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Sample records for rna binding activity

  1. Insights into activation and RNA binding of trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) through all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Falck, Emma

    2008-06-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus stearothermophilus is regulated by a trp RNA binding attenuation protein (TRAP). It is a ring-shaped 11-mer of identical 74 residue subunits. Tryptophan binding pockets are located between adjacent subunits, and tryptophan binding activates TRAP to bind RNA. Here, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the system, complementing existing extensive experimental studies. We focus on two questions. First, we look at the activation mechanism, of which relatively little is known experimentally. We find that the absence of tryptophan allows larger motions close to the tryptophan binding site, and we see indication of a conformational change in the BC loop. However, complete deactivation seems to occur on much longer time scales than the 40 ns studied here. Second, we study the TRAP-RNA interactions. We look at the relative flexibilities of the different bases in the complex and analyze the hydrogen bonds between the protein and RNA. We also study the role of Lys37, Lys56, and Arg58, which have been experimentally identified as essential for RNA binding. Hydrophobic stacking of Lys37 with the nearby RNA base is confirmed, but we do not see direct hydrogen bonding between RNA and the other two residues, in contrast to the crystal structure. Rather, these residues seem to stabilize the RNA-binding surface, and their positive charge may also play a role in RNA binding. Simulations also indicate that TRAP is able to attract RNA nonspecifically, and the interactions are quantified in more detail using binding energy calculations. The formation of the final binding complex is a very slow process: within the simulation time scale of 40 ns, only two guanine bases become bound (and no others), indicating that the binding initiates at these positions. In general, our results are in good agreement with experimental studies, and provide atomic-scale insights into the processes. PMID:18186477

  2. Primary structure and binding activity of the hnRNP U protein: binding RNA through RGG box.

    PubMed Central

    Kiledjian, M; Dreyfuss, G

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to influence the structure of hnRNA and participate in the processing of hnRNA to mRNA. The hnRNP U protein is an abundant nucleoplasmic phosphoprotein that is the largest of the major hnRNP proteins (120 kDa by SDS-PAGE). HnRNP U binds pre-mRNA in vivo and binds both RNA and ssDNA in vitro. Here we describe the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the hnRNP U protein, the determination of its amino acid sequence and the delineation of a region in this protein that confers RNA binding. The predicted amino acid sequence of hnRNP U contains 806 amino acids (88,939 Daltons), and shows no extensive homology to any known proteins. The N-terminus is rich in acidic residues and the C-terminus is glycine-rich. In addition, a glutamine-rich stretch, a putative NTP binding site and a putative nuclear localization signal are present. It could not be defined from the sequence what segment of the protein confers its RNA binding activity. We identified an RNA binding activity within the C-terminal glycine-rich 112 amino acids. This region, designated U protein glycine-rich RNA binding region (U-gly), can by itself bind RNA. Furthermore, fusion of U-gly to a heterologous bacterial protein (maltose binding protein) converts this fusion protein into an RNA binding protein. A 26 amino acid peptide within U-gly is necessary for the RNA binding activity of the U protein. Interestingly, this peptide contains a cluster of RGG repeats with characteristic spacing and this motif is found also in several other RNA binding proteins. We have termed this region the RGG box and propose that it is an RNA binding motif and a predictor of RNA binding activity. Images PMID:1628625

  3. RNA-binding properties and RNA chaperone activity of human peroxiredoxin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Lee, Hae Na; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Ha, Bin; Ahn, Sung-Min; Jang, Ho Hee; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hPrx1 has RNA-binding properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hPrx1 exhibits helix-destabilizing activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold stress increases hPrx1 level in the nuclear fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hPrx1 enhances the viability of cells exposed to cold stress. -- Abstract: Human peroxiredoxin 1 (hPrx1), a member of the peroxiredoxin family, detoxifies peroxide substrates and has been implicated in numerous biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and redox signaling. To date, Prx1 has not been implicated in RNA metabolism. Here, we investigated the ability of hPrx1 to bind RNA and act as an RNA chaperone. In vitro, hPrx1 bound to RNA and DNA, and unwound nucleic acid duplexes. hPrx1 also acted as a transcription anti-terminator in an assay using an Escherichia coli strain containing a stem-loop structure upstream of the chloramphenicol resistance gene. The overall cellular level of hPrx1 expression was not increased at low temperatures, but the nuclear level of hPrx1 was increased. In addition, hPrx1 overexpression enhanced the survival of cells exposed to cold stress, whereas hPrx1 knockdown significantly reduced cell survival under the same conditions. These findings suggest that hPrx1 may perform biological functions as a RNA-binding protein, which are distinctive from known functions of hPrx1 as a reactive oxygen species scavenger.

  4. Uncoupling of RNA binding and PKR kinase activation by viral inhibitor RNAs.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Sean A; Kim, Insil; Liu, Corey W; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2006-05-19

    Protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) is a serine/threonine kinase that contains an N-terminal RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. Upon binding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), PKR can become activated and phosphorylate cellular targets, such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF-2alpha). Phosphorylation of eIF-2alpha results in attenuation of protein translation by the ribosome in either a general or an mRNA-specific manner. Therefore, the interaction between PKR and dsRNAs represents a crucial host cell defense mechanism against viral infection. Viruses can circumvent PKR function by transcription of virus-encoded dsRNA inhibitors that bind to and inactivate PKR. We present here a biophysical characterization of the interactions between human PKR and two viral inhibitor RNAs, EBER(I) (from Epstein-Barr virus) and VA(I) (from human adenovirus). Autophosphorylation assays confirmed that both EBER(I) and VA(I) are inhibitors of PKR activation, and profiled the kinetics of the inhibition. Binding affinities of dsRNAs to PKR double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and gel electrophoresis. A single stem-loop domain from each inhibitory RNA mediates the interaction with both dsRBDs of PKR. The binding sites on inhibitor RNAs and the dsRBDs of PKR have been mapped by NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments, which indicate that inhibitors of PKR employ similar surfaces of interaction as activators. Finally, we show that dsRNA binding and inactivation are non-equivalent; regions other than the dsRBD stem-loops of inhibitory RNA are required for inhibition.

  5. The anti-trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (Anti-TRAP), AT, recognizes the tryptophan-activated RNA binding domain of the TRAP regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Valbuzzi, Angela; Gollnick, Paul; Babitzke, Paul; Yanofsky, Charles

    2002-03-22

    In Bacillus subtilis, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan metabolism in response to the accumulation of l-tryptophan. Tryptophan-activated TRAP negatively regulates expression by binding to specific mRNA sequences and either promoting transcription termination or blocking translation initiation. Conversely, the accumulation of uncharged tRNA(Trp) induces synthesis of an anti-TRAP protein (AT), which forms a complex with TRAP and inhibits its activity. In this report, we investigate the structural features of TRAP required for AT recognition. A collection of TRAP mutant proteins was examined that were known to be partially or completely defective in tryptophan binding and/or RNA binding. Analyses of AT interactions with these proteins were performed using in vitro transcription termination assays and cross-linking experiments. We observed that TRAP mutant proteins that had lost the ability to bind RNA were no longer recognized by AT. Our findings suggest that AT acts by competing with messenger RNA for the RNA binding domain of TRAP. B. subtilis AT was also shown to interact with TRAP proteins from Bacillus halodurans and Bacillus stearothermophilus, implying that the structural elements required for AT recognition are conserved in the TRAP proteins of these species. Analyses of AT interaction with B. stearothermophilus TRAP at 60 degrees C demonstrated that AT is active at this elevated temperature. PMID:11786553

  6. An RNA chaperone activity of non-specific RNA binding proteins in hammerhead ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, D; Khosla, M; Tsuchihashi, Z; Karpel, R L

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that a protein derived from the p7 nucleocapsid (NC) protein of HIV type-1 increases kcat/Km and kcat for cleavage of a cognate substrate by a hammerhead ribozyme. Here we show directly that the increase in kcat/Km arises from catalysis of the annealing of the RNA substrate to the ribozyme and the increase in kcat arises from catalysis of dissociation of the RNA products from the ribozyme. A peptide polymer derived from the consensus sequence of the C-terminal domain of the hnRNP A1 protein (A1 CTD) provides similar enhancements. Although these effects apparently arise from non-specific interactions, not all non-specific binding interactions led to these enhancements. NC and A1 CTD exert their effects by accelerating attainment of the thermodynamically most stable species throughout the ribozyme catalytic cycle. In addition, NC protein is shown to resolve a misfolded ribozyme-RNA complex that is otherwise long lived. These in vitro results suggest that non-specific RNA binding proteins such as NC and hnRNP proteins may have a biological role as RNA chaperones that prevent misfolding of RNAs and resolve RNAs that have misfolded, thereby ensuring that RNA is accessible for its biological functions. Images PMID:8026476

  7. Association of guide RNA binding protein gBP21 with active RNA editing complexes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Allen, T E; Heidmann, S; Reed, R; Myler, P J; Göringer, H U; Stuart, K D

    1998-10-01

    RNA editing in Trypanosoma brucei mitochondria produces mature mRNAs by a series of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that specifically insert or delete uridylates in association with a macromolecular complex. Using a mitochondrial fraction enriched for in vitro RNA editing activity, we produced several monoclonal antibodies that are specific for a 21-kDa guide RNA (gRNA) binding protein initially identified by UV cross-linking. Immunofluorescence studies localize the protein to the mitochondrion, with a preference for the kinetoplast. The antibodies cause a supershift of previously identified gRNA-specific ribonucleoprotein complexes and immunoprecipitate in vitro RNA editing activities that insert and delete uridylates. The immunoprecipitated material also contains gRNA-specific endoribonuclease, terminal uridylyltransferase, and RNA ligase activities as well as gRNA and both edited and unedited mRNA. The immunoprecipitate contains numerous proteins, of which the 21-kDa protein, a 90-kDa protein, and novel 55- and 16-kDa proteins can be UV cross-linked to gRNA. These studies indicate that the 21-kDa protein associates with the ribonucleoprotein complex (or complexes) that catalyze RNA editing.

  8. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  9. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  10. mRNA 5'-cap binding activity in purified influenza virus detected by simple, rapid assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kroath, H; Shatkin, A J

    1982-01-01

    Reovirus mRNA 5'-terminal caps were 3'-radiolabeled with pCp and as affinity probes for proteins with cap binding activity. A rapid, simple, and sensitive blot assay was devised that could detect cellular cap binding protein in a complex polypeptide mixture. By using this method, cap binding activity was found in detergent-treated influenza virus but not in reovirus or vaccinia virus. Preincubation of capped reovirus mRNA with purified cellular cap binding protein reduced its primer effect on influenza transcriptase, whereas priming by ApG was not affected. The results indicate that influenza transcriptase complexes include cap-recognizing proteins that are involved in the formation of chimeric mRNAs. Images PMID:7097854

  11. Thermodynamics of tryptophan-mediated activation of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Craig A; Manfredo, Amanda; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2006-06-27

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) functions in many bacilli to control the expression of the tryptophan biosynthesis genes. Transcription of the trp operon is controlled by TRAP through an attenuation mechanism, in which competition between two alternative secondary-structural elements in the 5' leader sequence of the nascent mRNA is influenced by tryptophan-dependent binding of TRAP to the RNA. Previously, NMR studies of the undecamer (11-mer) suggested that tryptophan-dependent control of RNA binding by TRAP is accomplished through ligand-induced changes in protein dynamics. We now present further insights into this ligand-coupled event from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Scanning calorimetry showed tryptophan dissociation to be independent of global protein unfolding, while analysis of the temperature dependence of the binding enthalpy by ITC revealed a negative heat capacity change larger than expected from surface burial, a hallmark of binding-coupled processes. Analysis of this excess heat capacity change using parameters derived from protein folding studies corresponds to the ordering of 17-24 residues per monomer of TRAP upon tryptophan binding. This result is in agreement with qualitative analysis of residue-specific broadening observed in TROSY NMR spectra of the 91 kDa oligomer. Implications for the mechanism of ligand-mediated TRAP activation through a shift in a preexisting conformational equilibrium and an induced-fit conformational change are discussed. PMID:16784236

  12. Regulated Pumilio-2 binding controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and CPEB activation.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Kiran; Richter, Joel D

    2006-01-15

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that controls the polyadenylation-induced translation of mos and cyclin B1 mRNAs in maturing Xenopus oocytes. CPEB activity requires not only the phosphorylation of S174, but also the synthesis of a heretofore-unknown upstream effector molecule. We show that the synthesis of RINGO/Spy, an atypical activator of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), is necessary for CPEB-directed polyadenylation. Deletion analysis and mRNA reporter assays show that a cis element in the RINGO/Spy 3'UTR is necessary for translational repression in immature (G2-arrested) oocytes. The repression is mediated by 3'UTR Pumilio-Binding Elements (PBEs), and by its binding protein Pumilio 2 (Pum2). Pum2 also interacts with the Xenopus homolog of human Deleted for Azoospermia-like (DAZL) and the embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (ePAB). Following the induction of maturation, Pum2 dissociates not only from RINGO/Spy mRNA, but from XDAZL and ePAB as well; as a consequence, RINGO/Spy mRNA is translated. These results demonstrate that a reversible Pum2 interaction controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and, as a result, CPEB-mediated cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

  13. Screening of Pre-miRNA-155 Binding Peptides for Apoptosis Inducing Activity Using Peptide Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jaeyoung; Hyun, Soonsil; Hyun, Ji Young; Park, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Won-Je; Bae, Sung-Hun; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Yu, Jaehoon; Shin, Injae

    2016-01-27

    MicroRNA-155, one of the most potent miRNAs that suppress apoptosis in human cancer, is overexpressed in numerous cancers, and it displays oncogenic activity. Peptide microarrays, constructed by immobilizing 185 peptides containing the C-terminal hydrazide onto epoxide-derivatized glass slides, were employed to evaluate peptide binding properties of pre-miRNA-155 and to identify its binding peptides. Two peptides, which were identified based on the results of peptide microarray and in vitro Dicer inhibition studies, were found to inhibit generation of mature miRNA-155 catalyzed by Dicer and to enhance expression of miRNA-155 target genes in cells. In addition, the results of cell experiments indicate that peptide inhibitors promote apoptotic cell death via a caspase-dependent pathway. Finally, observations made in NMR and molecular modeling studies suggest that a peptide inhibitor preferentially binds to the upper bulge and apical stem-loop region of pre-miRNA-155, thereby suppressing Dicer-mediated miRNA-155 processing. PMID:26771315

  14. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  15. Evolution of RNA-protein interactions: non-specific binding led to RNA splicing activity of fungal mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Lamech, Lilian T; Mallam, Anna L; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mtTyrRS; CYT-18 protein) evolved a new function as a group I intron splicing factor by acquiring the ability to bind group I intron RNAs and stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. Previous studies showed: (i) CYT-18 binds group I introns by using both its N-terminal catalytic domain and flexibly attached C-terminal anticodon-binding domain (CTD); and (ii) the catalytic domain binds group I introns specifically via multiple structural adaptations that occurred during or after the divergence of Peziomycotina and Saccharomycotina. However, the function of the CTD and how it contributed to the evolution of splicing activity have been unclear. Here, small angle X-ray scattering analysis of CYT-18 shows that both CTDs of the homodimeric protein extend outward from the catalytic domain, but move inward to bind opposite ends of a group I intron RNA. Biochemical assays show that the isolated CTD of CYT-18 binds RNAs non-specifically, possibly contributing to its interaction with the structurally different ends of the intron RNA. Finally, we find that the yeast mtTyrRS, which diverged from Pezizomycotina fungal mtTyrRSs prior to the evolution of splicing activity, binds group I intron and other RNAs non-specifically via its CTD, but lacks further adaptations needed for group I intron splicing. Our results suggest a scenario of constructive neutral (i.e., pre-adaptive) evolution in which an initial non-specific interaction between the CTD of an ancestral fungal mtTyrRS and a self-splicing group I intron was "fixed" by an intron RNA mutation that resulted in protein-dependent splicing. Once fixed, this interaction could be elaborated by further adaptive mutations in both the catalytic domain and CTD that enabled specific binding of group I introns. Our results highlight a role for non-specific RNA binding in the evolution of RNA-binding proteins.

  16. Evolution of RNA-Protein Interactions: Non-Specific Binding Led to RNA Splicing Activity of Fungal Mitochondrial Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Lamech, Lilian T.; Mallam, Anna L.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mtTyrRS; CYT-18 protein) evolved a new function as a group I intron splicing factor by acquiring the ability to bind group I intron RNAs and stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. Previous studies showed: (i) CYT-18 binds group I introns by using both its N-terminal catalytic domain and flexibly attached C-terminal anticodon-binding domain (CTD); and (ii) the catalytic domain binds group I introns specifically via multiple structural adaptations that occurred during or after the divergence of Peziomycotina and Saccharomycotina. However, the function of the CTD and how it contributed to the evolution of splicing activity have been unclear. Here, small angle X-ray scattering analysis of CYT-18 shows that both CTDs of the homodimeric protein extend outward from the catalytic domain, but move inward to bind opposite ends of a group I intron RNA. Biochemical assays show that the isolated CTD of CYT-18 binds RNAs non-specifically, possibly contributing to its interaction with the structurally different ends of the intron RNA. Finally, we find that the yeast mtTyrRS, which diverged from Pezizomycotina fungal mtTyrRSs prior to the evolution of splicing activity, binds group I intron and other RNAs non-specifically via its CTD, but lacks further adaptations needed for group I intron splicing. Our results suggest a scenario of constructive neutral (i.e., pre-adaptive) evolution in which an initial non-specific interaction between the CTD of an ancestral fungal mtTyrRS and a self-splicing group I intron was “fixed” by an intron RNA mutation that resulted in protein-dependent splicing. Once fixed, this interaction could be elaborated by further adaptive mutations in both the catalytic domain and CTD that enabled specific binding of group I introns. Our results highlight a role for non-specific RNA binding in the evolution of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:25536042

  17. Nucleotide Sequences and Modifications That Determine RIG-I/RNA Binding and Signaling Activities

    PubMed Central

    Uzri, Dina; Gehrke, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Cytoplasmic viral RNAs with 5′ triphosphates (5′ppp) are detected by the RNA helicase RIG-I, initiating downstream signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) expression that establish an antiviral state. We demonstrate here that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) 3′ untranslated region (UTR) RNA has greater activity as an immune stimulator than several flavivirus UTR RNAs. We confirmed that the HCV 3′-UTR poly(U/UC) region is the determinant for robust activation of RIG-I-mediated innate immune signaling and that its antisense sequence, poly(AG/A), is an equivalent RIG-I activator. The poly(U/UC) region of the fulminant HCV JFH-1 strain was a relatively weak activator, while the antisense JFH-1 strain poly(AG/A) RNA was very potent. Poly(U/UC) activity does not require primary nucleotide sequence adjacency to the 5′ppp, suggesting that RIG-I recognizes two independent RNA domains. Whereas poly(U) 50-nt or poly(A) 50-nt sequences were minimally active, inserting a single C or G nucleotide, respectively, into these RNAs increased IFN-β expression. Poly(U/UC) RNAs transcribed in vitro using modified uridine 2′ fluoro or pseudouridine ribonucleotides lacked signaling activity while functioning as competitive inhibitors of RIG-I binding and IFN-β expression. Nucleotide base and ribose modifications that convert activator RNAs into competitive inhibitors of RIG-I signaling may be useful as modulators of RIG-I-mediated innate immune responses and as tools to dissect the RNA binding and conformational events associated with signaling. PMID:19224987

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catabolite Repression Control Protein Crc Is Devoid of RNA Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2013-01-01

    The Crc protein has been shown to mediate catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas, leading to a preferential assimilation of carbon sources. It has been suggested that Crc acts as a translational repressor of mRNAs, encoding functions involved in uptake and breakdown of different carbon sources. Moreover, the regulatory RNA CrcZ, the level of which is increased in the presence of less preferred carbon sources, was suggested to bind to and sequester Crc, resulting in a relief of catabolite repression. Here, we determined the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Crc, a member of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease family, at 1.8 Å. Although Crc displays high sequence similarity with its orthologs, there are amino acid alterations in the area corresponding to the active site in AP proteins. Unlike typical AP endonuclease family proteins, Crc has a reduced overall positive charge and the conserved positively charged amino-acid residues of the DNA-binding surface of AP proteins are partially substituted by negatively charged, polar and hydrophobic residues. Crc protein purified to homogeneity from P. aeruginosa did neither display DNase activity, nor did it bind to previously identified RNA substrates. Rather, the RNA chaperone Hfq was identified as a contaminant in His-tagged Crc preparations purified by one step Ni-affinity chromatography from Escherichia coli, and was shown to account for the RNA binding activity observed with the His-Crc preparations. Taken together, these data challenge a role of Crc as a direct translational repressor in carbon catabolite repression in P. aeruginosa. PMID:23717639

  19. Binding of small interfering RNA molecules is crucial for RNA interference suppressor activity of rice hoja blanca virus NS3 in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemmes, Hans; Kaaij, Lucas; Lohuis, Dick; Prins, Marcel; Goldbach, Rob; Schnettler, Esther

    2009-07-01

    The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus represents a viral suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) that sequesters small interfering (si)RNAs in vitro. To determine whether this siRNA binding property is the critical determinant for the suppressor activity of NS3, NS3 was altered by alanine point mutations and the resulting mutant proteins were tested for both siRNA binding ability and RNAi suppressor activity in plants. Alanine substitutions of lysine residues at positions 173-175 resulted in mutant proteins that lost both their affinity for siRNAs and their RNAi suppressor activity in planta. This indicates that siRNA binding of NS3 is indeed essential for the suppressor function of NS3 and that residues at positions 173-175 are involved in the siRNA binding and suppressor activities. PMID:19282433

  20. Rice LGD1 containing RNA binding activity affects growth and development through alternative promoters.

    PubMed

    Thangasamy, Saminathan; Chen, Pei-Wei; Lai, Ming-Hsing; Chen, Jychian; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2012-07-01

    Tiller initiation and panicle development are important agronomical traits for grain production in Oryza sativa L. (rice), but their regulatory mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this study, T-DNA mutant and RNAi transgenic approaches were used to functionally characterize a unique rice gene, LAGGING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 (LGD1). The lgd1 mutant showed slow growth, reduced tiller number and plant height, altered panicle architecture and reduced grain yield. The fewer unelongated internodes and cells in lgd1 led to respective reductions in tiller number and to semi-dwarfism. Several independent LGD1-RNAi lines exhibited defective phenotypes similar to those observed in lgd1. Interestingly, LGD1 encodes multiple transcripts with different transcription start sites (TSSs), which were validated by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Additionally, GUS assays and a luciferase promoter assay confirmed the promoter activities of LGD1.1 and LGD1.5. LGD1 encoding a von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain containing protein is a single gene in rice that is seemingly specific to grasses. GFP-tagged LGD1 isoforms were predominantly detected in the nucleus, and weakly in the cytoplasm. In vitro northwestern analysis showed the RNA-binding activity of the recombinant C-terminal LGD1 protein. Our results demonstrated that LGD1 pleiotropically regulated rice vegetative growth and development through both the distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns of its multiple transcripts and RNA binding activity. Hence, the study of LGD1 will strengthen our understanding of the molecular basis of the multiple transcripts, and their corresponding polypeptides with RNA binding activity, that regulate pleiotropic effects in rice.

  1. Rice LGD1 containing RNA binding activity affects growth and development through alternative promoters.

    PubMed

    Thangasamy, Saminathan; Chen, Pei-Wei; Lai, Ming-Hsing; Chen, Jychian; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2012-07-01

    Tiller initiation and panicle development are important agronomical traits for grain production in Oryza sativa L. (rice), but their regulatory mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this study, T-DNA mutant and RNAi transgenic approaches were used to functionally characterize a unique rice gene, LAGGING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 (LGD1). The lgd1 mutant showed slow growth, reduced tiller number and plant height, altered panicle architecture and reduced grain yield. The fewer unelongated internodes and cells in lgd1 led to respective reductions in tiller number and to semi-dwarfism. Several independent LGD1-RNAi lines exhibited defective phenotypes similar to those observed in lgd1. Interestingly, LGD1 encodes multiple transcripts with different transcription start sites (TSSs), which were validated by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Additionally, GUS assays and a luciferase promoter assay confirmed the promoter activities of LGD1.1 and LGD1.5. LGD1 encoding a von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain containing protein is a single gene in rice that is seemingly specific to grasses. GFP-tagged LGD1 isoforms were predominantly detected in the nucleus, and weakly in the cytoplasm. In vitro northwestern analysis showed the RNA-binding activity of the recombinant C-terminal LGD1 protein. Our results demonstrated that LGD1 pleiotropically regulated rice vegetative growth and development through both the distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns of its multiple transcripts and RNA binding activity. Hence, the study of LGD1 will strengthen our understanding of the molecular basis of the multiple transcripts, and their corresponding polypeptides with RNA binding activity, that regulate pleiotropic effects in rice. PMID:22409537

  2. Tombusvirus P19 RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity in mammalian cells correlates with charged amino acids that contribute to direct RNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tombusvirus P19 is a protein encoded by tomato bushy stunt virus and related tombusviruses. Earlier studies have demonstrated that P19 is an RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) in plant cells. However, it has not been systematically investigated how P19 suppresses RNA interference in various mammalian cell settings. Results We have studied the RSS effect of P19 in mammalian cells, HEK293T, HeLa, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We have individually mutated 18 positively charged residues in P19 and found that 6 of these charged residues in P19 reduce its ability to suppress RNA interference. In each case, the reduction of silencing of RNA interference correlated with the reduced ability by these P19 mutants to bind siRNAs (small interfering RNAs). Conclusions Our findings characterize a class of RNA-binding proteins that function as RSS moieties. We find a tight correlation between positively charged residues in P19 accounting for siRNA-binding and their RSS activity. Because P19’s activity is conserved in plant and animal cells, we conclude that its RSS function unlikely requires cell type-specific co-factors and likely arises from direct RNA-binding. PMID:23216864

  3. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  4. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  5. HuR/ELAVL1 RNA binding protein modulates interleukin-8 induction by muco-active ribotoxin deoxynivalenol

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hye Jin; Yang, Hyun; Park, Seong Hwan; Moon, Yuseok

    2009-10-01

    HuR/Elav-like RNA binding protein 1 (ELAVL1) positively regulates mRNA stability of AU-rich elements (ARE)-containing transcript such as pro-inflammatory cytokines. Ribotoxic stresses can trigger the production of pro-inflammatory mediators by enhancing mRNA stability and the transcriptional activity. We investigated the effects of ribotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) on HuR translocation and its involvement in the regulation of the pro-inflammatory interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA stability. Exposure to the muco-active DON induced nuclear export of both endogenous and exogenous HuR RNA binding protein in human intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the interference with HuR protein production suppressed ribotoxic DON-induced IL-8 secretion and its mRNA stability. Cytoplasmic HuR protein interacted with IL-8 mRNA and the complex stabilization was due to the presence of 3'-untranslated region of the transcript. Partly in terms of IL-8-modulating transcription factors, HuR protein was demonstrated to be positively and negatively associated with DON-induced early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), respectively. HuR was a critical mechanistic link between ribotoxic stress and the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and may have a broader functional significance with regard to mucosal insults since ribotoxic stress responses are also produced upon interactions with the diverse environment of gut.

  6. The RNA-Binding Protein, Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1) Is a Key Regulator of CD4 T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Acevedo, Aníbal

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the RNA binding protein, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) plays a critical role in regulating the expression of CD40L in activated CD4 T cells. This is achieved mechanistically through message stabilization at late times of activation as well as by altered distribution of CD40L mRNA within distinct cellular compartments. PTBP1 has been implicated in many different processes, however whether PTBP1 plays a broader role in CD4 T cell activation is not known. To examine this question, experiments were designed to introduce shRNA into primary human CD4 T cells to achieve decreased, but not complete ablation of PTBP1 expression. Analyses of shPTB-expressing CD4 T cells revealed multiple processes including cell proliferation, activation-induced cell death and expression of activation markers and cytokines that were regulated in part by PTBP1 expression. Although there was an overall decrease in the steady-state level of several activation genes, only IL-2 and CD40L appeared to be regulated by PTBP1 at the level of RNA decay suggesting that PTBP1 is critical at different regulatory steps of expression that is gene-specific. Importantly, even though the IL-2 protein levels were reduced in cells with lowered PTBP1, the steady-state level of IL-2 mRNA was significantly higher in these cells suggesting a block at the translational level. Evaluation of T cell activation in shPTB-expressing T cells revealed that PTBP1 was linked primarily to the activation of the PLCγ1/ERK1/2 and the NF-κB pathways. Overall, our results reveal the importance of this critical RNA binding protein in multiple steps of T cell activation. PMID:27513449

  7. Mediation of CTCF transcriptional insulation by DEAD-box RNA-binding protein p68 and steroid receptor RNA activator SRA

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongjie; Brick, Kevin; Evrard, Yvonne; Xiao, Tiaojiang; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2010-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein that plays important roles in chromatin organization, although the mechanism by which CTCF carries out these functions is not fully understood. Recent studies show that CTCF recruits the cohesin complex to insulator sites and that cohesin is required for insulator activity. Here we showed that the DEAD-box RNA helicase p68 (DDX5) and its associated noncoding RNA, steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), form a complex with CTCF that is essential for insulator function. p68 was detected at CTCF sites in the IGF2/H19 imprinted control region (ICR) as well as other genomic CTCF sites. In vivo depletion of SRA or p68 reduced CTCF-mediated insulator activity at the IGF2/H19 ICR, increased levels of IGF2 expression, and increased interactions between the endodermal enhancer and IGF2 promoter. p68/SRA also interacts with members of the cohesin complex. Depletion of either p68 or SRA does not affect CTCF binding to its genomic sites, but does reduce cohesin binding. The results suggest that p68/SRA stabilizes the interaction of cohesin with CTCF by binding to both, and is required for proper insulator function. PMID:20966046

  8. RNA-Binding Proteins in the Regulation of miRNA Activity: A Focus on Neuronal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Loffreda, Alessia; Rigamonti, Aurora; Barabino, Silvia M. L.; Lenzken, Silvia C.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are key processes in the fine-tuning of cellular homeostasis. Two major actors in this scenario are RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) that together play important roles in the biogenesis, turnover, translation and localization of mRNAs. This review will highlight recent advances in the understanding of the role of RBPs in the regulation of the maturation and the function of miRNAs. The interplay between miRNAs and RBPs is discussed specifically in the context of neuronal development and function. PMID:26437437

  9. NMR structure of a biologically active peptide containing the RNA-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    PubMed Central

    Mujeeb, A; Bishop, K; Peterlin, B M; Turck, C; Parslow, T G; James, T L

    1994-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhances transcription by binding to a specific RNA element on nascent viral transcripts. Binding is mediated by a 10-amino acid basic domain that is rich in arginines and lysines. Here we report the three-dimensional peptide backbone structure of a biologically active 25-mer peptide that contains the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat basic domain linked to the core regulatory domain of another lentiviral Tat--i.e., that from equine infectious anemia virus. Circular dichroism and two-dimensional proton NMR studies of this hybrid peptide indicate that the Tat basic domain forms a stable alpha-helix, whereas the adjacent regulatory sequence is mostly in extended form. These findings suggest that the tendency to form stable alpha-helices may be a common property of arginine- and lysine-rich RNA-binding domains. Images PMID:8058789

  10. Reciprocal control of RNA-binding and aconitase activity in the regulation of the iron-responsive element binding protein: role of the iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Haile, D J; Rouault, T A; Tang, C K; Chin, J; Harford, J B; Klausner, R D

    1992-08-15

    Several mechanisms of posttranscriptional gene regulation are involved in regulation of the expression of essential proteins of iron metabolism. Coordinate regulation of ferritin and transferrin receptor expression is produced by binding of a cytosolic protein, the iron-responsive element binding protein (IRE-BP) to specific stem-loop structures present in target RNAs. The affinity of this protein for its cognate RNA is regulated by the cell in response to changes in iron availability. The IRE-BP demonstrates a striking level of amino acid sequence identity to the iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein mitochondrial aconitase. Moreover, the recombinant IRE-BP has aconitase function. The lability of the Fe-S cluster in mitochondrial aconitase has led us to propose that the mechanism by which iron levels are sensed by the IRE-BP involves changes in an Fe-S cluster in the IRE-BP. In this study, we demonstrate that procedures aimed at altering the IRE-BP Fe-S cluster in vitro reciprocally alter the RNA binding and aconitase activity of the IRE-BP. The changes in the RNA binding of the protein produced in vitro appear to match the previously described alterations of the protein in response to iron availability in the cell. Furthermore, iron manipulation of cells correlates with the activation or inactivation of the IRE-BP aconitase activity. The results are consistent with a model for the posttranslational regulation of the IRE-BP in which the Fe-S cluster is altered in response to the availability of intracellular iron and this, in turn, regulates the RNA-binding activity. PMID:1502165

  11. Essential role of lncRNA binding for WDR5 maintenance of active chromatin and embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yul W; Flynn, Ryan A; Chen, Yong; Qu, Kun; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C; Lei, Ming; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-01

    The WDR5 subunit of the MLL complex enforces active chromatin and can bind RNA; the relationship between these two activities is unclear. Here we identify a RNA binding pocket on WDR5, and discover a WDR5 mutant (F266A) that selectively abrogates RNA binding without affecting MLL complex assembly or catalytic activity. Complementation in ESCs shows that WDR5 F266A mutant is unable to accumulate on chromatin, and is defective in gene activation, maintenance of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, and ESC self renewal. We identify a family of ESC messenger and lncRNAs that interact with wild type WDR5 but not F266A mutant, including several lncRNAs known to be important for ESC gene expression. These results suggest that specific RNAs are integral inputs into the WDR5-MLL complex for maintenance of the active chromatin state and embryonic stem cell fates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02046.001 PMID:24521543

  12. Specificity of the double-stranded RNA-binding domain from the RNA-activated protein kinase PKR for double-stranded RNA: insights from thermodynamics and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunita; Blose, Joshua M; Sokoloski, Joshua E; Pollack, Lois; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2012-11-20

    The interferon-inducible, double-stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) contains a dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD) and plays key roles in viral pathogenesis and innate immunity. Activation of PKR is typically mediated by long dsRNA, and regulation of PKR is disfavored by most RNA imperfections, including bulges and internal loops. Herein, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to dissect the thermodynamic basis for the specificity of the dsRBD termed "p20" for various RNAs and to detect any RNA conformational changes induced upon protein binding. We monitor binding of p20 to chimeric duplexes containing terminal RNA-DNA hybrid segments and a central dsRNA segment, which was either unbulged ("perfect") or bulged. The ITC data reveal strong binding of p20 to the perfect duplex (K(d) ~ 30 nM) and weaker binding to the bulged duplex (K(d) ~ 2-5 μM). SAXS reconstructions and p(r) distance distribution functions further uncover that p20 induces no significant conformational change in perfect dsRNA but largely straightens bulged dsRNA. Together, these observations support the dsRBD's ability to tightly bind to only A-form RNA and suggest that in a noninfected cell, PKR may be buffered via weak interactions with various bulged and looped RNAs, which it may straighten. This work suggests that PKR-regulating RNAs with complex secondary and tertiary structures likely mimic dsRNA and/or engage portions of PKR outside of the dsRBD.

  13. Roles for RNA-binding proteins in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Brinegar, Amy E; Cooper, Thomas A

    2016-09-15

    RNA-binding protein activities are highly regulated through protein levels, intracellular localization, and post-translation modifications. During development, mRNA processing of specific gene sets is regulated through manipulation of functional RNA-binding protein activities. The impact of altered RNA-binding protein activities also affects human diseases in which there are either a gain-of-function or loss-of-function causes pathogenesis. We will discuss RNA-binding proteins and their normal developmental RNA metabolism and contrast how their function is disrupted in disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease.

  14. Histidine-rich glycoprotein binds DNA and RNA and attenuates their capacity to activate the intrinsic coagulation pathway.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Leslie, Beverly A; Stafford, Alan R; Zhou, Ji; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-01-01

    When triggered by factor (F) XII and nucleic acids, we showed that thrombosis in HRG-deficient mice is accelerated compared with that in wild-type mice. In this study, we set out to identify the mechanisms by which nucleic acids promote contact activation, and to determine whether HRG attenuates their effects. DNA or RNA addition to human plasma enhances thrombin generation via the intrinsic pathway and shortens the clotting time. Their effect on the clotting time is seven- to 14-fold greater in HRG-deficient plasma than in control plasma. Investigations into the mechanisms of activation reveal that nucleic acids a) promote FXII activation in the presence of prekallikrein- and high molecular weight kininogen (HK), and b) enhance thrombin-mediated FXI activation by 10- to 12-fold. Surface plasmon resonance studies show that DNA and RNA bind FXII, FXIIa, HK, FXI, FXIa and thrombin with high affinity. HRG attenuates DNA- and RNA-mediated FXII activation, and FXI activation by FXIIa or by thrombin, suggesting that HRG down regulates the capacity of DNA and RNA to activate the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, HRG attenuates the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids at multiple levels.

