Science.gov

Sample records for river british columbia

  1. British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    The province of British Columbia has a dubious history where support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) issues in education is concerned. Most notable is the Surrey School Board's decision in 1997 to ban three picture books for children that depict families with two moms or two dads. The North Vancouver School Board has also…

  2. British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    The province of British Columbia has a dubious history where support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) issues in education is concerned. Most notable is the Surrey School Board's decision in 1997 to ban three picture books for children that depict families with two moms or two dads. The North Vancouver School Board has also…

  3. Hydraulic and sedimentary processes causing anastomosing morphology of the upper Columbia River, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makaske, Bart; Smith, Derald G.; Berendsen, Henk J. A.; de Boer, Arjan G.; van Nielen-Kiezebrink, Marinka F.; Locking, Tracey

    2009-10-01

    The upper Columbia River, British Columbia, Canada, shows typical anastomosing morphology — multiple interconnected channels that enclose floodbasins — and lateral channel stability. We analysed field data on hydraulic and sedimentary processes and show that the anastomosing morphology of the upper Columbia River is caused by sediment (bedload) transport inefficiency, in combination with very limited potential for lateral bank erosion because of very low specific stream power (≤ 2.3 W/m 2) and cohesive silty banks. In a diagram of channel type in relation to flow energy and median grain size of the bed material, data points for the straight upper Columbia River channels cluster separately from the data points for braided and meandering channels. Measurements and calculations indicate that bedload transport in the anastomosing reach of the upper Columbia River decreases downstream. Because of lateral channel stability no lateral storage capacity for bedload is created. Therefore, the surplus of bedload leads to channel bed aggradation, which outpaces levee accretion and causes avulsions because of loss of channel flow capacity. This avulsion mechanism applies only to the main channel of the system, which transports 87% of the water and > 90% of the sediment in the cross-valley transect studied. Because of very low sediment transport capacity, the morphological evolution of most secondary channels is slow. Measurements and calculations indicate that much more bedload is sequestered in the relatively steep upper anastomosing reach of the upper Columbia River than in the relatively gentle lower anastomosing reach. With anastomosing morphology and related processes (e.g., crevassing) being best developed in the upper reach, this confirms the notion of upstream rather than downstream control of upper Columbia River anastomosis.

  4. Okanagan Lake, British Columbia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-01

    STS068-155-011 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- (Okanagan Lake, British Columbia) View southward down the lake; Vernon is in the foreground, Kelowna just before the bend in the lake, and Penticton at the far end of the lake. Green crops are still vigorous despite the season (early October); clear-cuts dot the forested hillsides.

  5. Contaminants in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) from the upper Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.D.; Ikonomou, M.G.; Rantalaine, A.L.; Rogers, I.H.; Sutherland, D.; Oostdam, J. Van

    1997-03-01

    Four white sturgeon were collected from the upper Fraser River near Prince George, British Columbia, Canada, in the fall of 199a and 1992. Two additional fish were taken from the Fraser River near Williams Lake, some 250 km downstream of Prince George. Samples of white muscle, red muscle, liver, and roe were analyzed for metals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), non-ortho and mono-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorophenols to determine whether the tissues of this species were acceptable for human consumption. The concentrations of mercury in the white muscle and liver of several fish from the upper Fraser River exceeded the provincial tissue residue criteria for people who consumed low quantities of fish. The concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs, and coplanar PCBs (expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents) in red muscle and liver of these fish exceeded the Health Canada working guidelines for the protection of human health. By comparison, white sturgeon collected in the lower Fraser River had much lower concentrations of metals and organic contaminants. The differences in contaminant burdens in fish from the two widely separated reaches of the river reflect their proximity to or distance from known contaminant sources.

  6. Modelling gravel transport and morphology for the Fraser River Gravel Reach, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. S.; Millar, R. G.; Islam, S.

    2008-03-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) numerical hydrodynamic-morphological model is developed to investigate gravel transport and channel morphology in a large wandering gravel-bed river, the Fraser River Gravel Reach, in British Columbia, Canada. The model takes into count multi-fraction bedload transport, including the effects of surface coarsening, hiding and protrusion. Model outputs together with river discharge statistics were analyzed, producing distributed sediment budget and well-defined, localised zones of aggradation and degradation along the gravel reach. Long-term channel response to gravel extraction from aggrading zones as a flood hazard mitigation measure was also investigated numerically to assess the effectiveness of such an extraction. The total computed sediment budget agrees well with results based on field measurements of gravel transport available to us. This study points to the importance of a number of factors to bedload predictions: the gravel-to-sand ratio, the adequacy of resolving the wandering planform, and the distinction between bed shear stress driving bedload transport and bed resistance on the flow. These are in addition to the physical processes governing the flow field and gravel mobilization. The methodology presented in this paper can provide a scientific basis for gravel management including monitoring and extraction in order to maintain adequate flood protection and navigation, while preserving the ecosystem.

  7. Sedimentary processes and depositional environments of the Horn River Shale in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seok-Hoon; Koh, Chang-Seong; Joe, Young-Jin; Woo, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Suk

    2017-04-01

    The Horn River Basin in the northeastern British Columbia, Canada, is one of the largest unconventional gas accumulations in North America. It consists mainly of Devonian shales (Horn River Formation) and is stratigraphically divided into three members, the Muskwa, Otterpark and Evie in descending order. This study focuses on sedimentary processes and depositional environments of the Horn River shale based on sedimentary facies analysis aided by well-log mineralogy (ECS) and total organic carbon (TOC) data. The shale formation consists dominantly of siliceous minerals (quartz, feldspar and mica) and subordinate clay mineral and carbonate materials, and TOC ranging from 1.0 to 7.6%. Based on sedimentary structures and micro texture, three sedimentary facies were classified: homogeneous mudstone (HM), indistinctly laminated mudstone (ILM), and planar laminated mudstone (PLM). Integrated interpretation of the sedimentary facies, lithology and TOC suggests that depositional environment of the Horn River shale was an anoxic quiescent basin plain and base-of-slope off carbonate platform or reef. In this deeper marine setting, organic-rich facies HM and ILM, dominant in the Muskwa (the upper part of the Horn River Formation) and Evie (the lower part of the Horn River Formation) members, may have been emplaced by pelagic to hemipelagic sedimentation on the anoxic sea floor with infrequent effects of low-density gravity flows (turbidity currents or nepheloid flows). In the other hand, facies PLM typifying the Otterpark Member (the middle part of the Horn River Formation) suggests more frequent inflow of bottom-hugging turbidity currents punctuating the hemipelagic settling of the background sedimentation process. The stratigraphic change of sedimentary facies and TOC content in the Horn River Formation is most appropriately interpreted to have been caused by the relative sea-level change, that is, lower TOC and frequent signal of turbidity current during the sea

  8. Trends in selected water-quality characteristics, Flathead River at Flathead, British Columbia, and at Columbia Falls, Montana, water years, 1975-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cary, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Data for selected water quality variables were evaluated for trends at two sampling stations--Flathead River at Flathead, British Columbia (Flathead station) and Flathead River at Columbia Falls, Montana (Columbia Falls station). The results were compared between stations. The analyses included data from water years 1975-86 at the Flathead station and water years 1979-86 at the Columbia Falls station. The seasonal Kendall test was applied to adjusted concentrations for variables related to discharge and to unadjusted concentrations for the remaining variables. Slope estimates were made for variables with significant trends unless data were reported as less than the detection limit. At the Flathead station, concentrations of dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen (total and dissolved), total organic nitrogen, and total phosphorus increased during the study period. Concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and dissolved iron decreased during the same period. At the Columbia Falls station, concentrations increased for calcium and magnesium and decreased for sulfate and dissolved phosphorus. No trends were detected for 10 other variables tested at each station. Data for the Flathead station were reanalyzed for water years 1979-86. Trends in the data increased for magnesium and dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and decreased for dissolved iron. Magnesium was the only variable that displayed a trend (increasing) at both stations. The increasing trends that were detected probably will not adversely affect the water quality of the Flathead River in the near future. (USGS)

  9. Annual bed-elevation regime in the alluvial channel of Squamish River, southwestern British Columbia Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanford, S.D.; Seidl, M.A.; Ashley, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the annual regime of channel scour and fill by monitoring bed-elevation changes in a reach of Squamish River in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Sonar surveys of 13 river cross-sections in a sandy gravel-bed single-channel study reach were repeated biweekly over a full hydrologic year (1995/6). The survey results show that bedload movement occurs as waves or pulses forming bedwaves that appear to maintain an overall coherence with movement downstream. These bedwaves propagate downstream by a mode here termed pulse scour and pulse fill, a process distinguished from the conventional mode of scour and fill commonly associated with flood events (here termed local scour and local fill). Bedwave celerity was estimated to be about 15.5 m d-1 corresponding to a bedwave residence time in the study reach of almost one hydrologic year. The total amount of local bed-elevation change ranged between 0.22 m and 2.41 m during the period of study. Analysis of the bed-elevation and flow data reveals that, because of the bedware phenomenon, there is no simple relation between the mean bed-elevation and discharge nor any strong linear correlation among cross-sectional behaviour. The bed-elevation data also suggest that complex changes to the bed within a cross-section are masked when the bed is viewed in one dimension, although no definitive trends in bed behaviour were found in the two-dimensional analysis. Although a weak seasonal effect is evident in this study, the bed-elevation regime is dominated by sediment supply-driven fluctuations in bedload transport occurring at timescales shorter than the seasonal fluctuation in discharge. The study also indicates that bed-elevation monitoring on Squamish River, and others like it, for purposes of detecting and measuring aggradation/degradation must take into account very considerable and normal channel-bed variability operating at timescales from hours to months. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and

  10. Variations of Carbon Isotopes during Shale Gas Production from the Horn River Basin, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norville, G.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical and stable isotope compositions of natural gases are key parameters for characterizing gas and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Produced gases were obtained from eight wells at multi-well pad sites located in the Horn River Basin (HRB), NE British Columbia. Shale gas wells were drilled and completed in the Devonian Muskwa, Otter Park and Evie Formations of the HRB, and gases collected as time series over short term (~50 days) and long term periods (~ 1250 days). δ13C of gases from HRB formations confirm high thermal maturity and the shale gases frequently showed partial or full isotope reversals among hydrocarbon components. A 10‰ variation in δ13C values of methane was observed during production. In general, during early phases of production shale gases appear enriched in 12C compared to gases sampled at later stages and δ13Cmethane values were approximately between -38‰ and -35‰ during times up to 50 days. The majority of cases of carbon isotope reversals between methane and ethane components of gases (δ13Cmethane > δ13Cethane) were observed at times greater than 100 days, while ethane and propane reversals were common throughout production. Gas production rates differed significantly among the sampled wells from ~ 50 to 400 e3m3/d. Higher rates were frequently associated with gases showing 12Cmethane enrichment. Subsequent to periods of well 'shut in' a change in the carbon isotope composition was detected with enrichment in 13Cmethane of gases. Carbon isotope signatures of produced gases likely reflect a combination of both the in-situ shale gas isotope signature as well as effects of isotope fractionation which may occur during transport through pores and fractures of the shale.

  11. Predictors of High Streamflow Events in the Fraser River Basin of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Fraser River basin (FRB) of British Columbia is one of the largest and most important watersheds in Western North America, and is home to a rich diversity of biological species and economic assets that depend implicitly upon its extensive riverine habitats. The hydrology of the FRB is dominated by snow accumulation and melt processes, leading to a prominent annual peak streamflow invariably occurring in June-July. However, while annual peak daily streamflow (APDF) during the spring freshet in the FRB is historically well correlated with basin-averaged, annual maximum snow water equivalent (SWEmax), there are numerous occurrences of anomalously large APDF in below- or near-normal SWEmax years, some of which have resulted in damaging floods in the region. An imperfect understanding of which other climatic factors contribute to these anomalously large APDFs complicates future projections of streamflow magnitude and frequency. We employ the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) process-based hydrological model driven by both observations and an ensemble of CMIP3 climate models in an attempt to discover the proximate causes of anomalous APDF events in the FRB. At several hydrometric stations representing a range of elevations, the relative importance of a set of predictors characterizing the magnitude and timing of rainfall, snowfall, and temperature is examined within a regression framework. The results indicate that next to the magnitude of SWEmax, the rate of warming subsequent to the date of SWEmax is the most influential variable for predicting APDF magnitudes in the lower FRB. Finally, the role of large-scale climate modes of variability for APDF magnitude and timing in the basin will be briefly discussed.

  12. Evaluating uncertainties in modelling the snow hydrology of the Fraser River Basin, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Siraj Ul; Déry, Stephen J.

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates predictive uncertainties in the snow hydrology of the Fraser River Basin (FRB) of British Columbia (BC), Canada, using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model forced with several high-resolution gridded climate datasets. These datasets include the Canadian Precipitation Analysis and the thin-plate smoothing splines (ANUSPLIN), North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), University of Washington (UW) and Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC) gridded products. Uncertainties are evaluated at different stages of the VIC implementation, starting with the driving datasets, optimization of model parameters, and model calibration during cool and warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The inter-comparison of the forcing datasets (precipitation and air temperature) and their VIC simulations (snow water equivalent - SWE - and runoff) reveals widespread differences over the FRB, especially in mountainous regions. The ANUSPLIN precipitation shows a considerable dry bias in the Rocky Mountains, whereas the NARR winter air temperature is 2 °C warmer than the other datasets over most of the FRB. In the VIC simulations, the elevation-dependent changes in the maximum SWE (maxSWE) are more prominent at higher elevations of the Rocky Mountains, where the PCIC-VIC simulation accumulates too much SWE and ANUSPLIN-VIC yields an underestimation. Additionally, at each elevation range, the day of maxSWE varies from 10 to 20 days between the VIC simulations. The snow melting season begins early in the NARR-VIC simulation, whereas the PCIC-VIC simulation delays the melting, indicating seasonal uncertainty in SWE simulations. When compared with the observed runoff for the Fraser River main stem at Hope, BC, the ANUSPLIN-VIC simulation shows considerable underestimation of runoff throughout the water year owing to reduced precipitation in the ANUSPLIN forcing dataset. The NARR-VIC simulation yields more winter and spring runoff and earlier decline

  13. Surveying Cross Sections of the Kootenai River Between Libby Dam, Montana, and Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Moran, Edward H.; Berenbrock, Charles

    2004-01-01

    The declining population of Kootenai River white sturgeon, which was listed as an Endangered Species in 1994, has prompted a recovery team to assess the feasibility of various habitat enhancement scenarios to reestablish white sturgeon populations. As the first phase in this assessment, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section and longitudinal data during 2002—03 at about 400 locations along the Kootenai River from Libby Dam near Libby, Montana, to where the river empties into Kootenay Lake near Creston, British Columbia, Canada. Survey control stations with a horizontal and vertical accuracy of less than 0.1 foot were established using a global positioning system (GPS) prior to collection of stream channel cross-section data along the Kootenai River. A total of 245 cross sections were surveyed. Six cross sections upstream from Kootenai Falls were surveyed using a total station where the river was too shallow or dangerous to navigate by vessel. The remaining 239 cross sections were surveyed by interfacing real-time GPS equipment with an echo sounder to obtain bathymetric data and with a laser range- finder to obtain streambank data. These data were merged, straightened, ordered, and reduced in size to be useful. Spacing between these cross sections ranged from about 600 feet in the valley flat near Deep Creek and Shorty Island and near bridges to as much as several miles in other areas. These stream channel cross sections will provide information that can be used to develop hydraulic flow models of the Kootenai River from Libby Dam, Montana, to Queens Bay on Kootenay Lake in British Columbia, Canada.

  14. Use of beta regression for statistical downscaling of precipitation in the Campbell River basin, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sohom; Srivastav, Roshan K.; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2016-07-01

    Impacts of global climate change on water resources systems are assessed by downscaling coarse scale climate variables into regional scale hydro-climate variables. In this study, a new multisite statistical downscaling method based on beta regression (BR) is developed for generating synthetic precipitation series, which can preserve temporal and spatial dependence along with other historical statistics. The beta regression based downscaling method includes two main steps: (1) prediction of precipitation states for the study area using classification and regression trees, and (2) generation of precipitation at different stations in the study area conditioned on the precipitation states. Daily precipitation data for 53 years from the ANUSPLIN data set is used to predict precipitation states of the study area where predictor variables are extracted from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set for the same interval. The proposed model is applied to downscaling daily precipitation at ten different stations in the Campbell River basin, British Columbia, Canada. Results show that the proposed downscaling model can capture spatial and temporal variability of local precipitation very well at various locations. The performance of the model is compared with a recently developed non-parametric kernel regression based downscaling model. The BR model performs better regarding extrapolation compared to the non-parametric kernel regression model. Future precipitation changes under different GHG (greenhouse gas) emission scenarios also projected with the developed downscaling model that reveals a significant amount of changes in future seasonal precipitation and number of wet days in the river basin.

  15. Glacial stratigraphy of the Bulkley River region: A depositional framework for the late Pleistocene in central British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, A.J.; Broster, B.E.; Levson, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    A depositional framework for late Pleistocene sediments in central British Columbia was developed from the composite stratigraphy of glacial sediments found in the Bulkley River region. Nonglacial deposits correlated to the Olympia Nonglacial Interval, are overlain in succession by sub-till, ice-advance sediments, Late Wisconsinan (Fraser Glaciation) till, and late-glacial sediments. Due to local erosion and depositional variability, some of the units are not continuous throughout the region and differ locally in their thickness and complexity. At the onset of the Fraser Glaciation, ice advance was marked by rising base levels in rivers, lake ponding, and ice marginal sub-aqueous deposition. Physiography and glacier dynamics influenced the position of drainage outlets, direction of water flow, and ponding. The region was completely ice covered during this glaciation and ice-flow directions were variable, being dominantly influenced by the migrating position of ice divides. Deglaciation was marked by the widespread deposition of fine-grained sediments in proglacial lakes and glaciofluvial sands and gravels at locations with unrestricted drainage.

  16. Geochemical and isotopic characteristics of lithospheric mantle beneath West Kettle River, British Columbia: Evidence from ultramafic xenoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xianyu; Baadsgaard, H.; Scarfe, C.M. ); Irving, A.J. )

    1990-09-10

    A group of spinel peridotite xenoliths from West Kettle River, British Columbia, represents essentially undepleted to moderately depleted lithospheric mantle rocks in terms of major and compatible trace elements. Whole rock Sr isotopic composition for most of these xenoliths, and whole rock Sm-Nd isotopic composition and LREE contents for some of them, seem to have been perturbed by near-surface processes. Sr and Nd isotopic results for acid-cleaned clinopyroxenes separated from these spinel peridotites reveal an isotopically mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like mantle. Seven spinel lherzolites gave Nd model ages of 1.5-3.6 Ga, similar to MORB, and on a Sm-Nd isotope diagram plot close to a reference Nd isochron with an age of 0.7 Ga and an initial {var epsilon}{sub Nd} of +7. These features likely resulted from multiple mantle depletion. The isotopic similarities of these xenoliths with MORB suggest that this area is underlain by oceanic lithospheric mantle, possibly accreted to North America during the mid-Jurassic. The Nd isochron age could record the time when the oceanic lithosphere was isolated from the asthenosphere. Recent enrichment event may have acted on such a depleted mantle, as indicated by the low Sm/Nd ratios of two spinel harzburgites.

  17. Integration of Invertebrate Monitoring Data Into a Chemical-Based Water Quality Index for Selected Rivers in British Columbia, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvestre, S.; Ryan, A.

    2005-05-01

    The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment Water Quality Index (CCME WQI) is a recently developed tool used to summarize complex water quality data for communication to senior managers and the public. Within the index, water quality is assessed relative to its desirable state, as defined by water quality objectives, and indicates the degree to which it is affected by human activities. The index combines water quality measures of concern at a particular site (e.g. coliforms, metals, dissolved oxygen) and compares them to objectives to provide a ranking (e.g. good, fair, poor) for rivers and lakes. In British Columbia, the federal and provincial governments collaboratively maintain a network of water quality stations which are sampled routinely for a range of chemical variables. Environment Canada incorporated an annual biomonitoring component at 10 of these stations using the reference condition approach. Benthic invertebrates are used in this approach to assess the health of a stream by comparing expected invertebrate communities with observed communities. At one station the biological community indicated an impaired environment where the CCME WQI indicated "good" water quality. We will discuss options for incorporating the information provided by the benthic invertebrate community into the calculation of the index.

  18. Remote mineralogic and lithologic mapping of the Ice River alkaline complex, British Columbia, Canada, using AVIRIS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, T.L.; Rowan, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Ice River Alkaline Complex is a late Paleozoic intrusion of mafic alkaline rocks, syenite, and carbonatite exposed in southeastern British Columbia, Canada. The complex intrudes Cambrian and Ordovician shales, slates, and limestones of the Chancellor and Ottertail Formations and the McKay Group. We examined the alkaline complex and adjacent country rocks using Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. The data were first calibrated to relative reflectance and then used to spectrally map mineralogies in the study area by using a linear spectral unmixing program. This technique models each pixel spectrum in an AVIRIS image as a linear combination of unique endmember spectra. We selected endmember spectra from well-exposed and spectrally distinct mineralogic units, vegetation, and snow. Four of the endmembers reflect mineralogic variations within the McKay group in the study area, and may represent lateral and vertical variations of sedimentary or metamorphic facies. Otherwise, the resultant spatial distribution of endmembers shows generally close agreement with the published geologic map, although, in several places, our image-map is more accurate than the published map.

  19. Immunization delivery in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Omura, John; Buxton, Jane; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Catterson, Jason; Li, Jane; Derban, Andrea; Hasselback, Paul; Machin, Shelagh; Linekin, Michelle; Morgana, Tamsin; O’Briain, Barra; Scheifele, David; Dawar, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences of family physicians and pediatricians delivering immunizations, including perceived barriers and supports. Design Qualitative study using focus groups. Setting Ten cities throughout British Columbia. Participants A total of 46 family physicians or general practitioners, 10 pediatricians, and 2 residents. Methods A semistructured dialogue guide was used by a trained facilitator to explore participants’ experiences and views related to immunization delivery in British Columbia. Verbatim transcriptions were independently coded by 2 researchers. Key themes were analyzed and identified in an iterative manner using interpretive description. Main findings Physicians highly valued vaccine delivery. Factors facilitating physician-delivered immunizations included strong beliefs in the value of vaccines and having adequate information. Identified barriers included the large time commitment and insufficient communication about program changes, new vaccines, and the adult immunization program in general. Some physicians reported good relationships with local public health, while others reported the opposite experience, and this varied by geographic location. Conclusion These findings suggest that physicians are supportive of delivering vaccines. However, there are opportunities to improve the sustainability of physician-delivered immunizations. While compensation schemes remain under the purview of the provincial governments, local public health authorities can address the information needs of physicians. PMID:24627403

  20. British Columbia Transfer TIPS. Second Edition Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Karlinski, Jean, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    BCTransfer TIPS is a user friendly document outlining how transfer between British Columbia (BC) post-secondary institutions works. It includes tips, student quotes, scenarios, a personal plan and checklist. Information in this document can only be reproduced with permission from the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT.)

  1. Integrated Curriculum Programs in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Julie

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses British Columbia's integrated curriculum programs (ICPs). In this province of sea and mountains, outdoor adventures figure prominently in its ICPs--with a healthy dose of environmental and sustainability education mixed in. The author presents five examples from British Columbia's ICPs: (1) Earthquest Outdoor…

  2. Seasonal flows of international British Columbia-Alaska rivers: The nonlinear influence of ocean-atmosphere circulation patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Sean W.; Hood, Eran; Dalhke, Helen; O'Neel, Shad

    2016-01-01

    The northern portion of the Pacific coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR) is one of the least anthropogenically modified regions on earth and remains in many respects a frontier area to science. Rivers crossing the northern PCTR, which is also an international boundary region between British Columbia, Canada and Alaska, USA, deliver large freshwater and biogeochemical fluxes to the Gulf of Alaska and establish linkages between coastal and continental ecosystems. We evaluate interannual flow variability in three transboundary PCTR watersheds in response to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Arctic Oscillation (AO), and North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO). Historical hydroclimatic datasets from both Canada and the USA are analyzed using an up-to-date methodological suite accommodating both seasonally transient and highly nonlinear teleconnections. We find that streamflow teleconnections occur over particular seasonal windows reflecting the intersection of specific atmospheric and terrestrial hydrologic processes. The strongest signal is a snowmelt-driven flow timing shift resulting from ENSO- and PDO-associated temperature anomalies. Autumn rainfall runoff is also modulated by these climate modes, and a glacier-mediated teleconnection contributes to a late-summer ENSO-flow association. Teleconnections between AO and freshet flows reflect corresponding temperature and precipitation anomalies. A coherent NPGO signal is not clearly evident in streamflow. Linear and monotonically nonlinear teleconnections were widely identified, with less evidence for the parabolic effects that can play an important role elsewhere. The streamflow teleconnections did not vary greatly between hydrometric stations, presumably reflecting broad similarities in watershed characteristics. These results establish a regional foundation for both transboundary water management and studies of long-term hydroclimatic and environmental change.

  3. Cryogenic Sampling and Biogeochemical Characterization of Hyporheic Sediments from the Fraser River near Vancouver, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, M.; Simister, R.; Crowe, S.; Beckie, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    We present 5-cm scale depth profiles of aqueous and sediment biogeochemistry of the hyporheic zone (HZ) from the tidally-forced Fraser River, where anaerobic, iron-rich groundwater is discharging through the HZ into the aerobic river. River levels change seasonally during the freshet and up to 3 m over a tidal cycle, creating a highly dynamic flow regime. By examining the biogeochemistry of the HZ, we seek to better understand the fate of groundwater contaminants as they discharge into the river. Our work focuses on collecting representative, high-quality sediment samples from the HZ. A custom-made cryogenic probe is used to collect frozen sediments preserved with adjacent porewater. Porewater and sediment analyses reveal vertical geochemical trends while DNA sequencing yields a wealth of information on the microbial community and its variation with depth. The source groundwater at the site has a specific conductance of up to 12000 µS/cm. At 1 m below the river bed in the HZ the specific conductance is 2200 µS/cm, while at a depth of 10 cm, it is less than 140 µS/cm. Dilution of groundwater based on Cl concentrations is estimated to be more than two orders of magnitude. Dissolved metal concentrations suggest that Fe oxidation occurs between the depths of 35 and 50 cm and Mn oxidation occurs between the depths of 15 and 25 cm. Reduced Mn accumulates at depths below 25 cm despite dilution. Results from DNA sequencing show a higher abundance of aerobic microorganisms in the top 30 cm of sediment, while anaerobic microorganisms are more prominent at depth. Metabolic processes in the HZ suggested by identified taxa include redox-active couples of Mn(II)/(IV), Fe(II)/(III), H2S/SO4, and CH4/CO2. We note that microbiology serves as a useful indicator for chemical and physical processes in the HZ. This work sets the stage for in- and ex-situ experiments to quantitatively assess natural attenuation of contaminants in the HZ.

  4. Progress of a sediment wave along the Lillooet River, British Columbia following a large debris flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rego, K. G.; Eaton, B. C.; Hassan, M. A.; Lauer, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We report field data and preliminary numerical modeling results documenting the transit of a sediment wave along the Lillooet River following a large debris flow in 2010. The Lillooet drains a midsize ( 4000 km2) glacially-influenced alpine catchment. Our study reach lies 70 km between the Mt. Meager Volcanic Complex (MMVC) and Lillooet Lake, which traps over 90% of incoming sediment. The channel transitions from braided and cobble-bedded to straight and sand-bedded, and the downstream half is dyked. Sediment supply is dominated by frequent debris flows originating in the MMVC. In 2010, a landslide on the MMVC released 48.5 x 106 m3 of material and triggered a debris flow that extended 2.5 km down the Lillooet Valley, briefly damming the river and causing an outburst flood. 1500 valley residents were evacuated temporarily, and the event led to $10 M CAD of damage to commercial forests and roads. The subsequent sediment wave is expected to lead to channel aggradation, putting pressure on the Lillooet's dyking system. We conducted bulk sampling and Wolman pebble counts along the river in 2014. Grainsize distributions from channel bars along the reach are compared to those of cutbanks to track the extent of the wave and the mobility of individual grainsize classes. We use the Morphodynamics and Sediment Tracers in 1-Dimension (MAST-1D) model to simulate the Lillooet's response to the debris flow on decadal timescales and to predict its recovery time. Sediment from the debris flow is traced in the model to estimate the proportion of the sediment wave that will remain in permanent storage within the valley fill. Future work will focus on quantifying the role of floodplain-channel interactions on sediment wave evolution for decadal and longer timescales.

  5. Geomorphic response of Lillooet River, British Columbia, to meander cutoffs and base level lowering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherly, Hamish; Jakob, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    A detailed record of channel profiles, slopes, and stream discharge on Lillooet River provides an opportunity to study the effects of natural and artificial channel changes that have occurred over the past century. We analyze the long-term effects of channel alterations that may affect flood hazard. In the mid 1940s several meanders were artificially severed, side channels blocked off, and the level of downstream Lillooet Lake was lowered. These measures were thought to increase hydrologic efficiency and decrease flood risk in the largely agricultural valley. Between 1947 and 1994 average channel width in the upper reaches decreased by 50%, most of which occurred by the late 1950s. Between 1945 and 1969 Lillooet River degraded its bed elevation by 3-4 m (12.5 to 16.7 cm a- 1) in the upper reaches and up to 2 m (8.3 cm a- 1) in the lower reaches. This sudden and profound degradation compares to average bed elevation increases of 2.4 cm a- 1 prior to the engineering works. Between 1969 and 1985 the cross section area increased by 22% in the upper reaches and 13% in the lower reaches and decreased to 12% and 8%, respectively, for the time period 1985 to 2000. The increased sediment supply that was caused by channel straightening accelerated delta advance in Lillooet Lake from 7 m a- 1 (1858 to 1948) to 30 m a- 1 for the five-year period following the 1948 channel works. These rates have decreased over time, but with a current advance rate of 10.5 m a- 1 (1986-2009) are still above the long-term average prior to the channel changes. This study demonstrates the time scale, direction, and magnitude of channel changes following significant artificial river alterations. While the initial goal of decreasing flood risk had been achieved in the short term, the lower river apparently is slowly returning to an overall aggradational phase. Ongoing delta advance will ultimately increase channel elevations in the lower reaches and lead to significant flood hazards for populated

  6. Hydrogeochemistry of the Fraser River, British Columbia: seasonal variation in major and minor components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Eion M.

    1996-07-01

    For several years Environment Canada (EC) has carried out a program of water sampling at four stations along the Fraser River and at one station on each of its two principal tributaries, the Thompson and the Nechako. Samples collected at bi-weekly intervals have been analyzed by EC for major and some trace components. Seasonal variation in water composition mainly relates to changes in discharge, this being low during winter and high during early summer snowmelt. Dissolved constituents, Mg, Si, K, Ca, Sr, HCO 3, SO 4 and (NO 3 + NO 2), show moderate variation, being least concentrated during maximum discharge, reflecting dilution of groundwater by melting snow. Factor analysis shows secondary seasonal variation for SO 4, that is related to the importance of deep groundwater as a source, and for (NO 3 + NO 2), precipitated with snow and released during snowmelt. Large amounts of Na and Cl are added in pulp mill effluent. A uniform flux of this effluent, superimposed on a highly variable river discharge, gives rise to greater seasonal variation for Na and Cl than other dissolved constituents. The trace constituents, Fe, Mn, Al, P and Sr, were analyzed by EC in unfiltered water samples by methods that extract the elements from suspended material. Except for Sr, these elements have a high partition factor in favor of suspended over dissolved phases; their results reflect seasonal changes in quantities of suspended material, which can vary by two orders of magnitude.

  7. Channel and landscape dynamics in the alluvial forest mosaic of the Carmanah River valley, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Patrick J.; Richardson, John S.; Alila, Younes

    2013-11-01

    The highly diverse shifting-mosaic of forest patches of an alluvial forest within the Carmanah River valley on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia was studied to examine the hydrogeomorphic disturbance regime that structures it. We used a landscape-scale analysis to quantify historical channel migrations and changes in the extent of specific forest types. This GIS-based analysis using a 70-year aerial photographic record was complemented by field-based research. Thirty-eight plots containing 4509 trees were sampled for forest structure, age, and elevation above the contemporary channel. These data, including a vegetation chronosequence spanning over 500 years, were used to examine channel and landscape dynamics. Our findings support a general conceptual model that describes cycles of patch development and destruction in unconfined alluvial forests of the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. Over the past century, Carmanah River has eroded nearly 30% of the alluvial forest in this study area, and approximately 65% over the past 500 years. At least 80% of the 2007 channel was forested area within the past 70 years. Younger landforms were disturbed more frequently than mature forest patches, which suggest that as biogeomorphic succession progresses the likelihood of future disturbance decreases. Estimated half lives of landforms ranged from 24 years for pioneer bars to over 1500 years for old growth terraces. Years of regional high magnitude floods resulted in a net loss of floodplain forest area indicating that disturbance was climate driven in this pluvial watershed, whereby rain events result in flood disturbance that converted forests to channel. These events initiate a subsequent course of vegetation succession and geomorphic development, and often result in the deposition of large wood that modifies the channel environment and contributes to channel avulsion and further hydrogeomorphic disturbance. The composition of the landscape is a reflection of the

  8. Frequency and magnitude of debris flows on Cheekye River, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, M.; Friele, P.

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments are predicated on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e., several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the frequency-magnitude ( F- M) model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well-researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. The Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris-flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable F- M relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris-flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi-homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps, or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million m 3 in volume are unlikely to reach the Cheekye fan as a result of limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. Without the significant precursor investigations and the additional efforts of this study, life and

  9. The Physical, Geochemical and Microbial Conditions and Processes in the Hyporheic Zone of a Large Tidally Influenced River: The Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchin, M.; Roschinski, T.; Ross, K.; Leslie, S.; William, M.; Beckie, R.

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the physical, chemical and biological conditions and processes that occur in the hyporheic zone of the lower Fraser River, British Columbia. The large flows of between 2000 and 10000 cubic meters per second, the 10 15 m deep, 250 m wide channel, the 1 m tidal fluctuations, the localized scour and redeposition of sediments during freshet and the strong geochemical contrast between groundwater and surface water distinguish this investigation from studies on smaller channels and streams and required the development of novel characterization tools and strategies. The geochemistry of water samples collected with a push-in profiler, bulk electrical conductivity (EC) measurements collected with a push-in tool and hydraulic head measurements indicate that groundwater principally discharges into the river approximately 100 m offshore in a 10 m wide band. River water and groundwater mix to a maximum depth of between 0.75 and 1.5 m. While hydraulic heads show strong tidal reversals, bulk EC profiles show only moderate changes during the tidal cycle. It was hypothesized that high iron (10's mg/L of Fe(II)) in reduced groundwater would precipitate from solution as secondary iron-oxide phases in the zone where groundwater mixes with aerobic river water. Sediments were collected with a freeze-shoe corer and depth profiles through the hyporheic zone and into the underlying aquifer were analyzed by selective extractions. The 15-30 mg/g of total extractable iron in both the aquifer and hyporheic zone is relatively high. The lack of noticeable iron accumulation in the hyporheic zone may indicate that iron precipitates on shallow sediments that are subsequently scoured from the river bed during freshet. Microbial DNA from sediments was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and showed a relatively diverse community structure but an overall low biomass.

  10. Libraries in British Columbia: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/britishcolumbia.html Libraries in British Columbia To use the sharing features ... George University Hospital of Northern BC Northern Health Library Services / ILL Learning & Development Centre 1475 Edmonton Street ...

  11. Indian Education Programs in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Reg

    The British North America Act of 1867, the founding constitution of Canada, provides that all matters pertaining to Indians and Indian lands are under Federal jurisdiction. Because of this, the province of British Columbia (BC) has not felt it could do much for native peoples and little attention has been paid to the extension of provincial…

  12. Indian Education Programs in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Reg

    The British North America Act of 1867, the founding constitution of Canada, provides that all matters pertaining to Indians and Indian lands are under Federal jurisdiction. Because of this, the province of British Columbia (BC) has not felt it could do much for native peoples and little attention has been paid to the extension of provincial…

  13. British Columbia: improving retention and recruitment in smaller communities.

    PubMed

    Healey-Ogden, Marion; Wejr, Patricia; Farrow, Catherine

    2012-03-01

    This pilot project involved the application, in Canada, of the innovative 80/20 staffing model to a hospital in a small rural setting. The model provides the voluntary participants with 20% of their salaried time off from direct patient care in order to pursue various types of professional development activities. The project, overseen by a steering committee, lasted from June 2009 to February 2010 and involved 14 nurses on the pediatric unit of Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, British Columbia. It entailed a collaborative partnership of the British Columbia Nurses' Union, Interior Health Authority, Thompson Rivers University and the British Columbia Ministry of Health, and aimed to demonstrate how professional development opportunities can improve recruitment and retention of nurses, quality of work life and quality of patient care.

  14. Alternative models of climatic effects on sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) productivity in Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkison, M.; Peterman, R.; Lapointe, M.; Gillis, D.; Korman, J.

    1996-01-01

    We compare alternative models of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) productivity (returns per spawner) using more than 30 years of catch and escapement data for Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia. The models examined include several alternative forms of models that incorporate climatic influences as well as models not based on climate. For most stocks, a stationary stock-recruitment relationship explains very little of the interannual variation in productivity. In Bristol Bay, productivity co-varies among stocks and appears to be strongly related to fluctuations in climate. The best model for Bristol Bay sockeye involved a change in the 1970s in the parameters of the Ricker stock-recruitment curve; the stocks generally became more productive. In contrast, none of the models of Fraser River stocks that we examined explained much of the variability in their productivity.

  15. Extensive feeding on sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts by bull trout Salvelinus confluentus during initial outmigration into a small, unregulated and inland British Columbia river.

    PubMed

    Furey, N B; Hinch, S G; Lotto, A G; Beauchamp, D A

    2015-01-01

    Stomach contents were collected and analysed from 22 bull trout Salvelinus confluentus at the edge of the Chilko Lake and Chilko River in British Columbia, Canada, during spring outmigration of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts. Twenty of the 22 (>90%) stomachs contained prey items, virtually all identifiable prey items were outmigrant O. nerka smolts and stomach contents represented a large portion (0·0-12·6%) of estimated S. confluentus mass. The results demonstrate nearly exclusive and intense feeding by S. confluentus on outmigrant smolts, and support recent telemetry observations of high disappearance rates of O. nerka smolts leaving large natural lake systems prior to entering high-order unregulated river systems.

  16. Extensive feeding on sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts by bull trout Salvelinus confluentus during initial outmigration into a small, unregulated and inland British Columbia river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furey, Nathan B.; Hinch, Scott G.; Lotto, A.G.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Stomach contents were collected and analysed from 22 bull trout Salvelinus confluentus at the edge of the Chilko Lake and Chilko River in British Columbia, Canada, during spring outmigration of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts. Twenty of the 22 (>90%) stomachs contained prey items, virtually all identifiable prey items were outmigrant O. nerka smolts and stomach contents represented a large portion (0·0–12·6%) of estimated S. confluentus mass. The results demonstrate nearly exclusive and intense feeding by S. confluentus on outmigrant smolts, and support recent telemetry observations of high disappearance rates of O. nerka smolts leaving large natural lake systems prior to entering high-order unregulated river systems.

  17. Water and Sediment Quality in the Yukon River and its Tributaries Between Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, and Eagle, Alaska, USA, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halm, Douglas R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.

    2007-01-01

    The Yukon River basin is the fourth largest watershed in North America at 831,400 square kilometers (km2). Approximately 126,000 people live within the basin and depend on the Yukon River and its tributaries for drinking water, commerce, subsistence, and recreational fish and game resources. Climate warming in the Arctic and Subarctic regions encompassing the Yukon basin has recently become a concern because of possible far-reaching effects on the ecosystem. Large amounts of carbon and nutrients are stored in permafrost and have potential for release in response to this warming. These changes in carbon and nutrient cycling may result in changes in stream chemistry and productivity, including salmon populations, and ultimately changes in the chemistry and productivity of the Bearing Sea. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a 5-year comprehensive water-quality study of the Yukon River and its major tributaries starting in 2000. The study included frequent water-quality sampling at a fixed site network as well as intensive sampling along the Yukon River and its major tributaries. This report contains observations of water and sediment quantity and quality of the Yukon River and its tributaries in Canada during 2004. Chemical, biological, physical, and discharge data are presented for the reach of river between Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, and Eagle, Alaska, USA.

  18. Considerations for Education Reform in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Countries around the world refer to twenty-first century education as essential to maintaining personal and national economic advantage and draw on this discourse to advocate for and embark on educational reform. This paper examines issues around education reform, particularly in British Columbia. It argues that reformers should give careful…

  19. Deprivatizing Private Education: The British Columbia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Jean

    1991-01-01

    The experience of British Columbia in deprivatizing private schools by requiring their registration and providing financial support is reviewed. It is argued that family choice and state control have grown dialectically. Government funding has created higher enrollments and new schools, but resultant public oversight ultimately constrains choice.…

  20. British Columbia. Reference Series No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of British Columbia and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. A discussion of the province's history includes the early European explorers, Indian natives, and later fur traders and settlers. The building of the transcontinental railway, entry…

  1. British Columbia water quality guidelines, criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This publication contains tables summarizing approved water quality guidelines for various contaminants that may be present in British Columbia water supplies. It begins with a section in question and answer format that explains certain aspects of the guidelines. Contaminants covered by the guidelines include particulate matter, nutrients and algae, aluminium, lead, mercury, nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, copper, chlorine, fluoride, hydrocarbons, pH, and silver.

  2. British Columbia/Alberta Transfer System Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this agreement is to provide assurance to students that they will receive transfer credit for courses or programs they have successfully completed where the content/outcomes are demonstrably equivalent to those offered at the institution to which they transfer. This protocol is undertaken by the British Columbia Council on…

  3. British Columbia. Reference Series No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of British Columbia and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. A discussion of the province's history includes the early European explorers, Indian natives, and later fur traders and settlers. The building of the transcontinental railway, entry…

  4. British Columbia Transfer TIPS: Facilitation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, Vancouver.

    This document is a guide for teachers, career counselors, community practitioners, and students to navigate the British Columbia (BC) Transfer TIPS (transfer information for post-secondary success), a handbook for students intending to transfer among institutions listed in the BC Transfer TIPS. Specifically, the BC Transfer TIPS is intended…

  5. Seasonal variation in biological oxygen demand levels in the main stem of the Fraser River, British Columbia and an agriculturally impacted tributary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, S. L.; Fraser, H.; Marsh, S. J.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B. M.; Marcotte, D.; Fanslau, J.; Epp, A.; Bennett, M.; Hanson-Carson, J.; Luymes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Fraser River basin is one of British Columbia's most diverse and valuable ecosystems. Water levels and temperatures along the Fraser are seasonally variable, with high flow during the spring freshet and low flow during winter months. In the Fraser River, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations impact many aquatic species. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) measures the amount of oxygen consumed by bacteria during the decomposition of organic matter and is an indicator of water quality in freshwater environments. We compared BOD, DO, and pH during winter (November 2011) and summer (July 2012) in the main stem of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and a tributary in an agricultural area of the Fraser Valley, Nathan Creek. In November the BOD of the main stem of the Fraser River was 2.36 mg/L, pH 7.26, and DO 9.13 mg/L. BOD and DO of Nathan Creek was not significantly lower at 1.68 mg/L and DO 8.28 mg/L, however, the pH was significantly lower (p=0.001) at 6.75. In July, the Fraser River had significantly higher BOD levels than in winter at 4.43 mg/L, but no significant change in pH and DO. Nathan Creek BOD was significantly higher than it was in winter and higher than the main stem at 7.34 mg/L, with no significant change in pH and DO. There were strong seasonal differences in BOD in the Fraser River and Nathan Creek, with the highest levels seen in July. The higher BOD seen in Nathan Creek in July may be an indication of agricultural impact. Although all BOD values fell in the range of 1-8 mg/L and are considered to be relatively unpolluted.

  6. Atmospheric River impacts in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest on 22-24 January 2015 during the CalWater 2015 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggini, N. G.; Spackman, J. R.; Neiman, P. J.; White, A. B.; Fairall, C. W.; Barnet, C.; Gambacorta, A.; Hughes, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over 30 dropsonde transects were performed across atmospheric rivers (ARs) over the eastern Pacific during CalWater 2015. An event in late January allowed first-of-its-kind coordinated dropsonde transects of an AR using the NOAA G-IV aircraft in tandem with the NOAA Ronald H. Brown (RHB), which observed the marine boundary layer during the passage of this major AR. Dropsonde data collected on 22 January 2015 sampled the early stages of the AR, when the AR began making landfall near Vancouver Island, British Columbia. At the same time the RHB collected precipitation and oceanic moisture flux measurements on the warm side of the AR. A second flight on 24 January 2015 sampled the later stages of the AR, again passing over the RHB stationed beneath the AR. During this later period, the AR axis of moisture shifted north-northeast and fanned out along the coast, affecting regions from Northern Washington to Southern Alaska. Multi-day landfalling AR conditions led to flooding in British Columbia and northern Washington. The influence of the coastal orography combined with the shift in AR orientation is examined to understand the orographic control of precipitation that triggered the flooding. In addition, cross section analysis of the AR using dropsonde and reanalysis data are used to better understand the synoptic influences, water vapor transport, and moisture evolution during the lifecycle of the AR. To gain greater insight into AR development and prolonged AR conditions that led to enhanced flooding, a comparison of aircraft and ship data from CalWater 2015 and NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) retrievals (integrated water vapor, vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and an experimental ATMS-only rain rate product) will be compared for the 22-24 January period.

  7. Modelling the Impacts of Changing Land Cover/Land Use and Climate on Flooding in the Elk River Watershed, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. C.; Byrne, J. M.; Hopkinson, C.; MacDonald, R. J.; Johnson, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Elk River is a mountain watershed located along the eastern border of British Columbia, Canada. The Elk River is confined by railway bridges, roads, and urban areas. Flooding has been a concern in the valley for more than a century. The most recent major flood event occurred in 2013 affecting several communities. River modifications such as riprapped dykes, channelization, and dredging have occurred in an attempt to reduce inundation, with limited success. Significant changes in land cover/land use (LCLU) such as natural state to urban, forestry practices, and mining from underground to mountaintop/valley fill have changed terrain and ground surfaces thereby altering water infiltration and runoff processes in the watershed. Future climate change in this region is expected to alter air temperature and precipitation as well as produce an earlier seasonal spring freshet potentially impacting future flood events. The objective of this research is to model historical and future hydrological conditions to identify flood frequency and risk under a range of climate and LCLU change scenarios in the Elk River watershed. Historic remote sensing data, forest management plans, and mining industry production/post-mining reclamation plans will be used to create a predictive past and future LCLU time series. A range of future air temperature and precipitation scenarios will be developed based on accepted Global Climate Modelling (GCM) research to examine how the hydrometeorological conditions may be altered under a range of future climate scenarios. The GENESYS (GENerate Earth SYstems Science input) hydrometeorological model will be used to simulate climate and LCLU to assess historic and potential future flood frequency and magnitude. Results will be used to create innovative flood mitigation, adaptation, and management strategies for the Elk River with the intent of being wildlife friendly and non-destructive to ecosystems and habitats for native species.

