tonsillar B cells, were found in the Percoll gradient fraction of highest density, together with resting follicular mantle (FM) B cells. The latter B cells, however, expressed surface CD5 and could be removed by an immune rosetting procedure. The remaining small CD5- B cells had a surface phenotype (IgM+, IgD+, CD23-, CD38+/-, CD10-, CD44+) that was different from that of FM (IgM+, IgD+, CD23+, CD39+, CD38-, CD10-, CD44+2) and of germinal center (GC) (CD23-, CD39-, CD38+, CD10+, CD44+/-, IgG+) B cells isolated from the same cell suspensions. Furthermore, the absence of surface activation markers (CD71 and CD69) and of surface IgG allowed us to distinguish small CD5- B cells from activated and memory cells migrating within Percoll fractions of lower density. In situ immunohistochemical studies revealed that B cells with an identical phenotype as that of small CD5- B cells could be detected predominantly in the SE region (lamina propria) of the tonsil, and also within the epithelium lining the cryptae. This area was also comprised of a relatively minor proportion of activated B cells, not found in the small CD5- B cell fraction owing to the separation procedure used. Consistent with the notion that the SE area could be a site of B cell activation was also the presence of activated macrophages and of plasma cells. Thirty to forty percent of small CD5- B cells isolated in suspension were positive for the endogeneous alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In contrast, only a few FM B cells were ALP+, while GC cells were consistently ALP-. In situ studies also demonstrated a prevalent expression of ALP activity by the B cells in the SE area. At the ultrastructural level, small CD5- B cells were clearly different from both FM and GC B cells. They displayed a

  14. Perspectives on fetal-derived CD5+ B1 B cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Richard R.; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    CD5+ B cell origins and their pre-disposition to lymphoma are long-standing issues. Transfer of fetal and adult liver bone marrow Pro-B cells generates B cells with distinct phenotypes: fetal cells generate IgMhighIgDlowCD5+, whereas adult cells IgMlowIgDhighCD5−. This suggests a developmental switch in B lymphopoiesis, similar to the switch in erythropoiesis. Comparison of mRNA and miRNA expression in fetal and adult Pro-B cells revealed differential expression of Lin28b mRNA and Let-7 miRNA, providing evidence that this regulatory axis functions in the switch. Recent work has shown that Arid3a is a key transcription factor mediating fetal-type B-cell development. Lin28b-promoted fetal development generates CD5+ B cells as a consequence of positively selected self-reactivity. CD5+ B cells play important roles in clearance of apoptotic cells and in protective immune responses, but also pose a risk of progression to leukemia/lymphoma. Differential Lin28b expression in fetal and adult human B-cell precursors showed that human B-cell development may resemble mouse, with self-reactive “innate-like” B cells generated early in life. It remains to be determined whether such human B cells have a higher propensity to leukemic progression. This review describes our recent research with CD5+ B cells and presents our perspective on their role in disease. PMID:26339791

  15. Determination of the Role of Estrogen Receptors and Estrogen Regulated Genes in B Cell Autoreactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that occurs preferentially in women. In murine models of SLE, it is... Systemic Lupus , Estrogen, BCR Signaling, B Cell Maturation, B Cell Selection 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...therefore, be important to test ERα antagonists in murine studies of B cell development and in murine models of lupus . This approach to therapy might

  16. Quorum Sensing Contributes to Activated IgM-Secreting B Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Montaudouin, Caroline; Anson, Marie; Hao, Yi; Duncker, Susanne V.; Fernandez, Tahia; Gaudin, Emmanuelle; Ehrenstein, Michael; Kerr, William G.; Colle, Jean-Hervé; Bruhns, Pierre; Daëron, Marc; Freitas, António A.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of plasma IgM levels is critical for immune system function and homeostasis in humans and mice. However, the mechanisms that control homeostasis of the activated IgM-secreting B cells are unknown. After adoptive transfer into immune-deficient hosts, B lymphocytes expand poorly, but fully reconstitute the pool of natural IgM-secreting cells and circulating IgM levels. By using sequential cell transfers and B cell populations from several mutant mice, we were able to identify novel mechanisms regulating the size of the IgM-secreting B cell pool. Contrary to previous mechanisms described regulating homeostasis, which involve competition for the same niche by cells having overlapping survival requirements, homeostasis of the innate IgM-secreting B cell pool is also achieved when B cell populations are able to monitor the number of activated B cells by detecting their secreted products. Notably, B cell populations are able to assess the density of activated B cells by sensing their secreted IgG. This process involves the FcγRIIB, a low-affinity IgG receptor that is expressed on B cells and acts as a negative regulator of B cell activation, and its intracellular effector the inositol phosphatase SHIP. As a result of the engagement of this inhibitory pathway, the number of activated IgM-secreting B cells is kept under control. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled B cell activation and autoimmunity. PMID:23209322

  17. Age-related differences in human palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jino; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Wook; Choi, Yoon Seok; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Racanelli, Vito; Kim, Dae Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The tonsils provide defense of the upper aerodigestive tract against pathogens. Although long known to undergo functional changes with age, the precise changes occurring within tonsillar B cell populations remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated age-related changes in palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Palatine tonsils were obtained from forty-two tonsillectomy patients without tonsillitis who were divided into three groups: young children (4-9 years), adolescents (10-19 years), and adults (20-60 years). Tonsillar B cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Using expression of CD38 and IgD to define B cell subsets, we found that the frequency of germinal center (GC) B cells in the tonsils was significantly higher, and the frequency of memory B cells lower, in young children as compared to adolescents and adults. Within the GC B cell subsets, adults had a higher frequency of IgA(+) cells and a lower frequency of IgM(+) cells as compared to individuals in the younger age groups. Moreover, young children had a higher frequency of IgG(+) cells in the GC B cell subsets than did individuals in the older age groups. We also observed an abundance of IgM(+) cells among memory B cells and plasmablasts in young children and IgA(+) cells in adults. In summary, the proportion of GC B cells in palatine tonsillar B cells decreases with age, while the proportion of memory B cells increases with age. In addition, Ig isotypes in tonsils preferentially switch from IgM to IgA as individuals age.

  18. Translating transitions – how to decipher peripheral human B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the last two decades our understanding of human B cell differentiation has developed considerably. Our understanding of the human B cell compartment has advanced from a point where essentially all assays were based on the presence or not of class-switched antibodies to a level where a substantial diversity is appreciated among the cells involved. Several consecutive transitional stages that newly formed IgM expressing B cells go through after they leave the bone marrow, but before they are fully mature, have been described, and a significant complexity is also acknowledged within the IgM expressing and class-switched memory B cell compartments. It is possible to isolate plasma blasts in blood to follow the formation of plasma cells during immune responses, and the importance and uniqueness of the mucosal IgA system is now much more appreciated. Current data suggest the presence of at least one lineage of human innate-like B cells akin to B1 and/or marginal zone B cells in mice. In addition, regulatory B cells with the ability to produce IL-10 have been identified. Clinically, B cell depletion therapy is used for a broad range of conditions. The ability to define different human B cell subtypes using flow cytometry has therefore started to come into clinical use, but as our understanding of human B cell development further progresses, B cell subtype analysis will be of increasing importance in diagnosis, to measure the effect of immune therapy and to understand the underlying causes for diseases. In this review the diversity of human B cells will be discussed, with special focus on current data regarding their phenotypes and functions. PMID:26243514

  19. B cells as multi-functional players during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Willem J; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, André G

    2016-03-01

    Immunity to tuberculosis is still understood to be driven and maintained by T-cell derived immune responses. With a steady influx of data, it is becoming clear that B cells, the mediators of humoral immunity, have the capacity to function in roles not previously appreciated within the traditional B cell dogma. In this review we aim to discuss B cells, from its generation through to its functioning as effectors in both the innate and adaptive immune response, within the tuberculosis domain.

  20. B-cell homeostasis requires complementary CD22 and BLyS/BR3 survival signals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan H.; Haas, Karen M.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Yanaba, Koichi; Ward, Christopher D.; Migone, Thi-Sau

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral B-cell numbers are tightly regulated by homeostatic mechanisms that influence the transitional and mature B-cell compartments and dictate the size and clonotypic diversity of the B-cell repertoire. B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS, a trademark of Human Genome Sciences, Inc.) plays a key role in regulating peripheral B-cell homeostasis. CD22 also promotes peripheral B-cell survival through ligand-dependent mechanisms. The B-cell subsets affected by the absence of BLyS and CD22 signals overlap, suggesting that BLyS- and CD22-mediated survival are intertwined. To examine this, the effects of BLyS insufficiency following neutralizing BLyS mAb treatment in mice also treated with CD22 ligand-blocking mAb were examined. Combined targeting of the BLyS and CD22 survival pathways led to significantly greater clearance of recirculating bone marrow, blood, marginal zone and follicular B cells than either treatment alone. Likewise, BLyS blockade further reduced bone marrow, blood and spleen B-cell numbers in CD22−/− mice. Notably, BLyS receptor expression and downstream signaling were normal in CD22−/− B cells, suggesting that CD22 does not directly alter BLyS responsiveness. CD22 survival signals were likewise intact in the absence of BLyS, as CD22 mAb treatment depleted blood B cells from mice with impaired BLyS receptor 3 (BR3) signaling. Finally, enforced BclxL expression, which rescues BR3 impairment, did not affect B-cell depletion following CD22 mAb treatment. Thus, the current studies support a model whereby CD22 and BLyS promote the survival of overlapping B-cell subsets but contribute to their maintenance through independent and complementary signaling pathways. PMID:20513733

  1. Targeted Therapies in Adult B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocytes are programmed for the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) after antigen presentation, in the context of T-lymphocyte control within lymphoid organs. During this differentiation/activation process, B-lymphocytes exhibit different restricted or common surface markers, activation of cellular pathways that regulate cell cycle, metabolism, proteasome activity, and protein synthesis. All molecules involved in these different cellular mechanisms are potent therapeutic targets. Nowadays, due to the progress of the biology, more and more targeted drugs are identified, a situation that is correlated with an extended field of the targeted therapy. The full knowledge of the cellular machinery and cell-cell communication allows making the best choice to treat patients, in the context of personalized medicine. Also, focus should not be restricted to the immediate effects observed as clinical endpoints, that is, response rate, survival markers with conventional statistical methods, but it should consider the prediction of different clinical consequences due to other collateral drug targets, based on new methodologies. This means that new reflection and new bioclinical follow-up have to be monitored, particularly with the new drugs used with success in B-cell malignancies. This review discussed the principal aspects of such evident bioclinical progress. PMID:26425544

  2. Epigenetic Heterogeneity of B-Cell Lymphoma: Chromatin Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Lydia; Nersisyan, Lilit; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Arakelyan, Arsen; Binder, Hans

    2015-01-01

    We systematically studied the expression of more than fifty histone and DNA (de)methylating enzymes in lymphoma and healthy controls. As a main result, we found that the expression levels of nearly all enzymes become markedly disturbed in lymphoma, suggesting deregulation of large parts of the epigenetic machinery. We discuss the effect of DNA promoter methylation and of transcriptional activity in the context of mutated epigenetic modifiers such as EZH2 and MLL2. As another mechanism, we studied the coupling between the energy metabolism and epigenetics via metabolites that act as cofactors of JmjC-type demethylases. Our study results suggest that Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma differ by an imbalance of repressive and poised promoters, which is governed predominantly by the activity of methyltransferases and the underrepresentation of demethylases in this regulation. The data further suggest that coupling of epigenetics with the energy metabolism can also be an important factor in lymphomagenesis in the absence of direct mutations of genes in metabolic pathways. Understanding of epigenetic deregulation in lymphoma and possibly in cancers in general must go beyond simple schemes using only a few modes of regulation. PMID:26506391