  15. RNA-binding motif protein 47 inhibits Nrf2 activity to suppress tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, T; Isogaya, K; Sakai, S; Morikawa, M; Morishita, Y; Ehata, S; Miyazono, K; Koinuma, D

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins provide a new layer of posttranscriptional regulation of RNA during cancer progression. We identified RNA-binding motif protein 47 (RBM47) as a target gene of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG cells) that have undergone the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. TGF-β repressed RBM47 expression in NMuMG cells and lung cancer cell lines. Expression of RBM47 correlated with good prognosis in patients with lung, breast and gastric cancer. RBM47 suppressed the expression of cell metabolism-related genes, which were the direct targets of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2; also known as NFE2L2). RBM47 bound to KEAP1 and Cullin 3 mRNAs, and knockdown of RBM47 inhibited their protein expression, which led to enhanced binding of Nrf2 to target genomic regions. Knockdown of RBM47 also enhanced the expression of some Nrf2 activators, p21/CDKN1A and MafK induced by TGF-β. Both mitochondrial respiration rates and the side population cells in lung cancer cells increased in the absence of RBM47. Our findings, together with the enhanced tumor formation and metastasis of xenografted mice by knockdown of the RBM47 expression, suggested tumor-suppressive roles for RBM47 through the inhibition of Nrf2 activity. PMID:26923328

  16. IRP1 Ser-711 is a phosphorylation site, critical for regulation of RNA-binding and aconitase activities.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Caltagirone, Annie; Martelli, Alain; Moulis, Jean-Marc; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2005-05-15

    In iron-starved cells, IRP1 (iron regulatory protein 1) binds to mRNA iron-responsive elements and controls their translation or stability. In response to increased iron levels, RNA-binding is inhibited on assembly of a cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster, which renders IRP1 to a cytosolic aconitase. Phosphorylation at conserved serine residues may also regulate the activities of IRP1. We demonstrate that Ser-711 is a phosphorylation site in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) treated with PMA, and we study the effects of the S711E (Ser-711-->Glu) mutation on IRP1 functions. A highly purified preparation of recombinant IRP1(S711E) displays negligible IRE-binding and aconitase activities. It appears that the first step in the aconitase reaction (conversion of citrate into the intermediate cis-aconitate) is more severely affected, as recombinant IRP1(S711E) retains approx. 45% of its capacity to catalyse the conversion of cis-aconitate into the end-product isocitrate. When expressed in mammalian cells, IRP1(S711E) completely fails to bind to RNA and to generate isocitrate from citrate. We demonstrate that the apparent inactivation of IRP1(S711E) is not related to mutation-associated protein misfolding or to alterations in its stability. Sequence analysis of IRP1 from all species currently deposited in protein databases shows that Ser-711 and flanking sequences are highly conserved in the evolutionary scale. Our results suggest that Ser-711 is a critical residue for the control of IRP1 activities.

  17. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  18. Interaction between the tRNA-binding and C-terminal domains of Yeast Gcn2 regulates kinase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lageix, Sebastien; Zhang, Jinwei; Rothenburg, Stefan; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2015-02-01

    The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α. Gcn2 is activated in amino acid-deprived cells by binding of uncharged tRNA to the regulatory domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase, but the molecular mechanism of activation is unclear. We used a genetic approach to identify a key regulatory surface in Gcn2 that is proximal to the predicted active site of the HisRS domain and likely remodeled by tRNA binding. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions on this surface were identified that activate Gcn2 at low levels of tRNA binding (Gcd- phenotype), while other substitutions block kinase activation (Gcn- phenotype), in some cases without altering tRNA binding by Gcn2 in vitro. Remarkably, the Gcn- substitutions increase affinity of the HisRS domain for the C-terminal domain (CTD), previously implicated as a kinase autoinhibitory segment, in a manner dampened by HisRS domain Gcd- substitutions and by amino acid starvation in vivo. Moreover, tRNA specifically antagonizes HisRS/CTD association in vitro. These findings support a model wherein HisRS-CTD interaction facilitates the autoinhibitory function of the CTD in nonstarvation conditions, with tRNA binding eliciting kinase activation by weakening HisRS-CTD association with attendant disruption of the autoinhibitory KD-CTD interaction.

  19. Activity-dependent expression of RNA binding protein HuD and its association with mRNAs in neurons.

    PubMed

    Tiruchinapalli, Dhanrajan M; Ehlers, Michael D; Keene, Jack D

    2008-01-01

    The dendritic trafficking of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) is an important posttranscriptional process involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. For example, HuD RBP binds to AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR) of immediate-early gene (IEG) transcripts, whose protein products directly affect synaptic plasticity. However, the subcellular localization of HuD RBPs and associated mRNAs has not been investigated following neuronal stimulation. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed activity-dependent dendritic localization of HuD RBPs following KCl stimulation in hippocampal neurons, while immunoprecipitation demonstrated the association of HuD RBP with neuronal mRNAs encoding neuritin, Homer1a, GAP-43, Neuroligins, Verge and CAMKIIalpha. Activity-dependent expression of HuD involves activation of NMDAR as NMDA receptor 1 knockout mice (Nr1(neo-/-)) exhibited decreased expression of HuD. Moreover, translational regulation of HuD-associated transcripts was suggested by its co-localization with poly-A-binding protein (PABP) as well as the cap-binding protein (eIF4E). We propose that post-transcriptional regulation of neuronal mRNAs by HuD RBPs mediates protein synthesis-dependent changes in synaptic plasticity. PMID:18769135

  20. Host Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein Regulates Replication Complex Assembly and Activity of a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly. PMID:22345450

  1. Host acyl coenzyme A binding protein regulates replication complex assembly and activity of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2012-05-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly.

  2. RNA binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production and stress tolerance by controlling Gpd1p activity during winemaking.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Helena; Sepúlveda, Ana; Picazo, Cecilia; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol is a key yeast metabolite in winemaking because it contributes to improve the organoleptic properties of wine. It is also a cellular protective molecule that enhances the tolerance of yeasts to osmotic stress and promotes longevity. Thus, its production increases by genetic manipulation, which is of biotechnological and basic interest. Glycerol is produced by diverting glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (coded by genes GPD1 and GPD2). Here, we demonstrate that RNA-binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production by controlling Gpd1p activity. Its deletion does not alter GPD1 mRNA levels, but protein levels and enzymatic activity increase, which explains the higher intracellular glycerol concentration and greater tolerance to osmotic stress of the pub1∆ mutant. PUB1 deletion also enhances the activity of nicotinamidase, a longevity-promoting enzyme. Both enzymatic activities are partially located in peroxisomes, and we detected peroxisome formation during wine fermentation. The role of Pub1p in life span control depends on nutrient conditions and is related with the TOR pathway, and a major connection between RNA metabolism and the nutrient signaling response is established.

  3. Key importance of small RNA binding for the activity of a glycine-tryptophan (GW) motif-containing viral suppressor of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-30

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  4. Key importance of small RNA binding for the activity of a glycine-tryptophan (GW) motif-containing viral suppressor of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-30

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus.

  5. Key Importance of Small RNA Binding for the Activity of a Glycine-Tryptophan (GW) Motif-containing Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  6. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  7. A human chromosome 12-associated 83-kilodalton cellular protein specifically binds to the loop region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, C E; Saltrelli, M J; Galphin, J C; Schochetman, G

    1995-01-01

    trans activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves the viral trans-activator protein (Tat) and a cellular factor(s) encoded on human chromosome 12 (HuChr12) that targets the trans-activation response element (TAR) in the viral long terminal repeat. Because nascent TAR RNA is predicted to form a secondary structure that specifically binds cellular proteins, we investigated the composition of the TAR RNA-protein complex for HuChr12-specific proteins. UV cross-linking of TAR RNA-nuclear protein complexes formed in vitro identified an 83-kDa protein in human cells and in a human-hamster hybrid cell containing only HuChr12. The 83-kDa TAR RNA-binding protein was absent in the parental hamster cells. TAR RNA mutations that inhibited binding of the 83-kDa protein in vitro also inhibited HuChr12-dependent Tat trans activation. These TAR mutations changed the native sequence or secondary structure of the TAR loop. The TAR RNA binding activity of the 83-kDa protein also correlated with a HuChr12-dependent increase in steady-state HIV-1 RNA expression during Tat trans activation. Our results suggest that either a species-specific 83-kDa TAR RNA loop-binding protein is directly encoded on HuChr12 or a HuChr12 protein(s) induces the expression of an 83-kDa TAR-binding protein in nonprimate cells. PMID:7666565

  8. CMT2D neuropathy is linked to the neomorphic binding activity of glycyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    He, Weiwei; Bai, Ge; Zhou, Huihao; Wei, Na; White, Nicholas M.; Lauer, Janelle; Liu, Huaqing; Shi, Yi; Dumitru, Calin Dan; Lettieri, Karen; Shubayev, Veronica; Jordanova, Albena; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burgess, Robert W.; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Selective neuronal loss is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, which counter-intuitively are often caused by mutations in widely-expressed genes1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common hereditary peripheral neuropathies, for which there are no effective therapies2,3. A subtype of the diseases—CMT2D—is caused by dominant mutations in GARS, encoding the ubiquitously expressed enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS). Despite the broad requirement of GlyRS for protein biosynthesis in all cells, mutations in this gene cause a selective degeneration of peripheral axons leading to deficits in distal motor function4. How mutations in GlyRS (GlyRSCMT2D) are linked to motor neuron vulnerability has remained elusive. Here we report that GlyRSCMT2D acquires a neomorphic binding activity that directly antagonizes an essential signaling pathway for motor neuron survival. We find that CMT2D mutations alter the conformation of GlyRS, enabling GlyRSCMT2D to bind the Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) receptor. This aberrant interaction competitively interferes with the binding of the cognate ligand vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to Nrp1. Genetic reduction of Nrp1 in mice worsens CMT2D symptoms, whereas enhanced expression of VEGF improves motor function. These findings link the selective pathology of CMT2D to the neomorphic binding activity of GlyRSCMT2D that antagonizes the VEGF/Nrp1 interaction, and indicate the VEGF/Nrp1 signaling axis is an actionable target for treating CMT2D. PMID:26503042

  9. Steroid Receptor RNA Activator (SRA) Modification by the Human Pseudouridine Synthase 1 (hPus1p): RNA Binding, Activity, and Atomic Model

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Tiphaine; Miannay, François-Alexandre; Patton, Jeffrey R.; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The most abundant of the modified nucleosides, and once considered as the “fifth” nucleotide in RNA, is pseudouridine, which results from the action of pseudouridine synthases. Recently, the mammalian pseudouridine synthase 1 (hPus1p) has been reported to modulate class I and class II nuclear receptor responses through its ability to modify the Steroid receptor RNA Activator (SRA). These findings highlight a new level of regulation in nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transcriptional responses. We have characterised the RNA association and activity of the human Pus1p enzyme with its unusual SRA substrate. We validate that the minimal RNA fragment within SRA, named H7, is necessary for both the association and modification by hPus1p. Furthermore, we have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of hPus1p at 2.0 Å resolution, alone and in a complex with several molecules present during crystallisation. This model shows an extended C-terminal helix specifically found in the eukaryotic protein, which may prevent the enzyme from forming a homodimer, both in the crystal lattice and in solution. Our biochemical and structural data help to understand the hPus1p active site architecture, and detail its particular requirements with regard to one of its nuclear substrates, the non-coding RNA SRA. PMID:24722331

  10. Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) modification by the human pseudouridine synthase 1 (hPus1p): RNA binding, activity, and atomic model.

    PubMed

    Huet, Tiphaine; Miannay, François-Alexandre; Patton, Jeffrey R; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The most abundant of the modified nucleosides, and once considered as the "fifth" nucleotide in RNA, is pseudouridine, which results from the action of pseudouridine synthases. Recently, the mammalian pseudouridine synthase 1 (hPus1p) has been reported to modulate class I and class II nuclear receptor responses through its ability to modify the Steroid receptor RNA Activator (SRA). These findings highlight a new level of regulation in nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transcriptional responses. We have characterised the RNA association and activity of the human Pus1p enzyme with its unusual SRA substrate. We validate that the minimal RNA fragment within SRA, named H7, is necessary for both the association and modification by hPus1p. Furthermore, we have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of hPus1p at 2.0 Å resolution, alone and in a complex with several molecules present during crystallisation. This model shows an extended C-terminal helix specifically found in the eukaryotic protein, which may prevent the enzyme from forming a homodimer, both in the crystal lattice and in solution. Our biochemical and structural data help to understand the hPus1p active site architecture, and detail its particular requirements with regard to one of its nuclear substrates, the non-coding RNA SRA.

  11. Mutagenic analysis of potato virus X movement protein (TGBp1) and the coat protein (CP): in vitro TGBp1-CP binding and viral RNA translation activation.

    PubMed

    Zayakina, Olga; Arkhipenko, Marina; Kozlovsky, Stanislav; Nikitin, Nikolai; Smirnov, Alexander; Susi, Petri; Rodionova, Nina; Karpova, Olga; Atabekov, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that encapsidated Potato virus X (PVX) RNA was non-translatable in vitro, but could be converted into a translatable form by binding of the PVX movement protein TGBp1 to one end of the virion or by coat protein (CP) phosphorylation. Here, a mutagenic analysis of PVX CP and TGBp1 was used to identify the regions involved in TGBp1-CP binding and translational activation of PVX RNA by TGBp1. It was found that the C-terminal (C-ter) 10/18 amino acids region was not essential for virus-like particle (VP) assembly from CP and RNA. However, the VPs assembled from the CP lacking C-ter 10/18 amino acids were incapable of TGBp1 binding and being translationally activated. It was suggested that the 10-amino-acid C-ter regions of protein subunits located at one end of a polar helical PVX particle contain a domain accessible to TGBp1 binding and PVX remodelling. The non-translatable particles assembled from the C-ter mutant CP could be converted into a translatable form by CP phosphorylation. The TGBp1-CP binding activity was preserved unless a conservative motif IV was removed from TGBp1. By contrast, TGBp1-dependent activation of PVX RNA translation was abolished by deletions of various NTPase/helicase conservative motifs and their combinations. The motif IV might be essential for TGBp1-CP binding, but insufficient for PVX RNA translation activation. The evidence to discriminate between these two events, i.e. TGBp1 binding to the CP-helix and TGBp1-dependent RNA translation activation, is discussed.

  12. Identification and characterization of RNA-binding activity in the ORF1-encoded replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV) belongs to the genus Carmovirus (family Tombusviridae) and, as with the remaining members of the group, possesses a monopartite genome of single-stranded, positive-sense RNA that contains five ORFs. The two 5'-proximal ORFs (ORFs 1 and 2) encode two polypeptides of 27 and 86 kDa (p27 and p86), respectively, that show homology with replication proteins. The p27 does not present any motif to explain its presumed involvement in replication, while p86 has the motifs conserved in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. In this work, we have confirmed the necessity of p27 and p86 for PFBV replication. To gain insights into the function(s) of p27, we have expressed and purified the protein from Escherichia coli and tested its ability to bind RNA in vitro. The results have shown that p27 is able to bind ssRNA with high affinity and in a cooperative fashion and that it is also capable of binding other types of nucleic acids, though to a lesser extent. Additionally, competition experiments suggest that p27 has a preference for PFBV-derived ssRNAs. Using truncated forms of p27, it can be concluded that several regions of the protein contribute to its RNA-binding properties and that this contribution is additive. This study is the first to show nucleic acid-binding ability of the ORF1 product of a carmovirus and the data obtained suggest that this product plays an essential role in selection and recruitment of viral RNA replication templates. PMID:20826617

  13. Identification and characterization of RNA-binding activity in the ORF1-encoded replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV) belongs to the genus Carmovirus (family Tombusviridae) and, as with the remaining members of the group, possesses a monopartite genome of single-stranded, positive-sense RNA that contains five ORFs. The two 5'-proximal ORFs (ORFs 1 and 2) encode two polypeptides of 27 and 86 kDa (p27 and p86), respectively, that show homology with replication proteins. The p27 does not present any motif to explain its presumed involvement in replication, while p86 has the motifs conserved in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. In this work, we have confirmed the necessity of p27 and p86 for PFBV replication. To gain insights into the function(s) of p27, we have expressed and purified the protein from Escherichia coli and tested its ability to bind RNA in vitro. The results have shown that p27 is able to bind ssRNA with high affinity and in a cooperative fashion and that it is also capable of binding other types of nucleic acids, though to a lesser extent. Additionally, competition experiments suggest that p27 has a preference for PFBV-derived ssRNAs. Using truncated forms of p27, it can be concluded that several regions of the protein contribute to its RNA-binding properties and that this contribution is additive. This study is the first to show nucleic acid-binding ability of the ORF1 product of a carmovirus and the data obtained suggest that this product plays an essential role in selection and recruitment of viral RNA replication templates.

  14. Metazoan Maelstrom is an RNA-binding protein that has evolved from an ancient nuclease active in protists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Ming; Campbell, Edgar; Pandey, Radha Raman; Yang, Zhaolin; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Pillai, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide Piwi argonautes to their transposon targets for silencing. The highly conserved protein Maelstrom is linked to both piRNA biogenesis and effector roles in this pathway. One defining feature of Maelstrom is the predicted MAEL domain of unknown molecular function. Here, we present the first crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Bombyx Maelstrom, which reveals a nuclease fold. The overall architecture resembles that found in Mg2+- or Mn2+-dependent DEDD nucleases, but a clear distinguishing feature is the presence of a structural Zn2+ ion coordinated by the conserved ECHC residues. Strikingly, metazoan Maelstrom orthologs across the animal kingdom lack the catalytic DEDD residues, and as we show for Bombyx Maelstrom are inactive as nucleases. However, a MAEL domain-containing protein from amoeba having both sequence motifs (DEDD and ECHC) is robustly active as an exoribonuclease. Finally, we show that the MAEL domain of Bombyx Maelstrom displays a strong affinity for single-stranded RNAs. Our studies suggest that the ancient MAEL nuclease domain evolved to function as an RNA-binding module in metazoan Maelstrom. PMID:25778731

  15. Metazoan Maelstrom is an RNA-binding protein that has evolved from an ancient nuclease active in protists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Ming; Campbell, Edgar; Pandey, Radha Raman; Yang, Zhaolin; McCarthy, Andrew A; Pillai, Ramesh S

    2015-05-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide Piwi argonautes to their transposon targets for silencing. The highly conserved protein Maelstrom is linked to both piRNA biogenesis and effector roles in this pathway. One defining feature of Maelstrom is the predicted MAEL domain of unknown molecular function. Here, we present the first crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Bombyx Maelstrom, which reveals a nuclease fold. The overall architecture resembles that found in Mg(2+)- or Mn(2+)-dependent DEDD nucleases, but a clear distinguishing feature is the presence of a structural Zn(2+) ion coordinated by the conserved ECHC residues. Strikingly, metazoan Maelstrom orthologs across the animal kingdom lack the catalytic DEDD residues, and as we show for Bombyx Maelstrom are inactive as nucleases. However, a MAEL domain-containing protein from amoeba having both sequence motifs (DEDD and ECHC) is robustly active as an exoribonuclease. Finally, we show that the MAEL domain of Bombyx Maelstrom displays a strong affinity for single-stranded RNAs. Our studies suggest that the ancient MAEL nuclease domain evolved to function as an RNA-binding module in metazoan Maelstrom.

  16. Drosophila Nanos acts as a molecular clamp that modulates the RNA-binding and repression activities of Pumilio

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Chase A; Qiu, Chen; Arvola, René M; Lou, Tzu-Fang; Killingsworth, Jordan; Campbell, Zachary T; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration among the multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) is ubiquitous, yet our understanding of these key regulatory complexes has been limited to single RBPs. We investigated combinatorial translational regulation by Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) and Nanos (Nos), which control development, fertility, and neuronal functions. Our results show how the specificity of one RBP (Pum) is modulated by cooperative RNA recognition with a second RBP (Nos) to synergistically repress mRNAs. Crystal structures of Nos-Pum-RNA complexes reveal that Nos embraces Pum and RNA, contributes sequence-specific contacts, and increases Pum RNA-binding affinity. Nos shifts the recognition sequence and promotes repression complex formation on mRNAs that are not stably bound by Pum alone, explaining the preponderance of sub-optimal Pum sites regulated in vivo. Our results illuminate the molecular mechanism of a regulatory switch controlling crucial gene expression programs, and provide a framework for understanding how the partnering of RBPs evokes changes in binding specificity that underlie regulatory network dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17096.001 PMID:27482653

  17. Native mitochondrial RNA-binding complexes in kinetoplastid RNA editing differ in guide RNA composition.

    PubMed

    Madina, Bhaskara R; Kumar, Vikas; Metz, Richard; Mooers, Blaine H M; Bundschuh, Ralf; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastids require extensive U-insertion/deletion editing that progresses 3'-to-5' in small blocks, each directed by a guide RNA (gRNA), and exhibits substrate and developmental stage-specificity by unsolved mechanisms. Here, we address compositionally related factors, collectively known as the mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 (MRB1) or gRNA-binding complex (GRBC), that contain gRNA, have a dynamic protein composition, and transiently associate with several mitochondrial factors including RNA editing core complexes (RECC) and ribosomes. MRB1 controls editing by still unknown mechanisms. We performed the first next-generation sequencing study of native subcomplexes of MRB1, immunoselected via either RNA helicase 2 (REH2), that binds RNA and associates with unwinding activity, or MRB3010, that affects an early editing step. The particles contain either REH2 or MRB3010 but share the core GAP1 and other proteins detected by RNA photo-crosslinking. Analyses of the first editing blocks indicate an enrichment of several initiating gRNAs in the MRB3010-purified complex. Our data also indicate fast evolution of mRNA 3' ends and strain-specific alternative 3' editing within 3' UTR or C-terminal protein-coding sequence that could impact mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, we found robust specific copurification of edited and pre-edited mRNAs, suggesting that these particles may bind both mRNA and gRNA editing substrates. We propose that multiple subcomplexes of MRB1 with different RNA/protein composition serve as a scaffold for specific assembly of editing substrates and RECC, thereby forming the editing holoenzyme. The MRB3010-subcomplex may promote early editing through its preferential recruitment of initiating gRNAs.

  18. Activation of D-tyrosine by Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: 2. Cooperative binding of ATP is limited to the initial turnover of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Anita; First, Eric A

    2008-05-01

    The activation of D-tyrosine by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase has been investigated using single and multiple turnover kinetic methods. In the presence of saturating concentrations of D-tyrosine, the activation reaction displays sigmoidal kinetics with respect to ATP concentration under single turnover conditions. In contrast, when the kinetics for the activation reaction are monitored using a steady-state (multiple turnover) pyrophosphate exchange assay, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are observed. Previous investigations indicated that activation of l-tyrosine by the K233A variant of Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase displays sigmoidal kinetics similar to those observed for activation of d-tyrosine by the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic analyses indicate that the sigmoidal behavior of the d-tyrosine activation reaction is not enhanced when Lys-233 is replaced by alanine. This supports the hypothesis that the mechanistic basis for the sigmoidal behavior is the same for both d-tyrosine activation by wild-type tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and activation of l-tyrosine by the K233A variant. The observed sigmoidal behavior presents a paradox, as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase displays an extreme form of negative cooperativity, known as "half-of-the-sites reactivity," with respect to tyrosine binding and tyrosyl-adenylate formation. We propose that the binding of D-tyrosine weakens the affinity with which ATP binds to the functional subunit in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This allows ATP to bind initially to the nonfunctional subunit, inducing a conformational change in the enzyme that enhances the affinity of the functional subunit for ATP. The observation that sigmoidal kinetics are observed only under single turnover conditions suggests that this conformational change is stable over multiple rounds of catalysis. PMID:18319246

  19. The STAR RNA binding proteins GLD-1, QKI, SAM68 and SLM-2 bind bipartite RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, André; Richard, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Background SAM68, SAM68-like mammalian protein 1 (SLM-1) and 2 (SLM-2) are members of the K homology (KH) and STAR (signal transduction activator of RNA metabolism) protein family. The function of these RNA binding proteins has been difficult to elucidate mainly because of lack of genetic data providing insights about their physiological RNA targets. In comparison, genetic studies in mice and C. elegans have provided evidence as to the physiological mRNA targets of QUAKING and GLD-1 proteins, two other members of the STAR protein family. The GLD-1 binding site is defined as a hexanucleotide sequence (NACUCA) that is found in many, but not all, physiological GLD-1 mRNA targets. Previously by using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX), we defined the QUAKING binding site as a hexanucleotide sequence with an additional half-site (UAAY). This sequence was identified in QKI mRNA targets including the mRNAs for myelin basic proteins. Results Herein we report using SELEX the identification of the SLM-2 RNA binding site as direct U(U/A)AA repeats. The bipartite nature of the consensus sequence was essential for SLM-2 high affinity RNA binding. The identification of a bipartite mRNA binding site for QKI and now SLM-2 prompted us to determine whether SAM68 and GLD-1 also bind bipartite direct repeats. Indeed SAM68 bound the SLM-2 consensus and required both U(U/A)AA motifs. We also confirmed that GLD-1 also binds a bipartite RNA sequence in vitro with a short RNA sequence from its tra-2 physiological mRNA target. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the STAR proteins QKI, GLD-1, SAM68 and SLM-2 recognize RNA with direct repeats as bipartite motifs. This information should help identify binding sites within physiological RNA targets. PMID:19457263

  20. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  1. Both Sm-domain and C-terminal extension of Lsm1 are important for the RNA-binding activity of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ashis; Raju, Kalidindi K; Kalurupalle, Swathi; Tharun, Sundaresan

    2012-05-01

    Lsm proteins are a ubiquitous family of proteins characterized by the Sm-domain. They exist as hexa- or heptameric RNA-binding complexes and carry out RNA-related functions. The Sm-domain is thought to be sufficient for the RNA-binding activity of these proteins. The highly conserved eukaryotic Lsm1 through Lsm7 proteins are part of the cytoplasmic Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex, which is an activator of decapping in the conserved 5'-3' mRNA decay pathway. This complex also protects mRNA 3'-ends from trimming in vivo. Purified Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex is able to bind RNA in vitro and exhibits a unique binding preference for oligoadenylated RNA (over polyadenylated and unadenylated RNA). Lsm1 is a key subunit that determines the RNA-binding properties of this complex. The normal RNA-binding activity of this complex is crucial for mRNA decay and 3'-end protection in vivo and requires the intact Sm-domain of Lsm1. Here, we show that though necessary, the Sm-domain of Lsm1 is not sufficient for the normal RNA-binding ability of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex. Deletion of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Lsm1 (while keeping the Sm-domain intact) impairs mRNA decay in vivo and results in Lsm1-7-Pat1 complexes that are severely impaired in RNA binding in vitro. Interestingly, the mRNA decay and 3'-end protection defects of such CTD-truncated lsm1 mutants could be suppressed in trans by overexpression of the CTD polypeptide. Thus, unlike most Sm-like proteins, Lsm1 uniquely requires both its Sm-domain and CTD for its normal RNA-binding function.

  2. The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants: phylogeny, structural modeling, activity and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Puf proteins have important roles in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by promoting RNA decay and repressing translation. The Pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD) is a conserved region within Puf proteins that binds to RNA with sequence specificity. Although Puf proteins have been well characterized in animal and fungal systems, little is known about the structural and functional characteristics of Puf-like proteins in plants. Results The Arabidopsis and rice genomes code for 26 and 19 Puf-like proteins, respectively, each possessing eight or fewer Puf repeats in their PUM-HD. Key amino acids in the PUM-HD of several of these proteins are conserved with those of animal and fungal homologs, whereas other plant Puf proteins demonstrate extensive variability in these amino acids. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the predicted structure of this domain in plant Puf proteins provides a suitable surface for binding RNA. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments showed that the Arabidopsis AtPum2 PUM-HD binds with high affinity to BoxB of the Drosophila Nanos Response Element I (NRE1) RNA, whereas a point mutation in the core of the NRE1 resulted in a significant reduction in binding affinity. Transient expression of several of the Arabidopsis Puf proteins as fluorescent protein fusions revealed a dynamic, punctate cytoplasmic pattern of localization for most of these proteins. The presence of predicted nuclear export signals and accumulation of AtPuf proteins in the nucleus after treatment of cells with leptomycin B demonstrated that shuttling of these proteins between the cytosol and nucleus is common among these proteins. In addition to the cytoplasmically enriched AtPum proteins, two AtPum proteins showed nuclear targeting with enrichment in the nucleolus. Conclusions The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants consists of a greater number of members than any other model species studied to date. This, along with the

  3. Mammalian synthetic circuits with RNA binding proteins delivered by RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Liliana; Kitada, Tasuku; Endo, Kei; Siciliano, Velia; Stillo, Breanna; Saito, Hirohide; Weiss, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic regulatory circuits encoded on RNA rather than DNA could provide a means to control cell behavior while avoiding potentially harmful genomic integration in therapeutic applications. We create post-transcriptional circuits using RNA-binding proteins, which can be wired in a plug-and-play fashion to create networks of higher complexity. We show that the circuits function in mammalian cells when encoded on modified mRNA or self-replicating RNA. PMID:26237515

  4. A rat brain mRNA encoding a transcriptional activator homologous to the DNA binding domain of retroviral integrases.

    PubMed Central

    Duilio, A; Zambrano, N; Mogavero, A R; Ammendola, R; Cimino, F; Russo, T

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a rat cDNA, named FE65, hybridizing to an mRNA of about 2,300 nucleotides present in rat brain, undetectable in rat liver and very poorly represented in other tissues. An mRNA of the same size is present in human neuroblastoma cells and is absent from other human cell lines. The FE65 cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a polypeptide of 499 amino acids in which 143 residues can be aligned with the DNA binding domain of the integrases encoded by mammalian immunodeficiency viruses. The remaining part of the FE65 ORF is not homologous with the correspondent regions of the integrases; the first 206 residues of the FE65 ORF show numerous negative charges and a short sequence not dispensable for the function of the transactivating acidic domain of the jun family transcriptional factors. A plasmid which expresses FE65 amino acids 1-232 fused to the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain was co-transfected with a plasmid containing five GAL4 binding sites upstream of a minimal Adenovirus promoter controlling the expression of the CAT gene. This experiment showed that the fused protein GAL4-FE65 is able to obtain a 30-40 fold increase of the CAT gene expression compared to the expression observed in the presence of the GAL4 DNA binding domain alone. Two types of FE65 mRNA are present in rat brain, differing only for six nucleotides. We demonstrate that this is the consequence of a neuron-specific alternative splicing of a six-nucleotide miniexon, which is also present in the human genome, in an intron/exon context very similar to that of the rat FE65 gene. Images PMID:1923810

  5. RNA-binding protein HuR promotes growth of small intestinal mucosa by activating the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Christodoulou-Vafeiadou, Eleni; Rao, Jaladanki N; Zou, Tongtong; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Yang, Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2014-11-01

    Inhibition of growth of the intestinal epithelium, a rapidly self-renewing tissue, is commonly found in various critical disorders. The RNA-binding protein HuR is highly expressed in the gut mucosa and modulates the stability and translation of target mRNAs, but its exact biological function in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of HuR in intestinal homeostasis using a genetic model and further defined its target mRNAs. Targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells caused significant mucosal atrophy in the small intestine, as indicated by decreased cell proliferation within the crypts and subsequent shrinkages of crypts and villi. In addition, the HuR-deficient intestinal epithelium also displayed decreased regenerative potential of crypt progenitors after exposure to irradiation. HuR deficiency decreased expression of the Wnt coreceptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) in the mucosal tissues. At the molecular level, HuR was found to bind the Lrp6 mRNA via its 3'-untranslated region and enhanced LRP6 expression by stabilizing Lrp6 mRNA and stimulating its translation. These results indicate that HuR is essential for normal mucosal growth in the small intestine by altering Wnt signals through up-regulation of LRP6 expression and highlight a novel role of HuR deficiency in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal atrophy under pathological conditions.

  6. Cocaine differentially regulates activator protein-1 mRNA levels and DNA-binding complexes in the rat striatum and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Couceyro, P; Pollock, K M; Drews, K; Douglass, J

    1994-10-01

    Cocaine is a psychomotor stimulant that exerts many of its behavioral and physiological effects through alteration of catecholamine reuptake systems. One early cellular response to cocaine administration is a brain region-specific alteration in the transcriptional pattern of immediate early genes belonging to the Fos/Jun family of nucleotide sequence-specific [activator protein-1 (AP-1)] DNA-binding proteins. The work described here compares cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation of immediate early gene mRNA levels, as well as AP-1 DNA-binding activity, within the striatum and cerebellum. In the striatum, acute cocaine administration increases cellular levels of c-fos and jun-B mRNA, whereas transcriptional effects in the cerebellum are limited to c-fos mRNA. After chronic cocaine treatment a desensitization of c-fos mRNA induction is observed in the striatum, with sensitization of the same transcriptional effect occurring in the cerebellum. Pharmacological studies further reveal that the dopamine D1, dopamine D2, gamma-aminobutyric acid type B, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor systems mediate the effects of cocaine on cerebellar neurons, whereas striatal effects are modulated through D1 and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Gel retention analysis using antibodies to the various Fos and Jun proteins was used to characterize cocaine-dependent alterations in the composition of striatal and cerebellar AP-1 DNA-binding complexes. In striatum, cocaine increases the relative levels of c-Fos, Fos-B, Jun-B, and Jun-D proteins that bind the AP-1 DNA sequence element, whereas in the cerebellum only c-Fos and Jun-D binding activities are increased. These data suggest two possible neuroanatomical sites where tolerance and sensitization to cocaine can be examined at the genomic level. PMID:7969045

  7. Dihydrotanshinone-I interferes with the RNA-binding activity of HuR affecting its post-transcriptional function.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Vito Giuseppe; Lal, Preet; Mantelli, Barbara; Tiedje, Christopher; Zucal, Chiara; Thongon, Natthakan; Gaestel, Matthias; Latorre, Elisa; Marinelli, Luciana; Seneci, Pierfausto; Amadio, Marialaura; Provenzani, Alessandro

    2015-11-10

    Post-transcriptional regulation is an essential determinant of gene expression programs in physiological and pathological conditions. HuR is a RNA-binding protein that orchestrates the stabilization and translation of mRNAs, critical in inflammation and tumor progression, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). We identified the low molecular weight compound 15,16-dihydrotanshinone-I (DHTS), well known in traditional Chinese medicine practice, through a validated high throughput screening on a set of anti-inflammatory agents for its ability to prevent HuR:RNA complex formation. We found that DHTS interferes with the association step between HuR and the RNA with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range in vitro (Ki = 3.74 ± 1.63 nM). In breast cancer cell lines, short term exposure to DHTS influences mRNA stability and translational efficiency of TNF in a HuR-dependent manner and also other functional readouts of its post-transcriptional control, such as the stability of selected pre-mRNAs. Importantly, we show that migration and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to DHTS are modulated by HuR expression, indicating that HuR is among the preferential intracellular targets of DHTS. Here, we disclose a previously unrecognized molecular mechanism exerted by DHTS, opening new perspectives to therapeutically target the HuR mediated, post-transcriptional control in inflammation and cancer cells.

  8. Essential Roles of RNA-binding Protein HuR in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jingjing; Chang, Na; Zhao, Zhongxin; Tian, Lei; Duan, Xianghui; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding protein HuR mediates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced profibrogenic actions. Up-regulation of Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is involved in TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in liver fibrogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of TGF-β1 regulates SphK1 remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the role of HuR in TGF-β1-induced SphK1 expression and identify a new molecular mechanism in liver fibrogenensis. In vivo, HuR expression was increased, translocated to cytoplasm, and bound to SphK1 mRNA in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced mouse fibrotic liver. HuR mRNA expression had a positive correlation with mRNA expressions of SphK1 and fibrotic markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen α1(I), respectively. In vitro, up-regulation of SphK1 and activation of HSCs stimulated by TGF-β1 depended on HuR cytoplasmic accumulation. The effects of TGF-β1 were diminished when HuR was silenced or HuR cytoplasmic translocation was blocked. Meanwhile, overexpression of HuR mimicked the effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β1 prolonged half-life of SphK1 mRNA by promoting its binding to HuR. Pharmacological or siRNA-induced SphK1 inhibition abrogated HuR-mediated HSC activation. In conclusion, our data suggested that HuR bound to SphK1 mRNA and played a crucial role in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation. PMID:26912347

  9. Essential Roles of RNA-binding Protein HuR in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingjing; Chang, Na; Zhao, Zhongxin; Tian, Lei; Duan, Xianghui; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-02-25

    RNA-binding protein HuR mediates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced profibrogenic actions. Up-regulation of Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is involved in TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in liver fibrogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of TGF-β1 regulates SphK1 remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the role of HuR in TGF-β1-induced SphK1 expression and identify a new molecular mechanism in liver fibrogenensis. In vivo, HuR expression was increased, translocated to cytoplasm, and bound to SphK1 mRNA in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced mouse fibrotic liver. HuR mRNA expression had a positive correlation with mRNA expressions of SphK1 and fibrotic markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen α1(I), respectively. In vitro, up-regulation of SphK1 and activation of HSCs stimulated by TGF-β1 depended on HuR cytoplasmic accumulation. The effects of TGF-β1 were diminished when HuR was silenced or HuR cytoplasmic translocation was blocked. Meanwhile, overexpression of HuR mimicked the effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β1 prolonged half-life of SphK1 mRNA by promoting its binding to HuR. Pharmacological or siRNA-induced SphK1 inhibition abrogated HuR-mediated HSC activation. In conclusion, our data suggested that HuR bound to SphK1 mRNA and played a crucial role in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation.

  10. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Lingam, Arunth T; Bass, Brenda L

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs.

  11. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  12. Consensus PP1 binding motifs regulate transcriptional corepression and alternative RNA splicing activities of the steroid receptor coregulators, p54nrb and PSF.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liangliang; Xie, Ning; Rennie, Paul; Challis, John R G; Gleave, Martin; Lye, Stephen J; Dong, Xuesen

    2011-07-01

    Originally identified as essential pre-mRNA splicing factors, non-POU-domain-containing, octamer binding protein (p54nrb) and PTB-associated RNA splicing factor (PSF) are also steroid receptor corepressors. The mechanisms by which p54nrb and PSF regulate gene transcription remain unclear. Both p54nrb and PSF contain protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) consensus binding RVxF motifs, suggesting that PP1 may regulate phosphorylation status of p54nrb and PSF and thus their function in gene transcription. In this report, we demonstrated that PP1 forms a protein complex with both p54nrb and PSF. PP1 interacts directly with the RVxF motif only in p54nrb, but not in PSF. Association with PP1 results in dephosphorylation of both p54nrb and PSF in vivo and the loss of their transcriptional corepressor activities. Using the CD44 minigene as a reporter, we showed that PP1 regulates p54nrb and PSF alternative splicing activities that determine exon skipping vs. inclusion in the final mature RNA for translation. In addition, changes in transcriptional corepression and RNA splicing activities of p54nrb and PSF are correlated with alterations in protein interactions of p54nrb and PSF with transcriptional corepressors such as Sin3A and histone deacetylase 1, and RNA splicing factors such as U1A and U2AF. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel function of the RVxF motif within PSF that enhances its corepression and RNA splicing activities independent of PP1. We conclude that the RVxF motifs play an important role in controlling the multifunctional properties of p54nrb and PSF in the regulation of gene transcription.