  8. Accidental Deaths Among British Columbia Indians

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, N.; Hole, L. W.; Barclay, W. S.

    1966-01-01

    A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns. Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon. This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns. PMID:5902238

  9. Truffle diversity (Tuber, Tuberaceae) in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Berch, Shannon M; Bonito, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    To improve baseline data for the developing truffle industry in British Columbia, we compiled existing Tuber species sequences from published and unpublished studies and generated new ITS sequences for truffles belonging to Tuber collected in the province. In doing so, we obtained evidence that 13 species of Tuber occur in the province, including six introduced and seven native species, two of which are putative undescribed species. Of the native species, the Tuber anniae species complex is widely distributed in the province while Tuber beyerlei appears to be much more restricted in distribution. Four of the introduced species have commercial value (Tuber melanosporum, Tuber aestivum, Tuber brumale, and Tuber borchii) as do two of the native species (Tuber gibbosum and Tuber oregonense). Focused sampling on likely tree hosts, both hardwood and Pinaceae species, as well as in currently unexplored parts of the province seems likely to expand our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of Tuber species in British Columbia.

  10. The occurrence and sources of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the Salmon River, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Cassandra C; Schreier, Hans; Mauro, William; Taboada, Eduardo; Isaac-Renton, Judith L; Topp, Edward; Edge, Thomas; Thomas, James E; Gannon, Victor P J

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we wished to assess the prevalence and determine the sources of three zoonotic bacterial pathogens (Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli O157:H7) in the Salmon River watershed in southwestern British Columbia. Surface water, sewage, and animal faecal samples were collected from the watershed. Selective bacterial culture and PCR techniques were used to isolate these three pathogens and indicator bacteria from these samples and characterize them. Campylobacter was the most prevalent pathogen in all samples, followed by Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella isolation rates from water, as well as faecal coliform densities correlated positively with precipitation, while Campylobacter isolation rates correlated negatively with precipitation. Analysis of DNA extracted from water samples for the presence of Bacteroides host-species markers, and comparisons of C. jejuni flaA-RFLP types and Salmonella serovars from faecal and water samples provided evidence that human sewage and specific domestic and wild animal species were sources of these pathogens; however, in most cases the source could not be determined or more than one source was possible. The frequent isolation of these zoonotic pathogens in the Salmon River highlights the risks to human health associated with intentional and unintentional consumption of untreated surface waters.

  11. Use of major ion and stable isotope geochemistry to delineate natural and anthropogenic sources of nitrate and sulfate in the Kettle River Basin, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Leslie; Hutcheon, Ian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    The Kettle River Basin in South central British Columbia (Canada) is under increasing anthropogenic pressures affecting both water quantity and quality of surface waters and aquifers. We investigated water quality and sources and processes influencing NO3- and SO42- in the Kettle River Basin using a combination of chemical and isotopic techniques. The dominant water type in the Kettle River Basin is Ca-HCO3 with surface waters having total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations of < 115 mg/L and groundwaters having TDS values of up to 572 mg/L. Based on δ15NNO3andδ18ONO3 values and concentration data, NO3- in surface waters originates primarily from natural soil nitrification processes, with additional influences from anthropogenic activities, such as waste water effluents at sampling locations downstream from population centres. The source of NO3- in groundwater was predominantly nitrification of soil organic matter, although nitrate in a few groundwater samples originated from anthropogenic sources, including manure or septic systems. The dominant source of SO42- in surface water and groundwater samples was the natural oxidation of sulfide minerals. With increasing distance downstream, surface water δ18OSO4 values increase beyond the range of oxidation of sulfide minerals and into the range of soil and atmospheric-derived SO42- that is in part derived from anthropogenic emissions. Hence, we conclude that recent anthropogenic impacts have affected water quality only marginally at only few sites in the Kettle River Basin. The presented data will serve as an excellent baseline against which future impacts can be assessed.

  12. Trace element and isotopic composition of apatite in carbonatites from the Blue River area (British Columbia, Canada) and mineralogy of associated silicate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger; Chudy, Thomas; McFarlane, Christopher R. M.; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Apatites from the Verity, Fir, Gum, Howard Creek and Felix carbonatites of the Blue River (British Columbia, Canada) area have been investigated with respect to their paragenesis, cathodoluminescence, trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic composition. Although all of the Blue River carbonatites were emplaced as sills prior to amphibolite grade metamorphism and have undergone deformation, in many instances magmatic textures and mineralogy are retained. Attempts to constrain the U-Pb age of the carbonatites by SIMS, TIMS and LA-ICP-MS studies of zircon and titanite were inconclusive as all samples investigated have experienced significant Pb loss during metamorphism. The carbonatites are associated with undersaturated calcite-titanite amphibole nepheline syenite only at Howard Creek although most contain clasts of disaggregated phoscorite-like rocks. Apatite from each intrusion is characterized by distinct, but wide ranges, in trace element composition. The Sr and Nd isotopic compositions define an array on a 87Sr/86Sr vs²Nd diagram at 350 Ma indicating derivation from depleted sub-lithospheric mantle. This array could reflect mixing of Sr and Nd derived from HIMU and EM1 mantle sources, and implies that depleted mantle underlies the Canadian Cordillera. Although individual occurrences of carbonatites in the Blue River region are mineralogically and geochemically similar they are not identical and thus cannot be considered as rocks formed from a single batch of parental magma at the same stage of magmatic evolution. However, a common origin is highly probable. The variations in the trace element content and isotopic composition of apatite from each occurrence suggest that each carbonatite represents a combination of derivation of the parental magma(s) from mineralogically and isotopically heterogeneous depleted mantle sources coupled with different stages of limited differentiation and mixing of these magmas. We do not consider these carbonatites as primary direct

  13. Significance of Jurassic radiolarians from the Cache Creek terrane, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordey, Fabrice; Mortimer, N.; Dewever, Patrick; Monger, J. W. H.

    1987-12-01

    The discovery of new radiolarian localities in the western belt of the Cache Creek terrane in southern British Columbia possibly changes its upper age limit from Late Triassic to Early or Middle Jurassic. It favors a Middle Jurassic, rather than a Late Triassic, age of amalgamation for the Cache Creek terrane and Quesnellia (parts of superterrane I) in southern British Columbia. The new Jurassic ages also mean that the western Cache Creek terrane could be equivalent in age to the Bridge River Hozameen terrane in British Columbia and to terranes containing the Tethyan fusulinid Yabeina in northwest Washington and the Klamath Mountains of California.

  14. Class 1 and class 2 integrons in multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria isolated from the Salmon River, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai; Broersma, Klaas; Miao, Vivian; Davies, Julian

    2011-06-01

    Using an enrichment protocol, we isolated 16 gram-negative, multidrug-resistant strains of known or opportunistic bacterial pathogens from the Salmon River in south-central British Columbia from 2005 to 2009, and investigated the genetic basis of their resistance to a variety of antibiotics. Of the 16 strains, 13 carried class 1 integrons and three carried class 2 integrons. Genes found in cassettes associated with the integrons included those for dihydrofolate reductases (dfrA1, dfrA12, dfrA17, and dfrB7), aminoglycoside adenyltransferases (aadA1, aadA2, aadA5, and aadB), streptothricin acetyltransferase (sat), and hypothetical proteins (orfF and orfC). A new gene cassette of unknown function, orf1, was discovered between dfrA1 and aadA5 in Escherichia sp. Other genes for resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and kanamycin (tetA, tetB, tetD; catA; strA-strB; and aphA1-Iab, respectively) were outside the integrons. Several of these resistance determinants were transferable by conjugation. The detection of organisms and resistance determinants normally associated with clinical settings attest to their widespread dispersal and suggest that regular monitoring of their presence in aquatic habitats should become a part of the overall effort to understand the epidemiology of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria.

  15. Reconstructing source polybrominated diphenyl ether congener patterns from semipermeable membrane devices in the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada: comparison to commercial mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Ikonomou, Michael G

    2002-11-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were placed in the Fraser River near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, between August 6 and September 30, 1996. This location is near a large urban and industrial region (population 2,000,000) and is expected to be representative of other large, modern cities. After exposure to the ambient water column, SPMD samples were analyzed for a suite of 36 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners plus all homologue groups from mono- through hexa-brominated. Observed congener patterns differed significantly from that of the commercial penta- and octa-BDE mixtures. A reconstruction approach was developed based on an aquatic transport model and utilizing published octanol-water partition coefficients, calculated SPMD uptake rates, and predicted water concentrations by using the EcoFate multimedia mass balance aquatic simulation model for the 13 major PBDE congeners. In combination, composite technical mixtures were created by combining commercial penta-BDE mixtures (Bromkal 70-SDE and Great Lakes Chemicals DE-71) with commercial octa-BDE mixtures (Bromkal 79-8DE and Great Lakes Chemicals DE-79) in their relative 2000 North American production volumes. The reconstructed SPMD patterns more closely approximated the composite technical mixtures and suggest that PBDEs in such an industrial region arise primarily from penta- and octa-BDE source mixtures.

  16. Physiological, energetic and behavioural correlates of successful fishway passage of adult sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in the Seton River, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Pon, L B; Hinch, S G; Cooke, S J; Patterson, D A; Farrell, A P

    2009-04-01

    Electromyogram (EMG) radio telemetry was used in conjunction with physiological biopsy to relate prior physiological condition and subsequent swimming energetics and behaviours to passage success of 13 wild adult sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka at a vertical-slot fishway on the Seton River, British Columbia. At the time of capture, plasma lactate, glucose and cortisol levels indicated that fish were not exhibiting unusually high levels of physiological stress. Very few differences existed between successful and unsuccessful fish in body size, initial plasma physiology and energy state and mean swim speed and energy use during passage. Generally, fish did not employ burst swimming during successful or failed attempts at passage, indicating that failure was probably not related to metabolic acidosis. Plasma Na(+) concentration was significantly lower in unsuccessful fish (P < 0.05), which is suggestive of a depressed ionic state or a possible stress component, although values in all fish were within an expected range for migrant adult O. nerka. Nevertheless, six of 13 fish failed to reascend the fishway and remained in the tailrace of the dam for more than a day on average before moving downstream and away from the dam. During this time, fish were observed actively seeking a means of passage, suggesting that there may have been other, undetermined causes of passage failure.

  17. Prospects for Adult Literacy Policy in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darville, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Intended to assist in the formulation of effective policies for adult literacy in British Columbia, this paper reviews the current discussion of adult literacy policy and programming across Canada. It also reviews existing policies in Canada and in British Columbia, in education ministries, and in other ministries with interests and activities…

  18. Contagious ecthyma in mountain goat of coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Hebert, D M; Samuel, W M; Smith, G W

    1977-04-01

    Contagious ecthyma has been reported previously from mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in one restricted area of eastern British Columbia. A second focus of infection is reported for mountain goat from western British Columbia. Diagnosis was based on appearance of lesions at necropsy, histopathology and demonstration of poxvirus with the electron microscope. The epizootiology of this infection in mountain goat is discussed briefly.

  19. BCASP and the Evolution of School Psychology in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1992, the British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) has been the professional body for school psychologists in British Columbia. In the intervening 24 years, BCASP has been very successful in performing the dual roles of a certifying body and a professional development organization for school psychologists in British…

  20. BCASP and the Evolution of School Psychology in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1992, the British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) has been the professional body for school psychologists in British Columbia. In the intervening 24 years, BCASP has been very successful in performing the dual roles of a certifying body and a professional development organization for school psychologists in British…

  1. British Columbia log export policy: historical review and analysis.

    Treesearch

    Craig W. Shinn

    1993-01-01

    Log exports have been restricted in British Columbia for over 100 years. The intent of the restriction is to use the timber in British Columbia to encourage development of forest industry, employment, and well-being in the Province. Logs have been exempted from the within-Province manufacturing rule at various times, in varying amounts, for different reasons, and by...

  2. Survey of Columbia River Basin Streams for Giant Columbia River Spire Snail Fluminicola columbiana and Great Columbia River limpet Fisherola nuttalli

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Frest, T.J.; Washington Univ., Seattle, WA )

    1989-10-01

    Surveys have confirmed the survival of both the giant Columbia River spire snail Fluminicola columbiana and the great Columbia River limpet Fisherola nuttalli in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington State, as well as other sites in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. A review of historical collection records suggests that both species exist in still other sites of the Columbia River Basin. At present, there is insufficient information to allow adequate appraisal of either species relative to possible federal or state listing as endangered or threatened species. The results of our studies suggest that additional undiscovered populations of both species exist. There is a relatively good chance that pristine habitat required by spire snails and limpets remains in 37 streams or portions of streams in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana (British Columbia was considered outside the project scope). For a thorough survey, visits to more than 600 sites will be required. 20 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Lower Columbia River. Workshop Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-12

    Traffic Density 9.0 Ice Conditions 3.4 Waterway Complexity 2.5 4 Port Risk Assessment of the Lower Columbia River Analysis : Book 2...Waterway Complexity 6.0 7 Port Risk Assessment of the Lower Columbia River Analysis : This is the point in the workshop when the process...Port Risk and then translated into computer algorithms by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. In that model, risk is defined as the sum

  4. A Current and Retrospective Landscape-Level C Budget for the Fluxnet-Canada Coastal British Columbia Station (Oyster River).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Stinson, G.; Kurz, W.

    2006-12-01

    A retrospective carbon (C ) budget for the Fluxnet-Canada coastal BC Station (5 x 5 km Oyster River Area) for the period 1920 to 2005 was developed using the spatially-explicit version of the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3). CBM-CFS3 is an inventory-based C budget modeling tool that has been used to simulate forest C dynamics at national, regional, and operational scales. A current (circa 2000) forest inventory map for the Oyster River Area was compiled using data provided by forest companies (TimberWest and Island Timberlands). This inventory was overlaid with historic disturbance maps and orthophotographs to generate a coverage of forest cover polygons with unique disturbance histories. A 1920 timber cruise map was then used to help estimate the volume, cover type, and age of the forest in each polygon in 1920. Data were loaded into the CBM-CFS3 initialization routine and the model was then used to simulate the forest dynamics and C budget for the 85-year period. The C budget of the Oyster River Area is strongly tied to its disturbance history. In 1920, old-growth forest covered the majority of the study area and net C flux was neutral or small. In the 1930's and 40's, ground fires, clear-cut harvesting (using railroad logging), and slash burning resulted in a significant loss of biomass C and a substantial flux of C into dead organic matter, the atmosphere, and wood product pools (area net average C loss 5 - 20 Mg C/ha/yr). A gradual recovery of ecosystem C stocks followed this period of high disturbance activity but the area remained a significant C source, and did not become a net C sink until well into the 1950's. From 1960 through 1987 disturbance was minimal and the area remained a C sink (area average net uptake 2 - 6 Mg C/ha/yr). As harvesting of the second-growth forest began in the late 1980's, the C budget of the area was once again dominated by disturbances, albeit buffered by ongoing C uptake by living biomass in the

  5. Towards Diversification of Secondary Special Education in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1978-01-01

    Discussed is the trend in British Columbia, Canada, towards diversification of secondary special education programs, which in the past were restricted to occupational programs that became "dumping grounds" for all types of problem students. (DLS)

  6. SPECIES RICHNESS AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION PRIORITIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in the geographic distribution of seven species groups were used to identify important areas for conservation in British Columbia, Canada. Potential priority sites for conservation were determined using an integer programming algorithm that maximized the number of speci...

  7. SPECIES RICHNESS AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION PRIORITIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in the geographic distribution of seven species groups were used to identify important areas for conservation in British Columbia, Canada. Potential priority sites for conservation were determined using an integer programming algorithm that maximized the number of speci...

  8. Towards Diversification of Secondary Special Education in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1978-01-01

    Discussed is the trend in British Columbia, Canada, towards diversification of secondary special education programs, which in the past were restricted to occupational programs that became "dumping grounds" for all types of problem students. (DLS)

  9. Characteristics of Educational Programs for Autistic Children in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg; Gittins, Wyn

    1980-01-01

    The article reports on a British Columbia (Canada) survey to collect information on pupil, teacher, and program characteristics of classes for children with infantile autism, childhood schizophrenia, childhood psychoses, and severe language deficits. (Author/DLS)

  10. Magnetotactic bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Oestreicher, Zachery; Lower, Steven K.; Rees, Eric; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lower, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Pavilion Lake is a slightly alkaline, freshwater lake located in British Columbia, Canada (50°51'N, 121°44'W). It is known for unusual organosedimentary structures, called microbialites that are found along the lake basin. These deposits are complex associations of fossilized microbial communities and detrital- or chemical-sedimentary rocks. During the summer, a sediment sample was collected from near the lake's shore, approximately 25–50 cm below the water surface. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from this sample using a simple magnetic enrichment protocol. The MTB isolated from Pavilion Lake belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria class as determined by nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the bacteria were spirillum-shaped and contained a single chain of cuboctahedral-shaped magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals that were approximately 40 nm in diameter. This discovery of MTB in Pavilion Lake offers an opportunity to better understand the diversity of MTB habitats, the geobiological function of MTB in unique freshwater ecosystems, and search for magnetofossils contained within the lake's microbialites. PMID:24391636

  11. Community-based stream conservation initiatives in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wilson, N

    2002-01-01

    British Columbia is a diverse province, with ecosystems ranging from semi-arid deserts to valley glaciers and vast ice fields. By world standards, BC has an abundance of fresh water in its lakes and rivers. However, rivers have been exploited for social and industrial purposes, often to the detriment of the natural values. Community groups and non-government organizations have been active in rehabilitating and restoring waterways. The Outdoor Recreation Council of BC is a provincial non-government organization that has been instrumental in river conservation issues in BC. Three key initiatives have been established by the Council since its formation in 1975. BC Rivers Day has grown into the largest river celebration of its kind in North America, and there is a move to establish a national Rivers Day in Canada based on the model established in BC. Second is the annual Endangered Rivers List compiled by the Council and released each spring. The third initiative is the River Recovery Project in which dams and impoundment structures were evaluated against a set of criteria. A short list of candidates was generated by the project that will be further studied to determine what actions should be taken to alter the management of the structures to restore ecological values of the rivers and streams on which they are built. The three initiatives described rely on local community support. The Outdoor Recreation Council of BC provides coordination, promotion, and publicity as well as some resource materials while local groups and communities take on stewardship roles for their local streams. This model may be useful for other jurisdictions.

  12. Foreign students, visitors and immigration to British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Kunin, R

    1993-01-01

    "This report has provided a brief outline of business immigration to Canada and to British Columbia from several source countries in the Asian Pacific Rim. The importance of business immigration to Canada in general, and British Columbia in particular, is [examined].... Even with the limited data currently available, this brief study indicates a very high statistical relationship between business immigration and other less formal and less permanent movements of people such as student flows and visitors." excerpt

  13. Availability and estimates of veterinary antimicrobial use in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The amount of antimicrobial use is a significant selection pressure that alters the frequency of antimicrobial resistance. This paper summarizes attempts to estimate the weight of antimicrobial purchases in British Columbia for use in animals. The data reported here do not capture all sources of veterinary antimicrobial use in British Columbia. This paper highlights how information deficits on veterinary drug use complicate the development of an evidence-based policy framework for combating antimicrobial resistance. PMID:15144102

  14. Columbia River Impact Evaluation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    A preliminary impact evaluation was conducted to assess the adequacy of existing data and proposed data collection programs for evaluating cumulative health and environmental impacts to the Columbia River due to past practices at the Hanford Site. The results of this evaluation were used to develop this plan to ensure collection of sufficient data for adequate characterization of the Columbia River along the 100 Area for CERCLA purposes. The evaluation used to develop the plan is not a risk assessment; the plan presented here is only a mechanism to collect additional data to support a future risk assessment.

  15. Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-02-01

    The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual flow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak flood waters, that flow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, officials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the flooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

  16. Transforming family practice in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Cavers, William J.R.; Tregillus, Valerie H.F.; Micco, Angela; Hollander, Marcus J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe a new approach to primary care reform developed in British Columbia (BC) under the leadership of the General Practice Services Committee (GPSC). COMPOSITION OF THE COMMITTEE The GPSC is a joint committee of the BC Ministry of Health Services, the BC Medical Association, and the Society of General Practitioners of BC. Representatives of BC’s health authorities also attend as guests. METHOD This paper is based on the 2008–2009 annual report of the GPSC. It summarizes the history and main activities of the GPSC. REPORT The GPSC is currently supporting a number of key activities to transform primary care in BC. These activities include the Full Service Family Practice Incentive Program, which provides incentive payments to promote enhanced primary care; the Practice Support Program, which provides family physicians and their medical office assistants with various practical evidence-based strategies and tools for managing practice enhancement; the Family Physicians for BC Program to develop family practices in areas of identified need; the Shared Care Committee, which supports and enables the determination of appropriate scopes of practice among GPs, specialists, and other health care professionals; the Divisions of Family Practice, which are designed to facilitate interactions among family doctors and between doctors and their respective health authorities; and the Community Healthcare and Resource Directory, a Web-based resource to help health care providers find appropriate mental health resources. CONCLUSION Early results indicate that the GPSC’s initiatives are enhancing the delivery of primary care services in BC. PMID:21156899

  17. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  18. How Activity Systems Evolve: Making / Saving Salmon in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yew-Jin; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the history of a state-sponsored salmon enhancement project in British Columbia and to explicate the development of the former using cultural historical activity theory. We make thematic the notion of inner contradictions, which express themselves outwardly as a function of both quantitative and…

  19. The Discursive Framing of International Education Programs in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cover, Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how international education programs in British Columbia have been discursively framed by government and media sources. Over the past two decades, international education programs have expanded in number and scale in the province, a phenomenon that has been interpreted by some education researchers and media sources as…

  20. English for "Old" Canadians: The Finnish Project in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, John A.

    The Finnish-Canadian Citizenship Project was organized to teach English to older Canadians of Finnish descent in British Columbia. The 24 enrollees had between one and ten years of formal schooling. The Finnish Canadians use a dialect of English words with Finnish pronunciations that must be unlearned in order to learn English. The students…

  1. The British Columbia Literature 12 Curriculum and I: A Soliloquy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouritzin, Sandra G.

    2004-01-01

    A critique of the prescribed Literature 12 curriculum for British Columbia teachers, this article is a life-history narrative juxtaposed against my own literary education, examining how my lived experiences were reflected and reinforced in the Literature 12 curriculum, and in the literary canons of both high school and university English teaching…

  2. Occupational Therapy: Roles and Functions in British Columbia Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Linda E.; Backman, Catherine L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 73 school districts in British Columbia (Canada) evaluated availability of occupational therapy (OT) services, the most important aspects of OT evaluation, OT treatment and services in general, additional training needed by occupational therapists, demographic information on therapists, and therapists' current roles and functions. (DB)

  3. Labour Trends and Training Needs in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Susan P.

    In an effort to meet the training needs of the British Columbia (BC) labor force, Open College (OC), in Burnaby, has focused future activities on market-driven, employer-centered training programs utilizing advanced technologies and traditional on-site instructional methods. Designed to ensure that these courses and programs reflect actual labor…

  4. How Activity Systems Evolve: Making / Saving Salmon in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yew-Jin; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the history of a state-sponsored salmon enhancement project in British Columbia and to explicate the development of the former using cultural historical activity theory. We make thematic the notion of inner contradictions, which express themselves outwardly as a function of both quantitative and…

  5. The 1990 British Columbia Mathematics Assessment: Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robitaille, David F., Ed.

    This book presents the results of the fourth British Columbia Mathematics Assessment conducted in the spring of 1990. Students in Grades 4, 7, and 10 (approximately 120,000) were asked to provide information about themselves, to express their opinions about school-related experiences, and to demonstrate their ability to do the mathematics…

  6. Learning to Be. A Perspective from British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbert, Judy; Kaser, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how "learning to be", with a specific focus on social-emotional competencies, has become part of the educational mindset--and educational policy--in British Columbia, Canada. The development of a set of learning progressions for social responsibility, an emphasis on social emotional learning in the new curriculum…

  7. A Review of Special Education in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Linda; Ladyman, Stewart

    This report presents findings of a special team to review special education policy, its implementation, accountability, and program effectiveness in British Columbia. The team identified a set of issues to address including: inclusion/integration, parental involvement, assessment, Individual Education Plans, evaluation, transitions, employees who…

  8. Learning to Be. A Perspective from British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbert, Judy; Kaser, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how "learning to be", with a specific focus on social-emotional competencies, has become part of the educational mindset--and educational policy--in British Columbia, Canada. The development of a set of learning progressions for social responsibility, an emphasis on social emotional learning in the new curriculum…

  9. Comment: The People's Law School of British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprowls, David

    1980-01-01

    The People's Law School of British Columbia is a nonprofit organization informing laymen of their legal rights and responsibilities. The program features free evening courses cosponsored by community groups in 60 centers around the province. (Journal availability: Canada-United States Law Journal, 11075 East Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44106.) (MSE)

  10. A Brief History of the Transfer System in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaber, Devron

    2005-01-01

    This document presents a brief history of important events in the development and maintenance of the post-secondary transfer system in British Columbia (BC) over the last six decades. Information is presented in point form and in chronological order. Several points related to the expansion of the post-secondary system are included, and hence the…

  11. Educator Preparedness to Teach Health Education in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Sandra; Zhou, Mingming

    2007-01-01

    Background: To date, few studies have been conducted to investigate the preparedness of health educators in Canadian school systems. Purpose: This study assessed practicing and pre-service teachers' self-perceptions of preparedness to teach health education in British Columbia K-12 classrooms. It also investigated factors related to their…

  12. Governing the "New Administrative Frontier:" "Cohering" Rationalities and Educational Leadership in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Michelle; Mazawi, Andre Elias

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the School Leadership Society, later renamed the British Columbia Educational Leadership Council (BCELC), was launched with the assistance of the British Columbia Ministry of Education to transform the goals and objectives of educational leadership and management in the Province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. In this paper the authors…

  13. Medicare financing and redistribution in british columbia, 1992 and 2002.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2007-05-01

    Equity in healthcare in British Columbia is defined as the provision of services based on need rather than ability to pay and a separation of contributions to financing from the use of services. Physician and hospital services in Canada are financed mainly through general tax revenues, and there is a perception that this financing is progressive. This paper uses Gini coefficients, concentration indexes and Kakwani indexes of progressivity to assess the progressivity of medicare financing in British Columbia in 1992 and 2002. It also measures the overall redistributive effect of medicare services, considering both contributions to financing and use of hospital and physician services. The conclusion is that medicare does redistribute across income groups, but this redistribution is the result solely of the positive correlation between health status and income; financing is nearly proportionate across income groups, but use is higher among lower-income groups. Informed public debate requires a better understanding of these concepts of equity.

  14. West Nile virus range expansion into British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Roth, David; Henry, Bonnie; Mak, Sunny; Fraser, Mieke; Taylor, Marsha; Li, Min; Cooper, Ken; Furnell, Allen; Wong, Quantine; Morshed, Muhammad

    2010-08-01

    In 2009, an expansion of West Nile virus (WNV) into the Canadian province of British Columbia was detected. Two locally acquired cases of infection in humans and 3 cases of infection in horses were detected by ELISA and plaque-reduction neutralization tests. Ten positive mosquito pools were detected by reverse transcription PCR. Most WNV activity in British Columbia in 2009 occurred in the hot and dry southern Okanagan Valley. Virus establishment and amplification in this region was likely facilitated by above average nightly temperatures and a rapid accumulation of degree-days in late summer. Estimated exposure dates for humans and initial detection of WNV-positive mosquitoes occurred concurrently with a late summer increase in Culex tarsalis mosquitoes (which spread western equine encephalitis) in the southern Okanagan Valley. The conditions present during this range expansion suggest that temperature and Cx. tarsalis mosquito abundance may be limiting factors for WNV transmission in this portion of the Pacific Northwest.

  15. Job Location Decisions of Pharmacy Graduates in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the factors influencing pharmacy graduates' selection of their first professional job location. Methods A survey was conducted of the 2007 graduating class of the University of British Columbia, examining hometown location, community and workplace factors, personal relationships, financial factors, and leisure activities. Responses were analyzed to determine whether community size or demographic characteristics affected the degree to which each factor influenced the job location decision. Results The majority of graduates moved from their hometowns to larger communities, mainly to the largest city in British Columbia. Most of those taking jobs in rural and remote communities grew up in or near those communities, and were more influenced by community size and anticipated working conditions, and less influenced by access to cultural and social activities, than their urban counterparts. Conclusions The admission of students from rural and remote communities is modestly effective in ensuring a supply of pharmacists for these areas. PMID:20585436

  16. The Hypersensitivity of Horses to Culicoides Bites in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gail S.; Belton, Peter; Kleider, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    Culicoides hypersensitivity is a chronic, recurrent, seasonal dermatitis of horses that has a worldwide distribution, but has only recently been reported in Canada. It is characterized by intense pruritus resulting in lesions associated with self-induced trauma. A survey of veterinarians and horse-owners in British Columbia showed no differences in susceptibility due to the sex, color, breed, or height of the horses. The prevalence of the disease in the 209 horses surveyed was 26%. Horses sharing the same pasture could be unaffected. The disease was reported primarily from southwestern British Columbia; it occurred between April and October and usually affected the ventral midline, mane, and tail. Horses were generally less than nine years old when the clinical signs first appeared ([unk]=5.9 yr). Culicoides hypersensitivity was common in the lineage of several affected horses, possibly indicating a genetic susceptibility. Most cases were severe enough to require veterinary attention and some horses were euthanized. PMID:17423117

  17. Individual and cumulative effects of agriculture, forestry and metal mining activities on the metal and phosphorus content of fluvial fine-grained sediment; Quesnel River Basin, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler B; Owens, Philip N

    2014-10-15

    The impact of agriculture, forestry and metal mining on the quality of fine-grained sediment (<63 μm) was investigated in the Quesnel River Basin (QRB) (~11,500 km(2)) in British Columbia, Canada. Samples of fine-grained sediment were collected monthly during the snow-free season in 2008 using time-integrated samplers at replicate sites representative of agriculture, forestry and mining activities in the basin (i.e. "impacted" sites). Samples were also collected from replicate reference sites and also from the main stem of the Quesnel River at the downstream confluence with the Fraser River. Generally, metal(loid) and phosphorus (P) concentrations for "impacted" sites were greater than for reference sites. Furthermore, concentrations of copper (forestry and mining sites), manganese (agriculture and forestry sites) and selenium (agriculture, forestry and mining sites) exceeded upper sediment quality guideline (SQG) thresholds. These results suggest that agriculture, forestry and metal mining activities are having an influence on the concentrations of sediment-associated metal(loid)s and P in the Quesnel basin. Metal(loid) and P concentrations of sediment collected from the downstream site were not significantly greater than values for the reference sites, and were typically lower than the values for the impacted sites. This suggests that the cumulative effects of agriculture, forestry and mining activities in the QRB are presently not having a measureable effect at the river basin-scale. The lack of a cumulative effect at the basin-scale is thought to reflect: (i) the relatively recent occurrence of land use disturbances in this basin; (ii) the dominance of sediment contributions from natural forest and agriculture; and (iii) the potential for storage of contaminants on floodplains and other storage elements between the locations of disturbance activities and the downstream sampling site, which may be attenuating the disturbance signal.

  18. Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1990-05-01

    An extensional duplex consisting of fault-bounded blocks (horses) located between how-angle normal faults is exposed in Proterozoic strata in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. This is one of the first documented extensional duplexes, and it is geometrically and kinematically analogous to duplexes developed in contractional and strike-slip fault systems. The duplex formed within an extensional fault with a ramp and flat geometry when horses were sliced from the ramp and transported within the fault system.

  19. Remote sensing education at the University of British Columbia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murtha, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development, current status, and organization of the University of British Columbia's interdisciplinary graduate program in remote sensing are described. Specialized programs are tailored to meet student's needs and interest and can range from the theoretical development of technology (sensor development, modelling, and computer analysis) to specialized application of remote sensing in resource analysis such as the determination of vegetation damage, land classification, and land use. The courses and faculty members are listed.

  20. Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection Is Underdiagnosed in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Sorichetti, Brendan; Goshen, Oran; Pauwels, Julie; Kozak, Frederick K; Tilley, Peter; Krajden, Mel; Gantt, Soren

    2016-02-01

    Records were reviewed from all infants tested for congenital cytomegalovirus infection in British Columbia, Canada from 2006 to June 2014. Fourteen of 701 infants, or approximately 4.2 per 100,000 live births, had a positive test, indicating that >90% of expected symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection cases were not diagnosed using clinician-initiated testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Middle Jurassic terrane accretion along the western edge of the Intermontane superterrane, southwestern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmore, Margaret E.; Potter, Christopher J.; Umhoefer, Paul J.

    1988-10-01

    Two small lower Mesozoic terranes, the Bridge River and Cadwallader, lie along the southwestern margin of the Intermontane superterrane and represent fragments of a volcanic arc and marginal basin that bordered North America in the early Mesozoic. During Middle Jurassic time, these terranes were juxtaposed and deformed. This event was synchronous with deformation in northern and central British Columbia, and it probably records accretion of the Cadwallader and Stikine volcanic arcs against Quesnellia during closure of the Bridge River-Cache Creek ocean basin.

  2. Union-Active School Librarians and School Library Advocacy: A Modified Case Study of the British Columbia Teacher-Librarians' Association and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewbank, Ann Dutton

    2015-01-01

    This modified case study examines how the members of the British Columbia Teacher-Librarians' Association (BCTLA), a Provincial Specialist Association (PSA) of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF), work together to advocate for strong school library programs headed by a credentialed school librarian. Since 2002, despite nullification…

  3. 33 CFR 117.869 - Columbia River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.869 Columbia River. (a) The draws of the... the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad bridge, mile 201.2, between Celilo, Oregon, and...

  4. 33 CFR 117.869 - Columbia River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.869 Columbia River. (a) The draws of the... the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad bridge, mile 201.2, between Celilo, Oregon, and...

  5. 33 CFR 117.869 - Columbia River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.869 Columbia River. (a) The draws of the... the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad bridge, mile 201.2, between Celilo, Oregon, and...

  6. 33 CFR 117.869 - Columbia River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.869 Columbia River. (a) The draws of the... the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad bridge, mile 201.2, between Celilo, Oregon, and...

  7. 33 CFR 117.869 - Columbia River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.869 Columbia River. (a) The draws of the... the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad bridge, mile 201.2, between Celilo, Oregon, and...

  8. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  9. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  10. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  11. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  12. Preliminary tsunami hazard assessment in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insua, T. L.; Grilli, A. R.; Grilli, S. T.; Shelby, M. R.; Wang, K.; Gao, D.; Cherniawsky, J. Y.; Harris, J. C.; Heesemann, M.; McLean, S.; Moran, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC), a not-for-profit initiative by the University of Victoria that operates several cabled ocean observatories, is developing a new generation of ocean observing systems (referred to as Smart Ocean Systems™), involving advanced undersea observation technologies, data networks and analytics. The ONC Tsunami project is a Smart Ocean Systems™ project that addresses the need for a near-field tsunami detection system for the coastal areas of British Columbia. Recent studies indicate that there is a 40-80% probability over the next 50 for a significant tsunami impacting the British Columbia (BC) coast with runups higher than 1.5 m. The NEPTUNE cabled ocean observatory, operated by ONC off of the west coast of British Columbia, could be used to detect near-field tsunami events with existing instrumentation, including seismometers and bottom pressure recorders. As part of this project, new tsunami simulations are underway for the BC coast. Tsunami propagation is being simulated with the FUNWAVE-TVD model, for a suite of new source models representing Cascadia megathrust rupture scenarios. Simulations are performed by one-way coupling in a series of nested model grids (from the source to the BC coast), whose bathymetry was developed based on digital elevation maps (DEMs) of the area, to estimate both tsunami arrival time and coastal runup/inundation for different locations. Besides inundation, maps of additional parameters such as maximum current are being developed, that will aid in tsunami hazard assessment and risk mitigation, as well as developing evacuation plans. We will present initial results of this work for the Port Alberni inlet, in particular Ucluelet, based on new source models developed using the best available data. We will also present a model validation using measurements of the 2011 transpacific Tohoku-oki tsunami recorded in coastal BC by several instruments from various US and Canadian agencies.

  13. Earthquake hazard mapping for lifeline engineering Coquitlam, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Gohl, W.B.; Hawson, H.H.; Dou, H.; Nyberg, N.; Lee, R.; Wong, H.

    1995-12-31

    A series of maps plotted at a 1:15,000 scale were prepared to illustrate geotechnical aspects of seismic hazard for the 475 year return period earthquake event within the City of Coquitlam located in the Vancouver Lower Mainland of British Columbia. The maps were prepared to facilitate evaluation of lifeline damage potential within the City of Coquitlam (e.g. roads, sewers, water supply lines, oil/gas pipelines, power lines, compressor/pumping stations, water reservoirs, bridges, and rail lines) and to assist in evaluation of the impact of seismic ground shaking on new infrastructure.

  14. Integrated geoscientific exploration at Meager Creek British Columbia (1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, C.C.; Leach, T.M.; Macdonald, W.J.P.

    1983-09-01

    The application of an integrated geoscientific approach to the exploration stage of the Meager Creek geothermal project in British Columbia is discussed. The approach has provided a preliminary assessment of the resource potential of the area. The work has included geological reconnaissance, geophysics, and an extensive geochemical sampling program. The surveys have indicated that a geothermal resource exists on the south side of the Meager Complex an outflows down the Meager Valley. Geophysical surveys and drilling operations failed to identify evidence of an outflow from an active high-temperature geothermal system on the north side of the Meager complex.

  15. Ground water-surface water relations in the Flathead River valley near the proposed Cabin Creek coal mine, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreland, J.A.; Liebscher, Hugh; Van Voast, W. A.; Feltis, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The area of the proposed Cabin Creek coal mine was studied to obtain information needed to respond to questions posed by the International Joint Commission advisers concerning water resources near the international border. Specific interest focused on determining the extent and character of surficial material in the Flathead River valley, identifying gaining and losing reaches of the river and major tributaries, and documenting ambient water quality at selected sites. Thickness of the alluvial deposits depends on depth to underlaying Quaternary glacial deposits or Tertiary bedrock. The alluvial deposits in the Flathead River valley thin to a veneer of cobbles near the mouth of Couldrey Creek. Measurements of streamflow at 20 sites in the Flathead River valley indicate that water discharges from the alluvial deposits to most of the tributaries and to the river near the proposed mine. The Flathead River gains 0.87 cu m/sec (31 cu ft/sec) of flow near Howell Creek. The Flathead River and Couldrey Creek gained about 0.81 cu m/sec (28.5 cu ft/sec) of flow near the mouth of Couldrey Creek where bedrock crops out in the streambeds. Bedrock outcrops effectively interrupt the alluvial aquifer system between the proposed mine site and the international border. The Flathead River lost 0.87 cu m/sec (31 cu ft/sec) of flow between the bedrock outcrops and the international border; this streamflow loss enters alluvial deposits and flows across the international border as subsurface flow. Analysis of samples from 18 stream sites and 1 spring site indicates general trends in water quality. In Howell Creek, concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and sulfates increased slightly downstream. Conversely, samples from Sage and Couldrey Creeks indicate downstream increases in concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and alkalinity, but decreases in concentrations of sulfate. Water quality of Cabin Creek was relatively stable through the sampled reach. Decreased concentrations of calcium and

  16. Columbia River impact evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    As a result of past practices, four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. To accomplish the timely cleanup of the past-practice units, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), was signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). To support the Tri-Party Agreement, milestones were adopted. These milestones represent the actions needed to ensure acceptable progress toward Hanford Site compliance with CERCLA, RCRA, and the Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act of 1976. This report was prepared to fulfill the requirement of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-30-02, which requires a plan to determine cumulative health and environmental impacts to the Columbia River. This plan supplements the CERCLA remedial investigations/feasibility studies (RI/FS) and RCRA facility investigations/corrective measures studies (RFI/CMSs) that will be undertaken in the 100 Area. To support the plan development process, existing information was reviewed and a preliminary impact evaluation based on this information was performed. The purpose of the preliminary impact evaluation was to assess the adequacy of existing data and proposed data collection activities. Based on the results of the evaluation, a plan is proposed to collect additional data or make changes to existing or proposed data collection activities.

  17. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P. )

    1997-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  18. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1998-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  19. Associate Degrees Awarded in British Columbia, 1993-94 to 2005-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlinski, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The Associate Degree is a two year academic credential available with an Arts or Science focus. The British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) initiated development of this provincial credential at the request of British Columbia's (BC's) public post-secondary institutions. In March 2003, BCCAT prepared a report detailing the…

  20. Transfer in British Columbia: What Does the Research Tell Us? Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Findings from the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) sponsored research describing the British Columbia (BC) transfer system over the past decade are summarized. The overall assessment is that the transfer system has performed well: many students have transferred, they have done so with relative ease, and they have…

  1. Operations Research Support for Critical Infrastructure Resilience in the Province of British Columbia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    OPERATIONS RESEARCH SUPPORT FOR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE RESILIENCE IN THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Lynne Genik...October 2012 - 1 - OPERATIONS RESEARCH SUPPORT FOR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE RESILIENCE IN THE PROVINCE...OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Lynne Genik, MSc Operations Research Scientist DRDC Centre for Security Science 222 Nepean St, Ottawa, ON K1A0A2 1-613-943

  2. Moving from the Margins: Culturally Safe Teacher Education in Remote Northwestern British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Edward B.; Lautensach, Alexander K.; McDonald, Verna Lynn

    2012-01-01

    In 2007 the University of Northern British Columbia initiated a two-year elementary teacher education program at the Northwest Campus in Terrace, British Columbia. The program was designed to meet specific community needs in the North that arise from inequities in the cultural safety of Indigenous teachers and students. The authors share three…

  3. American shad in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Hinrichsen, R.A.; Gadomski, D.M.; Feil, D.H.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    American shad Alosa sapidissima from the Hudson River, New York, were introduced into the Sacramento River, California, in 1871 and were first observed in the Columbia River in 1876. American shad returns to the Columbia River increased greatly between 1960 and 1990, and recently 2-4 million adults have been counted per year at Bonneville Dam, Oregon and Washington State (river kilometer 235). The total return of American shad is likely much higher than this dam count. Returning adults migrate as far as 600 km up the Columbia and Snake rivers, passing as many as eight large hydroelectric dams. Spawning occurs primarily in the lower river and in several large reservoirs. A small sample found returning adults were 2-6 years old and about one-third of adults were repeat spawners. Larval American shad are abundant in plankton and in the nearshore zone. Juvenile American shad occur throughout the water column during night, but school near the bottom or inshore during day. Juveniles consume a variety of zooplankton, but cyclopoid copepods were 86% of the diet by mass. Juveniles emigrate from the river from August through December. Annual exploitation of American shad by commercial and recreational fisheries combined is near 9% of the total count at Bonneville Dam. The success of American shad in the Columbia River is likely related to successful passage at dams, good spawning and rearing habitats, and low exploitation. The role of American shad within the aquatic community is poorly understood. We speculate that juveniles could alter the zooplankton community and may supplement the diet of resident predators. Data, however, are lacking or sparse in some areas, and more information is needed on the role of larval and juvenile American shad in the food web, factors limiting adult returns, ocean distribution of adults, and interactions between American shad and endangered or threatened salmonids throughout the river. ?? 2003 by the American Fisheries Society.

  4. Intestinal parasites of raccoons (Procyon lotor) from southwest British Columbia.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, H L; Leighton, B J; Stephen, C

    2000-01-01

    This is the first extensive survey of metazoan parasites (particularly of the roundworm Baylisascaris procyonis) from the intestines of raccoons in British Columbia. The sample collected in 1997-1998 consisted of 82 raccoons that had been sick or had been killed accidentally by automobiles. Fifteen parasite taxa were found: 3 nematodes, 9 digenetic trematodes, 2 acanthocephalans and 1 cestode. Ten of these parasites constitute new host records for raccoons, including 4 digenetic trematodes that have been reported in marine birds and mammals on the Pacific Coast of North America. Baylisascaris procyonis infected 61% of the raccoons with a mean intensity of 27. The high rate of infection indicates a large potential for environmental contamination and, thus, human and animal exposure to infectious eggs. Prevention of larva migrans is discussed, particularly for people in contact with raccoons in wildlife rehabilitation centers. PMID:10805249

  5. Perceived Learning Needs of Family Physicians in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Jennifer

    1990-01-01

    To determine family physicians' preferences for time, location, instructional format, and topics, the Division of Continuing Medical Education at the University of British Columbia conducted a survey, in which 1200 questionnaires were mailed to a stratified, proportional random sample of the 3270 general practitioners in the province, the stratifications being urban or rural and decade of graduation. A return rate of 61% yielded 648 usable questionnaires, which exceeds the sample required for analysis with no stratifications. Most popular days for involvement in continuing medical education were Fridays and Saturdays in the months of February, March, October, and November. Common skin disorders and hypertension headed the list of most relevant topics for the whole group and for the urban stratification. Hypertension was superseded by eye emergencies in the rural stratification. PMID:21234037

  6. Evaluation of the British Columbia AIDS Information Line.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D C; Bell, M A; Gilchrist, L D

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated implementation of the British Columbia AIDS Information Line during its initial 15 weeks of operation. Data collected during daily operation of the line included call frequency, caller characteristics, response patterns, caller concerns and community referrals. Information on activities and resources required to implement the AIDS Line was also assembled. The study concluded that the advertising campaign sponsored by the provincial government and other AIDS-related media events had a strong impact on the frequency of calls made to the AIDS Line. However, the effect of both advertising and media events was of relatively short duration, suggesting that utilization of an AIDS information line is dependent on continuing promotional activities. The evaluation results demonstrate the importance of continuous collection of data online utilization, to track public awareness of and response to AIDS-related issues, and to facilitate planning of public education.

  7. Assessing the impact of human activities on British Columbia's estuaries.

    PubMed

    Robb, Carolyn K

    2014-01-01

    The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats. Scientific consensus suggests that management should evolve to focus on ecosystems and their human, ecological, and physical components. Estuaries are recognized globally as one of the world's most productive and most threatened ecosystems and many estuarine areas in British Columbia (BC) have been lost or degraded. To help prioritize activities and areas for regional management efforts, spatial information on human activities that adversely affect BC's estuaries was compiled. Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management. The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection. This research is timely, as it will inform ongoing marine planning, land acquisition, and stewardship efforts in BC.