  3. B cells and their role in the teleost gut

    PubMed Central

    Korytář, Tomáš; Takizawa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are the main route of entry for pathogens in all living organisms. In the case of teleost fish, mucosal surfaces cover the vast majority of the animal. As these surfaces are in constant contact with the environment, fish are perpetually exposed to a vast number of pathogens. Despite the potential prevalence and variety of pathogens, mucosal surfaces are primarily populated by commensal non-pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, a fine balance between these two populations of microorganisms is crucial for animal survival. This equilibrium, controlled by the mucosal immune system, maintains homeostasis at mucosal tissues. Teleost fish possess a diffuse mucosa-associated immune system in the intestine, with B cells being one of the main responders. Immunoglobulins produced by these lymphocytes are a critical line of defense against pathogens and also prevent the entrance of commensal bacteria into the epithelium. In this review we will summarize recent literature regarding the role of B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins in gut immunity in teleost fish, with specific focus on immunoglobulin isotypes and the microorganisms, pathogenic and non-pathogenic that interact with the immune system. PMID:26995768

  4. A rare case of primary cardiac B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac lymphomas represent an extremely rare entity of extranodal lymphomas and should be distinguished from secondary cardiac involvement of disseminated lymphomas belonging to the non-Hodgkin’s classification of blood cancers. Only 90 cases have been reported in literature. Presentation of cardiac lymphomas on imaging studies may not be unambiguous since they potentially mimic other cardiac neoplasms including myxomas, angiosarcoma or rhadomyomas and therefore require multimodality cardiac imaging, endomyocardial biopsy, excisional intraoperative biopsy and pericardial fluid cytological evaluation to establish final diagnosis. Herein we report the case of a 70 y/o immunocompetent Caucasian female with a rapidly progressing superior vena cava syndrome secondary to a large primary cardiac diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL lymphoma) almost completely obstructing the right atrium, right ventricle and affecting both mitral and tricuspid valve. The patient had no clinical evidence of disseminated disease and was successfully treated with extensive debulking during open-heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass and 6 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone chemotherapy (R-CHOP). PMID:24422789

  5. Relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2011-01-01

    Despite overall improvements in outcomes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), approximately one-third of patients will develop relapsed/refractory disease that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Novel insights from gene-expression analyses have increased our understanding of chemotherapy resistance and yielded rational targets for therapeutic intervention to both prevent and treat relapsed/refractory DLBCL. The clinical approach to relapsed/refractory DLBCL should include high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-ASCT) with curative intent in patients without comorbidities. Results from the recently reported CORAL study suggest that patients refractory to rituximab-containing regimens have inferior outcomes with HD-ASCT. Ongoing efforts to improve ASCT include novel conditioning regimens and evaluation of maintenance approaches after ASCT. Unfortunately, because the majority of patients are not eligible for ASCT due to refractory disease or age/comorbidities, these approaches have limited impact. The large group of patients not eligible for ASCT have incurable disease and should be referred for clinical trials of rationally targeted agents.

  6. B Cell-Based Seamless Engineering of Antibody Fc Domains

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Akiho; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) enables us to obtain mAbs with additional functions. In particular, modifications in antibody’s Fc (fragment, crystallizable) region can provide multiple benefits such as added toxicity by drug conjugation, higher affinity to Fc receptors on immunocytes, or the addition of functional modules. However, the generation of recombinant antibodies requires multiple laborious bioengineering steps. We previously developed a technology that enables rapid in vitro screening and isolation of specific mAb-expressing cells from the libraries constructed with chicken B-cell line DT40 (referred to as the ‘ADLib system’). To upgrade this ADLib system with the ability to generate customized mAbs, we developed a novel and rapid engineering technology that enables seamless exchanges of mAbs’ Fc domains after initial selections of mAb-producing clones by the ADLib system, using a gene-replacement unit for recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). In this system, Cre-recombinase recognition sites were inserted into the Fc region of the active DT40 IgM allele, allowing the replacement of the Fc domain by the sequences of interest upon co-transfection of a Cre recombinase and a donor DNA, enabling the rapid exchange of Fc regions. Combining this method with the ADLib system, we demonstrate rapid Fc engineering to generate fluorescent antibodies and to enhance affinity to Fc receptors. PMID:27907066

  7. The human fetal lymphocyte lineage: identification by CD27 and LIN28B expression in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Laurie; Su, Kuei-Ying; Liang, Xiaoe; Liao, Dongmei; Floyd, Serina; Amos, Joshua; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kuraoka, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    CD27, a member of the TNFR superfamily, is used to identify human memory B cells. Nonetheless, CD27+ B cells are present in patients with HIGM1 syndrome who are unable to generate GCs or memory B cells. CD27+IgD+ fetal B cells are present in umbilical cord blood, and CD27 may also be a marker of the human B1-like B cells. To define the origin of naïve CD27+IgD+ human B cells, we studied B cell development in both fetal and adult tissues. In human FL, most CD19+ cells coexpressed CD10, a marker of human developing B cells. Some CD19+CD10+ B cells expressed CD27, and these fetal CD27+ cells were present in the pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cell compartments. Lower frequencies of phenotypically identical cells were also identified in adult BM. CD27+ pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cells expressed recombination activating gene-1, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and Vpre-B mRNA comparably to their CD27− counterparts. CD27+ and CD27− developing B cells showed similar Ig heavy chain gene usage with low levels of mutations, suggesting that CD27+ developing B cells are distinct from mutated memory B cells. Despite these similarities, CD27+ developing B cells differed from CD27− developing B cells by their increased expression of LIN28B, a transcription factor associated with the fetal lymphoid lineages of mice. Furthermore, CD27+ pro-B cells efficiently generated IgM+IgD+ immature/transitional B cells in vitro. Our observations suggest that CD27 expression during B cell development identifies a physiologic state or lineage for human B cell development distinct from the memory B cell compartment. PMID:23901121

  8. PI3K Signaling in Normal B Cells and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    PubMed Central

    Okkenhaug, Klaus; Burger, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    B cells provide immunity to extracellular pathogens by secreting a diverse repertoire of antibodies with high affinity and specificity for exposed antigens. The B cell receptor (BCR) is a transmembrane antibody, which facilitates the clonal selection of B cells producing secreted antibodies of the same specificity. The diverse antibody repertoire is generated by V(D)J recombination of heavy and light chain genes, whereas affinity maturation is mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated mutagenesis. These processes, which are essential for the generation of adaptive humoral immunity, also render B cells susceptible to chromosomal rearrangements and point mutations that in some cases lead to cancer. In this chapter, we will review the central role of PI3Ks in mediating signals from the B cell receptor that not only facilitate the development of functional B cell repertoire, but also support the growth and survival of neoplastic B cells, focusing on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells. Perhaps because of the central role played by PI3K in BCR signaling, B cell leukemia and lymphomas are the first diseases for which a PI3K inhibitor has been approved for clinical use. PMID:26350103

  9. CD22 Regulates Adaptive and Innate Immune Responses of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Rademacher, Christoph; Paulson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    B cells sense microenvironments through the B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). While signals from BCR and TLRs synergize to distinguish self from nonself, inappropriate regulation can result in development of autoimmune disease. Here we show that CD22, an inhibitory co-receptor of BCR, also negatively regulates TLR signaling in B cells. CD22-deficient (Cd22–/–) B cells exhibit hyperactivation in response to ligands of TLRs 3, 4 and 9. Evidence suggests that this results from impaired induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3, well-known suppressors of TLR signaling. Antibody-mediated sequestration of CD22 on wild-type (WT) B cells augments proliferation by TLR ligands. Conversely, expression of CD22 in a Cd22–/– B cell line blunts responses to TLR ligands. We also show that lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription by nuclear factor-κB is inhibited by ectopic expression of CD22 in a TLR4 reporter cell line. Taken together, these results suggest that negative regulation of TLR signaling is an intrinsic property of CD22. Since TLRs and BCR activate B cells through different signaling pathways, and are differentially localized in B cells, CD22 exhibits a broader regulation of receptors that mediate adaptive and innate immune responses of B cells than previously recognized. PMID:21178327

  10. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  11. Signaling and Dynamic Actin Responses of B Cells on Topographical Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchum, Christina; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells become activated upon physical contact with antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells. Binding of the B cell receptor with antigen initiates actin-mediated spreading of B cells, signaling cascades and eventually infection fighting antibodies. Lymphocytes, including B cells and T cells, have been shown to be responsive to the physical parameters of the contact surface, such as antigen mobility and substrate stiffness. However the roll of surface topography on lymphocyte function is unknown. Here we investigate the degree to which substrate topography controls actin-mediated spreading and B cell activation using nano-fabricated surfaces and live cell imaging. The model topographical system consists of 600 nanometer tall ridges with spacing varying between 800 nanometers and 5 micrometers. Using TIRF imaging we observe actin dynamics, B cell receptor motion and calcium signaling of B cells as they spread on the ridged substrates. We show that the spacing between ridges had a strong effect on the dynamics of actin and calcium influx on B cells. Our results indicate that B cells are highly sensitive to surface topography during cell spreading and signaling activation.

  12. MicroRNA-155 influences B-cell function through PU.1 in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alivernini, Stefano; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Tolusso, Barbara; Benvenuto, Roberta; Elmesmari, Aziza; Canestri, Silvia; Petricca, Luca; Mangoni, Antonella; Fedele, Anna Laura; Di Mario, Clara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Gremese, Elisa; McInnes, Iain B.; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is an important regulator of B cells in mice. B cells have a critical role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we show that miR-155 is highly expressed in peripheral blood B cells from RA patients compared with healthy individuals, particularly in the IgD-CD27- memory B-cell population in ACPA+ RA. MiR-155 is highly expressed in RA B cells from patients with synovial tissue containing ectopic germinal centres compared with diffuse synovial tissue. MiR-155 expression is associated reciprocally with lower expression of PU.1 at B-cell level in the synovial compartment. Stimulation of healthy donor B cells with CD40L, anti-IgM, IL-21, CpG, IFN-α, IL-6 or BAFF induces miR-155 and decreases PU.1 expression. Finally, inhibition of endogenous miR-155 in B cells of RA patients restores PU.1 and reduces production of antibodies. Our data suggest that miR-155 is an important regulator of B-cell activation in RA. PMID:27671860

  13. Coordinate suppression of B cell lymphoma by PTEN and SHIP phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Miletic, Ana V; Anzelon-Mills, Amy N; Mills, David M; Omori, Sidne A; Pedersen, Irene M; Shin, Dong-Mi; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Bolland, Silvia; Morse, Herbert C; Rickert, Robert C

    2010-10-25

    The inositol phosphatases phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulate phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated growth, survival, and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. Although deletion of PTEN in mouse T cells results in lethal T cell lymphomas, we find that animals lacking PTEN or SHIP in B cells show no evidence of malignancy. However, concomitant deletion of PTEN and SHIP (bPTEN/SHIP(-/-)) results in spontaneous and lethal mature B cell neoplasms consistent with marginal zone lymphoma or, less frequently, follicular or centroblastic lymphoma. bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells exhibit enhanced survival and express more MCL1 and less Bim. These cells also express low amounts of p27(kip1) and high amounts of cyclin D3 and thus appear poised to undergo proliferative expansion. Unlike normal B cells, bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells proliferate to the prosurvival factor B cell activating factor (BAFF). Interestingly, although BAFF availability may promote lymphoma progression, we demonstrate that BAFF is not required for the expansion of transferred bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells. This study reveals that PTEN and SHIP act cooperatively to suppress B cell lymphoma and provides the first direct evidence that SHIP is a tumor suppressor. As such, assessment of both PTEN and SHIP function are relevant to understanding the etiology of human B cell malignancies that exhibit augmented activation of the PI3K pathway.