  13. Helical Defects in MicroRNA Influence Protein Binding by TAR RNA Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Roderico; Orench-Rivera, Nichole; Quarles, Kaycee A.; Showalter, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Their precursors have a globally A-form helical geometry, which prevents most proteins from identifying their nucleotide sequence. This suggests the hypothesis that local structural features (e.g., bulges, internal loops) play a central role in specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) selection from cellular RNA pools by dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) containing proteins. Furthermore, the processing enzymes in the miRNA maturation pathway require tandem-dsRBD cofactor proteins for optimal function, suggesting that dsRBDs play a key role in the molecular mechanism for precise positioning of the RNA within these multi-protein complexes. Here, we focus on the tandem-dsRBDs of TRBP, which have been shown to bind dsRNA tightly. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a combination of dsRNA binding assays demonstrating that TRBP binds dsRNA in an RNA-length dependent manner. Moreover, circular dichroism data shows that the number of dsRBD moieties bound to RNA at saturation is different for a tandem-dsRBD construct than for constructs with only one dsRBD per polypeptide, revealing another reason for the selective pressure to maintain multiple domains within a polypeptide chain. Finally, we show that helical defects in precursor miRNA alter the apparent dsRNA size, demonstrating that imperfections in RNA structure influence the strength of TRBP binding. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that TRBP is responsible for recognizing structural imperfections in miRNA precursors, in the sense that TRBP is unable to bind imperfections efficiently and thus is positioned around them. We propose that once positioned around structural defects, TRBP assists Dicer and the rest of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) in providing efficient and homogenous conversion of substrate precursor miRNA into mature miRNA downstream. PMID:25608000

  14. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA.

    PubMed

    Nou, X; Kadner, R J

    2000-06-20

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 microM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  15. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA

    PubMed Central

    Nou, Xiangwu; Kadner, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 μM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  16. FASTKD2 is an RNA-binding protein required for mitochondrial RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Popow, Johannes; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Curk, Tomaz; Schwarzl, Thomas; Sauer, Sven; Hentze, Matthias W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial RNA processing is an essential step for the synthesis of the components of the electron transport chain in all eukaryotic organisms, yet several aspects of mitochondrial RNA biogenesis and regulation are not sufficiently understood. RNA interactome capture identified several disease-relevant RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with noncanonical RNA-binding architectures, including all six members of the FASTK (FAS-activated serine/threonine kinase) family of proteins. A mutation within one of these newly assigned FASTK RBPs, FASTKD2, causes a rare form of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. To investigate whether RNA binding of FASTKD2 contributes to the disease phenotype, we identified the RNA targets of FASTKD2 by iCLIP. FASTKD2 interacts with a defined set of mitochondrial transcripts including 16S ribosomal RNA (RNR2) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) messenger RNA. CRISPR-mediated deletion of FASTKD2 leads to aberrant processing and expression of RNR2 and ND6 mRNA that encodes a subunit of the respiratory complex I. Metabolic phenotyping of FASTKD2-deficient cells reveals impaired cellular respiration with reduced activities of all respiratory complexes. This work identifies key aspects of the molecular network of a previously uncharacterized, disease-relevant RNA-binding protein, FASTKD2, by a combination of genomic, molecular, and metabolic analyses.

  17. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets. PMID:26712751

  18. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets. PMID:26712751

  19. A 3' untranslated region variant in FMR1 eliminates neuronal activity-dependent translation of FMRP by disrupting binding of the RNA-binding protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Suhl, Joshua A; Muddashetty, Ravi S; Anderson, Bart R; Ifrim, Marius F; Visootsak, Jeannie; Bassell, Gary J; Warren, Stephen T

    2015-11-24

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. The gene underlying the disorder, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1), is silenced in most cases by a CGG-repeat expansion mutation in the 5' untranslated region (UTR). Recently, we identified a variant located in the 3'UTR of FMR1 enriched among developmentally delayed males with normal repeat lengths. A patient-derived cell line revealed reduced levels of endogenous fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), and a reporter containing a patient 3'UTR caused a decrease in expression. A control reporter expressed in cultured mouse cortical neurons showed an expected increase following synaptic stimulation that was absent when expressing the patient reporter, suggesting an impaired response to neuronal activity. Mobility-shift assays using a control RNA detected an RNA-protein interaction that is lost with the patient RNA, and HuR was subsequently identified as an associated protein. Cross-linking immunoprecipitation experiments identified the locus as an in vivo target of HuR, supporting our in vitro findings. These data suggest that the disrupted interaction of HuR impairs activity-dependent translation of FMRP, which may hinder synaptic plasticity in a clinically significant fashion.

  20. Nature of DNA binding and RNA polymerase interaction of the Bordetella pertussis BvgA transcriptional activator at the fha promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, P E; Murakami, K; Ishihama, A; Stibitz, S

    1997-01-01

    The expression of virulence factor genes in Bordetella pertussis is mediated by the BvgA-BvgS two-component signal transduction system. The response regulator, BvgA, acts directly as a transcriptional activator at the loci encoding pertussis toxin (ptx) and filamentous hemagglutinin (fha). Previous studies have demonstrated that these two loci are differentially regulated by BvgA. As an initial step in gaining insight into the mechanism underlying this differential regulation, we initiated DNA binding and in vitro transcription analyses to examine the activities of BvgA and RNA polymerase (RNAP) purified from both B. pertussis and Escherichia coli at the fha promoter. We discovered that unphosphorylated BvgA binds to a single region (-100 to -70, relative to the start of transcription), whereas phosphorylated BvgA binds both this region and another, farther downstream, that extends to the -35 nucleotide. In the absence of BvgA, RNAP binds a region farther upstream than expected (-104 to -35). However, occupation of both sites by BvgA phosphate repositions RNAP to the site used in vivo. The binding of BvgA phosphate to the downstream site correlates with in vitro transcriptional activity at the fha promoter. As the DNA binding and transcription activities of the E. coli-derived RNAP are similar to those observed for the B. pertussis enzyme, we employed several mutant E. coli proteins in in vitro transcription analyses. We observed that polymerases carrying either a deletion of the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit or substitution of alanine at either of two critical residues within this domain were severely impaired in the ability to mediate BvgA-activated transcription at fha. PMID:9045838

  1. The V proteins of paramyxoviruses bind the IFN-inducible RNA helicase, mda-5, and inhibit its activation of the IFN-β promoter

    PubMed Central

    Andrejeva, J.; Childs, K. S.; Young, D. F.; Carlos, T. S.; Stock, N.; Goodbourn, S.; Randall, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    Most paramyxoviruses circumvent the IFN response by blocking IFN signaling and limiting the production of IFN by virus-infected cells. Here we report that the highly conserved cysteine-rich C-terminal domain of the V proteins of a wide variety of paramyxoviruses binds melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (mda-5) product. mda-5 is an IFN-inducible host cell DExD/H box helicase that contains a caspase recruitment domain at its N terminus. Overexpression of mda-5 stimulated the basal activity of the IFN-β promoter in reporter gene assays and significantly enhanced the activation of the IFN-β promoter by intracellular dsRNA. Both these activities were repressed by coexpression of the V proteins of simian virus 5, human parainfluenza virus 2, mumps virus, Sendai virus, and Hendra virus. Similar results to the reporter assays were obtained by measuring IFN production. Inhibition of mda-5 by RNA interference or by dominant interfering forms of mda-5 significantly inhibited the activation of the IFN-β promoter by dsRNA. It thus appears that mda-5 plays a central role in an intracellular signal transduction pathway that can lead to the activation of the IFN-β promoter, and that the V proteins of paramyxoviruses interact with mda-5 to block its activity. PMID:15563593

  2. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, B. A.; Spencer, C.; Eberwine, J.

    1996-01-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington's disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to > 37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and UV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8751857

  3. Alternative polyadenylation and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the extent of microRNA-based gene regulation has expanded in an impressive pace over the past decade. Now, we are beginning to better appreciate the role of 3'-UTR (untranslated region) cis-elements which harbor not only microRNA but also RNA-binding protein (RBP) binding sites that have significant effect on the stability and translational rate of mRNAs. To add further complexity, alternative polyadenylation (APA) emerges as a widespread mechanism to regulate gene expression by producing shorter or longer mRNA isoforms that differ in the length of their 3'-UTRs or even coding sequences. Resulting shorter mRNA isoforms generally lack cis-elements where trans-acting factors bind, and hence are differentially regulated compared with the longer isoforms. This review focuses on the RBPs involved in APA regulation and their action mechanisms on APA-generated isoforms. A better understanding of the complex interactions between APA and RBPs is promising for mechanistic and clinical implications including biomarker discovery and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27208003

  4. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD.

  5. Straightening of bulged RNA by the double-stranded RNA-binding domain from the protein kinase PKR

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaofeng; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2000-01-01

    The human interferon-induced protein kinase, PKR, is an antiviral agent that is activated by long stretches of double-stranded (ds)RNA. PKR has an N-terminal dsRNA-binding domain that contains two tandem copies of the dsRNA-binding motif and interacts with dsRNA in a nonsequence-specific fashion. Surprisingly, PKR can be regulated by certain viral and cellular RNAs containing non-Watson–Crick features. We found that RNAs containing bulges in the middle of a helix can bind to p20, a C-terminal truncated PKR containing the dsRNA-binding domain. Bulges are known to change the global geometry of RNA by bending the helical axis; therefore, we investigated the conformational changes of bulged RNA caused by PKR binding. A 66-mer DNA-RNA(+/− A3 bulge)-DNA chimera was constructed and annealed to a complementary RNA strand. This duplex forces the protein to bind in the middle. A 66-mer duplex with a top strand composed of DNA-DNA(+/−A3 bulge)-RNA was used as a control. Gel mobility-shift changes among the RNA-protein complexes are consistent with straightening of bulged RNA on protein binding. In addition, a van't Hoff analysis of p20 binding to bulged RNA reveals a favorable ΔΔH° and an unfavorable ΔΔS° relative to binding to straight dsRNA. These thermodynamic parameters are in good agreement with predictions from a nearest-neighbor analysis for RNA straightening and support a model in which the helical junction flanking the bulge stacks on protein binding. The ability of dsRNA-binding motif proteins to recognize and straighten bent RNA has implications for modulating the topology of RNAs in vivo. PMID:11114159

  6. Site size of cooperative single-stranded RNA binding by poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Beckman, M T; Kirkegaard, K

    1998-03-20

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase binds cooperatively to single-stranded RNA. We have determined the minimal RNA-binding site size of the poliovirus polymerase using binding titration with oligonucleotides of increasing length. A dramatic increase in affinity was observed when the length of the oligo(U) increased from 8 to 10 nucleotides (nt), arguing that the minimal size of RNA for polymerase binding is 10 nt. Another increase in affinity seen as the oligo(U) reached 24 nt suggests that a 24-nucleotide RNA can be occupied by two polymerase molecules. Direct binding of wild-type polymerase to oligo(U)12 and oligo(U)24 RNAs showed differences in affinity and cooperativity consistent with this model. The increase in binding affinity seen for oligo(U)10 suggests either that the RNA-binding determinants are widely spaced on the polymerase structure or that a substantial conformational change in the polymerase occurs upon the filling of its RNA-binding site.

  7. Systematic discovery of Xist RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ci; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Flynn, Ryan A; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Calabrese, J Mauro; Magnuson, Terry; Heard, Edith; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-04-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function with associated proteins to effect complex structural and regulatory outcomes. To reveal the composition and dynamics of specific noncoding RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) in vivo, we developed comprehensive identification of RNA binding proteins by mass spectrometry (ChIRP-MS). ChIRP-MS analysis of four ncRNAs captures key protein interactors, including a U1-specific link to the 3' RNA processing machinery. Xist, an essential lncRNA for X chromosome inactivation (XCI), interacts with 81 proteins from chromatin modification, nuclear matrix, and RNA remodeling pathways. The Xist RNA-protein particle assembles in two steps coupled with the transition from pluripotency to differentiation. Specific interactors include HnrnpK, which participates in Xist-mediated gene silencing and histone modifications but not Xist localization, and Drosophila Split ends homolog Spen, which interacts via the A-repeat domain of Xist and is required for gene silencing. Thus, Xist lncRNA engages with proteins in a modular and developmentally controlled manner to coordinate chromatin spreading and silencing.

  8. Systematic discovery of Xist RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ci; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Flynn, Ryan A.; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Calabrese, J. Mauro; Magnuson, Terry; Heard, Edith; Chang, Howard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function with associated proteins to effect complex structural and regulatory outcomes. To reveal the composition and dynamics of specific noncoding RNA- protein complexes (RNPs) in vivo, we developed comprehensive identification of RNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry (ChIRP-MS). ChIRP-MS analysis of four ncRNAs captures key protein interactors, including a U1-specific link to the 3′ RNA processing machinery. Xist, an essential lncRNA for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), interacts with 81 proteins from chromatin modification, nuclear matrix, and RNA remodeling pathways. The Xist RNA-protein particle assembles in two steps coupled with the transition from pluripotency to differentiation. Specific interactors include HnrnpK that participates in Xist-mediated gene silencing and histone modifications, but not Xist localization and Drosophila Split ends homolog Spen that interacts via the A-repeat domain of Xist and is required for gene silencing. Thus, Xist lncRNA engages with proteins in a modular and developmentally controlled manner to coordinate chromatin spreading and silencing. PMID:25843628

  9. Regulation of Pluripotency by RNA Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Julia; Blelloch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Establishment, maintenance, and exit from pluripotency require precise coordination of a cell’s molecular machinery. Substantial headway has been made in deciphering many aspects of this elaborate system, particularly with respect to epigenetics, transcription, and noncoding RNAs. Less attention has been paid to posttranscriptional regulatory processes such as alternative splicing, RNA processing and modification, nuclear export, regulation of transcript stability, and translation. Here, we introduce the RNA binding proteins that enable the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, summarizing current and ongoing research on their roles at different regulatory points and discussing how they help script the fate of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25192462

  10. Structure-activity studies on the fluorescent indicator in a displacement assay for the screening of small molecules binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Shiori; Im, Seongwang; Zhang, Jinhua; Hagihara, Masaki; Murata, Asako; Harada, Yasue; Fukuzumi, Takeo; Wazaki, Takahiro; Sasaoka, Shin-ichi; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2012-08-01

    A series of xanthone and thioxanthone derivatives with aminoalkoxy substituents were synthesized as fluorescent indicators for a displacement assay in the study of small-molecule-RNA interactions. The RNA-binding properties of these molecules were investigated in terms of the improved binding selectivity to the loop region in the RNA secondary structure relative to 2,7-bis(2-aminoethoxy)xanthone (X2S) by fluorimetric titration and displacement assay. An 11-mer double-stranded RNA and a hairpin RNA mimicking the stem loop IIB of Rev response element (RRE) RNA of HIV-1 mRNA were used. The X2S derivatives with longer aminoalkyl substituents showed a higher affinity to the double-stranded RNA than the parent molecule. Introduction of a methyl group on the aminoethoxy moiety of X2S effectively modulated the selectivity to the RNA secondary structure. Methyl group substitution at the C1' position suppressed the binding to the loop regions. Substitution with two methyl groups on the amino nitrogen atom resulted in reducing the affinity to the double-stranded region by a factor of 40%. The effect of methyl substitution on the amino nitrogen atom was also observed for a thioxanthone derivative. Titration experiments, however, suggested that thioxanthone derivatives showed a more prominent tendency of multiple binding to RNA than xanthone derivatives. The selectivity index calculated from the affinity to the double-stranded and loop regions suggested that the N,N-dimethyl derivative of X2S would be suitable for the screening of small molecules binding to RRE.

  11. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  12. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 corrects differentiation of DM1 myoblasts through activation of RNA CUG-binding protein, CUGBP1

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sakai, Keiko; Schoser, Benedikt; Huichalaf, Claudia; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Nguyen, Heather; Wang, Gou-Li; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.; Timchenko, Lubov T.

    2008-07-01

    Differentiation of myocytes is impaired in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1, DM1. CUG repeat binding protein, CUGBP1, is a key regulator of translation of proteins that are involved in muscle development and differentiation. In this paper, we present evidence that RNA-binding activity of CUGBP1 and its interactions with initiation translation complex eIF2 are differentially regulated during myogenesis by specific phosphorylation and that this regulation is altered in DM1. In normal myoblasts, Akt kinase phosphorylates CUGBP1 at Ser28 and increases interactions of CUGBP1 with cyclin D1 mRNA. During differentiation, CUGBP1 is phosphorylated by cyclinD3-cdk4/6 at Ser302, which increases CUGBP1 binding with p21 and C/EBP{beta} mRNAs. While cyclin D3 and cdk4 are elevated in normal myotubes; DM1 differentiating cells do not increase these proteins. In normal myotubes, CUGBP1 interacts with cyclin D3/cdk4/6 and eIF2; however, interactions of CUGBP1 with eIF2 are reduced in DM1 differentiating cells and correlate with impaired muscle differentiation in DM1. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 in DM1 cells increases the CUGBP1-eIF2 complex, corrects expression of differentiation markers, myogenin and desmin, and enhances fusion of DM1 myoblasts. Thus, normalization of cyclin D3 might be a therapeutic approach to correct differentiation of skeletal muscle in DM1 patients.

  13. PRBP: Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins Using a Random Forest Algorithm Combined with an RNA-Binding Residue Predictor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Xiao, Ke; Sun, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of RNA-binding proteins is an incredibly challenging problem in computational biology. Although great progress has been made using various machine learning approaches with numerous features, the problem is still far from being solved. In this study, we attempt to predict RNA-binding proteins directly from amino acid sequences. A novel approach, PRBP predicts RNA-binding proteins using the information of predicted RNA-binding residues in conjunction with a random forest based method. For a given protein, we first predict its RNA-binding residues and then judge whether the protein binds RNA or not based on information from that prediction. If the protein cannot be identified by the information associated with its predicted RNA-binding residues, then a novel random forest predictor is used to determine if the query protein is a RNA-binding protein. We incorporated features of evolutionary information combined with physicochemical features (EIPP) and amino acid composition feature to establish the random forest predictor. Feature analysis showed that EIPP contributed the most to the prediction of RNA-binding proteins. The results also showed that the information from the RNA-binding residue prediction improved the overall performance of our RNA-binding protein prediction. It is anticipated that the PRBP method will become a useful tool for identifying RNA-binding proteins. A PRBP Web server implementation is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/PRBP/.

  14. A membrane-associated movement protein of Pelargonium flower break virus shows RNA-binding activity and contains a biologically relevant leucine zipper-like motif.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2011-05-10

    Two small viral proteins (DGBp1 and DGBp2) have been proposed to act in a concerted manner to aid intra- and intercellular trafficking of carmoviruses though the distribution of functions and mode of action of each protein partner are not yet clear. Here we have confirmed the requirement of the DGBps of Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV), p7 and p12, for pathogen movement. Studies focused on p12 have shown that it associates to cellular membranes, which is in accordance to its hydrophobic profile and to that reported for several homologs. However, peculiarities that distinguish p12 from other DGBps2 have been found. Firstly, it contains a leucine zipper-like motif which is essential for virus infectivity in plants. Secondly, it has an unusually long and basic N-terminal region that confers RNA binding activity. The results suggest that PFBV p12 may differ mechanistically from related proteins and possible roles of PFBV DGBps are discussed.

  15. The RNA helicase MOV10L1 binds piRNA precursors to initiate piRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Vourekas, Anastassios; Fu, Qi; Maragkakis, Manolis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Ma, Jing; Pillai, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Piwi–piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA) ribonucleoproteins (piRNPs) enforce retrotransposon silencing, a function critical for preserving the genome integrity of germ cells. The molecular functions of most of the factors that have been genetically implicated in primary piRNA biogenesis are still elusive. Here we show that MOV10L1 exhibits 5′-to-3′ directional RNA-unwinding activity in vitro and that a point mutation that abolishes this activity causes a failure in primary piRNA biogenesis in vivo. We demonstrate that MOV10L1 selectively binds piRNA precursor transcripts and is essential for the generation of intermediate piRNA processing fragments that are subsequently loaded to Piwi proteins. Multiple analyses suggest an intimate coupling of piRNA precursor processing with elements of local secondary structures such as G quadruplexes. Our results support a model in which MOV10L1 RNA helicase activity promotes unwinding and funneling of the single-stranded piRNA precursor transcripts to the endonuclease that catalyzes the first cleavage step of piRNA processing. PMID:25762440

  16. A strategy to enhance the binding affinity of fluorophore-aptamer pairs for RNA tagging with neomycin conjugation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jongho; Lee, Kyung Hyun; Rao, Jianghong

    2012-10-14

    Fluorogenic sulforhodamine-neomycin conjugates have been designed and synthesized for RNA tagging. Conjugates were fluorescently activated by binding to RNA aptamers and exhibited greater than 250-400 fold enhancement in binding affinity relative to corresponding unconjugated fluorophores.

  17. A protein with simultaneous capsid scaffolding and dsRNA-binding activities enhances the birnavirus capsid mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Johann; Casado, Santiago; Mata, Carlos P.; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2015-01-01

    Viral capsids are metastable structures that perform many essential processes; they also act as robust cages during the extracellular phase. Viruses can use multifunctional proteins to optimize resources (e.g., VP3 in avian infectious bursal disease virus, IBDV). The IBDV genome is organized as ribonucleoproteins (RNP) of dsRNA with VP3, which also acts as a scaffold during capsid assembly. We characterized mechanical properties of IBDV populations with different RNP content (ranging from none to four RNP). The IBDV population with the greatest RNP number (and best fitness) showed greatest capsid rigidity. When bound to dsRNA, VP3 reinforces virus stiffness. These contacts involve interactions with capsid structural subunits that differ from the initial interactions during capsid assembly. Our results suggest that RNP dimers are the basic stabilization units of the virion, provide better understanding of multifunctional proteins, and highlight the duality of RNP as capsid-stabilizing and genetic information platforms. PMID:26336920

  18. Host and viral RNA-binding proteins involved in membrane targeting, replication and intercellular movement of plant RNA virus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Kiwamu; Kaido, Masanori; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Many plant viruses have positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] as their genome. Therefore, it is not surprising that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles during (+)RNA virus infection in host plants. Increasing evidence demonstrates that viral and host RBPs play critical roles in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, including translation and replication of viral genomic RNAs, and their intra- and intercellular movement. Although studies focusing on the RNA-binding activities of viral and host proteins, and their associations with membrane targeting, and intercellular movement of viral genomes have been limited to a few viruses, these studies have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the replication and movement of viral genomic RNAs. In this review, we briefly overview the currently defined roles of viral and host RBPs whose RNA-binding activity have been confirmed experimentally in association with their membrane targeting, and intercellular movement of plant RNA virus genomes. PMID:25071804

  19. The nuclear splicing factor RNA binding motif 5 promotes caspase activation in human neuronal cells, and increases after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Travis C; Du, Lina; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Vagni, Vincent A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Poloyac, Samuel M; Jackson, Edwin K; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Splicing factors (SFs) coordinate nuclear intron/exon splicing of RNA. Splicing factor disturbances can cause cell death. RNA binding motif 5 (RBM5) and 10 (RBM10) promote apoptosis in cancer cells by activating detrimental alternative splicing of key death/survival genes. The role(s) of RBM5/10 in neurons has not been established. Here, we report that RBM5 knockdown in human neuronal cells decreases caspase activation by staurosporine. In contrast, RBM10 knockdown augments caspase activation. To determine whether brain injury alters RBM signaling, we measured RBM5/10 protein in mouse cortical/hippocampus homogenates after controlled cortical impact (CCI) traumatic brain injury (TBI) plus hemorrhagic shock (CCI+HS). The RBM5/10 staining was higher 48  to 72 hours after injury and appeared to be increased in neuronal nuclei of the hippocampus. We also measured levels of other nuclear SFs known to be essential for cellular viability and report that splicing factor 1 (SF1) but not splicing factor 3A (SF3A) decreased 4  to 72 hours after injury. Finally, we confirm that RBM5/10 regulate protein expression of several target genes including caspase-2, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), LETM1 Domain-Containing Protein 1 (LETMD1), and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) in neuronal cells. Knockdown of RBM5 appeared to increase expression of c-FLIP(s), LETMD1, and APLP2 but decrease caspase-2. PMID:25586139

  20. The specific binding to 21-nt double-stranded RNAs is crucial for the anti-silencing activity of Cucumber vein yellowing virus P1b and perturbs endogenous small RNA populations

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Adrián; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Molnar, Attila; Baulcombe, David; García, Juan Antonio

    2011-01-01

    RNA silencing mediated by siRNAs plays an important role as an anti-viral defense mechanism in plants and other eukaryotic organisms, which is usually counteracted by viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs). The ipomovirus Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) lacks the typical RSS of members of the family Potyviridae, HCPro, which is replaced by an unrelated RSS, P1b. CVYV P1b resembles potyviral HCPro in forming complexes with synthetic siRNAs in vitro. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that P1b, like potyviral HCPro, interacts with double-stranded siRNAs, but is not able to bind single-stranded small RNAs or small DNAs. These assays also showed a preference of CVYV P1b for binding to 21-nt siRNAs, a feature also reported for HCPro. However, these two potyvirid RSSs differ in their requirements of 2-nucleotide (nt) 3′ overhangs and 5′ terminal phosphoryl groups for siRNA binding. Copurification assays confirmed in vivo P1b–siRNA interactions. We have demonstrated by deep sequencing of small RNA populations interacting in vivo with CVYV P1b that the size preference of P1b for small RNAs of 21 nt also takes place in the plant, and that expression of this RSS causes drastic changes in the endogenous small RNA populations. In addition, a site-directed mutagenesis analysis strongly supported the assumption that P1b–siRNA binding is decisive for the anti-silencing activity of P1b and localized a basic domain involved in the siRNA-binding activity of this protein. PMID:21531919

  1. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-01

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26751491

  2. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  3. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve 'metabolic remodeling' with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation ('moonlighting') and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme-RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future.

  4. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve ‘metabolic remodeling’ with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation (‘moonlighting’) and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme–RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future. PMID:26520658

  5. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  6. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE)- and CPE-binding protein (CPEB)-independent mechanisms regulate early class maternal mRNA translational activation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Cox, Linda L; MacNicol, Angus M

    2004-04-23

    Meiotic cell cycle progression during vertebrate oocyte maturation requires the correct temporal translation of maternal mRNAs encoding key regulatory proteins. The mechanism by which specific mRNAs are temporally activated is unknown, although both cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPE) within the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of mRNAs and the CPE-binding protein (CPEB) have been implicated. We report that in progesterone-stimulated Xenopus oocytes, the early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation of multiple maternal mRNAs occur in a CPE- and CPEB-independent manner. We demonstrate that polyadenylation response elements, originally identified in the 3'-UTR of the mRNA encoding the Mos proto-oncogene, direct CPE- and CPEB-independent polyadenylation of an early class of Xenopus maternal mRNAs. Our findings refute the hypothesis that CPE sequences alone account for the range of temporal inductions of maternal mRNAs observed during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Rather, our data indicate that the sequential action of distinct 3'-UTR-directed translational control mechanisms coordinates the complex temporal patterns and extent of protein synthesis during vertebrate meiotic cell cycle progression.

  7. BC1-FMRP interaction is modulated by 2′-O-methylation: RNA-binding activity of the tudor domain and translational regulation at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lacoux, Caroline; Di Marino, Daniele; Pilo Boyl, Pietro; Zalfa, Francesca; Yan, Bing; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Falconi, Mattia; Urlaub, Henning; Achsel, Tilmann; Mougin, Annie; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Bagni, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The brain cytoplasmic RNA, BC1, is a small non-coding RNA that is found in different RNP particles, some of which are involved in translational control. One component of BC1-containing RNP complexes is the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) that is implicated in translational repression. Peptide mapping and computational simulations show that the tudor domain of FMRP makes specific contacts to BC1 RNA. Endogenous BC1 RNA is 2′-O-methylated in nucleotides that contact the FMRP interface, and methylation can affect this interaction. In the cell body BC1 2′-O-methylations are present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, but they are virtually absent at synapses where the FMRP–BC1–mRNA complex exerts its function. These results strongly suggest that subcellular region-specific modifications of BC1 affect the binding to FMRP and the interaction with its mRNA targets. We finally show that BC1 RNA has an important role in translation of certain mRNAs associated to FMRP. All together these findings provide further insights into the translational regulation by the FMRP–BC1 complex at synapses. PMID:22238374

  8. Plant Coilin: Structural Characteristics and RNA-Binding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Protopopova, Anna; Yaminsky, Igor; Arutiunian, Alexander; Love, Andrew J.; Taliansky, Michael; Kalinina, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are dynamic subnuclear compartments involved in the biogenesis of ribonucleoproteins. Coilin is a major structural scaffolding protein necessary for CB formation, composition and activity. The predicted secondary structure of Arabidopsis thaliana coilin (Atcoilin) suggests that the protein is composed of three main domains. Analysis of the physical properties of deletion mutants indicates that Atcoilin might consist of an N-terminal globular domain, a central highly disordered domain and a C-terminal domain containing a presumable Tudor-like structure adjacent to a disordered C terminus. Despite the low homology in amino acid sequences, a similar type of domain organization is likely shared by human and animal coilin proteins and coilin-like proteins of various plant species. Atcoilin is able to bind RNA effectively and in a non-specific manner. This activity is provided by three RNA-binding sites: two sets of basic amino acids in the N-terminal domain and one set in the central domain. Interaction with RNA induces the multimerization of the Atcoilin molecule, a consequence of the structural alterations in the N-terminal domain. The interaction with RNA and subsequent multimerization may facilitate coilin’s function as a scaffolding protein. A model of the N-terminal domain is also proposed. PMID:23320094

  9. Differential RNA-binding activity of the hnRNP G protein correlated with the sex genotype in the amphibian oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Kanhoush, Rasha; Praseuth, Danièle; Perrin, Caroline; Chardard, Dominique; Vinh, Joëlle; Penrad-Mobayed, May

    2011-01-01

    A proteomic approach has enabled the identification of an orthologue of the splicing factor hnRNP G in the amphibians Xenopus tropicalis, Ambystoma mexicanum, Notophthalmus viridescens and Pleurodeles walt, which shows a specific RNA-binding affinity similar to that of the human hnRN G protein. Three isoforms of this protein with a differential binding affinity for a specific RNA probe were identified in the P. walt oocyte. In situ hybridization to lampbrush chromosomes of P. waltl revealed the presence of a family of hnRNP G genes, which were mapped on the Z and W chromosomes and one autosome. This indicates that the isoforms identified in this study are possibly encoded by a gene family linked to the evolution of sex chromosomes similarly to the hnRNP G/RBMX gene family in mammals. PMID:21278421

  10. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Andrew B; Goodrich, Karen J; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-06-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem-loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem-loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer.

  11. Effect of Zn2+ binding and enzyme active site on the transition state for RNA 2'-O-transphosphorylation interpreted through kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haoyuan; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Harris, Michael E; York, Darrin M

    2015-11-01

    Divalent metal ions, due to their ability to stabilize high concentrations of negative charge, are important for RNA folding and catalysis. Detailed models derived from the structures and kinetics of enzymes and from computational simulations have been developed. However, in most cases the specific catalytic modes involving metal ions and their mechanistic roles and effects on transition state structures remain controversial. Valuable information about the nature of the transition state is provided by measurement of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). However, KIEs reflect changes in all bond vibrational modes that differ between the ground state and transition state. QM calculations are therefore essential for developing structural models of the transition state and evaluating mechanistic alternatives. Herein, we present computational models for Zn2+ binding to RNA 2'O-transphosphorylation reaction models that aid in the interpretation of KIE experiments. Different Zn2+ binding modes produce distinct KIE signatures, and one binding mode involving two zinc ions is in close agreement with KIEs measured for non-enzymatic catalysis by Zn2+ aquo ions alone. Interestingly, the KIE signatures in this specific model are also very close to those in RNase A catalysis. These results allow a quantitative connection to be made between experimental KIE measurements and transition state structure and bonding, and provide insight into RNA 2'O-ransphosphorylation reactions catalyzed by metal ions and enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  12. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Kutluay, Sebla B; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  13. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  14. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  15. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein. PMID:24878641

  16. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein.

  17. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  18. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  19. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism. PMID:27165283

  20. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  1. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences. PMID:27315567

  2. A versatile assay for RNA-binding proteins in living cells.

    PubMed

    Strein, Claudia; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control RNA fate from synthesis to decay. Since their cellular expression levels frequently do not reflect their in vivo activity, methods are needed to assess the steady state RNA-binding activity of RBPs as well as their responses to stimuli. While electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) have been used for such determinations, their results serve at best as proxies for the RBP activities in living cells. Here, we describe a quantitative dual fluorescence method to analyze protein-mRNA interactions in vivo. Known or candidate RBPs are fused to fluorescent proteins (eGFP, YFP), expressed in cells, cross-linked in vivo to RNA by ultraviolet light irradiation, and immunoprecipitated, after lysis, with a single chain antibody fragment directed against eGFP (GFP-binding protein, GBP). Polyadenylated RNA-binding activity of fusion proteins is assessed by hybridization with an oligo(DT) probe coupled with a red fluorophore. Since UV light is directly applied to living cells, the assay can be used to monitor dynamic changes in RNA-binding activities in response to biological or pharmacological stimuli. Notably, immunoprecipitation and hybridization can also be performed with commercially available GBP-coupled 96-well plates (GFP-multiTrap), allowing highly parallel RNA-binding measurements in a single experiment. Therefore, this method creates the possibility to conduct in vivo high-throughput RNA-binding assays. We believe that this fast and simple radioactivity-free method will find many useful applications in RNA biology.

  3. Identification of an RNA binding region within the N-terminal third of the influenza A virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albo, C; Valencia, A; Portela, A

    1995-06-01

    The influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) has been examined with regard to its RNA-binding characteristics. NP, purified from virions and devoid of RNA, bound synthetic RNAs in vitro and interacted with the ribonucleotide homopolymers poly(A), poly(G), poly(U), and poly(C) in a salt-dependent manner, showing higher binding affinity for polypyrimidine homopolymers. To map the NP regions involved in RNA binding, a series of deleted forms of the NP were prepared, and these truncated polypeptides were tested for their ability to bind poly(U) and poly(C) homopolymers linked to agarose beads. Proteins containing deletions at the N terminus of the NP molecule showed reduced RNA-binding activity, indicating that this part of the protein was required to bind RNA. To identify the NP region or regions which directly interact with RNA, proteins having the maltose-binding protein fused with various NP fragments were obtained and tested for binding to radioactively labeled RNAs in three different assays: (i) nitrocellulose filter binding assays, (ii) gel shift assays, and (iii) UV light-induced cross-linking experiments. A maltose-binding protein fusion containing the N-terminal 180 amino acids of NP behaved as an RNA-binding protein in the three assays, demonstrating that the N terminus of NP can directly interact with RNA. This NP region could be further subdivided into two smaller regions (amino acids 1 to 77 and 79 to 180) that also retained RNA-binding activity.

  4. The RNA binding of protein A from Wuhan nodavirus is mediated by mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Miao, Meng; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-08-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the lipids present in intracellular membranes, the sites of which viral replicases associate with. However, the direct effects of membrane lipids on viral replicases are still poorly understood. Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) protein A, which associates with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for RNA replication. Here, we report that WhNV protein A binds to RNA1 in a cooperative manner. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) stimulated the RNA binding activity and cooperativity of protein A, and such stimulations exhibited strong selectivity for distinct phospholipids. Interestingly, MMLs stimulated the RNA-binding cooperativity only at higher protein A concentrations. Further investigation showed that MMLs stimulate the RNA binding of protein A by promoting its self-interaction. Finally, manipulating MML metabolism affected the protein A-induced RNA1 recruitment in cells. Together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on the RNA binding activity of a nodaviral replicase. PMID:25092456

  5. Architecture and RNA binding of the human negative elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M; Pöllmann, David; Caizzi, Livia; Hofmann, Katharina B; Rombaut, Pascaline; Zimniak, Tomasz; Herzog, Franz; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in metazoans often involves promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase (Pol) II, which requires the 4-subunit negative elongation factor (NELF). Here we discern the functional architecture of human NELF through X-ray crystallography, protein crosslinking, biochemical assays, and RNA crosslinking in cells. We identify a NELF core subcomplex formed by conserved regions in subunits NELF-A and NELF-C, and resolve its crystal structure. The NELF-AC subcomplex binds single-stranded nucleic acids in vitro, and NELF-C associates with RNA in vivo. A positively charged face of NELF-AC is involved in RNA binding, whereas the opposite face of the NELF-AC subcomplex binds NELF-B. NELF-B is predicted to form a HEAT repeat fold, also binds RNA in vivo, and anchors the subunit NELF-E, which is confirmed to bind RNA in vivo. These results reveal the three-dimensional architecture and three RNA-binding faces of NELF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14981.001 PMID:27282391

  6. RNA binding proteins in neurodegeneration: Seq and you shall receive

    PubMed Central

    Nussbacher, Julia K.; Batra, Ranjan; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Yeo, Gene W.