  8. Organic carbon transport in the Columbia River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, Stanley V.; Kilho Park, P.

    1981-12-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC) levels in the Columbia River measured monthly from May 1973 to December 1974 ranged from a maximum of 270 μmol l -1 during late spring and early summer to a minimum of 150 μmol l -1 during late autumn. Sampling locations were directly behind the spillway at the Bonneville Dam, 230 km upstream, and at Kalama, Washington, 128km upstream from the river mouth. The average annual TOC contribution from the Columbia River drainage to the north-eastern Pacific is 4·9×10 10 mol with an average concentration of approximately 195μmol l -1. Of this TOC annual export, 89% is dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 11% is particulate organic carbon (OOC). The TOC and DOC levels were most highly correlated with increased oxygen saturation and dischange, while POC correlated more closely to high instream primary productivy as indicated by higher pH and oxygen supersaturation. Variability of DOC in the main channel of the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon, to the estuary during a June 1974 cruise was minimal. The DOC concentrations ranged from 221-260 μmol l -1 with no significant upstream or downstream gradients. Diel variation also was slight, varying randomly during 24h between 235-257 μmol l -1. The relative annual constancy of the DOC is indicative of the refractory nature of a significant proportion of the dissolved organic load of the Columbia River.

  9. Food chain sources of polychlorinated dioxins and furans to great blue herons, ardea herodias, foraging in the fraser river estuary, british columbia. Technical report series no. no. 169

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents results of determinations of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) levels in the prey of great blue herons foraging on the Fraser River estuary tidal flats. Observations of herons foraging at Iona and Westham Islands showed that starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) and Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus) were the major prey species throughout the year. The paper includes measurements of PCDD/PCDF levels in those two species and others such as redside shiner (Richardsonius balteatus), peamouth chub (Mylocheilus caurinum), and shiner perch (Cymatogaster aggregata). The paper concludes with a discussion of the role of contaminated inshore fish on the entry of PCDD/PCDF into herons.The purpose of the Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network is to provide information and understanding needed for the sustainable management of Canada`s resources and resource-based industries. This document presents the proceedings of the first meeting of the Network. It includes presentations by federal government representatives on ecological monitoring and research programs in federal departments, reviews of progress in establishing Ecological Science Cooperatives for ecological monitoring and research, presentations on topical workshops, and workshop summaries. The workshops were arranged by ecological issue (biodiversity, climate change, ultraviolet radiation, toxic chemicals, and cumulative effects). They discussed and recommended local and national goals, objectives, and deliverables for ongoing research, monitoring, and synthesis related to the ecological effects of each issue.

  10. Rural surgery in British Columbia: is there anybody out there?

    PubMed

    Humber, Nancy; Frecker, Temma

    2008-06-01

    To document surgical procedures performed in British Columbia between 1996 and 2001 at rural hospital sites with no resident specialist surgeons and to define the scope of practice of general practitioner (GP)-surgeons at these small-volume surgical sites. We obtained data from published information available in the medical directories for British Columbia and from the Population Utilization Rates and Referrals For Easy Comparative Tables database (versions 6.0 and 9.0) to conduct a retrospective study of all rural BC hospitals with surgical programs that had no resident specialist surgeon and relied on GP-surgeons for emergency surgical care between 1996 and 2001. We studied surgical programs at the 12 hospitals that met inclusion criteria and interviewed the physician or nurse responsible for the program. Outcomes were measured in terms of the types and volumes of surgical procedures (elective and emergency) from 1996 to 2001, including itinerant surgery. On average, 2690 surgical procedures were performed annually at the 12 hospitals included in the study. Endoscopy, hand surgery, cesarean section, herniorrhaphy, tonsillectomy and dilation and curettage (D&C) were among the top elective and emergency procedures. For each hospital, between 8 and 26 procedures of hand surgery, cesarean section, herniorrhaphy, D&C and appendectomy were performed each year. In the 12 communities studied, 19% of all surgery was emergency and 81% elective. There was significant overlap in the types of emergency and elective procedures. GP-surgeons carried out most of the emergency procedures, which nonetheless accounted for a small portion of their surgical work. GP-surgeons still perform a significant number of emergency and elective surgical procedures in rural BC hospitals. This study defines useful procedures for GP-surgeons in communities without the population base to sustain a resident specialist surgeon. This information can be used to structure training programs for GP

  11. Landslide-generated tsunami geomorphology at Chehalis Lake, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, N. J.; McKillop, R.; Clague, J. J.; Lawrence, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The 2007 Chehalis Lake tsunami in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia is one of the most comprehensively described landslide-generated tsunamis in the world. We use field observations and remotely sensed data collected during the two years following the tsunami to characterize its geomorphic impact and propose a suite of geomorphic features characteristic of tsunamis generated by subaerial landslides. On December 4, 2007, a highly fragmented 3 Mm3 rockslide entered the north end of Chehalis Lake and generated a tsunami that drastically altered much of the shore of the 8.5-km-long lake, with local run-up exceeding 35 m. The tsunami continued as a surge down lower Chehalis River, at the south end of the lake. We characterized geomorphic features produced by the tsunami by collecting multi-scale data, starting immediately after the event. Data included reconnaissance helicopter and ground observations, low-altitude aerial digital photography and aerial LiDAR survey, detailed GPS-controlled field traverses, and an underwater survey using side-scan sonar and swath bathymetric sounding. The impact of the tsunami was greatest on low-gradient shores and the shoreline nearest the landslide. Erosional features include wave-cut scarps, soil erosion, and complete removal of forest, leaving sharp trimlines. Debris transported by the tsunami stripped bark from standing trees, left impact marks on them, and embedded gravel in them. Depositional features include imbricated cobbles and boulders, ripples in sand and gravel, pebble lags, rip-up clasts of glaciolacustrine silt, and trash lines of woody debris in forest at and near the limit of tsunami run-up. Similar features have been reported at sites of landslide-triggered tsunamis, notably in Alaska, Chile, Norway, and elsewhere in Canada. We grouped geomorphic features at Chehalis Lake on the basis of their areal distribution and their inferred formative energy. The geomorphic groups form a continuum, reflecting

  12. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash. (a) Grand Coulee Dam discharge channel; restricted area—(1) The area. That portion of the Columbia River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...

  13. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash. (a) Grand Coulee Dam discharge channel; restricted area—(1) The area. That portion of the Columbia River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...

  14. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash. (a) Grand Coulee Dam discharge channel; restricted area—(1) The area. That portion of the Columbia River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...

  15. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash. (a) Grand Coulee Dam discharge channel; restricted area—(1) The area. That portion of the Columbia River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...

  16. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash. (a) Grand Coulee Dam discharge channel; restricted area—(1) The area. That portion of the Columbia River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...

  17. 78 FR 15293 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY... (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Columbia River, mile 105.6, at Vancouver, WA. This deviation is... swing span of the BNSF Railway Bridge across the Columbia River at Vancouver, WA will be disabled and...

  18. A decade of experience: Cryptococcus gattii in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Karen H; Cheng, Po-Yan; Duncan, Colleen; Galanis, Eleni; Hoang, Linda; Kidd, Sarah; Lee, Min-Kuang; Lester, Sally; MacDougall, Laura; Mak, Sunny; Morshed, Muhammad; Taylor, Marsha; Kronstad, James

    2012-06-01

    It has been over a decade since Cryptococcus gattii was first recognized as the causative organism of an outbreak of cryptococcosis on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A number of novel observations have been associated with the study of this emergent pathogen. A novel genotype of C. gattii, VGIIa was described as the major genotype associated with clinical disease. Minor genotypes, VGIIb and VGI, are also responsible for disease in British Columbians, in both human and animal populations. The clinical major genotype VGIIa and minor genotype VGIIb are identical to C. gattii isolated from the environment of Vancouver Island. There is more heterogeneity in VGI, and a clear association with the environment is not apparent. Between 1999 and 2010, there have been 281 cases of C. gattii cryptococcosis. Risk factors for infection are reported to be age greater than 50 years, history of smoking, corticosteroid use, HIV infection, and history of cancer or chronic lung disease. The major C. gattii genotype VGIIa is as virulent in mice as the model Cryptococcus, H99 C. neoformans, although the outbreak strain produces a less protective inflammatory response in C57BL/6 mice. The minor genotype VGIIb is significantly less virulent in mouse models. Cryptococcus gattii is found associated with native trees and soil on Vancouver Island. Transiently positive isolations have been made from air and water. An ecological niche for this organism is associated within a limited biogeoclimatic zone characterized by daily average winter temperatures above freezing.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Columbia River Estuary Currents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    D-A1i6i 689 SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY CURRENTS 1/2 (U) ARMY E GINEER VATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKCSBURG MS HYDRAULICS LAB B...26 PART IV: ANALYSIS PROCEDURES. .................... 29 *PART V: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .. ................. 32 Astoria Winds...45 eStation T11B..........................46 Station T12. .......................... 46 Summary of Results

  20. Climatology of the interior Columbia River basin.

    Treesearch

    Sue A. Ferguson

    1999-01-01

    This work describes climate means and trends in each of three major ecological zones and 13 ecological reporting units in the interior Columbia River basin. Widely differing climates help define each major zone and reporting unit, the pattern of which is controlled by three competing air masses: marine, continental, and arctic. Paleoclimatic evidence and historical...

  1. Columbia River flow and drought since 1750.

    Treesearch

    Ze' ev Gedalof; David L. Peterson; Nathan J. Mantua

    2004-01-01

    A network of 32 drought sensitive tree-ring chronologies is used to reconstruct mean water year flow on the Columbia River at The Dalles, Oregon, since 1750. The reconstruction explains 30 percent of the variability in mean water year (October to September) flow, with a large portion of unexplained variance caused by underestimates of the most severe low flow events....

  2. An overview of recent large landslides in northern British Columbia, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geertsema, M.; Clague, J. J.; Schwab, J. W.; Evans, S. G.

    2003-04-01

    Within the last few decades, at least twenty-four, long-runout rapid landslides, each in excess of 1 million m^3, have occurred in northern British Columbia. Fifteen of the landslides have happened within the last 10 years alone. The landslides include low- gradient rapid flowslides in cohesive sediments, rock avalanches, and complex rock slide - flowslides and rock slide - debris flows. The flowslides have occurred in a variety of sediments, including glaciolacustrine deposits, clay-rich tills, and clay-rich colluvium. The rock failures have involved weak shales overlain by sandstone, and volcanic rocks. We are cataloguing these landslides in a compendium of natural hazards for northern British Columbia. Pre- and post-landslide aerial photographs have been obtained for fifteen of the landslides, and detailed topographic maps have been generated from these photographs. In addition we have determined soil properties, including Atterberg tests for six of the flowslides. The rock avalanches occur in three types of settings: (1) dip slopes in sedimentary rocks in the Rocky Mountain foothills; (2) escarpments of flat-lying sedimentary rocks where spreading is happening; and (3) unstable cirque walls. Infrastructure and resources at risk from these types of large landslides include settlements, forest roads and highways, pipelines, fish habitat, forests, and farmland. One rock avalanche terminated within 2 km of the Alaska Highway, and a rock slide came within a few kilometres of a farm house. Most of these landslides have impounded streams or rivers, thus the hazard associated with upstream inundation and catastrophic dam failure must also be considered. There appears to be an increase in the frequency of large landslides in northern British Columbia. Is this due to climate change? Can we expect this trend to continue?

  3. Climatic variability and trends in the surface waters of coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Masson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Multi-decadal records of monthly sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) collected at a set of lighthouse stations are used to examine climatic variability and trends in the coastal waters of British Columbia. Particular attention is given to relations between the water property anomalies and variability in coastal freshwater discharge and alongshore wind stress. Within the Strait of Georgia, SSS anomalies are closely related to Fraser River discharge anomalies. Along the Pacific coast, anomalies in alongshore wind stress and freshwater runoff have the characteristics of white noise processes. A cross-correlation analysis demonstrates that SST and SSS variability along the open west coast is consistent with the response of a first-order autoregressive process driven by anomalous alongshore wind stress and coastal freshwater discharge, respectively. Thus climatic variability of SST and SSS along the Pacific coast of British Columbia occurs, in part, through the integration of noisy atmospheric forcing and coastal precipitation. Seasonal correlations show that SST is strongly related to wind stress during winter and fall. Conversely, SSS is relatively weakly related to the alongshore wind during spring, suggesting that variability in upwelling makes only a modest contribution to variability of SSS in the nearshore environment. Consistent with previous studies, secular trends indicate long-term warming and freshening of the coastal ocean at most stations. It is shown that long-term SST trends can be obscured by the pronounced climatic variability of these waters, requiring that time series extend for several decades to be reliably detected.

  4. View from west side of Columbia River (at transformer spread ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from west side of Columbia River (at transformer spread yard from No. 3 Powerhouse), looking east to downstream face of Grand Coulee Dam. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  5. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  6. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  7. Postpartum domperidone use in British Columbia: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Smolina, Kate; Morgan, Steven G.; Hanley, Gillian E.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Mintzes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Domperidone is commonly used off-label to stimulate milk production in mothers who have low milk supply. The aim of this study was to describe trends, patterns and determinants of postpartum domperidone use. Methods: This is a retrospective, population-based study involving all women with a live birth between Jan. 1, 2002, and Dec. 31, 2011, in the province of British Columbia. We examined administrative data sets containing person-specific information on filled prescriptions and use of medical services, and we used logistic regression to examine associations between domperidone use and maternal characteristics. Results: The study population consisted of 225 532 women with 320 351 live births. The prevalence of postpartum domperidone use more than doubled between 2002 and 2011. In 2011, 1 in 3 women with a preterm birth and 1 in 5 women with a full-term birth were prescribed domperidone in the first 6 months postpartum. Women who were older, had a higher body mass index, had a chronic disease, were first-time mothers, delivered more than 1 baby (multiple pregnancy), had a preterm birth or had a cesarian delivery were more likely to fill a postpartum domperidone prescription. Interpretation: We found an increase in postpartum domperidone use over a 10-year period. More research is needed on maternal and infant health outcomes. PMID:27280111

  8. Mountain goat response to hydroelectric exploration in northwestern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.R.; Rahs, E.Y.

    1983-03-01

    The behavioral responses of more than 800 mountain goats, comprised of 195 social groups, were recorded during hydroelectric exploration activities (primarily aircraft) in northwestern British Columbia. Four categories of overt response were recorded during case tests, ranging from maintenance activity to severe flight. More than 80 percent (n=667) of the observed goats elicited some form of behavioral stress-response, with 33 percent (n=265) displaying a severe flight response to local rock or plant cover. Multiple regression analysis inferred goat responses to be statistically independent of the time of year, type, and vertical orientation of disturbance and group size. As expected, significant correlations (p less than or equal to 0.05) existed between distance of disturbance, geographic area, cover availability, and degree of awareness. Responses were stimulated primarily by auditory and secondarily by visual cues. Repeated aerial and ground follow-up surveys documented temporary range abandonment and changing observability indices (habitat use and activity patterns) associated with areas of intense exploration activity. The assessed data offer mitigation possibilities and enable formulation of management guidelines to lessen project impacts during future exploration, construction, and operation phases.

  9. Mountain goat response to hydroelectric exploration in northwestern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Bryan R.; Rahs, Engel Y.

    1983-03-01

    The behavioral responses of more than 800 mountain goats, comprised of 195 social groups, were recorded during hydroelectric exploration activities (primarily aircraft) in northwestern British Columbia. Four categories of overt response were recorded during case tests, ranging from maintenance activity to severe flight. More than 80 percent ( n=667) of the observed goats elicited some form of behavioral stress-response, with 33 percent ( n=265) displaying a severe flight response to local rock or plant cover. Multiple regression analysis inferred goat responses to be statistically independent of the time of year, type, and vertical orientation of disturbance and group size. As expected, significant correlations ( p≤0.05) existed between distance of disturbance, geographic area, cover availability, and degree of awareness. Responses were stimulated primarily by auditory and secondarily by visual cues. Repeated aerial and ground follow-up surveys documented temporary range abandonment and changing observability indices (habitat use and activity patterns) associated with areas of intense exploration activity. The assessed data offer mitigation possibilities and enable formulation of management guidelines to lessen project impacts during future exploration, construction, and operation phases.

  10. Expo '86, Vancouver: impact on British Columbia's Children's Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Hlady, L J; Macnab, A J; Smith, D F; Wensley, D F

    1987-01-01

    Over 22 million visitors attended the 1986 world exposition in Vancouver, and this had a significant impact on the local pediatric facility. A total of 559 children visited the emergency department of British Columbia's Children's Hospital with injuries or illnesses resulting from the fair. Of these, 193 (34%) had come directly from the site. The children's ages ranged from 1 1/2 months to 18 years, 4 months (mean 6.99 years). Of the 559 children 31% were not covered by medical insurance. Twenty-four of the children were admitted to the hospital, and one died at the Expo site. Most of the illnesses were upper respiratory tract infections and gastroenteritis. The proportion of visits for trauma was 50%, compared with the yearly average of 25%. There was a 6% increase in the workload in the emergency department during the fair; the percentage was even higher during July and August, particularly after 1800 hours. Recommendations are made to aid with the planning of medical care for similar events. PMID:3676971

  11. The University of British Columbia model of interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Charles, Grant; Bainbridge, Lesley; Gilbert, John

    2010-01-01

    The College of Health Disciplines, at the University of British Columbia (UBC) has a long history of developing interprofessional learning opportunities for students and practitioners. Historically, many of the courses and programmes were developed because they intuitively made sense or because certain streams of funding were available at particular times. While each of them fit generally within our understanding of interprofessional education in the health and human service education programs, they were not systematically developed within an educational or theoretical framework. This paper discusses the model we have subsequently developed at the College for conceptualizing the various types of interprofessional experiences offered at UBC. It has been developed so that we can offer the broadest range of courses and most effective learning experiences for our students. Our model is based on the premise that there are optimal learning times for health and human services students (and practitioners) depending upon their stage of development as professionals in their respective disciplines and their readiness to learn and develop new perspectives on professional interaction.

  12. Satellite chlorophyll off the British Columbia Coast, 1997-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jennifer M.; Thomson, Richard E.; Brown, Leslie N.; Willis, Peter G.; Borstad, Gary A.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal variability of satellite-sensed sea surface chlorophyll off the west coast of North America from 1997 to 2010, with focus on coastal British Columbia. The variability in surface chlorophyll is complex. Whereas the spring bloom generates the highest phytoplankton concentration for coastal Alaska, the north and east coasts of Haida Gwaii, Queen Charlotte Sound, the Strait of Georgia, and coastal Oregon and California, it is the fall bloom that normally generates the highest concentration for the west coast of Vancouver Island, Juan de Fuca Strait, and the west coast of Washington. The highest satellite-sensed chlorophyll concentrations occur in the Strait of Georgia, where mean values are at least 2 times higher than elsewhere in the northeast Pacific. Moreover, the annual average surface chlorophyll concentration increased significantly in the Strait of Georgia during this period, with highest concentration observed during the near neutral ENSO conditions of the spring of 2007. The next highest concentrations occur off southwest Vancouver Island but have no statistically significant trend. The lowest average peak chlorophyll concentration is observed off Southern California. The timing of the highest chlorophyll concentration is latest off the coast of Washington and earliest off the coast of Southern California. Small increasing concentration trends are observed off the Washington and California coasts.

  13. Streamlined erosional residuals and drumlins in central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenagan, J. Donald

    2013-05-01

    The upland-lowland pattern in the plateau region of central British Columbia, Canada forms an extremely large anastomosing channel network, with the uplands representing interfluves between channels. The study area landscape is remarkably similar in form to water-produced channel systems and qualitatively resembles flood landscapes from the Channelled Scablands and the margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Numerical shape analysis of the area erosional residuals gives similar results as those derived from known flood landscapes; the length-to-width ratios of the uplands (L/W = 2.38, R2 = 0.89) are similar to those reported for braid bars and erosional residuals formed by glacial outburst floods. Thus, the study area landscape records a megaflood or floods that almost completely immersed the landscape. Drumlins with, in places, ubiquitous hairpin furrows, locations downstream from steep slopes facing into the flow, and eroded into till and bedrock similarly reflect regional-scale meltwater flow that immersed the landscape. The regional flow submerged the anastomosing channels at the time of drumlin formation. Drumlins likely formed as the anastomosing network developed; divergent drumlin orientations probably reflect either late flow or separate drumlin-forming events that did not appreciably alter the anastomosing system.

  14. Breast cancer treatment and ethnicity in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, survival and mortality are well documented; but few studies have reported on disparities in breast cancer treatment. This paper compares the treatment received by breast cancer patients in British Columbia (BC) for three ethnic groups and three time periods. Values for breast cancer treatments received in the BC general population are provided for reference. Methods Information on patients, tumour characteristics and treatment was obtained from BC Cancer Registry (BCCR) and BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) records. Treatment among ethnic groups was analyzed by stage at diagnosis and time period at diagnosis. Differences among the three ethnic groups were tested using chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests and a multivariate logistic model. Results There was no significant difference in overall surgery use for stage I and II disease between the ethnic groups, however there were significant differences when surgery with and without radiation were considered separately. These differences did not change significantly with time. Treatment with chemotherapy and hormone therapy did not differ among the minority groups. Conclusion The description of treatment differences is the first step to guiding interventions that reduce ethnic disparities. Specific studies need to examine reasons for the observed differences and the influence of culture and beliefs. PMID:20406489

  15. SURVEY OF COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN STREAMS FOR COLUMBIA PEBBLESNAIL Fluminicola columbiana AND SHORTFACE LANX Fisherola nuttalli

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D. A.; Frest, T. J.

    1993-05-01

    At present, there are only two remaining sizable populations of Columbia pebblesnail Fluminicola columbiana; those in the Methow and Okanogan rivers, Washington. Smaller populations survive in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington; the lower Salmon River and middle Snake River, Idaho; and possibly in Hells Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon; and the Grande Ronde River, Oregon and Washington. Neither large population is at present protected, and there has been a substantial documented reduction in the species' historical range. Large populations of the shortface lanx Fisherola nuttalli persist in four streams: the Deschutes River, Oregon; the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington; Hells Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho and Oregon; and the Okanogan River, Washington. Smaller populations, or ones of uncertain size, are known from the lower Salmon and middle Snake rivers, Idaho; the Grande Ronde, Washington and Oregon; Imnaha and John Day rivers, Oregon; Bonneville Dam area of the Columbia River, Washington and Oregon; and the Methow River, Washington. While substantial range reduction has occurred in this species, and the large populations are not well protected, the problem is not as severe as in the case of the Columbia pebblesnail. Both species appear to have been widespread historically in the mainstem Columbia River and the Columbia River Basin prior to the installation of the current dam system. Both are now apparently reduced within the Columbia River: Columbia pebblesnail to a population in the Hanford Reach plus six other sites that are separated by large areas of unsuitable habitat from those in the river's major mbutaries shortface lanx to two populations (in the Hanford Reach and near Bonneville Dam) plus nine other sites that are separated by large areas of unsuitable habitat from those in the river's major tributaries.

  16. Going for Gold in 2010: An Analysis of British Columbia's Literacy Goal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines a recent government initiative aimed at raising adult literacy levels across the Canadian province of British Columbia by 2010. Through analysis of policy documents and interviews conducted with policymakers, analysts, researchers and practitioners, the author argues that the current focus on adult literacy in British Columbia…

  17. The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

  18. Cretaceous and Eocene poroid hymenophores from Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Selena Y; Currah, Randolph S; Stockey, Ruth A

    2004-01-01

    Two fossil poroid hymenophore fragments, one from the Cretaceous Period and the other from the Eocene Epoch, are described. The permineralized specimens were obtained from marine calcareous concretions on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, and were studied using the cellulose acetate peel technique. Size and distribution of pores in the hymenophores, as well as the hyphal anatomy of the dissepiments and some hymenial elements, were examined. In the Cretaceous specimen, Quatsinoporites cranhamii sp. nov., pores are round to elliptical, three per mm, and 130-540 μm diam. Dissepiments consist of narrow, simple septate, hyphae. Neither basidia nor basidiospores are present, but acuminate hymenial cystidia, up to 54 μm in length, are common. The Eocene specimen, Appianoporites vancouverensis sp. nov., has a pore density of six per mm and pores are 130-163 μm in diam. Dissepiments consist of narrow, simple septate, thin-walled hyphae. Neither basidia nor basidiospores are present, but acuminate, thick-walled hymenial cystidia, up to 32 μm in length, are common. The poroid hymenophore is a characteristic of a number of extant basidiomycete taxa, including the Boletales, Polyporales and Hymenochaetales. It is unlikely that the fleshy, ephemeral, terrestrial basidiomata of the Boletales would be preserved in a marine environment, and thus the specimens are interpreted as belonging to basidiomycete lineages, with persistent, leathery or corky basidiomata. The simple septate hyphae, the minute pores and presence of cystidia most closely resemble taxa of the Hymenochaetales. These fossils unequivocally push back the minimum age of homobasidiomycetes and extend their paleogeographical range.

  19. Methamphetamine use among marginalized youth in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ian; Lampinen, Thomas M; McGhee, Doug

    2006-01-01

    Crystal methamphetamine (MA) is a powerful, highly addictive central nervous stimulant that can cause serious health consequences including neurotoxicity, paranoia, psychosis, depression, violence, and death. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence and characteristics of MA use among two marginalized populations of youth (less than 30 years of age) in British Columbia. A self-administered questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of Vancouver street-involved youth (SY) and Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Questioning (LGBTQ) centre youth in Vancouver and Victoria. Items measured include: participants' demographic characteristics; illicit substance use, including details of MA use; attempts at recovery and treatment; and potential consequences of MA use. One hundred and eighty of the 200 questionnaires distributed were completed. Sixty-seven percent of the SY and 24% of the LGBTQ youth reported ever having used MA. Of these: 43% had used within the last week; 46-57% used multiple times per day in their lifetime; they spent a maximum of 7-9 consecutive days awake; they began use in their middle to late teens; and half had sought help for a substance use disorder. SY who used MA within the last week were more likely to also use marijuana, cigarettes, heroin, ecstasy, and ketamine. Previous use of MA was associated with reports of auditory hallucinations. The current study demonstrates a high prevalence of MA use in two marginalized populations of youth. Use in sexual minorities, resulting psychopathology, and concurrent substance use all have important implications in delivery of service, prevention, and subsequent research.

  20. QUALITY OF WOOD PELLETS PRODUCED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR EXPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluru, J.S.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, X.T.; Lau, A.K.; Melin, Staffan; Oveisi, E.; Sowlati, T.

    2010-11-01

    Wood pellet production and its use for heat and power production are increasing worldwide. The quality of export pellets has to consistently meet certain specifications as stipulated by the larger buyers, such as power utilities or as specified by the standards used for the non-industrial bag market. No specific data is available regarding the quality of export pellets to Europe. To develop a set of baseline data, wood pellets were sampled at an export terminal in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The sampling period was 18 months in 2007-2008 when pellets were transferred from storage bins to the ocean vessels. The sampling frequency was once every 1.5 to 2 months for a total of 9 loading/shipping events. The physical properties of the wood pellets measured were moisture content in the range of 3.5% to 6.5%, bulk density from 728 to 808 kg/m3, durability from 97% to 99%, fines content from 0.03% to 0.87%, calorific value as is from 17 to almost 18 MJ/kg, and ash content from 0.26% to 0.93%.The diameter and length were in the range of 6.4 to 6.5 mm and 14.0 to 19.0 mm, respectively. All of these values met the published non-industrial European grades (CEN) and the grades specified by the Pellet Fuel Institute for the United States for the bag market. The measured values for wood pellet properties were consistent except the ash content values decreased over the test period.

  1. Quality of Wood Pellets Produced in British Columbia for Export

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Tumuluru; S. Sokhansanj; C. J. Lim; T. Bi; A. Lau; S. Melin; T. Sowlati; E. Oveisi

    2010-11-01

    Wood pellet production and its use for heat and power production are increasing worldwide. The quality of export pellets has to consistently meet certain specifications as stipulated by the larger buyers, such as power utilities or as specified by the standards used for the non-industrial bag market. No specific data is available regarding the quality of export pellets to Europe. To develop a set of baseline data, wood pellets were sampled at an export terminal in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The sampling period was 18 months in 2007-2008 when pellets were transferred from storage bins to the ocean vessels. The sampling frequency was once every 1.5 to 2 months for a total of 9 loading/shipping events. The physical properties of the wood pellets measured were moisture content in the range of 3.5% to 6.5%, bulk density from 728 to 808 kg/m3, durability from 97% to 99%, fines content from 0.03% to 0.87%, calorific value as is from 17 to almost 18 MJ/kg, and ash content from 0.26% to 0.93%.The diameter and length were in the range of 6.4 to 6.5 mm and 14.0 to 19.0 mm, respectively. All of these values met the published non-industrial European grades (CEN) and the grades specified by the Pellet Fuel Institute for the United States for the bag market. The measured values for wood pellet properties were consistent except the ash content values decreased over the test period.

  2. Web services for open meteorological data in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebert, J.; Anslow, F. S.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, British Columbia suffered from a dearth of publicly and easily accessible (open) meteorological data. While Environment Canada (EC) maintains approximately 250 active in situ weather stations, the remaining meteorological and climate data -- which represent the majority of observations made in the province -- have been gathered by the provincial government within several disparate, ministry-specific networks. Those observations have traditionally been either inaccessible to non-government employees or only available on a network-by-network basis by contacting network managers and requesting custom data queries. Under a collaborative agreement between several provincial ministries, private industry and the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC) and with support from EC, the entire province's meteorological archive has been collected into a single database at PCIC and made publicly accessible via web services and open data protocols. In this paper, we describe our web services, built on open-source software, which provide users access to the full catalogue of BC's meteorological observations through a simple user interface. Our geographic web services provide users access to station locations using Open Geospatial Consortium's Web Mapping Service and Web Feature Service protocols. We use OpenDAP to provide users download access to over a century of weather observations through a variety of open formats such as NetCDF, HDF, ASCII, and others. The goals of these web services are twofold. We primarily aim to provide planners, scientists and researchers with timely and comprehensive climate data as conveniently and efficiently as possible. A natural consequence of this is to enable the flexibility to expand the volume and types of data served and to facilitate more sophisticated analysis regarding past and future climate.

  3. Anatomy of the Kitimat fiord system, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John; Stacey, Cooper D.; Wu, Yongsheng; Lintern, D. Gwyn

    2017-09-01

    The geomorphic complexity of the Kitimat fiord system, on the active margin of British Columbia, Canada, is analysed from several perspectives. Sub-glacial landforms and sediments show that grounded ice exiting the fiord system at the last glacial maximum streamed down Moresby Trough towards the Queen Charlotte trough mouth fan. After brief halts on the inner shelf, grounded ice margins cleared the fiord threshold perhaps by c. 15.5 ka cal. yrs BP, and certainly before 13 ka cal. yrs BP. Just outside the fiords, meltwater plumes deposited stratified glaciomarine sediments interbedded with submarine slides. Inside the fiords, thick glaciomarine sediments were deposited, and large transverse moraines formed during temporary halts in retreat. Several glacial outburst floods eroded the Kitkiata moraine and deposited distinctive mud deposits. Postglacial sedimentation on fiord floors has been spatially variable: drifts of mud > 90 m-thick corresponding with areas of low current velocity alternate with areas of non-deposition and erosion corresponding with areas of high velocity. The fiord system hosts more than a hundred morphologically diverse fan deltas that can be classified in the Prior and Bornhold (1989, 1990) system. Submarine mass transport was most frequent immediately following ice retreat (15.5-11.5 ka cal. yrs BP). The largest event ( 1.2 km3) involved failure of glaciomarine sediment on a submarine moraine at Squally Channel, and consequent movement of material into the adjacent deep basin. This event occurred post-13 ka cal. yrs BP. In the postglacial phase, mass transport continued on a lesser scale up to the present day, most intensively in Kitimat Arm. From the perspective of glacial landforms, postglacial sedimentation and mass transport, this Pacific active margin fiord system has some parallels with fiord systems on Canada's east coast passive margin, and with Norwegian fiords, but the intensive development of Holocene fan deltas is strongly

  4. Trends in paediatric sport- and recreation-related injuries: An injury surveillance study at the British Columbia Children's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) from 1992 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Pakzad-Vaezi, Kaivon; Singhal, Ash

    2011-04-01

    Sport- and recreation-related injuries are a major source of morbidity in the paediatric population. Long-term trends for these injuries are largely unknown. A traumatic injury surveillance system (the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program) was used to examine the demographics and trends of paediatric sports injuries in children who presented to or were directly admitted to the British Columbia Children's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) emergency department or intensive care unit from 1992 to 2005. Over the 14-year study period, there was a significant increase in sport- and recreation-related injuries among patients who presented to the British Columbia Children's Hospital. Of 104,414 injuries between 1992 and 2005, 27,466 were related to sports and recreational activities. The number of sport-related injuries increased by 28%, while all-cause injuries did not change significantly. Males comprised 68% of the sport-related injuries, and both sexes displayed an increasing trend over time. Cycling, basketball, soccer and ice hockey were the top four injury-causing activities. The main body parts injured were the face, head and digits. Paediatric sports injuries significantly increased at the British Columbia Children's Hospital over the 14-year study period. This is likely due to increased sport participation, increased risk associated with certain sports, or both. Trends in paediatric sports injury may be predicted by changes in popular media, possibly allowing prevention programs to help to avoid these injuries before they occur.

  5. Rivers Run Through It: Discovering the Interior Columbia River Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Shelley; Wojtanik, Brenda Lincoln; Rieben, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Explores the Columbia River Basin, its ecosystems, and challenges faced by natural resource managers. By studying the basin's complexity, students can learn about common scientific concepts such as the power of water and effects of rain shadows. Students can also explore social-scientific issues such as conflicts between protecting salmon runs and…

  6. Rivers Run Through It: Discovering the Interior Columbia River Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Shelley; Wojtanik, Brenda Lincoln; Rieben, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Explores the Columbia River Basin, its ecosystems, and challenges faced by natural resource managers. By studying the basin's complexity, students can learn about common scientific concepts such as the power of water and effects of rain shadows. Students can also explore social-scientific issues such as conflicts between protecting salmon runs and…

  7. Extreme Wave Statistics within the Mouth of the Columbia River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS EXTREME WAVE STATISTICS WITIDN THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER Thesis Advisor: Co...Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS EXTREME WAVE STATISTICS WITHIN THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER 6. AUTHOR: Calter L. Johnston 7...in the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) dming the peak of ebb tide in May and June of2013. Over three separate collection days, effects of opposing

  8. Surveillance for Borrelia burgdorferi in Ixodes Ticks and Small Rodents in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Muhammad G; Lee, Min-Kuang; Man, Stephanie; Fernando, Keerthi; Wong, Quantine; Hojgaard, Andrias; Tang, Patrick; Mak, Sunny; Henry, Bonnie; Patrick, David M

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in British Columbian ticks, fieldwork was conducted over a 2-year period. In all, 893 ticks (Ixodes pacificus, I. angustus, I. soricis, Ixodes spp., and Dermacentor andersoni) of different life stages were retrieved from 483 small rodents (Peromyscus maniculatus, Perognathus parvus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis). B. burgdorferi DNA was detected in 5 out of 359 tick pools, and 41 out of 483 mice were serologically confirmed to have antibodies against B. burgdorferi. These results were consistent with previous studies, data from passive surveillance in British Columbia, and data from neighboring states in the Pacific Northwest, suggesting a continually low prevalence of B. burgdorferi in British Columbia ticks.

  9. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Ecosystem Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith Marcoe

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  10. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Geomorphic Catena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  11. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Hydrogeomorphic Reach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  12. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pinza, M. R.; Word, J. Q.; Barrows, E. S.; Mayhew, H. L.; Clark, D. R.

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  13. Survey of Columbia River Basin streams for Columbia pebblesnail Fluminicola columbiana and shortface lanx Fisherola nuttalli

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Frest, T.J.

    1992-08-01

    At present, there are only two remaining sizable populations of Columbia pebblesnails Fluminicola columbiana; those in the Methow and Okanogan rivers, Washington. Smaller populations survive in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, and the lower Salmon River, Idaho, and possibly in the middle Snake River, Idaho; Hells Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, and the Grande Ronde River, Oregon and Washington. Neither large population is at present protected, and there has been a substantial documented reduction in the species` historic range. Large populations of the shortface lanx Fisherolla nuttalli persist in four streams: the Deschutes River, Oregon; the Hanford Reach and Bonneville Dam area of the Columbia River, Washington and Oregon; Hens Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho and Oregon; and the Okanogan River, Washington. Smaller populations, or ones of uncertain size, are known from the lower Salmon and middle Snake rivers, Idaho; the Grande Ronde Washington and Oregon; Imnaha, and John Day rivers, Oregon; and the Methow River, Washington. While substantial range reduction has occurred in this species, and the large populations are not well protected, the problem is not as severe as in the case of the Columbia pebblesnail. Both species appear to have been widespread historically in the mainstem Columbia River and the Columbia River Basin prior to the installation of the current dam system. Both are now apparently reduced within the Columbia River to populations in the Hanford Reach and possibly other sites that are now separated by large areas of unsuitable habitat from those in the river`s major tributaries.

  14. Submarine glaciated landscapes of central and northern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John; Lintern, Gwyn

    2015-04-01

    Recent systematic multibeam sonar mapping and ground-truthing surveys in the fjords and coastal waters of central and northern British Columbia, Canada, provide information on glacial processes associated with the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, and also on postglacial processes that have strongly modified the glacial terrain. During the last glacial maximum, ice covered the Coast Range, except for nunataks. Convergent streamlined glacial landforms in the Strait of Georgia testify to a strong flow of ice towards the southeast, between Vancouver Island and the mainland. During ice retreat, thick deposits of acoustically stratified glaciomarine mud were deposited in glacially over deepened basins. Retreat through the Douglas Channel fjord system was punctuated by still stands, resulting in a series of submarine moraines. Postglacial processes have created a suite of landforms that mask the primary glacial terrain: 1) Fjord floors host thick deposits of acoustically transparent postglacial mud with highly variable distribution: banks up to 80-m thick are commonly adjacent to erosional zones with glaciomarine mud exposed at the seafloor; 2) In this region of high precipitation and snowpack melt, numerous cone-shaped Holocene fan deltas developed on the fjord sidewalls transport coarse sediment to the fjord floors. Larger deltas are developed at fjord heads, notably at Kitimat and Kildala; 3) Submarine slope failures in this tectonically active area have resulted in a suite of mass transport deposits on sidewalls and fjord floors. The very large submarine slope failures at Camano Sound and KitKat Inlet occurred on the steep, rear facets of large transverse moraines, and involved the failure of glaciomarine sediment that moved into deeper basins, perhaps as a retrogressive failure. The ages of these events are unknown, although the presence of postglacial mud in the slide scar at Caamano suggests that the event at that location occurred in the late glacial or early Holocene. Also

  15. Holocene glacier activity in the British Columbia Coast Mountains, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mood, Bryan J.; Smith, Dan J.

    2015-11-01

    The Coast Mountains flank the Pacific Ocean in western British Columbia, Canada. Subdivided into the southern Pacific Ranges, central Kitimat Ranges and northern Boundary Ranges, the majority of large glaciers and icefields are located in the Boundary and Pacific ranges. Prior descriptions of the Holocene glacial history of this region indicate the Holocene was characterized by repeated episodes of ice expansion and retreat. Recent site-specific investigations augment our understanding of the regional character and duration of these events. In this paper, previously reported and new radiocarbon evidence is integrated to provide an updated regional assessment. The earliest evidence of glacier expansion in the Coast Mountains comes from the Boundary Ranges at 8.9 and 7.8 ka and in the Pacific Ranges at 8.5-8.2 ka, with the latter advance corresponding to an interval of rapid, global climate deterioration. Although generally warm and dry climates from 7.3 to 5.3 ka likely limited the size of glaciers in the region, there is radiocarbon evidence for advances over the interval from 7.3 to 6.0 and at 5.4-5.3 ka in the Pacific Ranges. Following these advances, glaciers in the Pacific Ranges expanded down valley at 4.8-4.6, 4.4-4.0, 3.5-2.6, 1.4-1.2, and 0.8-0.4 ka, while glaciers in Boundary Ranges were advancing at 4.1-4.0, 3.7-3.4, 3.1-2.8, 2.3, 1.7-1.1, and 0.8-0.4 ka. After 0.4 ka, it appears that most glaciers in the Coast Mountains continued to expand to attain their maximum Holocene extents by the early 18th to late 19th centuries. This enhanced record of Holocene glacier activity highlights the temporal synchrony in the Coast Mountains. Individual expansion events in the mid-to late Holocene broadly correspond to intervals of regional glacier activity reported in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, in Alaska, and on high-elevation volcanic peaks in Washington State.

  16. Repeated precise gravity measurements on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.; Lambert, A.; Liard, J.

    1981-07-01

    Over the past 3 years, repeated precise gravity measurements have been made on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, to test a practical field technique for precise gravimetric surveys and to monitor possible gravity changes associated with contemporary crustal deformation. In order to obtain a precision for measured gravity differences of a few microgals (1 μGal = 10 nm/s2), rigorous field survey procedures were followed and the operating characteristics and calibration nonlinearities of the LaCoste and Romberg model D gravimeters were taken into account. Instrument evaluations indicate that although the standard error of the mean of several gravity ties is 1.5-2.0 μGal for an individual instrument, the present achievable accuracy of the model D gravimeter for the measurement of temporal gravity changes is 3-4 μGal, provided the dial settings of previous surveys are recovered or both long and short wavelength nonlinearities in calibration can be specified. Semiannual surveys of the central Vancouver Island region indicate significant temporal variations over the past 3 years. Gravity changes as large as 60 μGal at sites adjacent to lake shorelines are caused by the mass effect of changing water levels and can be accounted for by simple model calculations. A gravity effect of seasonal changes in groundwater levels is not identifiable in the data, although easternmost network sites are underlain by porous sediments subject to seasonal water table fluctuations of 1 or 2 m which are expected to cause gravity variations of the order of 10μGal. A spatially coherent pattern of longer-term gravity trends is indicated in the northern network after corrections have been made for known mass changes. These trends can be interpreted in terms of relative elevation changes of the order of 2 cm/a between Buttle Lake and the area to the northwest. Alternatively, a change in density caused by secular changes of water content in fracture zones or by compression through an

  17. Survey of Columbia River Basin streams for Columbia pebblesnail Fluminicola columbiana and shortface lanx Fisherola nuttalli

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A. ); Frest, T.J. )

    1992-08-01

    At present, there are only two remaining sizable populations of Columbia pebblesnails Fluminicola columbiana; those in the Methow and Okanogan rivers, Washington. Smaller populations survive in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, and the lower Salmon River, Idaho, and possibly in the middle Snake River, Idaho; Hells Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, and the Grande Ronde River, Oregon and Washington. Neither large population is at present protected, and there has been a substantial documented reduction in the species' historic range. Large populations of the shortface lanx Fisherolla nuttalli persist in four streams: the Deschutes River, Oregon; the Hanford Reach and Bonneville Dam area of the Columbia River, Washington and Oregon; Hens Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho and Oregon; and the Okanogan River, Washington. Smaller populations, or ones of uncertain size, are known from the lower Salmon and middle Snake rivers, Idaho; the Grande Ronde Washington and Oregon; Imnaha, and John Day rivers, Oregon; and the Methow River, Washington. While substantial range reduction has occurred in this species, and the large populations are not well protected, the problem is not as severe as in the case of the Columbia pebblesnail. Both species appear to have been widespread historically in the mainstem Columbia River and the Columbia River Basin prior to the installation of the current dam system. Both are now apparently reduced within the Columbia River to populations in the Hanford Reach and possibly other sites that are now separated by large areas of unsuitable habitat from those in the river's major tributaries.

  18. Return to the river: strategies for salmon restoration in the Columbia River Basin.

    Treesearch

    Richard N. Williams; Jack A. Standford; James A. Lichatowich; William J. Liss; Charles C. Coutant; Willis E. McConnaha; Richard R. Whitney; Phillip R. Mundy; Peter A. Bisson; Madison S. Powell

    2006-01-01

    The Columbia River today is a great "organic machine" (White 1995) that dominates the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Even though natural attributes remain—for example, salmon production in Washington State's Hanford Reach, the only unimpounded reach of the mainstem Columbia River—the Columbia and Snake River mainstems are dominated...

  19. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbia River, Oregon and... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.228 Columbia River, Oregon and Washington... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly...

  20. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbia River, Oregon and... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.228 Columbia River, Oregon and Washington... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly...

  1. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia River, Oregon and... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.228 Columbia River, Oregon and Washington... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly...

  2. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbia River, Oregon and... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.228 Columbia River, Oregon and Washington... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly...

  3. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbia River, Oregon and... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.228 Columbia River, Oregon and Washington... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly...

  4. 77 FR 53141 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY... across the Columbia River, mile 106.5, between Portland, OR and Vancouver, WA. This deviation is...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA. 165.1308 Section 165.1308 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at...

  6. 77 FR 24146 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY... (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Columbia River, mile 105.6, at Vancouver, WA. This deviation is...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA. 165.1308 Section 165.1308 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at...

  8. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot's model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia's five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer.

  9. Comparison of access to services in rural emergency departments in Quebec and British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Richard; Audette, Louis-David; Marcoux, Jérémie; Villa, Julie; Archambault, Patrick; Poitras, Julien

    2014-11-01

    Although emergency departments (EDs) in Canada's rural areas serve approximately 20% of the population, a serious problem in access to health care services has emerged. The objective of this project was to compare access to support services in rural EDs between British Columbia and Quebec. Rural EDs were identified through the Canadian Healthcare Association's Guide to Canadian Healthcare Facilities. We selected hospitals with 24/7 ED physician coverage and hospitalization beds that were located in rural communities (using the rural and small town definition from Statistics Canada). Data were collected from ministries of health, local health authorities, and ED statistics. A telephone interview was administered to collect denominative user data statistics and determine the status of services. British Columbia has more rural EDs (n  =  34) than Quebec (n  =  26). EDs in Quebec have higher volumes (19,310 versus 7,793 annual visits). With respect to support services, 81% of Quebec rural EDs have a 24/7 on-call general surgeon compared to 12% for British Columbia. Nearly 75% of Quebec rural EDs have 24/7 access to computed tomography versus only 3% for British Columbia. Rural EDs in Quebec are also supported by a greater proportion of intensive care units (88% versus 15%); however, British Columbia appears to have more medevac aircraft/helicopters than Quebec. The results suggest that major differences exist in access to support services in rural EDs in British Columbia and Quebec. A nationwide study is justified to address this issue of variability in rural and remote health service delivery and its impact on interfacility transfers and patient outcomes.