  14. MicroRNA-155 influences B-cell function through PU.1 in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alivernini, Stefano; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Tolusso, Barbara; Benvenuto, Roberta; Elmesmari, Aziza; Canestri, Silvia; Petricca, Luca; Mangoni, Antonella; Fedele, Anna Laura; Di Mario, Clara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Gremese, Elisa; McInnes, Iain B; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2016-09-27

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is an important regulator of B cells in mice. B cells have a critical role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we show that miR-155 is highly expressed in peripheral blood B cells from RA patients compared with healthy individuals, particularly in the IgD(-)CD27(-) memory B-cell population in ACPA(+) RA. MiR-155 is highly expressed in RA B cells from patients with synovial tissue containing ectopic germinal centres compared with diffuse synovial tissue. MiR-155 expression is associated reciprocally with lower expression of PU.1 at B-cell level in the synovial compartment. Stimulation of healthy donor B cells with CD40L, anti-IgM, IL-21, CpG, IFN-α, IL-6 or BAFF induces miR-155 and decreases PU.1 expression. Finally, inhibition of endogenous miR-155 in B cells of RA patients restores PU.1 and reduces production of antibodies. Our data suggest that miR-155 is an important regulator of B-cell activation in RA.

  15. Interferon-driven deletion of antiviral B cells at the onset of chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Ertuna, Yusuf I.; Remy, Melissa; Sommerstein, Rami; Cornille, Karen; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Page, Nicolas; Zimmer, Gert; Geier, Florian; Straub, Tobias; Pircher, Hanspeter; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; Merkler, Doron; Pinschewer, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate antibody responses and perturbed B cell compartments represent hallmarks of persistent microbial infections, but the mechanisms whereby persisting pathogens suppress humoral immunity remain poorly defined. Using adoptive transfer experiments in the context of a chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of mice, we have documented rapid depletion of virus-specific B cells that coincided with the early type I interferon response to infection. We found that the loss of activated B cells was driven by type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling to several cell types including dendritic cells, T cells and myeloid cells. Intriguingly, this process was independent of B cell-intrinsic IFN-I sensing and resulted from biased differentiation of naïve B cells into short-lived antibody-secreting cells. The ability to generate robust B cell responses was restored upon IFN-I receptor blockade or, partially, when experimentally depleting myeloid cells or the IFN-I-induced cytokines interleukin 10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha. We have termed this IFN-I-driven depletion of B cellsB cell decimation”. Strategies to counter “B cell decimation” should thus help us better leverage humoral immunity in the combat against persistent microbial diseases. PMID:27872905

  16. EndoU is a novel regulator of AICD during peripheral B cell selection

    PubMed Central

    Poe, Jonathan C.; Kountikov, Evgueni I.; Lykken, Jacquelyn M.; Natarajan, Abirami; Marchuk, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Balanced transmembrane signals maintain a competent peripheral B cell pool limited in self-reactive B cells that may produce pathogenic autoantibodies. To identify molecules regulating peripheral B cell survival and tolerance to self-antigens (Ags), a gene modifier screen was performed with B cells from CD22-deficient C57BL/6 (CD22−/−[B6]) mice that undergo activation-induced cell death (AICD) and fail to up-regulate c-Myc expression after B cell Ag receptor ligation. Likewise, lysozyme auto-Ag–specific B cells in IgTg hen egg lysozyme (HEL) transgenic mice inhabit the spleen but undergo AICD after auto-Ag encounter. This gene modifier screen identified EndoU, a single-stranded RNA-binding protein of ancient origin, as a major regulator of B cell survival in both models. EndoU gene disruption prevents AICD and normalizes c-Myc expression. These findings reveal that EndoU is a critical regulator of an unexpected and novel RNA-dependent pathway controlling peripheral B cell survival and Ag responsiveness that may contribute to peripheral B cell tolerance. PMID:24344237

  17. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  18. Phosphatidylserine Outer Layer Translocation Is Implicated in IL-10 Secretion by Human Regulatory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Audo, Rachel; Hua, Charlotte; Hahne, Michael; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daien, Claire I

    2017-01-01

    B cells can have a regulatory role, mainly mediated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) cells remain to be better characterized. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine (PS), which is externalized during apoptosis. Previous works suggested that B10 cells are apoptotic cells since they bind Annexin V. Others showed that Annexin V binding could also be expressed on viable B cells. We aimed to explore if PS exposure can be a marker of B10 cells and if PS exposure has a functional role on B cell IL-10 production in healthy subjects. We found that B10 cells were significantly more often Annexin V+ than IL-10 non-producing B cells. After CpG activation, Annexin V+ B cells differentiated more often into B10 cells than Annexin Vneg B cells. Cell death and early apoptosis were similar between Annexin V+ and Annexin Vneg B cells. PS blockage, using biotinylated AnV and glyburide, decreased B10 cell differentiation. This study showed that B10 cells have an increased PS exposure independently of any apoptotic state. B cells exposing PS differentiate more into B10 cells whereas PS blockage inhibits B10 cells generation. These results strongly suggest a link between PS exposure and B10 cells.

  19. B cells produce less IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Parman, Yeşim G; Direskeneli, Haner; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-06-01

    B cells from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with autoantibodies (Aab) against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) or with no detectable Aab were investigated as cytokine producing cells in this study. B cells were evaluated for memory phenotypes and expressions of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12A. Induced productions of IL-10, IL-6, IL-12p40, TNF-α and LT from isolated B cells in vitro were measured by immunoassays. MG patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment had higher proportions of memory B cells compared with healthy controls and untreated patients. With CD40 stimulation MG patients produced significantly lower levels of IL-10, IL-6. With CD40 and B cell receptor stimulation of B cells, TNF-α production also decreased in addition to these cytokines. The lower levels of these cytokine productions were not related to treatment. Our results confirm a disturbance of B cell subpopulations in MG subgroups on immunosuppressive treatment. B cell derived IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α are down-regulated in MG, irrespective of different antibody productions. Ineffective cytokine production by B cells may be a susceptibility factor in dysregulation of autoimmune Aab production.

  20. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rovituso, Damiano M.; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1+ B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain −3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of airway allergy patients

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiang-Qian; Yang, Shao-Bo; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Xie, Rui-Di; Yang, Li-Tao; Ke, Yu-Xing; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Da-Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The dysfunction of peripheral immune tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Recent reports indicate that micro RNA (miR)-98 is associated with the process of aberrant immune responses. This study aims to test a hypothesis that miR-98 is associated with the pathogenesis of airway allergy via interfering with the development of regulatory B cells (Breg). In this study, patients with airway allergy were recruited into this study. The frequency of Bregs was assessed by flow cytometry. The levels of miR-98 in peripheral B cells were determined by RT-qPCR. A cell-culture model of B cells was developed to test the role of miR-98 in the repressing of interleukin (IL)-10 in B cells. The results showed that the levels of IL-10 in peripheral B cells were significantly lower in patients with airway allergy as compared with healthy subjects. High levels of miR-98 (one of the miR-98 members) were detected in peripheral B cells of patients with airway allergy, which was mimicked by stimulating B cells with IL-4. Histone acetyltransferase p300 was involved in the IL-4-induced miR-98 expression. miR-98 mediated the IL-4-inhibited IL-10 expression in B cells. In conclusion, miR-98 affects the expression of IL-10 in B cells and may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:28078048

  2. B cell maturation antigen deficiency exacerbates lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M; Greenley, Erin J; Tung, Kenneth S; Erickson, Loren D

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and its preclinical lupus-prone mouse models are autoimmune disorders involving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus results in B cell hyperactivity, survival of self-reactive B cells, and differentiation to autoantibody-secreting plasma cells (PCs). These corrupt B cell responses are, in part, controlled by excess levels of the cytokine BAFF that normally maintains B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance through limited production. B cell maturation Ag (BCMA) is a receptor for BAFF that, under nonautoimmune conditions, is important for sustaining enduring Ab protection by mediating survival of long-lived PCs but is not required for B cell maturation and homeostasis. Through analysis of two different lupus-prone mouse models deficient in BCMA, we identify BCMA as an important factor in regulating peripheral B cell expansion, differentiation, and survival. We demonstrate that a BCMA deficiency combined with the lpr mutation or the murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 causes dramatic B cell and PC lymphoproliferation, accelerated autoantibody production, and early lethality. This study unexpectedly reveals that BCMA works to control B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance in systemic autoimmunity.

  3. Plasmodium chabaudi infection induces AID expression in transitional and marginal zone B cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilmore, Joel R.; Maue, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) is associated with Epstein–Barr virus and repeated malaria infections. A defining feature of eBL is the translocation of the c‐myc oncogene to the control of the immunoglobulin promoter. Activation‐induced cytidine deaminase (AID) has been shown to be critical for this translocation. Malaria infection induces AID in germinal center B cells, but whether malaria infection more broadly affects AID activation in extrafollicular B cells is unknown. Methods We either stimulated purified B cells from AID‐green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter mice or infected AID‐GFP mice with Plasmodium chabaudi, AID fluorescence was monitored in B cell subsets by flow cytometry. Results In vitro analysis of B cells from these mice revealed that CpG (a Toll‐like receptor 9 ligand) was a potent inducer of AID in both mature and immature B cell subsets. Infection of AID‐GFP mice with Plasmodium chabaudi demonstrated that AID expression occurs in transitional and marginal zone B cells during acute malaria infection. Transitional B cells were also capable of differentiating into antibody secreting cells when stimulated in vitro with CpG when isolated from a P. chabaudi‐infected mouse. Conclusions These data suggest that P. chabaudi is capable of inducing AID expression in B cell subsets that do not participate in the germinal center reaction, suggesting an alternative role for malaria in the etiology of eBL. PMID:27980783

  4. Phosphatidylserine Outer Layer Translocation Is Implicated in IL-10 Secretion by Human Regulatory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Michael; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daien, Claire I.

    2017-01-01

    B cells can have a regulatory role, mainly mediated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) cells remain to be better characterized. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine (PS), which is externalized during apoptosis. Previous works suggested that B10 cells are apoptotic cells since they bind Annexin V. Others showed that Annexin V binding could also be expressed on viable B cells. We aimed to explore if PS exposure can be a marker of B10 cells and if PS exposure has a functional role on B cell IL-10 production in healthy subjects. We found that B10 cells were significantly more often Annexin V+ than IL-10 non-producing B cells. After CpG activation, Annexin V+ B cells differentiated more often into B10 cells than Annexin Vneg B cells. Cell death and early apoptosis were similar between Annexin V+ and Annexin Vneg B cells. PS blockage, using biotinylated AnV and glyburide, decreased B10 cell differentiation. This study showed that B10 cells have an increased PS exposure independently of any apoptotic state. B cells exposing PS differentiate more into B10 cells whereas PS blockage inhibits B10 cells generation. These results strongly suggest a link between PS exposure and B10 cells. PMID:28072868

  5. Increased RP105-Negative B Cells in IgG4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Koarada, S; Tashiro, S; Nagao, N; Suematsu, R; Ohta, A; Tada, Y

    2013-01-01

    Four patients with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) showed increased percentages of RP105-negative B cells in the peripheral blood. Case 1: A 66-year-old man having retroperitoneal fibrosis had 18.8% of RP105-negative B cells. Oral prednisolone improved the affected lesions and the percentage of RP105-negative B cells decreased (3.2%) after the treatment. Case 2: A 53-year-old man with retroperitoneal fibrosis had 27.9% of RP105-negative B cells. Case 3: A 38-year-old man with follicular hyperplasia showed increased percentage of RP105-negative B cells (8.3%). Case 4: A 60-year-old man with interstitial nephritis had 27.5% of RP105-negative B cells. The treatment decreased the numbers of RP105-negative B cells. Increased numbers of RP105-negatvie B cells is possibly associated with disease activity of IgG4-RD. Analysis of expression of RP105 on B cells may be helpful in evaluation of disease activity of IgG4-RD.