    2015-01-01

    As critical players in gene regulation, RNA binding proteins are taking center stage in our understanding of cellular function and disease. In our era of bench-top sequencers and unprecedented computational power, biological questions can be addressed in a systematic, genome-wide manner. Development of high-throughput sequencing methodologies provides unparalleled potential to discover new mechanisms of disease-associated perturbations of RNA homeostasis. Complementary to candidate single-gene studies, these innovative technologies may elicit the discovery of unexpected mechanisms, and allow us to determine the widespread influence of the multifunctional RNA binding proteins on their targets. As disruption of RNA processing is increasingly implicated in neurological diseases, these approaches will continue to provide insights into the roles of RNA binding proteins in disease pathogenesis. PMID:25765321

  7. Dual role for the RNA-binding domain of Xenopus laevis SLBP1 in histone pre-mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Ingledue, T C; Dominski, Z; Sánchez, R; Erkmann, J A; Marzluff, W F

    2000-01-01

    The replication-dependent histone mRNAs end in a conserved 26-nt sequence that forms a stem-loop structure. This sequence is required for histone pre-mRNA processing and plays a role in multiple aspects of histone mRNA metabolism. Two proteins that bind the 3' end of histone mRNA are found in Xenopus oocytes. xSLBP1 is found in the nucleus, where it functions in histone pre-mRNA processing, and in the cytoplasm, where it may control histone mRNA translation and stability. xSLBP2 is a cytoplasmic protein, inactive in histone pre-mRNA processing, whose expression is restricted to oogenesis and early development. These proteins are similar only in their RNA-binding domains (RBD). A chimeric protein (1-2-1) in which the RBD of xSLBP1 has been replaced with the RBD of xSLBP2 binds the stem-loop with an affinity similar to the original protein. The 1-2-1 protein efficiently localizes to the nucleus of the frog oocyte, but is not active in processing of histone pre-mRNA in vivo. This protein does not support processing in a nuclear extract, but inhibits processing by competing with the active SLBP by binding to the substrate. The 1-2-1 protein also inhibits processing of synthetic histone pre-mRNA injected into frog oocytes, but has no effect on processing of histone pre-mRNA transcribed from an injected histone gene. This result suggests that sequences in the RBD of xSLBP1 give it preferential access to histone pre-mRNA transcribed in vivo. PMID:11105762

  8. Bacillus subtilis TRAP binds to its RNA target by a 5' to 3' directional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Barbolina, Maria V; Li, Xiufeng; Gollnick, Paul

    2005-01-28

    TRAP is an 11 subunit RNA-binding protein that regulates expression of the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon by transcription attenuation and translation control mechanisms. Tryptophan-activated TRAP acts by binding to a site in the 5'-untranslated leader region of trp mRNA consisting of 11 (G/U)AG repeats. We used mung bean nuclease footprinting to analyze the interaction of TRAP with several artificial binding sites composed of 11 GAG repeats in nucleic acids that lack secondary structure. Affinities for individual repeats within a binding site did not vary significantly. In contrast, the association rate constants were highest for repeats at the 5' end and lowest for those at the 3' end of all binding sites tested. These results indicate that TRAP binds to its RNA targets by first associating with one or more repeat at the 5' end of its binding site followed by wrapping the remainder of binding site around the protein in a 5' to 3' direction. This directional binding is novel among RNA-binding proteins. We suggest that this mechanism of binding is important for TRAP-mediated transcription attenuation control of the trp operon. PMID:15588817

  9. General RNA binding proteins render translation cap dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Svitkin, Y V; Ovchinnikov, L P; Dreyfuss, G; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is relatively independent of the presence of the mRNA m7G cap structure and the cap binding protein, eIF-4E. In addition, initiation occurs frequently at spurious internal sites. Here we show that a critical parameter which contributes to cap-dependent translation is the amount of general RNA binding proteins in the extract. Addition of several general RNA binding proteins, such as hnRNP A1, La autoantigen, pyrimidine tract binding protein (hnRNP I/PTB) and the major core protein of cytoplasmic mRNP (p50), rendered translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cap dependent. These proteins drastically inhibited the translation of an uncapped mRNA, but had no effect on translation of a capped mRNA. Based on these and other results, we suggest that one function of general mRNA binding proteins in the cytoplasm is to promote ribosome binding by a 5' end, cap-mediated mechanism, and prevent spurious initiations at aberrant translation start sites. Images PMID:9003790

  10. Specific binding of tryptophan transfer RNA to avian myeloblastosis virus RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase).

    PubMed Central

    Panet, A; Haseltine, W A; Baltimore, D; Peters, G; Harada, F; Dahlberg, J E

    1975-01-01

    The ability of tryptophan tRNA (tRNATrp) to initiate reverse transcription of the 70S RNA of avian RNA tumor viruses suggested that the reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA polymerase; deoxynucleosidetriphosphate: DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase; EC 2.7.7.7) might have a specific binding site for the tRNA. A complex of tRNATrp and the avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase has been demonstrated using chromatography on Sephadex G-100 columns. Of all the chicken tRNAs, only tRNATrp and a tRNA4Met bind to the enzyme with high enough affinity to be selected from a mixture of the chicken cell tRNAs. The ability of tRNATrp to change the sedimentation rate of the enzyme indicates that tRNATrp is not binding to a contaminant in the enzyme preparation. Treatment of the enzyme with monospecific antibody to reverse transcriptase prevented binding of tRNA as well as inhibited the DNA polymerase activity of the enzyme. The ability of reverse transcriptase to utilize tRNATrp aa a primer for DNA synthesis, therefore, appears to involve a highly specific site on the enzyme. Images PMID:52156

  11. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Pai, Dave A; Kaplan, Craig D; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C; Engelke, David R

    2014-05-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template.

  12. Coupling of histone methylation and RNA processing by the nuclear mRNA cap-binding complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Jiang, Danhua; Fu, Xing; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Renyi; He, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genes are transcribed into pre-mRNAs that are subsequently processed into mature mRNAs by adding a 5'-cap and a 3'-polyA tail and splicing introns. Pre-mRNA processing involves their binding proteins and processing factors, whereas gene transcription often involves chromatin modifiers. It has been unclear how the factors involved in chromatin modifications and RNA processing function in concert to control mRNA production. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, the evolutionarily conserved nuclear mRNA cap-binding complex (CBC) forms multi-protein complexes with a conserved histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex called COMPASS-like and a histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36) methyltransferase to integrate active histone methylations with co-transcriptional mRNA processing and cap preservation, leading to a high level of mature mRNA production. We further show that CBC is required for H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation, and the histone methyltransferases are required for CBC-mediated mRNA cap preservation and efficient pre-mRNA splicing at their target loci, suggesting that these factors are functionally interdependent. Our study reveals novel roles for histone methyltransferases in RNA-processing-related events and provides mechanistic insights into how the 'downstream' RNA CBC controls eukaryotic gene transcription. PMID:27249350

  13. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  14. SUMO-Modification of the La Protein Facilitates Binding to mRNA In Vitro and in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Venkatesh; Sommer, Gunhild; Durette, Chantal; Thibault, Pierre; van Niekerk, Erna A.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein La is involved in several aspects of RNA metabolism including the translational regulation of mRNAs and processing of pre-tRNAs. Besides its well-described phosphorylation by Casein kinase 2, the La protein is also posttranslationally modified by the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO), but the functional outcome of this modification has not been defined. The objective of this study was to test whether sumoylation changes the RNA-binding activity of La. Therefore, we established an in vitro sumoylation assay for recombinant human La and analyzed its RNA-binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We identified two novel SUMO-acceptor sites within the La protein located between the RNA recognition motif 1 and 2 and we demonstrate for the first time that sumoylation facilitates the RNA-binding of La to small RNA oligonucleotides representing the oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) elements from the 5’ untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein L22 and L37 and to a longer RNA element from the 5’ UTR of cyclin D1 (CCND1) mRNA in vitro. Furthermore, we show by RNA immunoprecipitation experiments that a La mutant deficient in sumoylation has impaired RNA-binding activity in cells. These data suggest that modulating the RNA-binding activity of La by sumoylation has important consequences on its functionality. PMID:27224031

  15. A novel RNA binding protein that interacts with NMDA R1 mRNA: regulation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2006-05-01

    Excitatory NMDA receptors are an important target of ethanol. Chronic ethanol exposure, in vivo and in vitro, increases polypeptide levels of NR1 subunit, the key subunit of functional NMDA receptors. In vitro, chronic ethanol treatment increases the half-life of NR1 mRNA and this observation is dependent on new protein synthesis. The present study was undertaken to locate cis-acting region(s) within the NR1 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and identify NR1 3'-UTR binding trans-acting proteins expressed in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Utilizing RNA gel shift assays we identified a 156-nt cis-acting region that binds to polysomal trans-acting proteins. This binding was highly specific as inclusion of cyclophilin RNA or tRNA did not interfere with cis-trans interactions. Importantly, the 3'-UTR binding activity was significantly up-regulated in the presence of ethanol. UV cross-link analysis detected three NR1 3'-UTR binding proteins and their molecular mass calculated by Northwestern analysis was approximately 88, 60 and 47 kDa, respectively. Northwestern analysis showed a significant up-regulation of the 88-kDa protein after chronic ethanol treatment. The 88-kDa protein was purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry as the beta subunit of alpha glucosidase II (GIIbeta). That GIIbeta is indeed a trans-acting protein and binds specifically to 3'-UTR of NR1 mRNA was confirmed by RNA gel mobility supershift assays and immuno RT-PCR. Western blotting data established a significant increase of GIIbeta polypeptide in chronic ethanol-exposed fetal cortical neurons. We hypothesize that the identified cis-acting region and the associated RNA-binding proteins are important regulators of NR1 subunit gene expression.

  16. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Serrano, Natalia L.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses. PMID:27405932

  17. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-07-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes.

  18. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. PMID:1098024

  19. Regulation of gene expression by the RNA-binding protein Sam68 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Prabhakar; Gaughan, Luke; Dalgliesh, Caroline; El-Sherif, Amira; Robson, Craig N; Leung, Hing Y; Elliott, David J

    2008-06-01

    Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis 68 kDa) is the prototypical member of the STAR (signal transducer and activator of RNA) family of RNA-binding proteins. Sam68 is implicated in a number of cellular processes including signal transduction, transcription, RNA metabolism, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. In the present review, we summarize the functions of Sam68 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression, with particular relevance to cancer. PMID:18481990

  20. Human polypyrimidine tract-binding protein interacts with mitochondrial tRNA(Thr) in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Marnef, Aline; Jády, Beáta E; Kiss, Tamás

    2016-02-18

    Human polypyrimidine tract-binding protein PTB is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein with four RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 to RRM4). PTB is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein that functions as a key regulator of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in the nucleoplasm and promotes internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation initiation of viral and cellular mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Here, we demonstrate that PTB and its paralogs, nPTB and ROD1, specifically interact with mitochondrial (mt) tRNA(Thr) both in human and mouse cells. In vivo and in vitro RNA-binding experiments demonstrate that PTB forms a direct interaction with the T-loop and the D-stem-loop of mt tRNA(Thr) using its N-terminal RRM1 and RRM2 motifs. RNA sequencing and cell fractionation experiments show that PTB associates with correctly processed and internally modified, mature mt tRNA(Thr) in the cytoplasm outside of mitochondria. Consistent with this, PTB activity is not required for mt tRNA(Thr) biogenesis or for correct mitochondrial protein synthesis. PTB association with mt tRNA(Thr) is largely increased upon induction of apoptosis, arguing for a potential role of the mt tRNA(Thr)/PTB complex in apoptosis. Our results lend strong support to the recently emerging conception that human mt tRNAs can participate in novel cytoplasmic processes independent from mitochondrial protein synthesis. PMID:26657638

  1. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  2. The VP3 Factor from Viruses of Birnaviridae Family Suppresses RNA Silencing by Binding Both Long and Small RNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R.; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery. PMID:23049903

  3. Melatonin Suppresses the Expression of 45S Preribosomal RNA and Upstream Binding Factor and Enhances the Antitumor Activity of Puromycin in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Eun Jung; Shin, Eun Ah; Lee, Duckgue; Kim, Bonglee; Jung, Deok-Beom; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Yun, Miyong; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Yong Koo; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Since the dysregulation of ribosome biogenesis is closely associated with tumor progression, in the current study, the critical role of ribosome biogenesis related signaling was investigated in melatonin and/or puromycin induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Despite its weak cytotoxicity, melatonin from 3 mM attenuated the expression of 45S pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA), UBF as a nucleolar transcription factor, and fibrillarin at mRNA level and consistently downregulated nucleolar proteins such as UBF and fibrillarin at protein level in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay revealed that UBF was also degraded by melatonin in MDA-MB-231 cells. In contrast, melatonin attenuated the expression of survival genes such as Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, cyclinD1, and cyclin E, suppressed the phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, and STAT3, and cleaved PARP and activated caspase 3 only at a high concentration of 12 mM. However, combined treatment of melatonin (3 mM) and puromycin (1 μM) synergistically inhibited viability, attenuated the expression of 45S pre-rRNA and UBF, and consistently downregulated UBF, XPO1 and IPO7, procaspase 3, and Bcl-xL in MDA-MB 231 cells. Overall, these findings suggest that melatonin can be a cancer preventive agent by combination with puromycin via the inhibition of 45S pre-rRNA and UBF in MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells. PMID:23690862

  4. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by captan at both DNA and substrate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, G; Lewis, R A

    1992-12-01

    RNA synthesis carried out in vitro by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase was inhibited irreversibly by captan when T7 DNA was used as template. An earlier report and this one show that captan blocks the DNA binding site on the enzyme. Herein, it is also revealed that captan acts at the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site, and kinetic relationships of the action of captan at the two sites are detailed. The inhibition by captan via the DNA binding site of the enzyme was confirmed by kinetic studies and it was further shown that [14C]captan bound to the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase. This subunit contains the DNA binding site. Competitive-like inhibition by captan versus UTP led to the conclusion that captan also blocked the NTP binding site. In support of this conclusion, [14C]captan was observed to bind to the beta subunit which contains the NTP binding site. Whereas, preincubation of RNA polymerase with both DNA and NTPs prevented captan inhibition, preincubation with either DNA or NTPs alone was insufficient to protect the enzyme from the action of captan. Furthermore, the interaction of [14C]captan with the beta and beta' subunits was not prevented by a similar preincubation. Captan also bound, to a lesser extent, to the alpha and sigma subunits. Therefore, captan binding appears to involve interaction with RNA polymerase at sites in addition to those for DNA and NTP; however, this action does not inhibit the polymerase activity.

  5. A mutation in polynucleotide phosphorylase from Escherichia coli impairing RNA binding and degradosome stability

    PubMed Central

    Regonesi, Maria Elena; Briani, Federica; Ghetta, Andrea; Zangrossi, Sandro; Ghisotti, Daniela; Tortora, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2004-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3′ to 5′ exonuclease encoded by pnp, plays a key role in Escherichia coli RNA decay. The enzyme, made of three identical 711 amino acid subunits, may also be assembled in the RNA degradosome, a heteromultimeric complex involved in RNA degradation. PNPase autogenously regulates its expression by promoting the decay of pnp mRNA, supposedly by binding at the 5′-untranslated leader region of an RNase III-processed form of this transcript. The KH and S1 RNA-binding domains at the C-terminus of the protein (amino acids 552–711) are thought to be involved in pnp mRNA recognition. Here we show that a G454D substitution in E.coli PNPase impairs autogenous regulation whereas it does not affect the catalytic activities of the enzyme. Although the mutation maps outside of the KH and S1 RNA-binding domains, analysis of the mutant protein revealed a defective RNA binding, thus suggesting that other determinants may be involved in PNPase–RNA interactions. The mutation also caused a looser association with the degradosome and an abnormal electrophoretic mobility in native gels. The latter feature suggests an altered structural conformation of PNPase, which may account for the properties of the mutant protein. PMID:14963263

  6. Folic acid binds DNA and RNA at different locations.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-03-01

    We located multiple binding sites for folic acid on DNA and tRNA at physiological conditions, using FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. Structural analysis revealed that folic acid binds DNA and tRNA at multiple sites via hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of Kfolic acid-DNA=1.1 (±0.3)×10(4) M(-1) and Kfolic acid-tRNA=6.4 (±0.5)×10(3) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in folic acid complexes with DNA and tRNA, stabilized by H-bonding network. Two types of complexes were located for folic acid-tRNA adducts, one at the major groove and the other with TΨC loop, while acid binding occurs at major and minor grooves of DNA duplex. Folic acid complexation induced more alterations of DNA structure than tRNA.

  7. Structural and mutational analysis of archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase identifies amino acids required for RNA binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huiqiong; Yoshinari, Shigeo; Ghosh, Raka; Ignatochkina, Anna V.; Gollnick, Paul D.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Ho, C. Kiong

    2016-01-01

    An ATP-dependent RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (MthRnl) catalyzes intramolecular ligation of single-stranded RNA to form a closed circular RNA via covalent ligase-AMP and RNA-adenylylate intermediate. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of an MthRnl•ATP complex as well as the covalent MthRnl–AMP intermediate. We also performed structure-guided mutational analysis to survey the functions of 36 residues in three component steps of the ligation pathway including ligase-adenylylation (step 1), RNA adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester bond synthesis (step 3). Kinetic analysis underscored the importance of motif 1a loop structure in promoting phosphodiester bond synthesis. Alanine substitutions of Thr117 or Arg118 favor the reverse step 2 reaction to deadenylate the 5′-AMP from the RNA-adenylate, thereby inhibiting step 3 reaction. Tyr159, Phe281 and Glu285, which are conserved among archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligases and are situated on the surface of the enzyme, are required for RNA binding. We propose an RNA binding interface of the MthRnl based on the mutational studies and two sulfate ions that co-crystallized at the active site cleft in the MthRnl–AMP complex. PMID:26896806

  8. The DGCR8 RNA-binding heme domain recognizes primary microRNAs by clamping the hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Quick-Cleveland, Jen; Jacob, Jose P.; Weitz, Sara H.; Shoffner, Grant; Senturia, Rachel; Guo, Feng

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Canonical primary microRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) are characterized by a ~30-bp hairpin flanked by single-stranded regions. These pri-miRNAs are recognized and cleaved by the Microprocessor complex consisting of the Drosha nuclease and its obligate RNA-binding partner DGCR8. It is not well understood how the Microprocessor specifically recognizes pri-miRNA substrates. Here we show that in addition to the well-known double-stranded RNA-binding domains, DGCR8 uses a dimeric heme-binding domain to directly contact pri-miRNAs. This RNA-binding heme domain (Rhed) directs two DGCR8 dimers to bind each pri-miRNA hairpin. The two Rhed-binding sites are located at both ends of the hairpin. The Rhed and its RNA-binding surface are important for pri-miRNA processing activity. Additionally, the heme cofactor is required for formation of processing-competent DGCR8-pri-miRNA complexes. Our study reveals a unique protein-RNA interaction central to pri-miRNA recognition. We propose a unifying model in which two DGCR8 dimers clamp a pri-miRNA hairpin using their Rheds. PMID:24910438

  9. ATP-independent diffusion of double-stranded RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hye Ran; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Myong, Sua

    2013-01-01

    The proteins harboring double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs) play diverse functional roles such as RNA localization, splicing, editing, export, and translation, yet mechanistic basis and functional significance of dsRBDs remain unclear. To unravel this enigma, we investigated transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP) consisting of three dsRBDs, which functions in HIV replication, protein kinase R(PKR)–mediated immune response, and RNA silencing. Here we report an ATP-independent diffusion activity of TRBP exclusively on dsRNA in a length-dependent manner. The first two dsRBDs of TRBP are essential for diffusion, whereas the third dsRBD is dispensable. Two homologs of TRBP, PKR activator and R3D1-L, displayed the same diffusion, implying a universality of the diffusion activity among this protein family. Furthermore, a Dicer–TRBP complex on dsRNA exhibited dynamic diffusion, which was correlated with Dicer’s catalytic activity. These results implicate the dsRNA-specific diffusion activity of TRBP that contributes to enhancing siRNA and miRNA processing by Dicer. PMID:23251028

  10. ATP-independent diffusion of double-stranded RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Doudna, Jennifer A; Myong, Sua

    2013-01-01

    The proteins harboring double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs) play diverse functional roles such as RNA localization, splicing, editing, export, and translation, yet mechanistic basis and functional significance of dsRBDs remain unclear. To unravel this enigma, we investigated transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP) consisting of three dsRBDs, which functions in HIV replication, protein kinase R(PKR)-mediated immune response, and RNA silencing. Here we report an ATP-independent diffusion activity of TRBP exclusively on dsRNA in a length-dependent manner. The first two dsRBDs of TRBP are essential for diffusion, whereas the third dsRBD is dispensable. Two homologs of TRBP, PKR activator and R3D1-L, displayed the same diffusion, implying a universality of the diffusion activity among this protein family. Furthermore, a Dicer-TRBP complex on dsRNA exhibited dynamic diffusion, which was correlated with Dicer's catalytic activity. These results implicate the dsRNA-specific diffusion activity of TRBP that contributes to enhancing siRNA and miRNA processing by Dicer. PMID:23251028

  11. Importance of diffuse metal ion binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-01-01

    RNAs are highly charged polyanionic molecules. RNA structure and function are strongly correlated with the ionic condition of the solution. The primary focus of this article is on the role of diffusive ions in RNA folding. Due to the long-range nature of electrostatic interactions, the diffuse ions can contribute significantly to RNA structural stability and folding kinetics. We present an overview of the experimental findings as well as the theoretical developments on the diffuse ion effects in RNA folding. This review places heavy emphasis on the effect of magnesium ions. Magnesium ions play a highly efficient role in stabilizing RNA tertiary structures and promoting tertiary structural folding. The highly efficient role goes beyond the mean-field effect such as the ionic strength. In addition to the effects of specific ion binding and ion dehydration, ion-ion correlation for the diffuse ions can contribute to the efficient role of the multivalent ions such as the magnesium ions in RNA folding.

  12. SPOT-Seq-RNA: predicting protein-RNA complex structure and RNA-binding function by fold recognition and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in RNA metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. Computational methods have been developed separately for prediction of RBPs and RNA-binding residues by machine-learning techniques and prediction of protein-RNA complex structures by rigid or semiflexible structure-to-structure docking. Here, we describe a template-based technique called SPOT-Seq-RNA that integrates prediction of RBPs, RNA-binding residues, and protein-RNA complex structures into a single package. This integration is achieved by combining template-based structure-prediction software, SPARKS X, with binding affinity prediction software, DRNA. This tool yields reasonable sensitivity (46 %) and high precision (84 %) for an independent test set of 215 RBPs and 5,766 non-RBPs. SPOT-Seq-RNA is computationally efficient for genome-scale prediction of RBPs and protein-RNA complex structures. Its application to human genome study has revealed a similar sensitivity and ability to uncover hundreds of novel RBPs beyond simple homology. The online server and downloadable version of SPOT-Seq-RNA are available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/SPOT-Seq-RNA/.

  13. Role of V protein RNA binding in inhibition of measles virus minigenome replication.

    PubMed

    Parks, Christopher L; Witko, Susan E; Kotash, Cheryl; Lin, Shuo L; Sidhu, Mohinder S; Udem, Stephen A

    2006-04-25

    Measles virus V protein represses genome replication through a poorly understood mechanism, which led us to investigate whether V protein might be an RNA-binding modulatory factor. Recombinant V protein, expressed from transfected HEp-2 cells or E. coli, formed protein-RNA complexes with poly-guanosine (poly-G) or poly-U linked to agarose beads. RNA binding was not exclusive to ribonucleotide homopolymers as complex formation between V protein and an RNA molecule equivalent to the 3' terminal 107 bases of the measles virus genome was observed with an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The interaction with poly-G was used to further examine the RNA binding properties of V demonstrating that protein-RNA complex formation was dependent upon the unique Cys-rich carboxy terminus, a region also required to induce maximal repression of minireplicon-encoded reporter gene expression in transient assays. Surprisingly, two mutant proteins that contained Cys-to-Ala substitutions in the C-terminus were found to retain their ability to bind poly-G binding and repress minireplicon reporter gene expression indicating that neither activity was dependent on the integrity of all 7 C-terminal Cys residues. Additional genetic analysis revealed that amino acids 238-266 were necessary for efficient RNA binding and overlapped with residues (238-278) required for maximal repression induced by the C-terminal domain. In addition, a 10 amino acid deletion was identified (residues 238-247) that blocked RNA binding and repression indicating that these two activities were related.

  14. The N Terminus of Pro-endothelial Monocyte-activating Polypeptide II (EMAP II) Regulates Its Binding with the C Terminus, Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase, and Neurofilament Light Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Awasthi, Niranjan; Schwarz, Roderich E.; Schwarz, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II), one component of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex, plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes of protein translation, signal transduction, immunity, lung development, and tumor growth. Recent studies have determined that pro-EMAP II has an essential role in maintaining axon integrity in central and peripheral neural systems where deletion of the C terminus of pro-EMAP II has been reported in a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred suffering from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. We hypothesized that the N terminus of pro-EMAP II has an important role in the regulation of protein-protein interactions. Using a GFP reporter system, we defined a putative leucine zipper in the N terminus of human pro-EMAP II protein (amino acid residues 1–70) that can form specific strip-like punctate structures. Through GFP punctum analysis, we uncovered that the pro-EMAP II C terminus (amino acids 147–312) can repress GFP punctum formation. Pulldown assays confirmed that the binding between the pro-EMAP II N terminus and its C terminus is mediated by a putative leucine zipper. Furthermore, the pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid region was identified as the binding partner of arginyl-tRNA synthetase, a polypeptide of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex. We also determined that the punctate GFP pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid aggregate colocalizes and binds to the neurofilament light subunit protein that is associated with pathologic neurofilament network disorganization and degeneration of motor neurons. These findings indicate the structure and binding interaction of pro-EMAP II protein and suggest a role of this protein in pathological neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25724651

  15. Finding the target sites of RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Kazan, Hilal; Lipshitz, Howard D; Morris, Quaid D

    2014-01-01

    RNA–protein interactions differ from DNA–protein interactions because of the central role of RNA secondary structure. Some RNA-binding domains (RBDs) recognize their target sites mainly by their shape and geometry and others are sequence-specific but are sensitive to secondary structure context. A number of small- and large-scale experimental approaches have been developed to measure RNAs associated in vitro and in vivo with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Generalizing outside of the experimental conditions tested by these assays requires computational motif finding. Often RBP motif finding is done by adapting DNA motif finding methods; but modeling secondary structure context leads to better recovery of RBP-binding preferences. Genome-wide assessment of mRNA secondary structure has recently become possible, but these data must be combined with computational predictions of secondary structure before they add value in predicting in vivo binding. There are two main approaches to incorporating structural information into motif models: supplementing primary sequence motif models with preferred secondary structure contexts (e.g., MEMERIS and RNAcontext) and directly modeling secondary structure recognized by the RBP using stochastic context-free grammars (e.g., CMfinder and RNApromo). The former better reconstruct known binding preferences for sequence-specific RBPs but are not suitable for modeling RBPs that recognize shape and geometry of RNAs. Future work in RBP motif finding should incorporate interactions between multiple RBDs and multiple RBPs in binding to RNA. WIREs RNA 2014, 5:111–130. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1201 PMID:24217996

  16. Methylated DNA Binding Domain Protein 2 (MBD2) Coordinately Silences Gene Expression through Activation of the MicroRNA hsa-mir-496 Promoter in Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Wyglinski, Joanne; Suderman, Matthew; Andrews, Stephen A.; Szyf, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Methylated DNA binding protein 2 (MBD2) binds methylated promoters and suppresses transcription in cis through recruitment of a chromatin modification repressor complex. We show here a new mechanism of action for MBD2: suppression of gene expression indirectly through activation of microRNA hsa-mir-496. Overexpression of MBD2 in breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A results in induced expression and demethylation of hsa-mir-496 while depletion of MBD2 in a human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 results in suppression of hsa-mir-496. Activation of hsa-mir-496 by MBD2 is associated with silencing of several of its target genes while depletion of MBD2 leads to induction of hsa-mir-496 target genes. Depletion of hsa-mir-496 by locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotide leads to activation of these target genes in MBD2 overexpressing cells supporting that hsa-mir-496 is mediating in part the effects of MBD2 on gene expression. We demonstrate that MBD2 binds the promoter of hsa-mir-496 in MCF-10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and that it activates an in vitro methylated hsa-mir-496 promoter driving a CG-less luciferase reporter in a transient transfection assay. The activation of hsa-mir-496 is associated with reduced methylation of the promoter. Taken together these results describe a novel cascade for gene regulation by DNA methylation whereby activation of a methylated microRNA by MBD2 that is associated with loss of methylation triggers repression of downstream targets. PMID:24204564

  17. SVM based prediction of RNA-binding proteins using binding residues and evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gromiha, M Michael; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2011-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial role in transcription and gene-regulation. This paper describes a support vector machine (SVM) based method for discriminating and classifying RNA-binding and non-binding proteins using sequence features. With the threshold of 30% interacting residues, RNA-binding amino acid prediction method PPRINT achieved the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.32. BLAST and PSI-BLAST identified RBPs with the coverage of 32.63 and 33.16%, respectively, at the e-value of 1e-4. The SVM models developed with amino acid, dipeptide and four-part amino acid compositions showed the MCC of 0.60, 0.46, and 0.53, respectively. This is the first study in which evolutionary information in form of position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profile has been successfully used for predicting RBPs. We achieved the maximum MCC of 0.62 using SVM model based on PSSM called PSSM-400. Finally, we developed different hybrid approaches and achieved maximum MCC of 0.66. We also developed a method for predicting three subclasses of RNA binding proteins (e.g., rRNA, tRNA, mRNA binding proteins). The performance of the method was also evaluated on an independent dataset of 69 RBPs and 100 non-RBPs (NBPs). An additional benchmarking was also performed using gene ontology (GO) based annotation. Based on the hybrid approach a web-server RNApred has been developed for predicting RNA binding proteins from amino acid sequences (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/rnapred/).

  18. Affinity labeling of Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase at the binding site for tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hountondji, C.; Schmitter, J.M.; Beauvallet, C.; Blanquet, S.

    1987-08-25

    Periodate-oxidized tRNA/sup Phe/ (tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/) behaves as a specific affinity label of tetrameric Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Reaction of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ enzyme with tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ results in the loss of tRNA/sup Phe/ aminoacylation activity with covalent attachment of 2 mol of tRNA dialdehyde/mol of enzyme, in agreement with the stoichiometry of tRNA binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the PheRS-(/sup 14/C)tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ covalent complex indicates that the large (..cap alpha.., M/sub r/ 87K) subunit of the enzyme interacts with the 3'-adenosine of tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/. The (/sup 14/C)tRNA-labeled chymotryptic peptides of PheRS were purified by both gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The radioactivity was almost equally distributed among three peptides: Met-Lys(Ado)-Phe, Ala-Asp-Lys(Ado)-Leu, and Lys-Ile-Lys(Ado)-Ala. These sequences correspond to residues 1-3, 59-62, and 104-107, respectively, in the N-terminal region of the 795 amino acid sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunit. It is noticeable that the labeled peptide Ala-Asp-Lys-Leu is adjacent to residues 63-66 (Arg-Val-Thr-Lys). The latter sequence was just predicted to resemble the proposed consensus tRNA CCA binding region Lys-Met-Ser-Lys-Ser, as deduced from previous affinity labeling studies on E. coli methionyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases.

  19. GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase 'i' and 'i+1' sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Tuske, Steve; Irschik, Herbert; Jansen, Rolf; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center 'i' and 'i+1' nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001.

  20. Complex formation of quercetin with lanthanum enhances binding to plant viral satellite double stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Rusak, Gordana; Piantanida, Ivo; Bretschneider, Sabine; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2009-12-01

    Due to the broad spectrum of biological activities of flavonoids, their target molecules in the cell are intensively studied. We examined the interactions of the flavonoid quercetin (Q) and its lanthanum complex (QLa(3+)) with very recently isolated plant viral satellite (sat) dsRNA. Comparison of the cumulative binding affinity and the estimated intercalative binding constant pointed towards an additional binding mode of quercetin to exclusively viral dsRNA, which is not recorded for synthetic dsRNAs. The QLa(3+) showed significantly higher affinity toward viral dsRNA than Q and La(3+) alone, most likely as the consequence of quercetin intercalation accompanied by additional electrostatic interaction of La(3+) with the negatively charged viral RNA backbone.

  1. Natural product (-)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer cell growth by targeting RNA-binding protein Musashi-1.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lan; Appelman, Carl; Smith, Amber R; Yu, Jia; Larsen, Sarah; Marquez, Rebecca T; Liu, Hao; Wu, Xiaoqing; Gao, Philip; Roy, Anuradha; Anbanandam, Asokan; Gowthaman, Ragul; Karanicolas, John; De Guzman, Roberto N; Rogers, Steven; Aubé, Jeffrey; Ji, Min; Cohen, Robert S; Neufeld, Kristi L; Xu, Liang

    2015-08-01

    Musashi-1 (MSI1) is an RNA-binding protein that acts as a translation activator or repressor of target mRNAs. The best-characterized MSI1 target is Numb mRNA, whose encoded protein negatively regulates Notch signaling. Additional MSI1 targets include the mRNAs for the tumor suppressor protein APC that regulates Wnt signaling and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P21(WAF-1). We hypothesized that increased expression of NUMB, P21 and APC, through inhibition of MSI1 RNA-binding activity might be an effective way to simultaneously downregulate Wnt and Notch signaling, thus blocking the growth of a broad range of cancer cells. We used a fluorescence polarization assay to screen for small molecules that disrupt the binding of MSI1 to its consensus RNA binding site. One of the top hits was (-)-gossypol (Ki = 476 ± 273 nM), a natural product from cottonseed, known to have potent anti-tumor activity and which has recently completed Phase IIb clinical trials for prostate cancer. Surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance studies demonstrate a direct interaction of (-)-gossypol with the RNA binding pocket of MSI1. We further showed that (-)-gossypol reduces Notch/Wnt signaling in several colon cancer cell lines having high levels of MSI1, with reduced SURVIVIN expression and increased apoptosis/autophagy. Finally, we showed that orally administered (-)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer growth in a mouse xenograft model. Our study identifies (-)-gossypol as a potential small molecule inhibitor of MSI1-RNA interaction, and suggests that inhibition of MSI1's RNA binding activity may be an effective anti-cancer strategy.

  2. Determinants of affinity and specificity in RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helder, Stephanie; Blythe, Amanda J; Bond, Charles S; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data suggest that the mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with RNA and the rules governing specificity might be substantially more complex than those underlying their DNA-binding counterparts. Even our knowledge of what constitutes the RNA-bound proteome is contentious; recent studies suggest that 10-30% of RBPs contain no known RNA-binding domain. Adding to this situation is a growing disconnect between the avalanche of identified interactions between proteins and long noncoding RNAs and the absence of biophysical data on these interactions. RNA-protein interactions are also at the centre of what might emerge as one of the biggest shifts in thinking about cell and molecular biology this century, following from recent reports of ribonucleoprotein complexes that drive reversible membrane-free phase separation events within the cell. Unexpectedly, low-complexity motifs are important in the formation of these structures. Here we briefly survey recent advances in our understanding of the specificity of RBPs. PMID:27315040

  3. The rate of TRAP binding to RNA is crucial for transcription attenuation control of the B. subtilis trp operon.

    PubMed

    Barbolina, Maria V; Kristoforov, Roman; Manfredo, Amanda; Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2007-07-27

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic and transport genes in Bacillus subtilis in response to changes in the levels of intracellular tryptophan. Transcription of the trpEDCFBA operon is controlled by an attenuation mechanism involving two overlapping RNA secondary structures in the 5' leader region of the trp transcript; TRAP binding promotes formation of a transcription terminator structure that halts transcription prior to the structural genes. TRAP consists of 11 identical subunits and is activated to bind RNA by binding up to 11 molecules of L-tryptophan. The TRAP binding site in the leader region of the trp operon mRNA consists of 11 (G/U)AG repeats. We examined the importance of the rate of TRAP binding to RNA for the transcription attenuation mechanism. We compared the properties of two types of TRAP 11-mers: homo-11-mers composed of 11 wild-type subunits, and hetero-11-mers with only one wild-type subunit and ten mutant subunits defective in binding either RNA or tryptophan. The hetero-11-mers bound RNA with only slightly diminished equilibrium binding affinity but with slower on-rates as compared to WT TRAP. The hetero-11-mers showed significantly decreased ability to induce transcription termination in the trp leader region when examined using an in vitro attenuation system. Together these results indicate that the rate of TRAP binding to RNA is a crucial factor in TRAP's ability to control attenuation. PMID:17555767

  4. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  5. Evidence for cooperative tandem binding of hnRNP C RRMs in mRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Cieniková, Zuzana; Jayne, Sandrine; Damberger, Fred Franz; Allain, Frédéric Hai-Trieu; Maris, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The human hnRNP C is a ubiquitous cellular protein involved in mRNA maturation. Recently, we have shown that this protein specifically recognizes uridine (U) pentamers through its single RNA recognition motif (RRM). However, a large fraction of natural RNA targets of hnRNP C consists of much longer contiguous uridine stretches. To understand how these extended sites are recognized, we studied the binding of the RRM to U-tracts of 8–11 bases. In vivo investigation of internal translation activation of unr (upstream of N-ras) mRNA indicates that the conservation of the entire hnRNP C binding site, UC(U)8, is required for hnRNP C-dependent IRES activation. The assays further suggest a synergistic interplay between hnRNP C monomers, dependent on the protein's ability to oligomerize. In vitro spectroscopic and thermodynamic analyses show that isolated RRMs bind to (U)11 oligomers as dimers. Structural modeling of a ternary double-RRM/RNA complex indicates additionally that two RRM copies can be accommodated on the canonical sequence UC(U)8. The proposed tandem RRM binding is in very good agreement with the transcriptome-wide recognition of extended U-tracts by full-length hnRNP C, which displays a cross-linking pattern consistent with a positively cooperative RRM dimer binding model. PMID:26370582

  6. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing the RNA-binding function of PSF.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-11-15

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF's RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF's ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression. PMID:19855157

  7. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing the RNA-binding function of PSF.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-11-15

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF's RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF's ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression.