  10. Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

    1996-03-01

    Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

  11. Social space, social class and Bourdieu: health inequalities in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry

    2007-03-01

    This article adopts Pierre Bourdieu's cultural-structuralist approach to conceptualizing and identifying social classes in social space and seeks to identify health effects of class in one Canadian province. Utilizing data from an original questionnaire survey of randomly selected adults from 25 communities in British Columbia, social (class) groupings defined by cultural tastes and dispositions, lifestyle practices, social background, educational capital, economic capital, social capital and occupational categories are presented in visual mappings of social space constructed by use of exploratory multiple correspondence analysis techniques. Indicators of physical and mental health are then situated within this social space, enabling speculations pertaining to health effects of social class in British Columbia.

  12. Trends in paediatric sport- and recreation-related injuries: An injury surveillance study at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) from 1992 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Pakzad-Vaezi, Kaivon; Singhal, Ash

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sport- and recreation-related injuries are a major source of morbidity in the paediatric population. Long-term trends for these injuries are largely unknown. METHODS: A traumatic injury surveillance system (the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program) was used to examine the demographics and trends of paediatric sports injuries in children who presented to or were directly admitted to the British Columbia Children’s Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) emergency department or intensive care unit from 1992 to 2005. RESULTS: Over the 14-year study period, there was a significant increase in sport- and recreation-related injuries among patients who presented to the British Columbia Children’s Hospital. Of 104,414 injuries between 1992 and 2005, 27,466 were related to sports and recreational activities. The number of sport-related injuries increased by 28%, while all-cause injuries did not change significantly. Males comprised 68% of the sport-related injuries, and both sexes displayed an increasing trend over time. Cycling, basketball, soccer and ice hockey were the top four injury-causing activities. The main body parts injured were the face, head and digits. CONCLUSIONS: Paediatric sports injuries significantly increased at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital over the 14-year study period. This is likely due to increased sport participation, increased risk associated with certain sports, or both. Trends in paediatric sports injury may be predicted by changes in popular media, possibly allowing prevention programs to help to avoid these injuries before they occur. PMID:22468125

  13. Genetic structure of Columbia River redband trout populations in the Kootenai River drainage, Montana, revealed by microsatellite and allozyme loci

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, K.-L.; Muhlfeld, C.C.; Sage, G.K.; Leary, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the genetic divergence among 10 populations of redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri from the upper Columbia River drainage. Resident redband trout from two watersheds in the Kootenai River drainage and hatchery stocks of migratory Kamloops redband trout from Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, were analyzed using allele frequency data from microsatellite and allozyme loci. The Kamloops populations have significantly different allele frequencies from those of the Kootenai River drainage. Of the total genetic variation detected in the resident redband trout, 40.7% (microsatellites) and 15.5% (allozymes) were due to differences between populations from the two Kootenai River watersheds. The divergence among populations within each watershed, however, was less than 3.5% with both techniques. Our data indicate that watershed-specific broodstocks of redband trout are needed by fisheries managers for reintroduction or the supplementation of populations at risk of extinction.

  14. Stratigraphic and Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Hazelton Trough-Bowser Basin, Northwest British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Francois

    The Hazelton trough--Bowser basin is a large sedimentary basin that developed on volcanic arc rocks of the Stikine terrane in northern British Columbia, Canada. Its fill mostly consists of the Lower to Middle Jurassic Hazelton Group and the Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Bowser Lake Group. Regional correlations indicate that the Hazelton Group can be divided in two distinct lithostratigraphic intervals separated in most places by an unconformity. The lower Hazelton Group (LHG) is dominated by arc-related volcanic rocks, whereas the upper Hazelton Group (UHG) contains mainly fine-grained clastic rocks and lesser bimodal rift-related volcanic rocks. Lowermost coarse-grained strata of the UHG, including the bioturbated and fossiliferous units of the Smithers Formation and the Spatisizi River Formation, record a transgressive trend consistent with thermal subsidence and relative sea-level rise. Transgression of the Stikine arc culminated with the establishment of deep-water conditions in the Late Toarcian-Early Aalenian, and deposition of the Quock Formation. Interbedded siliceous mudstone and rusty-weathered tuff of the Quock Formation are correlated throughout most of the basin, except in the Iskut River area on the northwestern margin of the basin, where contemporaneous strata of the Iskut River Formation are dominated by rift-related volcanic rocks and conglomerates. Inception of rifting in the Iskut River area constitutes an independent extensional event on Stikinia, and could be related to reorganization of tectonic plates during a protracted period of terrane accretion in the Middle Jurassic. Obduction of the Cache Creek terrane over Stikinia in early Middle Jurassic provided a new source of sediment, which led to accumulation of the Bowser Lake Group. The second pulse of subsidence observed at Todagin Mountain can be explained by sediment loading of the accommodation previously generated during extension of the Hazelton trough in Early Jurassic time.

  15. Enantiospecific Pheromone Production and Response Profiles for Populations of Pine Engraver, Ips pini (SAY) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    D.R. Miller; J.H. Borden; K.N. Slessor

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of the enantiomeric composition of ipsdienol produced by individual male pine engravers, Ips pini (Say), from six populations in British Columbia, support the hypothesis that New York and Idaho races of this species hybridize in southeastern British Columbia. Production profiles, expressed as frequency distributions of (+):(-) ipsdienol...

  16. 100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.G.

    1993-09-08

    Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

  17. From Casual Work to Economic Security: The Case of British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Fiona; Bowles, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of casual work in British Columbia is an important issue given that the increase in casual work has been greater in this province than in other provinces in Canada and given that the labour market has been substantially deregulated since 2001. In this paper, we analyse how individuals' casual employment status affects their economic…

  18. Recreating the University from within: Collaborative Reflections on the University of British Columbia's Engagement with Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Janet; Pagani, Freda; Quayle, Moura; Robinson, John; Sawada, Brenda; Spiegelman, George; Van Wynsberghe, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--In 1997, the University of British Columbia (UBC) adopted a sustainable development policy stating that the campus should adhere to sustainable practices in all of its actions and mandates and that all students who attend UBC will be educated about sustainability. The purpose of the paper is to consider how far UBC has moved in the last…

  19. Hidden Fragility: Closure among Licensed Child-Care Services in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershaw, Paul; Forer, Barry; Goelman, Hillel

    2005-01-01

    Research shows that stability is one component of quality child care. We investigate the understudied phenomenon of the stability of child-care facilities over time, focusing on the province of British Columbia, Canada. Although net figures show growth in the number of providers between 1997 and 2001, they obfuscate a dramatic level of closure…

  20. From Community College to University: Institutionalization and Neoliberalism in British Columbia and Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida; Walker, Laurencia

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative investigation of higher education institutional development addresses new universities that were former community colleges in the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta. Stemming from an original study conducted nearly two decades earlier, this investigation's data were collected from the same institutions and from similar…

  1. A Preliminary Study of Job-Related Communications Skills in British Columbia Sawmills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Forest Industries (British Columbia).

    A preliminary study of job-related communications skills in British Columbia sawmills investigated the extent of agreement between reading grade levels of written workplace materials and reading comprehension levels of employees expected to read them. In 1990, 227 employees in 8 sawmills were interviewed with a 52-item structured interview, a…

  2. Fusarium species-a British Columbia perspective in forest seedling production

    Treesearch

    Michael Peterson

    2008-01-01

    This review provides a brief biological outline of some species in the genus Fusarium and how these can be implicated as seedborne organisms leading to conifer seed and seedling losses in British Columbia. Fusarium spp. are implicated with pre- and post-emergence damping-off, seedling wilt, late damping-off, root rot, and seedling mortality after outplanting. Current...

  3. Continuing Education Activities of the University of British Columbia, 1977/1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Univ., Vancouver.

    The 1977-78 annual report on continuing education activities of the University of British Columbia is presented. The provision of continuing education by the university is decentralized. Several administrative units are responsible for credit and noncredit, general and professional continuing education, and professional development. The following…

  4. Continuing Education Activities of the University of British Columbia, 1978-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Univ., Vancouver. Center for Continuing Education.

    Continuing education opportunities offered by the University of British Columbia (UBC) are summarized in this third comprehensive annual report for the year September 1978 to August 1979. The university administers a decentralized program encompassing several university offices, community resource centers, and individual faculty members. Evening,…

  5. The Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia. Annual Report, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native Courtworker and Counseling Association of British Columbia, Vancouver.

    The Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia, with objectives of providing courtworker services for Native Indians charged with offenses; supplying information on legal rights, responsibilities, and operation of the justice system; and reducing the number of Native people in conflict with the law, handled 4,860 Native…

  6. First Nations, Consultation, and the Rule of Law: Salmon Farming and Colonialism in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Dorothee

    2006-01-01

    Many coastal First Nations communities, particularly in British Columbia, see consultation as a positive way of getting around the firmly entrenched position of both provincial and federal governments on fish farming. Even those Native groups such as the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council (MTTC) and the Homalco First Nation, who are adamantly…

  7. The State of Educators' Professional Learning in British Columbia: Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sherri; Hales, Anne; Kuehn, Larry; Steffensen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Coinciding with the 2016 Annual Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Learning Forward commissioned and supported a study of professional learning across the nation of Canada entitled "The State of Educators' Professional Learning in Canada." A research team led by Carol Campbell, Associate Professor of Leadership and Educational…

  8. Perceptions of Present and Future Capability among a Sample of Rural British Columbia Youth Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapil, Meg E.; Shepard, Blythe C.

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey explored 96 rural adolescents' perceptions of their rural context and how their self-concept is related to perceptions of capability regarding hopes and fears for the future. The youth surveyed, from the Kootenay Boundary region of British Columbia, indicated ambivalence about staying in their communities after leaving…

  9. Chapter 16: Inland Habitat Associations of Marbled Murrelets in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Alan E. Burger

    1995-01-01

    Most Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in British Columbia nest in the Coastal Western Hemlock biogeoclimatic zone. In this zone, detection frequencies were highest in the moister ecosections and in low elevation forests. Nests and moderately high levels of activity were also found in some forest patches in the subalpine Mountain Hemlock...

  10. The Administrative Impact of Computers on the British Columbia Public School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbens, Trevor P.

    This case study analyzes and evaluates the administrative computer systems in the British Columbia public school organization in order to investigate the costs and benefits of computers, their impact on managerial work, their influence on centralization in organizations, and the relationship between organizational objectives and the design of…

  11. The Politics of School Choice in British Columbia: Citizenship, Equity and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskell, Jane

    This research explored the politics of educational choice through a case study of one public school testing the limits of difference in the British Columbia (Canada) school system in the 1990s. The Fine Arts elementary school was created by the school board based on pedagogical ideas from teachers. This fine arts magnet offered teachers a great…

  12. Farmer Contacts with District Agriculturists in Three Areas in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinbode, Isaac A.; Dorling, M. J.

    This study analyzed data gathered in a Canada Land Inventory project in British Columbia; the purpose was to measure the degree of communication between farmers and the agricultural extension service by analyzing the nature and extent of contacts, and the relationship of the contacts to socioeconomic characteristics. The farmers tended to be an…

  13. The Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia. Annual Report, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native Courtworker and Counseling Association of British Columbia, Vancouver.

    The Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of British Columbia, with objectives of providing courtworker services for Native Indians charged with offenses; supplying information on legal rights, responsibilities, and operation of the justice system; and reducing the number of Native people in conflict with the law, handled 4,860 Native…

  14. Admissions and Transfer Experiences of Students Continuing Their Studies in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrance, Jill

    This report presents the results of an analysis of admissions and transfer data from the 2000 British Columbia (BC) College and Institute Student Outcomes Survey. It addresses a number of issues related to the admissions and transfer experiences of former students from BC's college and institute system, from the students' perspective. Twenty-one…

  15. Nonspecific Mental Retardation in British Columbia as Ascertained through a Registry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Diana S.; Baird, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Findings from the British Columbia Health Surveillance Registry revealed information about the age specific prevalence of mental retardation with no known etiology; association of mild and profound retardation with microcephalus, hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, or epilepsy; and survival rates. (Author/CL)

  16. A GENERAL SITE LOCATION STUDY FOR A REGIONAL COLLEGE FOR THE OKANAGAN AREA OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GILES, FREDERIC T.; AND OTHERS

    THE FEASIBILITY AND GENERAL SITE LOCATION OF A REGIONAL COLLEGE FOR TEN SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN THE OKANAGAN AREA OF BRITISH COLUMBIA WAS STUDIED AND ESTABLISHED. GEOGRAPHIC CENTERS OF POPULATION DISTRIBUTION, TRANSPORTATION, GENERAL ECONOMY AND SCHOOL POPULATIONS FOR GRADES 1-12 AND 13-14 WERE DETERMINED FROM THE ANALYSIS OF DEMOGRAPHIC, GEOGRAPHIC…

  17. Infestation of apricot by Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Washington state and British Columbia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Tephritidae), is native to the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. and British Columbia in Canada and is known to attack and develop in the fruit of 12 plant species in nature. Here we report that R. indifferens in nature infests yet another plant,...

  18. Leisure Education and Employment in BC [British Columbia]: An Analysis of Selected Relationships and Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olenick, Norman F. E.; And Others

    In order to assess the effect of community college programs in British Columbia aimed at training workers in urban recreation services, and to determine the need for expansion of such training programs, a comprehensive 5-month study was conducted in 1975-76. The study and research methods included: (1) the compilation and analysis of historical…

  19. Integrated management of timber and deer: coastal forests of British Columbia and Alaska.

    Treesearch

    J.B. Nyberg; R.S. McNay; M.D. [and others] Kirchhoff

    1989-01-01

    Current techniques for integrating timber and deer management in coastal British Columbia and Alaska are reviewed and evaluated. Integration can be improved by setting objectives for deer habitat and timber, improving managers' knowledge of interactions, and providing planning tools to analyze alternative programs of forest management. A handbook designed to...

  20. Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape: The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, George P.

    2006-01-01

    In British Columbia, Canada, the practice of archaeology has been strongly influenced by issues of First Nations rights and the ways government and industry have chosen to address them. In turn, this situation has affected academic (i.e., research-based) and consulting (i.e., cultural resource management) archaeology, which have had to respond to…

  1. Do British Columbia's Recent Education Policy Changes Enhance Professionalism among Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimmett, Peter P.; D'Amico, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Beginning with the Sullivan Royal Commission on Education in 1988, British Columbia (BC) teachers experienced a policy context that led to a decade of intense professional learning around innovative instructional strategies and curriculum. From 2001 on, the policy context changed considerably. There has been a flurry of changes designed to bring…

  2. Preschools for Science: The Child Study Centre at the University of British Columbia, 1960-1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Penney; Gleason, Mona; Petrina, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The development of the Child Study Centre (CSC) at University of British Columbia (UBC) provides a unique perspective on the complex and often contradictory relationship between child study and preschool education in postwar Canada. In this article, the authors detail the development and eventual closure of the CSC at UBC, focusing on the uneasy…

  3. Connections '96. Proceedings of a Faculty Conference (2nd, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, May 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton-Sakari, Mary, Ed.; Miller, Carole S., Ed.; Liedtke, Werner, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 19 papers presented at the second annual faculty conference at the University of Victoria (British Columbia, Canada). Papers cover a wide variety of disciplines, including preschool education, classroom communication, mathematics instruction, theater, attention deficit disorders, distance learning by rural home schoolers,…

  4. Tall among the Trees: Organizing against Globalist Forestry in Rural British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prudham, Scott

    2008-01-01

    In January of 2001, the TimberWest Corporation permanently closed its Youbou sawmill facility near Duncan, British Columbia, Canada laying off 220 workers. On the surface, the Youbou mill closure reinforced a pervasive sense that workers and communities in the province are increasingly vulnerable to an ever more globally integrated and footloose…

  5. ADULT EDUCATION AND THE ADOPTION OF INNOVATIONS BY ORCHARDISTS IN THE OKANAGAN VALLEY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLERD, FRANK W.; VERNER, COOLIE

    THIS STUDY ANALYZED THE GENERAL BEHAVIOR OF ORCHARDISTS IN THE OKANAGAN VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, AND THE FACTORS RELATED TO ADOPTION OF INNOVATIONS IN THIS SETTING. FIVE PERCENT SAMPLES WERE DRAWN FROM 19 DISTRICTS CONSISTING OF 2,721 ORCHARDS, AND DATA WERE GATHERED BY RESIDENT AGRICULTURISTS. THE DATA WERE ANALYZED BY STAGE IN THE ADOPTION…

  6. Mixed-severity fire regimes in dry forests of southern interior British Columbia, Canada

    Treesearch

    Emily K. Heyerdahl; Ken Lertzman; Carmen M. Wong

    2012-01-01

    Historical fire severity is poorly characterized for dry forests in the interior west of North America. We inferred a multicentury history of fire severity from tree rings in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) - ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P. Lawson & C. Lawson) forests in the southern interior of British Columbia,...

  7. First Nations, Consultation, and the Rule of Law: Salmon Farming and Colonialism in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Dorothee

    2006-01-01

    Many coastal First Nations communities, particularly in British Columbia, see consultation as a positive way of getting around the firmly entrenched position of both provincial and federal governments on fish farming. Even those Native groups such as the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council (MTTC) and the Homalco First Nation, who are adamantly…

  8. Combining Forces: Fostering Sustainability Collaboration between the City of Vancouver and the University of British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Alison; Marcus, Jean; Dolling, Katie; Robinson, John; Wahl, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes the sustainability partnership between the City of Vancouver and the University of British Columbia (UBC) and, in particular, the co-curricular Greenest City Scholars graduate student internship program, which has been developed by the two organizations. Through the program, UBC graduate students work on projects at…

  9. Multiculturalism and Human Rights in Civic Education: The Case of British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper considers how textbooks resolve the tension between contradictory goals of promoting a cohesive national identity while teaching respect and equality among diverse social groups in British Columbia (B.C.), Canada. Purpose: The article presents preliminary results of a larger study examining the content of required civic…

  10. The State of Educators' Professional Learning in British Columbia: Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sherri; Hales, Anne; Kuehn, Larry; Steffensen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Coinciding with the 2016 Annual Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Learning Forward commissioned and supported a study of professional learning across the nation of Canada entitled "The State of Educators' Professional Learning in Canada." A research team led by Carol Campbell, Associate Professor of Leadership and Educational…

  11. British Columbia Council on Admissions & Transfer Annual Report, 2008-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The role of the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) is to facilitate admission, articulation, and transfer arrangements in the BC post-secondary system. BCCAT carries out this work in various ways; for example, engaging in research on admissions and student transitions, evaluating the effectiveness of the transfer system…

  12. An Evaluation of Project Learning Tree in British Columbia, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conry, Robert F.; Jeroski, Sharon F.

    Evaluation of Project Learning Tree (PLT) involved a survey of PLT's utilization in British Columbia and the field experiment. The survey included participant observers' reports on PLT teacher training workshops, a mail survey of workshop participants, and telephone interviews with selected respondents. Two treatment conditions were effected at…

  13. Re-use of nest sites by marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Alan E. Burger; Irene A. Manley; Michael P. Silvergieter; David B. Lank; Kevin M. Jordan; Thomas D. Bloxton; Martin G. Raphael

    2009-01-01

    Marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) nest predominantly in the canopies of large old-growth conifers, and are listed as Threatened in Canada and three U.S. states mainly as a consequence of reductions in this habitat owing to logging. We assessed the re-use of nest sites (nest trees) by murrelets in British Columbia using three types of...

  14. The Reluctant Learner. A Research Report on Nonparticipation and Dropout in Literacy Programs in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Audrey M.

    An exploratory study investigated the issues of nonparticipation and program attrition in adult basic education (ABE)literacy programs in the province of British Columbia (Canada). Literature was reviewed and opinions were sought from ABE professionals and other field workers. Seven literacy classes were visited, 66 persons from several different…

  15. Degree Completion for Aboriginal People in British Columbia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Ruth; Burtch, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a First Nations educational initiative in British Columbia. Simon Fraser University's (SFU) Integrated Studies Program created two unique adult education programs in response to a request from the Aboriginal-operated Nicola Valley Institute of Technology (NVIT); this request involved the two institutions…

  16. Educational Change and the Women's Movement: Lessons From British Columbia Schools in the 1970s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskell, Jane

    2004-01-01

    This article uses Melucci's approach to social movements to explore how the women"s movement changed education in British Columbia in the 1970s. The women's movement was a multifaceted social phenomenon with multiple agendas and actors. In the early 1970s, it developed a temporary sense of cohesion in the field of education in the context of a…

  17. Identification of metapopulation dynamics among Northern Goshawks of the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and Coastal British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; McClaren, Erica L.; Doyle, Frank I.; Titus, K.; Sage, George K.; Wilson, Robert E.; Gust, Judy R.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Northern Goshawks occupying the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and coastal British Columbia nest primarily in old-growth and mature forest, which results in spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of individuals across the landscape. We used microsatellite and mitochondrial data to infer genetic structure, gene flow, and fluctuations in population demography through evolutionary time. Patterns in the genetic signatures were used to assess predictions associated with the three population models: panmixia, metapopulation, and isolated populations. Population genetic structure was observed along with asymmetry in gene flow estimates that changed directionality at different temporal scales, consistent with metapopulation model predictions. Therefore, Northern Goshawk assemblages located in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia interact through a metapopulation framework, though they may not fit the classic model of a metapopulation. Long-term population sources (coastal mainland British Columbia) and sinks (Revillagigedo and Vancouver islands) were identified. However, there was no trend through evolutionary time in the directionality of dispersal among the remaining assemblages, suggestive of a rescue-effect dynamic. Admiralty, Douglas, and Chichagof island complex appears to be an evolutionarily recent source population in the Alexander Archipelago. In addition, Kupreanof island complex and Kispiox Forest District populations have high dispersal rates to populations in close geographic proximity and potentially serve as local source populations. Metapopulation dynamics occurring in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia by Northern Goshawks highlight the importance of both occupied and unoccupied habitats to long-term population persistence of goshawks in this region.

  18. Microcomputers in the Schools: New Directions for British Columbia. Discussion Paper Number 05/80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Annette

    This summary of the Instructional Use of Microcomputers Scope Document dated February 22, 1980, outlines short-term plans for the educational use of microcomputers in British Columbia, indicates long-term possibilities, and describes current project activities. The project comprises two major phases: continued field liaison and research, and…

  19. Performance Logic in Simulation Research at the University of British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Marcia A.

    Advantages of the performance simulation setting are considered, along with what can be studied or developed within this setting. Experiences at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and views on future development and research opportunities in the performance simulation setting are also discussed. The benefits of simulating the clinical…

  20. Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape: The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, George P.

    2006-01-01

    In British Columbia, Canada, the practice of archaeology has been strongly influenced by issues of First Nations rights and the ways government and industry have chosen to address them. In turn, this situation has affected academic (i.e., research-based) and consulting (i.e., cultural resource management) archaeology, which have had to respond to…

  1. Screening Sitka spruce for resistance to weevil damage in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    René I. Alfaro; John N. King

    2012-01-01

    The white pine weevil, Pissodes strobi (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), has serious impacts on Sitka (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carrière), Engelmann (P. engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.), and white spruce (P. glauca (Moench) Voss) plantations in British Columbia (BC), Canada. This weevil attacks...

  2. Combining Forces: Fostering Sustainability Collaboration between the City of Vancouver and the University of British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Alison; Marcus, Jean; Dolling, Katie; Robinson, John; Wahl, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes the sustainability partnership between the City of Vancouver and the University of British Columbia (UBC) and, in particular, the co-curricular Greenest City Scholars graduate student internship program, which has been developed by the two organizations. Through the program, UBC graduate students work on projects at…

  3. Suicide by Oxygen Deprivation with Helium: A Preliminary Study of British Columbia Coroner Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Russel D.; Hassan, Shereen

    2011-01-01

    This article researches a relatively new suicide method advanced by right-to-die organizations: oxygen deprivation by breathing helium inside a plastic hood. The article begins with a review of the role of the coroner and the history of oxygen deprivation with helium; it then examines 20 Judgements of Inquiry (JOI) by British Columbia coroners…

  4. Colliding Rights in the Schools: Trinity Western University v. The British Columbia College of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Brummelen, Harro; Sawatsky, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses British Columbia College of Teachers' (BCCT) denial of Trinity Western University's (TWU) teacher education programs and teacher certification due to TWU's prohibition of homosexuality. Reports that TWU filed suit, and the Supreme Court of Canada determined that BCCT's action interfered with TWU's right to religious freedom. (Contains 32…

  5. Recreating the University from within: Collaborative Reflections on the University of British Columbia's Engagement with Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Janet; Pagani, Freda; Quayle, Moura; Robinson, John; Sawada, Brenda; Spiegelman, George; Van Wynsberghe, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--In 1997, the University of British Columbia (UBC) adopted a sustainable development policy stating that the campus should adhere to sustainable practices in all of its actions and mandates and that all students who attend UBC will be educated about sustainability. The purpose of the paper is to consider how far UBC has moved in the last…

  6. Nonspecific Mental Retardation in British Columbia as Ascertained through a Registry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Diana S.; Baird, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Findings from the British Columbia Health Surveillance Registry revealed information about the age specific prevalence of mental retardation with no known etiology; association of mild and profound retardation with microcephalus, hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, or epilepsy; and survival rates. (Author/CL)

  7. Performance Logic in Simulation Research at the University of British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Marcia A.

    Advantages of the performance simulation setting are considered, along with what can be studied or developed within this setting. Experiences at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and views on future development and research opportunities in the performance simulation setting are also discussed. The benefits of simulating the clinical…

  8. Libraries: Vital to Tomorrow's World; British Columbia Centennial Citizens' Conference on Libraries (Victoria, May 3, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Library Development Commission, Vancouver. Committee on Library Development.

    The purpose of this meeting of an invited group of concerned citizens was to focus attention on the interrelation of all types of libraries in British Columbia. It was intended to involve those who pay for library service in a discussion of its potential to meet the demands of the coming generation. This record, which is not intended to be a…

  9. The Impact of "Virtualization" on Independent Study Course Completion Rates: The British Columbia Open University Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Louis

    2009-01-01

    In 1997 the British Columbia Open University (BCOU) adopted a virtualization strategy based primarily on twinning off-line independent study distance education courses (textbook-based with study guide and telephone and e-mail tutor support) with alternate online versions (textbook-based with integrated conferencing and communications provided…

  10. Giving Voice: Autobiographical/Testimonial Literature by First Nations Women of British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Laura J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses various definitions of the "testimonial" and characteristics that distinguish it from related literary genres. Examines autobiographical and testimonial literature by Native women of British Columbia, focusing on first-hand accounts of student experiences in Indian residential schools. Contains 29 references. (SV)

  11. The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Lynda

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior. National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign. Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01). The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.

  12. Multiculturalism and Human Rights in Civic Education: The Case of British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper considers how textbooks resolve the tension between contradictory goals of promoting a cohesive national identity while teaching respect and equality among diverse social groups in British Columbia (B.C.), Canada. Purpose: The article presents preliminary results of a larger study examining the content of required civic…

  13. Jump-Starting Educational Reform. Implementing British Columbia's Comprehensive School Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Paul

    An educational reform effort to implement a comprehensive school act in British Columbia (Canada) is analyzed with a focus on some sociotechnical and political aspects. An overview of the content, background, and implementation of the reform effort is followed by identification of seven contradictions inherent in the plan. Contradictions are as…

  14. Caregiver Perceptions of the Community Integration of Adults with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Erica; Minnes, Patricia; Lutke, Jan; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Background: Adults with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) require support to be part of the community; however, most have few supports other than family and friends. The purpose of this study was to assess caregiver perceptions of community integration of adults with FASD living in British Columbia. Method: The Assimilation, Integration,…

  15. Suicide by Oxygen Deprivation with Helium: A Preliminary Study of British Columbia Coroner Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Russel D.; Hassan, Shereen

    2011-01-01

    This article researches a relatively new suicide method advanced by right-to-die organizations: oxygen deprivation by breathing helium inside a plastic hood. The article begins with a review of the role of the coroner and the history of oxygen deprivation with helium; it then examines 20 Judgements of Inquiry (JOI) by British Columbia coroners…

  16. Chapter 29: Marine Distribution, Abundance, and Habitats of Marbled Murrelets in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Alan E. Burger

    1995-01-01

    About 45,000-50,000 Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) breed in British Columbia, with some birds found in most parts of the inshore coastline. A review of at-sea surveys at 84 sites revealed major concentrations in summer in six areas. Murrelets tend to leave these breeding areas in winter. Many murrelets overwinter in the Strait of...

  17. Recent workforce trends and their effects on the silviculture program in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    John Betts

    2008-01-01

    British Columbia's entrepreneurial silviculture sector provides a reliable just-in-time service delivery of forestry activities from planting trees to fighting wildfires. Transient, and seeming to rely often on improvisation, contractors actually run logistically sophisticated businesses that are able to match varying field conditions to the biological and...

  18. Made in B.C.: A History of Postsecondary Education in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2007-01-01

    This overview of the development of the university, college and institute sector in British Columbia, Canada focuses on the public sector but makes passing reference to the few private institutions that provide academic education. Some contextual information about the role of government and agencies is provided, along with a listing of key…

  19. Connections '99. Proceedings of a Faculty Conference (5th, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, May 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Sandra L., Ed.; Liedtke, Werner W., Ed.

    This proceedings contains 13 papers from the 1999 annual conference of the Faculty of Education, University of Victoria (British Columbia). The papers are: (1) "Sacred and the Profane in Advertising Art" (Bill Zuk, Robert Dalton); (2) "Finding the Fund$ in Fun Run: Evaluating the Effectiveness and Efficiency of Physical Activity…

  20. The Implementation of DOBIS/LEUVEN at the British Columbia Institute of Technology Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, Paula

    This report discusses the implementation of DOBIS, an online, integrated library system run on a shared-use mainframe computer, at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Library during 1984 and 1985. General information about BCIT, the library, and DOBIS is provided, and the project background is discussed. An overview of the…

  1. Catalogue Support Systems Study. Final Report for British Columbia Library Development Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, R. W.; And Others

    To determine the need for additional bibliographic resources in the libraries of British Columbia, Canada, an evaluation was undertaken which included visits to libraries and existing operational catalog support systems, and meetings with advisory committees. Recommendations included: (1) implementation of a province-wide, on-line catalog system;…

  2. Caregiver Perceptions of the Community Integration of Adults with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Erica; Minnes, Patricia; Lutke, Jan; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Background: Adults with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) require support to be part of the community; however, most have few supports other than family and friends. The purpose of this study was to assess caregiver perceptions of community integration of adults with FASD living in British Columbia. Method: The Assimilation, Integration,…

  3. Children in Need of Protection: Reporting Policies in British Columbia School Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewchuk, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High profile sexual assault cases by British Columbia elementary school teachers in 2010 revealed BC school boards had "disturbingly inconsistent" child protection policies. As a result of the intense media scrutiny, the BC Ministry of Education required all school boards to reassess and update their policies on reporting suspected child…

  4. From Casual Work to Economic Security: The Case of British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Fiona; Bowles, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of casual work in British Columbia is an important issue given that the increase in casual work has been greater in this province than in other provinces in Canada and given that the labour market has been substantially deregulated since 2001. In this paper, we analyse how individuals' casual employment status affects their economic…

  5. Private Funding for Elementary and Secondary Public Education in British Columbia for 1983/84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salloum, Kirk

    This study examines major issues in, and effective practices for, private funding for elementary and secondary public education in British Columbia. The sources and allocation of funds for school districts and schools were investigated, along with their funding practices. Using data on funds obtained from a representative sampling of 13 districts…

  6. Connections '97. Proceedings of a Faculty Conference (3rd, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, May 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liedtke, Werner, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 17 papers presented at the third annual faculty conference at the University of Victoria (British Columbia, Canada). Papers cover a wide variety of disciplines and topics, including student teaching, athletics, researcher-teacher collaboration, hands-on science instruction, violence prevention, youth violence, counseling,…

  7. Connections '98. Proceedings of a Faculty Conference (4th, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, May 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Sandra L., Ed.; Anderson, John O., Ed.

    This proceedings contains 13 papers from the 1998 annual Faculty of Education conference at the University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). The papers are: (1) "Struggling with Re-Presentation, Voice, and Self in Narrative Research" (Marla Arvay); (2) "Women's Soccer in Canada: A Slow Road to Equity" (Meredith Bogle,…

  8. Yellow-cedar decline in the North Coast Forest District of British Columbia.

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Hennon; David V. D' Amore; Stefan Zeglan; Mike. Grainger

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of a forest decline of yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis (D. Don) Örsted) has been documented in southeast Alaska, but its occurrence in British Columbia was previously unknown. We conducted an aerial survey in the Prince Rupert area in September 2004 to determine if yellow-cedar forests in the North Coast Forest District of...

  9. The Columbia River--on the Leading Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    On the leading edge of the North American plate, the Columbia River is the largest of the world's 40 or so rivers with drainage areas greater than 500,000 square kilometers to drain toward a convergent plate boundary. This unique setting results in a unique continental river basin; marked by episodic and cataclysmic geologic disturbance, but also famously fecund with perhaps 10 to 16 million salmon historically spawning in its waters each year. Now transformed by dams, transportation infrastructure, dikes and diversions, the Columbia River presents an expensive conundrum for management of its many values. Inclusion of river ecology and geomorphology in discussions of river management is generally limited to observations of the last 200 years-a time period of little natural disturbance and low sediment transport. However, consideration of longer timescales provides additional perspective of historical ecologic and geomorphic conditions. Only 230 km from its mouth, the Columbia River bisects the volcanic arc of the Cascade Range, forming the Columbia River Gorge. Cenozoic lava flows have blocked the river, forcing diversions and new canyon cutting. Holocene eruptions of Mount Mazama (Crater Lake), Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Rainier have shed immense quantities of sediment into the lower Columbia River, forming a large percentage of the Holocene sediment transported through the lower river. Quaternary landslides, perhaps triggered by great earthquakes, have descended from the 1000-m-high gorge walls, also blocking and diverting the river, one as recently as 550 years ago. These geologic disturbances, mostly outside the realm of historical observation and operating at timescales of 100s to 1000s of years in the gorge and elsewhere, have clearly affected basin geomorphology, riverine ecology, and past and present cultural utilization of river resources. The historic productivity of the river, however, hints at extraordinary resilience (and perhaps

  10. Discharge in the lower Columbia River basin, 1928-65

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, Hollis M.

    1968-01-01

    Estimates of monthly and annual mean discharge for five ungaged sites in the lower Columbia River are presented for water years 1928-65. These sites are Columbia River at Vancouver, Wash., Willamette River at mouth, Columbia River at St. Helens, Oreg., Columbia River at Longview, Wash., and Columbia River at mouth. Two tables of estimates are compiled for each site. One table lists estimates of 'observed' flow, the flows that would be measured by a gaging station. The other table lists 'adjusted' flows, the 'observed' flows adjusted for storage changes in major reservoirs arid for diversion at Grand Coulee Dam. Two methods are used in making these estimates. One method involves a detailed summation of flows from all gaged and ungaged areas, allowance for precipitation on and evaporation from the channel water surface, and adjustment of flow to allow for travel time from gaging stations at the Dalles, Oreg. (Columbia River main stem), and at Salem Oreg. (Willamette River). The other method is the same as the summation method except that flows from individual gaged and ungaged areas below The Dalles and Salem are not summed in detail. Instead, the entire drainage area below The Dalles is divided into three major inflow segments and the flow from each segment is obtained from a correlation with streams that are representative of the flow from that segment. Estimates of monthly mean flows are considered to be accurate within 2 or 3 percent.

  11. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  12. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot’s model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia’s five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  13. Age and significance of earthquake-induced liquefaction near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, J.J.; Naesgaard, E.; Nelson, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    In late 1994, sand dykes, large sand blows, and deformed strata were exposed in the walls of an excavation at Annacis Island on the Fraser River delta near Vancouver, British Columbia. The features record liquefaction during a large earthquake about 1700 years ago; this was perhaps the largest earthquake to affect the Vancouver area in the last 3500 years. Similar, less well-dated features have been reported from several other sites on the Fraser delta and may be products of the same earthquake. Three radiocarbon ages that closely delimit the time of liquefaction on Annacis Island are similar to the most precise radiocarbon ages on coseismically subsided marsh soils at estuaries in southern Washington and Oregon. Both the liquefaction and the subsidence may have been produced by a single great plate-boundary earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone. Alternatively, liquefaction at Annacis Island may have been caused by a large crustal or subcrustal earthquake of about the same age as a plate-boundary earthquake farther west. The data from Annacis Island and other sites on the Fraser delta suggest that earthquakes capable of producing extensive liquefaction in this area are rare events. Further, liquefaction analysis using historical seismicity suggests that current assessment procedures may overestimate liquefaction risk.

  14. Low-flow hydraulic geometry of small, steep mountain streams in southwest British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Donald E.; Hickin, Edward J.; Babakaiff, Scott C.

    2010-10-01

    This investigation explores the at-a-station hydraulic geometry (AHG) of small, steep mountain streams at low discharge. Thirteen reaches in five tributaries of Chilliwack River, British Columbia, ranging in size from 12 to 77 km 2 are examined. The resulting data set is composed of eight to twelve measurements of water-surface width, mean depth, and mean velocity at each of 61 cross sections or 625 unique combinations of the three variables. Mean velocity in a given cross section responds most rapidly to changing discharge, and 31 of the 61 cross sections have velocity exponents that are greater than the water-surface width and mean-depth exponents combined. The velocity exponent ( m) averages 0.51, while the mean water-surface width exponent ( b) and mean-depth exponent ( f) average 0.20 and 0.29, respectively. Somewhat surprisingly, the AHG of steep mountain streams can be reasonably predicted from just a few measurements of the primary flow variables and stream discharge. While conditions at the cross section appear predictable from a few measurements, extrapolating the results from one cross section to another in the same reach involves large errors. The section-to-section variability of the exponents and coefficients, even when they are located in similar channel units such as riffles, prevents accurate extrapolation to unmeasured cross sections.

  15. Geologic reservoir model for the Triassic Doig Formation, northeast British Columbia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F. ); Munroe, H.D. )

    1991-03-01

    A subsurface investigation of the mid-Triassic Doig formation in northeastern British Columbia documented two main reservoir facies. Both are a product of mass movement and sediment gravity flow processes on a progradational, tectonically active continental shelf margin. Substrate instability was likely a product of sediment loading, perhaps in concert with seismic activity. Sedimentary facies and reservoir parameters were determined from analysis of approximately 150 cores and 900 well logs. Laterally discontinuous Doig sandstones are up to 60 m thick and trend northeasterly within the study area. The main reservoir facies are incised density flow deposits and laterally extensive slump deposits. Reservoir quality within these sands is extremely variable with porosity ranging from less than 5% to 15%. In core, these deposits consist of moderately well sorted, very fine grained sandstones with no vertical grain size variation. The best production to date is in the Buick Creek field with initial flows of 346 BOPD. The slump deposits are thinner and tend to be more elongate parallel to paleoshoreline. These sands were subject to some wave or current reworking. Modern analogs where similar processes and products of deposition are known to occur include the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf and the Fraser River Delta slope. Doig sandstones usually are enclosed in fine-grained shelf deposits that provide a good stratigraphic trapping mechanism. Successful development of Doig reservoirs must incorporate geologic modes that assist in understanding the complex and highly variable reservoir quality of sandstones units.

  16. Historical changes in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jay, David A.; Bradford Harvey, R.; Hamilton, Peter; Simenstad, Charles A.

    Historical changes in the hydrology, sedimentology, and physical oceanography of the Columbia River Estuary have been evaluated with a combination of statistical, cartographic, and numerical-modelling techniques. Comparison of data digitized from US Coast and Geodetic Survey bathymetric surveys conducted in the periods 1867-1875, 1926-1937, and 1949-1958 reveals that large changes in the morphology of the estuary have been caused by navigational improvements (jetties, dredged channels, and pile dikes) and by the diking and filling of much of the wetland area. Lesser changes are attributable to natural shoaling and erosion. There has been roughly a 15% decrease in tidal prism and a net accumulation of about 68 × 10 6m 3 of sediment in the estuary. Large volumes of sediment have been eroded from the entrance region and deposited on the continental shelf and in the balance of the estuary, contributing to formation of new land. The bathymetric data indicate that, ignoring erosion at the entrance, 370 to 485 × 10 6m 3 of sediment has been deposited in the estuary since 1868 at an average rate of about 0.5 cm y -1, roughly 5 times the rate at which sea level has fallen locally since the turn of the century. Riverflow data indicate that the seasonal flow cycle of the Columbia River has been significantly altered by regulation and diversion of water for irrigation. The greatest changes have occurred in the last thirty years. Flow variability over periods greater than a month has been significantly damped and the net discharge has been slightly reduced. These changes in riverflow are too recent to be reflected in the available in the available bathymetric data. Results from a laterally averaged, multiple-channel, two-dimensional numerical flow model (described in HAMILTON, 1990) suggest that the changes in morphology and riverflow have reduced mixing, increased stratification, altered the response to fortnightly (neap-spring) changes in tidal forcing, and decreased the

  17. The Volcanic Story of the Columbia River Gorge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John Eliot

    1982-01-01

    Uses maps, diagrams, and geological accounts to describe the Columbia River Gorge which separates Oregon from Washington and exposes an unexcelled record of Cenozoic volcanic stratigraphy, sedimentation, flooding, and landsliding for the visiting tourists, geologists, or students. (Author/DC)

  18. The Volcanic Story of the Columbia River Gorge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John Eliot

    1982-01-01

    Uses maps, diagrams, and geological accounts to describe the Columbia River Gorge which separates Oregon from Washington and exposes an unexcelled record of Cenozoic volcanic stratigraphy, sedimentation, flooding, and landsliding for the visiting tourists, geologists, or students. (Author/DC)

  19. Arts and the Perceived Quality of Life in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Kahlke, P. Maurine

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were (1) to measure the impact of arts-related activities on the perceived quality of life of a representative sample of British Columbians aged 18 years or more in the spring of 2007, and (2) to compare the findings of this study with those of a sample of 1,027 adults drawn from five B.C. communities (Comox Valley,…

  20. Arts and the Perceived Quality of Life in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalos, Alex C.; Kahlke, P. Maurine

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were (1) to measure the impact of arts-related activities on the perceived quality of life of a representative sample of British Columbians aged 18 years or more in the spring of 2007, and (2) to compare the findings of this study with those of a sample of 1,027 adults drawn from five B.C. communities (Comox Valley,…

  1. Identifying sources and biomagnification of persistent organic contaminants in biota from mountain streams of southwestern British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Christy A; Bendell-Young, Leah I; Elliott, John E

    2005-10-15

    We assessed whether biota occupying mountain streams accumulate and biomagnify remotely derived organic pollutants originating from atmospheric inputs to snowpack and glacial runoff and from marine sources introduced by migrating anadromous salmon. Several persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-dichloro-diphenyl-dichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, and trans-nonachlor were commonly detected in benthic invertebrates, salmon fry (Oncorhynchus spp.), and eggs of an aquatic passerine, the American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) from the Chilliwack River watershed, British Columbia, Canada. Total PCBs and several organochlorines (OCs) biomagnified from benthic invertebrate composites to salmon fry to dipper eggs. Invertebrate samples generally did not differ significantly in contaminant burdens between the river main stem where salmon are more abundant and higher-elevation tributaries where the salmon density is lower. Concentrations of total OCs and total PCBs in dipper eggs were positively related to drainage basin area and collection year but not to elevation. No differences in PCB congener patterns existed between dipper egg samples from the Chilliwack watershed and other watersheds in southwestern British Columbia. However, principal component analysis revealed significant spatial differences in egg PCB congener patterns between the main Chilliwack River and the higher-elevation tributaries. This difference was primarily due to a greater occurrence of lower chlorinated PCB congeners (66 and 105) in dipper eggs collected from the tributaries and higher loadings of the more stable and persistent congeners (153, 138, 130, and 128) in eggs from the river main stem. The results suggest that atmospheric sources are the main contributor of contaminants detected in biota from the region and that biomagnification is a common pathway for accumulation in lotic predators such as the American dipper.

  2. Thermochronologic constraints on mylonite and detachment fault development, Kettle Highlands, northeastern Washington and southern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, B.R.; Snee, L.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The Kettle dome, northeastern Washington and southern British Columbia, is one of several large metamorphic core complexes in the region. New Ar-40/Ar-39 cooling dates from the mylonite immediately beneath the Kettle River detachment fault at Barney's Junction, a cross-cutting mafic dike, and the youngest Eocene lavas in the Republic graben set constraints on kinematic models of the tectonic evolution of the dome and related grabens: Amphibolite--hornblende (59.0 [+-] 0.2); Pegmatite--muscovite (49.3 [+-] 0.2); Pegmatite--K-feldspar (49.2 [+-] 1); Augen gneiss--K-feldspar (48.0 [+-] 1); Mafic dike--hornblende (54.5 [+-] 0.1) and biotite (49.6 [+-] 0.1); Klondike Mt. Formation lava--feeder dike (48.8 [+-] 1). The authors interpret the dates to indicate that the tectonized amphibolite, part of a Cretaceous and older metamorphosed terrane, had formed and cooled to [approx] 500 C by Late Paleocene, the mylonite zone was being domed above the ductile zone by Early Eocene at the time of emplacement of the dike--temporally equivalent to the Keller Butte suite, Eocene Colville batholith--which crosscuts the mylonite, and incipient rifting was occurring in the Republic graben as evidenced by dike swarms. The mylonite complex reached 300 C by 49Ma coincident with the termination of Sanpoil volcanism, and then cooled rapidly to near or below 150 C by 48 Ma. At about this time, mafic Klondike Mt. lavas mark the termination of Republic graben rifting and possibly detachment faulting along the Kettle River fault.