  6. Assessing somatic hypermutation in Ramos B cells after overexpression or knockdown of specific genes.

    PubMed

    Upton, Dana C; Unniraman, Shyam

    2011-11-01

    B cells start their life with low affinity antibodies generated by V(D)J recombination. However, upon detecting a pathogen, the variable (V) region of an immunoglobulin (Ig) gene is mutated approximately 100,000-fold more than the rest of the genome through somatic hypermutation (SHM), resulting in high affinity antibodies. In addition, class switch recombination (CSR) produces antibodies with different effector functions depending on the kind of immune response that is needed for a particular pathogen. Both CSR and SHM are initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which deaminates cytosine residues in DNA to produce uracils. These uracils are processed by error-prone forms of repair pathways, eventually leading to mutations and recombination. Our current understanding of the molecular details of SHM and CSR come from a combination of studies in mice, primary cells, cell lines, and cell-free experiments. Mouse models remain the gold standard with genetic knockouts showing critical roles for many repair factors (e.g. Ung, Msh2, Msh6, Exo1, and polymerase η). However, not all genes are amenable for knockout studies. For example, knockouts of several double-strand break repair proteins are embryonically lethal or impair B-cell development. Moreover, sometimes the specific function of a protein in SHM or CSR may be masked by more global defects caused by the knockout. In addition, since experiments in mice can be lengthy, altering expression of individual genes in cell lines has become an increasingly popular first step to identifying and characterizing candidate genes. Ramos - a Burkitt lymphoma cell line that constitutively undergoes SHM - has been a popular cell-line model to study SHM. One advantage of Ramos cells is that they have a built-in convenient semi-quantitative measure of SHM. Wild type cells express IgM and, as they pick up mutations, some of the mutations knock out IgM expression. Therefore, assaying IgM loss by fluorescence

  7. Genetic sperm defects.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Genetic sperm defects are specific sperm defects, which have been shown to have a genetic mode of transmission. Such genetic linkage, either direct or indirect, has been associated with a number of sperm defects in different species, with this number increasing with improved diagnostic capabilities. A number of sperm defects, which have proven or suspected genetic modes of transmission are discussed herein, with particular emphasis on cattle. These include: 1. Acrosome defects (knobbed, ruffled and incomplete); 2. Head defects (abnormal condensation, decapitated, round head, rolled head, nuclear crest); 3. Midpiece abnormalities ("Dag" defect, "corkscrew" defect, "pseudo-droplet" defect); 4. Tail defects ("tail stump" defect, primary ciliary dyskinesia).

  8. Induction of in vivo antipolysaccharide immunoglobulin responses to intact Streptococcus pneumoniae is more heavily dependent on Btk-mediated B-cell receptor signaling than antiprotein responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Q; Sen, Goutam; Guo, Shuling; Witte, Owen N; Snapper, Clifford M

    2006-02-01

    The relative role of Btk-dependent B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the induction of antipolysaccharide (anti-PS) and antiprotein immunoglobulin (Ig) responses to an intact extracellular bacterium in vivo is unknown. Btklow mice exhibit reduced BCR signaling but largely restore B-cell development. Btklow mice immunized with intact Streptococcus pneumoniae elicit reduced anti-PS but normal antiprotein Ig responses. Immunization of Btklow mice with PS-protein conjugate in saline results in an even more profound defect in the anti-PS but not antiprotein response, which is largely restored by use of a CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide as an adjuvant. These data demonstrate a greater dependence on Btk-mediated BCR signaling for physiologic anti-PS relative to antiprotein responses, as well as the existence of a compensatory Toll-like-receptor-mediated signaling pathway naturally triggered in response to intact bacterial pathogens.

  9. Suppression of human B cell activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin involves altered regulation of B cell lymphoma-6.

    PubMed

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S; Crawford, Robert B; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2015-03-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces marked suppression of the primary humoral immune response in virtually every animal species evaluated thus far. In addition, epidemiological studies performed in areas of dioxin contamination have identified an association between TCDD exposure and an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Recent studies using an in vitro CD40 ligand model of human B cell differentiation have shown that TCDD impairs both B cell activation and differentiation. The present study extends these findings by identifying B cell lymphoma-6 [BCL-6] as a putative cellular target for deregulation by TCDD, which may contribute to suppression of B cell function as well as NHL. BCL-6 is a multifunctional transcriptional repressor frequently mutated in NHLs and known to regulate critical events of B cell activation and differentiation. In the presence of TCDD, BCL-6 protein levels were elevated and concurrently the same population of cells with high BCL-6 levels showed decreased CD80 and CD69 expression indicative of impaired cellular activation. The elevated BCL-6 levels resulted in a concomitant increase in BCL-6 DNA binding activity at its cognate binding site within an enhancer region for CD80. Furthermore, a small molecule inhibitor of BCL-6 activity reversed TCDD-mediated suppression of CD80 expression in human B cells. In the presence of a low-affinity ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), suppression of B cell activation and altered BCL-6 regulation were not observed. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the role of BCL-6 in the suppression of human B cell activation by TCDD.

  10. Engagement of CD22 on B cells with the monoclonal antibody epratuzumab stimulates the phosphorylation of upstream inhibitory signals of the B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Lumb, Simon; Fleischer, Sarah J; Wiedemann, Annika; Daridon, Capucine; Maloney, Alison; Shock, Anthony; Dörner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The binding of antigen to the B cell receptor (BCR) results in a cascade of signalling events that ultimately drive B cell activation. Uncontrolled B cell activation is regulated by negative feedback loops that involve inhibitory co-receptors such as CD22 and CD32B that exert their functions following phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). The CD22-targeted antibody epratuzumab has previously been shown to inhibit BCR-driven signalling events, but its effects on ITIM phosphorylation of CD22 and CD32B have not been properly evaluated. The present study therefore employed both immunoprecipitation and flow cytometry approaches to elucidate the effects of epratuzumab on direct phosphorylation of key tyrosine (Tyr) residues on both these proteins, using both transformed B cell lines and primary human B cells. Epratuzumab induced the phosphorylation of Tyr(822) on CD22 and enhanced its co-localisation with SHP-1. Additionally, in spite of high basal phosphorylation of other key ITIMs on CD22, in primary human B cells epratuzumab also enhanced phosphorylation of Tyr(807), a residue involved in the recruitment of Grb2. Such initiation events could explain the effects of epratuzumab on downstream signalling in B cells. Finally, we were able to demonstrate that epratuzumab stimulated the phosphorylation of Tyr(292) on the low affinity inhibitory Fc receptor CD32B which would further attenuate BCR-induced signalling. Together, these data demonstrate that engagement of CD22 with epratuzumab leads to the direct phosphorylation of key upstream inhibitory receptors of BCR signalling and may help to explain how this antibody modulates B cell function.

  11. Activation of resting human B cells by helper T-cell clone supernatant: characterization of a human B-cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Diu, A; Gougeon, M L; Moreau, J L; Reinherz, E L; Thèze, J

    1987-01-01

    The effects of helper T-cell clone supernatants on resting human B cells were investigated. Four different helper T-cell clones (two T4+ and two T8+) were stimulated by anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies on Sepharose beads or anti-T11(2) plus anti-T11(3) monoclonal antibodies. The supernatants from these activated clones induced the proliferation of highly purified resting B lymphocytes from the peripheral blood. The B cells exhibited a cell size and a surface-antigen pattern (4F2 antigen and transferrin receptor) of phase G0 B cells, and they were functionally resting. In response to T-cell supernatants a large fraction of the B cells enlarged and expressed 4F2 antigens and transferrin receptors. In gel filtration, the corresponding activity migrated with an apparent Mr of 12,000-15,000. Our findings strongly support the existence of a human B-cell-activating factor acting on resting B cells and causing them to enter phase G1 of the cell cycle. PMID:2962196

  12. A cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of germinal center B-cell-like subtype in the right tonsil

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changrui; Shi, Xiuying; Fan, Chuifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cyclin D1-positive tumor cells are commonly found in mantle cell lymphoma but they are very rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Clinical findings/Patient concerns: Here we present a rare case of cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the right tonsil of a 50-year-old man. Computed tomographic imaging detected a mass, about 2.5 cm × 1.8 cm in size, in the left side of the oropharynx. Diagnoses: Microscopically, the tumor cells were located under the pharyngeal mucosa and diffusely arranged. The tumor cells were large, with marked nuclear atypia. On performing immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells showed diffuse positive staining for CD10, CD20, cyclin D1, and Pax-5, and negative staining for CD3, CD15, CD30, CD56, and CK. Bcl-6 and Mum-1 expression were observed in 60% and 80% of tumor cells, respectively. The tumor Ki67 index was about 60%. Based on these findings, The tumor was diagnosed as a rare cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma rather than a mantle cell lymphoma. Conclusion: Cyclin D1-positive large B-cell lymphoma is rare, but as large B-cell lymphoma is a common type of lymphoma, cyclin D1-positive large B-cell lymphoma should be considered a major possibility during differential diagnosis, including in the tonsils. PMID:28296741

  13. Translational Mini-Review Series on B Cell-Directed Therapies: The pathogenic role of B cells in autoantibody-associated autoimmune diseases – lessons from B cell-depletion therapy

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, M J; de la Torre, I

    2009-01-01

    B cell depletion therapy with rituximab (BCDT) is a licensed treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and has shown promising results in the treatment of severe, refractory patients with other autoantibody-associated autoimmune diseases (AAID). The exact role that B cells play in the pathogenesis of AAID and consequently the mechanisms by which BCDT is effective are not known. The two more widely discussed hypotheses are that BCDT is effective because it removes the precursors of plasma cells producing pathogenic autoantibody species, or because it depletes a critical mass of autoreactive B cell clones that present antigen to pathogenic autoreactive T cells. This review will focus on the effects of BCDT and whether the response of patients with AAID to BCDT could be due ultimately to its effects on autoantibodies. A better knowledge of the main role that B cells play in the pathogenesis of the different diseases and a better understanding of the most likely mechanism of relapse following an earlier response to BCDT would help to guide further developments of B cell targeting therapies and potentially increase the chance of designing a protocol that could induce a long-term remission. PMID:19604258

  14. IL-15 Expression on RA Synovial Fibroblasts Promotes B Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Miguel, Marta; García-Carmona, Yolanda; Balsa, Alejandro; Bautista-Caro, María-Belén; Arroyo-Villa, Irene; Cobo-Ibáñez, Tatiana; Bonilla-Hernán, María Gema; de Ayala, Carlos Pérez; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Martín-Mola, Emilio; Miranda-Carús, María-Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to examine the role of RA Synovial Fibroblast (RASFib) IL-15 expression on B cell survival. Methods Magnetically sorted peripheral blood memory B cells from 15 healthy subjects were cocultured with RASFib. Results RASFib constitutively expressed membrane IL-15. Survival of isolated B cells cultured for 6 days, below 5%, was extended in coculture with RASFib to 52+/−8% (p<0.001). IL-15 neutralizing agents but not isotype controls, reduced this rate to 31+/−6% (p<0.05). Interestingly, rhIL-15 had no effect on isolated B cells but significantly increased their survival in coculture with RASFib. In parallel, B cell IL-15R chains were upregulated in cocultures. BAFF and VCAM-1, that are expressed on RASFib, were tested as potential candidates involved in upregulating B cell IL-15R. Culture of B cells in the presence of rhBAFF or rhVCAM-1 resulted in significantly increased survival, together with upregulation of all three IL-15R chains; in parallel, rhIL-15 potentiated the anti-apoptotic effect of BAFF and VCAM-1. Both BAFF and VCAM-1 neutralizing agents downmodulated the effect of RASFib on B cell survival and IL-15R expression. In parallel, rhIL-15 had a lower effect on the survival of B cells cocultured with RASFib in the presence of BAFF or VCAM-1 neutralizing agents. Peripheral blood B cells from 15 early RA patients demonstrated an upregulated IL-15R and increased survival in cocultures. Conclusion IL-15 expression on RASFib significantly contributes to the anti-apoptotic effect of RASFib on B cells. IL-15 action is facilitated by BAFF and VCAM-1 expressed on RASFib, through an upregulation of IL-15R chains. PMID:22792388