  8. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by switching on the RNA-binding function of PSF

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF’s RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF’s ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression. PMID:19855157

  9. ARTD2 activity is stimulated by RNA

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Karolin; Bär, Dominik; Savić, Nataša; Santoro, Raffaella; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) are important enzymes that regulate the genotoxic stress response and the maintenance of genome integrity. ARTD1 (PARP1) and ARTD2 (PARP2) are homologous proteins that modify themselves and target proteins by the addition of mono- and poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) moieties. Both enzymes have been described to be involved in the genotoxic stress response. Here, we characterize cellular PAR formation on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or N-methyl-N′-methyl-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) stress, in combination with application of the RNA polymerase I inhibitor Actinomycin D (ActD), known to cause accumulation of short RNA polymerase I-dependent rRNA transcripts. Intriguingly, co-treatment with ActD substantially increased H2O2- or MNNG-induced PAR formation. In cells, this enhancement was predominantly mediated by ARTD2 and not ARTD1. In vitro experiments confirmed that ARTD2 is strongly activated by RNA and that the N-terminal SAP domain is important for the binding to RNA. Thus, our findings identify a new activator of ARTD2-dependent ADP-ribosylation, which has important implications for the future analysis of the biological role of ARTD2 in the nucleus. PMID:24510188

  10. RNA binding properties of the US11 protein from four primate simplexviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein encoded by the Us11 gene of herpes simplex viruses is a dsRNA binding protein which inhibits protein kinase R activity, thereby preventing the interferon-induced shut down of protein synthesis following viral infection. Us11 protein is not essential for infectivity in vitro and in mice in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), however this virus has a second, and apparently more important, inhibitor of PKR activity, the γ134.5 protein. Recently sequenced simian simplexviruses SA8, HVP2 and B virus do not have an ORF corresponding to the γ134.5 protein, yet they have similar, or greater, infectivity as HSV1 and HSV2. Methods We have expressed the US11 proteins of the simplexviruses HSV1, HSV2, HVP2 and B virus and measured their abilities to bind dsRNA, in order to investigate possible differences that could complement the absence of the γ134.5 protein. We employed a filter binding technique that allows binding of the Us11 protein under condition of excess dsRNA substrate and therefore a measurement of the true Kd value of Us11-dsRNA binding. Results and Conclusions The results show a Kd of binding in the range of 0.89 nM to 1.82 nM, with no significant difference among the four Us11 proteins. PMID:22054255

  11. Recycling of a regulatory protein by degradation of the RNA to which it binds.

    PubMed

    Deikus, Gintaras; Babitzke, Paul; Bechhofer, David H

    2004-03-01

    When Bacillus subtilis is grown in the presence of excess tryptophan, transcription of the trp operon is regulated by binding of tryptophan-activated TRAP to trp leader RNA, which promotes transcription termination in the trp leader region. Transcriptome analysis of a B. subtilis strain lacking polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease) revealed a striking overexpression of trp operon structural genes when the strain was grown in the presence of abundant tryptophan. Analysis of trp leader RNA in the PNPase(-) strain showed accumulation of a stable, TRAP-protected fragment of trp leader RNA. Loss of trp operon transcriptional regulation in the PNPase(-) strain was due to the inability of ribonucleases other than PNPase to degrade TRAP-bound leader RNA, resulting in the sequestration of limiting TRAP. Thus, in the case of the B. subtilis trp operon, specific ribonuclease degradation of RNA in an RNA-protein complex is required for recycling of an RNA-binding protein. Such a mechanism may be relevant to other systems in which limiting concentrations of an RNA-binding protein must keep pace with ongoing transcription. PMID:14976255

  12. Roquin binds microRNA-146a and Argonaute2 to regulate microRNA homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Monika; Duan, Guowen; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Athanasopoulos, Vicki; Yeo, Janet H. C.; Ose, Toyoyuki; Hu, Desheng; Brown, Simon H. J.; Jergic, Slobodan; Patel, Hardip R.; Pratama, Alvin; Richards, Sashika; Verma, Anil; Jones, E. Yvonne; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Preiss, Thomas; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Chong, Mark M. W.; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Vinuesa, Carola G.

    2015-01-01

    Roquin is an RNA-binding protein that prevents autoimmunity and inflammation via repression of bound target mRNAs such as inducible costimulator (Icos). When Roquin is absent or mutated (Roquinsan), Icos is overexpressed in T cells. Here we show that Roquin enhances Dicer-mediated processing of pre-miR-146a. Roquin also directly binds Argonaute2, a central component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, and miR-146a, a microRNA that targets Icos mRNA. In the absence of functional Roquin, miR-146a accumulates in T cells. Its accumulation is not due to increased transcription or processing, rather due to enhanced stability of mature miR-146a. This is associated with decreased 3′ end uridylation of the miRNA. Crystallographic studies reveal that Roquin contains a unique HEPN domain and identify the structural basis of the ‘san’ mutation and Roquin’s ability to bind multiple RNAs. Roquin emerges as a protein that can bind Ago2, miRNAs and target mRNAs, to control homeostasis of both RNA species. PMID:25697406

  13. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants.

  14. Distinct binding sites for zinc and double-stranded RNA in the reovirus outer capsid protein sigma 3.

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, L A; Nibert, M L; Co, M S; Brown, E G; Fields, B N

    1988-01-01

    By atomic absorption analysis, we determined that the reovirus outer capsid protein sigma 3, which binds double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), is a zinc metalloprotein. Using Northwestern blots and a novel zinc blotting technique, we localized the zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities of sigma 3 to distinct V8 protease-generated fragments. Zinc-binding activity was contained within an amino-terminal fragment that contained a transcription factor IIIA-like zinc-binding sequence, and dsRNA-binding activity was associated with a carboxy-terminal fragment. By these techniques, new zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities were also detected in reovirus core proteins. A sequence similarity was observed between the catalytic site of the picornavirus proteases and the transcription factor IIIA-like zinc-binding site within sigma 3. We suggest that the zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities of sigma 3 may be important for its proposed regulatory effects on viral and host cell transcription and translation. Images PMID:3275869

  15. Functionally related transcripts have common RNA motifs for specific RNA-binding proteins in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Noé, Griselda; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Frasch, Alberto C

    2008-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes mostly control gene expression by post-transcriptional events such as modulation of mRNA stability and translational efficiency. These mechanisms involve RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which associate with transcripts to form messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes. Results In this study, we report the identification of mRNA targets for Trypanosoma cruzi U-rich RBP 1 (TcUBP1) and T. cruzi RBP 3 (TcRBP3), two phylogenetically conserved proteins among Kinetoplastids. Co-immunoprecipitated RBP-associated RNAs were extracted from mRNP complexes and binding of RBPs to several targets was confirmed by independent experimental assays. Analysis of target transcript sequences allowed the identification of different signature RNA motifs for each protein. Cis-elements for RBP binding have a stem-loop structure of 30–35 bases and are more frequently represented in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs. Insertion of the correctly folded RNA elements to a non-specific mRNA rendered it into a target transcript, whereas substitution of the RNA elements abolished RBP interaction. In addition, RBPs competed for RNA-binding sites in accordance with the distribution of different and overlapping motifs in the 3'-UTRs of common mRNAs. Conclusion Functionally related transcripts were preferentially associated with a given RBP; TcUBP1 targets were enriched in genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism, whereas ribosomal protein-encoding transcripts were the largest group within TcRBP3 targets. Together, these results suggest coordinated control of different mRNA subsets at the post-transcriptional level by specific RBPs. PMID:19063746

  16. RNA-protein binding kinetics in an automated microfluidic reactor.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, William K; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Phillips, Rob; Williamson, James R

    2009-11-01

    Microfluidic chips can automate biochemical assays on the nanoliter scale, which is of considerable utility for RNA-protein binding reactions that would otherwise require large quantities of proteins. Unfortunately, complex reactions involving multiple reactants cannot be prepared in current microfluidic mixer designs, nor is investigation of long-time scale reactions possible. Here, a microfluidic 'Riboreactor' has been designed and constructed to facilitate the study of kinetics of RNA-protein complex formation over long time scales. With computer automation, the reactor can prepare binding reactions from any combination of eight reagents, and is optimized to monitor long reaction times. By integrating a two-photon microscope into the microfluidic platform, 5-nl reactions can be observed for longer than 1000 s with single-molecule sensitivity and negligible photobleaching. Using the Riboreactor, RNA-protein binding reactions with a fragment of the bacterial 30S ribosome were prepared in a fully automated fashion and binding rates were consistent with rates obtained from conventional assays. The microfluidic chip successfully combines automation, low sample consumption, ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection and a high degree of reproducibility. The chip should be able to probe complex reaction networks describing the assembly of large multicomponent RNPs such as the ribosome.

  17. Functional Equivalence of an Evolutionarily Conserved RNA Binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Melissa L.; Hicks, Stephanie N.; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay. PMID:26292216

  18. Functional equivalence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding module.

    PubMed

    Wells, Melissa L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-10-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay.

  19. Functional equivalence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding module.

    PubMed

    Wells, Melissa L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-10-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay. PMID:26292216

  20. A 3′ untranslated region variant in FMR1 eliminates neuronal activity-dependent translation of FMRP by disrupting binding of the RNA-binding protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Suhl, Joshua A.; Muddashetty, Ravi S.; Anderson, Bart R.; Ifrim, Marius F.; Visootsak, Jeannie; Bassell, Gary J.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. The gene underlying the disorder, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1), is silenced in most cases by a CGG-repeat expansion mutation in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Recently, we identified a variant located in the 3′UTR of FMR1 enriched among developmentally delayed males with normal repeat lengths. A patient-derived cell line revealed reduced levels of endogenous fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), and a reporter containing a patient 3′UTR caused a decrease in expression. A control reporter expressed in cultured mouse cortical neurons showed an expected increase following synaptic stimulation that was absent when expressing the patient reporter, suggesting an impaired response to neuronal activity. Mobility-shift assays using a control RNA detected an RNA–protein interaction that is lost with the patient RNA, and HuR was subsequently identified as an associated protein. Cross-linking immunoprecipitation experiments identified the locus as an in vivo target of HuR, supporting our in vitro findings. These data suggest that the disrupted interaction of HuR impairs activity-dependent translation of FMRP, which may hinder synaptic plasticity in a clinically significant fashion. PMID:26554012

  1. RNA-binding proteins in pluripotency, differentiation, and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    GUALLAR, Diana; WANG, Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and somatic cell reprogramming require the interplay of multiple pluripotency factors, epigenetic remodelers, and extracellular signaling pathways. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved in a wide range of regulatory pathways, from RNA metabolism to epigenetic modifications. In recent years we have witnessed more and more studies on the discovery of new RBPs and the assessment of their functions in a variety of biological systems, including stem cells. We review the current studies on RBPs and focus on those that have functional implications in pluripotency, differentiation, and/or reprogramming in both the human and mouse systems. PMID:25554730

  2. RNA Silencing Suppressor p21 of Beet Yellows Virus Forms an RNA binding Octameric Ring Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ye,K.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many plant viruses encode proteins that suppress the antiviral RNA silencing response mounted by the host. The suppressors p19 from tombusvirus and p21 from Beet yellows virus appear to block silencing by directly binding siRNA, a critical mediator in the process. Here, we report the crystal structure of p21, which reveals an octameric ring architecture with a large central cavity of {approx}90 Angstrom diameter. The all {alpha}-helical p21 monomer consists of N- and C-terminal domains that associate with their neighboring counterparts through symmetric head-to-head and tail-to-tail interactions. A putative RNA binding surface is identified in the conserved, positive-charged inner surface of the ring. In contrast to the specific p19-siRNA duplex interaction, p21 is a general nucleic acid binding protein, interacting with 21 nt or longer single- and double-stranded RNAs in vitro. This study reveals an RNA binding structure adopted by the p21 silencing suppressor.

  3. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  4. Expression of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1), Progestin and AdipoQ Receptor 7 (PAQPR7), and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 RNA-Binding Protein (PAIRBP1) in Glioma Spheroids In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hlavaty, Juraj; Ertl, Reinhard; Miller, Ingrid; Gabriel, Cordula

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Some effects of progesterone on glioma cells can be explained through the slow, genomic mediated response via nuclear receptors; the other effects suggest potential role of a fast, nongenomic action mediated by membrane-associated progesterone receptors. Methods. The effects of progesterone treatment on the expression levels of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA-binding protein (PAIRBP1), and progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (PAQR7) on both mRNA and protein levels were investigated in spheroids derived from human glioma cell lines U-87 MG and LN-229. Results. The only significant alteration at the transcript level was the decrease in PGRMC1 mRNA observed in LN-229 spheroids treated with 30 ng/mL of progesterone. No visible alterations at the protein levels were observed using immunohistochemical analysis. Stimulation of U-87 MG spheroids resulted in an increase of PGRMC1 but a decrease of PAIRBP1 protein. Double immunofluorescent detection of PGRMC1 and PAIRBP1 identified the two proteins to be partially colocalized in the cells. Western blot analysis revealed the expected bands for PGRMC1 and PAIRBP1, whereas two bands were detected for PAQR7. Conclusion. The progesterone action is supposed to be mediated via membrane-associated progesterone receptors as the nuclear progesterone receptor was absent in tested spheroids. PMID:27340667

  5. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Puf RNA Binding Proteins and Their mRNA Targets.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Gregory J; Brown, Patrick O; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming of a gene's expression pattern by acquisition and loss of sequences recognized by specific regulatory RNA binding proteins may be a major mechanism in the evolution of biological regulatory programs. We identified that RNA targets of Puf3 orthologs have been conserved over 100-500 million years of evolution in five eukaryotic lineages. Focusing on Puf proteins and their targets across 80 fungi, we constructed a parsimonious model for their evolutionary history. This model entails extensive and coordinated changes in the Puf targets as well as changes in the number of Puf genes and alterations of RNA binding specificity including that: 1) Binding of Puf3 to more than 200 RNAs whose protein products are predominantly involved in the production and organization of mitochondrial complexes predates the origin of budding yeasts and filamentous fungi and was maintained for 500 million years, throughout the evolution of budding yeast. 2) In filamentous fungi, remarkably, more than 150 of the ancestral Puf3 targets were gained by Puf4, with one lineage maintaining both Puf3 and Puf4 as regulators and a sister lineage losing Puf3 as a regulator of these RNAs. The decrease in gene expression of these mRNAs upon deletion of Puf4 in filamentous fungi (N. crassa) in contrast to the increase upon Puf3 deletion in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) suggests that the output of the RNA regulatory network is different with Puf4 in filamentous fungi than with Puf3 in budding yeast. 3) The coregulated Puf4 target set in filamentous fungi expanded to include mitochondrial genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and other nuclear-encoded RNAs with mitochondrial function not bound by Puf3 in budding yeast, observations that provide additional evidence for substantial rewiring of post-transcriptional regulation. 4) Puf3 also expanded and diversified its targets in filamentous fungi, gaining interactions with the mRNAs encoding the mitochondrial electron transport

  6. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Puf RNA Binding Proteins and Their mRNA Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Gregory J.; Brown, Patrick O.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming of a gene’s expression pattern by acquisition and loss of sequences recognized by specific regulatory RNA binding proteins may be a major mechanism in the evolution of biological regulatory programs. We identified that RNA targets of Puf3 orthologs have been conserved over 100–500 million years of evolution in five eukaryotic lineages. Focusing on Puf proteins and their targets across 80 fungi, we constructed a parsimonious model for their evolutionary history. This model entails extensive and coordinated changes in the Puf targets as well as changes in the number of Puf genes and alterations of RNA binding specificity including that: 1) Binding of Puf3 to more than 200 RNAs whose protein products are predominantly involved in the production and organization of mitochondrial complexes predates the origin of budding yeasts and filamentous fungi and was maintained for 500 million years, throughout the evolution of budding yeast. 2) In filamentous fungi, remarkably, more than 150 of the ancestral Puf3 targets were gained by Puf4, with one lineage maintaining both Puf3 and Puf4 as regulators and a sister lineage losing Puf3 as a regulator of these RNAs. The decrease in gene expression of these mRNAs upon deletion of Puf4 in filamentous fungi (N. crassa) in contrast to the increase upon Puf3 deletion in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) suggests that the output of the RNA regulatory network is different with Puf4 in filamentous fungi than with Puf3 in budding yeast. 3) The coregulated Puf4 target set in filamentous fungi expanded to include mitochondrial genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and other nuclear-encoded RNAs with mitochondrial function not bound by Puf3 in budding yeast, observations that provide additional evidence for substantial rewiring of post-transcriptional regulation. 4) Puf3 also expanded and diversified its targets in filamentous fungi, gaining interactions with the mRNAs encoding the mitochondrial electron transport

  7. Selection of RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the NS3 protease of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Urvil, P T; Kakiuchi, N; Zhou, D M; Shimotohno, K; Kumar, P K; Nishikawa, S

    1997-08-15

    The RNA genome of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) is translated into a large precursor polyprotein. The NS3 protease of HCV has a crucial role in the processing of the polyprotein into functional viral proteins. We have used an in vitro genetic-selection strategy to isolate high-affinity RNA aptamers that bind to the NS3 protein, especially to its protease domain. Starting from a RNA pool that had a random sequence core of 12-18 nucleotides, aptamers that bind specifically to the NS3 protein were selected after 10 rounds of selection and amplification. A single aptamer, 10G-1, was found predominantly (71%) in the selected pool. This aptamer could bind to the NS3 protein with a binding constant of 650 nM and inhibit the proteolytic activity in vitro. By phosphate-modification-interference analysis we showed that the phosphate residues that are critical for the binding of 10G-1 to NS3 lie within the selected regions of the aptamer and that binding involves electrostatic contacts with the phosphates of regions G28-U34 and A47-A55. The NS3-binding region in 10G-1 can serve as a basis for designing more potential inhibitors of the NS3 protein.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA binding sites of oncogenes: implications in cancer and pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer, a complex genetic disease involving uncontrolled cell proliferation, is caused by inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. A vast majority of these cancer causing genes are known targets of microRNAs (miRNAs) that bind to complementary sequences in 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of messenger RNAs and repress them from translation. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring naturally in such miRNA binding regions can alter the miRNA:mRNA interaction and can significantly affect gene expression. We hypothesized that 3'UTR SNPs in miRNA binding sites of proto-oncogenes could abrogate their post-transcriptional regulation, resulting in overexpression of oncogenic proteins, tumor initiation, progression, and modulation of drug response in cancer patients. Therefore, we developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases, followed stringent selection criteria and identified a panel of 30 high-confidence SNPs that may impair miRNA target sites in the 3' UTR of 54 mRNA transcripts of 24 proto-oncogenes. Further, 8 SNPs amidst them had the potential to determine therapeutic outcome in cancer patients. Functional annotation suggested that altogether these SNPs occur in proto-oncogenes enriched for kinase activities. We provide detailed in silico evidence for the functional effect of these candidate SNPs in various types of cancer.

  9. Selection of TAR RNA-Binding Chameleon Peptides by Using a Retroviral Replication System

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Baode; Calabro, Valerie; Wainberg, Mark A.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between the arginine-rich motif (ARM) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat protein and TAR RNA is essential for Tat activation and viral replication. Two related lentiviruses, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and Jembrana disease virus (JDV), also require Tat ARM-TAR interactions to mediate activation, but the viruses have evolved different RNA-binding strategies. Interestingly, the JDV ARM can act as a “chameleon,” adopting both the HIV and BIV TAR binding modes. To examine how RNA-protein interactions may evolve in a viral context and possibly to identify peptides that recognize HIV TAR in novel ways, we devised a retroviral system based on HIV replication to amplify and select for RNA binders. We constructed a combinatorial peptide library based on the BIV Tat ARM and identified peptides that, like the JDV Tat ARM, also function through HIV TAR, revealing unexpected sequence characteristics of an RNA-binding chameleon. The results suggest that a retroviral screening approach may help identify high-affinity TAR binders and may provide new insights into the evolution of RNA-protein interactions. PMID:14722301

  10. Importance of diffuse metal ion binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-01-01

    RNAs are highly charged polyanionic molecules. RNA structure and function are strongly correlated with the ionic condition of the solution. The primary focus of this article is on the role of diffusive ions in RNA folding. Due to the long-range nature of electrostatic interactions, the diffuse ions can contribute significantly to RNA structural stability and folding kinetics. We present an overview of the experimental findings as well as the theoretical developments on the diffuse ion effects in RNA folding. This review places heavy emphasis on the effect of magnesium ions. Magnesium ions play a highly efficient role in stabilizing RNA tertiary structures and promoting tertiary structural folding. The highly efficient role goes beyond the mean-field effect such as the ionic strength. In addition to the effects of specific ion binding and ion dehydration, ion-ion correlation for the diffuse ions can contribute to the efficient role of the multivalent ions such as the magnesium ions in RNA folding. PMID:22010269

  11. Evoking picomolar binding in RNA by a single phosphorodithioate linkage

    PubMed Central

    Abeydeera, N. Dinuka; Egli, Martin; Cox, Nehemiah; Mercier, Karen; Conde, Jonas Nascimento; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Sierant, Malgorzata; Hibti, Fatima-Ezzahra; Hassell, Tom; Wang, Tianzhi; Liu, Feng-Wu; Liu, Hong-Min; Martinez, Carlos; Sood, Anil K.; Lybrand, Terry P.; Frydman, Chiraz; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Gomer, Richard H.; Nawrot, Barbara; Yang, Xianbin

    2016-01-01

    RNA aptamers are synthetic oligonucleotide-based affinity molecules that utilize unique three-dimensional structures for their affinity and specificity to a target such as a protein. They hold the promise of numerous advantages over biologically produced antibodies; however, the binding affinity and specificity of RNA aptamers are often insufficient for successful implementation in diagnostic assays or as therapeutic agents. Strong binding affinity is important to improve the downstream applications. We report here the use of the phosphorodithioate (PS2) substitution on a single nucleotide of RNA aptamers to dramatically improve target binding affinity by ∼1000-fold (from nanomolar to picomolar). An X-ray co-crystal structure of the α-thrombin:PS2-aptamer complex reveals a localized induced-fit rearrangement of the PS2-containing nucleotide which leads to enhanced target interaction. High-level quantum mechanical calculations for model systems that mimic the PS2 moiety and phenylalanine demonstrate that an edge-on interaction between sulfur and the aromatic ring is quite favorable, and also confirm that the sulfur analogs are much more polarizable than the corresponding phosphates. This favorable interaction involving the sulfur atom is likely even more significant in the full aptamer-protein complexes than in the model systems. PMID:27566147

  12. In vitro RNA-binding assay for studying trans-factors for RNA editing in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Okuda, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In plant organelles, specific C residues are modified to U by RNA editing. Short RNA sequences surrounding the target site (i.e., cis-elements) are recognized by trans-factors, which were recently shown to be pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. PPR proteins consist of tandem arrays of a highly degenerate unit of 35 (pentatrico) amino acids, and PPR motifs are believed to recognize specific RNA sequences. In Arabidopsis thaliana, more than 450 sites are edited in mitochondria and plastids, and a similar number of PPR proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. To study how the tandem array of a PPR motif facilitates the recognition of RNA sequences, an efficient biochemical strategy is an in vitro binding assay of recombinant PPR proteins with target RNA. This analysis is especially powerful with a combination of in vivo analyses based on the phenotypes of mutants and transgenic plants. In this chapter, we describe methods for the expression of recombinant PPR proteins in Escherichia coli, preparation of probe RNAs, and RNA gel shift assays. These methods can also be utilized for other RNA-binding proteins.

  13. An essential E box in the promoter of the gene encoding the mRNA cap-binding protein (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) is a target for activation by c-myc.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R M; Branda, J; Johnston, K A; Polymenis, M; Gadd, M; Rustgi, A; Callanan, L; Schmidt, E V

    1996-01-01

    The mRNA cap-binding protein (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E [eIF4E]) binds the m7 GpppN cap on mRNA, thereby initiating translation. eIF4E is essential and rate limiting for protein synthesis. Overexpression of eIF4E transforms cells, and mutations in eIF4E arrest cells in G, in cdc33 mutants. In this work, we identified the promoter region of the gene encoding eIF4E, because we previously identified eIF4E as a potential myc-regulated gene. In support of our previous data, a minimal, functional, 403-nucleotide promoter region of eIF4E was found to contain CACGTG E box repeats, and this core eIF4E promoter was myc responsive in cotransfections with c-myc. A direct role for myc in activating the eIF4E promoter was demonstrated by cotransfections with two dominant negative mutants of c-myc (MycdeltaTAD and MycdeltaBR) which equally suppressed promoter function. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated quantitative binding to the E box motifs that correlated with myc levels in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay extracts; supershift assays demonstrated max and USF binding to the same motif. cis mutations in the core or flank of the eIF4E E box simultaneously altered myc-max and USF binding and inactivated the promoter. Indeed, mutations of this E box inactivated the promoter in all cells tested, suggesting it is essential for expression of eIF4E. Furthermore, the GGCCACGTG(A/T)C(C/G) sequence is shared with other in vivo targets for c-myc, but unlike other targets, it is located in the immediate promoter region. Its critical function in the eIF4E promoter coupled with the known functional significance of eIF4E in growth regulation makes it a particularly interesting target for c-myc regulation. PMID:8756633

  14. Secondary structure of the HIV-2 leader RNA comprising the tRNA-primer binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, B; Schoneveld, I

    1993-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of a retroviral RNA genome occurs by a tRNA primer bound near the 5' end of the genomic RNA at a position called the primer-binding site (PBS). To understand the molecular basis for this RNA-RNA interaction, the secondary structure of the leader RNA of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) RNA was analyzed. In vitro synthesized HIV-2 RNA was probed with various structure-specific enzymes and chemicals. A computer program was then used to predict the secondary structure consistent with these data. In addition, the nucleotide sequences of different HIV-2 isolates were used to screen for the occurrence of covariation among putative base pairs. The primary sequences have diverged rapidly in some HIV-2 isolates, however, some strikingly conserved secondary structure elements were identified. Most nucleotides in the leader region are involved in base pairing. An exception is the PBS sequence, of which 15 out of 18 nucleotides are exposed in an internal loop. These findings suggest that the overall structure of the HIV-2 genome has evolved to facilitate an optimal interaction with its tRNA primer. Images PMID:8464701

  15. Cooperative binding of ATP and RNA induces a closed conformation in a DEAD box RNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Theissen, Bettina; Karow, Anne R; Köhler, Jürgen; Gubaev, Airat; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2008-01-15

    RNA helicases couple the energy from ATP hydrolysis with structural changes of their RNA substrates. DEAD box helicases form the largest class of RNA helicases and share a helicase core comprising two RecA-like domains. An opening and closing of the interdomain cleft during RNA unwinding has been postulated but not shown experimentally. Single-molecule FRET experiments with the Bacillus subtilis DEAD box helicase YxiN carrying donor and acceptor fluorophores on different sides of the interdomain cleft reveal an open helicase conformation in the absence of nucleotides, or in the presence of ATP, or ADP, or RNA. In the presence of ADP and RNA, the open conformation is retained. By contrast, cooperative binding of ATP and RNA leads to a compact helicase structure, proving that the ATP- and ADP-bound states of RNA helicases display substantially different structures only when the RNA substrate is bound. These results establish a closure of the interdomain cleft in the helicase core at the beginning of the unwinding reaction, and suggest a conserved mechanism of energy conversion among DEAD box helicases across kingdoms.

  16. Interaction of zanamivir with DNA and RNA: Models for drug DNA and drug RNA bindings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Kahangi, Fatemeh Ghoreyshi; Azizi, Ebrahim; Zebarjad, Nader; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2007-03-01

    Zanamivir (ZAN) is the first of a new generation of influenza virus-specific drugs known as neuraminidase inhibitors, which acts by interfering with life cycles of influenza viruses A and B. It prevents the virus spreading infection to other cells by blocking the neuraminidase enzyme present on the surface of the virus. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA complexes with zanamivir in aqueous solution, using constant DNA or RNA concentration (12.5 mM) and various zanamivir/polynucleotide ( P) ratios of 1/20, 1/10, 1/4, and 1/2. FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopy are used to determine the drug external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of zanamivir-DNA and RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Structural analysis showed major interaction of zanamivir with G-C (major groove) and A-T (minor groove) base pairs and minor perturbations of the backbone PO 2 group with overall binding constants of Kzanamivir-DNA = 1.30 × 10 4 M -1 and Kzanamivir-RNA = 1.38 × 10 4 M -1. The drug interaction induces a partial B to A-DNA transition, while RNA remains in A-conformation.

  17. In vivo and in vitro arginine methylation of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q; Dreyfuss, G

    1995-01-01

    Heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) bind pre-mRNAs and facilitate their processing into mRNAs. Many of the hnRNPs undergo extensive posttranslational modifications including methylation on arginine residues. hnRNPs contain about 65% of the total NG,NG-dimethylarginine found in the cell nucleus. The role of this modification is not known. Here we identify the hnRNPs that are methylated in HeLa cells and demonstrate that most of the pre-mRNA-binding proteins receive this modification. Using recombinant human hnRNP A1 as a substrate, we have partially purified and characterized a protein-arginine N-methyltransferase specific for hnRNPs from HeLa cells. This methyltransferase can methylate the same subset of hnRNPs in vitro as are methylated in vivo. Furthermore, it can also methylate other RNA-binding proteins that contain the RGG motif RNA-binding domain. This activity is evolutionarily conserved from lower eukaryotes to mammals, suggesting that methylation has a significant role in the function of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:7739561

  18. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3′ untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  19. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3' untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3' untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  20. A conserved loop in polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) essential for both RNA and ADP/phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Mazzantini, Elisa; Nardini, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Greco, Claudio; Briani, Federica; De Gioia, Luca; Dehò, Gianni; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) reversibly catalyzes RNA phosphorolysis and polymerization of nucleoside diphosphates. Its homotrimeric structure forms a central channel where RNA is accommodated. Each protomer core is formed by two paralogous RNase PH domains: PNPase1, whose function is largely unknown, hosts a conserved FFRR loop interacting with RNA, whereas PNPase2 bears the putative catalytic site, ∼20 Å away from the FFRR loop. To date, little is known regarding PNPase catalytic mechanism. We analyzed the kinetic properties of two Escherichia coli PNPase mutants in the FFRR loop (R79A and R80A), which exhibited a dramatic increase in Km for ADP/Pi binding, but not for poly(A), suggesting that the two residues may be essential for binding ADP and Pi. However, both mutants were severely impaired in shifting RNA electrophoretic mobility, implying that the two arginines contribute also to RNA binding. Additional interactions between RNA and other PNPase domains (such as KH and S1) may preserve the enzymatic activity in R79A and R80A mutants. Inspection of enzyme structure showed that PNPase has evolved a long-range acting hydrogen bonding network that connects the FFRR loop with the catalytic site via the F380 residue. This hypothesis was supported by mutation analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of PNPase domains and RNase PH suggests that such network is a unique feature of PNPase1 domain, which coevolved with the paralogous PNPase2 domain.

  1. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs.

  2. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity.

  3. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Turkington, Hannah L.; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S.; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity. PMID:26246567

  4. Integrity of the core mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 is vital for trypanosome RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Křížová, Adéla; Kafková, Lucie; Read, Laurie K; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of the human and veterinarian diseases African sleeping sickness and nagana. A majority of its mitochondrial-encoded transcripts undergo RNA editing, an essential process of post-transcriptional uridine insertion and deletion to produce translatable mRNA. Besides the well-characterized RNA editing core complex, the mitochondrial RNA-binding 1 (MRB1) complex is one of the key players. It comprises a core complex of about six proteins, guide RNA-associated proteins (GAPs) 1/2, which form a heterotetramer that binds and stabilizes gRNAs, plus MRB5390, MRB3010, and MRB11870, which play roles in initial stages of RNA editing, presumably guided by the first gRNA:mRNA duplex in the case of the latter two proteins. To better understand all functions of the MRB1 complex, we performed a functional analysis of the MRB8620 core subunit, the only one not characterized so far. Here we show that MRB8620 plays a role in RNA editing in both procyclic and bloodstream stages of T. brucei, which reside in the tsetse fly vector and mammalian circulatory system, respectively. While RNAi silencing of MRB8620 does not affect procyclic T. brucei fitness when grown in glucose-containing media, it is somewhat compromised in cells grown in the absence of this carbon source. MRB8620 is crucial for integrity of the MRB1 core, such as its association with GAP1/2, which presumably acts to deliver gRNAs to this complex. In contrast, GAP1/2 is not required for the fabrication of the MRB1 core. Disruption of the MRB1 core assembly is followed by the accumulation of mRNAs associated with GAP1/2. PMID:26447184

  5. Integrity of the core mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 is vital for trypanosome RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Křížová, Adéla; Kafková, Lucie; Read, Laurie K; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of the human and veterinarian diseases African sleeping sickness and nagana. A majority of its mitochondrial-encoded transcripts undergo RNA editing, an essential process of post-transcriptional uridine insertion and deletion to produce translatable mRNA. Besides the well-characterized RNA editing core complex, the mitochondrial RNA-binding 1 (MRB1) complex is one of the key players. It comprises a core complex of about six proteins, guide RNA-associated proteins (GAPs) 1/2, which form a heterotetramer that binds and stabilizes gRNAs, plus MRB5390, MRB3010, and MRB11870, which play roles in initial stages of RNA editing, presumably guided by the first gRNA:mRNA duplex in the case of the latter two proteins. To better understand all functions of the MRB1 complex, we performed a functional analysis of the MRB8620 core subunit, the only one not characterized so far. Here we show that MRB8620 plays a role in RNA editing in both procyclic and bloodstream stages of T. brucei, which reside in the tsetse fly vector and mammalian circulatory system, respectively. While RNAi silencing of MRB8620 does not affect procyclic T. brucei fitness when grown in glucose-containing media, it is somewhat compromised in cells grown in the absence of this carbon source. MRB8620 is crucial for integrity of the MRB1 core, such as its association with GAP1/2, which presumably acts to deliver gRNAs to this complex. In contrast, GAP1/2 is not required for the fabrication of the MRB1 core. Disruption of the MRB1 core assembly is followed by the accumulation of mRNAs associated with GAP1/2.

  6. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  7. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements. PMID:21087992

  8. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A.; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutations in vivo. PMID:26347403

  9. The sweet side of RNA regulation: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a noncanonical RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    White, Michael R; Garcin, Elsa D

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has a vast array of extraglycolytic cellular functions, including interactions with nucleic acids. GAPDH has been implicated in the translocation of transfer RNA (tRNA), the regulation of cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and translation, as well as the regulation of replication and gene expression of many single-stranded RNA viruses. A growing body of evidence supports GAPDH-RNA interactions serving as part of a larger coordination between intermediary metabolism and RNA biogenesis. Despite the established role of GAPDH in nucleic acid regulation, it is still unclear how and where GAPDH binds to its RNA targets, highlighted by the absence of any conserved RNA-binding sequences. This review will summarize our current understanding of GAPDH-mediated regulation of RNA function. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:53-70. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1315 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. When core competence is not enough: functional interplay of the DEAD-box helicase core with ancillary domains and auxiliary factors in RNA binding and unwinding.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Markus G; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    DEAD-box helicases catalyze RNA duplex unwinding in an ATP-dependent reaction. Members of the DEAD-box helicase family consist of a common helicase core formed by two RecA-like domains. According to the current mechanistic model for DEAD-box mediated RNA unwinding, binding of RNA and ATP triggers a conformational change of the helicase core, and leads to formation of a compact, closed state. In the closed conformation, the two parts of the active site for ATP hydrolysis and of the RNA binding site, residing on the two RecA domains, become aligned. Closing of the helicase core is coupled to a deformation of the RNA backbone and destabilization of the RNA duplex, allowing for dissociation of one of the strands. The second strand remains bound to the helicase core until ATP hydrolysis and product release lead to re-opening of the core. The concomitant disruption of the RNA binding site causes dissociation of the second strand. The activity of the helicase core can be modulated by interaction partners, and by flanking N- and C-terminal domains. A number of C-terminal flanking regions have been implicated in RNA binding: RNA recognition motifs (RRM) typically mediate sequence-specific RNA binding, whereas positively charged, unstructured regions provide binding sites for structured RNA, without sequence-specificity. Interaction partners modulate RNA binding to the core, or bind to RNA regions emanating from the core. The functional interplay of the helicase core and ancillary domains or interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding is not entirely understood. This review summarizes our current knowledge on RNA binding to the DEAD-box helicase core and the roles of ancillary domains and interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding by DEAD-box proteins.

  11. A third member of the RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene family, ADAR3, contains both single- and double-stranded RNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C X; Cho, D S; Wang, Q; Lai, F; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    2000-01-01

    Members of the double-stranded RNA- (dsRNA) specific adenosine deaminase gene family convert adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and are involved in A-to-I RNA editing of transcripts of glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and serotonin receptor subtype 2C (5-HT(2C)R). We have isolated hADAR3, the third member of this class of human enzyme and investigated its editing site selectivity using in vitro RNA editing assay systems. As originally reported for rat ADAR3 or RED2, purified ADAR3 proteins could not edit GluR-B RNA at the "Q/R" site, the "R/G" site, and the intronic "hot spot" site. In addition, ADAR3 did not edit any of five sites discovered recently within the intracellular loop II region of 5-HT(2C)R RNAs, confirming its total lack of editing activity for currently known substrate RNAs. Filter-binding analyses revealed that ADAR3 is capable of binding not only to dsRNA but also to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). Deletion mutagenesis identified a region rich in arginine residues located in the N-terminus that is responsible for binding of ADAR3 to ssRNA. The presence of this ssRNA-binding domain as well as its expression in restricted brain regions and postmitotic neurons make ADAR3 distinct from the other two ADAR gene family members, editing competent ADAR1 and ADAR2. ADAR3 inhibited in vitro the activities of RNA editing enzymes of the ADAR gene family, raising the possibility of a regulatory role in RNA editing. PMID:10836796

  12. RNA-binding proteins in plants: the tip of an iceberg?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.; Federoff, N. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins, which are involved in the synthesis, processing, transport, translation, and degradation of RNA, are emerging as important, often multifunctional, cellular regulatory proteins. Although relatively few RNA-binding proteins have been studied in plants, they are being identified with increasing frequency, both genetically and biochemically. RNA-binding proteins that regulate chloroplast mRNA stability and translation in response to light and that have been elegantly analyzed in Clamydomonas reinhardtii have counterparts with similar functions in higher plants. Several recent reports describe mutations in genes encoding RNA-binding proteins that affect plant development and hormone signaling.