  3. Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review • Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty or CRT) of 1964, Canada and the United States (U.S.) jointly regulate and manage the Columbia River as it flows from British Columbia into the U.S. The Treaty has provided substantial flood control and power generation benefits to both nations. The Treaty established Canadian and U.S. Entities as implementing agents for each government. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (BC Hydro) was designated as the Canadian Entity. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Division Engineer, Northwestern Division, were designated as the U.S. Entity. The Canadian and U.S. Entities are empowered by their respective governments with broad discretion to implement the existing Columbia River Treaty. They are not, however, authorized to terminate, renegotiate, or otherwise modify the Treaty. In the U.S., authority over international treaties rests with the President, assisted in foreign relations and international negotiations by the Department of State and subject in certain cases to the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. In Canada, international treaties are within the prerogative of the executive branch of the federal government. Under current policy, treaties are tabled in the House of Commons, and are subject to a waiting period before the executive branch brings the treaty into effect. In the case of the Columbia River Treaty, Canada has assigned certain rights and obligations relating to the Treaty to British Columbia pursuant to the Canada-B.C. Agreement. The Phase 1 report is provided to those respective governmental bodies to support possible independent and/or joint decisions that may be made with respect to the future of the Treaty. The Treaty contains two important provisions that take effect on and after September 16, 2024, that could impact the current power and flood control benefits: 1. Canadian flood control obligations automatically change from a pre

  4. The quick and the dead: "managing" inpatient care in British Columbia hospitals, 1969-1995/96.

    PubMed Central

    McGrail, K M; Evans, R G; Barer, M L; Sheps, S B; Hertzman, C; Kazanjian, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in hospital use in British Columbia during a decade of capacity reductions. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The data used are all separation records for British Columbia hospitals for the years 1969, 1978, 1985/86, 1993/94, and 1995/96. Separation records include acute care, rehabilitation, extended care, and surgical day care hospital encounters in British Columbia that were concluded during the years of interest. STUDY DESIGN: Analyses were based on per capita use of services for five-year age groups of the population to ages 90+; the emphasis was on looking at changes in the use of specific types of hospital services over the 26 years of study, with a particular focus on the most recent decade. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Data were extracted from hospital separations files owned by the British Columbia Ministry of Health and housed at the Centre for Health Services and Policy Research. All separation records for the years of interest were included in the study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acute care use continued to fall over the last decade. The rate of decline increased during the last time period of study and affected seniors to the same degree as younger patients. At the same time, use of extended care decreased, compared to steady increases in earlier years. The result was that by 1995/96 nearly 40 percent of inpatient days were used by people who died in hospital, compared to 9 percent in 1969. These people, however, still represent a small proportion of separations. CONCLUSIONS: The "bed blocker" problem common to many hospital systems appears to have been largely alleviated in British Columbia over the decade 1985-95. The concurrent decrease in extended care use, however, makes it difficult to say where and how these people are now being cared for. Care for the dying has become a bigger issue for hospitals, but whether this is because of heroic interventions at the end of life is not clear. A "top-down," capacity

  5. Data Compendium for the Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Huesties, L.R.; Maughan, A.D.; Miley, T.B.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-04-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). The CRCIA is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the CRCIA is to evaluate the current human and ecological risk from the Columbia River attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. Human risk will be addressed for radioactive and hazardous materials over a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The initial effort for the CRCIA is the development of a compendium of existing data on Columbia River contamination. This document provides the data compendium. It also includes a discussion of data sources, descriptions of the physical format of the data, and descriptions of the search process used to identify data.

  6. USGS Activities at Lake Roosevelt and the Upper Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Cynthia; Turney, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Roosevelt (Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake) is the impoundment of the upper Columbia River behind Grand Coulee Dam, and is the largest reservoir within the Bureau of Reclamation's Columbia Basin Project (CBP). The reservoir is located in northeastern Washington, and stretches 151 miles from Grand Coulee Dam north to the Canadian border. The 15-20 miles of the Columbia River downstream of the border are riverine and are under small backwater effects from the dam. Grand Coulee Dam is located on the mainstem of the Columbia River about 90 miles northwest of Spokane. Since the late 1980s, trace-element contamination has been known to be widely present in Lake Roosevelt. Trace elements of concern include arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc. Contaminated sediment carried by the Columbia River is the primary source of the widespread occurrence of trace-element enrichment present in Lake Roosevelt. In 2001, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a preliminary assessment of environmental contamination of the Lake Roosevelt area (also referred to as Upper Columbia River, UCR site, or UCR/LR site) and has subsequently begun remedial investigations of the UCR site.

  7. What lies below the Columbia River Basalt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidel, S.; Kauffman, J.; Garwood, D.; Bush, J.

    2006-12-01

    More than 200,000 sq km of the Pacific Northwest are covered by the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRB). The lavas were erupted onto a complex structural setting dominated by cratonic rocks, and accreted terranes at a convergent plate margin. Few boreholes penetrate the basalt so the sub-basalt structure must be deduced from geophysical data, the surrounding area and structures within the basalt. In Oregon (OR) and Idaho (ID) the eastern edge of the basalt follows the boundary between the craton and accreted terranes but the suture zone becomes lost beneath the basalt in eastern WA. In northern OR and Washington (WA), a thick basalt sequence in the western part of the province overlies an early Tertiary basin with kms of sediment fill which, in turn, overlies accreted terranes. In eastern WA and western ID, a much thinner basalt sequence overlies cratonic and accreted terrane rocks without thick intervening Tertiary sediments. This basin began in the Eocene and continued into the present; the sediment now controls the location of the Yakima fold belt (YFB). Prior to basalt eruptions, a rugged mountainous terrane existed in eastern WA and ID that probably extended to the west. NW faults and folds (e.g. the Orofino fault zone ID, and Chiwaukum graben and White River-Naches River fault zone, Cascade Range) dominate the prebasalt rocks and must extend under the basalt. Remanents of this NW trend are present in YFB (e.g. Rattlesnake-Wallula fault zone) but these are less prominent than the large basalt anticlinal folds that are decoupled from the basement. CRB dikes have a NW to N trend and are thought to reflect a basement structural weakness. In the basalt province many folds and faults follow this dike trend. Major NE trending faults in the basalts do not have major counterparts beyond the basalt. One fault, the Hite Fault, must form a significant sub-basalt boundary. Dikes to the east of the Hite fault trend N-N20W whereas dikes to the west trend N40-50W

  8. Rates, controls, and sand-body geometries of transgressive-regressive cycles: Cretaceous Moosebar and Gates formations, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, D.

    1986-05-01

    The Moosebar and Gates Formations (Lower Cretaceous) in northeastern British Columbia consist of seven transgressive-regressive sequences. Nonmarine sediments are thickest in the south and pinch out northward. The sequences are laterally persistent, extending east from the foothills for 240 km 9150 mi). The orientation of maximum transgressive and regressive limits in five cycles occurs within an east-west-trending zone 30-40 km (19-25 mi) wide. A recurring, northward-bulging sediments depocenter near the Alberta-British Columbia border was fed by a series of stacked, northerly flowing rivers. The rivers were a major source of sediment for gravel beaches to the north and east. Isopach maps of marine sandstone and conglomerate show a series of west-northwest-east-southeast-oriented sand bodies 60-70 km (37-43 mi) wide, parallel with the shorelines. Each coastline prograded northward as a shoreline-attached strand plain and a series of arcuate or cuspate deltas. Gates Formation marine-nonmarine cyclicity is a series of fourth-order cycles superimposed on a major third-order cycle. The cyclicity and lateral extent of the sequences can be explained as a result of tectonic thrusting and loading superimposed on the trend of the Peace River arch. The influence of eustatic sea level variations and sedimentologic switching of point sources had minimal effect. Coastal retreat ranged from 437 to 875 m/1000 years (1433 to 2780 ft/1000 years). Coastal progradation ranged from 218 to 437 m/1000 years (175 to 1433 ft/1000 years). The duration of several transgressive-regressive cycles was 103,000-275,000 years. 20 figures, 2 tables.

  9. An audit of pain management following pediatric day surgery at British Columbia Children’s Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Serena; Lim, Joanne; Page, Trish; Lamb, Elizabeth; Gow, Jennifer; Ansermino, J Mark; Lauder, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    A prospective audit of 225 children was conducted to evaluate current pain management strategies both in-hospital and at home following day surgery at British Columbia Children’s Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia). Anesthetic, postanesthetic care unit and surgical day care unit records were collected to generate in-hospital data. A telephone questionnaire was administered 48 h postdischarge for at home data. Pain reports and scores were significantly higher (P<0.01) at home compared with in-hospital. Children undergoing certain procedures were more likely to experience significant pain. Although good pain control was commonly achieved after surgery, improvements may be possible by increasing the use of multimodal analgesia, providing standardized written discharge instructions and using surgery-specific pediatric analgesia guidelines. PMID:23061083

  10. Creating a safety culture at the Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, Katrina N; Taylor, Annemarie; Northway, Tracie L; Hudson, Denise G; Van Stolk, Dori E; Shearer, Kim J; McDougall, Debbie L; Miller, Georgene

    2007-02-01

    The Children's' and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia (C&W) is the largest hospital providing specialized care to women and children across the province of British Columbia in Canada. The values of quality and safety are threaded throughout the C&W strategic plan which emphasizes that safety is vital for better health. At C&W, a multifaceted approach is used to create and sustain a culture of safety. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has developed tools to facilitate the development of safety cultures within hospital settings. This article describes the implementation of some of these tools, such as the Safety Briefings Model and Patient Safety Leadership Walkrounds. We will discuss how we adapted these strategies to our pediatric settings; what we learned through the implementation process-our successes and challenges; and implications for future success.

  11. 40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

    PubMed

    McLean, David I; Phillips, Norm; Zhou, Youwen; Gallagher, Richard; Lee, Tim K

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage. To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period. Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003. Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM. The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented. The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.

  12. Mercury and other trace elements in farmed and wild salmon from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Barry C; Ikonomou, Michael G; Higgs, David A; Oakes, Janice; Dubetz, Cory

    2008-06-01

    The present study reports measured levels of Hg and other trace elements in commercial salmon feed; farmed Atlantic, coho, and chinook salmon (n = 110); and wild coho, chinook, chum, sockeye, and pink salmon (n = 91). Metal concentrations in farmed and wild salmon from British Columbia, Canada, were relatively low and below human health consumption guidelines. Methylmercury in all salmon samples (range, 0.03-0.1 microg/g wet wt) were below the 0.5 microg/g guideline set by Health Canada. Negligible differences in metal concentrations were observed between the various species of farmed and wild salmon. Metal concentrations generally were higher in commercial salmon feed compared to farmed salmon. Mercury showed slight bioaccumulation potential in farmed salmon, with biomagnification factors (BMFs) ranging between 0.8 and 1.9. Other metals, such as Cd, Pb, and Ni, exhibited biodilution, with BMFs of much less than one. The relatively low degree of biomagnification of metals observed in farmed salmon likely resulted from the combination of low gastrointestinal absorption efficiency, negligible transfer to muscle tissue relative to other compartments, and a high degree of growth dilution in these fish. Human dietary exposure calculations indicate intakes of Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu, As, and Ni via farmed and wild British Columbia salmon are a relatively small percentage of total intakes (0.05-32%) compared to other Canadian foodstuffs, such as fruits, vegetables, chicken, and beef (68-99%). Although total dietary exposure of Cd, Pb, and Cu approached provisional tolerable daily intake levels, the contribution from British Columbia salmon was less than 2%. Our findings indicate farmed and wild British Columbia salmon remain a safe source of omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acid intake for cardioprotective and, possibly, other health benefits.

  13. Geology of the Redcap Mountain area, Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Redcap Mountain area lies within the Coast Plutonic Complex about 60 km northeast of Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Detailed geologic investigations in this area provide information on the protolith of the Central Gneiss Complex, the conditions and timing of metamorphism and deformation, and the timing of plutonism. These results have significant implications for the tectonic history of this part of the Coast Plutonic Complex.

  14. Descriptive epidemiology of marine anemia in seapen-reared salmon in southern British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Stephen, C; Ribble, C S; Kent, M L

    1996-07-01

    Marine anemia, also known as plasmacytoid leukemia, is a recently described disease of farmed Pacific salmon in British Columbia. Most of what is known about the disease has been generated through laboratory studies or field investigations of severely affected farms. The goals of this study were to determine the range of the spatial and temporal distribution of naturally occurring marine anemia, identify potential risk factors, and provide an initial description of the impact of the disease on commercial salmon farms in British Columbia. Data were obtained from mail surveys, farm visits, and reviews of clinical and laboratory records. An attempt was made to evaluate negative, as well as mildly, moderately, and severely affected sites. The results showed marine anemia to be widely distributed throughout the major salmon farming regions in British Columbia. The disease was most commonly diagnosed in August and September, when water temperatures were at their seasonal peaks. A wide variety of lineage's and fish sources were associated with the disease. The average mortality rate attributed to marine anemia was 6% (range 2.5% to 11%). The peak occurrence of the disease was associated with a peak in the occurrence of other infectious and inflammatory diseases. The broad demographic distribution of marine anemia, coupled with its endemic nature, indicated that the disease is unlikely to be due to the recent introduction of a new pathogen and that causal factors are widespread in southern British Columbia. It is concluded that the significance of diagnosing marine anemia is not that it is predictive of an impending epidemic of mortality, but that it is an indicator of the general pattern of disease on a farm.

  15. Organic parasite control for poultry and rabbits in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plants used for treating endo- and ectoparasites of rabbits and poultry in British Columbia included Arctium lappa (burdock), Artemisia sp. (wormwood), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum (opium poppy), Rubus spp. (blackberry and raspberry relatives), Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion), Thuja plicata (western redcedar) and Urtica dioica (stinging nettle). PMID:21756341

  16. Organic parasite control for poultry and rabbits in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy

    2011-07-14

    Plants used for treating endo- and ectoparasites of rabbits and poultry in British Columbia included Arctium lappa (burdock), Artemisia sp. (wormwood), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum (opium poppy), Rubus spp. (blackberry and raspberry relatives), Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion), Thuja plicata (western redcedar) and Urtica dioica (stinging nettle).

  17. Breeding biology of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba) in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Lorraine A. Andrusiak; K. M. Cheng

    1997-01-01

    Breeding of the Barn Owl was studied from 1990-1992 in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, the northern limit of the species' North American range. Over 3 years, mean clutch size was 6.5 ± 3.5, mean brood size at time of banding was 3.3 ± 2.0, and mean number of nestlings fledged was 2.6 ± 2.1. Clutch size ranged from 2 to 18 eggs....

  18. Isolation of Sphaerophorus necrophorus from Bovine Hepatic Abscesses in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Simon, P. C.; Stovell, P. L.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the predominant microflora in hepatic abscesses of cattle slaughtered in British Columbia. Samples of approximately 400 livers were examined by direct smear and culture. Sphaerophorus necrophorus was present in 97% of the 431 abscesses and in 67% it was present in pure culture. In 30% it was present in combination with other organisms such as coryne-bacterium and streptococcus. PMID:4253458

  19. View of Rocky Mountains area of British Columbia and Alberta, Canada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-07-24

    AST-19-1570 (24 July 1975) --- An oblique view of the Rocky Mountains area of British Columbia and Alberta in Canada, as photographed from the Apollo spacecraft in Earth orbit during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. This picture was taken at an altitude of 222 kilometers (138 statute miles) with a 70mm Hasselblad camera using medium-speed Ektachrome QX-807 type film.

  20. Characterization of active faulting beneath the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cassidy, J.F.; Rogers, Gary C.; Waldhauser, F.

    2000-01-01

    Southwestern British Columbia and northwestern Washington State are subject to megathrust earthquakes, deep intraslab events, and earthquakes in the continental crust. Of the three types of earthquakes, the most poorly understood are the crustal events. Despite a high level of seismicity, there is no obvious correlation between the historical crustal earthquakes and the mapped surface faults of the region. On 24 June 1997, a ML = 4.6 earthquake occurred 3-4 km beneath the Strait of Georgia, 30 km to the west of Vancouver, British Columbia. This well-recorded earthquake was preceded by 11 days by a felt foreshock (ML = 3.4) and was followed by numerous small aftershocks. This earthquake sequence occurred in one of the few regions of persistent shallow seismic activity in southwestern British Columbia, thus providing an ideal opportunity to attempt to characterize an active near-surface fault. We have computed focal mechanisms and utilized a waveform cross-correlation and joint hypocentral determination routine to obtain accurate relative hypocenters of the mainshock, foreshock, and 53 small aftershocks in an attempt to image the active fault and the extent of rupture associated with this earthquake sequence. Both P-nodal and CMT focal mechanisms show thrust faulting for the mainshock and the foreshock. The relocated hypocenters delineate a north-dipping plane at 2-4 km depth, dipping at 53??, in good agreement with the focal mechanism nodal plane dipping to the north at 47??. The rupture area is estimated to be a 1.3-km-diameter circular area, comparable to that estimated using a Brune rupture model with the estimated seismic moment of 3.17 ?? 1015 N m and the stress drop of 45 bars. The temporal sequence indicates a downdip migration of the seismicity along the fault plane. The results of this study provide the first unambiguous evidence for the orientation and sense of motion for active faulting in the Georgia Strait area of British Columbia.

  1. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  2. Going coastal: Shared evolutionary history between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves (canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckworth, B.V.; Dawson, N.G.; Talbot, S.L.; Flamme, M.J.; Cook, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many coastal species occupying the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest in North America comprise endemic populations genetically and ecologically distinct from interior continental conspecifics. Morphological variation previously identified among wolf populations resulted in recognition of multiple subspecies of wolves in the Pacific Northwest. Recently, separate genetic studies have identified diverged populations of wolves in coastal British Columbia and coastal Southeast Alaska, providing support for hypotheses of distinct coastal subspecies. These two regions are geographically and ecologically contiguous, however, there is no comprehensive analysis across all wolf populations in this coastal rainforest. Methodology/Principal Findings: By combining mitochondrial DNA datasets from throughout the Pacific Northwest, we examined the genetic relationship between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolf populations and compared them with adjacent continental populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates complete overlap in the genetic diversity of coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves, but these populations are distinct from interior continental wolves. Analyses of molecular variation support the separation of all coastal wolves in a group divergent from continental populations, as predicted based on hypothesized subspecies designations. Two novel haplotypes also were uncovered in a newly assayed continental population of interior Alaska wolves. Conclusions/Significance: We found evidence that coastal wolves endemic to these temperate rainforests are diverged from neighbouring, interior continental wolves; a finding that necessitates new international strategies associated with the management of this species. ?? 2011 This is an open-access article.

  3. Going coastal: shared evolutionary history between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Weckworth, Byron V; Dawson, Natalie G; Talbot, Sandra L; Flamme, Melanie J; Cook, Joseph A

    2011-05-04

    Many coastal species occupying the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest in North America comprise endemic populations genetically and ecologically distinct from interior continental conspecifics. Morphological variation previously identified among wolf populations resulted in recognition of multiple subspecies of wolves in the Pacific Northwest. Recently, separate genetic studies have identified diverged populations of wolves in coastal British Columbia and coastal Southeast Alaska, providing support for hypotheses of distinct coastal subspecies. These two regions are geographically and ecologically contiguous, however, there is no comprehensive analysis across all wolf populations in this coastal rainforest. By combining mitochondrial DNA datasets from throughout the Pacific Northwest, we examined the genetic relationship between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolf populations and compared them with adjacent continental populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates complete overlap in the genetic diversity of coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves, but these populations are distinct from interior continental wolves. Analyses of molecular variation support the separation of all coastal wolves in a group divergent from continental populations, as predicted based on hypothesized subspecies designations. Two novel haplotypes also were uncovered in a newly assayed continental population of interior Alaska wolves. We found evidence that coastal wolves endemic to these temperate rainforests are diverged from neighbouring, interior continental wolves; a finding that necessitates new international strategies associated with the management of this species.

  4. Competency Development to Support Safe Nurse Practitioner Prescribing of Controlled Drugs and Substances in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Alison; Klein, Tracy; Daly, Chris

    2016-08-01

    In 2012, Canada passed legislation giving nurse practitioners (NPs) authority to prescribe controlled drugs and substances. Steps toward safe implementation by the nursing regulatory body in British Columbia included development of controlled drugs and substances prescribing competencies for use in educating and authorizing NPs for this new scope. In this article, we discuss the development and refinement of the competencies, specifically their application to nursing regulation in British Columbia. Methods include incorporation of the Competency Outcome Performance Assessment Model as a guiding theoretical framework. Over two meetings in 2014, a small representative panel of health professionals completed face and content validation of 17 initial competencies using a visual Likert-type scale ranking process (1-5, unnecessary to essential) with Google Docs for real-time comparative refinement. The resulting 10 competency statements provide the foundation for outcome indicator development which will be used in NP education and the regulatory body's regulation and remediation processes. Finally, we describe the policy process applied to implement competencies for NP controlled drugs and substances prescribing and the subsequent challenges of implementation of controlled drugs and substances authority in British Columbia. The article concludes with an overview of lessons learned that may be beneficial to health professions regulatory bodies introducing or expanding prescribing scope for NPs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Going Coastal: Shared Evolutionary History between Coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska Wolves (Canis lupus)

    PubMed Central

    Weckworth, Byron V.; Dawson, Natalie G.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Flamme, Melanie J.; Cook, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Many coastal species occupying the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest in North America comprise endemic populations genetically and ecologically distinct from interior continental conspecifics. Morphological variation previously identified among wolf populations resulted in recognition of multiple subspecies of wolves in the Pacific Northwest. Recently, separate genetic studies have identified diverged populations of wolves in coastal British Columbia and coastal Southeast Alaska, providing support for hypotheses of distinct coastal subspecies. These two regions are geographically and ecologically contiguous, however, there is no comprehensive analysis across all wolf populations in this coastal rainforest. Methodology/Principal Findings By combining mitochondrial DNA datasets from throughout the Pacific Northwest, we examined the genetic relationship between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolf populations and compared them with adjacent continental populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates complete overlap in the genetic diversity of coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves, but these populations are distinct from interior continental wolves. Analyses of molecular variation support the separation of all coastal wolves in a group divergent from continental populations, as predicted based on hypothesized subspecies designations. Two novel haplotypes also were uncovered in a newly assayed continental population of interior Alaska wolves. Conclusions/Significance We found evidence that coastal wolves endemic to these temperate rainforests are diverged from neighbouring, interior continental wolves; a finding that necessitates new international strategies associated with the management of this species. PMID:21573241

  6. The Evolving Landscape of the Columbia River Gorge: Lewis and Clark and Cataclysms on the Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, James E.

    2004-01-01

    TAVELERS RETRACING LEWIS AND CLARKE JOURNEY to the Pacific over the past two hundred years have witnessed tre mendous change to the Columbia River Gorge and its pri mary feature, the Columbia River. Dams, reservoirs, timber harvest, altered fisheries, transportation infrastructure, and growth and shrinkage of communities have transformed the river and valley.1 This radically different geography of human use and habitation is commonly contrasted with the sometimes romantic view of a prior time provided both by early nineteenth-century chroniclers and present-day critics of the modern condition ? an ecotopia of plentiful and perpetual resources sustaining a stable culture from time immemorial. Reality is more com plicated. Certainly the human-caused changes to the Columbia River and the gorge since Lewis and Clark have been profound; but the geologic his tory of immense floods, landslides, and volcanic eruptions that occurred before their journey had equally, if not more, acute effects on landscapes and societies of the gorge. In many ways, the Lewis and Clark Expedi tion can be viewed as a hinge point for the Columbia River, the changes engineered to the river and its valley in the two hundred years since their visit mirrored by tremendous changes geologically engendered in the thousands of years before. 

  7. The Evolving Landscape of the Columbia River Gorge: Lewis and Clark and Cataclysms on the Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Travelers reacting Lewis and Clark's journey to the Pacific over the past two hundred years have witnessed tremendous change to the Columbia River Gorge and its primary feature, the Columbia River. Dams, reservoirs, timer harvest, altered fisheries, transportation infrastructure, and growth and shrinkage of communities have transformed the river and valley. This radically different geography of human use and habitation is  commonly contrasted with the sometimes romantic view of a prior time provided both by early nineteenth-century chronicle and present day critics of the modern condition - an ectopia of plentiful and perpetual resources sustaining a stable culture from time immemorial. Reality is more complicated. Certainly the human-caused changes to the Columbia River and the gorge since Lewis and Clark have been profound; by the geologic history of immense floods, landslides, and volcanic eruptions that occurred before the journey had equally, if not more, acute effects on landscapes and societies of the gorge. In many ways, the Lewis and Clark Expidition can be viewed as a hinge point for the Columbia River, the changes engineered to the river and its valley in the two hundred years since their visit mirrored by tremendous cchanges geologically engendered in the thousands of years before. 

  8. Quantifying non-indigenous species in accumulated ballast slurry residuals (swish) arriving at Vancouver, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, T. F.; Levings, C. D.

    2013-08-01

    Ballast tank “swish” samples were collected from ships following their arrival at Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) after undergoing either a trans-oceanic or a Pacific-coastal voyage. The ballast swish consisted of a residual slurry mixture of sediment and water that remained trapped in ballast tanks following water discharge at port. The ballast tanks of 27 ships were sampled and ballast swish was found on 19 of the 27 ships. These ships were categorized according to ballast water management type: (1) Trans-oceanic = 7 trans-oceanic ships undergoing ballast water exchange (BWE) > 200 nm from shore; (2) Coastal-exchange = 7 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports south of Cape Blanco, Oregon undergoing coastal exchange > 50 nm from shore south of Cape Blanco; and (3) Coastal-no-exchange = 5 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports north of Cape Blanco, Oregon, without undergoing BWE. Invertebrate abundance and taxa richness were directly correlated with ballast-swish turbidity suggesting that highly-productive coastal source waters and ballast tank retention processes contributed to this trend. In turn, invertebrate taxa diversity increased with increasing invertebrate abundance. A Principal Component Analysis of the trans-oceanic data revealed that length of voyage showed a strong inverse relationship with invertebrate abundance for this category. Within the coastal-exchange voyage category, voyage length and ballast water age tended to be of the same magnitude and were directly correlated with both crustacean and nematode taxa. Finally, the coastal-no-exchange PCA results revealed that voyage length and salinity were inversely related due to the high number of river ports located at the southern border of the regulatory BWE exemption zone. Coastal voyages not undergoing BWE and undertaking a direct river-to-river route should be considered risky for the introduction of non-indigenous species, if the source waters contain potentially invasive species

  9. Impacts of a changing winter precipitation regime on the Great Snowforest of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsvig, H.; Dery, S. J.; Coxson, D.

    2012-12-01

    Rising air temperatures have profoundly impacted British Columbia (BC) mountain ecosystems, including its Interior Wetbelt. This region supports the sole Interior Temperate Rainforest (ITR), or perhaps more appropriately "snowforest", of North America. This snowforest encompasses about 30,500 km2 and contains Western redcedar (Thuja plicata) and western hemlock (Tsuga heteropylla) in excess of 1500 years old. This region is projected to be one of the more vulnerable biogeoclimatic zones in BC due to forest operations and climate change. Loss of snow as a storage medium has the potential to negatively affect the forest. A decrease in snow water equivalent (SWE) has the potential to decrease soil moisture values; impacts of decreased water availability in this region have the possibility to affect soil moisture storage, vegetative species composition, flora and fauna interdependence, and pathogen outbreaks. Given the projected climate change in high latitude and altitude areas, this project analyzes the contemporary and potential future climate of BC's Interior Wetbelt and explores the possible environmental and ecohydrological impacts of climate change on the snowforest. Models project an increase in air temperature and precipitation but a decrease in snowfall in this region. Analyses of the snow depth, SWE, and temperature from the Upper Fraser River Basin automated snow pillow sites of the BC River Forecast Centre (RFC) were conducted; snow depth, SWE, and temperature were also measured at the field site via automated weather stations and bi-monthly snow surveys. Surveys recorded depth and SWE after observed peak accumulation and continued until snowpack was depleted in 80% of the field site. To determine the influence of precipitation on the soil moisture levels in the ITR, soil moisture and water table levels were measured for the 2011-12 water year in addition to meteorological conditions; snow, spring water, and near surface ground water samples were collected

  10. Propagule pressure and stream characteristics influence introgression: Cutthroat and rainbow trout in British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, S.N.; Olson, J.R.; Kershner, J.L.; Corbett, P.

    2010-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression between introduced and native salmonids threaten the continued persistence of many inland cutthroat trout species. Environmental models have been developed to predict the spread of introgression, but few studies have assessed the role of propagule pressure. We used an extensive set of fish stocking records and geographic information system (GIS) data to produce a spatially explicit index of potential propagule pressure exerted by introduced rainbow trout in the Upper Kootenay River, British Columbia, Canada. We then used logistic regression and the information-theoretic approach to test the ability of a set of environmental and spatial variables to predict the level of introgression between native westslope cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout. Introgression was assessed using between four and seven co-dominant, diagnostic nuclear markers at 45 sites in 31 different streams. The best model for predicting introgression included our GIS propagule pressure index and an environmental variable that accounted for the biogeoclimatic zone of the site (r2 = 0.62). This model was 1.4 times more likely to explain introgression than the next-best model, which consisted of only the propagule pressure index variable. We created a composite model based on the model-averaged results of the seven top models that included environmental, spatial, and propagule pressure variables. The propagule pressure index had the highest importance weight (0.995) of all variables tested and was negatively related to sites with no introgression. This study used an index of propagule pressure and demonstrated that propagule pressure had the greatest influence on the level of introgression between a native and introduced trout in a human-induced hybrid zone. ?? 2010 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Propagule pressure and stream characteristics influence introgression: cutthroat and rainbow trout in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Stephen N; Olson, John R; Kershner, Jeffrey L; Corbett, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression between introduced and native salmonids threaten the continued persistence of many inland cutthroat trout species. Environmental models have been developed to predict the spread of introgression, but few studies have assessed the role of propagule pressure. We used an extensive set of fish Stocking records and geographic information system (GIS) data to produce a spatially explicit index of potential propagule pressure exerted by introduced rainbow trout in the Upper Kootenay River, British Columbia, Canada. We then used logistic regression and the information-theoretic approach to test the ability of a set of environmental and spatial variables to predict the level of introgression between native westslope cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout. Introgression was assessed using between four and seven co-dominant, diagnostic nuclear markers at 45 sites in 31 different streams. The best model for predicting introgression included our GIS propagule pressure index and an environmental variable that accounted for the biogeoclimatic zone of the site (r2=0.62). This model was 1.4 times more likely to explain introgression than the next-best model, which consisted of only the propagule pressure index variable. We created a composite model based on the model-averaged results of the seven top models that included environmental, spatial, and propagule pressure variables. The propagule pressure index had the highest importance weight (0.995) of all variables tested and was negatively related to sites with no introgression. This study used an index of propagule pressure and demonstrated that propagule pressure had the greatest influence on the level of introgression between a native and introduced trout in a human-induced hybrid zone.

  12. Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

  13. Fish tapeworm infections (diphyllobothriasis) in Canada, particularly British Columbia.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Although the risk of diphyllobothriasis is generally low in Canada, fish tapeworm infections seem to have become more frequent in recent years. This increase is probably a consequence of the growing popularity of raw or inadequately cooked ethnic fish dishes or of a preference for lightly cooked fish, especially salmon. Only freshwater fish become infected with the larvae, but not everyone may realize that salmon can acquire the parasites before they leave their native lakes and rivers for the sea. If fish known to be sources of the tapeworms are to be eaten raw they should first be well frozen or salted to kill the larvae. Physicians should regard fish tapeworm infection as a notifiable disease. In Canada niclosamide, the drug of choice, is available from the manufacturer on a patient-by-patient basis. PMID:6713334

  14. Fish tapeworm infections (diphyllobothriasis) in Canada, particularly British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Ching, H L

    1984-05-01

    Although the risk of diphyllobothriasis is generally low in Canada, fish tapeworm infections seem to have become more frequent in recent years. This increase is probably a consequence of the growing popularity of raw or inadequately cooked ethnic fish dishes or of a preference for lightly cooked fish, especially salmon. Only freshwater fish become infected with the larvae, but not everyone may realize that salmon can acquire the parasites before they leave their native lakes and rivers for the sea. If fish known to be sources of the tapeworms are to be eaten raw they should first be well frozen or salted to kill the larvae. Physicians should regard fish tapeworm infection as a notifiable disease. In Canada niclosamide, the drug of choice, is available from the manufacturer on a patient-by-patient basis.

  15. Puget Sound, Seattle, WA, USA, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-20

    STS047-151-488 (12 - 20 Sept 1992) --- In this large format camera image, the forested Cascade Range appears along the left side; the Pacific Ocean, on the right. The frame was photographed as the Space Shuttle Endeavour flew north to south over Vancouver and Seattle. Many peaks in the Cascades reach altitudes greater than 9,000 feet and remain snowcapped even in mid-summer. The Strait of Juan de Fuca separates the Olympic Peninsula (top right) from Vancouver Island (bottom right). Snowcapped Mt. Olympus (7,965 feet) is one of the wettest places in the continental United States, with rainfall in excess of 120 inches per year. The port cities of Seattle and Tacoma occupy the heavily indented coastline of Puget Sound (top center). They appear as light-colored areas on the left side of the Sound. The angular street pattern of Tacoma is visible at the top of the picture. The international boundary between Canada and the United States of America runs across the middle of the view. The city of Victoria (center) is the light patch on the tip of Vancouver Island. Canada's Fraser River Delta provides flat topography on which the cities of Vancouver, Burnaby, and New Westminster were built. These cities appear as the light-colored area just left of center. The Fraser River can be seen snaking its way out of the mountains at the apex of the delta. Numerous ski resorts dot the slopes of the mountains (bottom left) that rise immediately to the north of Vancouver. In the same area the blue water of Harrison and other, smaller lakes fills some of the valleys that were excavated by glaciers in the "recent" geological past, according to NASA scientists studying the photography. A Linhof camera was used to expose the frame.

  16. Ambient nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations over a region of natural gas production, Northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S. M. Nazrul; Jackson, Peter L.; Aherne, Julian

    2016-10-01

    The Peace River district of Northeastern British Columbia, Canada is a region of natural gas production that has undergone rapid expansion since 2005. In order to assess air quality implications, Willems badge passive diffusive samplers were deployed for six two-week exposure periods between August and November 2013, at 24 sites across the region to assess the ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The highest concentrations of both species (NO2: 9.1 ppb, SO2: 1.91 ppb) during the whole study period (except the 1st exposure period), were observed in Taylor (Site 14), which is consistent with its location near major industrial sources. Emissions from industrial activities, and their interaction with meteorology and topography, result in variations in atmospheric dispersion that can increase air pollution concentrations in Taylor. However, relatively high concentrations of NO2 were also observed near the center of Chetwynd (site F20), indicating the importance of urban emissions sources in the region as well. Observations of both species from the other study sites document the spatial variability and show relatively high concentrations near Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, where unconventional oil and gas development activities are quite high. Although a few sites in Northeastern British Columbia recorded elevated concentrations of NO2 and SO2 during this investigation, the concentrations over the three-month period were well below provincial annual ambient air quality objectives. Nonetheless, given the limited observations in the region, and the accelerated importance of unconventional oil and gas extraction in meeting energy demands, it is imperative that monitoring networks are established to further assess the potential for elevated ambient concentrations associated with industrial emissions sources in the Peace River region.

  17. The return on the blueback salmon to the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Frederick S.

    1948-01-01

    THE year 1941 was a crucial one for the blueback salmon of the Columbia River. During that year, one brood came closer to extinction than was realized by more than a few individuals. The immediate causes were not overfishing, hydroelectric power development, or irrigation—although these factors continued to exert their long-standing effects. The direct causes can be attributed to an “act of God” plus—in large measure--lack of knowledge concerning the basic principles of effective artificial propagation. With the security and assurance provided by subsequent developments, those concerned with the Columbia River blueback salmon may be interested in a brief recapitulation of events that transpired during the early 1940s. This particular piece of fishery history bears upon the problems of the immediate future on the Columbia River.

  18. Polybrominated diphenyl ether trends in eggs of marine and freshwater birds from British Columbia, Canada, 1979-2002.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John E; Wilson, Laurie K; Wakeford, Bryan

    2005-08-01

    Temporal, spatial, and interspecific trends in polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants were determined in eggs of marine and freshwater bird species from the province of British Columbia, Canada. Temporal trends in the Fraser River estuary, 1983-2002, were examined by analysis of eggs of great blue herons (Ardea herodias) and from the Strait of Georgia marine ecosystem, 1979-2002, in eggs of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). Results were compared to those from eggs of the osprey (Pandion haliaetus) taken along the lower Fraser River and along the Columbia River near Castlegar, British Columbia, and of a pelagic seabird, the Leach's storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), collected at a colony on the Queen Charlotte Islands. Mean concentration of sigmaPBDE, 455 microg/kg w.w., were highest in heron eggs collected in 2002 from the Fraser estuary. Concentrations in eggs of cormorants and ospreys taken from sites of varying urban influence tended to be about half that value. Leach's storm petrel eggs had only trace amounts of sigmaPBDE (3.38 microg/kg), despite having similar concentrations of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides to the other species. PBDEs increased exponentially with a doubling time of 5.7 years in eggs of both herons and cormorants. Over this period of increasing PBDEs, major chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as PCBs and DDE, were stable or decreased. The PBDE pattern was relatively consistent in most years and sites, with BDEs 47 > 100 > 99 > 153 > 154 > 28 > 183. This was interpreted as evidence of technical pentaBDE formulations as primary sources of the contamination, with the octaBDE formulations as secondary. Higher resolution analysis of a subsample of the eggs revealed the presence of up to nine other congeners, including BDE209 (range: 0.9-1.8 microg/kg), indicating exposure and uptake of decaBDE sourced congeners in North American foodchains. At some locations, concentrations of pentabrominated congeners and

  19. Sediments from the lower columbia river and origin of graywacke.

    PubMed

    Whetten, J T

    1966-05-20

    The mineral and chemical composition of sediments deposited in the three lowermost reservoirs of the Columbia River is remarkably similar to the composition of many graywackes. Lithic fragments are abundant. In comparison with an "average" sandstone, the sediments have low concentrations of silica and high concentrations of all other major constituents, except calcium. Sodium is more abundant than potassium. The sediments are generally better sorted than graywackes. If graywacke texture is post-depositional in origin, Columbia River-type sediments could be expected to form graywackes upon deep burial without any significant addition or removal of material.

  20. Debris flow hazards and risks on Cheekye Fan, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, M.

    2009-04-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments hinge fundamentally on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e. several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the F-M model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable frequency-magnitude relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million cubic metres in volume are unlikely to reach Cheekye fan due to limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan, significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. As a second step in the analysis, we model the design debris flow using a two-dimensional debris flow runout model

  1. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data in southwestern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sheri; Dosso, Stan E.; Cassidy, John F.

    2010-11-01

    ) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in Canada, to study the ability to recover an accurate VS profile in relatively deep and shallow geological settings on the Fraser River delta in Greater Vancouver and in Victoria, respectively. A well-resolved VS profile to at least 110 m depth is determined at the Fraser River delta site for a power-law gradient parametrization. At the Victoria site, a layer with low VS and a weak linear gradient is indicated to 15-18 m depth, above much higher velocity material. Invasive VS measurements from seismic cone penetration testing and/or surface-to-downhole methods are used to assess the reliability of the Bayesian microtremor inversion results, with excellent agreement obtained at both sites.

  2. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  3. Effects of Columbia River water on early life-stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus).

    PubMed

    Tompsett, Amber R; Vardy, David W; Higley, Eric; Doering, Jon A; Allan, Marcie; Liber, Karsten; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-03-01

    The white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population that resides in the Columbia River in British Columbia (BC), Canada, has suffered recruitment failures for more than three decades. During the summers of 2008 and 2009, studies were performed to determine whether exposure to water downstream of a metal smelter in Trail, BC affected survival or growth of early life-stages of white sturgeon through 60+ days post-fertilization (dpf). In both years, there were no significant differences in survival of fish that were exposed to water from downstream compared to water from upstream of the smelter. At 20-21dpf, average mortality was 2.4 percent and 12 percent in upstream water for 2008 and 2009, respectively, which was similar to the average mortality of 3.8 percent and 7.2 percent in downstream water for 2008 and 2009, respectively. Relatively great mortality after 20-21dpf complicated analysis of the subchronic exposure, but use of a survival analysis indicated that the average fish died at 25-29dpf, regardless of whether the water to which they were exposed came from upstream or downstream of the smelter. In addition, measured concentrations of metals in river water were less than the threshold for adverse effects on early life stages of white sturgeon. Based upon these analyses, it is not likely that current concentrations of metals in the Columbia River in southern BC are adversely affecting survival of early life stages of white sturgeon larvae.

  4. 76 FR 8345 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan Module for Columbia River Estuary Salmon and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Plan Module for Columbia River Estuary Salmon and Steelhead AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...; recovery plan module for Columbia River estuary salmon and steelhead. SUMMARY: NMFS announces the adoption of the Columbia River Estuary Endangered Species Act (ESA) Recovery Plan Module for Salmon...

  5. 75 FR 81464 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, The Dalles Lock and Dam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Columbia River, The Dalles Lock and Dam... temporary safety zone on the waters of the Columbia River in the vicinity of The Dalles Lock and Dam while... Dalles Lock and Dam (a) Location. The following is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River...

  6. 76 FR 13438 - Amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... POWER AND CONSERVATION PLANNING COUNCIL Amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program AGENCY... Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 4(h) of the Northwest Power Act, the Council has amended its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to add...

  7. 75 FR 64752 - Amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... POWER AND CONSERVATION PLANNING COUNCIL Amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program AGENCY... Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 4(h) of the Northwest Power Act, the Council has amended its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to add...

  8. 76 FR 13676 - Amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... POWER AND CONSERVATION PLANNING COUNCIL Amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program AGENCY... Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 4(h) of the Northwest Power Act, the Council has amended its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to add...

  9. Understanding Extreme Precipitation Behaviour in British Columbia's Lower Mainland Using Historical and Proxy Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spry, Christina

    In British Columbia, Pineapple Express storms can lead to flooding, slope failures and negative impacts to water quality. Mitigating the impacts of extreme weather events in a changing climate requires an understanding of how local climate responds to regional-toglobal climate forcing patterns. In this study, I use historical and proxy data to identify the distinguishing characteristics of Pineapple Express storms and to develop a tree ring oxygen isotope record (1960--1995) of local climate conditions in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. I found that high magnitude Pineapple Express storms have significantly higher precipitation and streamflow than other storms types, which result in relatively high contributions of Pineapple Express storms to the annual water budget. As well, Pineapple Express precipitation is characterized by an enriched delta18O isotopic signature when compared to precipitation originating from the North Pacific Ocean. However, differences in source water do not appear to be driving the variability in tree ring delta18O ratios. Instead, tree ring isotopic values exhibit a regional climate pattern that is strongly driven by latitudinal temperature gradients and the Rayleigh distillation effect. Therefore, future warmer conditions may decrease the temperature gradient between the equator and the poles, which can be recorded in the tree ring isotope record. The results also suggest that warmer temperatures due to climate change could result in more active Pineapple Express storm seasons, with multiple PE storms happening over a short period of time. Concurrent storms significantly increase the risk to society because the resulting antecedent saturated soil conditions can trigger precipitationinduced natural hazards. Keywords: extreme weather; stable isotopes; Pineapple Express; British Columbia; climate change; tree rings.

  10. Oral and pharyngeal cancer: knowledge and opinions of dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Clovis, Joanne B; Horowitz, Alice M; Poel, Dale H

    2002-01-01

    Oral and pharyngeal cancers are largely preventable and can be successfully treated when diagnosed at an early stage. Dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia were surveyed regarding their knowledge and opinions about oral and pharyngeal cancer. In February 1998 a pretested 41-item survey was mailed to a random sample of dentists in British Columbia and the population of dentists in Nova Scotia. A reminder postcard and one additional mailing were sent to nonrespondents. Of the 670 dentists supplying usable responses (response rate 55.2%) only 56.7% agreed that their knowledge of the subject was current. Most dentists correctly identified tobacco use (99.4%) and alcohol use (90.4%) as risk factors, but fewer correctly identified factors such as the use of spicy foods (57.0%) and poor oral hygiene (46.3%) as not being risk factors. Only 42.5% identified both erythroplakia and leukoplakia, in that order, as the conditions most likely associated with oral cancer. Indices of risk and diagnostic knowledge were constructed by summing the number of correct responses to items in each domain. On 16 risk factors the mean correct score was 9.2, and on 14 diagnostic procedures the mean correct score was 10.0. Only 38.5% of dentists had consistent levels of knowledge on both indices. Differences between the provinces were statistically significant (p < 0.01) for only 2 knowledge items. About three-quarters of all dentists (77.0%) were interested in taking continuing education courses. Dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia could benefit from undergraduate and continuing education courses to increase their knowledge of risk and diagnostic factors for oral cancer.

  11. Oral and pharyngeal cancer: practices and opinions of dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Clovis, Joanne B; Horowitz, Alice M; Poel, Dale H

    2002-01-01

    Oral and pharyngeal cancers are associated with high mortality rates, a situation usually attributed to late-stage diagnosis. Dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia were surveyed regarding their practices and opinions related to oral and pharyngeal cancer. In February 1998 a pretested, 41-item survey was mailed to a random sample of dentists in British Columbia (n = 817) and the population of dentists in Nova Scotia (N = 423). A reminder postcard and one additional mailing were sent to nonrespondents. Of the 670 dentists supplying usable responses (response rate 55.2%), only 56.7% agreed that their knowledge of the subject was current. Of 8 health history items, dentists assessed 5 on average, with most (88.0%) asking about the patients' current use of tobacco. A total of 72.7% of the responding dentists performed an oral cancer examination for all edentulous patients at every appointment, but 10.9% never did so. Similarly, 70.7% of the dentists always provided an oral cancer examination at the initial appointment for patients 40 years of age and older, but 9.8% never did so. Undergraduate training related to oral cancer examination was reported as good by only 52.2% of the dentists. About three-quarters of all dentists (77.0%) were interested in taking continuing education courses on this subject. Differences between the 2 provinces were not statistically significant (p > 0.01). Dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia could benefit from undergraduate and continuing education courses to increase their knowledge of health history assessment, examination for oral and pharyngeal cancers, and risk reduction strategies, such as counselling about tobacco cessation.

  12. Assessing the health care needs of women in rural British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Meghan; Norman, Wendy V.; Malhotra, Unjali

    2013-01-01

    Objective To design reliable survey instruments to evaluate needs and expectations for provision of women's health services in rural communities in British Columbia (BC). These tools will aim to plan programming for, and evaluate effectiveness of, a women's health enhanced skills residency program at the University of British Columbia. Design A qualitative design that included administration of written surveys and on-site interviews in several rural communities. Setting Three communities participated in initial questionnaire and interview administration. A fourth community participated in the second interview iteration. Participating communities did not have obstetrician-gynecologists but did have hospitals capable of supporting outpatient specialized women's health procedural care. Participants Community physicians, leaders of community groups serving women, and allied health providers, in Vancouver Island, Southeast Interior BC, and Northern BC. Methods Two preliminary questionnaires were developed to assess local specialized women's health services based on the curriculum of the enhanced skills training program; one was designed for physicians and the other for women's community group leaders and aboriginal health and community group leaders. Interview questions were designed to ensure the survey could be understood and to identify important areas of women's health not included on the initial questionnaires. Results were analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods, and a second draft of the questionnaires was developed for a second iteration of interviews. Main findings Clarity and comprehension of questionnaires were good; however, nonphysician participants answered that they were unsure on many questions pertaining to specific services. Topics identified as important and missing from questionnaires included violence and mental health. A second version of the questionnaires was shown to have addressed these concerns. Conclusion Through iterations of

  13. Neospora caninum is the leading cause of bovine fetal loss in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Devon J; Orsel, Karin; Waddington, Josh; Rajeev, Malavika; Sweeny, Amy R.; Joseph, Tomy; Grigg, Michael E; Raverty, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan pathogen Neospora caninum is recognized as a leading cause of infectious abortions in cattle worldwide. To evaluate the impact of neosporosis on dairy and beef herd production, a retrospective, longitudinal study was performed to identify the impact of neosporosis alongside other causes of fetal abortion in British Columbia, Canada. Retrospective analysis of pathology records of bovine fetal submissions submitted to the Animal Health Centre, Abbotsford, British Columbia, a provincial veterinary diagnostic laboratory, from January 2007– July 2013 identified 182 abortion cases (passive surveillance). From July 2013–May 2014, an active surveillance program identified a further 54 abortion cases from dairy farmers in the Upper Fraser Valley, British Columbia. Of the total 236 fetal submissions analyzed, N. caninum was diagnosed in 18.2% of cases, making it the most commonly identified infectious agent associated with fetal loss. During active surveillance, N. caninum was associated with 41% of fetuses submitted compared to 13.3% during passive surveillance (P<0.001). Breed of dam was significantly associated with N. caninum diagnosis, with a higher prevalence in dairy versus beef breeds, and fetuses of 3–6 months gestational age had the highest prevalence of N. caninum. There was no significant association with dam parity. Neospora caninum was diagnosed in every year except 2009 and cases were geographically widespread throughout the province. Furthermore, the active surveillance program demonstrates that N. caninum is highly prevalent in the Upper Fraser Valley and is a major causal agent of production losses in this dairy intensive region. PMID:26872927

  14. Magnitude and frequency of landslides triggered by a storm event, Loughborough Inlet, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, R. H.; Evans, S. G.