  15. Pax5: a master regulator of B cell development and leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Medvedovic, Jasna; Ebert, Anja; Tagoh, Hiromi; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2011-01-01

    The B cell lineage of the hematopoietic system is responsible for the generation of high-affinity antibodies, which provide humoral immunity for protection against foreign pathogens. B cell commitment and development depend on many transcription factors including Pax5. Here, we review the different functions of Pax5 in regulating various aspects of B lymphopoiesis. At B cell commitment, Pax5 restricts the developmental potential of lymphoid progenitors to the B cell pathway by repressing B-lineage-inappropriate genes, while it simultaneously promotes B cell development by activating B-lymphoid-specific genes. Pax5 thereby controls gene transcription by recruiting chromatin-remodeling, histone-modifying, and basal transcription factor complexes to its target genes. Moreover, Pax5 contributes to the diversity of the antibody repertoire by controlling V(H)-DJ(H) recombination by inducing contraction of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus in pro-B cells, which is likely mediated by PAIR elements in the 5' region of the V(H) gene cluster. Importantly, all mature B cell types depend on Pax5 for their differentiation and function. Pax5 thus controls the identity of B lymphocytes throughout B cell development. Consequently, conditional loss of Pax5 allows mature B cells from peripheral lymphoid organs to develop into functional T cells in the thymus via dedifferentiation to uncommitted progenitors in the bone marrow. Pax5 has also been implicated in human B cell malignancies because it can function as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor or oncogenic translocation fusion protein in B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. TGF-β3 Inhibits Antibody Production by Human B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Yumi; Sumitomo, Shuji; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Akari; Kochi, Yuta; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Ota, Mineto; Komai, Toshihiko; Inoue, Mariko; Morita, Kaoru; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujio, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β is a pleotropic cytokine involved in various biological processes. Of the three isoforms of TGF-β, TGF-β1 has long been recognized as an important inhibitory cytokine in the immune system and has been reported to inhibit B cell function in both mice and humans. Recently, it has been suggested that TGF-β3 may play an important role in the regulation of immune system in mice. Murine CD4+CD25-LAG3+ regulatory T cells suppress B cell function through the production of TGF-β3, and it has been reported that TGF-β3 is therapeutic in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of TGF-β3 on human B cells has not been reported, and we herein examined the effect of TGF-β3 on human B cells. TGF-β3 suppressed B cell survival, proliferation, differentiation into plasmablasts, and antibody secretion. Although the suppression of human B cells by TGF-β1 has long been recognized, the precise mechanism for the suppression of B cell function by TGF-β1 remains elusive; therefore, we examined the effect of TGF-β1 and β3 on pathways important in B cell activation and differentiation. TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 inhibited some of the key molecules of the cell cycle, as well as transcription factors important in B cell differentiation into antibody secreting cells such as IRF4, Blimp-1, and XBP1. TGF-β1 and β3 also inhibited B cell receptor signaling. Our results suggest that TGF-β3 modifying therapy might be therapeutic in autoimmune diseases with B cell dysregulation in humans. PMID:28052118

  17. Synergistic activation of cells by Epstein-Barr virus and B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is initiated by virus binding to the C3dg-C3d receptor CR2. Several workers have implicated this receptor in the control of B-cell activation by examining the effects of antibodies to CR2 and isolated C3d on B-cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here on the activating effects of irradiated EBV, which retains its capacity to bind to CR2 but loses its ability to function as a T-independent B-cell activator. EBV synergized with B-cell growth factor in the induction of uptake of tritiated thymidine by T cell-depleted leukocytes from seronegative donors but did not induce secretion of immunoglobulin. Synergism could be inhibited with an anti-viral antibody that inhibited binding of EBV to CR2. No similar synergism was found between EBV and recombinant interleukin 2, interleukin 1 alpha, or gamma interferon or with the lipid A fraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. EBV may thus initiate B-cell activation as it binds to CR2. Infectious virus may, under normal circumstances, induce the cell to make those growth factors necessary to support B-cell proliferation; the difficulty of transforming cells with transfected EBV DNA may in part reflect the absence of an activation event provided by intact virus as it attaches to CR2. The synergism of EBV and B-cell growth factor more clearly distinguishes the effects of B-cell growth factor from those of interleukin 1 and interleukin 2 in other models of B-cell activation. Thus, this may be a useful model for further delineation of unique effects of B-cell growth factor on B-cell function. PMID:3027404

  18. Regulation of Cell Surface CB2 Receptor during Human B Cell Activation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Roth, Michael D

    2017-03-31

    Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) is the primary receptor pathway mediating the immunologic consequences of cannabinoids. We recently reported that human peripheral blood B cells express CB2 on both the extracellular membrane and at intracellular sites, where-as monocytes and T cells only express intracellular CB2. To better understand the pattern of CB2 expression by human B cells, we examined CD20(+) B cells from three tissue sources. Both surface and intracellular expression were present and uniform in cord blood B cells, where all cells exhibited a naïve mature phenotype (IgD(+)/CD38(Dim)). While naïve mature and quiescent memory B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(-)) from tonsils and peripheral blood exhibited a similar pattern, tonsillar activated B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(+)) expressed little to no surface CB2. We hypothesized that regulation of the surface CB2 receptor may occur during B cell activation. Consistent with this, a B cell lymphoma cell line known to exhibit an activated phenotype (SUDHL-4) was found to lack cell surface CB2 but express intracellular CB2. Furthermore, in vitro activation of human cord blood resulted in a down-regulation of surface CB2 on those B cells acquiring the activated phenotype but not on those retaining IgD expression. Using a CB2 expressing cell line (293 T/CB2-GFP), confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of both cell surface expression and multifocal intracellular expression, the latter of which co-localized with endoplasmic reticulum but not with mitochondria, lysosomes, or nucleus. Our findings suggest a dynamic multi-compartment expression pattern for CB2 in B cells that is specifically modulated during the course of B cell activation.

  19. Ageing Adversely Affects the Migration and Function of Marginal Zone B Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Vivian M; Mabbott, Neil A

    2017-04-02

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells are positioned within the spleen to capture blood-borne Ag and immune complexes and deliver them to follicular dendritic cells in the B cell follicles. We show that within the spleens of aged mice antigen (Ag) capture by MZ B cells, and their ability to shuttle between the follicle and MZ were impaired. The ability of aged MZ B cells to migrate towards the MZ chemoattractant sphingosine 1-phosphate was increased, suggesting that aged MZ B cells had a greater propensity to be retained within the MZ. An extrinsic impairment in aged B cell migration towards the MZ was demonstrated using bone marrow chimeras. The follicular shuttling of MZ B cells derived from either young or aged bone marrow was similarly reduced in aged recipient spleens, showing that ageing effects on splenic stromal cells were responsible for the impaired follicular shuttling of MZ B cells. MZ B cells rapidly mount T cell-independent (TI) antibody-responses to microbial polysaccharide Ag. In aged mice the ability to produce immunoglobulins in response to the TI-type 1 Ag, TNP-LPS, was impaired. These ageing related changes to the MZ and MZ B cells have implications for the clearance of blood-borne pathogens. Indeed elderly people have increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a TI Ag, and decreased responses to vaccination. A thorough analysis of the mechanisms that underpin the ageing-related decline in the status of the MZ and MZ B cells will help the design of novel treatments to improve immunity in the elderly. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. B cell depletion for autoimmune diseases in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Annette F; Sengler, Claudia; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Gruhn, Bernd; Kranz, A Birgitta; Lehmann, Hartwig; Kleinert, Daniela; Pape, Lars; Girschick, Hermann J; Foeldvari, Ivan; Haffner, Dieter; Haas, Johannes P; Moebius, Dagmar; Foell, Dirk; Peitz, Joachim; Grote, Veit

    2011-01-01

    Data on B cell depletion therapy in severe autoimmune diseases in paediatric patients are very limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study and recruited patients who were treated with rituximab (RTX) and followed up for at least 6 months through the German societies of paediatric rheumatology and nephrology. The aim was to describe the spectrum of autoimmune disorders for which RTX was used and to describe the applied therapeutic regimens, the observed efficacy, as well as potential immunological side effects. The need to develop standard treatment guidelines for future trials should be discussed. Sixty-five patients were included. Nineteen patients suffered from systemic lupus erythematosus, 13 from vasculitic disorders, 12 from hematological autoimmune diseases, 5 from mixed connective tissue disorders, 4 from juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and 9 had other autoimmune diseases. Adverse, infusion-related events were reported in 12/65 (18%) patients. Considering laboratory and clinical parameters, 13 patients (22%) were in complete remission, 31 (52%) were in partial remission, 6 (10%) were unchanged and 10 (17%) had progressed after 6 months. In 46% of the patients, the steroid dose could be more than halved. IgG, IgM and IgA decreased from normal levels prior to RTX therapy to below normal levels at 6 months in 2/22 (9%), 10/21 (48%), and 4/22 (18%) patients, respectively. Immunoglobulin deficiency or prolonged CD20 depletion was reported in eight patients after an observation period longer than 12 months. RTX therapy led to a perceivable reduction in disease activity. However, long-term immunological alterations may occur in more than 10% of the patients. Guidelines and protocols for off-label therapy are desirable to document reasonable follow-up data. Controlled prospective studies for RTX therapies in children with standardised therapeutic and diagnostic protocols are urgently needed.

  1. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Stage I-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-15

    CD20 Positive; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  2. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  3. Glycosidase inhibitors (castanospermine and swainsonine) and neuraminidase inhibit pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, T; Kanayama, Y; Nishiura, T; Nakao, H; Yonezawa, T; Tarui, S

    1992-08-01

    Castanospermine (CSP), an inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase, enhanced immunoglobulin (Ig) release in a Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-induced lymphocyte culture (Scand. J. Immunol. 1990. 32: 529). In a pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-human lymphocyte culture, unlike the SAC-stimulated system, CSP strongly decreased the number of IgG-, IgA- and IgM-secreting cells as well as that of Ig-bearing cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes treated with swainsonine, a mannosidase II inhibitor, or with neuraminidase also showed a reduced response to PWM. In cross-culture experiments, only a mixture of B cells pretreated with either agent and untreated T cells showed such a suppressive effect. Adhesion was decreased between B cells treated with either agent and untreated T cells, but not between treated T cells and untreated B cells. These results demonstrate that a certain alteration in B cell membrane oligosaccharides inhibited the T cell-B cell adhesion in the PWM culture, leading to an arrest of B cell maturation. Considering that these inhibitors eventually prevent terminal sialic acid addition, the present study provides evidence that sialic acids on B cell surface oligosaccharides play a biological role in the T cell-B cell interaction.

  4. Blood B Cell and Regulatory Subset Content in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Jakob; Deng, Jiusheng; Lava, Neil; Tyor, William; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective B cell targeted therapies have been effective in slowing multiple sclerosis (MS) disease progression suggesting a direct causal link for this lymphoid subset. A small subset of B cells with regulative properties (Bregs) exists in peripheral blood, and induction of Bregs ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the murine model for MS. Therefore the frequency of B cell subsets and regulatory B cells in particular in peripheral blood of MS patients is of interest. Methods The phenotype and frequency of B cell subsets in peripheral blood from 32 MS patients and 34 healthy controls (HC) were examined using flow cytometry. Results We found that there is an increase in CD19+ cell number in MS 1347 ± 159 cells/μL, (average ± SEM) compared to HC, 935 ± 129 cells/μL and no apparent deficiency in B-cells with a regulatory phenotype. In addition, we observed a loss of correlation between CD19+ B cells and total lymphocyte count in MS. Conclusion These findings suggest altered blood B-cell homeostasis in MS patients. PMID:26137596

  5. A Transcriptional Regulatory Switch Underlying B-Cell Terminal Differentiation and Its Disruption by Dioxin (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terminal differentiation of B cells in lymphoid organs into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon antigen stimulation is a crucial step in the humoral immune response. The architecture of the B-cell transcriptional regulatory network consists of coupled mutually-repressive fee...