  13. Structural and functional analysis reveals that human OASL binds dsRNA to enhance RIG-I signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Gad, Hans Henrik; Andersen, Line Lykke; Hornung, Veit; Julkunen, Ilkka; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Hartmann, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) enzymes are cytoplasmic dsRNA sensors belonging to the antiviral innate immune system. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, the OAS enzymes synthesize 2′-5′ linked oligoadenylates (2-5As) that initiate an RNA decay pathway to impair viral replication. The human OAS-like (OASL) protein, however, does not harbor the catalytic activity required for synthesizing 2-5As and differs from the other human OAS family members by having two C-terminal ubiquitin-like domains. In spite of its lack of enzymatic activity, human OASL possesses antiviral activity. It was recently demonstrated that the ubiquitin-like domains of OASL could substitute for K63-linked poly-ubiquitin and interact with the CARDs of RIG-I and thereby enhance RIG-I signaling. However, the role of the OAS-like domain of OASL remains unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of the OAS-like domain, which shows a striking similarity with activated OAS1. Furthermore, the structure of the OAS-like domain shows that OASL has a dsRNA binding groove. We demonstrate that the OAS-like domain can bind dsRNA and that mutating key residues in the dsRNA binding site is detrimental to the RIG-I signaling enhancement. Hence, binding to dsRNA is an important feature of OASL that is required for enhancing RIG-I signaling. PMID:25925578

  14. BORIS/CTCFL is an RNA-binding protein that associates with polysomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background BORIS (CTCFL), a paralogue of the multifunctional and ubiquitously expressed transcription factor CTCF, is best known for its role in transcriptional regulation. In the nucleus, BORIS is particularly enriched in the nucleolus, a crucial compartment for ribosomal RNA and RNA metabolism. However, little is known about cytoplasmic BORIS, which represents the major pool of BORIS protein. Results We show, firstly, that BORIS has a putative nuclear export signal in the C-terminal domain. Furthermore, BORIS associates with mRNA in both neural stem cells and young neurons. The majority of the BORIS-associated transcripts are different in the two cell types. Finally, by using polysome profiling we show that BORIS is associated with actively translating ribosomes. Conclusion We have demonstrated the RNA binding properties of cellular BORIS and its association with actively translating ribosomes. We suggest that BORIS is involved in gene expression at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:24279897

  15. CED-4 is an mRNA-binding protein that delivers ced-3 mRNA to ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao-xing; Itoh, Masanori; Li, Shimo; Hida, Yoko; Ohta, Kazunori; Hayakawa, Miki; Nishida, Emika; Ueda, Masashi; Islam, Saiful; Tana; Nakagawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-29

    Cell death abnormal (ced)-3 and ced-4 genes regulate apoptosis to maintain tissue homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apoptosome formation and CED-4 translocation drive CED-3 activation. However, the precise role of CED-4 translocation is not yet fully understood. In this study, using a combination of immunoprecipitation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods in cells and a glutathione-S-transferase pull down assay in a cell-free system, we show that CED-4 binds ced-3 mRNA. In the presence of ced-3 mRNA, CED-4 protein is enriched in the microsomal fraction and interacts with ribosomal protein L10a in mammalian cells, increasing the levels of CED-3. These results suggest that CED-4 forms a complex with ced-3 mRNA and delivers it to ribosomes for translation.

  16. Characterization of RNA-Protein Interactions: Lessons from Two RNA-Binding Proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2.

    PubMed

    Skrdlant, Lindsey; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins whose RNA-binding ability is required for both constitutive and alternative splicing. While members of the SR protein family were once thought to have redundant functions, in-depth biochemical analysis of their RNA-binding abilities has revealed distinct binding profiles for each SR protein, that often lead to either synergistic or antagonistic functions. SR protein family members SRSF1 and SRSF2 are two of the most highly studied RNA-binding proteins. Here we examine the various methods used to differentiate SRSF1 and SRSF2 RNA-binding ability. We discuss the benefits and type of information that can be determined using each method. PMID:26965252

  17. Characterization of RNA-Protein Interactions: Lessons from Two RNA-Binding Proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2.

    PubMed

    Skrdlant, Lindsey; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins whose RNA-binding ability is required for both constitutive and alternative splicing. While members of the SR protein family were once thought to have redundant functions, in-depth biochemical analysis of their RNA-binding abilities has revealed distinct binding profiles for each SR protein, that often lead to either synergistic or antagonistic functions. SR protein family members SRSF1 and SRSF2 are two of the most highly studied RNA-binding proteins. Here we examine the various methods used to differentiate SRSF1 and SRSF2 RNA-binding ability. We discuss the benefits and type of information that can be determined using each method.

  18. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-03-27

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA, and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), revealing critical structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the structures show how conformational changes that occur upon RNA binding create the cofactor-binding site. There are nine conserved functional motifs (motifs IVIII and X) in KsgA. Prior to RNA binding, motifs I and VIII are flexible, each exhibiting two distinct conformations. Upon RNA binding, the two motifs become stabilized in one of these conformations, which is compatible with the binding of SAH. Motif X, which is also stabilized upon RNA binding, is directly involved in the binding of SAH.

  19. Targeting of cytosolic mRNA to mitochondria: naked RNA can bind to the mitochondrial surface.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Morgane; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondria contain hundreds of proteins but only a few are encoded by the mitochondrial genome. The other proteins are nuclear-encoded and imported into mitochondria. These proteins can be translated on free cytosolic polysomes, then targeted and imported into mitochondria. Nonetheless, numerous cytosolic mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins are detected at the surface of mitochondria in yeast, plants and animals. The localization of mRNAs to the vicinity of mitochondria would be a way for mitochondrial protein sorting. The mechanisms responsible for mRNA targeting to mitochondria are not clearly identified. Sequences within the mRNA molecules (cis-elements), as well as a few trans-acting factors, have been shown to be essential for targeting of some mRNAs. In order to identify receptors involved in mRNA docking to the mitochondrial surface, we have developed an in vitro mRNA binding assay with isolated plant mitochondria. We show that naked mRNAs are able to bind to isolated mitochondria, and our results strongly suggest that mRNA docking to the plant mitochondrial outer membrane requires at least one component of TOM complex.

  20. Binding of Y-box proteins to RNA: involvement of different protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ladomery, M; Sommerville, J

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic Y-box proteins are reported to interact with a wide variety of nucleic acid structures to act as transcription factors and mRNA masking proteins. The modular structure of Y-box proteins includes a highly conserved N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD, equivalent to the bacterial cold-shock proteins) plus four basic C-terminal domains containing arginine clusters and aromatic residues. In addition, the basic domains are separated by acidic regions which contain several potential sites for serine/threonine phosphorylation. The interaction of Y-box proteins, isolated from Xenopus oocytes (FRGY2 type), with RNA molecules has been studied by UV crosslinking and protein fragmentation. We have identified two distinct binding activities. The CSD interacts preferentially with the polypurines poly(A,G) and poly(G) but not poly(A), this activity being sensitive to 5 mM MgCl2 but not to 5 mM spermidine. In the presence of 1 mM MgCl2 or 1 mM spermidine, the basic domains interact preferentially with poly(C,U), this activity being sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl. Binding of the basic domains is also sensitive to low concentrations of heparin. The basic domains can be crosslinked individually to labelled RNA. These results are discussed with reference to the various specificities noted in the binding of Y-box proteins to RNA and DNA. Images PMID:7530842

  1. A Second RNA-Binding Site in the NS1 Protein of Influenza B Virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Chung; Guan, Rongjin; Hamilton, Keith; Aramini, James M; Mao, Lei; Wang, Shanshan; Krug, Robert M; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-09-01

    Influenza viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans. The NS1 proteins of influenza A and B viruses (NS1A and NS1B proteins, respectively) are composed of two domains, a dimeric N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain, connected by a flexible polypeptide linker. Here we report the 2.0-Å X-ray crystal structure and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the NS1B C-terminal domain, which reveal a novel and unexpected basic RNA-binding site that is not present in the NS1A protein. We demonstrate that single-site alanine replacements of basic residues in this site lead to reduced RNA-binding activity, and that recombinant influenza B viruses expressing these mutant NS1B proteins are severely attenuated in replication. This novel RNA-binding site of NS1B is required for optimal influenza B virus replication. Most importantly, this study reveals an unexpected RNA-binding function in the C-terminal domain of NS1B, a novel function that distinguishes influenza B viruses from influenza A viruses.

  2. A Second RNA-Binding Site in the NS1 Protein of Influenza B Virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Chung; Guan, Rongjin; Hamilton, Keith; Aramini, James M; Mao, Lei; Wang, Shanshan; Krug, Robert M; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-09-01

    Influenza viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans. The NS1 proteins of influenza A and B viruses (NS1A and NS1B proteins, respectively) are composed of two domains, a dimeric N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain, connected by a flexible polypeptide linker. Here we report the 2.0-Å X-ray crystal structure and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the NS1B C-terminal domain, which reveal a novel and unexpected basic RNA-binding site that is not present in the NS1A protein. We demonstrate that single-site alanine replacements of basic residues in this site lead to reduced RNA-binding activity, and that recombinant influenza B viruses expressing these mutant NS1B proteins are severely attenuated in replication. This novel RNA-binding site of NS1B is required for optimal influenza B virus replication. Most importantly, this study reveals an unexpected RNA-binding function in the C-terminal domain of NS1B, a novel function that distinguishes influenza B viruses from influenza A viruses. PMID:27545620

  3. Identification of RNA-binding surfaces in iron regulatory protein-1.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, P; Menotti, E; Moret, R; Kühn, L C

    1999-11-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA translation and stability in iron metabolism involves the interaction between the trans-acting cytoplasmic iron regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and IRP-2) and cis-acting iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNA 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions. IRP-1 can adopt two conformations: one with a [4Fe-4S]-cluster, unable to bind IREs, which functions as a cytoplasmic aconitase; one lacking this cluster, which accumulates in iron-deprived cells and binds mRNA firmly. We investigated which surfaces of IRP-1 interact with IREs. Surface areas were predicted on the basis of the crystallized porcine mitochondrial aconitase structure. We selected nine sequences absent or different in mitochondrial and Escherichia coli aconitases, both being devoid of RNA-binding properties. Mutations in two regions of domain 4 of IRP-1 lowered the affinity for a wild-type IRE up to 7-fold in vitro, whereas the aconitase activity, a control for structural integrity, was not affected. Scatchard plot analysis with mutant IREs indicated that domain 4 is involved in the binding specificity. This conclusion was confirmed with hybrid proteins in which IRP-1 surface loops were grafted into IRP-2. The results indicate that arginines 728 and 732 contact the IRE bulge, whereas region 685-689 is necessary for recognition of the IRE loop. PMID:10545118

  4. The RNA-binding Protein TDP-43 Selectively Disrupts MicroRNA-1/206 Incorporation into the RNA-induced Silencing Complex*♦

    PubMed Central

    King, Isabelle N.; Yartseva, Valeria; Salas, Donaldo; Kumar, Abhishek; Heidersbach, Amy; Ando, D. Michael; Stallings, Nancy R.; Elliott, Jeffrey L.; Srivastava, Deepak; Ivey, Kathryn N.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) maturation is regulated by interaction of particular miRNA precursors with specific RNA-binding proteins. Following their biogenesis, mature miRNAs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) where they interact with mRNAs to negatively regulate protein production. However, little is known about how mature miRNAs are regulated at the level of their activity. To address this, we screened for proteins differentially bound to the mature form of the miR-1 or miR-133 miRNA families. These muscle-enriched, co-transcribed miRNA pairs cooperate to suppress smooth muscle gene expression in the heart. However, they also have opposing roles, with the miR-1 family, composed of miR-1 and miR-206, promoting myogenic differentiation, whereas miR-133 maintains the progenitor state. Here, we describe a physical interaction between TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein that forms aggregates in the neuromuscular disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the miR-1, but not miR-133, family. Deficiency of the TDP-43 Drosophila ortholog enhanced dmiR-1 activity in vivo. In mammalian cells, TDP-43 limited the activity of both miR-1 and miR-206, but not the miR-133 family, by disrupting their RISC association. Consistent with TDP-43 dampening miR-1/206 activity, protein levels of the miR-1/206 targets, IGF-1 and HDAC4, were elevated in TDP-43 transgenic mouse muscle. This occurred without corresponding Igf-1 or Hdac4 mRNA increases and despite higher miR-1 and miR-206 expression. Our findings reveal that TDP-43 negatively regulates the activity of the miR-1 family of miRNAs by limiting their bioavailability for RISC loading and suggest a processing-independent mechanism for differential regulation of miRNA activity. PMID:24719334

  5. A second essential function of the Est1-binding arm of yeast telomerase RNA.

    PubMed

    Lebo, Kevin J; Niederer, Rachel O; Zappulla, David C

    2015-05-01

    The enzymatic ribonucleoprotein telomerase maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, including humans, and plays a central role in aging and cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, is a flexible scaffold that tethers telomerase holoenzyme protein subunits to the complex. Here we test the hypothesis that a lengthy conserved region of the Est1-binding TLC1 arm contributes more than simply Est1-binding function. We separated Est1 binding from potential other functions by tethering TLC1 to Est1 via a heterologous RNA-protein binding module. We find that Est1-tethering rescues in vivo function of telomerase RNA alleles missing nucleotides specifically required for Est1 binding, but not those missing the entire conserved region. Notably, however, telomerase function is restored for this condition by expressing the arm of TLC1 in trans. Mutational analysis shows that the Second Essential Est1-arm Domain (SEED) maps to an internal loop of the arm, which SHAPE chemical mapping and 3D modeling suggest could be regulated by conformational change. Finally, we find that the SEED has an essential, Est1-independent role in telomerase function after telomerase recruitment to the telomere. The SEED may be required for establishing telomere extendibility or promoting telomerase RNP holoenzyme activity.

  6. The extended AT-hook is a novel RNA binding motif

    PubMed Central

    Filarsky, Michael; Zillner, Karina; Araya, Ingrid; Villar-Garea, Ana; Merkl, Rainer; Längst, Gernot; Németh, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The AT-hook has been defined as a DNA binding peptide motif that contains a glycine-arginine-proline (G-R-P) tripeptide core flanked by basic amino acids. Recent reports documented variations in the sequence of AT-hooks and revealed RNA binding activity of some canonical AT-hooks, suggesting a higher structural and functional variability of this protein domain than previously anticipated. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of the extended AT-hook peptide motif (eAT-hook), in which basic amino acids appear symmetrical mainly at a distance of 12–15 amino acids from the G-R-P core. We identified 80 human and 60 mouse eAT-hook proteins and biochemically characterized the eAT-hooks of Tip5/BAZ2A, PTOV1 and GPBP1. Microscale thermophoresis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal the nucleic acid binding features of this peptide motif, and show that eAT-hooks bind RNA with one order of magnitude higher affinity than DNA. In addition, cellular localization studies suggest a role for the N-terminal eAT-hook of PTOV1 in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. In summary, our findings classify the eAT-hook as a novel nucleic acid binding motif, which potentially mediates various RNA-dependent cellular processes. PMID:26156556

  7. The extended AT-hook is a novel RNA binding motif.

    PubMed

    Filarsky, Michael; Zillner, Karina; Araya, Ingrid; Villar-Garea, Ana; Merkl, Rainer; Längst, Gernot; Németh, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The AT-hook has been defined as a DNA binding peptide motif that contains a glycine-arginine-proline (G-R-P) tripeptide core flanked by basic amino acids. Recent reports documented variations in the sequence of AT-hooks and revealed RNA binding activity of some canonical AT-hooks, suggesting a higher structural and functional variability of this protein domain than previously anticipated. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of the extended AT-hook peptide motif (eAT-hook), in which basic amino acids appear symmetrical mainly at a distance of 12-15 amino acids from the G-R-P core. We identified 80 human and 60 mouse eAT-hook proteins and biochemically characterized the eAT-hooks of Tip5/BAZ2A, PTOV1 and GPBP1. Microscale thermophoresis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal the nucleic acid binding features of this peptide motif, and show that eAT-hooks bind RNA with one order of magnitude higher affinity than DNA. In addition, cellular localization studies suggest a role for the N-terminal eAT-hook of PTOV1 in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. In summary, our findings classify the eAT-hook as a novel nucleic acid binding motif, which potentially mediates various RNA-dependent cellular processes.

  8. Robust transcriptome-wide discovery of RNA binding protein binding sites with enhanced CLIP (eCLIP)

    PubMed Central

    Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Shishkin, Alexander A.; Gelboin-Burkhart, Chelsea; Fang, Mark Y.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Blue, Steven M.; Nguyen, Thai B.; Surka, Christine; Elkins, Keri; Stanton, Rebecca; Rigo, Frank; Guttman, Mitchell; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    As RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in cellular physiology by interacting with target RNAs, binding site identification by UV-crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) of ribonucleoprotein complexes is critical to understanding RBP function. However, current CLIP protocols are technically demanding and yield low complexity libraries with high experimental failure rates. We have developed an enhanced CLIP (eCLIP) protocol that decreases requisite amplification by ~1,000-fold, decreasing discarded PCR duplicate reads by ~60% while maintaining single-nucleotide binding resolution. By simplifying the generation of paired IgG and size-matched input controls, eCLIP improves specificity in discovery of authentic binding sites. We generated 102 eCLIP experiments for 73 diverse RBPs in HepG2 and K562 cells (available at https://www.encodeproject.org), demonstrating that eCLIP enables large-scale and robust profiling, with amplification and sample requirements similar to ChIP-seq. eCLIP enables integrative analysis of diverse RBPs to reveal factor-specific profiles, common artifacts for CLIP and RNA-centric perspectives of RBP activity. PMID:27018577

  9. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  10. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  11. RNA and protein complexes of trp RNA-binding attenuation protein characterized by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Satoko; Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Unzai, Satoru; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-03-15

    We have characterized both wild-type and mutant TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) from Bacillus stearothermophilus , and their complexes with RNA or its regulator anti-TRAP protein (AT), by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Wild-type TRAP mainly forms homo-11mer rings. The mutant used carries three copies of the TRAP monomer on a single polypeptide chain so that it associates to form a 12mer ring with four polypeptide molecules. Mass spectra showed that both the wild-type TRAP 11mer and the mutant TRAP 12mer can bind a cognate single-stranded RNA molecule with a molar ratio of 1:1. The crystal structure of wild-type TRAP complexed with AT shows a TRAP 12mer ring surrounded by six AT trimers. However, nanoESI-MS of wild-type TRAP mixed with AT shows four species with different binding stoichiometries, and the complex observed by crystallography represents only a minor species in solution; most of the TRAP remains in an 11mer ring form. Mass spectra of mutant TRAP showed only a single species, TRAP 12mer + six copies of AT trimer, which is observed by crystallography. These results suggest that crystallization selects only the most symmetrical TRAP-AT complex from the solution, whereas ESI-MS can take a "snapshot" of all the species in solution. PMID:19219981

  12. Exploring the RNA World in Hematopoietic Cells Through the Lens of RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Joan; Muljo, Stefan A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The discovery of microRNAs has renewed interest in post-transcriptional modes of regulation, fueling an emerging view of a rich RNA world within our cells that deserves further exploration. Much work has gone into elucidating genetic regulatory networks that orchestrate gene expression programs and direct cell fate decisions in the hematopoietic system. However, the focus has been to elucidate signaling pathways and transcriptional programs. To bring us one step closer to reverse engineering the molecular logic of cellular differentiation, it will be necessary to map post-transcriptional circuits as well and integrate them in the context of existing network models. In this regard, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) may rival transcription factors as important regulators of cell fates and represent a tractable opportunity to connect the RNA world to the proteome. ChIP-seq has greatly facilitated genome-wide localization of DNA-binding proteins, helping us to understand genomic regulation at a systems level. Similarly, technological advances such as CLIP-seq allow transcriptome-wide mapping of RBP binding sites, aiding us to unravel post-transcriptional networks. Here, we review RBP-mediated post-transcriptional regulation, paying special attention to findings relevant to the immune system. As a prime example, we highlight the RBP Lin28B, which acts as a heterochronic switch between fetal and adult lymphopoiesis. PMID:23550653

  13. Identification of the RNA recognition element of the RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins and their transcriptome-wide mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Farazi, Thalia A; Leonhardt, Carl S; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Li, Song; Max, Klaas E A; Meyer, Cindy; Yamaji, Masashi; Cekan, Pavol; Jacobs, Nicholas C; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Bognanni, Claudia; Larsson, Erik; Ohler, Uwe; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies implicated the RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) family of proteins in oocyte, retinal ganglion cell, heart, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle development. These RNA-binding proteins contain a single RNA recognition motif (RRM), and their targets and molecular function have not yet been identified. We defined transcriptome-wide RNA targets using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) in HEK293 cells, revealing exonic mature and intronic pre-mRNA binding sites, in agreement with the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of the proteins. Computational and biochemical approaches defined the RNA recognition element (RRE) as a tandem CAC trinucleotide motif separated by a variable spacer region. Similar to other mRNA-binding proteins, RBPMS family of proteins relocalized to cytoplasmic stress granules under oxidative stress conditions suggestive of a support function for mRNA localization in large and/or multinucleated cells where it is preferentially expressed.

  14. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected themore » splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.« less

  15. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.

  16. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  17. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yingbiao; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is intricately regulated at the post-transcriptional level by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) via their interactions with pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) and mRNA during development. However, very little is known about the mechanism regulating RBP activities in RNA metabolism. During the past few years, a large body of evidence has suggested that many RBPs, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), undergo post-translational modification through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation to modulate RNA processing, including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, miRNA biogenesis and rRNA processing. Accordingly, RBP poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation has been shown to be involved in stress responses, stem cell differentiation and retinal morphogenesis. Here, we summarize recent advances in understanding the biological roles of RBP poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, as controlled by Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) and Poly(ADP-ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG). In addition, we discuss the potential of PARP and PARG inhibitors for the treatment of RBP-related human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23921685

  18. BindUP: a web server for non-homology-based prediction of DNA and RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Paz, Inbal; Kligun, Efrat; Bengad, Barak; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-07-01

    Gene expression is a multi-step process involving many layers of regulation. The main regulators of the pathway are DNA and RNA binding proteins. While over the years, a large number of DNA and RNA binding proteins have been identified and extensively studied, it is still expected that many other proteins, some with yet another known function, are awaiting to be discovered. Here we present a new web server, BindUP, freely accessible through the website http://bindup.technion.ac.il/, for predicting DNA and RNA binding proteins using a non-homology-based approach. Our method is based on the electrostatic features of the protein surface and other general properties of the protein. BindUP predicts nucleic acid binding function given the proteins three-dimensional structure or a structural model. Additionally, BindUP provides information on the largest electrostatic surface patches, visualized on the server. The server was tested on several datasets of DNA and RNA binding proteins, including proteins which do not possess DNA or RNA binding domains and have no similarity to known nucleic acid binding proteins, achieving very high accuracy. BindUP is applicable in either single or batch modes and can be applied for testing hundreds of proteins simultaneously in a highly efficient manner.

  19. BindUP: a web server for non-homology-based prediction of DNA and RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Inbal; Kligun, Efrat; Bengad, Barak; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is a multi-step process involving many layers of regulation. The main regulators of the pathway are DNA and RNA binding proteins. While over the years, a large number of DNA and RNA binding proteins have been identified and extensively studied, it is still expected that many other proteins, some with yet another known function, are awaiting to be discovered. Here we present a new web server, BindUP, freely accessible through the website http://bindup.technion.ac.il/, for predicting DNA and RNA binding proteins using a non-homology-based approach. Our method is based on the electrostatic features of the protein surface and other general properties of the protein. BindUP predicts nucleic acid binding function given the proteins three-dimensional structure or a structural model. Additionally, BindUP provides information on the largest electrostatic surface patches, visualized on the server. The server was tested on several datasets of DNA and RNA binding proteins, including proteins which do not possess DNA or RNA binding domains and have no similarity to known nucleic acid binding proteins, achieving very high accuracy. BindUP is applicable in either single or batch modes and can be applied for testing hundreds of proteins simultaneously in a highly efficient manner. PMID:27198220

  20. Association of the Adenovirus DNA-Binding Protein with RNA Both in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleghon, Vaughn G.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1986-12-01

    The multifunctional DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenovirus binds RNA. The association of purified DBP with RNA in vitro was demonstrated by using either a gel filtration or a filter binding assay. This association is sensitive to ionic strength and exhibits no apparent sequence specificity. DBP also interacts with RNA in vivo; it can be crosslinked to polyadenylylated RNA by UV-irradiation of intact cells during the late phase of adenovirus infections. The 46-kDa carboxyl-terminal domain of DBP binds RNA in vitro and was found to be associated with polyadenylylated RNA in vivo. This is the same domain that interacts with DNA. However, the differences in sensitivity of DBP to trypsin when bound to RNA versus DNA suggest that RNA and DNA either bind at different sites within this domain or induce different conformational changes within the protein.

  1. Coordinated Activities of Human Dicer Domains in Regulatory RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Enbo; Zhou, Kaihong; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The conserved ribonuclease Dicer generates microRNAs and short interfering RNAs that guide gene silencing in eukaryotes. The specific contributions of human Dicer's structural domains to RNA product length and substrate preference are incompletely understood, due in part to the difficulties of Dicer purification. Here we show that active forms of human Dicer can be assembled from recombinant polypeptides expressed in bacteria. Using this system, we find that three distinct modes of RNA recognition give rise to Dicer's fidelity and product length specificity. The first involves anchoring one end of a dsRNA helix within the PAZ domain, which can assemble in trans with Dicer's catalytic domains to reconstitute an accurate but non-substrate-selective dicing activity. The second entails non-specific RNA binding by the double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD), an interaction that is essential for substrate recruitment in the absence of the PAZ domain. The third mode of recognition involves hairpin RNA loop recognition by the helicase domain, which ensures efficient processing of specific substrates. These results reveal distinct interactions of each Dicer domain with different RNA structural features, and provide a facile system for investigating the molecular mechanisms of human miRNA biogenesis. PMID:22727743

  2. RNA-Binding Protein FXR1 Regulates p21 and TERC RNA to Bypass p53-Mediated Cellular Senescence in OSCC.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Mrinmoyee; House, Reniqua; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Qie, Shuo; Day, Terrence A; Neskey, David; Diehl, J Alan; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2016-09-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBP) regulate numerous aspects of co- and post-transcriptional gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that RBP, fragile X-related protein 1 (FXR1), plays an essential role in cellular senescence by utilizing mRNA turnover pathway. We report that overexpressed FXR1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma targets (G-quadruplex (G4) RNA structure within) both mRNA encoding p21 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A, Cip1) and the non-coding RNA Telomerase RNA Component (TERC), and regulates their turnover to avoid senescence. Silencing of FXR1 in cancer cells triggers the activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, p53, increases DNA damage, and ultimately, cellular senescence. Overexpressed FXR1 binds and destabilizes p21 mRNA, subsequently reduces p21 protein expression in oral cancer cells. In addition, FXR1 also binds and stabilizes TERC RNA and suppresses the cellular senescence possibly through telomerase activity. Finally, we report that FXR1-regulated senescence is irreversible and FXR1-depleted cells fail to form colonies to re-enter cellular proliferation. Collectively, FXR1 displays a novel mechanism of controlling the expression of p21 through p53-dependent manner to bypass cellular senescence in oral cancer cells. PMID:27606879

  3. RNA-Binding Protein FXR1 Regulates p21 and TERC RNA to Bypass p53-Mediated Cellular Senescence in OSCC

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mrinmoyee; House, Reniqua; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Qie, Shuo; Day, Terrence A.; Neskey, David; Diehl, J. Alan

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBP) regulate numerous aspects of co- and post-transcriptional gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that RBP, fragile X-related protein 1 (FXR1), plays an essential role in cellular senescence by utilizing mRNA turnover pathway. We report that overexpressed FXR1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma targets (G-quadruplex (G4) RNA structure within) both mRNA encoding p21 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A, Cip1) and the non-coding RNA Telomerase RNA Component (TERC), and regulates their turnover to avoid senescence. Silencing of FXR1 in cancer cells triggers the activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, p53, increases DNA damage, and ultimately, cellular senescence. Overexpressed FXR1 binds and destabilizes p21 mRNA, subsequently reduces p21 protein expression in oral cancer cells. In addition, FXR1 also binds and stabilizes TERC RNA and suppresses the cellular senescence possibly through telomerase activity. Finally, we report that FXR1-regulated senescence is irreversible and FXR1-depleted cells fail to form colonies to re-enter cellular proliferation. Collectively, FXR1 displays a novel mechanism of controlling the expression of p21 through p53-dependent manner to bypass cellular senescence in oral cancer cells. PMID:27606879

  4. A Bromodomain-Containing Protein from Tomato Specifically Binds Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid RNA In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Sägesser, Rudolf; Tabler, Martin; Tsagris, Mina

    2003-01-01

    For the identification of RNA-binding proteins that specifically interact with potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), we subjected a tomato cDNA expression library prepared from viroid-infected leaves to an RNA ligand screening procedure. We repeatedly identified cDNA clones that expressed a protein of 602 amino acids. The protein contains a bromodomain and was termed viroid RNA-binding protein 1 (VIRP1). The specificity of interaction of VIRP1 with viroid RNA was studied by different methodologies, which included Northwestern blotting, plaque lift, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. VIRP1 interacted strongly and specifically with monomeric and oligomeric PSTVd positive-strand RNA transcripts. Other RNAs, for example, U1 RNA, did not bind to VIRP1. Further, we could immunoprecipitate complexes from infected tomato leaves that contained VIRP1 and viroid RNA in vivo. Analysis of the protein sequence revealed that VIRP1 is a member of a newly identified family of transcriptional regulators associated with chromatin remodeling. VIRP1 is the first member of this family of proteins, for which a specific RNA-binding activity is shown. A possible role of VIRP1 in viroid replication and in RNA mediated chromatin remodeling is discussed. PMID:12915580

  5. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  6. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Galietta, Annamaria; Gunby, Rosalind H; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W; Tartari, Carmen J; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK(+) ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK(+) cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells.

  7. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gunby, Rosalind H.; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W.; Tartari, Carmen J.; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G.; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK+ ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK+ cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells. PMID:17537995

  8. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Galietta, Annamaria; Gunby, Rosalind H; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W; Tartari, Carmen J; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK(+) ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK(+) cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells. PMID:17537995

  9. Substrate recognition and specificity of double-stranded RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lela; Koh, Hye Ran; Myong, Sua; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Recognition of double-stranded (ds) RNA is an important part of many cellular pathways, including RNA silencing, viral recognition, RNA editing, processing, and transport. dsRNA recognition is often achieved by dsRNA binding domains (dsRBDs). We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to examine the binding interface of the transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP) dsRBDs to dsRNA substrates. Our results explain the exclusive selectivity of dsRBDs toward dsRNA and against DNA-RNA hybrid and dsDNA duplexes. We also provide corresponding experimental evidence. The dsRNA duplex is recognized by dsRBDs through the A-form of three duplex grooves and by the chemical properties of RNA bases, which have 2'-hydroxyl groups on their sugar rings. Our simulations show that TRBP dsRBD discriminates dsRNA- from DNA-containing duplexes primarily through interactions at two duplex grooves. The simulations also reveal that the conformation of the DNA-RNA duplex can be altered by dsRBD proteins, resulting in a weak binding of dsRBDs to DNA-RNA hybrids. Our study reveals the structural and molecular basis of protein-RNA interaction that gives rise to the observed substrate specificity of dsRNA binding proteins. PMID:24801449

  10. Polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins of potato mediate tuberization through an interaction with StBEL5 RNA.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Ki; Sharma, Pooja; Butler, Nathaniel M; Kang, Il-Ho; Shah, Shweta; Rao, A Gururaj; Hannapel, David J

    2015-11-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteins are a family of RNA-binding proteins that function in a wide range of RNA metabolic processes by binding to motifs rich in uracils and cytosines. A PTB protein of pumpkin was identified as the core protein of an RNA-protein complex that trafficks RNA. The biological function of the PTB-RNA complex, however, has not been demonstrated. In potato, six PTB proteins have been identified, and two, designated StPTB1 and StPTB6, are similar to the phloem-mobile pumpkin type. RNA binding assays confirmed the interaction of StPTB1 and StPTB6 with discrete pyrimidine-rich sequences of the 3'-untranslated regions of the phloem-mobile mRNA, StBEL5. The promoter of StPTB1 was active in companion cells of phloem in both stem and petioles. Expression of both types was evident in phloem cells of roots and in stolons during tuber formation. RNA accumulation of both PTB proteins was induced by short days in leaves in correlation with enhanced accumulation of StBEL5 RNA. StPTB suppression lines exhibited reduced tuber yields and decreased StBEL5 RNA accumulation, whereas StPTB overexpression lines displayed an increase in tuber production correlated with the enhanced production in stolons of steady-state levels of StBEL5 transcripts and RNA of key tuber identity genes. In StPTB overexpression lines, both the stability and long-distance transport of StBEL5 transcripts were enhanced, whereas in suppression lines stability and transport decreased. Using a transgenic approach, it is shown that the StPTB family of RNA-binding proteins regulate specific stages of development through an interaction with phloem-mobile transcripts of StBEL5. PMID:26283046

  11. Polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins of potato mediate tuberization through an interaction with StBEL5 RNA.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Ki; Sharma, Pooja; Butler, Nathaniel M; Kang, Il-Ho; Shah, Shweta; Rao, A Gururaj; Hannapel, David J

    2015-11-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteins are a family of RNA-binding proteins that function in a wide range of RNA metabolic processes by binding to motifs rich in uracils and cytosines. A PTB protein of pumpkin was identified as the core protein of an RNA-protein complex that trafficks RNA. The biological function of the PTB-RNA complex, however, has not been demonstrated. In potato, six PTB proteins have been identified, and two, designated StPTB1 and StPTB6, are similar to the phloem-mobile pumpkin type. RNA binding assays confirmed the interaction of StPTB1 and StPTB6 with discrete pyrimidine-rich sequences of the 3'-untranslated regions of the phloem-mobile mRNA, StBEL5. The promoter of StPTB1 was active in companion cells of phloem in both stem and petioles. Expression of both types was evident in phloem cells of roots and in stolons during tuber formation. RNA accumulation of both PTB proteins was induced by short days in leaves in correlation with enhanced accumulation of StBEL5 RNA. StPTB suppression lines exhibited reduced tuber yields and decreased StBEL5 RNA accumulation, whereas StPTB overexpression lines displayed an increase in tuber production correlated with the enhanced production in stolons of steady-state levels of StBEL5 transcripts and RNA of key tuber identity genes. In StPTB overexpression lines, both the stability and long-distance transport of StBEL5 transcripts were enhanced, whereas in suppression lines stability and transport decreased. Using a transgenic approach, it is shown that the StPTB family of RNA-binding proteins regulate specific stages of development through an interaction with phloem-mobile transcripts of StBEL5.

  12. Arabidopsis RNA-binding Protein FCA Regulates MicroRNA172 Processing in Thermosensory Flowering*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Pil Joon; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Ambient temperature fluctuates diurnally and seasonally. It profoundly influences the timing of flowering in plants. The floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) mediates ambient temperature signals via the thermosensory pathway in Arabidopsis flowering. microRNA172 (miR172), which promotes flowering by inducing FT, also responds to changes in ambient temperature. However, it is largely unknown how miR172 integrates ambient temperature signals into the flowering genetic network. Here, we show that Arabidopsis RNA-binding protein FCA promotes the processing of primary microRNA172 transcripts (pri-miR172) in response to changes in ambient temperature. Ambient temperature regulates miR172 biogenesis primarily at the pri-miR172 processing step. miR172 abundance is elevated at 23 °C but not at 16 °C. miR172 accumulation at 23 °C requires functional FCA. FCA binds to the flanking sequences of the stem-loop within the pri-miR172 transcripts via the RNA recognition motif. FCA also binds to the primary transcripts of other temperature-responsive miRNAs, such as miR398 and miR399. Notably, levels of FCA mRNAs and proteins increase at 23 °C but remain low at 16 °C, supporting the role of FCA in temperature perception. Our data show that FCA regulation of miR172 processing is an early event in the thermosensory flowering pathway. We propose that the FCA-miR172 regulon provides an adaptive strategy that fine tunes the onset of flowering under fluctuating ambient temperature conditions. PMID:22431732

  13. Phosphorylation of the RNA-binding protein Dazl by MAPKAP kinase 2 regulates spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Patrick A.; Krug, Michael S.; McMillan, Emily A.; Peake, Jasmine D.; Davis, Tara L.; Cocklin, Simon; Strochlic, Todd I.

    2016-01-01

    Developing male germ cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental insults such as heat and oxidative stress. An additional characteristic of these cells is their unique dependence on RNA-binding proteins for regulating posttranscriptional gene expression and translational control. Here we provide a mechanistic link unifying these two features. We show that the germ cell–specific RNA-binding protein deleted in azoospermia-like (Dazl) is phosphorylated by MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), a stress-induced protein kinase activated downstream of p38 MAPK. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of Dazl by MK2 on an evolutionarily conserved serine residue inhibits its interaction with poly(A)-binding protein, resulting in reduced translation of Dazl-regulated target RNAs. We further show that transgenic expression of wild-type human Dazl but not a phosphomimetic form in the Drosophila male germline can restore fertility to flies deficient in boule, the Drosophila orthologue of human Dazl. These results illuminate a novel role for MK2 in spermatogenesis, expand the repertoire of RNA-binding proteins phosphorylated by this kinase, and suggest that signaling by the p38-MK2 pathway is a negative regulator of spermatogenesis via phosphorylation of Dazl. PMID:27280388

  14. In vitro selection of novel RNA ligands that bind human cytomegalovirus and block viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Jiang, H; Liu, F

    2000-01-01

    Ribonuclease-resistant RNA molecules that bind to infectious human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were isolated in vitro from a pool of randomized sequences after 16 cycles of selection and amplification. The two ligands (L13 and L19) characterized exhibited high HCMV-binding affinity in vitro and effectively inhibited viral infection in tissue culture. Their antiviral activity was also specific as they only reacted with two different strains of HCMV but not with the related herpes simplex virus 1 and human cells. These two ligands appeared to function as antivirals by blocking viral entry. Ultraviolet (UV) crosslinking studies suggested that L13 and L19 bind to HCMV essential glycoproteins B and H, respectively. Thus, RNA ligands that bind to different surface antigens of HCMV can be simultaneously isolated by the selection procedure. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using these RNA ligands as a research tool to identify viral proteins required for infectivity and as an antiviral agent to block viral infection. PMID:10786848

  15. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    PubMed

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  16. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries. PMID:26120903

  17. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-01-01

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence. PMID:26612539

  18. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-01-01

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence. PMID:26612539

  19. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-11-27

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence.

  20. Pentamidine binds to tRNA through non-specific hydrophobic interactions and inhibits aminoacylation and translation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2008-03-01

    The selective and potent inhibition of mitochondrial translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by pentamidine suggests a novel antimicrobial action for this drug. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay, T1 ribonuclease footprinting, hydroxyl radical footprinting and isothermal titration calorimetry collectively demonstrated that pentamidine non-specifically binds to two distinct classes of sites on tRNA. The binding was driven by favorable entropy changes indicative of a large hydrophobic interaction, suggesting that the aromatic rings of pentamidine are inserted into the stacked base pairs of tRNA helices. Pentamidine binding disrupts the tRNA secondary structure and masks the anticodon loop in the tertiary structure. Consistently, we showed that pentamidine specifically inhibits tRNA aminoacylation but not the cognate amino acid adenylation. Pentamidine inhibited protein translation in vitro with an EC(50) equivalent to that binds to tRNA and inhibits tRNA aminoacylation in vitro, but drastically higher than that inhibits translation in vivo, supporting the established notion that the antimicrobial activity of pentamidine is largely due to its selective accumulation by the pathogen rather than by the host cell. Therefore, interrupting tRNA aminoacylation by the entropy-driven non-specific binding is an important mechanism of pentamidine in inhibiting protein translation, providing new insights into the development of antimicrobial drugs.