    2004-08-01

    One hundred and one landslides were documented across 370km2 following a rainstorm that swept the British Columbia coastline on 18 November 2001. Despite the regional nature of the storm, the landslides were spaced close together, even within the study area. Landslide clustering is attributed to high intensity storm cells too small to be recorded by the general hydrometric network. The evidence nicely corroborates previous historical studies that reached similar conclusions, but against which there was no modern analog analyzed for coastal British Columbia. Magnitude-cumulative frequency data plotted well on a power law curve for landslides greater than 10000m2, however, below that size several curves would fit. The rollover effect, a point where the data is no longer represented by the power law, therefore occurs at about 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than the smallest landslide. Additional work on Vancouver Island has provided evidence for rollovers at similar values. We propose that the rollover is a manifestation of the physical conditions of landslide occurrence and process uniformity. The data was fit to a double Pareto distribution and P-P plots were generated for several data sets to examine the fit of that model. The double Pareto model describes the bulk of the data well, however, less well at the tails. For small landslides (<650m2) this may still be a product of censoring. Landscape denudation from the storm was averaged over the study area and equal to 2mm of erosion. This is more than an order of magnitude larger than the annual rate of denudation reported by other authors for coastal British Columbia, but substantially less than New Zealand. The number is somewhat affected by the rather arbitrary choice of a study area boundary.

  15. 33 CFR 110.128 - Columbia River at Portland, Oreg.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waters of the Columbia River between Sand Island and Government Island, bounded on the west by pile dike... Sand Island and bounded on the east by a line bearing 339°15′ true, from a point on Government Island at latitude 45°35′10″, longitude 122°32′41″, to the southerly shore of Sand Island. ...

  16. Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1996-12-01

    In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

  17. Invertebrates of the Columbia River basin assessment area.

    Treesearch

    Christine G. Niwa; Roger E. Sandquist; Rod Crawford; et al.

    2001-01-01

    A general background on functional groups of invertebrates in the Columbia River basin and how they affect sustainability and productivity of their ecological communities is presented. The functional groups include detritivores, predators, pollinators, and grassland and forest herbivores. Invertebrate biodiversity and species of conservation interest are discussed....

  18. 77 FR 66714 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY... Waterway, at Tacoma, WA. This deviation is necessary to perform extensive maintenance and repair work on... (previously known as City Waterway) at mile 0.6, at Tacoma, WA. The Murray Morgan Bridge is a vertical lift...

  19. 78 FR 23487 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has...

  20. 77 FR 38004 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has...

  1. 33 CFR 110.128 - Columbia River at Portland, Oreg.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waters of the Columbia River between Sand Island and Government Island, bounded on the west by pile dike... Sand Island and bounded on the east by a line bearing 339°15′ true, from a point on Government Island at latitude 45°35′10″, longitude 122°32′41″, to the southerly shore of Sand Island. ...

  2. 33 CFR 110.128 - Columbia River at Portland, Oreg.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waters of the Columbia River between Sand Island and Government Island, bounded on the west by pile dike... Sand Island and bounded on the east by a line bearing 339°15′ true, from a point on Government Island at latitude 45°35′10″, longitude 122°32′41″, to the southerly shore of Sand Island....

  3. A climate-change scenario for the Columbia River Basin.

    Treesearch

    Sue A. Ferguson

    1997-01-01

    This work describes the method used to generate a climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. The scenario considers climate patterns that may change if the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (C02), or its greenhouse gas equivalent, were to double over pre-Industrial Revolution values. Given the current rate of increase in...

  4. Air quality climate in the Columbia River Basin.

    Treesearch

    Sue A. Ferguson

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of climate that influence air quality in the Columbia River basin of the Northwestern United States are described. A few, relatively simple, analytical tools were developed to show the spatial and temporal patterns of mean-monthly mixing heights, precipitation scavenging, upper level and surface trajectory winds, and drought that inhibit pollution uptake. Also...

  5. Historical changes in pool habitats in the Columbia River basin

    Treesearch

    Bruce A. McIntosh; James R. Sedell; Russell F. Thurow; Sharon E. Clarke; Gwynn L. Chandler

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of how stream habitats change over time in natural and human-influenced ecosystems at large, regional scales is currently limited. A historical stream survey (1934-1945) was compared to current surveys to assess changes in pool habitats in the Columbia River basin. Streams from across the basin, representing a wide range of geologies, stream sizes and land-...

  6. Historical changes in pool habitats in the Columbia River basin

    Treesearch

    Bruce A. McIntosh; James R. Sedell; Russell F. Thurow; Sharon E. Clarke; Gwynn L. Chandler

    2000-01-01

    An historical stream survey (1934-1945) was compared with current surveys (1987-1997) to assess changes in pool frequencies in the Columbia River Basin. We surveyed 2267 km of 122 streams across the basin, representing a wide range of lithologies, stream sizes, land use histories, ownerships, and ecoregions. Based on pool classes inherited from the historical surveys,...

  7. Earthworms (Annelida: Oligochaeta) of the Columbia River basin assessment area.

    Treesearch

    Sam. James

    2000-01-01

    Earthworms are key components of many terrestrial ecosystems; however, little is known of their ecology, distribution, and taxonomy in the eastern interior Columbia River basin assessment area (hereafter referred to as the basin assessment area). This report summarizes the main issues about the ecology of earthworms and their impact on the physical and chemical status...

  8. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  9. Investigation into seasonal water chemistry variations in the Clayburn Creek watershed, British Columbia: An opportunity for authentic research experience for University of the Fraser Valley undergraduate students.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Faber, A.; Clemence, E.; Yakemchuk, A.; McCabe, M.; Toner, A.; Dhaliwal, H.; Gaultier, M.; Kanda, S.; Leffers, R.; Mahil, G.; Paulson, D.; Puri, K.; Sekhton, J.; Sidhu, B.; Sidhu, D.; Turner, S.; Strangway, A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty and students from the University of the Fraser Valley participate in the time series sampling of the Fraser River and Fraser River tributaries as part of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) which is coordinated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Clayburn and Willband Creeks in Abbotsford, British Columbia are part of this project and are being threatened by increasing anthropogenic activity (agricultural, industrial and residential development) within the watershed. Undergraduate students from the Geography and Biology departments have been instructed in the sampling protocols and the collection of thw water chemistry data. Each student that has been involved in this sampling project will gain a greater understanding of the seasonal variation of the water chemistry of the Clayburn watershed. Through this involvement in this portion of the Global Rivers Observatory our students become more aware of the threats to our streams and the methods utilized to monitor water chemistry.

  10. Visible light nitrogen dioxide spectrophotometer intercomparison: Mount Kobau, British Columbia, July 28 to August 10, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, C. T.; Elokhov, A. S.; Elansky, N.; Frank, H.; Johnston, P.; Kerr, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization, Environment Canada hosted an international comparison of visible light spectrophotometers at Mt. Kobau, British Columbia in August of 1991. Instruments from four countries were involved. The intercomparison results have indicated that some significant differences exist in the responses of the various instruments, and have provided a basis for the comparison of the historical data sets which currently exist as a result of the independent researches carried out in the past in the former Soviet Union, New Zealand, and Canada.

  11. Outbreak of Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning Associated with Mussels, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Marsha; McIntyre, Lorraine; Ritson, Mark; Stone, Jason; Bronson, Roni; Bitzikos, Olga; Rourke, Wade; Galanis, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, a Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) outbreak occurred in British Columbia (BC), Canada that was associated with cooked mussel consumption. This is the first reported DSP outbreak in BC. Investigation of ill individuals, traceback of product and laboratory testing for toxins were used in this investigation. Sixty-two illnesses were reported. Public health and food safety investigation identified a common food source and harvest area. Public health and regulatory agencies took actions to recall product and notify the public. Shellfish monitoring program changes were implemented after the outbreak. Improved response and understanding of toxin production will improve management of future DSP outbreaks. PMID:23697950

  12. Sincere but naive: methodological queries concerning the British Columbia polygamy reference trial.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Sean Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Academics frequently serve as expert witnesses in legal cases, yet their role as transmitters of social scientific knowledge remains under-examined. The present study analyzes the deployment of social science within British Columbia's polygamy reference trial where research is used to support the assertion that polygamy is inherently harmful to society. Within the trial record and the written decision, the protection of monogamy as an institution is performed in part through the marginalization of qualitative methodology and the concurrent privileging of quantitative studies that purportedly demonstrate widespread social harms associated with the practice of polygyny.

  13. Detecting Near-Field Tsunamis off the Coast of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insua, Tania Lado; Moran, Kate

    2014-09-01

    Geological and historical records of the coast of British Columbia (BC) and orally transmitted legends from the First Nations in the area indicate the recurrence of tsunamis in this region. Recent studies show a 40% to 80% probability of a local earthquake occurring in the next 50 years over the Cascadia subduction zone, generating a tsunami run-up higher than 1.5 meters. Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates ocean observatories off the west coast of BC. Smart Oceans BC is a new multifaceted program to support coastal communities and decision makers by leveraging the unique capabilities of ONC's advanced cabled ocean observatories to inform public safety, marine safety, and environmental monitoring.

  14. Endangered Vancouver Island marmots (Marmota vancouverensis): sentinels of atmospherically delivered contaminants to British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lichota, Gillian B; McAdie, Malcolm; Ross, Peter S

    2004-02-01

    We characterized legacy and new contaminants in the highly endangered Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada) marmot and found generally low blood and fat concentrations of a complex mixture of pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), -dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), -dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in their tissues. The dominance of the more volatile alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) pesticides and the lesser chlorinated PCB congeners suggests that atmospheric processes largely explain the contamination of this high-altitude herbivore.

  15. Medicinal plants used in British Columbia, Canada for reproductive health in pets.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Brauer, Gerhard; Khan, Tonya

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, semi-structured interviews were conducted in British Columbia, Canada with participants obtained using a purposive sample on the ethnoveterinary remedies used for animals. Twenty-nine participants provided the information in this paper on the ethnoveterinary remedies used for reproductive health in dogs and cats. The plants used for pregnancy support and milk production in pets were raspberry-leaf (Rubus idaeus), motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca), flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) and ginger (Zingiber officinale). Uterine infections were treated with black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) and goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis). Most of the studies conducted on these plants have not been conducted on companion animals.

  16. Two new species in the family Axinellidae (Porifera, Demospongiae) from British Columbia and adjacent waters

    PubMed Central

    Austin, William C.; Ott, Bruce S.; Reiswig, Henry M.; Romagosa, Paula; McDaniel, Neil G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Demospongiae are described for British Columbia and adjacent waters in the family Axinellidae, Auletta krautteri sp. n. and Dragmacidon kishinensis sp. n. They represent range extensions for both of these genera. Both are fairly commonly encountered, Auletta krautteri below diving depths (87 to at least 300 m) and Dragmacidon kishinensis in shallow water (intertidal to 30 m). We propose an amended genus diagnosis for Auletta to account for the variability among species in principal spicules that form the ascending tracts to be either oxeas, styles or strongyles rather than just oxeas. PMID:24146581

  17. A review of catastrophic drainage of moraine-dammed lakes in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, John J.; Evans, Stephen G.

    2000-12-01

    Moraine-dammed lakes are common in the high mountains of British Columbia. Most of these lakes formed when valley and cirque glaciers retreated from advanced positions achieved during the Little Ice Age. Many moraine dams in British Columbia are susceptible to failure because they are steep-sided, have relatively low width-to-height ratios, comprise loose, poorly sorted sediment, and may contain ice cores or interstitial ice. In addition, the lakes commonly are bordered by steep slopes that are prone to snow and ice avalanches and rockfalls. Moraine dams generally fail by overtopping and incision. The triggering event may be a heavy rainstorm, or an avalanche or rockfall that generates waves that overtop the dam. The dam can also be overtopped by an influx of water caused by sudden drainage of an upstream ice-dammed lake (jökulhlaup). Melting of moraine ice cores and piping are other possible failure mechanisms. Failures of moraine dams in British Columbia produce destructive floods orders of magnitude larger than normal streamflows. Most outburst floods are characterized by an exponential increase in discharge, followed by an abrupt drop to background levels when the water supply is exhausted. Peak discharges are controlled by dam characteristics, the volume of water in the reservoir, failure mechanisms, and downstream topography and sediment availability. For the same potential energy at the dam site, floods from moraine-dammed lakes have higher peak discharges than floods from glacier-dammed lakes. The floodwaters may mobilize large amounts of sediment as they travel down steep valleys, producing highly mobile debris flows. Such flows have larger discharges and greater destructive impact than the floods from which they form. Moraine dam failures in British Columbia and elsewhere are most frequent following extended periods of cool climate when large lateral and end moraines are built. A period of protracted warming is required to trap lakes behind moraines and

  18. Taxonomic synopsis of invasive and native Spartina (Poaceae, Chloridoideae) in the Pacific Northwest (British Columbia, Washington and Oregon), including the first report of Spartina ×townsendii for British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, Jeffery M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Five species of the grass genus Spartina are invading salt marshes along the Pacific coast of North America, of which three have been documented in British Columbia, Canada, in only the last decade. A taxonomic synopsis of the two native (Spartina gracilis, Spartina pectinata) and five introduced Spartina taxa (Spartina anglica, Spartina alterniflora, Spartina densiflora, Spartina patens, Spartina ×townsendii) in the Pacific Northwest is presented to facilitate their identification, including nomenclature, a new taxonomic key, new descriptions for a subset of taxa, and representative specimens. Spartina ×townsendii is newly reported for the flora of British Columbia. The non-coastal species Spartina pectinata is reported from an urban site in British Columbia, the first confirmed report of the taxon for the province. Lectotypes are newly designated for Spartina anglica C.E. Hubb., Spartina maritima subvar. fallax St.-Yves, and Spartina cynosuroides f. major St.-Yves. PMID:22461730

  19. Electric river: salomon still run the Columbia, but hydropower is the bigger catch. [Full use of potential of Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, J.

    1981-07-01

    Centralized computers control virtually the entire length of the Columbia River to feed hydroelectric power plants, supply irrigation, prevent flooding, and aid migrating fish as it drops 2700 feet on its 1214 mile flow to the Pacific Ocean. The river carries a burden which may not be sustainable in the face of competing and incompatible demands. In spite of all the Columbia River development, the Pacific Northwest suffers a loss of topsoil which threatens food production, possible power interruptions wich threaten industrial development, and a decline in the salmon population. The river's size encouraged the feeling that it couldn't be depleted, but political pressure from Southern California now threatens to place even greater demands. A national water policy and an end to regional fighting is needed before massive water transfers should be developed. (DCK)

  20. 3-D Velocity Structure of Southwestern British Columbia and Northern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, K.; Ramachandran, K.; Spence, G. D.; Dosso, S.; Hyndman, R. D.; Hyndman, R. D.; Brocher, T. M.; Fisher, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    A seismic tomography analysis in S.W. British Columbia and N. Washington has been used to define the velocity structure of the forearc crust and underlying subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and to obtain precise earthquake locations. First arrival travel-times from earthquakes and from the large airgun array used in the `Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound' (SHIPS) 1998 experiment, were simultaneously inverted for hypocentral parameters and velocity structure. Approximately 16,000 picks from 1,400 earthquakes recorded at 46 permanent stations, and 35,000 picks from the SHIPS experiment were used in the inversion. The velocity model was parameterized in the forward/inverse step by a node/cell spacing of 3 X 3 X 3 km over a volume of 360 X 450 X 93 km depth. The starting and final RMS travel time misfits were 479 ms and 120 ms respectively. Checkerboard tests conducted on the final velocity model imply good lateral resolution ranging from 30 to 50 km. The SHIPS airgun data mainly constrained the upper ~12 km and the earthquake data the deeper structure. The high velocity mafic Crescent Terrane that dips beneath the margin is well mapped in the velocity model on a regional scale. Its thickness beneath southern Vancouver Island is interpreted to reach ~20 km. Three high velocity structures above the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, having mafic to ultramafic velocities of 7.25-7.5 km/s, occur beneath southern Vancouver Island and Puget Sound at a depth of ~25 km. They may be associated with deeper parts of the Crescent Terrane, or with structures such as seamounts on the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. At the southern tip of Vancouver Islands, the Leech River Fault, Southern Whidbey Island Fault, and the Devils Mountain Fault appear to correlate with mapped seismicity. The subducting Juan de Fuca plate is well mapped beneath southern Vancouver Island, Olympic Peninsula, Strait of Georgia, and Puget Sound. The velocity model identifies the steepening dip in the

  1. The long-term environmental impacts of the Mount Polley mine tailings spill, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Macklin, Mark; Brewer, Paul; Bird, Graham; Williams, Richard

    2015-04-01

    On the 4th August 2014 a tailings impoundment failure at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in British Columbia, Canada, released approximately 25 million m3 of solid and liquid waste into Hazeltine Creek, Quesnel Lake and Polley Lake. The sheer volume of the tailings released caused Haseltine Creek channel to expand from 2m to over 25m in width and Polley Lake water level to rise by 1.7m. The spill also removed trees in a 900 km2 corridor either side of Hazeltine Creek. Local residents and government officials have expressed serious concerns regarding the potential long-term effects on regional biodiversity, water security and to the livelihoods of First Nation communities. Among impoundment failures, the Mount Polley disaster is unique in that the solid tailings contain an unusual mixture of metal contaminants (arsenic, copper, gold, manganese, nickel, lead, vanadium). As particulate matter is the principal carrier of metal contaminants, the spilled tailings may reside in the regional soils and sediments for 1000s of years serving as a secondary source of pollution. The environmental risk posed by the spilled tailings is compounded by the location of the spill in a mountainous forested catchment, affected by severe winters with prominent spring snow melts that have the potential to remobilise very large quantities of spilled tailings. No data currently exist on the short- to long-term behaviour of these tailings in soils and sediments and the effects of the clean-up operations on their behaviour in this type of river environment. In this study, we adopt a multidisciplinary approach to determine the environmental and geomorphological impacts of the tailings spill. We have two specific objectives. (1) The physicochemical speciation and geochemical stability of spilled tailings will be characterised in surface and hyporheic sediments using bulk chemistry, mineralogical (XRD and SEM) and speciation methods (sequential extractions, electron microprobe analysis, XAS

  2. Regional calibration of MODIS snow classification algorithms in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubilowicz, J. W.; Shea, J. M.; Jost, G.; Moore, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    The twice-daily temporal resolution and 500-m spatial resolution of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-covered area (SCA) products offer great promise in the field of hydrologic forecasting. MODIS snow classification algorithms are accurate in most situations, but the situations in which accuracy suffers the most are also the situations where spatial observations of SCA would be most useful to operational hydrologists, particularly in the dynamic mountain watersheds of the Coast Mountains of British Columbia (BC). Transient snow coverage and snow melt due to rain-on-snow events can cause the SCA in these watersheds to change rapidly, both in the shoulder seasons and mid-winter. These rapid changes are often poorly represented by MODIS SCA products due to both cloud obscuration and the nature of the classification algorithms used. Snow classification algorithms used in the MODIS SCA products have been calibrated globally, but operational use of MODIS snow cover maps has indicated that accuracy could be improved through regional calibration of fractional SCA products. One challenge to regional calibration is the availability of calibration data. To generate a suitable data set, we used ground-based oblique imagery of the Cheakamus River catchment, an operational hydroelectric catchment in the southern Coast Mountains of BC with a catchment area of 721 km2. Images were collected over two seasons at locations determined to have the highest visibility of the entire Cheakamus catchment based on a viewshed analysis. Unsupervised image classification was used to delineate snow cover. The oblique photographs were then geo-located and subsequently re-projected onto a digital elevation model to enable direct comparison to MODIS SCA products. Regional calibration of MODIS SCA classification algorithms using MODIS reflectance bands resulted in improved accuracy of fractional SCA products. While regional calibration may not be practical for short term

  3. Groundwater and climate change: a sensitivity analysis for the Grand Forks aquifer, southern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. M.; Mackie, D. C.; Wei, M.

    The Grand Forks aquifer, located in south-central British Columbia, Canada was used as a case study area for modeling the sensitivity of an aquifer to changes in recharge and river stage consistent with projected climate-change scenarios for the region. Results suggest that variations in recharge to the aquifer under the different climate-change scenarios, modeled under steady-state conditions, have a much smaller impact on the groundwater system than changes in river-stage elevation of the Kettle and Granby Rivers, which flow through the valley. All simulations showed relatively small changes in the overall configuration of the water table and general direction of groundwater flow. High-recharge and low-recharge simulations resulted in approximately a +0.05 m increase and a -0.025 m decrease, respectively, in water-table elevations throughout the aquifer. Simulated changes in river-stage elevation, to reflect higher-than-peak-flow levels (by 20 and 50%), resulted in average changes in the water-table elevation of 2.72 and 3.45 m, respectively. Simulated changes in river-stage elevation, to reflect lower-than-baseflow levels (by 20 and 50%), resulted in average changes in the water-table elevation of -0.48 and -2.10 m, respectively. Current observed water-table elevations in the valley are consistent with an average river-stage elevation (between current baseflow and peak-flow stages). L'aquifère de Grand Forks, situé en Colombie britannique (Canada), a été utilisé comme zone d'étude pour modéliser la sensibilité d'un aquifère à des modifications de la recharge et du niveau de la rivière, correspondant à des scénarios envisagés de changement climatique dans cette région. Les résultats font apparaître que les variations de recharge de l'aquifère pour différents scénarios de changement climatique, modélisées pour des conditions de régime permanent, ont un impact sur le système aquifère beaucoup plus faible que les changements du niveau des

  4. The effects of changing demographics on the distribution of marine anemia in farmed salmon in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Stephen, R C; Ribble, C S

    1995-09-01

    The changing geographic distribution of marine anemia (plasmacytoid leukemia) was compared with the evolving demographics of the chinook farming industry in British Columbia to explore the hypothesis that the disease had spread throughout the province between 1987 and 1992. Through retrospective and prospective methods, it was shown that the apparent spread of the disease was likely an artifact, resulting from changes in the distribution of fish farms throughout the province and corresponding changes in the intensity of regional disease surveillance. When viewed over a 5-year period, there were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the disease amongst fish sampled from each of the major salmon farming regions of British Columbia. By increasing the intensity of surveillance for the disease in apparently negative regions or chinook farms, one could routinely find cases of the disease. The results suggest that marine anemia is an endemic problem for farmed chinook salmon in British Columbia and is not a spreading epidemic.

  5. Supply and distribution of primary healthcare registered nurses in british columbia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E; Young, Ella; Mooney, Dawn

    2009-11-01

    WHAT DID WE DO?: This study uses an existing data source to (a) describe the population and geographic distribution of registered nurses (RNs) working in primary healthcare (PHC) in British Columbia, (b) compare this workforce to PHC physicians and (c) assess the distribution of PHC-RNs relative to population health status. WHAT DID WE LEARN?: Of the 27,570 practising RNs in British Columbia in 2000, there were 3,179 (12%) in the PHC workforce. This translates into 147 people per practising RN and 1,277 people per PHC-RN. In 2000, there were 990 people per PHC physician. PHC-RNs represented 43% of the combined PHC workforce of physicians and RNs. A large proportion (47%) of PHC-RNs worked in community health centres, whereas less than 2% worked in physicians' offices. Geographic distribution of PHC-RNs is similar to the distribution of PHC physicians and is not associated with population health status. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?: There seem to be sufficient PHC-RNs to implement policy objectives in support of interdisciplinary PHC teams, but physicians and nurses will increasingly need to practice in the same location or have access to electronic information systems to support coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness of PHC. The PHC workforce could be better deployed to align with population health status.

  6. Piscine reovirus in wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, Canada: 1974-2013.

    PubMed

    Marty, G D; Morrison, D B; Bidulka, J; Joseph, T; Siah, A

    2015-08-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) was common among wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, western Canada, from 1987 to 2013. Salmonid tissues tested for PRV by real-time rRT-PCR included sections from archived paraffin blocks from 1974 to 2008 (n = 363) and fresh-frozen hearts from 2013 (n = 916). The earliest PRV-positive sample was from a wild-source steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from 1977. By histopathology (n = 404), no fish had lesions diagnostic for heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI). In some groups, lymphohistiocytic endocarditis affected a greater proportion of fish with PRV than fish without PRV, but the range of Ct values among affected fish was within the range of Ct values among unaffected fish. Also, fish with the lowest PRV Ct values (18.4-21.7) lacked endocarditis or any other consistent lesion. From 1987 to 1994, the proportion of PRV positives was not significantly different between farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. (44% of 48), and wild-source salmonids (31% of 45). In 2013, the proportion of PRV positives was not significantly different between wild coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), sampled from British Columbia (5.0% of 60) or the reference region, Alaska, USA (10% of 58). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Status Review of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Alaska and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, J.F.; Kuletz, K.J.; Burger, A.E.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Friesen, V.L.; Birt, T.P.; Arimitsu, M.L.; Drew, G.S.; Harding, A.M.A.; Bixler, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a small, diving seabird inhabiting inshore waters of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. This species feeds on small, schooling fishes and zooplankton, and nests primarily on the moss-covered branches of large, old-growth conifers, and also, in some parts of its range, on the ground. We reviewed existing information on this species to evaluate its current status in the northern part of its range-Alaska (U.S.) and British Columbia (Canada). Within the southern part of its range (Washington, Oregon, and California, U.S.), the Marbled Murrelet was listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1993, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) needed information on the species throughout its range for ESA deliberations. We compiled published information on the conservation status, population biology, foraging ecology, population genetics, population status and trends, demography, marine and nesting habitat characteristics, threats, and ongoing conservation efforts for Marbled Murrelets in Alaska and British Columbia. We conducted a new genetic study using samples from a segment of the range that had not been included in previous studies (Washington, Oregon) and additional nuclear intron and microsatellite markers. We also analyzed available at-sea survey data from several locations for trend. To understand the reasonableness of the empirical trend data, we developed demographic models incorporating stochasticity to discern what population trends were possible by chance. The genetic studies substantially confirmed previous findings on population structure in the Marbled Murrelet. Our present work finds three populations: (1) one comprising birds in the central and western Aleutian Islands; (2) one comprising birds in central California; and (3) one comprising birds within the center of the range from the eastern Aleutians to northern California. Our knowledge of genetic structure within this

  8. Hydrocarbon concentrations and patterns in free-ranging sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kate A; Nichol, Linda M; Ross, Peter S

    2011-10-01

    With oil pollution recognized as a major threat to British Columbia's recovering sea otter (Enhydra lutris) population, it is important to distinguish acute from chronic exposures to oil constituent groups in this marine mammal. Concentrations and patterns of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in blood samples from 29 live-captured sea otters in two coastal areas of British Columbia, as well as in representative samples of their invertebrate prey. Hydrocarbon concentrations in sea otters were similar between areas and among age and sex classes, suggesting that metabolism dominates the fate of these compounds in sea otters. Biomagnification factors derived from PAH ratios in otter:prey supported this notion. Although some higher alkylated three- and four-ring PAHs appeared to biomagnify, the majority of PAHs did not. The apparent retention of alkyl PAHs was reflected in the composition of estimated sea otter body burdens, which provided an alternative way of evaluating hydrocarbon exposure. Alkyl PAHs made up 86 ± 9% of estimated body burdens (4,340 ± 2,950 µg), with no differences between males and females (p = 0.18). The importance of measuring both parent and alkyl PAHs is underscored by their divergent dynamics in sea otters, with ready depuration of parent PAHs (metabolized or excreted) by sea otters on the one hand and biomagnification of alkyl PAHs on the other. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  9. Ethnoveterinary medicines used for horses in Trinidad and in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Brauer, Gerhard; Lourenco, Grant; Georges, Karla

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the commonalities in ethnoveterinary medicine used for horses between Trinidad (West Indies) and British Columbia (Canada). These research areas are part of a common market in pharmaceuticals and are both involved in the North American racing circuit. There has been very little research conducted on medicinal plants used for horses although their use is widespread. The data on ethnoveterinary medicines used for horses was obtained through key informant interviews with horse owners, trainers, breeders, jockeys, grooms and animal care specialists in two research areas: Trinidad and British Columbia (BC). A participatory validation workshop was held in BC. An extensive literature review and botanical identification of the plants was also done. In all, 20 plants were found to be used in treating racehorses in Trinidad and 97 in BC. Of these the most-evidently effective plants 19 of the plants used in Trinidad and 66 of those used in BC are described and evaluated in this paper. Aloe vera, Curcuma longa and Ricinus communis are used in both research areas. More research is needed in Trinidad to identify plants that respondents claimed were used in the past. Far more studies have been conducted on the temperate and Chinese medicinal plants used in BC and therefore these ethnoveterinary remedies reflect stronger evidence of efficacy. PMID:16893454

  10. Does sex matter? Temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflict in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Kristine J; Cristescu, Bogdan; Nielsen, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife-human conflicts occur wherever large carnivores overlap human inhabited areas. Conflict mitigation can be facilitated by understanding long-term dynamics and examining sex-structured conflict patterns. Predicting areas with high probability of conflict helps focus management strategies in order to proactively decrease carnivore mortality. We investigated the importance of cougar (Puma concolor) habitat, human landscape characteristics and the combination of habitat and human features on the temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflicts in British Columbia. Conflicts (n = 1,727; 1978-2007) involved similar numbers of male and female cougars with conflict rate decreasing over the past decade. Conflicts were concentrated within the southern part of the province with the most conflicts per unit area occurring on Vancouver Island. For both sexes, the most supported spatial models for the most recent (1998-2007) conflicts contained both human and habitat variables. Conflicts were more likely to occur close to roads, at intermediate elevations and far from the northern edge of the cougar distribution range in British Columbia. Male cougar conflicts were more likely to occur in areas of intermediate human density. Unlike cougar conflicts in other regions, cattle density was not a significant predictor of conflict location. With human populations expanding, conflicts are expected to increase. Conservation tools, such as the maps predicting conflict hotspots from this study, can help focus management efforts to decrease carnivore-human conflict.

  11. Exploring spatial and temporal variations of cadmium concentrations in pacific oysters from british columbia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cindy Xin; Cao, Jiguo; Bendell, Leah

    2011-09-01

    Oysters from the Pacific Northwest coast of British Columbia, Canada, contain high levels of cadmium, in some cases exceeding some international food safety guidelines. A primary goal of this article is the investigation of the spatial and temporal variation in cadmium concentrations for oysters sampled from coastal British Columbia. Such information is important so that recommendations can be made as to where and when oysters can be cultured such that accumulation of cadmium within these oysters is minimized. Some modern statistical methods are applied to achieve this goal, including monotone spline smoothing, functional principal component analysis, and semi-parametric additive modeling. Oyster growth rates are estimated as the first derivatives of the monotone smoothing growth curves. Some important patterns in cadmium accumulation by oysters are observed. For example, most inland regions tend to have a higher level of cadmium concentration than most coastal regions, so more caution needs to be taken for shellfish aquaculture practices occurring in the inland regions. The semi-parametric additive modeling shows that oyster cadmium concentration decreases with oyster length, and oysters sampled at 7 m have higher average cadmium concentration than those sampled at 1 m.

  12. British Columbia capital regional district 100% smokefree bylaw: a successful public health campaign despite industry opposition.

    PubMed

    Drope, J; Glantz, S

    2003-09-01

    To describe how the British Columbia Capital Regional District successfully passed, implemented, and enforced a 100% smokefree bylaw in all public places, including restaurants and bars, despite an aggressive campaign by the tobacco industry (acting through the hospitality industry) to stop it. Information was obtained from news reports, internal tobacco industry documents, reports, public documents, and interviews with key players. Tobacco industry documents were accessed between February and April 2002. This project was approved by the University of California San Francisco committee on human research. As in the USA and elsewhere in the world, the tobacco industry in British Columbia, Canada, recruited and created hospitality associations to fight against the district smokefree bylaw. They used the classic industry rhetoric of individual rights and freedoms, economic devastation, and ventilation as a solution. Public health authorities were able to counter industry strategies with a strong education campaign, well written bylaws, and persistent enforcement. It is possible to overcome serious opposition orchestrated by the tobacco industry and develop and implement a 100% smokefree bylaw in Canada. Doing so requires attention to detail in drafting the bylaw, as well as a public education campaign on the health dangers of secondhand smoke and active enforcement to overcome organised resistance to the bylaw. Jurisdictions considering smokefree bylaws should anticipate this opposition when developing and implementing their bylaws.

  13. Observations and Numerical Modeling of the 2012 Haida Gwaii Tsunami off the Coast of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Isaac V.; Cherniawsky, Josef Y.; Thomson, Richard E.; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Krassovski, Maxim V.

    2015-03-01

    A major ( M w 7.7) earthquake occurred on October 28, 2012 along the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone off the west coast of Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands). The earthquake was the second strongest instrumentally recorded earthquake in Canadian history and generated the largest local tsunami ever recorded on the coast of British Columbia. A field survey on the Pacific side of Haida Gwaii revealed maximum runup heights of up to 7.6 m at sites sheltered from storm waves and 13 m in a small inlet that is less sheltered from storms (L eonard and B ednarski 2014). The tsunami was recorded by tide gauges along the coast of British Columbia, by open-ocean bottom pressure sensors of the NEPTUNE facility at Ocean Networks Canada's cabled observatory located seaward of southwestern Vancouver Island, and by several DART stations located in the northeast Pacific. The tsunami observations, in combination with rigorous numerical modeling, enabled us to determine the physical properties of this event and to correct the location of the tsunami source with respect to the initial geophysical estimates. The initial model results were used to specify sites of particular interest for post-tsunami field surveys on the coast of Moresby Island (Haida Gwaii), while field survey observations (L eonard and B ednarski 2014) were used, in turn, to verify the numerical simulations based on the corrected source region.

  14. Does Sex Matter? Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Cougar-Human Conflict in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Teichman, Kristine J.; Cristescu, Bogdan; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife-human conflicts occur wherever large carnivores overlap human inhabited areas. Conflict mitigation can be facilitated by understanding long-term dynamics and examining sex-structured conflict patterns. Predicting areas with high probability of conflict helps focus management strategies in order to proactively decrease carnivore mortality. We investigated the importance of cougar (Puma concolor) habitat, human landscape characteristics and the combination of habitat and human features on the temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflicts in British Columbia. Conflicts (n = 1,727; 1978–2007) involved similar numbers of male and female cougars with conflict rate decreasing over the past decade. Conflicts were concentrated within the southern part of the province with the most conflicts per unit area occurring on Vancouver Island. For both sexes, the most supported spatial models for the most recent (1998–2007) conflicts contained both human and habitat variables. Conflicts were more likely to occur close to roads, at intermediate elevations and far from the northern edge of the cougar distribution range in British Columbia. Male cougar conflicts were more likely to occur in areas of intermediate human density. Unlike cougar conflicts in other regions, cattle density was not a significant predictor of conflict location. With human populations expanding, conflicts are expected to increase. Conservation tools, such as the maps predicting conflict hotspots from this study, can help focus management efforts to decrease carnivore-human conflict. PMID:24040312

  15. Sink or Night Float: University of British Columbia Radiology Residents' Experience With Overnight Call.

    PubMed

    Scali, Elena P; Strovski, Evgeny; Forster, Bruce B; Mar, Colin; Chang, Silvia D

    2015-05-01

    In July 2012, in response to residents' concerns regarding the impact of the traditional 24-hour call system on their personal well-being and educational experience, the University of British Columbia Radiology residency program adopted a 12-hour night float system. This shift takes place in the context of increasing concerns, both across Canada and internationally, about resident well-being and the impact of prolonged duty hours on patient care. An anonymous survey was distributed to all 25 postgraduate years 2-5 University of British Columbia radiology residents 12 months after the introduction of night float. This study sought to solicit residents' feedback about these changes and to identify potential future changes to optimize the call system. The response rate was 100%; 96% of residents were in favor of continuing with night float rather than the traditional call system; 72% of residents reported that their judgement was affected secondary to being on night float. Although most residents described varying degrees of impairment, the rate of acute discrepancies between resident preliminary and attending radiologist final reports decreased by more than half, from 2% to less than 1%. The vast majority of our residents were in favor of maintaining the night float call system. Night float had a beneficial effect on the resident educational experience: by eliminating the pre-call morning and post-call day off rotation, residents gained an additional 24 days per year on other clinical rotations. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. British Columbia capital regional district 100% smokefree bylaw: a successful public health campaign despite industry opposition

    PubMed Central

    Drope, J; Glantz, S

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe how the British Columbia Capital Regional District successfully passed, implemented, and enforced a 100% smokefree bylaw in all public places, including restaurants and bars, despite an aggressive campaign by the tobacco industry (acting through the hospitality industry) to stop it. Methods: Information was obtained from news reports, internal tobacco industry documents, reports, public documents, and interviews with key players. Tobacco industry documents were accessed between February and April 2002. This project was approved by the University of California San Francisco committee on human research. Results: As in the USA and elsewhere in the world, the tobacco industry in British Columbia, Canada, recruited and created hospitality associations to fight against the district smokefree bylaw. They used the classic industry rhetoric of individual rights and freedoms, economic devastation, and ventilation as a solution. Public health authorities were able to counter industry strategies with a strong education campaign, well written bylaws, and persistent enforcement. Conclusion: It is possible to overcome serious opposition orchestrated by the tobacco industry and develop and implement a 100% smokefree bylaw in Canada. Doing so requires attention to detail in drafting the bylaw, as well as a public education campaign on the health dangers of secondhand smoke and active enforcement to overcome organised resistance to the bylaw. Jurisdictions considering smokefree bylaws should anticipate this opposition when developing and implementing their bylaws. PMID:12958385

  17. Availability of limited service food outlets surrounding schools in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer L; Day, Meghan

    2012-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to provide a descriptive profile of the availability of limited service food outlets surrounding public schools in British Columbia, Canada. Data from the 2010 Canadian Business Data Files were used to identify limited service food outlets including fast food outlets, beverage and snack food stores, delis and convenience stores. The number of food outlets within 800 metres of 1,392 public schools and the distance from schools to the nearest food outlets were assessed. Multivariate regression models examined the associations between food outlet availability and school-level characteristics. In 2010, over half of the public schools in BC (54%) were located within a 10-12 minute walk from at least one limited service food outlet. The median closest distance to a food outlet was just over 1 km (1016 m). Schools comprised of students living in densely populated urban neighbourhoods and neighbourhoods characterized by lower socio-economic status were more likely to have access to limited service food outlets within walking distance. After adjusting for school-level median family income and population density, larger schools had higher odds of exposure to food vendors compared to schools with fewer students. The availability of and proximity to limited service food outlets vary widely across schools in British Columbia and school-level characteristics are significantly associated with food outlet availability. Additional research is needed to understand how food environment exposures inside and surrounding schools impact students' attitudes, food choices and dietary quality.

  18. Genomic Analysis of a Serotype 5 Streptococcus pneumoniae Outbreak in British Columbia, Canada, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ruth R.; Langille, Morgan G. I.; Montoya, Vincent; Crisan, Anamaria; Stefanovic, Aleksandra; Martin, Irene; Patrick, David M.; Romney, Marc; Tyrrell, Gregory; Jones, Steven J. M.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tang, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background. Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause a wide spectrum of disease, including invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). From 2005 to 2009 an outbreak of IPD occurred in Western Canada, caused by a S. pneumoniae strain with multilocus sequence type (MLST) 289 and serotype 5. We sought to investigate the incidence of IPD due to this S. pneumoniae strain and to characterize the outbreak in British Columbia using whole-genome sequencing. Methods. IPD was defined according to Public Health Agency of Canada guidelines. Two isolates representing the beginning and end of the outbreak were whole-genome sequenced. The sequences were analyzed for single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and putative genomic islands. Results. The peak of the outbreak in British Columbia was in 2006, when 57% of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were serotype 5. Comparison of two whole-genome sequenced strains showed only 10 SNVs between them. A 15.5 kb genomic island was identified in outbreak strains, allowing the design of a PCR assay to track the spread of the outbreak strain. Discussion. We show that the serotype 5 MLST 289 strain contains a distinguishing genomic island, which remained genetically consistent over time. Whole-genome sequencing holds great promise for real-time characterization of outbreaks in the future and may allow responses tailored to characteristics identified in the genome. PMID:27366170

  19. Spatiotemporal patterns of observed bark beetle-caused tree mortality in British Columbia and the western United States.

    PubMed

    Meddens, Arjan J H; Hicke, Jeffrey A; Ferguson, Charles A

    2012-10-01

    Outbreaks of aggressive bark beetle species cause widespread tree mortality, affecting timber production, wildlife habitat, wildfire, forest composition and structure, biogeochemical cycling, and biogeophysical processes. As a result, agencies responsible for forest management in the United States and British Columbia conduct aerial surveys to map these forest disturbances. Here we combined aerial surveys from British Columbia (2001 2010) and the western conterminous United States (1997-2010), produced 1-km2 grids of the area of crown mortality from bark beetle attack, and analyzed spatial and temporal patterns. We converted aerial-survey polygon data for each combination of host type and bark beetle species available in the western United States, and for each bark beetle species available in British Columbia. We converted affected area (which includes live and killed trees) to mortality area (crown area of killed trees) using species-specific crown diameters and the number (U.S.) or percentage (British Columbia) of killed trees. In the United States we also produced an upper estimate of mortality area by forcing the mortality area to match that from high-resolution imagery in Idaho, Colorado, and New Mexico. Resulting adjustment factors of 3.7-20.9 illustrate the underestimate of mortality by the U.S. aerial surveys. The upper estimate, which we suggest is more realistic, better matched the spatial patterns and severity of the British Columbia mortality area. Cumulative mortality area from all bark beetles was 5.46 Mha in British Columbia in 2001-2010 and 0.47-5.37 Mha (lower and upper estimate) in the western conterminous United States during 1997-2010. We note that we report year of detection here; studies that consider year of tree mortality should shift the time series back one year. We conclude by discussing uses and limitations of these data in ecological studies, including uncertainties associated with assumptions in the methods, lack of complete coverage

  20. Metal content of road deposited sediment and fluvial channel-bed sediment in the City of Prince George, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Phil; Droppo, Ian; Taylor, Kevin; Caley, Katrina; Campbell, Sarah; Rutherford, Mike

    2010-05-01

    Over 50% of the global population live in urban centres and, therefore, an understanding of the processes acting upon urban systems is a global issue. The nature of human-made, often impervious, land surfaces and heavily engineered waterways results in hydrological and sedimentological systems in urbanised basins which contrast significantly to those within more natural (i.e. pristine, forested, agricultural) aquatic systems. In addition, the abundance of contamination sources in urban systems results in chemical pressures often manifested as high pollution concentrations or loadings which in turn have detrimental impacts on human and ecosystem health. We collected samples of road deposited sediment (RDS) and fluvial channel-bed sediment within the city of Prince George, British Columbia, in order to determine the metal content of the sediment within the urban landscape, and to investigate the link between the urban road surface and the urban river network, which flows into the Fraser River. Replicate samples of RDS were collected from street surfaces in fall 2008, summer 2009 and fall 2009, air-dried, and sieved into: 500-250 microns, 250-125 microns, 125-63 microns and <63 microns. We are currently undertaking a chemical sequential extraction to give detailed information on the metal speciation within the different size classes. Samples of channel bed sediment have also been analysed for total metal content. This presentation describes this work and presents preliminary results.

  1. Response to ‘Discussion: “Streamlined erosional residuals and drumlins in central British Columbia, Canada”’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenagan, J. Donald

    2014-03-01

    A response is given to 'Discussion: “Streamlined erosional residuals and drumlins in central British Columbia, Canada”'. Emphasis is made that the main purpose of the paper under discussion is to present the recognition of a distinctive landscape pattern in central British Columbia that appears to be an immense anastomosing channel network. A channel network of the magnitude described requires a large magnitude of flowing water to form it. Thus, that recognizable landscape pattern and associated upland landform shapes can be explained as products of water erosion. Such landscape patterns are observed being formed by water today.

  2. A bi-directional river plume: The Columbia in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, B.; Geier, S.; Kachel, N.; MacFadyen, A.

    2005-09-01

    Freshwater plumes have important effects on marine ecosystems: in the presence of a plume, stratification, nutrient pathways, light and circulation patterns are significantly altered from patterns that occur under the influence of wind and ambient currents alone. The historical picture of the plume from the Columbia River is of a freshwater plume oriented southwest offshore of the Oregon shelf in summer and north or northwest along the Washington shelf in winter. Recent CTD data and new data from moored sensors support a picture quite different from the historical seasonal pattern. Specifically, the plume is frequently present up to 150 km north of the river mouth on the Washington shelf from spring to fall, even during periods of upwelling. The plume is frequently bi-directional, with branches both north and south of the river mouth. During a downwelling event, the southwest plume moves onshore over the Oregon shelf. At the same time, a new plume forms north of the river mouth over the Washington shelf, trapped within ˜20-30 km of the coast. This plume propagates and also is advected northward by inner shelf currents that reverse during downwelling. When winds return to upwelling-favorable, inner shelf currents reverse immediately to flow to the south and the shallow plume is advected offshore in the wind-driven Ekman layer. Once over the central shelf, the plume is advected farther south by the seasonal mean ambient flow. Overall, freshwater from the Columbia plume overlies the Washington shelf ˜50% or more of the summer. Capping of upwelling on the inner shelf by the Columbia freshwater plume is illustrated, where the "capping potential" is related to stratification and wind magnitude and duration. Evidence is also presented to suggest that the seaward front of the Columbia River plume may provide a barrier to the transport of harmful algal blooms to coastal beaches in summer and early fall.