  6. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; Van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J

    2015-01-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation. PMID:25999171

  7. SIGLEC-G deficiency increases susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Giorgia; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Rodriguez, Tania Veliz; Apollonio, Benedetta; Dagklis, Antonis; Rocchi, Martina; Innocenzi, Anna; Casola, Stefano; Winkler, Thomas H.; Nitschke, Lars; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ghia, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin SIGLEC-G is a negative regulator of B-cell receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Its deficiency leads to reduced turnover and increased proliferation and survival of murine B-1a cells. Siglecg−/− mice show a premature expansion of polyclonal CD5+ B cells in the spleen and the peritoneal cavity. Here we studied the fate of B lymphocytes in Siglecg−/− mice over time. We demonstrate that in aging animals SIGLEC-G deficiency promotes progressive accumulation of monoclonal B lymphocytes and increases the susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Lymphoid tumors arising in aged Siglecg−/− mice are monoclonal and histologically heterogeneous as they include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and medium-to-large B-cell monomorphic lymphoma but surprisingly not chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The tumors express high levels of BCL-2 and are transplantable. In keeping with these findings we have also observed a remarkable down-regulation of the human ortholog SIGLEC10 in human B-cell lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Taken together, these observations indicate that the down-regulation of negative B-cell receptor regulators such as SIGLEC-G/SIGLEC10 may represent another mechanism relevant to the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24859880

  8. Whole-genome fingerprint of the DNA methylome during human B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Marta; Merkel, Angelika; Heath, Simon; Queirós, Ana C; Schuyler, Ronald P; Castellano, Giancarlo; Beekman, Renée; Raineri, Emanuele; Esteve, Anna; Clot, Guillem; Verdaguer-Dot, Néria; Duran-Ferrer, Martí; Russiñol, Nuria; Vilarrasa-Blasi, Roser; Ecker, Simone; Pancaldi, Vera; Rico, Daniel; Agueda, Lidia; Blanc, Julie; Richardson, David; Clarke, Laura; Datta, Avik; Pascual, Marien; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Alignani, Diego; Paiva, Bruno; Caron, Gersende; Fest, Thierry; Muench, Marcus O; Fomin, Marina E; Lee, Seung-Tae; Wiemels, Joseph L; Valencia, Alfonso; Gut, Marta; Flicek, Paul; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Siebert, Reiner; Küppers, Ralf; Gut, Ivo G; Campo, Elías; Martín-Subero, José I

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed the DNA methylome of ten subpopulations spanning the entire B cell differentiation program by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density microarrays. We observed that non-CpG methylation disappeared upon B cell commitment, whereas CpG methylation changed extensively during B cell maturation, showing an accumulative pattern and affecting around 30% of all measured CpG sites. Early differentiation stages mainly displayed enhancer demethylation, which was associated with upregulation of key B cell transcription factors and affected multiple genes involved in B cell biology. Late differentiation stages, in contrast, showed extensive demethylation of heterochromatin and methylation gain at Polycomb-repressed areas, and genes with apparent functional impact in B cells were not affected. This signature, which has previously been linked to aging and cancer, was particularly widespread in mature cells with an extended lifespan. Comparing B cell neoplasms with their normal counterparts, we determined that they frequently acquire methylation changes in regions already undergoing dynamic methylation during normal B cell differentiation.

  9. Targeting the B cell receptor signaling pathway in B lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, Maike; Müschen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW Normal B cells that failed to productively rearrange immunoglobulin V region genes, encoding a functional B cell receptor (BCR) are destined to die. Likewise, the majority of B cell malignancies remain dependent on functional BCR signaling, while in some subtypes BCR expression is missing and, apparently, counterselected. Here we summarize recent the experimental evidence for the importance of BCR signaling and clinical concepts to target the BCR pathway in B cell leukemia and lymphoma. RECENT FINDINGS While the dependency on pre-BCR signaling in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) seems to be limited to few ALL subtypes (e.g. TCF3-PBX1), most mature B cell lymphomas rely on BCR signaling provided by different stimuli e.g. tonic B cell signaling, chronic (auto)-antigen exposure, and self-binding properties of the BCR. The finding that in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), BCRs bind to an epitope on the BCR itself unravels a novel concept for CLL pathogenesis. SUMMARY Targeting of the B cell receptor tyrosine kinases SYK, BTK, and PI3K achieve promising clinical responses in various mature B cell malignancies and might also be useful in defined subsets of ALL. However, further understanding of the BCR signal integration in the different disease groups are required to accurately predict, which groups of patients will benefit from BCR pathway-inhibition. PMID:24811161

  10. IgG-Immune Complexes Promote B Cell Memory by Inducing BAFF.

    PubMed

    Kang, SunAh; Keener, Amanda B; Jones, Shannon Z; Benschop, Robert J; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Clarke, Stephen H; Matsushima, Glenn K; Whitmire, Jason K; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Memory B cell responses are vital for protection against infections but must also be regulated to prevent autoimmunity. Cognate T cell help, somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation within germinal centers (GCs) are required for high-affinity memory B cell formation; however, the signals that commit GC B cells to the memory pool remain unclear. In this study, we identify a role for IgG-immune complexes (ICs), FcγRs, and BAFF during the formation of memory B cells in mice. We found that early secretion of IgG in response to immunization with a T-dependent Ag leads to IC-FcγR interactions that induce dendritic cells to secrete BAFF, which acts at or upstream of Bcl-6 in activated B cells. Loss of CD16, hematopoietic cell-derived BAFF, or blocking IC:FcγR regions in vivo diminished the expression of Bcl-6, the frequency of GC and memory B cells, and secondary Ab responses. BAFF also contributed to the maintenance and/or expansion of the follicular helper T cell population, although it was dispensable for their formation. Thus, early Ab responses contribute to the optimal formation of B cell memory through IgG-ICs and BAFF. Our work defines a new role for FcγRs in GC and memory B cell responses.

  11. The Other Function: Class II-Restricted Antigen Presentation by B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Lital N.; Jiang, Wei; Bhamidipati, Kartik; Millican, Matthew; Macaubas, Claudia; Hung, Shu-chen; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2017-01-01

    Mature B lymphocytes (B cells) recognize antigens using their B cell receptor (BCR) and are activated to become antibody-producing cells. In addition, and integral to the development of a high-affinity antibodies, B cells utilize the specialized major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) antigen presentation pathway to process BCR-bound and internalized protein antigens and present selected peptides in complex with MHCII to CD4+ T cells. This interaction influences the fate of both types of lymphocytes and shapes immune outcomes. Specific, effective, and optimally timed antigen presentation by B cells requires well-controlled intracellular machinery, often regulated by the combined effects of several molecular events. Here, we delineate and summarize these events in four steps along the antigen presentation pathway: (1) antigen capture and uptake by B cells; (2) intersection of internalized antigen/BCRs complexes with MHCII in peptide-loading compartments; (3) generation and regulation of MHCII/peptide complexes; and (4) exocytic transport for presentation of MHCII/peptide complexes at the surface of B cells. Finally, we discuss modulation of the MHCII presentation pathway across B cell development and maturation to effector cells, with an emphasis on the shaping of the MHCII/peptide repertoire by two key antigen presentation regulators in B cells: HLA-DM and HLA-DO. PMID:28386257

  12. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Nico; Cantisani, Rocco; Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  13. Regulatory B cells present in lymph nodes draining a murine tumor.

    PubMed

    Maglioco, Andrea; Machuca, Damián G; Camerano, Gabriela; Costa, Héctor A; Ruggiero, Raúl; Dran, Graciela I

    2014-01-01

    In cancer, B cells have been classically associated with antibody secretion, antigen presentation and T cell activation. However, a possible role for B lymphocytes in impairing antitumor response and collaborating with tumor growth has been brought into focus. Recent reports have described the capacity of B cells to negatively affect immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The highly immunogenic mouse tumor MCC loses its immunogenicity and induces systemic immune suppression and tolerance as it grows. We have previously demonstrated that MCC growth induces a distinct and progressive increase in B cell number and proportion in the tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLN), as well as a less prominent increase in T regulatory cells. The aim of this research was to study B cell characteristics and function in the lymph node draining MCC tumor and to analyze whether these cells may be playing a role in suppressing antitumor response and favoring tumor progression. Results indicate that B cells from TDLN expressed increased CD86 and MHCII co-stimulatory molecules indicating activated phenotype, as well as intracellular IL-10, FASL and Granzyme B, molecules with regulatory immunosuppressive properties. Additionally, B cells showed high inhibitory upon T cell proliferation ex vivo, and a mild capacity to secrete antibodies. Our conclusion is that even when evidence of B cell-mediated activity of the immune response is present, B cells from TDLN exhibit regulatory phenotype and inhibitory activity, probably contributing to the state of immunological tolerance characteristic of the advanced tumor condition.

  14. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Denise F.; Kieu, Hung T.; Castillo, Luis D.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease. PMID:28095513

  15. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells.

  16. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor controls cell-fate decisions in B cells.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Yewdell, William T; Angeletti, Davide; Yen, Wei-Feng; Wheatley, Adam K; Bradfield, Christopher A; McDermott, Adrian B; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Generation of cellular heterogeneity is an essential feature of the adaptive immune system. This is best exemplified during humoral immune response when an expanding B cell clone assumes multiple cell fates, including class-switched B cells, antibody-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. Although each cell type is essential for immunity, their generation must be exquisitely controlled because a class-switched B cell cannot revert back to the parent isotype, and a terminally differentiated plasma cell cannot contribute to the memory pool. In this study, we show that an environmental sensor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is highly induced upon B cell activation and serves a critical role in regulating activation-induced cell fate outcomes. We find that AhR negatively regulates class-switch recombination ex vivo by altering activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression. We further demonstrate that AhR suppresses class switching in vivo after influenza virus infection and immunization with model antigens. In addition, by regulating Blimp-1 expression via Bach2, AhR represses differentiation of B cells into plasmablasts ex vivo and antibody-secreting plasma cells in vivo. These experiments suggest that AhR serves as a molecular rheostat in B cells to brake the effector response, possibly to facilitate optimal recall responses. Thus, AhR might represent a novel molecular target for manipulation of B cell responses during vaccination.

  17. Patient-Specific B-Cell Antibody Factories to Treat Metastatic Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...clinical interface training and education to assure optimal sample viability and lack of the unique immortalization virus, Epstein Barr Virus ( EBV ). All...Breast Cancer, Sentinel lymph node, B-cell, EBV immortalization, Cancer Antigens Patient-Specific B-Cell Antibody Factories to Treat Metastatic

  18. Loss of B cell regulatory function is associated with delayed healing in patients with tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shufeng; Ding, Wei; Feng, Dapeng; Gong, Haiyang; Zhu, Dongmei; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-11-01

    The process of bone regeneration after fracture is a complex and well-orchestrated process usually requiring 3-12 weeks. A subset of patients, however, exhibit delayed healing time and even incomplete restoration of the normal bone structure. Although the precise mechanism is unknown, studies have shown that smurf1 may play a role during the process. Here, we sought to determine the involvement of the immune system in impaired bone healing. We found that immediately after fracture, the B-cell composition was shifted toward increased frequency of plasmablasts and decreased frequency of naïve B cells, reflecting higher inflammatory status. The percentage of CD19(+) CD24(+) CD38(+) regulatory B cells was also upregulated in response to bone fracture. The production of IL-10, a pivotal cytokine in regulatory B-cell function, was upregulated in all patients. Interestingly, the increase in IL-10 production was only sustained throughout the healing course in normal healing patients but not in delayed healing patients. Rather, delayed healing patients downregulated B-cell IL-10 secretion early and had reduced level of regulatory B-cell activity. Together, these data revealed a role of regulatory B cells in the endogenous bone regeneration process and an alternation in B-cell-mediated regulation in delayed healing patients.

  19. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-05-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation.