  1. REF2 encodes an RNA-binding protein directly involved in yeast mRNA 3'-end formation.

    PubMed Central

    Russnak, R; Nehrke, K W; Platt, T

    1995-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ref2-1 (REF = RNA end formation) was originally identified by a genetic strategy predicted to detect decreases in the use of a CYC1 poly(A) site interposed within the intron of an ACT1-HIS4 fusion reporter gene. Direct RNA analysis now proves this effect and also demonstrates the trans action of the REF2 gene product on cryptic poly(A) sites located within the coding region of a plasmid-borne ACT1-lacZ gene. Despite impaired growth of ref2 strains, possibly because of a general defect in the efficiency of mRNA 3'-end processing, the steady-state characteristics of a variety of normal cellular mRNAs remain unaffected. Sequencing of the complementing gene predicts the Ref2p product to be a novel, basic protein of 429 amino acids (M(r), 48,000) with a high-level lysine/serine content and some unusual features. Analysis in vitro, with a number of defined RNA substrates, confirms that efficient use of weak poly(A) sites requires Ref2p: endonucleolytic cleavage is carried out accurately but at significantly lower rates in extracts prepared from delta ref2 cells. The addition of purified, epitope-tagged Ref2p (Ref2pF) reestablishes wild-type levels of activity in these extracts, demonstrating direct involvement of this protein in the cleavage step of 3' mRNA processing. Together with the RNA-binding characteristics of Ref2pF in vitro, our results support an important contributing role for the REF2 locus in 3'-end processing. As the first gene genetically identified to participate in mRNA 3'-end maturation prior to the final polyadenylation step, REF2 provides an ideal starting point for identifying related genes in this event. PMID:7862160

  2. LncRNA OIP5-AS1/cyrano sponges RNA-binding protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yang, Xiaoling; De, Supriyo; Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Noh, Ji Heon; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-03-18

    The function of the vast majority of mammalian long noncoding (lnc) RNAs remains unknown. Here, analysis of a highly abundant mammalian lncRNA, OIP5-AS1, known as cyrano in zebrafish, revealed that OIP5-AS1 reduces cell proliferation. In human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, the RNA-binding protein HuR, which enhances cell proliferation, associated with OIP5-AS1 and stabilized it. Tagging OIP5-AS1 with MS2 hairpins to identify associated microRNAs revealed that miR-424 interacted with OIP5-AS1 and competed with HuR for binding to OIP5-AS1. We further identified a 'sponge' function for OIP5-AS1, as high levels of OIP5-AS1 increased HuR-OIP5-AS1 complexes and prevented HuR interaction with target mRNAs, including those that encoded proliferative proteins, while conversely, lowering OIP5-AS1 increased the abundance of HuR complexes with target mRNAs. We propose that OIP5-AS1 serves as a sponge or a competing endogenous (ce)RNA for HuR, restricting its availability to HuR target mRNAs and thereby repressing HuR-elicited proliferative phenotypes.

  3. RNA Binding Proteins RZ-1B and RZ-1C Play Critical Roles in Regulating Pre-mRNA Splicing and Gene Expression during Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Zhu, Danling; Lin, Xiaoya; Miao, Jin; Gu, Lianfeng; Deng, Xian; Yang, Qian; Sun, Kangtai; Zhu, Danmeng; Cao, Xiaofeng; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Dean, Caroline; Aoyama, Takashi; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins are involved in various aspects of RNA metabolism, which in turn modulates gene expression. However, the functions of nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins in plants are poorly understood. Here, we report the functions of two proteins containing RNA recognition motifs, RZ-1B and RZ-1C, in Arabidopsis thaliana. RZ-1B and RZ-1C were localized to nuclear speckles and interacted with a spectrum of serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins through their C termini. RZ-1C preferentially bound to purine-rich RNA sequences in vitro through its N-terminal RNA recognition motif. Disrupting the RNA binding activity of RZ-1C with SR proteins through overexpression of the C terminus of RZ-1C conferred defective phenotypes similar to those observed in rz-1b rz-1c double mutants, including delayed seed germination, reduced stature, and serrated leaves. Loss of function of RZ-1B and RZ-1C was accompanied by defective splicing of many genes and global perturbation of gene expression. In addition, we found that RZ-1C directly targeted FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), promoting efficient splicing of FLC introns and likely also repressing FLC transcription. Our findings highlight the critical role of RZ-1B/1C in regulating RNA splicing, gene expression, and many key aspects of plant development via interaction with proteins including SR proteins.

  4. Characterization of the metal ion binding properties of the hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Bougie, Isabelle; Charpentier, Sébastien; Bisaillon, Martin

    2003-02-01

    The hepatitis C virus nonstructural 5B protein (NS5B) protein has been shown to require either magnesium or manganese for its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. As a first step toward elucidating the nature and the role(s) of the metal ions in the reaction chemistry, we have utilized endogenous tryptophan fluorescence to quantitate the interactions of magnesium and manganese ions with this protein. The association of either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions with the enzyme resulted in a decrease in the intensity of the tryptophan emission spectrum. This decrease was used to determine the apparent dissociation constants for both ions. The apparent K(d) values for the binding of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions to the free enzyme were 3.1 and 0.3 mm, respectively. Dual ligand titration experiments demonstrated that both ions bind to a single common site, for which they compete. The kinetics of real time metal ion binding to the NS5B protein were also investigated. Based on the results of our fluorescence and near-UV circular dichroism experiments, we show that NS5B undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of metal ions. However, this process does not significantly stimulate the binding to the RNA or NTP substrates. We envisage that the ion-induced conformational change is a prerequisite for catalytic activity by both correctly positioning the side chains of the residues located in the active site of the enzyme and also contributing to the stabilization of the intermediate transition state.

  5. Polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins of potato mediate tuberization through an interaction with StBEL5 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ki; Sharma, Pooja; Butler, Nathaniel M.; Kang, Il-Ho; Shah, Shweta; Rao, A. Gururaj; Hannapel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteins are a family of RNA-binding proteins that function in a wide range of RNA metabolic processes by binding to motifs rich in uracils and cytosines. A PTB protein of pumpkin was identified as the core protein of an RNA–protein complex that trafficks RNA. The biological function of the PTB–RNA complex, however, has not been demonstrated. In potato, six PTB proteins have been identified, and two, designated StPTB1 and StPTB6, are similar to the phloem-mobile pumpkin type. RNA binding assays confirmed the interaction of StPTB1 and StPTB6 with discrete pyrimidine-rich sequences of the 3′-untranslated regions of the phloem-mobile mRNA, StBEL5. The promoter of StPTB1 was active in companion cells of phloem in both stem and petioles. Expression of both types was evident in phloem cells of roots and in stolons during tuber formation. RNA accumulation of both PTB proteins was induced by short days in leaves in correlation with enhanced accumulation of StBEL5 RNA. StPTB suppression lines exhibited reduced tuber yields and decreased StBEL5 RNA accumulation, whereas StPTB overexpression lines displayed an increase in tuber production correlated with the enhanced production in stolons of steady-state levels of StBEL5 transcripts and RNA of key tuber identity genes. In StPTB overexpression lines, both the stability and long-distance transport of StBEL5 transcripts were enhanced, whereas in suppression lines stability and transport decreased. Using a transgenic approach, it is shown that the StPTB family of RNA-binding proteins regulate specific stages of development through an interaction with phloem-mobile transcripts of StBEL5. PMID:26283046

  6. Estrogen binding, receptor mRNA, and biologic response in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, B.S.; Terpening, C.M.; Benz, D.J.; Graeme, K.A.; Gallegos, A.; Korc, M.; Greene, G.L.; O'Malley, B.W.; Haussler, M.R.

    1988-07-01

    High specific activity estradiol labeled with iodine-125 was used to detect approximately 200 saturable, high-affinity (dissociation constant approximately equal to 1.0 nM) nuclear binding sites in rat (ROS 17/2.8) and human (HOS TE85) clonal osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells. Of the steroids tested, only testosterone exhibited significant cross-reactivity with estrogen binding. RNA blot analysis with a complementary DNA probe to the human estrogen receptor revealed putative receptor transcripts of 6 to 6.2 kilobases in both rat and human osteosarcoma cells. Type I procollagen and transforming growth factor-beta messenger RNA levels were enhanced in cultured human osteoblast-like cells treated with 1 nM estradiol. Thus, estrogen can act directly on osteoblasts by a receptor-mediated mechanism and thereby modulate the extracellular matrix and other proteins involved in the maintenance of skeletal mineralization and remodeling.

  7. APC/C-Mediated Degradation of dsRNA-Binding Protein 4 (DRB4) Involved in RNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Marrocco, Katia; Criqui, Marie-Claire; Zervudacki, Jérôme; Schott, Gregory; Eisler, Herfried; Parnet, Aude; Dunoyer, Patrice; Genschik, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background Selective protein degradation via the ubiquitin-26S proteasome is a major mechanism underlying DNA replication and cell division in all Eukaryotes. In particular, the APC/C (Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome) is a master ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) that targets regulatory proteins for degradation allowing sister chromatid separation and exit from mitosis. Interestingly, recent work also indicates that the APC/C remains active in differentiated animal and plant cells. However, its role in post-mitotic cells remains elusive and only a few substrates have been characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to identify novel APC/C substrates, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as the bait Arabidopsis APC10/DOC1, one core subunit of the APC/C, which is required for substrate recruitment. This screen identified DRB4, a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in the biogenesis of different classes of small RNA (sRNA). This protein interaction was further confirmed in vitro and in plant cells. Moreover, APC10 interacts with DRB4 through the second dsRNA binding motif (dsRBD2) of DRB4, which is also required for its homodimerization and binding to its Dicer partner DCL4. We further showed that DRB4 protein accumulates when the proteasome is inactivated and, most importantly, we found that DRB4 stability depends on APC/C activity. Hence, depletion of Arabidopsis APC/C activity by RNAi leads to a strong accumulation of endogenous DRB4, far beyond its normal level of accumulation. However, we could not detect any defects in sRNA production in lines where DRB4 was overexpressed. Conclusions/Significance Our work identified a first plant substrate of the APC/C, which is not a regulator of the cell cycle. Though we cannot exclude that APC/C-dependent degradation of DRB4 has some regulatory roles under specific growth conditions, our work rather points to a housekeeping function of APC/C in maintaining precise cellular

  8. RNA binding proteins, neural development and the addictions

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Camron D.; Yazdani, Neema

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression defines the neurobiological mechanisms that bridge genetic and environmental risk factors with neurobehavioral dysfunction underlying the addictions. More than 1000 genes in the eukaryotic genome code for multifunctional RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that can regulate all levels of RNA biogenesis. More than 50% of these RBPs are expressed in the brain where they regulate alternative splicing, transport, localization, stability, and translation of RNAs during development and adulthood. RBP dysfunction can exert global effects on their targetomes that underlie neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease as well as neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. Here, we consider the evidence that RBPs influence key molecular targets, neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, and neurobehavioral dysfunction underlying the addictions. Increasingly well-powered genome-wide association studies in humans and mammalian model organisms combined with ever more precise transcriptomic and proteomic approaches will continue to uncover novel and possibly selective roles for RBPs in the addictions. Key challenges include identifying the biological functions of the dynamic RBP targetomes from specific cell types throughout subcellular space (e.g., the nuclear spliceome versus the synaptic translatome) and time and manipulating RBP programs through post-transcriptional modifications to prevent or reverse aberrant neurodevelopment and plasticity underlying the addictions. PMID:26643147

  9. RNA-binding proteins, neural development and the addictions.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C D; Yazdani, N

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression defines the neurobiological mechanisms that bridge genetic and environmental risk factors with neurobehavioral dysfunction underlying the addictions. More than 1000 genes in the eukaryotic genome code for multifunctional RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that can regulate all levels of RNA biogenesis. More than 50% of these RBPs are expressed in the brain where they regulate alternative splicing, transport, localization, stability and translation of RNAs during development and adulthood. Dysfunction of RBPs can exert global effects on their targetomes that underlie neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases as well as neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. Here, we consider the evidence that RBPs influence key molecular targets, neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity and neurobehavioral dysfunction underlying the addictions. Increasingly well-powered genome-wide association studies in humans and mammalian model organisms combined with ever more precise transcriptomic and proteomic approaches will continue to uncover novel and possibly selective roles for RBPs in the addictions. Key challenges include identifying the biological functions of the dynamic RBP targetomes from specific cell types throughout subcellular space (e.g. the nuclear spliceome vs. the synaptic translatome) and time and manipulating RBP programs through post-transcriptional modifications to prevent or reverse aberrant neurodevelopment and plasticity underlying the addictions.

  10. RNA-binding proteins in eye development and disease: implication of conserved RNA granule components.

    PubMed

    Dash, Soma; Siddam, Archana D; Barnum, Carrie E; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Lachke, Salil A

    2016-07-01

    The molecular biology of metazoan eye development is an area of intense investigation. These efforts have led to the surprising recognition that although insect and vertebrate eyes have dramatically different structures, the orthologs or family members of several conserved transcription and signaling regulators such as Pax6, Six3, Prox1, and Bmp4 are commonly required for their development. In contrast, our understanding of posttranscriptional regulation in eye development and disease, particularly regarding the function of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), is limited. We examine the present knowledge of RBPs in eye development in the insect model Drosophila as well as several vertebrate models such as fish, frog, chicken, and mouse. Interestingly, of the 42 RBPs that have been investigated for their expression or function in vertebrate eye development, 24 (~60%) are recognized in eukaryotic cells as components of RNA granules such as processing bodies, stress granules, or other specialized ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. We discuss the distinct developmental and cellular events that may necessitate potential RBP/RNA granule-associated RNA regulon models to facilitate posttranscriptional control of gene expression in eye morphogenesis. In support of these hypotheses, three RBPs and RNP/RNA granule components Tdrd7, Caprin2, and Stau2 are linked to ocular developmental defects such as congenital cataract, Peters anomaly, and microphthalmia in human patients or animal models. We conclude by discussing the utility of interdisciplinary approaches such as the bioinformatics tool iSyTE (integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery) to prioritize RBPs for deriving posttranscriptional regulatory networks in eye development and disease. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:527-557. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27133484

  11. The RNA-binding protein ELAV regulates Hox RNA processing, expression and function within the Drosophila nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana; Picao-Osorio, Joao; Villava, Casandra; Patraquim, Pedro; Lafuente, Elvira; Aspden, Julie; Thomsen, Stefan; Technau, Gerhard M.; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2014-01-01

    The regulated head-to-tail expression of Hox genes provides a coordinate system for the activation of specific programmes of cell differentiation according to axial level. Recent work indicates that Hox expression can be regulated via RNA processing but the underlying mechanisms and biological significance of this form of regulation remain poorly understood. Here we explore these issues within the developing Drosophila central nervous system (CNS). We show that the pan-neural RNA-binding protein (RBP) ELAV (Hu antigen) regulates the RNA processing patterns of the Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) within the embryonic CNS. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and imaging approaches we demonstrate that ELAV binds to discrete elements within Ubx RNAs and that its genetic removal reduces Ubx protein expression in the CNS leading to the respecification of cellular subroutines under Ubx control, thus defining for the first time a specific cellular role of ELAV within the developing CNS. Artificial provision of ELAV in glial cells (a cell type that lacks ELAV) promotes Ubx expression, suggesting that ELAV-dependent regulation might contribute to cell type-specific Hox expression patterns within the CNS. Finally, we note that expression of abdominal A and Abdominal B is reduced in elav mutant embryos, whereas other Hox genes (Antennapedia) are not affected. Based on these results and the evolutionary conservation of ELAV and Hox genes we propose that the modulation of Hox RNA processing by ELAV serves to adapt the morphogenesis of the CNS to axial level by regulating Hox expression and consequently activating local programmes of neural differentiation. PMID:24803653

  12. MicroRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaochun; Rennie, William A; Mallick, Bibekanand; Kanoria, Shaveta; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Ding, Ye

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since the discovery of lin-4, the founding member of the miRNA family, over 360 miRNAs have been identified for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Prediction and validation of targets are essential for elucidation of regulatory functions of these miRNAs. For C. elegans, crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) has been successfully performed for the identification of target mRNA sequences bound by Argonaute protein ALG-1. In addition, reliable annotation of the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) as well as developmental stage-specific expression profiles for both miRNAs and 3' UTR isoforms are available. By utilizing these data, we developed statistical models and bioinformatics tools for both transcriptome-scale and developmental stage-specific predictions of miRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs. In performance evaluation via cross validation on the ALG-1 CLIP data, the models were found to offer major improvements over established algorithms for predicting both seed sites and seedless sites. In particular, our top-ranked predictions have a substantially higher true positive rate, suggesting a much higher likelihood of positive experimental validation. A gene ontology analysis of stage-specific predictions suggests that miRNAs are involved in dynamic regulation of biological functions during C. elegans development. In particular, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to development, cell cycle, trafficking, and cell signaling processes. A database for both transcriptome-scale and stage-specific predictions and software for implementing the prediction models are available through the Sfold web server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org. PMID:24827614

  13. Application of RNase in the purification of RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jonghoon; Lee, Myung Soog; Gorenstein, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Basic findings It was found that RNA-binding proteins can be contaminated with host RNA during purification. The contamination of purified RNA-binding protein with RNA was identified by gel electrophoresis and EtBr staining. Our data suggest that applications of appropriate enzymes (DNase or RNase) in the early stage of purification may remove the contaminating nucleic acids. Significance The concept introduced in this research can easily be extended to the purification of other RNA- or DNA-binding proteins by applying RNase or DNase directly to the cell extracts. PMID:17400170

  14. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, "sensor" proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)'s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as "liquid-demixing"). Among the

  15. A novel RNA-binding protein from Triturus carnifex identified by RNA-ligand screening with the newt hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Denti, Michela A.; Alba, A. Emilio Martínez de; Sägesser, Rudolf; Tsagris, Mina; Tabler, Martin

    2000-01-01

    The newt hammerhead ribozyme is transcribed from Satellite 2 DNA, which consists of tandemly repeated units of 330 bp. However, different transcripts are synthesized in different tissues. In all somatic tissues and in testes, dimeric and multimeric RNA transcripts are generated which, to some extent, self-cleave into monomers at the hammerhead domain. In ovaries, primarily a distinct monomeric unit is formed by transcription, which retains an intact hammerhead self-cleavage site. The ovarian monomeric RNA associates to form a 12S complex with proteins that are poorly characterised so far. In this work we identified NORA, a protein that binds the ovarian form of the newt ribozyme. We show that the newt ribozyme binds to the Escherichia coli-expressed protein, as well as to a protein of identical size that is found exclusively in newt ovaries. Also NORA mRNA was detectable only in ovary, but in neither somatic tissues nor testes. The tissue-specific expression of NORA is analogous to the ovary-specific transcription of the newt ribozyme. Although NORA was identified by its ability to bind to the newt ribozyme in the presence of a vast excess of carrier RNA, it was able to interact with certain other RNA probes. This novel RNA-binding protein does not contain any motif characteristic for RNA-binding proteins or any other known protein domain, but it shares a striking similarity with a rat resiniferatoxin-binding protein. PMID:10666442

  16. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-11-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. PMID:26351203

  17. A non-proteolytic role for ubiquitin in deadenylation of MHC-I mRNA by the RNA-binding E3-ligase MEX-3C

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Florencia; Rapiteanu, Radu; Sebastiaan Winkler, G.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein and mRNA turnover is essential for many cellular processes. We recently showed that ubiquitin—traditionally linked to protein degradation—directly regulates the degradation of mRNAs through the action of a newly identified family of RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases. How ubiquitin regulates mRNA decay remains unclear. Here, we identify a new role for ubiquitin in regulating deadenylation, the initial and often rate-limiting step in mRNA degradation. MEX-3C, a canonical member of this family of RNA-binding ubiquitin ligases, associates with the cytoplasmic deadenylation complexes and ubiquitinates CNOT7(Caf1), the main catalytic subunit of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation machinery. We establish a new role for ubiquitin in regulating MHC-I mRNA deadenylation as ubiquitination of CNOT7 by MEX-3C regulates its deadenylation activity and is required for MHC-I mRNA degradation. Since neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitors rescued MEX-3C-mediated MHC-I mRNA degradation, our findings suggest a new non-proteolytic function for ubiquitin in the regulation of mRNA decay. PMID:26471122

  18. Distinct modes of mature and precursor tRNA binding to Escherichia coli RNase P RNA revealed by NAIM analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Heide, C; Busch, S; Feltens, R; Hartmann, R K

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed by nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) pools of precursor or mature tRNA molecules, carrying a low level of Rp-RMPalphaS (R = A, G, I) or Rp-c7-deaza-RMPalphaS (R = A, G) modifications, to identify functional groups that contribute to the specific interaction with and processing efficiency by Escherichia coli RNase P RNA. The majority of interferences were found in the acceptor stem, T arm, and D arm, including the strongest effects observed at positions G19, G53, A58, and G71. In some cases (interferences at G5, G18, and G71), the affected functional groups are candidates for direct contacts with RNase P RNA. Several modifications disrupt intramolecular tertiary contacts known to stabilize the authentic tRNA fold. Such indirect interference effects were informative as well, because they allowed us to compare the structural constraints required for ptRNA processing versus product binding. Our ptRNA processing and mature tRNA binding NAIM analyses revealed overlapping but nonidentical patterns of interference effects, suggesting that substrate binding and cleavage involves binding modes or conformational states distinct from the binding mode of mature tRNA, the product of the reaction. PMID:11345434

  19. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  20. catRAPID signature: identification of ribonucleoproteins and RNA-binding regions

    PubMed Central

    Livi, Carmen Maria; Klus, Petr; Delli Ponti, Riccardo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Recent technological advances revealed that an unexpected large number of proteins interact with transcripts even if the RNA-binding domains are not annotated. We introduce catRAPID signature to identify ribonucleoproteins based on physico-chemical features instead of sequence similarity searches. The algorithm, trained on human proteins and tested on model organisms, calculates the overall RNA-binding propensity followed by the prediction of RNA-binding regions. catRAPID signature outperforms other algorithms in the identification of RNA-binding proteins and detection of non-classical RNA-binding regions. Results are visualized on a webpage and can be downloaded or forwarded to catRAPID omics for predictions of RNA targets. Availability and implementation: catRAPID signature can be accessed at http://s.tartaglialab.com/new_submission/signature. Contact: gian.tartaglia@crg.es or gian@tartaglialab.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26520853

  1. The RNA-binding properties and domain of Rice stripe virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuling; Xue, Yanan; Hao, Jiahui; Liang, Changyong

    2015-10-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NP) of rice stripe virus (RSV) encapsidates viral genomic RNAs to form virion. The binding of NP with RNA is essential for the formation of virus particle. In this study, the binding specificity of RSV NP to RNA and the domains within the NP that mediate this interaction were investigated by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays and Northwestern blot analysis. The results demonstrated that RSV NP was able to bind to all synthetic RNAs and DNAs without sequence specificity. Using a series of truncated NPs expressed in E. coli and synthetic peptides, we mapped the RNA-binding domain of NP to the central region from amino acid residues 201-232. Further alanine substitution analysis revealed that Lys(206), Lys(207), Lys(220), and Tyr(221) in the RNA-binding domain were essential for NP to bind with RNA.

  2. RNase footprinting of protein binding sites on an mRNA target of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi; Soper, Toby J; Woodson, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Endoribonuclease footprinting is an important technique for probing RNA-protein interactions with single nucleotide resolution. The susceptibility of RNA residues to enzymatic digestion gives information about the RNA secondary structure, the location of protein binding sites, and the effects of protein binding on the RNA structure. Here we present a detailed protocol for using RNase T2, which cleaves single stranded RNA with a preference for A nucleotides, to footprint the protein Hfq on the rpoS mRNA leader. This protocol covers how to form the RNP complex, determine the correct dose of enzyme, footprint the protein, and analyze the cleavage pattern using primer extension.

  3. Altered Gene Expression Associated with microRNA Binding Site Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Võsa, Urmo; Esko, Tõnu; Kasela, Silva; Annilo, Tarmo

    2015-01-01

    Allele-specific gene expression associated with genetic variation in regulatory regions can play an important role in the development of complex traits. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in microRNA (miRNA) response elements (MRE-SNPs) that either disrupt a miRNA binding site or create a new miRNA binding site can affect the allele-specific expression of target genes. By integrating public expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data, miRNA binding site predictions, small RNA sequencing, and Argonaute crosslinking immunoprecipitation (AGO-CLIP) datasets, we identified genetic variants that can affect gene expression by modulating miRNA binding efficiency. We also identified MRE-SNPs located in regions associated with complex traits, indicating possible causative mechanisms associated with these loci. The results of this study expand the current understanding of gene expression regulation and help to interpret the mechanisms underlying eQTL effects. PMID:26496489

  4. The double-stranded RNA binding domain of human Dicer functions as a nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Michael; Badertscher, Lukas; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Güttinger, Stephan; Jurado, Sabine; Hugenschmidt, Tabea; Kutay, Ulrike; Filipowicz, Witold

    2013-09-01

    Dicer is a key player in microRNA (miRNA) and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways, processing miRNA precursors and double-stranded RNA into ∼21-nt-long products ultimately triggering sequence-dependent gene silencing. Although processing of substrates in vertebrate cells occurs in the cytoplasm, there is growing evidence suggesting Dicer is also present and functional in the nucleus. To address this possibility, we searched for a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in human Dicer and identified its C-terminal double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) as harboring NLS activity. We show that the dsRBD-NLS can mediate nuclear import of a reporter protein via interaction with importins β, 7, and 8. In the context of full-length Dicer, the dsRBD-NLS is masked. However, duplication of the dsRBD localizes the full-length protein to the nucleus. Furthermore, deletion of the N-terminal helicase domain results in partial accumulation of Dicer in the nucleus upon leptomycin B treatment, indicating that CRM1 contributes to nuclear export of Dicer. Finally, we demonstrate that human Dicer has the ability to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We conclude that Dicer is a shuttling protein whose steady-state localization is cytoplasmic.

  5. RNA helicase: a novel activity associated with a protein encoded by a positive strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Laín, S; Riechmann, J L; García, J A

    1990-01-01

    Most positive strand RNA viruses infecting plants and animals encode proteins containing the so-called nucleotide binding motif (NTBM) (1) in their amino acid sequences (2). As suggested from the high level of sequence similarity of these viral proteins with the recently described superfamilies of helicase-like proteins (3-5), the NTBM-containing cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein from plum pox virus (PPV), which belongs to the potyvirus group of positive strand RNA viruses, is shown to be able to unwind RNA duplexes. This activity was found to be dependent on the hydrolysis of NTP to NDP and Pi, and thus it can be considered as an RNA helicase activity. In the in vitro assay used, the PPV CI protein was only able to unwind double strand RNA substrates with 3' single strand overhangs. This result indicates that the helicase activity of the PPV CI protein functions in the 3' to 5' direction (6). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a helicase activity associated with a protein encoded by an RNA virus. Images PMID:2263459

  6. Redundancy of primary RNA-binding functions of the bacterial transcription terminator Rho

    PubMed Central

    Shashni, Rajesh; Qayyum, M. Zuhaib; Vishalini, V.; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial transcription terminator, Rho, terminates transcription at half of the operons. According to the classical model derived from in vitro assays on a few terminators, Rho is recruited to the transcription elongation complex (EC) by recognizing specific sites (rut) on the nascent RNA. Here, we explored the mode of in vivo recruitment process of Rho. We show that sequence specific recognition of the rut site, in majority of the Rho-dependent terminators, can be compromised to a great extent without seriously affecting the genome-wide termination function as well as the viability of Escherichia coli. These terminators function optimally only through a NusG-assisted recruitment and activation of Rho. Our data also indicate that at these terminators, Rho-EC-bound NusG interaction facilitates the isomerization of Rho into a translocase-competent form by stabilizing the interactions of mRNA with the secondary RNA binding site, thereby overcoming the defects of the primary RNA binding functions. PMID:25081210

  7. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes.

  8. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  9. Ebolavirus VP35 uses a bimodal strategy to bind dsRNA for innate immune suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Li, Sheng; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; MacRae, Ian J.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2010-03-12

    Ebolavirus causes a severe hemorrhagic fever and is divided into five distinct species, of which Reston ebolavirus is uniquely nonpathogenic to humans. Disease caused by ebolavirus is marked by early immunosuppression of innate immune signaling events, involving silencing and sequestration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the viral protein VP35. Here we present unbound and dsRNA-bound crystal structures of the dsRNA-binding domain of Reston ebolavirus VP35. The structures show that VP35 forms an unusual, asymmetric dimer on dsRNA binding, with each of the monomers binding dsRNA in a different way: one binds the backbone whereas the other caps the terminus. Additional SAXS, DXMS, and dsRNA-binding experiments presented here support a model of cooperative dsRNA recognition in which binding of the first monomer assists binding of the next monomer of the oligomeric VP35 protein. This work illustrates how ebolavirus VP35 could mask key recognition sites of molecules such as RIG-I, MDA-5, and Dicer to silence viral dsRNA in infection.

  10. TRIBE: Hijacking an RNA-Editing Enzyme to Identify Cell-Specific Targets of RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Aoife C; Rahman, Reazur; Jin, Hua; Shen, James L; Fieldsend, Allegra; Luo, Weifei; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-04-21

    RNA transcripts are bound and regulated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Current methods for identifying in vivo targets of an RBP are imperfect and not amenable to examining small numbers of cells. To address these issues, we developed TRIBE (targets of RNA-binding proteins identified by editing), a technique that couples an RBP to the catalytic domain of the Drosophila RNA-editing enzyme ADAR and expresses the fusion protein in vivo. RBP targets are marked with novel RNA editing events and identified by sequencing RNA. We have used TRIBE to identify the targets of three RBPs (Hrp48, dFMR1, and NonA). TRIBE compares favorably to other methods, including CLIP, and we have identified RBP targets from as little as 150 specific fly neurons. TRIBE can be performed without an antibody and in small numbers of specific cells.

  11. Bases in 16S rRNA important for subunit association, tRNA binding, and translocation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinying; Chiu, Katie; Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-07-28

    Ribosomes are the cellular machinery responsible for protein synthesis. A well-orchestrated step in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis is the precise translocation of the tRNA-mRNA complex within the ribosome. Here we report the application of a new in vitro modification-interference method for the identification of bases in 16S rRNA that are essential for translocation. Our results suggest that conserved bases U56, U723, A1306, A1319, and A1468 in 16S rRNA are important for translocation. These five bases were deleted or mutated so their role in translation could be studied. Depending on the type of mutation, we observed inhibition of growth rate, subunit association, tRNA binding, and/or translocation. Interestingly, deletion of U56 or A1319 or mutation of A1319 to C showed a lethal phenotype and were defective in protein synthesis in vitro. Further analysis showed that deletion of U56 or A1319 caused defects in 30S subunit assembly, subunit association, and tRNA binding. In contrast, the A1319C mutation showed no defects in subunit association; however, the extent of tRNA binding and translocation was significantly reduced. These results show that conserved bases located as far as 100 A from the tRNA binding sites can be important for translation.

  12. Y65C missense mutation in the WW domain of the Golabi-Ito-Hall syndrome protein PQBP1 affects its binding activity and deregulates pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Victor E; Nicolaescu, Emilia; McDonald, Caleb B; Musi, Valeria; Oka, Tsutomu; Inayoshi, Yujin; Satteson, Adam C; Mazack, Virginia; Humbert, Jasper; Gaffney, Christian J; Beullens, Monique; Schwartz, Charles E; Landgraf, Christiane; Volkmer, Rudolf; Pastore, Annalisa; Farooq, Amjad; Bollen, Mathieu; Sudol, Marius

    2010-06-18

    The PQBP1 (polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1) gene encodes a nuclear protein that regulates pre-mRNA splicing and transcription. Mutations in the PQBP1 gene were reported in several X chromosome-linked mental retardation disorders including Golabi-Ito-Hall syndrome. The missense mutation that causes this syndrome is unique among other PQBP1 mutations reported to date because it maps within a functional domain of PQBP1, known as the WW domain. The mutation substitutes tyrosine 65 with cysteine and is located within the conserved core of aromatic amino acids of the domain. We show here that the binding property of the Y65C-mutated WW domain and the full-length mutant protein toward its cognate proline-rich ligands was diminished. Furthermore, in Golabi-Ito-Hall-derived lymphoblasts we showed that the complex between PQBP1-Y65C and WBP11 (WW domain-binding protein 11) splicing factor was compromised. In these cells a substantial decrease in pre-mRNA splicing efficiency was detected. Our study points to the critical role of the WW domain in the function of the PQBP1 protein and provides an insight into the molecular mechanism that underlies the X chromosome-linked mental retardation entities classified globally as Renpenning syndrome.

  13. Contribution of double-stranded RNA and CPSF30 binding domains of influenza virus NS1 to the inhibition of type I interferon production and activation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Irene; Carnero, Elena; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Seibert, Christopher W; Westera, Liset; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2013-03-01

    The influenza virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) inhibits innate immunity by multiple mechanisms. We previously reported that NS1 is able to inhibit the production of type I interferon (IFN) and proinflammatory cytokines in human primary dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we used recombinant viruses expressing mutant NS1 from the A/Texas/36/91 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 strains in order to analyze the contribution of different NS1 domains to its antagonist functions. We show that the polyadenylation stimulating factor 30 (CPSF30) binding function of the NS1 protein from A/Texas/36/91 influenza virus, which is absent in the A/Puerto Rico/08/34 strain, is essential for counteracting these innate immune events in DCs. However, the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain, present in both strains, specifically inhibits the induction of type I IFN genes in infected DCs, while it is essential only for inhibition of type I IFN proteins and proinflammatory cytokine production in cells infected with influenza viruses lacking a functional CPSF30 binding domain, such as A/Puerto Rico/08/34.

  14. Contribution of Double-Stranded RNA and CPSF30 Binding Domains of Influenza Virus NS1 to the Inhibition of Type I Interferon Production and Activation of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carnero, Elena; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Seibert, Christopher W.; Westera, Liset; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    The influenza virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) inhibits innate immunity by multiple mechanisms. We previously reported that NS1 is able to inhibit the production of type I interferon (IFN) and proinflammatory cytokines in human primary dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we used recombinant viruses expressing mutant NS1 from the A/Texas/36/91 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 strains in order to analyze the contribution of different NS1 domains to its antagonist functions. We show that the polyadenylation stimulating factor 30 (CPSF30) binding function of the NS1 protein from A/Texas/36/91 influenza virus, which is absent in the A/Puerto Rico/08/34 strain, is essential for counteracting these innate immune events in DCs. However, the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain, present in both strains, specifically inhibits the induction of type I IFN genes in infected DCs, while it is essential only for inhibition of type I IFN proteins and proinflammatory cytokine production in cells infected with influenza viruses lacking a functional CPSF30 binding domain, such as A/Puerto Rico/08/34. PMID:23255794

  15. Functional Equivalence of Retroviral MA Domains in Facilitating Psi RNA Binding Specificity by Gag

    PubMed Central

    Rye-McCurdy, Tiffiny; Olson, Erik D.; Liu, Shuohui; Binkley, Christiana; Reyes, Joshua-Paolo; Thompson, Brian R.; Flanagan, John M.; Parent, Leslie J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses specifically package full-length, dimeric genomic RNA (gRNA) even in the presence of a vast excess of cellular RNA. The “psi” (Ψ) element within the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of gRNA is critical for packaging through interaction with the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag. However, in vitro Gag binding affinity for Ψ versus non-Ψ RNAs is not significantly different. Previous salt-titration binding assays revealed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag bound to Ψ RNA with high specificity and relatively few charge interactions, whereas binding to non-Ψ RNA was less specific and involved more electrostatic interactions. The NC domain was critical for specific Ψ binding, but surprisingly, a Gag mutant lacking the matrix (MA) domain was less effective at discriminating Ψ from non-Ψ RNA. We now find that Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag also effectively discriminates RSV Ψ from non-Ψ RNA in a MA-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gag chimeras, wherein the HIV-1 and RSV MA domains were swapped, maintained high binding specificity to cognate Ψ RNAs. Using Ψ RNA mutant constructs, determinants responsible for promoting high Gag binding specificity were identified in both systems. Taken together, these studies reveal the functional equivalence of HIV-1 and RSV MA domains in facilitating Ψ RNA selectivity by Gag, as well as Ψ elements that promote this selectivity. PMID:27657107

  16. StreptoTag: a novel method for the isolation of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, M; Schroeder, R; von Ahsen, U

    1999-01-01

    We describe a fast and simple one-step affinity-purification method for the isolation of specific RNA-binding proteins. An in vitro-transcribed hybrid RNA consisting of an aptamer sequence with high binding specificity to the antibiotic streptomycin and a putative protein-binding RNA sequence is incubated with crude extract. After complex formation, the sample is applied to an affinity column containing streptomycin immobilized to Sepharose. The binding of the in vitro-assembled RNA-protein complex to streptomycin-Sepharose is mediated by the aptamer RNA and the specifically bound proteins are recovered from the affinity matrix by elution with the antibiotic. Employing two well-characterized RNA-protein interactions, we tested the performance of this new method. The spliceosomal U1A protein and the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein could be isolated via their appropriate RNA motif containing hybrid RNA from crude yeast extracts in high yield and purity after only one round of affinity purification. As the purification principle is independent of the extract source, this new affinity chromatography strategy that makes use of an in vitro-selected antibiotic-binding RNA as a tag, "StreptoTag," should be applicable to extracts from other organisms as well. Therefore, we propose StreptoTag to be a versatile tool for the isolation of unknown RNA-binding proteins. PMID:10580480

  17. Progesterone receptor induces bcl-x expression through intragenic binding sites favoring RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, Paola Y.; Nacht, A. Silvina; Alló, Mariano; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Ballaré, Cecilia; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Zaurin, Roser; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Pecci, Adali

    2013-01-01

    Steroid receptors were classically described for regulating transcription by binding to target gene promoters. However, genome-wide studies reveal that steroid receptors-binding sites are mainly located at intragenic regions. To determine the role of these sites, we examined the effect of progestins on the transcription of the bcl-x gene, where only intragenic progesterone receptor-binding sites (PRbs) were identified. We found that in response to hormone treatment, the PR is recruited to these sites along with two histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and GCN5, leading to an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation and to the binding of the SWI/SNF complex. Concomitant, a more relaxed chromatin was detected along bcl-x gene mainly in the regions surrounding the intragenic PRbs. PR also mediated the recruitment of the positive elongation factor pTEFb, favoring RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation activity. Together these events promoted the re-distribution of the active Pol II toward the 3′-end of the gene and a decrease in the ratio between proximal and distal transcription. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which PR regulates gene expression by facilitating the proper passage of the polymerase along hormone-dependent genes. PMID:23640331

  18. MicroRNA Target Site Identification by Integrating Sequence and Binding Information

    PubMed Central

    Majoros, William H.; Lekprasert, Parawee; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Corcoran, David L.; Cullen, Bryan R.; Ohler, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has opened numerous possibilities for the identification of regulatory RNA-binding events. Cross-linking and immunoprecipitation of Argonaute protein members can pinpoint microRNA target sites within tens of bases, but leaves the identity of the microRNA unresolved. A flexible computational framework that integrates sequence with cross-linking features reliably identifies the microRNA family involved in each binding event, considerably outperforms sequence-only approaches, and quantifies the prevalence of noncanonical binding modes. PMID:23708386

  19. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear. PMID:26834145

  20. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear.