  3. 77 FR 32021 - Safety Zones: Fireworks Displays in the Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zones: Fireworks Displays in the Captain of the Port Columbia... Guard will enforce the safety zones for fireworks displays in the Sector Columbia River Captain of the... safety zone without permission of the Captain of the Port Columbia River or his designated...

  4. Articulation Committee Handbook: A Guide to the Mandate and Operations of Provincial Post-Secondary Articulation Committees in British Columbia. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, Vancouver.

    This handbook, created by the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT), serves as a guide to individuals who serve on postsecondary articulation committees in British Columbia. The handbook is divided into four parts. Part A includes a chart detailing the major activities of BCCAT and a description of the membership, purpose,…

  5. British Columbia Jurisdictional Report Submitted to the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada for the Period April 1, 2006-March 31, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report is a summary of projects and activities completed by the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) during the period April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007. Its purpose is to inform the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) of the steps taken in British Columbia to improve student mobility and credit transfer in…

  6. Profile of BC College Transfer Students Admitted to the University of Northern British Columbia: 2003/04 to 2007/08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupp, Linda; Zajac, David

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a profile of undergraduate transfer students admitted to the University of Northern British Columbia from British Columbia colleges over the five-year fiscal period, 2003-04 to 2007-08 (Summer 2003 to Winter 2008). It includes a general profile of BC college transfer students, their academic performance while at UNBC, and a…

  7. Transfer Credit Assessment for B.C. College Transfer Students Admitted to the University of British Columbia in the 1997/98 Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reh-Bosch, Susan; Atkins, Lorraine

    This report assesses the transfer credit process for British Columbia (BC) college transfer applicants to the University of British Columbia (UBC). Results indicate that students are earning on average 49.7 credits from the BC college attended and are being granted an average of 42.2 credits when transferring to UBC. This translated into 84.9% of…

  8. British Columbia Jurisdictional Report to the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada for the Period April 1, 2008-March 31, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report is a summary of projects and activities completed by the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) during the period April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009. Its purpose is to inform the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) of the steps taken in British Columbia to improve student mobility and credit transfer in…

  9. Quality of surface waters in the lower Columbia River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santos, John F.

    1965-01-01

    This report, made during 1959-60, provides reconnaissance data on the quality of waters in the lower Columbia River basin ; information on present and future water problems in the basin; and data that can be employed both in water-use studies and in planning future industrial, municipal, and agricultural expansion within this area. The lower Columbia River basin consists of approximately 46,000 square miles downstream from the confluence of the Snake and Columbia Rivers The region can be divided into three geographic areas. The first is the heavily forested, sparsely populated mountain regions in which quality of water in general is related to geologic and climatological factors. The second is a semiarid plateau east of the Cascade Mountains; there differences in geology and precipitation, together with more intensive use of available water for irrigation, bring about marked differences in water quality. The third is the Willamette-Puget trough area in which are concentrated most of the industry and population and in which water quality is influenced by sewage and industrial waste disposal. The majority of the streams in the lower Columbia River basin are calcium magnesium bicarbonate waters. In general, the rivers rising in the. Coast Range and on the west slope of the Cascade Range contain less than 100 parts per million of dissolved solids, and hardness of the water is less than 50 parts per million. Headwater reaches of the streams on the east slope of the Cascade Range are similar to those on the west slope; but, downstream, irrigation return flows cause the dissolved-solids content and hardness to increase. Most of the waters, however, remain calcium magnesium bicarbonate in type. The highest observed dissolved-solids concentrations and also some changes in chemical composition occur in the streams draining the more arid parts of the area. In these parts, irrigation is chiefly responsible for increasing the dissolved-solids concentration and altering the

  10. Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

    1992-09-01

    Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

  11. Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

    1992-09-01

    Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

  12. Description and Analysis of School District Consultation Processes during Phase 1 of the British Columbia Year-Round School Study Project: A Study Conducted for the British Columbia Ministry of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocque, Linda; Shields, Carolyn

    In July 1994, the British Columbia Ministry of Education invited proposals from school districts interested in studying the feasibility of year-round schools (YRS). This paper presents findings of a study of six partner school districts, each of which implemented its project independently of others while engaging in cross-district collaboration.…

  13. Forecasting Impacts of Climate Change on Indicators of British Columbia's Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Keith Richard

    Understanding the relationships between biodiversity and climate is essential for predicting the impact of climate change on broad-scale landscape processes. Utilizing indirect indicators of biodiversity derived from remotely sensed imagery, we present an approach to forecast shifts in the spatial distribution of biodiversity. Indirect indicators, such as remotely sensed plant productivity metrics, representing landscape seasonality, minimum growth, and total greenness have been linked to species richness over broad spatial scales, providing unique capacity for biodiversity modeling. Our goal is to map future spatial distributions of plant productivity metrics based on expected climate change and to quantify anticipated change to park habitat in British Columbia. Using an archival dataset sourced from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite from the years 1987 to 2007 at 1km spatial resolution, corresponding historical climate data, and regression tree modeling, we developed regional models of the relationships between climate and annual productivity growth. Historical interconnections between climate and annual productivity were coupled with three climate change scenarios modeled by the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis (CCCma) to predict and map productivity components to the year 2065. Results indicate we can expect a warmer and wetter environment, which may lead to increased productivity in the north and higher elevations. Overall, seasonality is expected to decrease and greenness productivity metrics are expected to increase. The Coastal Mountains and high elevation edge habitats across British Columbia are forecasted to experience the greatest amount of change. In the future, protected areas may have potential higher greenness and lower seasonality as represented by indirect biodiversity indicators. The predictive model highlights potential gaps in protection along the central interior and Rocky Mountains. Protected

  14. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

  15. Columbia River flood basalts from a centralized crustal magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.; Hart, G. L.; Patterson, J. D.; Brandon, A. D.

    2008-03-01

    The Columbia River Basalt Group in the northwestern United States, comprising about 230,000 cubic kilometres of rock, exhibits unusual patterns in lava distribution, geochemistry and its apparent relationship to regional tectonics. Consequently, there is little consensus on the origin of its magmas. Here, we examine the isotopic ratios of Sr, Nd, Pb and Os and trace-element abundances in Columbia River basalts. The results suggest that most of the lava was produced when magma derived from a mantle plume assimilated continental crust in a central magma chamber system located at the boundary between the North American craton and the accreted terranes of Idaho and Oregon. Other, related basalts are the product of mixing between the mantle plume and different types of regional upper mantle. Magma was then transported over a wide region by an extensive network of dykes, a process that has been identified in other flood basalt provinces as well. Interactions of the plume with surrounding upper mantle, and of mantle-derived magmas with regional crust, provide a relatively simple model to explain the more unusual features of the main-phase Columbia River Basalts.

  16. Red tree voles in the Columbia River Gorge and Hood River basin, Oregon

    Treesearch

    Eric D. Forsman; James K. Swingle; Michael A. McDonald; Scott A. Graham; Nicholas R. Hatch

    2009-01-01

    In 2003 to 2008, we conducted surveys to document the eastern and northern range limits of red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus) in the Columbia River Gorge and Hood River basin, Oregon. Our survey indicated the current range of the vole includes the area from Wahkeena Creek, 20 km east of Troutdale to Seneca Fouts State Park, 6 km west of Hood...

  17. Pioneering a Profession in Canada. Graduate Study in Adult Education at the University of British Columbia 1961-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Univ., Vancouver. Faculty of Education.

    The five chapters in this publication relate to the development of the program of graduate study in adult education at the University of British Columbia. Chapter I, The Origin and Form of Graduate Study, by Coolie Verner and Alberta Johnston, discusses: The Nature of Adult Education (The Field, The Discipline, The Profession), The Graduate…

  18. Habitat selection of Northern Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus brooksi) on the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Michael Gill; Richard J. Cannings

    1997-01-01

    The Northern Saw-whet Owl of the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia is recognized as a distinct subspecies Aegolius acadicus brooksi. Little is known of the biology of this subspecies, and no nests have ever been found. We surveyed for Northern Saw-whet Owls on the Queen Charlotte Islands between 4 May and 28 May, 1996 establishing 10 survey...

  19. Evaluation of the Courtlink Auto Crime Prevention Program (CACPP) for Senior Elementary and Alternative School Students in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Charles K.; Meehan, George

    This study evaluated the Courtlink Auto Crime Prevention Program (CACPP), a 13-hour curriculum for senior elementary school and secondary school alternative program at-risk students in British Columbia, Canada. The program provides students with information about automobile crime and its costs, consequences, and prevention. It promotes positive…

  20. Education Funding. A Brief to the Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services from the British Columbia Teacher's Federation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The British Columbia Teachers' Federation and a number of its locals annually present to the Select Standing Committee. They do so because they think it is important to inform the committee and the public about the difference between the education funding decisions made by government and the reality of the needs in the schools. In reading through…

  1. Connecting to the Art Market from Home: An Exploration of First Nations Artists in Alert Bay, British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Margaret R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, Northwest Coast First Nations artists have been active participants in local and external economic markets. In Alert Bay, British Columbia, home of the 'Namgis People of the Kwakwaka'wakw Nation, artists have sold their work in urban centers since the 1950s. Now they are more rigorously involved in selling their work to local shops…

  2. Bending the Bars of the Identity Cage: Amy Brown and the Development of Teacher Identity in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raptis, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In September 1939, Amy (Brown) Dauphinee took up her first teaching appointment at Tate Creek, British Columbia where 518 refugees had recently settled after fleeing Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland. Amy--an avowed Social Democrat and member of the Young Socialist League--quickly embraced the refugees who were largely trade union activists and Social…

  3. University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre Partners with CPTAC | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre, a leader in proteomic technology development, has partnered with the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to make targeted proteomic assays accessible to the community through NCI’s CPTAC Assay Portal (https://assays.cancer.gov).

  4. Profile of BC College Transfer Students Admitted to the University of British Columbia: 2003/04 to 2007/08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Maberly, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the demographics, performance, and success of students who were admitted to the University of British Columbia's Vancouver campus on the basis of a minimum 24 transfer credits earned at a BC college during the five year period comprising the 2003/04 through 2007/08 academic years. The report mines familiar ground--similar…

  5. Influence of Survey Length and Radius Size on Grassland Bird Surveys by Point Counts at Williams Lake, British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Jean-Pierre L. Savard; Tracey D. Hooper

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effect of survey length and radius on the results of point count surveys for grassland birds at Williams Lake, British Columbia. Four- and 8-minute counts detected on average 68 percent and 85 percent of the number of birds detected during 12-minute counts. The most efficient sampling duration was 4 minutes, as long as travel time between points was...

  6. Adult Basic Education in British Columbia's Public Post-Secondary Institutions. An Articulation Handbook. 2007-2008 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Advanced Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This is the twenty-second edition of the Adult Basic Education (ABE) Articulation Handbook for British Columbia's public postsecondary institutions. The purpose of ABE articulation is to ensure learners have access to quality courses, receive appropriate credits and are able to transfer easily among publicly-funded colleges, university colleges,…

  7. Preschooler Study: The Medical, Social and Economic Correlates of Poverty in Preschool Children of British Columbia. A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonkin, Roger S.; And Others

    Over 200 families from lower and middle income areas of British Columbia, including a group representing the Indian communities, were studied in this effort to examine poverty as it relates to families, especially to young children. A wide variety of health, social, and economic variables were examined in the hope of developing output criteria for…

  8. Accountability Synopticism: How a Think Tank and the Media Developed a Quasimarket for School Choice in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Michael; Webb, P. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how a locally developed school ranking system affected student enrolment patterns in British Columbia over time. In developing an annual school "report card" that was published in newspapers and online, the Vancouver-based Fraser Institute created a marketplace for school choice by devising an accountability scheme…

  9. Accountability Synopticism: How a Think Tank and the Media Developed a Quasimarket for School Choice in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Michael; Webb, P. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how a locally developed school ranking system affected student enrolment patterns in British Columbia over time. In developing an annual school "report card" that was published in newspapers and online, the Vancouver-based Fraser Institute created a marketplace for school choice by devising an accountability scheme…

  10. Directory of Environmental Organizations for Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and the Province of British Columbia, February 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle, WA.

    Organizations dedicated to protecting the environment through on-going, active programs are listed in this directory. Prepared by Region 10 of the Environmental Protection Agency to serve Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and the Province of British Columbia, the volume is an update of a 1972 edition. Generally included are: the name of the…

  11. Updated Graduation Requirements Review. A Brief to the Ministry of Education from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF) is a union of professionals that represents the 41,000 teachers in BC's public-education system. The BCTF is committed to success for every student in a strong and stable public-education system. In reviewing the current BC graduation requirements and plans for the draft curriculum in the fall of…

  12. Agencies and Organizations. Made in B.C.: A History of Postsecondary Education in British Columbia. Volume 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    This report describes agencies (established by government) and organizations (established by others) that dealt exclusively with postsecondary education in British Columbia, Canada and which had at least one professional employee and/or were separate legal entities. Of the fifty groups described since 1960, about two dozen existed in 2012. The…

  13. The importance of floristics to sagebrush breeding birds of the south Okanagan and Similkameen Valleys, British Columbia

    Treesearch

    Susan Paczek; Pam Krannitz

    2005-01-01

    Habitat associations were determined for five species of songbirds breeding in sagebrush habitat of the South Okanagan and Similkameen valleys, British Columbia. We examined the relative importance of plant species versus “total forbs” and “total grasses” at a local level (<100 m) with point counts and vegetation survey...

  14. The Emerging Fourth Tier in K-12 Education Finance in British Columbia, Canada: Increasing Privatisation and Implications for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Wendy; Fallon, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines increasing privatisation of education in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Conceptually, the paper is informed by theories of privatisation and social justice; and methodologically, it uses policy analysis to examine documents and financial records obtained from government departments. The paper critically analyses…

  15. Education Funding: A Brief to the Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Students in British Columbia are being shortchanged in comparison to students elsewhere in Canada. The teachers of BC are urgently appealing to the Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services to recommend to government sufficient increases in education funding to reverse this situation and provide more educational services to BC…

  16. A Follow-Up Study of Non-Transfer, Academic Students from the British Columbia Community Colleges: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gordon; And Others

    In Fall 1979, a survey was conducted to determine the attitudes and goals of a selected sample of students who had enrolled in academic transfer programs at 13 British Columbia community colleges, but who had not transferred to a four-year institution. The 24-item questionnaire asked students to provide information on: (1) full/part-time status…

  17. Connecting to the Art Market from Home: An Exploration of First Nations Artists in Alert Bay, British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Margaret R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, Northwest Coast First Nations artists have been active participants in local and external economic markets. In Alert Bay, British Columbia, home of the 'Namgis People of the Kwakwaka'wakw Nation, artists have sold their work in urban centers since the 1950s. Now they are more rigorously involved in selling their work to local shops…

  18. Private Career Colleges. Made in B.C.: A History of Postsecondary Education in British Columbia. Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2013-01-01

    This report describes private colleges serving adults which since 1936 have been required to register with the provincial government of British Columbia, Canada or, since 1993, with a regulatory body created by the government. The sector has always included career colleges, but registration was expanded temporarily in the 1990s to include all…

  19. Post-Baccalaureate Programs. Made in B.C.: A History of Postsecondary Education in British Columbia. Volume 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2013-01-01

    This report describes programs that require a bachelor's degree, not necessarily in the same field, for entry to the program. They are equivalent to at least one semester of full-time study, with at least some of the instruction delivered face-to-face in British Columbia, Canada. Graduate programs, professional programs such as law and medicine,…

  20. MCOL, frontalin, and ethanol: A potential operational trap lure for Douglas-fir beetle in British Columbia

    Treesearch

    B. Staffan Lingren; Daniel R. Miller; J.P. LaFontaine

    2012-01-01

    The Douglas-fir beetle, Dedroctonus pseudotsugae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of Douglas-fire, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) in British Columbia (Humphreys 1995). An operational trap lure for D. pseudotsugae could be useful in an integrated pest management program to minimize mortality of Douglas-...

  1. Notions of Literacy in the K-12 School System in British Columbia Education since 2002: A Contested Terrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Developing literacy competencies has become a central component of educational policy in British Columbia (BC), with policies calling for province-wide assessment and school accountability. Based on the critical policy analysis (Blaikie & Soussan, 2000) of provincial and school district documents, complemented by semi-structured interviews of…

  2. Bending the Bars of the Identity Cage: Amy Brown and the Development of Teacher Identity in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raptis, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In September 1939, Amy (Brown) Dauphinee took up her first teaching appointment at Tate Creek, British Columbia where 518 refugees had recently settled after fleeing Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland. Amy--an avowed Social Democrat and member of the Young Socialist League--quickly embraced the refugees who were largely trade union activists and Social…

  3. Aboriginal Business Capacity Building Programs in the Central Interior of British Columbia: A Collaborative Project between the University and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, Titi; Schorcht, Blanca; Brazzoni, Randall

    2011-01-01

    Aboriginal communities in Canada are typically marginalized, have very low employment participation rates, and have limited economic infrastructure. The downturn in global economies further marginalized these communities. The University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC) Continuing Studies department piloted an Aboriginal and Small Business…

  4. Instruction, Assessment, and Learning: From Standardization to a Focus on Students. A Position Paper from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental goal of teachers in public schools in British Columbia (BC) is to ensure all students of every age, through the principle of continuous learning, have an equal opportunity to develop their full capacity for artistic, cultural, emotional, intellectual, and physical growth. BC public school teachers believe that the primary purpose of…

  5. The Public-Private Partnership That Built a "Traditional" School: A Case Study from British Columbia. SAEE Research Series #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel

    This study examines the management and outcome of the public-private partnerships (P3s) school construction project used in the Auguston housing development in Abbotsford, British Columbia to build a traditionally-designed elementary school. The study explored the relationship between the project's major players, the fiscal incentives that drove…

  6. Aboriginal Business Capacity Building Programs in the Central Interior of British Columbia: A Collaborative Project between the University and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, Titi; Schorcht, Blanca; Brazzoni, Randall

    2011-01-01

    Aboriginal communities in Canada are typically marginalized, have very low employment participation rates, and have limited economic infrastructure. The downturn in global economies further marginalized these communities. The University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC) Continuing Studies department piloted an Aboriginal and Small Business…

  7. Missing XX Chromosomes or Gender In/equity in Design and Technology Education? The Case of British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braundy, Marcia; O'Riley, Pat; Petrina, Stephen; Dalley, Stephen; Paxton, Anabelle

    2000-01-01

    Presents data demonstrating the disproportionately low numbers of female technology teachers, teacher educators, and students in British Columbia. Discusses recruiting inequities, history of gendering in industrial technology classrooms, and resistance to gender-specific interventions. Outlines a technology education curriculum for all students.…

  8. "A Nice Little Wife to Make Things Pleasant": Portrayals of Women in Canadian History Textbooks Approved in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Penney

    2005-01-01

    This study examined 20th Century Canadian history textbooks authorized in British Columbia, for their portrayals of women. The texts do not adequately reflect feminist scholarship nor societal changes. The nation building narrative of the textbooks precludes the inclusion of women in important ways. In the interwar years, the women who appear in…

  9. Building a System of Autonomous Institutions: Coordination and Collaboration in British Columbia's Community College, University College, and Institute System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaber, Devron A.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the historical development of British Columbia's community college, university college, and institute system with the focus on voluntary collaboration in relation to provincial coordination and on swings between centralization and decentralization. Study examines development in BC's post secondary system in light of broader global…

  10. Communication Disorders and the Inclusion of Newcomer African Refugees in Rural Primary Schools of British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usman, Lantana M.

    2012-01-01

    In Canadian public primary schools, newcomer West African refugees like other ethnic immigrant students are a visible minority group, often referred as Linguistic and Culturally Different (LCD) students. In the province of British Columbia, newcomer immigrant students are subjected to a battery of tests, as soon as they enroll in the primary…

  11. Myiasis in pet animals in British Columbia: The potential of forensic entomology for determining duration of possible neglect

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Results of a survey of veterinarians in British Columbia included 25 past cases of myiasis and 10 active cases. Most respondents received at least 5 to 10 cases per year, with some as high as 30 per year. This study revealed some advantages and disadvantages of using forensic entomology in living animals. PMID:15646845

  12. The Emerging Fourth Tier in K-12 Education Finance in British Columbia, Canada: Increasing Privatisation and Implications for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Wendy; Fallon, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines increasing privatisation of education in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Conceptually, the paper is informed by theories of privatisation and social justice; and methodologically, it uses policy analysis to examine documents and financial records obtained from government departments. The paper critically analyses…

  13. Communication Disorders and the Inclusion of Newcomer African Refugees in Rural Primary Schools of British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usman, Lantana M.

    2012-01-01

    In Canadian public primary schools, newcomer West African refugees like other ethnic immigrant students are a visible minority group, often referred as Linguistic and Culturally Different (LCD) students. In the province of British Columbia, newcomer immigrant students are subjected to a battery of tests, as soon as they enroll in the primary…

  14. University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre Partners with CPTAC - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre, a leader in proteomic technology development, has partnered with the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to make targeted proteomic assays accessible to the community through NCI’s CPTAC Assay Portal.

  15. The Seeds of Growth and the Winds of Change. Part II: Change and Stability: Classroom Life in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah; Riecken, Ted

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes the anticipation of educational change in British Columbia associated with the Year 2000 document. The perspective on change involves positive and negative aspects dependent on values and beliefs embedded in the culture. The study of four teachers and their classrooms shows that the seeds of change have been planted. (KS)

  16. Local-scale controls of a low-severity fire regime (1750-1950), southern British Columbia, Canada

    Treesearch

    Emily K. Heyerdahl; Ken Lertzman; Stephen Karpuk

    2007-01-01

    Historical low-severity fire regimes are well characterized in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests at many sites in the western United States, but not in the southern interior of British Columbia, Canada. We reconstructed a history of low-severity fires (1750-1950) near the northern limit of ponderosa pine and demonstrated that local-scale spatial variation in...

  17. Decomposition of carrion in the marine environment in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G S; Hobischak, N R

    2004-08-01

    Decomposition of carrion in the marine environment is not well understood. This research involved the decomposition of pig carcasses in Howe Sound in British Columbia. Freshly killed pigs were submerged at two depths, 7.6 m and 15.2 m. The carcasses were tethered so that they could float or sink, but not drift away. Observations were made from May until October. Decomposition was more greatly influenced by sediment type of the sea floor and whether the carcass remained floating, than by depth. Decomposition stages were modified in the marine environment from that seen on land, or in freshwater and were similar to those reported in human death investigations in the marine environment.

  18. Chiropractic in British Columbia: sociopolitical and clinical considerations for strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Eni, G

    1991-01-01

    Findings from a major study of chiropractic in British Columbia are used to illustrate the nature of limitations that should be considered in planning chiropractics future direction. Fifty chiropractors, 60 new clients of chiropractors and selected leaders of the chiropractic profession were interviewed on a variety of issues. Results indicate that sociopolitical factors limiting chiropractic include lack of access to public facilities, absence of representation in government services, lack of public funds for research and education, limits to reimbursement for services and low social valuation. Nine findings are identified as critical to future organizational plans. We suggest that a specific planning approach, such as the critical success factor (CSF) approach, be considered as a planning framework for organizational success in complex sociopolitical environments.

  19. Seniors' prescription drug cost inflation and cost containment: evidence from British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Steven G; Agnew, Jonathan D; Barer, Morris L

    2004-06-01

    We develop an analytic framework to map out the nature and relative importance of different cost-driving trends in the prescription drug market. This is used to measure prescription drug cost-drivers for the population of seniors in British Columbia during a period when they received comprehensive public drug coverage. Between 1991 and 2001, expenditures on prescription drugs for BC seniors increased from dollar 149 to 320 million. Increases in the population of seniors, and the rate at which they utilized therapies contributed under half of the total cost increase over the period. Changes in the mix of therapies and the type of product selected explained over half of the observed drug expenditure inflation. Increased generic substitution significantly reduced the price of products selected over the period.

  20. Thickness of unconsolidated deposits of the Puget Sound aquifer system, Washington and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Puget-Willamette Lowland is located in western Washington, western Oregon, and a small part of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. The Puget-Willamette Lowland study area is composed of two distinct subareas, the Puget Sound Lowland and the Willamette Lowland. This report presents the results of mapping the thickness of the unconsolidated deposits in the Puget Sound Lowland. The thickness of the unconsolidated deposits ranges from a discontinuous veneer in areas of bedrock outcrop to more than 3,600 feet. Available information shows that the unconsolidated deposits are thickest in the Fraser-Whatcom, Everett, Seattle, and Tacoma Basins. The mapped thickness of the unconsolidated deposits in the Tacoma Basin is probably underestimated because of the scarcity of wells penetrating the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits and the lack of sufficient marine-seismic data.

  1. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of Cryptococcus gattii cases: Lessons learned from British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Eleni; Hoang, Linda; Kibsey, Pamela; Morshed, Muhammad; Phillips, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The environmental fungus Cryptococcus gattii emerged on Vancouver Island, British Columbia (BC), in 1999. By the end of 2006, it led to 176 cases and eight deaths – one of the highest burdens of C gattii disease worldwide. The present paper describes three cases, and the BC experience in the diagnosis and management of this infection. All three cases presented with pulmonary findings, including cryptococcomas and infiltrates. One also presented with brain cryptococcomas. Cases were diagnosed by chest and brain imaging, and laboratory evidence including serum or cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen detection and culture of respiratory or cerebrospinal fluid specimens. Genotyping of fungal isolates confirmed infection with C gattii VGIIa. Pulmonary cases were treated with fluconazole. One patient with central nervous system disease was treated with amphotericin B followed by fluconazole. Although this infection remains rare, clinicians should be aware of it in patients with a compatible clinical presentation who are either living in or returning from a trip to BC. PMID:20190892

  2. Rape myth acceptance in men who completed the prostitution offender program of British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolin; Kennedy, M Alexis; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2009-06-01

    In an effort to characterize the attitudes and characteristics of men who solicit sex, this study investigated rape myth acceptance as assessed by a modification of Burt's Rape Myth Acceptance Scale. The participants were all men who took part in the Prostitution Offender Program of British Columbia after being arrested for attempting to solicit sex from an undercover police officer. Relationships between endorsement of rape myths, other attitudes, sexual behavior, and demographic variables were examined. Results reveal that age, education, use of pornography, ideal frequency of intercourse, and believing that purchasing sex is a problem are all negatively correlated with rape myth acceptance. Positive correlations were found between rape myth acceptance and sexual conservatism, sexual violence/coercion, and social desirability. Results are discussed in terms of the association between rape myth acceptance and the violence frequently perpetrated against those working in the sex trade.

  3. A model simulation of biogeochemical conditions along the British Columbia Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Angelica; Fine, Isaac; Masson, Diane

    2017-04-01

    The British Columbia shelf is at the northern end of the California Current System and is influenced by summer coastal upwelling, mesoscale eddies, and freshwater inputs. A regional coupled circulation-biogeochemical (ROMS) model of this region has been developed to gain a better understanding of the potential impact of climate variability and change on lower trophic levels and the biogeochemistry of the region. A first step to address the impacts of climate variability on marine ecosystem is to develop biophysical models that simulate the present ecosystem state in relation to the climate record and can be used to examine the influence of different forcing acting, at different scales, on ecological processes. This talk will will evaluate the capability of the model to reproduce observations and to respond to main episodic events (seasonal cycle and El Niño events).

  4. A Life Cycle Assessment of integrated dairy farm-greenhouse systems in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siduo; Bi, Xiaotao Tony; Clift, Roland

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticipated environmental benefits from integrating a dairy farm and a greenhouse; the integration is based on anaerobic digestion of manures to produce biogas energy, biogenic CO2, and digested slurry. A full Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been conducted on six modeled cases applicable in British Columbia, to evaluate non-renewable energy consumption, climate change, acidification, eutrophication, respiratory effects and human toxicity. Compared to conventional practice, an integrated system has the potential to nearly halve eutrophication and respiratory effects caused by inorganic emissions and to reduce non-renewable energy consumption, climate change, and acidification by 65-90%, while respiratory effects caused by organic emissions become negative as co-products substitute for other materials. Co-digestion of other livestock manures, greenhouse plant waste, or food and food processing waste with dairy manure can further improve the performance of the integrated system.

  5. Blood levels of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc in children in a British Columbia community.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K S; Meranger, J C

    1983-09-01

    The levels of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were measured in duplicate whole blood samples of 946 apparently normal children ranging in age from 2 years to 12 years and living in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. The metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry: graphite furnace AAS for Cd and Pb, and flame AAS for Cu and Zn. The median and extreme values expressed as milligram of metal per litre of whole blood for the total population were: Cd less than or equal to 0.0005, Cu 1.11 (0.69-1.78), Pb 0.112 (0.020-0.400), and Zn 4.30 (2.10-6.53). No significant variations were noted in the median metal values either with age or with sex. The median Cu, Pb and Zn values were within the normal range.

  6. Guidelines for metal leaching and acid rock drainage at minesites in British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Price, W.A.; Errington, J.C.

    1998-12-31

    The primary objectives of this document are to describe generic requirements and outline common errors, omissions, and constraints with regard to prevention or reduction of metal leaching and acid mine drainage (ML/ARD) at British Columbia mine sites. It begins with background on ML/ARD and guiding principles for the regulation of ML/ARD in the province. This is followed by guidance on ML/ARD prediction, measures to prevent or reduce ML/ARD, general considerations and information and design requirements for specific measures (underwater storage, blending of acid-generating wastes with materials having excess neutralization potential, covering the waste, drainage collection and treatment, and mitigation of specific mine components), and geotechnical and hydrological considerations. Finally, ML/ARD aspects of mine regulation and current ML/ARD research programs are reviewed.

  7. Evidence for underthrusting beneath the Queen Charlotte Margin, British Columbia, from teleseismic receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustin, A. M. M.; Hyndman, R. D.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte Fault zone is the transpressive boundary between the North America and Pacific Plates along the northwestern margin of British Columbia. Two models have been suggested for the accommodation of the ~20 mm yr-1 of convergence along the fault boundary: (1) underthrusting; (2) internal crustal deformation. Strong evidence supporting an underthrusting model is provided by a detailed teleseismic receiver function analysis that defines the underthrusting slab. Forward and inverse modelling techniques were applied to receiver function data calculated at two permanent and four temporary seismic stations within the Queen Charlotte Islands. The modelling reveals a ~10 km thick low-velocity zone dipping eastward at 28° interpreted to be underthrusting oceanic crust. The oceanic crust is located beneath a thin (28 km) eastward thickening (10°) continental crust.

  8. The importance of policy in emissions inventory accuracy--a lesson from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Judi

    2009-04-01

    Actual atmospheric emissions in northeast British Columbia, Canada, are much higher than reported emissions. The addition of upstream oil and gas sector sources not included in the year-2000 emissions inventory of Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs) increases annual totals of nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compound emissions by 115.1, 89.9, and 109.5%, respectively. These emissions arise from numerous small and unregulated point sources (N = 10,129). CAC summaries are given by source type and source sector. An analysis of uncertainty and reporting policy suggests that inventory omissions are not limited to the study area and that Canadian pollutant emissions are systematically underestimated. The omissions suggest that major changes in reporting procedures are needed in Canada if true estimates of annual pollutant emissions are to be documented.

  9. Ultrasound as visual feedback in speech habilitation: exploring consultative use in rural British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, May B; Bacsfalvi, Penelope; Adler-Bock, Marcy; Shimizu, Reiko; Cheney, Audrey; Giesbrecht, Nathan; O'connell, Maureen; Sirianni, Jason; Radanov, Bosko

    2008-02-01

    Ultrasound has shown promise as a visual feedback tool in speech therapy. Rural clients, however, often have minimal access to new technologies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate consultative treatment using ultrasound in rural communities. Two speech-language pathologists (SLPs) trained in ultrasound use provided consultation with ultrasound in rural British Columbia to 13 school-aged children with residual speech impairments. Local SLPs provided treatment without ultrasound before and after the consultation. Speech samples were transcribed phonetically by independent trained listeners. Eleven children showed greater gains in production of the principal target /[image omitted]/ after the ultrasound consultation. Four of the seven participants who received more consultation time with ultrasound showed greatest improvement. Individual client factors also affected outcomes. The current study was a quasi-experimental clinic-based study. Larger, controlled experimental studies are needed to provide ultimate evaluation of the consultative use of ultrasound in speech therapy.

  10. Freshwater Microbialites of Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada: A Limnological Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, D. S. S.; McKay, C. P.; Laval, B.; Bird, J.; Cady, S.

    2004-01-01

    Pavillion Lake is 5.7km long and an average of 0.8 km in width, and is located in Marble Canyon in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. It is a slightly alkaline, freshwater lake with a maximum-recorded depth of 65m. The basin walls of Pavilion Lake are lined with microbialite structures that are oriented perpendicularly to the shoreline, and which are found from depths of 5 meters to the bottom of the photic zone (light levels 1% of ambient; approximately 30m depth). These structures are speculated to have begun formation nearly 11,000 years ago, after the glacial retreat of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. They are likely a distinctive assemblage of freshwater calcite microbialites, which display micromorphologies possibly related to the ancient Epiphyton and Girvanella classes of calcareous organosedimentary structures.

  11. Assessing the breast cancer risk distribution for women undergoing screening in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Weisstock, Christina R; Rajapakshe, Rasika; Bitgood, Christabelle; McAvoy, Steven; Gordon, Paula B; Coldman, Andrew J; Parker, Brent A; Wilson, Christine

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer risk estimations are both informative and useful at the population level, with many screening programs relying on these assessments to allocate resources such as breast MRI. This cross-sectional multicenter study attempts to quantify the breast cancer risk distribution for women between the ages of 40 to 79 years undergoing screening mammography in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The proportion of women at high breast cancer risk was estimated by surveying women enrolled in the Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia (SMPBC) for known breast cancer risk factors. Each respondent's 10-year risk was computed with both the Tyrer-Cuzick and Gail risk assessment models. The resulting risk distributions were evaluated using the guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (United Kingdom). Of the 4,266 women surveyed, 3.5% of women between the ages of 40 to 79 years were found to have a high 10-year risk of developing breast cancer using the Tyrer-Cuzick model (1.1% using the Gail model). When extrapolated to the screening population, it was estimated that 19,414 women in the SMPBC are considered to be at high breast cancer risk. These women may benefit from additional MRI screening; preliminary analysis suggests that 4 to 5 additional MRI machines would be required to screen these high-risk women. However, the use of different models and guidelines will modify the number of women qualifying for additional screening interventions, thus impacting the MRI resources required. The results of this project can now be used to inform decision-making groups about resource allocation for breast cancer screening in BC.

  12. Observations of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami on the Coast of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, A.; Thomson, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0) of 11 March 2011 generated highly catastrophic tsunami waves that reached runup heights of up to 40 m along the coast of Japan and were recorded by numerous coastal tide gauges and bottom pressure stations throughout the Pacific Ocean. Near the coast of British Columbia (BC), the tsunami was measured by 15 permanent tide gauges, including gauges located well inside the Strait of Georgia and at Patricia Bay in Saanich Inlet (the site of the Institute of Ocean Sciences, IOS). Tsunami waves were also recorded by 5 temporary tide gauges within Victoria Harbour waterways (Gorge and Portage inlets), by 4 NEPTUNE-Canada bottom cable observatories on the Vancouver Island shelf and by 3 VENUS bottom pressure recorders within Saanich Inlet. Maximum tsunami wave heights observed on the outer BC coast were 1.0-1.5 m, while those within the sheltered basins of the inner coast were about ten times lower. The tsunami wave signal was also observed in the temperature, salinity and current velocity records of CTDs and an ADCP installed in an anoxic Canadian fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island. The collected data enabled us to examine the statistical and spectral properties of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami on the coast of British Columbia and to estimate the relative tsunami risk for this coast from distant earthquakes. The tsunami record from the deepest NEPTUNE (CORK) station was used as the input function for the IOS regional tsunami forecast model. The computed and observed tsunami wave forms for this event were in good agreement.

  13. Costs of Planned Home vs. Hospital Birth in British Columbia Attended by Registered Midwives and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Patricia A; Mitton, Craig; Aghajanian, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Home birth is available to women in Canada who meet eligibility requirements for low risk status after assessment by regulated midwives. While UK researchers have reported lower costs associated with planned home birth, there have been no published studies of the costs of home versus hospital birth in Canada. Costs for all women planning home birth with a regulated midwife in British Columbia, Canada were compared with those of all women who met eligibility requirements for home birth and were planning to deliver in hospital with a registered midwife, and with a sample of women of similar low risk status planning birth in the hospital with a physician. We calculated costs of physician service billings, midwifery fees, hospital in-patient costs, pharmaceuticals, home birth supplies, and transport. We compared costs among study groups using the Kruskall Wallis test for independent groups. In the first 28 days postpartum, we report a $2,338 average savings per birth among women planning home birth compared to hospital birth with a midwife and $2,541 compared to hospital birth planned with a physician. In longer term outcomes, similar reductions were observed, with cost savings per birth at $1,683 compared to the planned hospital birth with a midwife, and $1,100 compared to the physician group during the first eight weeks postpartum. During the first year of life, costs for infants of mothers planning home birth were reduced overall. Cost savings compared to planned hospital births with a midwife were $810 and with a physician $1,146. Costs were similarly reduced when findings were stratified by parity. Planned home birth in British Columbia with a registered midwife compared to planned hospital birth is less expensive for our health care system up to 8 weeks postpartum and to one year of age for the infant.

  14. Susceptibility of clinical Moraxella catarrhalis isolates in British Columbia to six empirically prescribed antibiotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Bandet, Tamara; Whitehead, Sue; Blondel-Hill, Edith; Wagner, Ken; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moraxella catarrhalis is a commensal organism of the respiratory tract that has emerged as an important pathogen for a variety of upper and lower respiratory tract infections including otitis media and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Susceptibility testing of M catarrhalis is not routinely performed in most diagnostic laboratories; rather, a comment predicting susceptibility based on the literature is attached to the report. The most recent Canadian report on M catarrhalis antimicrobial susceptibility was published in 2003; therefore, a new study at this time was of interest and importance. OBJECTIVE: To determine the susceptibility of M catarrhalis isolates from British Columbia to amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, clarithromycin, cefuroxime, levofloxacin and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole. METHODS: A total of 117 clinical M catarrhalis isolates were isolated and tested from five Interior hospitals and two private laboratory centres in British Columbia between January and December 2012. Antibiotic susceptibility of M catarrhalis isolates was characterized using the Etest (E-strip; bioMérieux, USA) according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. RESULTS: All isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, clarithromycin, levofloxacin and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole. One isolate was intermediately resistant to cefuroxime, representing a 99.15% sensitivity rate to the cephem agent. Cefuroxime minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) inhibiting 50% and 90% of organisms (MIC50 and MIC90) were highest among the antibiotics tested, and the MIC90 (3 μg/mL) of cefuroxime reached the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoint of susceptibility. DISCUSSION: The antibiotic susceptibility of M catarrhalis isolates evaluated in the present study largely confirms the findings of previous surveillance studies performed in Canada. Cefuroxime MICs are in the high end of the sensitive range and the MIC50 and MIC90

  15. Modeling the Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia, Canada with 3D Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinonez, S. M.; Olaya, J. C.; Miller, K. C.; Romero, R.; Velasco, A. A.; Harder, S. H.; Cerda, I.

    2011-12-01

    The Coast Mountains Batholith on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada comprises a series of granitic to tonalitic plutons; where felsic continental crust is generated from the subduction of mafic oceanic crust by partial melting and fractionation, leaving ultra-mafic roots. In July of 2009, a large controlled-source experiment was conducted along a 400km east - west transect from Bella Bella into central British Columbia. Student volunteers from multiple universities deployed 1,800 one-component and 200 three-component geophones plus 2400 Texan data recorders with 200-m spacing intervals and shot spacing at 30-km. The 18-point sources ranged from 160 to 1,000 kg of high explosive. The geoscience component of the NSF-funded Cyber-ShARE project at UTEP focuses on fusing models developed from different data sets to develop 3-D Earth models. Created in 2007, the Cyber-ShARE Center brings together experts in computer science, computational mathematics, education, earth science, and environmental science. We leverage the Cyber-ShARE work to implement an enhanced 3-D finite difference tomography approach for P-wave delays times (Hole, 1992) with a graphical user interface and visualization framework. In particular, to account for model sensitivity to picked P-wave arrival times, we use a model fusion approach (Ochoa et al., 2010) to generate a model with the lowest RMS residual that a combination of a set of Monte Carlo sample models. In order to make the seismic tomography process more interactive at many points, visualizations of model perturbation at each iteration will help to troubleshoot when a model is not converging to highlight where the RMS residual values are the highest to pinpoint where changes need to be made to achieve model convergence. Finally, a model of the upper mantle using 3-D P-wave tomography will be made to determine the location of these ultra-mafic roots.

  16. Diatom Records of Holocene Environmental and Climatic Change in Southeastern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, K. S.; Gavin, D. G.; Fritz, S. C.; Hu, F.; Roschen, L. A.

    2004-12-01

    The sediments of three lakes, spanning a latitudinal gradient and situated within the Interior Cedar-Hemlock biogeoclimatic zone of southeast British Columbia, have been analyzed for independent records of Holocene climate and vegetation history in order to evaluate the role of climate as a control on range expansion of western hemlock and western redcedar. Holocene climate reconstructions are based on multiple proxies, including the diatom and biogenic silica stratigraphies presented here. To our knowledge, these sites provide the first continuous Holocene paleoecological and paleoclimatic records from the region between the Interior Plateau and the Rocky Mountains. Stratigraphic variability in the diatom sedimentary records reflects lake response to changes in water balance, catchment development, and atmospheric inputs of silica (i.e. volcanic ash). At Eleanor Lake, the diatom record shows significant assemblage shifts at ˜7500, 6300, and 3700 cal yr BP. Increased abundance of planktonic and tychoplanktonic diatoms and an increase in the abundance of chrysophyte cysts relative to diatoms at 6300 cal yr BP is consistent with an increase in effective moisture at this time. At Mirror Lake, in the south, an assemblage dominated by small benthic species is replaced by a predominantly planktonic assemblage at 6900 cal yr BP, suggesting an earlier increase in lake level. After 6000 cal yr BP, planktonic diatoms further increase in dominance. These dates are consistent with reconstructions of Holocene climate in south-central British Columbia, which suggest a shift to moister conditions ca. 7000 to 6000 cal yr BP. The pollen record indicates the expansion of western hemlock and western redcedar near Mirror Lake at 3550 cal yr BP and 3250 cal yr BP respectively. At Eleanor Lake, hemlock expansion is dated at 4350 cal yr BP. The data indicate a difference of 1950 to > 3000 years between the lacustrine record of increased effective moisture and the vegetation response and

  17. Local government policies toward environmentally sensitive areas in British Columbia, Canada; Washington and Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Michael D.; Reganold, John P.

    1989-07-01

    While there has been sustained debate on the issue of provincial and state versus local government environmental planning, maintaining privately owned natural resources in the public interest is increasingly viewed as beyond the scope of local governments alone. This paper describes and compares province- and state-level mandates and options for local governments (i.e., city, county, or district) to regulate land uses of environmentally sensitive areas (ESAs) in British Columbia in Canada and in Washington and Oregon in the United States. We define ESAs as landscape elements or places that are vital to the long-term maintenance of biological diversity, soil, water, and other natural resources, especially as they relate to human health, safety, and welfare, both on-site and in a regional context. Underlying similarities are that all three jurisdictions legally express the need for land-use planning by local governments in managing ESAs. Although all three jurisdictions exhibit similar problems in their attempt to accomplish this, ESA planning by local governments is an optional process in British Columbia and Washington but mandatory in Oregon. Furthermore, actual processes prescribed by each of the three jurisdictions are quite different. The information base upon which local regulation of privately held ESAs depends is variable, both within and between the province- and statelevel jurisdictions. Other than for some specific water-related resources, standard definitions and inventory methods for ESAs are lacking, as is coordination among local governments or among the province- and state-level governments. This study concludes that there is a need for a regional environmental information system in the Pacific Northwest based upon an integrated and scientific approach toward ESA structures and functions.

  18. The impact of cost sharing on antidepressant use among older adults in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Philip S; Patrick, Amanda R; Dormuth, Colin R; Avorn, Jerry; Maclure, Malcolm; Canning, Claire F; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2008-04-01

    Antidepressant therapies are underused among older adults and could be further curtailed by patient cost-sharing requirements. The authors studied the effects of two sequential cost-sharing policies in a large, stable population of all British Columbia seniors: change from full prescription coverage to 10-25 dollars copayments (copay) in January 2002 and replacement with income-based deductibles and 25% coinsurance in May 2003. PharmaNet data were used to calculate monthly dispensing of antidepressants (in imipramine-equivalent milligrams) among all British Columbia residents age 65 and older beginning January 1997 through December 2005. Monthly rates of starting and stopping antidepressants were calculated. Population-level patterns over time were plotted, and the effects of implementing cost-sharing policies on antidepressant use, initiation, and stopping were examined in segmented linear regression models. Implementation of the copay policy was not associated with significant changes in level of antidepressant dispensing or the rate of dispensing growth. Subsequent implementation of the income-based deductible policy also did not lead to a significant change in dispensing level but led to a significant (p=.02) decrease in the rate of growth of antidepressant dispensing. The copay policy was associated with a significant (p=.01) drop in the frequency of antidepressant initiation among persons with depression. Income-based deductibles reduced the rate of increase in antidepressant initiation over time. Implementation of the copay and income-based deductible policies did not have significant effects on stopping rates. Introducing new forms of medication cost sharing appears to have the potential to reduce some use and initiation of antidepressant therapy by seniors. The clinical consequences of such reduced use need to be clarified.