  20. Differential requirement of MALT1 for BAFF-induced outcomes in B cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Tusche, Michael W; Ward, Lesley A; Vu, Frances; McCarthy, Doug; Quintela-Fandino, Miguel; Ruland, Jurgen; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Mak, Tak W

    2009-11-23

    B cell activation factor of the TNF family (BAFF) activates noncanonical nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) heterodimers that promote B cell survival. We show that although MALT1 is largely dispensable for canonical NF-kappaB signaling downstream of the B cell receptor, the absence of MALT1 results in impaired BAFF-induced phosphorylation of NF-kappaB2 (p100), p100 degradation, and RelB nuclear translocation in B220(+) B cells. This corresponds with impaired survival of MALT1(-/-) marginal zone (MZ) but not follicular B cells in response to BAFF stimulation in vitro. MALT1(-/-) MZ B cells also express higher amounts of TRAF3, a known negative regulator of BAFF receptor-mediated signaling, and TRAF3 was found to interact with MALT1. Furthermore, phenotypes associated with overexpression of BAFF, including increased MZ B cell numbers, elevated serum immunoglobulin titers, and spontaneous germinal center formation, were found to be dependent on B cell-intrinsic MALT1 expression. Our results demonstrate a novel role for MALT1 in biological outcomes induced by BAFF-mediated signal transduction.

  1. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  2. Control of memory B cell responses by extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-10-01

    Following primary activation, B lymphocytes generate a long-lived memory compartment to harness the organism for future reinfections by the same pathogen species. Only recently the composition and signaling signature of the scarce memory B cell pool could be explored in more detail. This review highlights current concepts of how B cells preserve their antigen experience at the cellular and molecular level.

  3. Yin-yang effect of tumor infiltrating B cells in breast cancer: From mechanism to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Pin; Huang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer cells secrete chemokines, such as CXCL13, and antigens or express high endothelial venules, attracting B cells to infiltrate into the tumor microenvironment and play a "yin-yang" effect. They not only enhance the anti-tumor immune effect via secreting antibodies and influencing the Fas/FasL, CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways but they also promote the tumor to form a suppressive milieu by producing immunomodulatory factors and cytokines or using cell-to-cell education to induce the generation of Tregs or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Currently, most studies on breast cancer tissue have indicated that B cell infiltration could predict better survival and response to therapy, but two studies have reported opposite results. In a 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice model, B cell-based immunotherapies were administered, but the efficiency was unstable. Herein, we review the "yin-yang" effect of B cells in breast cancer and discuss B cell-based immunotherapy. B cells are complex aggregates, and breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Further studies are urgently required to define the B cell subsets and to discover ways to use B cell-based immunotherapy in breast cancer.

  4. TSPAN33 is a novel marker of activated and malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Van Phi; Hevezi, Peter; Vences-Catalan, Felipe; Maravillas-Montero, Jose Luis; White, Clayton Alexander; Casali, Paolo; Llorente, Luis; Jakez-Ocampo, Juan; Lima, Guadalupe; Vilches-Cisneros, Natalia; Flores-Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    We have identified Tspan33 as a gene encoding a transmembrane protein exhibiting a restricted expression pattern including expression in activated B cells. TSPAN33 is a member of the tetraspanin family. TSPAN33 is not expressed in resting B cells, but is strongly induced in primary human B cells following activation. Human 2E2 cells, a Burkitt’s lymphoma-derived B cell model of activation and differentiation, also upregulate TSPAN33 upon activation. TSPAN33 is expressed in several lymphomas including Hodgkin’s and Diffuse large B Cell Lymphoma. TSPAN33 is also expressed in some autoimmune diseases where B cells participate in the pathology, including rheumatoid arthritis patients, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and in spleen B cells from MRL/Faslpr/lpr mice (a mouse model of SLE). We conclude that TSPAN33 may be used as a diagnostic biomarker or as a target for therapeutic antibodies for treatment of certain B cell lymphomas or autoimmune diseases. PMID:24211713

  5. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19+CD20+GM-CSF+ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19+CD20+GM-CSF- B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM+IgD+, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils. PMID:26066485

  6. Monosodium glutamate induces apoptosis in naive and memory human B cells.

    PubMed

    Jovic, Z; Veselinovic, M; Vasic, K; Stankovic-Djordjevic, D; Cekic, S; Milovanovic, M; Sarac, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the existence of mGluR7 in normal B lymphocytes and analyse the effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on B cell apoptosis in vitro. B cells were purified by magnetic cell sorting using anti-CD19-coupled magnetic beads. Cells (10(6)/ml) were cultured with increasing MSG concentrations (1-100 mM). Detection of apoptosis by flow cytometry was performed using the Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. Naïve and memory B cell population were identified by CD27 staining. Expression of GluRs was determined using PCR. Exposure to increasing MSG concentrations displayed dose dependent effect on B cell viability altogether, ranging from 35% with 100 mM up to 80% with 1 mM MSG. Moreover, the number of late apoptotic cells as well as necrotic cells was dose dependant. Both CD27- as well as CD27+ B cells were affected by MSG. Basal expression of GluRs7 was detected in unstimulated B cells. Glutamate induced apoptosis can be seen in memory as well as naive B cell population and is probably mediated through mGluR7, whose expression in B cells we also confirmed. Our study suggests a new possible mechanism of crosstalk between the nervous and the immune system through glutamate as a potential key mediator (Fig. 4, Ref. 27). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  7. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies. PMID:27699274

  9. UCH-L1 is induced in germinal center B cells and identifies patients with aggressive germinal center diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bedekovics, Tibor; Hussain, Sajjad; Feldman, Andrew L; Galardy, Paul J

    2016-03-24

    Gene expression profiling has identified 2 major subclasses of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Cases resembling germinal center (GC) B cells (GCB-DLBCL) generally occur in younger patients, have a distinct molecular pathophysiology, and have improved outcomes compared with those similar to activated post-GC cells (activated B-cell DLBCL). We previously found that the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 is frequently overexpressed in mature B-cell malignancies and is a potent oncogene in mice. The cause for its overexpression in lymphoma, and whether it impacts the outcome of patients with DLBCL is unknown. Here, we show that UCH-L1 reflects GC lineage in lymphoma and is an oncogenic biomarker of aggressive GCB-DLBCL. We find that UCH-L1 is specifically induced in GC B cells in mice and humans, and that its expression correlates highly with the GCB subtype in DLBCL. We also find that UCH-L1 cooperates with BCL6 in a mouse model of GC B-cell lymphoma, but not with the development of multiple myeloma derived from post-GC cells. Despite the typically good outcomes of GCB-DLBCL, increased UCHL1 identifies a subgroup with early relapses independent of MYC expression, suggesting biological diversity in this subset of disease. Consistent with this, forced Uchl1 overexpression had a substantial impact on gene expression in GC B cells including pathways of cell cycle progression, cell death and proliferation, and DNA replication. These data demonstrate a novel role for UCH-L1 outside of the nervous system and suggest its potential use as a biomarker and therapeutic target in DLBCL.

  10. MCL-1 is required throughout B-cell development and its loss sensitizes specific B-cell subsets to inhibition of BCL-2 or BCL-XL

    PubMed Central

    Vikström, Ingela B; Slomp, Anne; Carrington, Emma M; Moesbergen, Laura M; Chang, Catherine; Kelly, Gemma L; Glaser, Stefan P; Jansen, J H Marco; Leusen, Jeanette H W; Strasser, Andreas; Huang, David C S; Lew, Andrew M; Peperzak, Victor; Tarlinton, David M

    2016-01-01

    Pro-survival BCL-2 family members protect cells from programmed cell death that can be induced by multiple internal or external cues. Within the haematopoietic lineages, the BCL-2 family members BCL-2, BCL-XL and MCL-1 are known to support cell survival but the individual and overlapping roles of these pro-survival BCL-2 proteins for the persistence of individual leukocyte subsets in vivo has not yet been determined. By combining inducible knockout mouse models with the BH3-mimetic compound ABT-737, which inhibits BCL-2, BCL-XL and BCL-W, we found that dependency on MCL-1, BCL-XL or BCL-2 expression changes during B-cell development. We show that BCL-XL expression promotes survival of immature B cells, expression of BCL-2 is important for survival of mature B cells and long-lived plasma cells (PC), and expression of MCL-1 is important for survival throughout B-cell development. These data were confirmed with novel highly specific BH3-mimetic compounds that target either BCL-2, BCL-XL or MCL-1. In addition, we observed that combined inhibition of these pro-survival proteins acts in concert to delete specific B-cell subsets. Reduced expression of MCL-1 further sensitized immature as well as transitional B cells and splenic PC to loss of BCL-XL expression. More markedly, loss of MCL-1 greatly sensitizes PC populations to BCL-2 inhibition using ABT-737, even though the total wild-type PC pool in the spleen is not significantly affected by this drug and the bone marrow (BM) PC population only slightly. Combined loss or inhibition of MCL-1 and BCL-2 reduced the numbers of established PC >100-fold within days. Our data suggest that combination treatment targeting these pro-survival proteins could be advantageous for treatment of antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases and B-cell malignancies. PMID:27560714

  11. Engagement of the B cell receptor for antigen differentially affects B cell responses to Toll-like receptor-7 agonists and antagonists in BXSB mice

    PubMed Central

    Layer, T; Steele, A; Goeken, J A; Fleenor, S; Lenert, P

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid sensors of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family play a well-established role in the pathogenesis of lupus. This is particularly true for a single-stranded RNA-sensing TLR-7 receptor, as lupus mice lacking TLR-7 show ameliorated disease. Cytosine–guanosine dinucleotide (CpG)-DNA-sensing TLR-9, conversely, has a complex regulatory role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Much less is known about whether signals through the B cell receptor for antigen (BCR) may affect the ability of B cells to respond to suboptimal TLR-7 agonists and antagonists. We studied this question in prediseased BXSB male and female B cells. We found that male B cells responded more vigorously to numerous TLR-7 ligands and this responsiveness was enhanced further upon co-engagement of the BCR. This synergy was seen primarily with the interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. A number of 32-mer inhibitory oligonucleotides (INH-ODNs) with a nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate backbone were capable of blocking TLR-7, but not BCR-induced B cell activation, with an inhibitory concentration (IC)50 of approximately 100 nm. Surprisingly, while the presence of a single TGC motif at the 5′ end of an ODN did not increase its inhibitory capacity, INH-ODNs containing multiple TGC motifs had greater inhibitory potency. When BCR and TLR-7 were co-engaged, INH-ODNs showed a differential effect on B cell activation. Whereas apoptosis protection and G1-M entry completely escaped suppression, IL-6 secretion remained sensitive to inhibition, although with a 10-fold lower potency. Our results suggest that while TLR-7 antagonists may be considered as lupus therapeutics, simultaneous co-engagement of the TLR-7 and BCR might favour autoreactive B cell survival. This hypothesis needs further experimental validation. PMID:21235537

  12. Identification of a germ-line pro-B cell subset that distinguishes the fetal/neonatal from the adult B cell development pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Sheng; Tung, James; Baumgarth, Nicole; Herman, Ometa; Gleimer, Michael; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2002-03-05

    Studies presented here show that the expression of CD4, MHC class II (Ia,) and B220 cleanly resolves a major and a minor subset within the earliest pro-B cell population (germ-line pro-B) in adult bone marrow (BM). The major subset expresses intermediate B220 and low CD4 levels. The minor subset, which constitutes roughly 20% of the adult germ-line pro-B, expresses very low B220 levels and does not express CD4. Ia is clearly detectable at low levels on the major germ-line pro-B subset, both in wild-type adult mice and in gene-targeted mice (RAG2-/- and microMT), in which B cell development terminates before the pre-B cell stage. A small proportion of cells in the more mature pro-B cell subsets (Hardy Fractions B and C) also express Ia at this level. In contrast, Ia levels on the minor subset are barely above (or equal to) background. Surprisingly, the major germ-line pro-B cell subset found in adults is missing in fetal and neonatal animals. All of the germ-line pro-B in these immature animals express a phenotype (very low B220, no CD4, or Ia) similar to that of the minor pro-B cell subset in adult BM. Because B cell development in fetal/neonatal animals principally results in B-1 cells, these findings demonstrate that the B-1 development pathway does not include the major germ-line pro-B subset found in adult BM and hence identify a very early difference between the B-1 and -2 development pathways.

  13. Short-Circuiting Gene Regulatory Networks: Origins of B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Koues, Olivia I.; Oltz, Eugene M.; Payton, Jacqueline E.

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphomas (BCL) are characterized by widespread deregulation of gene expression when compared with their normal B cell counterparts. Recent epigenomic studies defined cis-regulatory elements (REs) whose activities are altered in BCL to drive some of these pathogenic expression changes. During transformation, multiple mechanisms are employed to alter RE activities, including perturbations in the function of chromatin modifiers, which can lead to revision of the B cell epigenome. Inherited and somatic variants also alter RE function via disruption of TF binding. Aberrant expression of non-coding RNAs deregulates genes involved in B cell differentiation via direct repression and post-transcriptional targeting. These discoveries have established epigenetic etiologies for B cell transformation that are being exploited by novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26604030

  14. Pediatric common variable immunodeficiency: immunologic and phenotypic associations with switched memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Pierre L; Orange, Jordan S; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and low numbers of switched memory B cells have lower IgG levels and higher rates of autoimmune disease, splenomegaly, and granulomatous disease; however, no prior literature has focused exclusively on pediatric cases. We examined the relationship between switched memory B cells and clinical and immunologic manifestations of CVID in a pediatric population. Forty-five patients were evaluated. Patients were categorized as Group I (<5 switched memory B cells/ml, n = 24) or Group II (> or =5 switched memory B cells/mL, n = 21). CD3(+) T-cell counts and CD19(+) B-cell levels were lower among Group I patients. Only those in Group I had meningitis, sepsis, bronchiectasis, granulomatous lung disease, autoimmune cytopenias, or hematologic malignancies. Segregation of pediatric patients into high risk (Group I) and average risk (Group II) may assist in targeting surveillance appropriately.

  15. B cells Regulate Macrophage Phenotype and Response to Chemotherapy in Squamous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Terry R.; Gunderson, Andrew J.; Johansson, Magnus; Bornstein, Sophia; Bergsland, Emily; Steinhoff, Martin; Li, Yijin; Gong, Qian; Ma, Yan; Wiesen, Jane F.; Wong, Melissa H.; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Irving, Bryan; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY B cells foster squamous cell carcinogenesis (SCC) through deposition of immunoglobulin-containing immune complexes in premalignant tissue and Fcγreceptor-dependent activation of myeloid cells. Since human SCCs of the vulva and head and neck exhibited hallmarks of B cell infiltration, we examined B cell-deficient mice and found reduced ability to support SCC growth. Although ineffective as a single agent, treatment of mice bearing pre-existing SCCs with B cell-depleting αCD20 monoclonal antibodies improved response to platinum- and taxol-based chemotherapy. Improved chemo-responsiveness was dependent on altered chemokine expression by macrophages that fostered tumor infiltration of activated CD8+ T cells via CCR5-dependent mechanisms. These data reveal that B cells, and the downstream myeloid-based pathways they regulate, represent tractable targets for anti-cancer therapy in select tumors. PMID:24909985

  16. Differential development of progenitor activity for three B-cell lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, A B; Stall, A M; Adams, S; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1992-01-01

    Cell-transfer studies presented here distinguish three murine B cell lineages: conventional B cells, which develop late and are continually replenished from progenitors in adult bone marrow; Ly-1 B cells (B-1a), which develop early and maintain their numbers by self-replenishment; and Ly-1B "sister" (B-1b) cells, which share many of the properties of Ly-1 B cells, including self-replenishment and feedback regulation of development but can also readily develop from progenitors in adult bone marrow. The sequential emergence of these lineages, the time at which their progenitors function during ontogeny, and the distinctions among their repertoires and functions suggest that evolution has created a layered immune system in which the immune response potential of each successive lineage is adapted to its particular niche. Images PMID:1565622

  17. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  18. New insights into pre-BCR and BCR signalling with relevance to B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Robert C

    2013-08-01

    The B cell receptor (BCR) and its precursor (pre-BCR) control B cell homeostasis, differentiation and function. Moreover, aberrant pre-BCR and BCR signalling have a central role in B cell neoplasia; for example, enhanced positive signalling or disrupted negative signalling downstream of the pre-BCR promotes B cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia. The emerging distinctions between tonic and chronic active BCR signalling have contributed to the identification of oncogenic targets downstream of BCR signalling in mature B cell neoplasms. Indeed, the encouraging results of several ongoing clinical trials that target the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ-isoform (PI3Kδ), Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) or spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) downstream of the BCR highlight the therapeutic potential of inhibiting BCR signalling.

  19. B-cell tolerance in transplantation: is repertoire remodeling the answer?

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Ronald F; Vivek, Kumar; Redfield, Robert R; Migone, Thi-Sau; Cancro, Michael P; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2010-01-01

    T lymphocytes are the primary targets of immunotherapy in clinical transplantation; however, B lymphocytes and their secreted alloantibodies are also highly detrimental to the allograft. Therefore, the achievement of sustained organ transplant survival will likely require the induction of B-lymphocyte tolerance. During development, acquisition of B-cell tolerance to self-antigens relies on clonal deletion in the early stages of B-cell compartment ontogeny. We contend that this mechanism should be recapitulated in the setting of alloantigens and organ transplantation to eliminate the alloreactive B-cell subset from the recipient. Clinically feasible targets of B-cell-directed immunotherapy, such as CD20 and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), should drive upcoming clinical trials aimed at remodeling the recipient B-cell repertoire. PMID:20161663

  20. Follicular B cell trafficking within the spleen actively restricts humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Kristen L.; Gordy, Laura E.; Collins, Patrick L.; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Aune, Thomas M.; Joyce, Sebastian; Thomas, James W.; Van Kaer, Luc; Sebzda, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Summary Follicular (FO) and marginal zone (MZ) B cells are maintained in distinct locations within the spleen but the genetic basis for this separation is still enigmatic. We now report that B cell sequestration requires lineage-specific regulation of migratory receptors by the transcription factor, Klf2. Moreover, using gene-targeted mice we show that altered splenic B cell migration confers a significant in vivo gain-of-function phenotype to FO B cells, including the ability to quickly respond to MZ-associated antigens and pathogens in a T cell-dependent manner. This work demonstrates that in wild-type animals, naïve FO B cells are actively removed from the MZ, thus restricting their capacity to respond to blood-borne pathogens. PMID:20691614

  1. Rituximab in the treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guarino, M; Ortiz-Romero, P L; Fernández-Misa, R; Montalbán, C

    2014-06-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric mouse-human antibody that targets the CD20 antigen, which is found in both normal and neoplastic B cells. In recent years, it has been increasingly used to treat cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and is now considered an alternative to classic treatment (radiotherapy and surgery) of 2 types of indolent lymphoma, namely, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma and primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. Rituximab is also administered as an alternative to polychemotherapy in the treatment of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type. Its use as an alternative drug led to it being administered intralesionally, with beneficial effects. In the present article, we review the literature published on the use of rituximab to treat primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

  2. In aged mice, low surrogate light chain promotes pro-B-cell apoptotic resistance, compromises the PreBCR checkpoint, and favors generation of autoreactive, phosphorylcholine-specific B cells.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Michelle; Alter, Sarah; McAvoy, Kelly; Frasca, Daniela; Wright, Jacqueline A; Zinkel, Sandra S; Khan, Wasif N; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Riley, Richard L

    2015-06-01

    In aged mice, new B-cell development is diminished and the antibody repertoire becomes more autoreactive. Our studies suggest that (i) apoptosis contributes to reduced B lymphopoiesis in old age and preferentially eliminates those B-cell precursors with higher levels of the surrogate light chain (SLC) proteins (λ5/VpreB) and (ii) λ5(low) B-cell precursors generate new B cells which show increased reactivity to the self-antigen/bacterial antigen phosphorylcholine (PC). Pro-B cells in old bone marrow as well as pro-B cells from young adult λ5-deficient mice are resistant to cytokine-induced apoptosis (TNFα; TGFβ), indicating that low λ5 expression in pro-B cells is sufficient to cause increased survival. Transfer of TNFα-producing 'age-associated B cells' (ABC; CD21/35(-) CD23(-)) or follicular (FO) B cells from aged mice into RAG-2 KO recipients led to preferential loss of λ5(high) pro-B cells, but retention of λ5(low), apoptosis-resistant pro-B cells. In old mice, there is increased reactivity to PC in both immature bone marrow B cells and mature splenic FO B cells. In young mice, absence of λ5 expression led to a similar increase in PC reactivity among bone marrow and splenic B cells. We propose that in old age, increased apoptosis, mediated in part by TNFα-producing B cells, results in preferential loss of SLC(high) pro-B cells within the bone marrow. Further B-cell development then occurs via an 'SLC(low)' pathway that not only impairs B-cell generation, but promotes autoreactivity within the naïve antibody repertoires in the bone marrow and periphery.

  3. B cells undergo unique compartmentalized redistribution in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Jürgen; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Milkova, Miriam; Balint, Bettina; Schwarz, Alexander; Korporal, Mirjam; Jarius, Sven; Fritz, Brigitte; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Wildemann, Brigitte

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence fosters the role of B cells (BC) in multiple sclerosis (MS). The compartmentalized distribution of BC in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is incompletely understood. In this study, we analyzed BC-patterns and BC-immunoreactivity at these sites during active and during stable disease and the impact of disease modifying drugs (DMD) on peripheral BC-homeostasis. For this purpose we assessed BC-subsets in blood and CSF from patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), relapsing remitting MS (RRMS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometric detection of whole (W-BC), naïve, transitional (TN-BC), class-switched memory (CSM-BC), unswitched memory (USM-BC), double-negative memory (DNM-BC) BC-phenotypes, plasma blasts (PB), and plasma cells (PC). FACS-data were correlated with BC-specific chemotactic activities in CSF, intrathecal CXCL13-levels, and immunoreactivity of peripheral W-BC. Our study revealed that frequencies of systemic CSM-BC/USM-BC became contracted in active CIS/MS while proportions of naive BC, TN-BC and DNM-BC were reciprocally expanded. Moreover, the shifted BC-composition promoted reduced immunoreactivity of W-BC and resolved during remission. Cross-over changes in CSF included privileged accumulation of CSM-BC linked to intrathecal CXCL13-concentrations and expansion of PB/PC. Treatment with interferon-beta and natalizumab evoked distinct though differing redistribution of circulating BC-subsets. We conclude that symptomatic CIS and MS are accompanied by distinctive changes in peripheral and CSF BC-homeostasis. The privileged reciprocal distribution between naïve versus CSM-phenotypes in both compartments together with the marked chemotactic driving force towards BC prompted by CSF supernatants renders it likely that CSF BC are mainly recruited from peripheral blood during active CIS/MS, whereas constantly low percentages of circulating PB/PC and their failure to respond to migratory stimuli

  4. Molecular characterization of the early B cell response to pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2012-12-15

    The role of B cells in host defense against fungi has been difficult to establish. We quantified and determined the molecular derivation of B-1a, B-1b, and B-2 B cell populations in C57BL/6 mice after pulmonary infection with Cryptococcus neoformans. Total B-1 and B-2 cell numbers increased in lungs and peritoneal cavity as early as day 1 postinfection, but lacked signs of clonal expansion. Labeled capsular (24067) and acapsular (Cap67) C. neoformans strains were used to identify C. neoformans-binding B cell subsets by flow cytometry. Peritoneal cavity B-1a B cells exhibited the most acapsular and capsular C. neoformans binding in C. neoformans-infected mice, and C. neoformans-selected B-1