  19. Standing at the crossroads: Identity and recognition of the Applied Science Technologist in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, Thomas

    Modern technical education in British Columbia has been affected by two societal trends: in industry, engineering technology evolved as a discipline to bridge the increasing chasm between the process-oriented skill sets of tradespersons/technicians, and the declarative knowledge focus of engineering; in education, the provincial college and institute system was created to address the need for a new post-secondary credential situated between trades certificates and university degrees. The Applied Science Technologist arguably forms the intersection of these two concepts. Almost forty years after its inception, it is timely to ask if the original model has matured into a distinct occupational category in industry, education, and in the public mind. The thesis proposes three environments, the Formative, Market and Public Domain, respectively. Interviews, surveys and personal experience afforded insights into the dynamics of these domains with respect to a fledgling occupational category, while the socio-philosophical concepts of culture, habitus and social imaginary provide the tools to interpret the findings. The thesis postulates that an emerging occupational category will not only challenge existing cultures and habitus, but that over time it will influence the imaginaries of each domain and society as a whole. Ultimately, the occupational category will be truly successful only when the general public is able to distinguish it from related disciplines. Charles Taylor's writings on multiculturalism are used to discuss identity and recognition of the Applied Science Technologist in each domain while Pierre Bourdieu's perspectives on the existence of habitus and self-proliferating elites form the framework to examine the relationships between technologists and engineers. Taylor's theory of multiple concurrent social imaginaries guides the comparison of divergent expectations among academic, career and vocational instructors at British Columbia's colleges. The thesis

  20. Ecological risk of pesticide residues in the British Columbia environment: 1973-2012.

    PubMed

    Wan, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    An updated ecological risk assessment was conducted to re-evaluate and review the overall risk of pesticide residues to certain aquatic life. The focus was the impact on offsite non-target, freshwater organisms of pesticide operational sprays in British Columbia from 1973 until 2012. The values of risk quotients for pesticides of selected indicator organisms were determined to measure the effect. When compared with organophosphorus, carbamate, and other miscellaneous pesticides, this risk assessment analysis suggests that the historical use of persistent and highly toxic organochlorine pesticides posed, and continue to pose, a deleterious ecological risk. The risk is both short-term acute and long-term sub-acute, chronic toxicity to offsite, non-target aquatic invertebrates and juvenile salmonid fish. Data indicated that these organisms were, and remain, subjected to harmful effects of pesticide residues to varying degrees. Most vulnerable were, and also are, benthic organisms inhabiting bottom sediments. This substrate is the natural sink for persistent pesticide residues, predominantly organochlorine pesticides from historical use, as well as dioxins, furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wood preservatives, and other sources. Environment Canada's main aquatic protection strategy was a 10 metre no-treatment buffer zone, augmented with an additional appropriate setback along shorelines of fishery and wildlife resource-sensitive water bodies. This study discusses why this guideline was necessary, useful and effective, but was only partially successful. The physical-chemical properties of pesticide residues, from either an individual compound or different compounds in combination, also influence the nature of biological impacts on non-target, aquatic organisms. Few studies have been conducted in British Columbia aquatic environments to investigate the significance of this aspect.

  1. The sex factor: epidemiology and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Camp, Pat G; Chaudhry, Munaza; Platt, Howard; Roch, Michael; Road, Jeremy; Sin, Donald; Levy, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in women have been predicted to overtake that of men within the next decade. These predictions are based in part on data from surveys using self-reports of a COPD diagnosis. Whether these predictions have been realized is unknown. The prevalence and mortality of men and women in British Columbia were compared from fiscal years 1992/1993 to 2003/2004 using administrative health services data. Case definitions for COPD were developed using International Classification of Diseases ninth and 10th revision (ICD-9/10) codes applied to medical and hospital data. Individuals 45 years and older, who had at least two physician visits or one hospitalization for specified COPD ICD-9/10 codes within a 365-day window, were considered to be cases. Cases were ascertained from 1992 to 2004. In 2003/2004, men had a greater prevalence (4.7% versus 4.0% in women) and a higher all-cause mortality rate (5.4% versus 4.1% in women) than women. Both men and women with COPD had low COPD medication use (45%) and low referral for lung function testing (55%). Including the ICD-9 code for 'bronchitis, not specified as acute or chronic' (ICD-9 490) in the case definition resulted in a greater prevalence of COPD in women than in men overall, and in the 45 to 64 year age group. Prevalence and mortality measured with administrative health data do not show evidence of relative increase in the prevalence of COPD for women in British Columbia. However, further analysis of ICD-9 490 may identify an early 'at-risk' group, specifically in women.

  2. Radiation Dose Survey for Common Computed Tomography Exams: 2013 British Columbia Results.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Yogesh; Bjarnason, Thorarin A; Baxter, Patricia; Griffith, Mitch; Eaton, Kirk

    2016-02-01

    In 2013 Health Canada conducted a national survey of computed tomography (CT) radiation usage. We analysed contributions from all 7 public health authorities in the province of British Columbia, which covered scanner age, number of slices, and common adult protocols (≥ 19 years: 70 ± 20 kg, head, chest, abdomen/pelvis, and trunk). Patient doses were recorded for common protocols. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) was calculated using scanner data with >10 patient doses recorded for each protocol. Data was analysed based on image reconstruction (filtered backprojection vs iterative reconstruction [IR] vs IR available but not in use). Provincial response was 92%, with 59 of 64 CT data used for analysis. The average scanner age was 5.5 years old, with 39% of scanners installed between 2008-2013; 78.5% of scanners were multislice (>64 slices), and 44% of scanners had IR available. Overall British Columbia DRLs were: head = 1305, chest = 529, abdomen/pelvis = 819, and trunk = 1225. DRLs were consistent with Health Canada recommendations and other Canadian published values, but above international standards. For sites with IR available, less than 50% used this technology routinely for head, chest and trunk exams. Overall, use of IR reduced radiation usage between 11%-32% compared to filtered backprojection, while sites using IR vs IR available used 30%/43% less radiation for head/chest exams (P < .05). No significant difference was observed for abdomen/pelvis exams (P = .385). With the fast pace of CT technical advancement, DRLs should reflect the technology used, instead of just globally applied to anatomical regions. Federal guidelines should be updated at a higher frequency to reflect new technology. In addition, new technologies must be utilised to optimize image quality vs radiation usage. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatial analysis of mass wasting and topography in coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Y.; Sjogren, D.

    2003-04-01

    The large inventory of mass wasting data collected by Gimbarzevsky (1988) for the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia is an exceptional data base. The archipelago is located approximately 80 km off the coast of British Columbia and is seismically active, having the potential for earthquakes of large magnitude. The climate is mild, wet (1300 to 3600 mm/yr) and very windy. These factors together contribute to a high frequency of landsliding. The inventory consists of 8328 debris slides, debris avalanches, debris flows and debris torrents. Identification and characterization of events were based on 1:50 000 panchromatic aerial photographs and 1:50 000 map sheets. UTM grid cells of area 1 km^2 were used to classify landslide attributes, such as gradient and aspect. Since the original analysis was undertaken, significant advances have been made in the availability of topographic data and techniques to assess the spatial distribution of mass wasting events and associated landscape attributes. The mass wasting events, originally plotted on 1:50 000 NTS map sheets, are digitized and transferred to the 25-m DEM available for the Queen Charlotte Islands. This format allows for improved analysis of the original data base and, in particular, landscape attributes which may affect mass wasting frequency. Sensitivity analysis is undertaken to explore the effects of improved topographic resolution on results. In addition, the GIS format allows us to extend the original analysis using the sophisticated analytical techniques now available. Gimbarzevsky, P. (1988) Mass Wasting on the Queen Charlotte Islands: A Regional Inventory, BC Ministry of Forests and Lands, Land Management Report, 29, 96 pp.

  4. Mental health, job satisfaction, and intention to relocate. Opinions of physicians in rural British Columbia.

    PubMed Central

    Thommasen, H. V.; Lavanchy, M.; Connelly, I.; Berkowitz, J.; Grzybowski, S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of depression and burnout among family physicians working in British Columbia's Northern and Isolation Allowance communities. Current level of satisfaction with work and intention to move were also investigated. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, mailed survey. SETTING: Family practices in rural communities eligible for British Columbia's Northern and Isolation Allowance. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of family physicians practising in rural BC communities. Initial response rate was 66% (131/198 surveys returned); excluding physicians on leave and in temporary situations and those who received duplicate mailings gave a corrected response rate of 92% (131/142 surveys returned). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographics; self-reported depression and burnout; Beck Depression Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory scores; job satisfaction; and intention to leave. RESULTS: Self-reported depression rate was 29%; the Beck Depression Inventory indicated 31% of physicians suffered from mild to severe depression. About 13% of physicians reported taking antidepressants in the past 5 years. Self-reported burnout rate was 55%; the Maslach Burnout Inventory showed that 80% of physicians suffered from moderate-to-severe emotional exhaustion, 61% suffered from moderate-to-severe depersonalization, and 44% had moderate-to-low feelings of personal accomplishment. Depression scores correlated with emotional exhaustion scores. More than half the respondents were considering relocation. CONCLUSION: Physicians working in these communities suffer from high levels of depression and very high levels of burnout and are dissatisfied with their current jobs. More than half are considering relocating. Intention to move is strongly associated with poor mental health. PMID:11340754

  5. Antiretroviral drug costs and prescription patterns in British Columbia, Canada: 1996-2011.

    PubMed

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Montaner, Julio S G; Yip, Benita; Lima, Viviane D; Hogg, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    Treatment options and therapeutic guidelines have evolved substantially since highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) became the standard of HIV care in 1996. We conducted the present population-based analysis to characterize the determinants of direct costs of HAART over time in British Columbia, Canada. We considered individuals ever receiving HAART in British Columbia from 1996 to 2011. Linear mixed-effects regression models were constructed to determine the effects of demographic indicators, clinical stage, and treatment characteristics on quarterly costs of HAART (in 2010$CDN) among individuals initiating in different temporal periods. The least-square mean values were estimated by CD4 category and over time for each temporal cohort. Longitudinal data on HAART recipients (N = 9601, 17.6% female, mean age at initiation = 40.5) were analyzed. Multiple regression analyses identified demographics, treatment adherence, and pharmacological class to be independently associated with quarterly HAART costs. Higher CD4 cell counts were associated with modestly lower costs among pre-HAART initiators [least-square means (95% confidence interval), CD4 > 500: 4674 (4632-4716); CD4: 350-499: 4765 (4721-4809) CD4: 200-349: 4826 (4780-4871); CD4 <200: 4809 (4759-4859)]; however these differences were not significant among post-2003 HAART initiators. Population-level mean costs increased through 2006 and stabilized post-2003 HAART initiators incurred quarterly costs up to 23% lower than pre-2000 HAART initiators in 2010. Our results highlight the magnitude of the temporal changes in HAART costs, and disparities between recent and pre-HAART initiators. This methodology can improve the precision of economic modeling efforts by using detailed cost functions for annual, population-level medication costs according to the distribution of clients by clinical stage and era of treatment initiation.

  6. Interannual climate variability drives regional fires in west central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Jill E.; Smith, Dan J.

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the influence of climate variability on forest fire occurrence at eight sites in west central British Columbia, Canada. Forty-six local fire years affecting a single site and 16 moderate fire years affecting two or more sites were identified (1600-1900 A.D.). Existing fire history data were incorporated to identify 17 regionally synchronous fire years (fires that affected ≥3 sites). Interannual and multidecadal relationships between fire occurrence and the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern were examined, in addition to the effects of additive positive phases of ENSO and PDO. We examined multiple reconstructions of ENSO, PDO, and PNA and utilized three methodological approaches to characterize climate-fire relationships. We found that the influence of interannual climate, expressed as PDSI, increasingly synchronized the occurrence of fires when examined from local to regional scales. An association between local fires and positive antecedent moisture conditions suggests moisture-driven fine fuel development and the proximity of some sites to grasslands likely function as key determinants of local-scale fire activity. The relationships between regional fires and ENSO, PDO, and PNA suggest that large-scale patterns of climate variability exert a weak and/or inconsistent influence over fire activity in west central British Columbia between 1700 and 1900 A.D. Although inconsistent among reconstructions of climate patterns, we identified a significant relationship between regional fires and large-scale climate patterns when ENSO and PDO were both in positive phases.

  7. Microbiological survey of locally grown lettuce sold at farmers' markets in Vancouver, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jayde L; Chen, Jessica C; Friesen, Elsie; Delaquis, Pascal; Allen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Increased consumer demand for fresh leafy produce has been paralleled by an increase in outbreaks and illness associated with these foods. Presently, data on the microbiological quality and safety of produce harvested in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia is lacking. Therefore, fresh green, red, and romaine lettuce samples (n = 68) were obtained from five regional farmers' markets in late summer of 2012 and subsequently analyzed to determine total numbers of aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli. Additionally, enrichment procedures were used to detect low concentrations of E. coli. Obtained E. coli isolates were subjected to multiplex PCRs to determine phylogenetic groupings and the presence of virulence genes (eaeA, hlyA, stx1, and stx2). All E. coli were tested for resistance to 15 antibiotics using a disk diffusion assay. Lettuce samples yielded mean aerobic colony counts of 6.3 log CFU/g. Coliforms were detected in 72% of samples, with a median concentration of 1.9 log CFU/g. Of samples, 13% were found to harbor E. coli, with a median level of 0.7 log CFU/g. Antibiogram typing of all E. coli (n = 33) revealed that 97% possessed resistance to one or more antimicrobials, with resistance to amikacin (58%), trimethoprim (48%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (45%) being the most common. Phylogroup typing showed that 79% of these isolates belonged to group B1, with the remaining assigned to groups A (9%) or D (12%); no virulence genes were detected. Considering that phylogroup indicators suggestive of fecal contamination (groups A and D E. coli) were recovered in lettuce samples presented at retail, further work is required to explore at what point along the food chain contamination occurs. Also, this study shows the presence of multidrug-resistant E. coli in fresh vegetables. Summed, these data provide important information on the microbiological quality of leafy vegetables grown in British Columbia through the detection and characterization of

  8. Beyond Consultation: First Nations and the Governance of Shale Gas in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, Kathryn Henderson

    As the province of British Columbia seeks to rapidly develop an extensive natural gas industry, it faces a number of challenges. One of these is that of ensuring that development does not disproportionately impact some of the province's most marginalized communities: the First Nations on whose land extraction will take place. This is particularly crucial given that environmental problems are often caused by unjust and inequitable social conditions that must be rectified before sustainable development can be advanced. This research investigates how the BC Oil and Gas Commission's consultation process addresses, and could be improved to better address Treaty 8 First Nations' concerns regarding shale gas development within their traditional territories. Interviews were conducted with four Treaty 8 First Nations, the Treaty 8 Tribal Association, and provincial government and industry staff. Additionally, participant observation was conducted with the Fort Nelson First Nation Lands and Resources Department. Findings indicate that like many other resource consultation processes in British Columbia, the oil and gas consultation process is unable to meaningfully address First Nations' concerns and values due to fundamental procedural problems, including the permit-by-permit approach and the exclusion of First Nations from the point of decision-making. Considering the government's failure to regulate the shale gas industry in a way that protects ecological, social and cultural resilience, we argue that new governance mechanisms are needed that reallocate authority to First Nations and incorporate proposals for early engagement, long-term planning and cumulative impact assessment and monitoring. Additionally, considering the exceptional power differential between government, industry and First Nations, we argue that challenging industry's social license to operate is an important strategy for First Nations working to gain greater influence over development within their

  9. Trends in AIDS incidence and AIDS-related mortality in British Columbia between 1981 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Lourenço, Lillian; Yip, Benita; Hogg, Robert S.; Phillips, Peter; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can markedly decrease the risk of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and of premature mortality. We aimed to characterize the trends between 1981 and 2013 in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) and in the number AIDS-related deaths in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We included data of 3550 HIV-positive individuals, aged 19 years or older, from different administrative databases in BC. We estimated the relative risk of developing an ADI over time using a Negative Binomial model, and we investigated trends in the percentage of all deaths associated with AIDS using generalized additive models. Findings The number of ADIs has decreased dramatically to its lowest level in 2013. The peak of the AIDS epidemic in BC happened in 1994 with 696 ADIs being reported (rate 42 ADIs per 100 person-years). Since 1997, the number of ADIs decreased from 253 (rate 7 per 100 person-years) to 84 cases in 2013 (rate 1 per 100 person-years) (p-value equals to zero for the trend in the number of ADIs). We have also shown that out of 22 ADIs considered, only PCP maintained its prominent ranking (albeit with much reduced overall prevalence). Finally, we observed that over time very few deaths were related to AIDS-related causes, especially in the most recent years. Interpretation We showed that the number of new ADIs and AIDS-related mortality have been decreasing rapidly over time in BC. These results provide further evidence that integrated comprehensive free programs that facilitate testing, and deliver treatment and care to this population can be effective in markedly decreasing AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, thus suggesting that controlling and eventually ending AIDS is possible. Funding The British Columbia Ministry of Health, the US National Institutes of Health, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Michael Institute for

  10. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification — Concept and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simenstad, Charles A.; Burke, Jennifer L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Cannon, Charles; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Waite, Ian R.; Counihan, Timothy D.; Jones, Krista L.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the concept, organization, and application of a hierarchical ecosystem classification that integrates saline and tidal freshwater reaches of estuaries in order to characterize the ecosystems of large flood plain rivers that are strongly influenced by riverine and estuarine hydrology. We illustrate the classification by applying it to the Columbia River estuary (Oregon-Washington, USA), a system that extends about 233 river kilometers (rkm) inland from the Pacific Ocean. More than three-quarters of this length is tidal freshwater. The Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification ("Classification") is based on six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. We define and map Levels 1-3 for the entire Columbia River estuary with existing geospatial datasets, and provide examples of Levels 4-6 for one hydrogeomorphic reach. In particular, three levels of the Classification capture the scales and categories of ecosystem structure and processes that are most tractable to estuarine research, monitoring, and management. These three levels are the (1) eight hydrogeomorphic reaches that embody the formative geologic and tectonic processes that created the existing estuarine landscape and encompass the influence of the resulting physiography on interactions between fluvial and tidal hydrology and geomorphology across 230 kilometers (km) of estuary, (2) more than 15 ecosystem complexes composed of broad landforms created predominantly by geologic processes during the Holocene, and (3) more than 25 geomorphic catenae embedded within ecosystem complexes that represent distinct geomorphic landforms, structures, ecosystems, and habitats, and components of the estuarine landscape most likely to change over short time periods.

  11. Columbia River Fishes of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2007-06-21

    The Lewis and Clark expedition crossed the Continental Divide in 1805 on the way west to the Pacific Ocean. Based on journal entries, members of the expedition probably encountered two species of resident salmonids and four of the six species of anadromous salmonids and steelhead (Family Salmonidae, genus Oncorhynchus). The salmonid species were called common salmon (now known as Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha), red char (sockeye salmon O.nerka) white salmon trout (coho salmon [also known as silver salmon] O. kisutch), salmon trout (steelhead O. mykiss), and spotted trout (cutthroat trout O. clarkii). There was no evidence of the expedition encountering pink salmon O. gorbuscha, chum salmon O. keta, or species of true char Salvelinus spp. Common fishes procured from Indian tribes living along the lower Columbia River included eulachon Thaleichthys pacificus and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. The identity of three additional resident freshwater species is questionable. Available descriptions suggest that what they called mullet were largescale sucker Catastomus macrocheilus, and that chubb were peamouth Mylocheilus caurinus. The third questionable fish, which they called bottlenose, was probably mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni, although there is no evidence that the species was observed in the Columbia River drainage. Missing from the species list were more than 20 other fishes known to Sahaptin-speaking people from the mid-Columbia region. More complete documentation of the icthyofauna of the Pacific Northwest region did not occur until the latter half of the 19th century. However, journals from the Lewis and Clark expedition provide the first documentation of Columbia River fishes.

  12. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  16. Comparison of gridded snow water equivalent products with in situ measurements in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snauffer, Andrew M.; Hsieh, William W.; Cannon, Alex J.

    2016-10-01

    Regional-scale estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) are challenging in alpine regions, particularly in areas of high accumulation and dense forest cover, suggesting efforts to improve these estimates may benefit from an evaluation of existing gridded products. Gridded SWE products comprising four reanalysis datasets (ERA-Interim, ERA-Interim/Land, MERRA and MERRA-Land), two land data assimilation system datasets (GLDAS1 and GLDAS2) and two observation-based products (CMC and GlobSnow) have been compared with in-situ measurements over five physiographic regions in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Time series were generated for each survey month (January through June), and median correlation, bias and mean absolute error (MAE) values were found for each product and physiographic region. The best performance in correlation and magnitude of bias and MAE was seen in areas of lowest SWE accumulation and land relief (e.g. the Interior Plains of northern BC), while poorer performance was seen in regions of high accumulation and complex topography (Columbia and Rocky Mountains and Coast Mountains). Overall, the performance ranking order is ERA-Interim/Land (best), GLDAS2, MERRA, CMC, GLDAS1, MERRA-Land, GlobSnow and ERA-Interim.

  17. Three-dimenstional crustal velocity structure beneath the strait of georgia, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, B.C.; Ellis, R.M.; Zelt, C.A.; Hyndman, R.D.; Lowe, C.; Spence, G.D.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a topographic depression straddling the boundary between the Insular and Coast belts in southwestern British Columbia. Two shallow earthquakes located within the strait (M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) and felt throughout the Vancouver area illustrate the seismic potential of this region. As part of the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiment, seismic instruments were placed in and around the Strait of Georgia to record shots from a marine source within the strait. We apply a tomographic inversion procedure to first-arrival travel-time data to derive a minimum-structure 3-D P-wave velocity model for the upper crust to about 13 km depth. We also present a 2-D velocity model for a profile orientated across the Strait of Georgia derived using a minimum-parameter traveltime inversion approach. This paper represents the first detailed look at crustal velocity variations within the major Cretaceous to Cenozoic Georgia Basin, which underlies the Strait of Georgia. The 3-D velocity model clearly delineates the structure of the Georgia Basin. Taking the 6 km s-1 isovelocity contour to represent the top of the underlying basement, the basin thickens from between 2 and 4 km in the northwestern half of the strait to between 8 and 9 km at the southeastern end of the study region. Basin velocities in the northeastern half are 4.5-6 km s-1 and primarily represent the Upper Cretaceous Nanaimo Group. Velocities to the south are lower (3-6 km s-1) because of the additional presence of the overlying Tertiary Huntingdon Formation and more recent sediments, including glacial and modern Fraser River deposits. In contrast to the relatively smoothly varying velocity structure of the basin, velocities of the basement rocks, which comprise primarily Palaeozoic to Jurassic rocks of the Wrangellia Terrane and possibly Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous granitic rocks of the Coast Belt, show significantly more structure, probably an indication

  18. AIDS incidence and AIDS-related mortality in British Columbia, Canada, between 1981 and 2013: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lima, Viviane D; Lourenço, Lillian; Yip, Benita; Hogg, Robert S; Phillips, Peter; Montaner, Julio S G

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) can substantially decrease the risk of progression to AIDS and of premature mortality. We aimed to characterise the trends between 1981 and 2013 in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) and the number AIDS-related deaths in British Columbia, Canada, where ART has been fully subsidised since 1996. We included data on HIV-positive individuals, aged 19 years or older, from four administrative databases in British Columbia: the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St Paul's Hospital, the British Columbia Vital Statistics Agency, the British Columbia Cancer Agency. We estimated the relative risk of developing an ADI over time by use of a negative binomial model, and we investigated trends in the proportion of all deaths associated with AIDS by use of generalised additive models. Data were available for 3550 people with HIV. 6205 ADIs were recorded. In 2013, 84 ADIs occurred, the lowest number since 1990. The peak of the AIDS epidemic in the region happened in 1994 with 696 ADIs reported (42 ADIs per 100 person-years). Since 1997, the number of ADIs decreased from 253 (7 per 100 person-years) to 84 cases in 2013 (1 per 100 person-years; p<0·0001 for trend in number of ADIs). We have also shown that of 22 ADIs included, only Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia remained prominent (albeit with much reduced overall prevalence). 2828 deaths were from AIDS-related causes, peaking in 1996 with 241 (96%) of 252 deaths in people with HIV and declining to 44 (20%) of 218 in 2013. Our results provide further evidence that integrated comprehensive free programmes that facilitate testing and deliver treatment and care can be eff ective in decreasing AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, thus suggesting that control of and eventually an end to AIDS are possible.

  19. The Columbia River: Its Future and You. Teacher's Manual for Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Marcia

    Designed as a part of a multidisciplinary set of curricula and educational materials on the Columbia River, this teacher's guide focuses on the many uses of the river and the conflicts arising from those uses. This unit's major purpose is to help students in grades 5-8 to start thinking about how the resources of the Columbia River should be…

  20. The Columbia River: Its Future and You. Teacher's Manual for Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Marcia

    Designed as a part of a multidisciplinary set of curricula and educational materials on the Columbia River, this teacher's guide focuses on the many uses of the river and the conflicts arising from those uses. This unit's major purpose is to help students in grades 5-8 to start thinking about how the resources of the Columbia River should be…

  1. 76 FR 63547 - Security Zone; Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Dredge Vessels Patriot and Liberty

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... [Docket No. USCG-2011-0939] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Dredge Vessels... vessels are underway, anchored, or conducting dredging operations in the vicinity of Willamette River Mile 2 and Columbia River Mile 105. Entry into this zone is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain...

  2. 76 FR 73511 - Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River AGENCY... enforcement period of a safety zone established on the waters of the Columbia River surrounding the remaining cofferdam at the M/V DAVY CROCKETT removal sight at approximate river mile 117. The original safety zone was...

  3. 76 FR 21253 - Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River AGENCY... the emergency safety zone established on the waters of the Columbia River surrounding the M/V DAVY CROCKETT at approximately river mile 117 on January 28, 2011. The safety zone is necessary to help ensure...

  4. Radar facies and architecture of alluvial fans and related sediments in high-energy alpine environments, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekes, Csaba

    2000-08-01

    It is widely recognized that the dominant depositional processes on alluvial fans include rock falls, rock slides, rock avalanches, debris flows, sheetfloods and incised-channel floods. A fundamental question addressed in this thesis is: Can ground penetrating radar (GPR) differentiate between the sediments associated with these processes? Do these individual deposits have characteristic radar reflection signatures? The dissertation is divided into two parts. In part one, a calibration exercise conducted in southern British Columbia, it was demonstrated that GPR was able to obtain good penetration and resolution in rock fall, rock slide, fluvial and alluvial fan sediments, and that a characteristic radar reflection pattern (or radar facies) can be assigned to these deposits. Bedrock reflection pattern is characterised by a discontinuous radar signal and by stacked diffractions. The radar facies for rock slide and rock avalanche sediments, where boulders constitute the predominant clast size, is characterized by discontinuous, high amplitude, macro-scale, hyperbolic reflections that are different from diffractions generated by bedrock. Alluvial fans dominated by debris flow processes produce a chaotic and discontinuous radar pattern; diffractions in these patterns are attributed to boulders. Alluvial fans dominated by sheetflood processes are likely to produce surface-parallel, gently dipping, more or less continuous radar patterns. Large-scale meandering-river radar-patterns are characterized by high amplitude, continuous, dipping clinoforms. Braided-river radar facies, based on data collected on the Kicking Horse braidplain, are characterized by predominantly horizontally continuous reflections with few identifiable features. Based solely on GPR data, it was possible to distinguish between sediments of meandering and braided rivers. Analysis of over 95 km GPR data suggests that alluvial fan radar-reflection patterns are distinctly different from those observed in

  5. Ameson metacarcini sp. nov. (Microsporidia) infecting the muscles of Dungeness crabs Metacarcinus magister from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Small, Hamish J; Meyer, Gary R; Stentiford, Grant D; Dunham, Jason S; Bateman, Kelly; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-11

    The Dungeness crab Metacarcinus magister supports a large and valuable fishery along the west coast of North America. Since 1998, Dungeness crabs exhibiting pink- to orange-colored joints and opaque white musculature have been sporadically observed in low prevalence from the Fraser River delta of British Columbia, Canada. We provide histological, ultrastructural, and molecular evidence that this condition is caused by a new microsporidian parasite. Crabs displaying gross symptoms were confirmed to have heavy infections of ovoid-shaped microsporidian spores (~1.8 × 1.4 µm in size) within muscle bundles of the skeletal musculature. The parasite apparently infected the outer periphery of each muscle bundle, and then proliferated into the muscle fibres near the centre of each infected bundle. Light infections were observed in heart tissues, and occasionally spores were observed within the fixed phagocytes lining the blood vessels of the hepatopancreas. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed multiple life stages of a monokaryotic microsporidian parasite within the sarcoplasm of muscle fibres. Molecular analysis of partial small subunit rRNA sequence data from the new species revealed an affinity to Ameson, a genus of Microsporidia infecting marine crustaceans. Based on morphological and molecular data, the new species is distinct from Nadelspora canceri, a related microsporidian that also infects the muscles of this host. At present, little is known about the distribution, seasonality, and transmission of A. metacarcini in M. magister.

  6. Modelling Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Dispersion from Marine Salmon Farms in the Discovery Islands, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Michael G. G.; Guo, Ming; Garver, Kyle A.; Stucchi, Dario; Chandler, Peter; Wan, Di; Morrison, John; Tuele, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume ocean circulation and particle tracking models are used to simulate water-borne transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) among Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the Discovery Islands region of British Columbia, Canada. Historical simulations for April and July 2010 are carried out to demonstrate the seasonal impact of river discharge, wind, ultra-violet (UV) radiation, and heat flux conditions on near-surface currents, viral dispersion and survival. Numerical particles released from infected farm fish in accordance with IHNV shedding rates estimated through laboratory experiments are dispersed by model oceanic flows. Viral particles are inactivated by ambient UV radiation levels and by the natural microbial community at rates derived through laboratory studies. Viral concentration maps showing temporal and spatial changes are produced and combined with lab-determined minimum infectious dosages to estimate the infective connectivity among farms. Results demonstrate that neighbouring naïve farms can become exposed to IHNV via water-borne transport from an IHNV diseased farm, with a higher risk in April than July, and that many events in the sequence of farm outbreaks in 2001-2002 are consistent with higher risks in our farm connectivity matrix. Applications to other diseases, transfers between farmed and wild fish, and the effect of vaccinations are also discussed. PMID:26114643

  7. Modelling Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Dispersion from Marine Salmon Farms in the Discovery Islands, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Michael G G; Guo, Ming; Garver, Kyle A; Stucchi, Dario; Chandler, Peter; Wan, Di; Morrison, John; Tuele, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume ocean circulation and particle tracking models are used to simulate water-borne transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) among Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the Discovery Islands region of British Columbia, Canada. Historical simulations for April and July 2010 are carried out to demonstrate the seasonal impact of river discharge, wind, ultra-violet (UV) radiation, and heat flux conditions on near-surface currents, viral dispersion and survival. Numerical particles released from infected farm fish in accordance with IHNV shedding rates estimated through laboratory experiments are dispersed by model oceanic flows. Viral particles are inactivated by ambient UV radiation levels and by the natural microbial community at rates derived through laboratory studies. Viral concentration maps showing temporal and spatial changes are produced and combined with lab-determined minimum infectious dosages to estimate the infective connectivity among farms. Results demonstrate that neighbouring naïve farms can become exposed to IHNV via water-borne transport from an IHNV diseased farm, with a higher risk in April than July, and that many events in the sequence of farm outbreaks in 2001-2002 are consistent with higher risks in our farm connectivity matrix. Applications to other diseases, transfers between farmed and wild fish, and the effect of vaccinations are also discussed.

  8. Quantifying Components of Drug Expenditure Inflation: The British Columbia Seniors' Drug Benefit Plan

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G

    2002-01-01

    Objective To quantify the relative and absolute importance of different factors contributing to increases in per capita prescription drug costs for a population of Canadian seniors. Data Sources/Study Setting Data consist of every prescription claim from 1985 to 1999 for the British Columbia Pharmacare Plan A, a tax-financed public drug plan covering all community-dwelling British Columbians aged 65 and older. Study Design Changes in per capita prescription drug expenditures are attributed to changes to four components of expenditure inflation: (1) the pattern of exposure to drugs across therapeutic categories; (2) the mix of drugs used within therapeutic categories; (3) the rate of generic drug product selection; and (4) the prices of unchanged products. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were extracted from administrative claims files housed at the UBC Centre for Health Services and Policy Research. Principal Findings Changes in drug prices, the pattern of exposure to drugs across therapeutic categories, and the mix of drugs used within therapeutic categories all caused spending per capita to increase. Incentives for generic substitution and therapeutic reference pricing policies temporarily slowed the cost-increasing influence of changes in product selection by encouraging the use of generic drug products and/or cost-effective brand-name products within therapeutic categories. Conclusions The results suggest that drug plans (and patients) would benefit from more concerted efforts to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of competing products within therapeutic categories of drugs. PMID:12479495

  9. High-Cost Users of Prescription Drugs: A Population-Based Analysis from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weymann, Deirdre; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J; Morgan, Steven G

    2017-04-01

    To examine variation in pharmaceutical spending and patient characteristics across prescription drug user groups. British Columbia's population-based linked administrative health and sociodemographic databases (N = 3,460,763). We classified individuals into empirically derived prescription drug user groups based on pharmaceutical spending patterns outside hospitals from 2007 to 2011. We examined variation in patient characteristics, mortality, and health services usage and applied hierarchical clustering to determine patterns of concurrent drug use identifying high-cost patients. Approximately 1 in 20 British Columbians had persistently high prescription costs for 5 consecutive years, accounting for 42 percent of 2011 province-wide pharmaceutical spending. Less than 1 percent of the population experienced discrete episodes of high prescription costs; an additional 2.8 percent transitioned to or from high-cost episodes of unknown duration. Persistent high-cost users were more likely to concurrently use multiple chronic medications; episodic and transitory users spent more on specialized medicines, including outpatient cancer drugs. Cluster analyses revealed heterogeneity in concurrent medicine use within high-cost groups. Whether low, moderate, or high, costs of prescription drugs for most individuals are persistent over time. Policies controlling high-cost use should focus on reducing polypharmacy and encouraging price competition in drug classes used by ordinary and high-cost users alike. © 2016 The Authors. Health Services Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  11. Scappoose Formation, Columbia County, Oregon: new evidence of age and relation to Columbia River basalt group

    SciTech Connect

    VanAtta, R.O.; Kelty, K.B.

    1985-05-01

    The Scappoose Formation, considered to be late Oligocene to early Miocene in age, was originally believed to be disconformably separated from both the underlying Pittsburg Bluff Formation and the overlying Yakima subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Recent mapping and petrography show that it lies disconformably on both the Keasey and Pittsburg Bluff Formations, and interfingers with the Yakima Basalt. The Scappoose is composed of fluvial sandstone, conglomerate, and carbonaceous to coal-bearing mud rock, intertongued with shallow neritic to estuarine siltstone, mud rock, and minor sandstone. Chemistry of basalt clasts from fluvial conglomerates reveals that they are derived from the Yakima subgroup. Basalt conglomerate and palagonitic sediments in the upper part of the formation are intercalated with Grande Ronde basalt (Yakima subgroup) flows at many localities. Flows of Yakima Basalt are also invasive into originally wet, unconsolidated Scappoose sediment. Grande Ronde basalt and the Frenchman Springs Member of the Wanapum basalt overlie conglomerate of the Scappoose. In places, the Scappoose Formation is absent, and Yakima Basalt lies directly on the Pittsburg Bluff and Keasey Formations. The thickness of both the Scappoose Formation and the Columbia River Basalt Group varies widely, indicating that both were deposited over a paleotopography with a relief up to 800 ft (245 m). The definition of the boundaries of the Scappoose Formation should be revised, owing to the disconformable relation of the Scappoose to both the underlying Keasey and Pittsburg Bluff Formations and to the Scappoose's intercalation with the overlying Yakima Basalt. Definition of age must also be revised, inasmuch as sedimentation of the formation was coeval with Columbia River Basalt volcanism.

  12. PROTECTING GROUNDWATER & THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2006-06-29

    Along the remote shores of the Columbia River in southeast Washington state, a race is on. Fluor Hanford, a prime cleanup contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site, is managing a massive, multi-faceted project to remove contaminants from the groundwater before they can reach the Columbia. Despite the daunting nature and size of the problem--about 80 square miles of aquifer under the site contains long-lived radionuclides and hazardous chemicals--significant progress is being made. Many groups are watching, speaking out, and helping. A large. passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is united in its desire to protect the Columbia River--the eighth largest in the world--and have a voice in Hanford's future. Fluor Hanford and the DOE, along with the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) interact with all the stakeholders to make the best decisions. Together, they have made some remarkable strides in the battle against groundwater contamination under the site.

  13. Tertiary meteoric hydrothermal systems and their relation to ore deposition, northwestern United States and southern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criss, Robert E.; Fleck, Robert J.; Taylor, Hugh P., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    Tertiary meteoric hydrothermal systems have altered the rocks exposed over more than 5 % of the land surface of the northwestern United States and southern British Columbia, including at least 25,000 km2 in Idaho. The systems typically involved convective circulation of fluid derived from ordinary meteoric groundwaters around crystallizing, calc-alkaline, epizonal plutons emplaced into coeval volcanic cover rocks. These individual systems had widely ranging "lifetimes" of 103 to 106 years and operated locally throughout the Cenozoic, although the most profound development of such activity occurred during Eocene time. Individual systems varied in size from a few tens of square kilometers (Yankee Fork, Idaho) or less to several thousand square kilometers (Sawtooth and Castro ring zones, Idaho) Typically, regional propylitization aacompanied the fluid circulation, although the higher-temperature alteration assemblages were developed locally, as were intense alteration effects (e.g., silicification, sericitization, etc.) near some veins and in mining districts. A significant amount, probably 25-50%, of the mineral production and potential in the region is closely related to Tertiary meteoric hydrothermal systems. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic data clearly demonstrate the close geologic association of meteoric hydrothermal systems and mineralization in (1) the Paleocene, Cu-Zn-Pb-Mn Main Stage mineralization at Butte, Montana; (2) numerous Eocene epithermal deposits principally valued for Au and Ag but also including significant deposits of Cu, Pb, Zn, F, Sb, etc., as at Republic, Washington, and in several mining districts in the Idaho batholith and the Challis volcanic field; (3) several Eocene skarn deposits valued for W (Ima, Idaho) and Cu (Mackay, Idaho); (4) important lead-silver vein and replacement deposits of Tertiary (Bluebell, British Columbia) and of probable Cretaceous and early Tertiary age (Wood River, Idaho); (5) several potentially economic Mo-, Be-, and

  14. Reconstruction of radioactive contamination in the Columbia River.

    PubMed

    Walters, W H; Richmond, M C; Gilmore, B G

    1996-10-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, an unsteady flow hydraulic model, modified to include radionuclide decay, was used to simulate the transport of radionuclides released to the Columbia River from Hanford. The model was applied to the river from Priest Rapids Dam to the vicinity of Portland, Oregon, for the period from January 1950 through January 1971. Model output consisted of monthly-average water concentrations for 24Na, 32P, 65Zn, 76As, and 239Np. Model validation was accomplished by comparing computed water depths and 51Cr concentrations to measured field data. This paper discusses the modeling approach and compares the results to historical river monitoring data collected during the peak years of operation.

  15. Regional Sediment Budget of the Columbia River Littoral Cell, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buijsman, Maarten C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Gibbs, A.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Kaminsky, G.M.; Ruggiero, P.; Franklin, J.

    2002-01-01

    Summary -- In this Open-File Report we present calculations of changes in bathymetric and topographic volumes for the Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay, and Columbia River entrances and the adjacent coasts of North Beach, Grayland Plains, Long Beach, and Clatsop Plains for four intervals: pre-jetty - 1920s (Interval 1), 1920s - 1950s (Interval 2), 1950s - 1990s (Interval 3), and 1920s 1990s (Interval 4). This analysis is part of the Southwest Washington Coastal Erosion Study (SWCES), the goals of which are to understand and predict the morphologic behavior of the Columbia River littoral cell on a management scale of tens of kilometers and decades. We obtain topographic Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data from a joint project by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) and bathymetric data from the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), USGS, and the DOE. Shoreline data are digitized from T-Sheets and aerial photographs from the USC&GS and National Ocean Service (NOS). Instead of uncritically adjusting each survey to NAVD88, a common vertical land-based datum, we adjust some surveys to produce optimal results according to the following criteria. First, we minimize offsets in overlapping surveys within the same era, and second, we minimize bathymetric changes (relative to the 1990s) in deep water, where we assume minimal change has taken place. We grid bathymetric and topographic datasets using kriging and triangulation algorithms, calculate bathymetric-change surfaces for each interval, and calculate volume changes within polygons that are overlaid on the bathymetric-change surfaces. We find similar morphologic changes near the entrances to Grays Harbor and the Columbia River following jetty construction between 1898 and 1916 at the Grays Harbor entrance and between 1885 and

  16. Variation in water chemistry parameters in the Clayburn Creek watershed, British Columbia during fall 2015.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Clemence, E.; Faber, A.; Yakemchuk, A.; McCabe, M.; Toner, A.; Strangway, A.; Turner, S.; Sidhu, D.; Sidhu, B.; Sekhton, J.; Puri, K.; Paulson, D.; Mahil, G.; Leffers, R.; Kanda, S.; Gaultier, M.; Dhaliwal, H.

    2015-12-01

    faculty and students from the University of the Fraser Valley have conducted the time series sampling of water chemistry of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and five Fraser Valley tributaries as a member of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) organized by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Clayburn Creek and Willband Creek in Abbotsford, British Columbiahave been part of this project and have been sampled for nutrient and major ion concentrations and parameters such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH and turbidity. This watershed is being threatened by increasing anthropogenic activity (agricultural, industrial and residential development) that may threaten the salmon that spawn in this watershed. Documenting the change in the water chemistry in this watershed as the seasons progress from a dry summer to a wet fall will yield a greater understanding of our impact on this watershed and may assist our attempts to protect this watershed.

  17. Lidar and paleoseismic trenching reveal first documentation of late Quaternary onshore faulting in the forearc of southwestern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K. D.; Regalla, C.; Amos, C. B.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Leonard, L. J.; Graham, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Two new paleoseismic trenches excavated across the Leech River fault, a 60-km-long fault in the forearc of the northern Cascadia subduction zone on Vancouver Island, confirm at least three surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in southwest British Columbia since the latest Quaternary. Analyses of high-resolution lidar-derived topography were used to identify the trench sites, where a 2-4 m-high, E-W-striking fault scarp offsets a latest Pleistocene colluvial surface. The western trench, excavated across one of several faulted debris flow channels incised into this surface, exposed schist of the Jurassic Leech River Complex in fault contact with latest Pleistocene loess and colluvium. The eastern trench, excavated across an adjacent interfluve, exposed latest Pleistocene till faulted against scarp-derived colluvium that post-dates the Last Glacial Maximum (< 15 ka). Colluvial wedge stratigraphy provide evidence for ≥ 3 large earthquakes since the latest Pleistocene, each with 1 m of vertical displacement. Restoration of surface displacement across the scarp suggests 6 m of dip-slip has occurred since development of the colluvial surface while only 4 m of displacement has occurred since channel incision, which further supports the occurrence of repeated surface-rupturing events within the past 15 ka. Our field mapping, aided by lidar-derived topography, indicates that this scarp is part of a steeply-dipping, 500 m-wide fault zone that is continuous for more than 30-50 km and likely accommodates regional transpression together with other active faults in western Washington (e.g., Devils Mountain fault). This study reinforces the need for lidar when conducting paleoseismic studies in this steep and densely vegetated terrain. These observations provide the first evidence of late Quaternary onshore faulting in the forearc of southwestern Canada and suggest the region is host to active structures that should be considered in seismic hazard assessments.

  18. Numerical Modelling of Freshwater Flux and Temperature on the Northern British Columbia Coast in support of Marine Oil Spill Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, D. R.; Fleming, S. W.; Fortin, V.; Durnford, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Canada has the longest coastline of any country (>120,000 miles). Canadian response to potential oil spills along its coast is being improved under a high-level federal government strategy, falling under the rubric of the World Class Tanker Safety System (WCTSS). The first component of this strategy focuses on the Kitimat area and its marine approaches on the northern British Columbia (BC) coast. This initiative reflects concerns around both existing ship traffic, and potential increases in tanker traffic associated with the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. The project includes joint development, between multiple federal departments, of an operational modeling system to predict currents in the coastal ocean. One of Environment Canada's (EC) contributions is the development and implementation of a short-term forecast model of river flows with corresponding stream temperatures. These quantities influence currents in the coastal ocean, which in turn affect oil spill fate and transport. Our platform is based on the Surface Prediction System (SPS), which is essentially a driver for a land surface scheme (LSS) linked to a hydrological routing model, and is related to the earlier MESH platform. LSS's under consideration for use in this mountain rainforest environment are the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), and the Soil and Vegetation Simulator (SVS), which is an evolution of the Interactions Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) model. Runoff and drainage outputs are then routed through the stream network by WATROUTE. The River Basin Model (RBM), a physically-based stream temperature simulator, is also being integrated into SPS to additionally enable water temperature forecasting. The freshwater modelling system will be directly driven by EC's numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems.Preliminary results from this ambitious modeling program are presented, along with recommendations for improvements to physical process representation in the various models employed.

  19. Environmental contaminants in bald eagles in the Columbia River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Garrett, M.G. ); Schuler, C.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Eggs, blood, and carcasses of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and fish were collected and breeding success of eagles was monitored in the Columbia River estuary, 1980-87, to determine if contaminants were having an effect on productivity. High levels of dichloro diphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were found in eggs, blood from adults, and 2 eagle carcasses. Detectable levels of DDE and PCB's were found in blood of nestlings indicating they were exposed to these contaminants early in life. Increasing concentrations of DDE and PCB's with age also indicated accumulation of these contaminants. Adult eagles also had higher levels of mercury (Hg) in blood than subadults or young indicating accumulation with age. The high levels of DDE and PCB's were associated with eggshell thinning ([bar x] = 10%) and with productivity ([bar x] = 0.56 young/occupied site) that was lower than that of healthy populations (i.e., [ge]1.00 young/occupied site). DDE and PCB's had a deleterious effect on reproduction of bald eagles in the estuary. The role dioxins play in eagle reproduction remains unclear, but concentrations in eagle eggs were similar to those in laboratory studies on other species where dioxins adversely affected hatchability of eggs. Probable source of these contaminants include dredged river sediments and hydroelectric dams, and the proper management of each may reduce the amount of contaminants released into the Columbia River estuary. 46 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Anadromous salmonids of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River: 1984 status

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Hanford Reach, a regulated but flowing section of the Columbia River, supports spawning populations of fall chinook salmon and steelhead. It also serves as a migration route for upriver runs of chinook, coho and sockeye salmon, and of steelhead. Environmental studies conducted in association with activities on the Hanford Site provide a basis for assessing present ecological conditions in the Hanford Reach. Spawning populations of fall chinook salmon at Hanford increased dramatically after 1960, when Priest Rapids Dam was completed, and have remained relatively stable since 1969. Generally, upriver runs of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon have been depressed, but the fall run has been increasing since 1980. Habitat modification represents the greatest threat to sustained production of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach. Operations on and near the Hanford Site releases of small amounts of radioactivity from onsite operations to river and groundwater, and operation of a steam electric plant, can have negligible effects on salmonids and other aquatic resources. Possible activities with potential future impacts include development of a multi-unit power plant complex at Hanford, construction of a low-head hydroelectric dam above Richland, flow fluctuations from peaking power generation at Priest Rapids Dam, irrigation and reductions of instream flows, and dredging and commercial navigation above Hanford. If reproducing populations of fall chinook salmon and steelhead are to survive in the mid-Columbia River, the Hanford Reach must remain flowing, undeveloped for navigation, and with unimpaired water quality. 156 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.