  1. Crystal structure of the RNA binding ribosomal protein L1 from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Nikonov, S; Nevskaya, N; Eliseikina, I; Fomenkova, N; Nikulin, A; Ossina, N; Garber, M; Jonsson, B H; Briand, C; Al-Karadaghi, S; Svensson, A; Aevarsson, A; Liljas, A

    1996-01-01

    L1 has a dual function as a ribosomal protein binding rRNA and as a translational repressor binding mRNA. The crystal structure of L1 from Thermus thermophilus has been determined at 1.85 angstroms resolution. The protein is composed of two domains with the N- and C-termini in domain I. The eight N-terminal residues are very flexible, as the quality of electron density map shows. Proteolysis experiments have shown that the N-terminal tail is accessible and important for 23S rRNA binding. Most of the conserved amino acids are situated at the interface between the two domains. They probably form the specific RNA binding site of L1. Limited non-covalent contacts between the domains indicate an unstable domain interaction in the present conformation. Domain flexibility and RNA binding by induced fit seems plausible. Images PMID:8635468

  2. Crystal structure of the single-stranded RNA binding protein HutP from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-04-18

    RNA binding proteins control gene expression by the attenuation/antitermination mechanism. HutP is an RNA binding antitermination protein. It regulates the expression of hut operon when it binds with RNA by modulating the secondary structure of single-stranded hut mRNA. HutP necessitates the presence of l-histidine and divalent metal ion to bind with RNA. Herein, we report the crystal structures of ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)) and EDTA (0.5 M) treated ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)), solved at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively, from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. The addition of 0.5 M EDTA does not affect the overall metal-ion mediated ternary complex structure and however, the metal ions at the non-specific binding sites are chelated, as evidenced from the results of structural features.

  3. GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase ‘i’ and ‘i+1’ sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Tuske, Steve; Irschik, Herbert; Jansen, Rolf; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center ‘i’ and ‘i+1’ nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001 PMID:24755292

  4. Riboactivators: transcription activation by noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Aseem Z

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of gene regulation was forever changed by the discovery that short RNA duplexes could directly regulate gene expression. Most regulatory roles attributed to noncoding RNA were often repressive. Recent observations are beginning to reveal that duplex RNA molecules can stimulate gene transcription. These RNA activators employ a wide array of mechanisms to up-regulate transcription of target genes, including functioning as DNA-tethered activation domains, as coactivators and modulators of general transcriptional machinery, and as regulators of other noncoding transcripts. The discoveries over the past few years defy "Moore's law" in the breath-taking rapidity with which new roles for noncoding RNA in gene expression are being revealed. As gene regulatory networks are reconstructed to accommodate the influence of noncoding RNAs, their importance in maintenance of cellular health will become increasingly apparent. In fact, a new generation of therapeutic agents will focus on modulating the function of noncoding RNA.

  5. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs. PMID:27565348

  6. Conserved amino acids in each subunit of the heteroligomeric tRNA m1A58 Mtase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae contribute to tRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Ozanick, Sarah G.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Sem, Daniel S.; Anderson, James T.

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a two-subunit methyltransferase (Mtase) encoded by the essential genes TRM6 and TRM61 is responsible for the formation of 1-methyladenosine, a modified nucleoside found at position 58 in tRNA that is critical for the stability of tRNAiMet. The crystal structure of the homotetrameric m1A58 tRNA Mtase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TrmI, has been solved and was used as a template to build a model of the yeast m1A58 tRNA Mtase heterotetramer. We altered amino acids in TRM6 and TRM61 that were predicted to be important for the stability of the heteroligomer based on this model. Yeast strains expressing trm6 and trm61 mutants exhibited growth phenotypes indicative of reduced m1A formation. In addition, recombinant mutant enzymes had reduced in vitro Mtase activity. We demonstrate that the mutations introduced do not prevent heteroligomer formation and do not disrupt binding of the cofactor S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Instead, amino acid substitutions in either Trm6p or Trm61p destroy the ability of the yeast m1A58 tRNA Mtase to bind tRNAiMet, indicating that each subunit contributes to tRNA binding and suggesting a structural alteration of the substrate-binding pocket occurs when these mutations are present. PMID:17932071

  7. Global changes in the RNA binding specificity of HIV-1 Gag regulate virion genesis

    PubMed Central

    Kutluay, Sebla B.; Zang, Trinity; Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Powell, Chelsea; Jannain, David; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The HIV-1 Gag protein orchestrates all steps of virion genesis, including membrane targeting and RNA recruitment into virions. Using crosslinking-immunoprecipitation (CLIP) sequencing, we uncover several dramatic changes in the RNA binding properties of Gag that occur during virion genesis, coincident with membrane binding, multimerization and proteolytic maturation. Prior to assembly, and after virion assembly and maturation, the nucleocapsid domain of Gag preferentially binds to psi and Rev Response elements in the viral genome, and GU-rich mRNA sequences. However, during virion genesis, this specificity transiently changes in a manner that facilitates genome packaging; nucleocapsid binds to many sites on the HIV-1 genome and to mRNA sequences with a HIV-1-like, A-rich nucleotide composition. Additionally, we find that the matrix domain of Gag binds almost exclusively to specific tRNAs in the cytosol, and this association regulates Gag binding to cellular membranes. PMID:25416948

  8. Global changes in the RNA binding specificity of HIV-1 gag regulate virion genesis.

    PubMed

    Kutluay, Sebla B; Zang, Trinity; Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Powell, Chelsea; Jannain, David; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-11-20

    The HIV-1 Gag protein orchestrates all steps of virion genesis, including membrane targeting and RNA recruitment into virions. Using crosslinking-immunoprecipitation (CLIP) sequencing, we uncover several dramatic changes in the RNA-binding properties of Gag that occur during virion genesis, coincident with membrane binding, multimerization, and proteolytic maturation. Prior to assembly, and after virion assembly and maturation, the nucleocapsid domain of Gag preferentially binds to psi and Rev Response elements in the viral genome, and GU-rich mRNA sequences. However, during virion genesis, this specificity transiently changes in a manner that facilitates genome packaging; nucleocapsid binds to many sites on the HIV-1 genome and to mRNA sequences with a HIV-1-like, A-rich nucleotide composition. Additionally, we find that the matrix domain of Gag binds almost exclusively to specific tRNAs in the cytosol, and this association regulates Gag binding to cellular membranes.

  9. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Cui, Peng; Xiong, Liming

    2015-09-30

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA.

  10. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Cui, Peng; Xiong, Liming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA. PMID:26227967

  11. RNase footprinting of protein binding sites on an mRNA target of small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng; Soper, Toby J.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Endoribonuclease footprinting is an important technique for probing RNA•protein interactions with single nucleotide resolution. The susceptibility of RNA residues to enzymatic digestion gives information about the RNA secondary structure, the location of protein binding sites, and the effects of protein binding on the RNA structure. Here we present a detailed protocol for using RNase T2, which cleaves single stranded RNA with a preference for A nucleotides, to footprint the protein Hfq on the rpoS mRNA leader. This protocol covers how to form the RNP complex, determine the correct dose of enzyme, footprint the protein, and analyze the cleavage pattern using primer extension. PMID:22736006

  12. Targeted siRNA Delivery and mRNA Knockdown Mediated by Bispecific Digoxigenin-binding Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Britta; Grote, Michael; John, Matthias; Haas, Alexander; Bramlage, Birgit; lckenstein, Ludger M; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Bauss, Frieder; Cheng, Weijun; Croasdale, Rebecca; Daub, Karin; Dill, Simone; Hoffmann, Eike; Lau, Wilma; Burtscher, Helmut; Ludtke, James L; Metz, Silke; Mundigl, Olaf; Neal, Zane C; Scheuer, Werner; Stracke, Jan; Herweijer, Hans; Brinkmann, Ulrjch

    2012-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that bind to cell surface antigens and to digoxigenin (Dig) were used for targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery. They are derivatives of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) that bind tumor antigens, such as Her2, IGF1-R, CD22, and LeY, with stabilized Dig-binding variable domains fused to the C-terminal ends of the heavy chains. siRNA that was digoxigeninylated at its 3′end was bound in a 2:1 ratio to the bsAbs. These bsAb–siRNA complexes delivered siRNAs specifically to cells that express the corresponding antigen as demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The complexes internalized into endosomes and Dig-siRNAs separated from bsAbs, but Dig-siRNA was not released into the cytoplasm; bsAb-targeting alone was thus not sufficient for effective mRNA knockdown. This limitation was overcome by formulating the Dig-siRNA into nanoparticles consisting of dynamic polyconjugates (DPCs) or into lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs). The resulting complexes enabled bsAb-targeted siRNA-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) knockdown with IC50 siRNA values in the low nanomolar range for a variety of bsAbs, siRNAs, and target cells. Furthermore, pilot studies in mice bearing tumor xenografts indicated mRNA knockdown in endothelial cells following systemic co-administration of bsAbs and siRNA formulated in LNPs that were targeted to the tumor vasculature. PMID:23344238

  13. TFIIIA binds to different domains of 5S RNA and the Xenopus borealis 5S RNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sands, M S; Bogenhagen, D F

    1987-01-01

    We have established the conditions for the reassociation of 5S RNA and TFIIIA to form 7S particles. We tested the ability of altered 5S RNAs to bind TFIIIA, taking advantage of the slower mobility of 7S particles compared with free 5S RNA in native polyacrylamide gels. Linker substitution mutants were constructed encompassing the entire gene, including the intragenic control region. In vitro transcripts of the linker substitution mutants were tested for their ability to bind TFIIIA to form 7S ribonucleoprotein particles. Altered 5S RNAs with base changes in or around helices IV and V, which would interfere with the normal base pairing of that region, showed decreased ability to bind TFIIIA. The transcripts of some mutant genes that were efficiently transcribed (greater than 50% of wild-type efficiency) failed to bind TFIIIA in this gel assay. In contrast, the RNA synthesized from a poorly transcribed mutant, LS 86/97, in which residues 87 to 96 of the RNA were replaced in the single-stranded loop at the base of helix V, bound TFIIIA well. The data indicate that TFIIIA binds to different domains in the 5S RNA gene and 5S RNA. Images PMID:3431548

  14. A plant viral coat protein RNA binding consensus sequence contains a crucial arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Ansel-McKinney, P; Scott, S W; Swanson, M; Ge, X; Gehrke, L

    1996-01-01

    A defining feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses [type virus: tobacco streak virus (TSV)] is that, in addition to genomic RNAs, viral coat protein is required to establish infection in plants. AMV and TSV coat proteins, which share little primary amino acid sequence identity, are functionally interchangeable in RNA binding and initiation of infection. The lysine-rich amino-terminal RNA binding domain of the AMV coat protein lacks previously identified RNA binding motifs. Here, the AMV coat protein RNA binding domain is shown to contain a single arginine whose specific side chain and position are crucial for RNA binding. In addition, the putative RNA binding domain of two ilarvirus coat proteins, TSV and citrus variegation virus, is identified and also shown to contain a crucial arginine. AMV and ilarvirus coat protein sequence alignment centering on the key arginine revealed a new RNA binding consensus sequence. This consensus may explain in part why heterologous viral RNA-coat protein mixtures are infectious. Images PMID:8890181

  15. siRNA targeting vaccinia virus double-stranded RNA binding protein [E3L] exerts potent antiviral effects.

    PubMed

    Dave, Rajnish S; McGettigan, James P; Qureshi, Tazeen; Schnell, Matthias J; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pomerantz, Roger J

    2006-05-10

    The Vaccinia virus gene, E3L, encodes a double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]-binding protein. We hypothesized that, owing to the critical nature of dsRNA in triggering host innate antiviral responses, E3L-specific small-interfering RNAs [siRNAs] should be effective antiviral agents against pox viruses, for which Vaccinia virus is an appropriate surrogate. In this study, we have utilized two human cell types, namely, HeLa and 293T, one which responds to interferon [IFN]-beta and the other produces and responds to IFN-beta, respectively. The antiviral effects were equally robust in HeLa and 293T cells. However, in the case of 293T cells, several distinct features were observed, when IFN-beta is activated in these cells. Vaccinia virus replication was inhibited by 97% and 98% as compared to control infection in HeLa and 293T cells transfected with E3L-specific siRNAs, respectively. These studies demonstrate the utility of E3L-specific siRNAs as potent antiviral agents for small pox and related pox viruses.

  16. Rec (formerly Corf) function requires interaction with a complex, folded RNA structure within its responsive element rather than binding to a discrete specific binding site.

    PubMed

    Magin-Lachmann, C; Hahn, S; Strobel, H; Held, U; Löwer, J; Löwer, R

    2001-11-01

    It was recently reported that the human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K encodes the regulatory protein Rec (formerly designated Corf), which is functionally equivalent to the nuclear export adapter proteins Rev of human immunodeficiency virus and Rex of human T-cell leukemia virus. We have demonstrated that the Rec protein interacts with a characteristic 429-nucleotide RNA element, the Rec-responsive element (RcRE), present in the 3' long terminal repeat of HTDV/HERV-K transcripts. In analogy to the Rev and Rex proteins, which have distinct RNA binding sites in their responsive elements, we have proposed that Rec may also have a defined binding site in the RcRE. In this report, we demonstrate that not every HTDV/HERV-K copy present in the human genome contains an active RcRE, and we characterize mutations that abrogate Rec function. In addition, we demonstrate that Rec function requires binding to a complex, folded RNA structure rather than binding to a discrete specific binding site, in contrast to Rev and Rex and their homologous responsive elements. We define four stem-loop structures in the RcRE that are essential for Rec function. Finally, we demonstrate that both Rev and Rex can mediate nuclear export through the RcRE but that their binding sites are different from each other and from that of Rec.

  17. A dsRNA-binding protein of a complex invertebrate DNA virus suppresses the Drosophila RNAi response

    PubMed Central

    Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; van Cleef, Koen W.R.; Venselaar, Hanka; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Invertebrate RNA viruses are targets of the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, which limits virus infection by degrading viral RNA substrates. Several insect RNA viruses encode suppressor proteins to counteract this antiviral response. We recently demonstrated that the dsDNA virus Invertebrate iridescent virus 6 (IIV-6) induces an RNAi response in Drosophila. Here, we show that RNAi is suppressed in IIV-6-infected cells and we mapped RNAi suppressor activity to the viral protein 340R. Using biochemical assays, we reveal that 340R binds long dsRNA and prevents Dicer-2-mediated processing of long dsRNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). We demonstrate that 340R additionally binds siRNAs and inhibits siRNA loading into the RNA-induced silencing complex. Finally, we show that 340R is able to rescue a Flock House virus replicon that lacks its viral suppressor of RNAi. Together, our findings indicate that, in analogy to RNA viruses, DNA viruses antagonize the antiviral RNAi response. PMID:25274730

  18. In Vitro Selection of a DNAzyme Cooperatively Binding Two Lanthanide Ions for RNA Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Vazin, Mahsa; Liu, Juewen

    2016-05-01

    Trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) were recently employed to select RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, and three new DNAzymes have been reported so far. In this work, dysprosium (Dy(3+)) was used with a library containing 50 random nucleotides. After six rounds of in vitro selection, a new DNAzyme named Dy10a was obtained and characterized. Dy10a has a bulged hairpin structure cleaving a RNA/DNA chimeric substrate. Dy10a is highly active in the presence of the five Ln(3+) ions in the middle of the lanthanide series (Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), and Dy(3+)), while its activity descends on the two sides. The cleavage rate reaches 0.6 min(-1) at pH 6 with just 200 nM Sm(3+), which is the fastest among all known Ln(3+)-dependent enzymes. Dy10a binds two Ln(3+) ions cooperatively. When a phosphorothioate (PS) modification is introduced at the cleavage junction, the activity decreases by >2500-fold for both the Rp and Sp diastereomers, and thiophilic Cd(2+) cannot rescue the activity. The pH-rate profile has a slope of 0.37 between pH 4.2 and 5.2, and the slope was even lower at higher pH. On the basis of these data, a model of metal binding is proposed. Finally, a catalytic beacon sensor that can detect Ho(3+) down to 1.7 nM is constructed. PMID:27054549

  19. In Vitro Selection of a DNAzyme Cooperatively Binding Two Lanthanide Ions for RNA Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Vazin, Mahsa; Liu, Juewen

    2016-05-01

    Trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) were recently employed to select RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, and three new DNAzymes have been reported so far. In this work, dysprosium (Dy(3+)) was used with a library containing 50 random nucleotides. After six rounds of in vitro selection, a new DNAzyme named Dy10a was obtained and characterized. Dy10a has a bulged hairpin structure cleaving a RNA/DNA chimeric substrate. Dy10a is highly active in the presence of the five Ln(3+) ions in the middle of the lanthanide series (Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), and Dy(3+)), while its activity descends on the two sides. The cleavage rate reaches 0.6 min(-1) at pH 6 with just 200 nM Sm(3+), which is the fastest among all known Ln(3+)-dependent enzymes. Dy10a binds two Ln(3+) ions cooperatively. When a phosphorothioate (PS) modification is introduced at the cleavage junction, the activity decreases by >2500-fold for both the Rp and Sp diastereomers, and thiophilic Cd(2+) cannot rescue the activity. The pH-rate profile has a slope of 0.37 between pH 4.2 and 5.2, and the slope was even lower at higher pH. On the basis of these data, a model of metal binding is proposed. Finally, a catalytic beacon sensor that can detect Ho(3+) down to 1.7 nM is constructed.

  20. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-02-29

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3' untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs.

  1. Structural implications into dsRNA binding and RNA silencing suppression by NS3 protein of Rice Hoja Blanca Tenuivirus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Tan, Sook Hwa; Teh, Yee Jin; Yuan, Y Adam

    2011-05-01

    Rice Hoja Blanca Tenuivirus (RHBV), a negative strand RNA virus, has been identified to infect rice and is widely transmitted by the insect vector. NS3 protein encoded by RHBV RNA3 was reported to be a potent RNAi suppressor to counterdefense RNA silencing in plants, insect cells, and mammalian cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of RHBV NS3 (residues 21-114) at 2.0 Å. RHBV NS3 N-terminal domain forms a dimer by two pairs of α-helices in an anti-parallel mode, with one surface harboring a shallow groove at the dimension of 20 Å × 30 Å for putative dsRNA binding. In vitro RNA binding assay and RNA silencing suppression assay have demonstrated that the structural conserved residues located along this shallow groove, such as Arg50, His51, Lys77, and His85, participate in dsRNA binding and RNA silencing suppression. Our results provide the initial structural implications in understanding the RNAi suppression mechanism by RHBV NS3.

  2. Structural implications into dsRNA binding and RNA silencing suppression by NS3 protein of Rice Hoja Blanca Tenuivirus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Tan, Sook Hwa; Teh, Yee Jin; Yuan, Y Adam

    2011-05-01

    Rice Hoja Blanca Tenuivirus (RHBV), a negative strand RNA virus, has been identified to infect rice and is widely transmitted by the insect vector. NS3 protein encoded by RHBV RNA3 was reported to be a potent RNAi suppressor to counterdefense RNA silencing in plants, insect cells, and mammalian cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of RHBV NS3 (residues 21-114) at 2.0 Å. RHBV NS3 N-terminal domain forms a dimer by two pairs of α-helices in an anti-parallel mode, with one surface harboring a shallow groove at the dimension of 20 Å × 30 Å for putative dsRNA binding. In vitro RNA binding assay and RNA silencing suppression assay have demonstrated that the structural conserved residues located along this shallow groove, such as Arg50, His51, Lys77, and His85, participate in dsRNA binding and RNA silencing suppression. Our results provide the initial structural implications in understanding the RNAi suppression mechanism by RHBV NS3. PMID:21460234

  3. MTHFSD and DDX58 are novel RNA-binding proteins abnormally regulated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    MacNair, Laura; Xiao, Shangxi; Miletic, Denise; Ghani, Mahdi; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Keith, Julia; Zinman, Lorne; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Robertson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Tar DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is an RNA-binding protein normally localized to the nucleus of cells, where it elicits functions related to RNA metabolism such as transcriptional regulation and alternative splicing. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, TDP-43 is mislocalized from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of diseased motor neurons, forming ubiquitinated inclusions. Although mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43, TARDBP, are found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, these are rare. However, TDP-43 pathology is common to over 95% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases, suggesting that abnormalities of TDP-43 play an active role in disease pathogenesis. It is our hypothesis that a loss of TDP-43 from the nucleus of affected motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will lead to changes in RNA processing and expression. Identifying these changes could uncover molecular pathways that underpin motor neuron degeneration. Here we have used translating ribosome affinity purification coupled with microarray analysis to identify the mRNAs being actively translated in motor neurons of mutant TDP-43(A315T) mice compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates. No significant changes were found at 5 months (presymptomatic) of age, but at 10 months (symptomatic) the translational profile revealed significant changes in genes involved in RNA metabolic process, immune response and cell cycle regulation. Of 28 differentially expressed genes, seven had a ≥ 2-fold change; four were validated by immunofluorescence labelling of motor neurons in TDP-43(A315T) mice, and two of these were confirmed by immunohistochemistry in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Both of these identified genes, DDX58 and MTHFSD, are RNA-binding proteins, and we show that TDP-43 binds to their respective mRNAs and we identify MTHFSD as a novel component of stress granules. This discovery-based approach has for the first time revealed translational changes in motor neurons of a TDP-43 mouse model

  4. Translating the genome in time and space: specialized ribosomes, RNA regulons, and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen; Barna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A central question in cell and developmental biology is how the information encoded in the genome is differentially interpreted to generate a diverse array of cell types. A growing body of research on posttranscriptional gene regulation is revealing that both global protein synthesis rates and the translation of specific mRNAs are highly specialized in different cell types. How this exquisite translational regulation is achieved is the focus of this review. Two levels of regulation are discussed: the translation machinery and cis-acting elements within mRNAs. Recent evidence shows that the ribosome itself directs how the genome is translated in time and space and reveals surprising functional specificity in individual components of the core translation machinery. We are also just beginning to appreciate the rich regulatory information embedded in the untranslated regions of mRNAs, which direct the selective translation of transcripts. These hidden RNA regulons may interface with a myriad of RNA-binding proteins and specialized translation machinery to provide an additional layer of regulation to how transcripts are spatiotemporally expressed. Understanding this largely unexplored world of translational codes hardwired in the core translation machinery is an exciting new research frontier fundamental to our understanding of gene regulation, organismal development, and evolution.

  5. Regulation of transcription attenuation and translation initiation by allosteric control of an RNA-binding protein: the Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein.

    PubMed

    Babitzke, Paul

    2004-04-01

    Tryptophan allosterically controls the 11-subunit trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) of Bacillus subtilis. When activated by tryptophan, TRAP binds to multiple trinucleotide repeats in target transcripts. TRAP is responsible for the decision to terminate transcription in the leader region of the trpEDCFBA operon or to allow transcription to proceed into the structural genes. TRAP also regulates translation of trpE by promoting formation of an RNA structure that prevents ribosome binding. In addition, bound TRAP regulates translation initiation of pabA, trpP and ycbK by directly blocking ribosome binding. The anti-TRAP protein inhibits TRAP activity by competing with RNA for the RNA binding surface of TRAP. PMID:15063849

  6. Specific RNA binding by amino-terminal peptides of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, M L; Houser, F; Loesch-Fries, L S; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    Specific RNA-protein interactions and ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential for many biological processes, but our understanding of how ribonucleoprotein particles form and accomplish their biological functions is rudimentary. This paper describes the interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus (A1MV) coat protein or peptides with viral RNA. A1MV coat protein is necessary both for virus particle formation and for the initiation of replication of the three genomic RNAs. We have examined protein determinants required for specific RNA binding and analyzed potential structural changes elicited by complex formation. The results indicate that the amino-terminus of the viral coat protein, which lacks primary sequence homology with recognized RNA binding motifs, is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RNA. Circular dichroism spectra and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments suggest that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal coat protein peptides bind to the viral RNA. The peptide--RNA interaction is functionally significant because the peptides will substitute for A1MV coat protein in initiating RNA replication. The apparent conformational change that accompanies RNA--peptide complex formation may generate a structure which, unlike the viral RNA alone, can be recognized by the viral replicase. Images PMID:8313916

  7. Cellular RNA binding proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K regulate influenza A virus RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression.

  8. Adding energy minimization strategy to peptide-design algorithm enables better search for RNA-binding peptides: Redesigned λ N peptide binds boxB RNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingqing; Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-15

    Our previously developed peptide-design algorithm was improved by adding an energy minimization strategy which allows the amino acid sidechains to move in a broad configuration space during sequence evolution. In this work, the new algorithm was used to generate a library of 21-mer peptides which could substitute for λ N peptide in binding to boxB RNA. Six potential peptides were obtained from the algorithm, all of which exhibited good binding capability with boxB RNA. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were then conducted to examine the ability of the λ N peptide and three best evolved peptides, viz. Pept01, Pept26, and Pept28, to bind to boxB RNA. Simulation results demonstrated that our evolved peptides are better at binding to boxB RNA than the λ N peptide. Sequence searches using the old (without energy minimization strategy) and new (with energy minimization strategy) algorithms confirm that the new algorithm is more effective at finding good RNA-binding peptides than the old algorithm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. MicroRNA binding to the HIV-1 Gag protein inhibits Gag assembly and virus production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antony K.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Waki, Kayoko; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Freed, Eric O.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, 18–22 nt long, noncoding RNAs that act as potent negative gene regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. To repress gene expression, miRNAs are packaged into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) that target mRNAs for degradation and/or translational repression in a sequence-specific manner. Recently, miRNAs have been shown to also interact with proteins outside RISCs, impacting cellular processes through mechanisms not involving gene silencing. Here, we define a previously unappreciated activity of miRNAs in inhibiting RNA–protein interactions that in the context of HIV-1 biology blocks HIV virus budding and reduces virus infectivity. This occurs by miRNA binding to the nucleocapsid domain of the Gag protein, the main structural component of HIV-1 virions. The resulting miRNA–Gag complexes interfere with viral–RNA-mediated Gag assembly and viral budding at the plasma membrane, with imperfectly assembled Gag complexes endocytosed and delivered to lysosomes. The blockade of virus production by miRNA is reversed by adding the miRNA’s target mRNA and stimulated by depleting Argonaute-2, suggesting that when miRNAs are not mediating gene silencing, they can block HIV-1 production through disruption of Gag assembly on membranes. Overall, our findings have significant implications for understanding how cells modulate HIV-1 infection by miRNA expression and raise the possibility that miRNAs can function to disrupt RNA-mediated protein assembly processes in other cellular contexts. PMID:24938790

  10. Crystallographic studies of RNA hairpins in complexes with recombinant MS2 capsids: implications for binding requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, E; Stonehouse, N J; Murray, J B; van den Worm, S; Valegård, K; Fridborg, K; Stockley, P G; Liljas, L

    1999-01-01

    The coat protein of bacteriophage MS2 is known to bind specifically to an RNA hairpin formed within the MS2 genome. Structurally this hairpin is built up by an RNA double helix interrupted by one unpaired nucleotide and closed by a four-nucleotide loop. We have performed crystallographic studies of complexes between MS2 coat protein capsids and four RNA hairpin variants in order to evaluate the minimal requirements for tight binding to the coat protein and to obtain more information about the three-dimensional structure of these hairpins. An RNA fragment including the four loop nucleotides and a two-base-pair stem but without the unpaired nucleotide is sufficient for binding to the coat protein shell under the conditions used in this study. In contrast, an RNA fragment containing a stem with the unpaired nucleotide but missing the loop nucleotides does not bind to the protein shell. PMID:9917072

  11. Targeted inhibition of oncogenic miR-21 maturation with designed RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Yang, Fan; Zubovic, Lorena; Pavelitz, Tom; Yang, Wen; Godin, Katherine; Walker, Matthew; Zheng, Suxin; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    The RNA recognition motif (RRM) is the largest family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins. Engineered RRMs with well-defined specificity would provide valuable tools and an exacting test of the current understanding of specificity. We have redesigned the specificity of an RRM using rational methods and demonstrated retargeting of its activity in cells. We engineered the conserved RRM of human Rbfox proteins to specifically bind to the terminal loop of a microRNA precursor (pre-miR-21) with high affinity and inhibit its processing by Drosha and Dicer. We further engineered Giardia Dicer by replacing its PAZ domain with the designed RRM. The reprogrammed enzyme degrades pre-miR-21 specifically in vitro and suppresses mature miR-21 levels in cells, which results in increased expression of the tumor suppressor PDCD4 and significantly decreased viability for cancer cells. The results demonstrate the feasibility of rationally engineering the sequence-specificity of RRMs and of using this ubiquitous platform for diverse biological applications. PMID:27428511

  12. Mutational Analysis of Vaccinia Virus E3 Protein: the Biological Functions Do Not Correlate with Its Biochemical Capacity To Bind Double-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dueck, Kevin J.; Hu, YuanShen (Sandy); Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. IMPORTANCE dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they

  13. Binding of the anticancer alkaloid sanguinarine with tRNA(phe): spectroscopic and calorimetric studies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Maidul; Kabir, Ayesha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the natural plant alkaloid and anticancer agent sanguinarine with tRNA(phe) has been investigated by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Sanguinarine iminium binds to tRNA(phe) cooperatively; alkanolamine does not bind but in presence of large tRNA(phe) concentration, a conversion from alkanolamine to iminium occurs resulting in concomitant binding of the latter. The binding affinity of the iminium to tRNA(phe) obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry was of the order of 10(5) M(-1), which is close to that evaluated from spectroscopy. The binding was driven largely by negative enthalpy and a smaller but favourable positive entropy change. The binding was dependent on the [Na(+)] concentration, but had a larger non-electrostatic contribution to the Gibbs energy. A small heat capacity value and the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the energetics of the interaction characterized the binding of the iminium form to tRNA(phe). This study confirms that the tRNA(phe) binding moiety is the iminium form of sanguinarine. PMID:22702734

  14. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-09-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design.

  15. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-09-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  16. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  17. Structure and RNA-binding properties of the bacterial LSm protein Hfq

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) emerged as important modulators of gene expression in bacteria. Guided by partial sequence complementarity, these sRNAs interact with target mRNAs and eventually affect transcript stability and translation. The physiological function of sRNAs depends on the protein Hfq, which binds sRNAs in the cell and promotes the interaction with their mRNA targets. This important physiological function of Hfq as a central hub of sRNA-mediated regulation made it one of the most intensely studied proteins in bacteria. Recently, a new model for sRNA binding by Hfq has been proposed that involves the direct recognition of the sRNA 3′ end and interactions of the sRNA body with the lateral RNA-binding surface of Hfq. This review summarizes the current understanding of the RNA binding properties of Hfq and its (s)RNA complexes. Moreover, the implications of the new binding model for sRNA-mediated regulation are discussed. PMID:23535768

  18. EBV noncoding RNA EBER2 interacts with host RNA-binding proteins to regulate viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Yario, Therese A; Gao, Jessica S; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-03-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) produces a highly abundant noncoding RNA called EBV-encoded RNA 2 (EBER2) that interacts indirectly with the host transcription factor paired box protein 5 (PAX5) to regulate viral latent membrane protein 1/2 (LMP1/2) gene expression as well as EBV lytic replication. To identify intermediary proteins, we isolated EBER2-PAX5-containing complexes and analyzed the protein components by mass spectrometry. The top candidates include three host proteins splicing factor proline and glutamine rich (SFPQ), non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO), and RNA binding motif protein 14 (RBM14), all reported to be components of nuclear bodies called paraspeckles. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking indicates that SFPQ and RBM14 contact EBER2 directly. Binding studies using recombinant proteins demonstrate that SFPQ and NONO associate with PAX5, potentially bridging its interaction with EBER2. Similar to EBER2 or PAX5 depletion, knockdown of any of the three host RNA-binding proteins results in the up-regulation of viral LMP2A mRNA levels, supporting a physiologically relevant interaction of these newly identified factors with EBER2 and PAX5. Identification of these EBER2-interacting proteins enables the search for cellular noncoding RNAs that regulate host gene expression in a manner similar to EBER2. PMID:26951683

  19. EBV noncoding RNA EBER2 interacts with host RNA-binding proteins to regulate viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Yario, Therese A; Gao, Jessica S; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-03-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) produces a highly abundant noncoding RNA called EBV-encoded RNA 2 (EBER2) that interacts indirectly with the host transcription factor paired box protein 5 (PAX5) to regulate viral latent membrane protein 1/2 (LMP1/2) gene expression as well as EBV lytic replication. To identify intermediary proteins, we isolated EBER2-PAX5-containing complexes and analyzed the protein components by mass spectrometry. The top candidates include three host proteins splicing factor proline and glutamine rich (SFPQ), non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO), and RNA binding motif protein 14 (RBM14), all reported to be components of nuclear bodies called paraspeckles. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking indicates that SFPQ and RBM14 contact EBER2 directly. Binding studies using recombinant proteins demonstrate that SFPQ and NONO associate with PAX5, potentially bridging its interaction with EBER2. Similar to EBER2 or PAX5 depletion, knockdown of any of the three host RNA-binding proteins results in the up-regulation of viral LMP2A mRNA levels, supporting a physiologically relevant interaction of these newly identified factors with EBER2 and PAX5. Identification of these EBER2-interacting proteins enables the search for cellular noncoding RNAs that regulate host gene expression in a manner similar to EBER2.

  20. Position-specific binding of FUS to nascent RNA regulates mRNA length

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Akio; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Tatsuya; Okamoto, Takaaki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Sobue, Gen

    2015-01-01

    More than half of all human genes produce prematurely terminated polyadenylated short mRNAs. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. CLIP-seq (cross-linking immunoprecipitation [CLIP] combined with deep sequencing) of FUS (fused in sarcoma) in neuronal cells showed that FUS is frequently clustered around an alternative polyadenylation (APA) site of nascent RNA. ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] combined with deep sequencing) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) demonstrated that FUS stalls RNAP II and prematurely terminates transcription. When an APA site is located upstream of an FUS cluster, FUS enhances polyadenylation by recruiting CPSF160 and up-regulates the alternative short transcript. In contrast, when an APA site is located downstream from an FUS cluster, polyadenylation is not activated, and the RNAP II-suppressing effect of FUS leads to down-regulation of the alternative short transcript. CAGE-seq (cap analysis of gene expression [CAGE] combined with deep sequencing) and PolyA-seq (a strand-specific and quantitative method for high-throughput sequencing of 3' ends of polyadenylated transcripts) revealed that position-specific regulation of mRNA lengths by FUS is operational in two-thirds of transcripts in neuronal cells, with enrichment in genes involved in synaptic activities. PMID:25995189

  1. A model for the study of ligand binding to the ribosomal RNA helix h44

    PubMed Central

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide models of ribosomal RNA domains are powerful tools to study the binding and molecular recognition of antibiotics that interfere with bacterial translation. Techniques such as selective chemical modification, fluorescence labeling and mutations are cumbersome for the whole ribosome but readily applicable to model RNAs, which are readily crystallized and often give rise to higher resolution crystal structures suitable for detailed analysis of ligand–RNA interactions. Here, we have investigated the HX RNA construct which contains two adjacent ligand binding regions of helix h44 in 16S ribosomal RNA. High-resolution crystal structure analysis confirmed that the HX RNA is a faithful structural model of the ribosomal target. Solution studies showed that HX RNA carrying a fluorescent 2-aminopurine modification provides a model system that can be used to monitor ligand binding to both the ribosomal decoding site and, through an indirect effect, the hygromycin B interaction region. PMID:20215440

  2. A model for the study of ligand binding to the ribosomal RNA helix h44

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2010-09-02

    Oligonucleotide models of ribosomal RNA domains are powerful tools to study the binding and molecular recognition of antibiotics that interfere with bacterial translation. Techniques such as selective chemical modification, fluorescence labeling and mutations are cumbersome for the whole ribosome but readily applicable to model RNAs, which are readily crystallized and often give rise to higher resolution crystal structures suitable for detailed analysis of ligand-RNA interactions. Here, we have investigated the HX RNA construct which contains two adjacent ligand binding regions of helix h44 in 16S ribosomal RNA. High-resolution crystal structure analysis confirmed that the HX RNA is a faithful structural model of the ribosomal target. Solution studies showed that HX RNA carrying a fluorescent 2-aminopurine modification provides a model system that can be used to monitor ligand binding to both the ribosomal decoding site and, through an indirect effect, the hygromycin B interaction region.

  3. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  4. Selection and Characterization of Small Molecules That Bind the HIV-1 Frameshift Site RNA

    PubMed Central

    Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 requires a −1 translational frameshift to properly synthesize the viral enzymes required for replication. The frameshift mechanism is dependent upon two RNA elements, a seven-nucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) and a downstream RNA structure. Frameshifting occurs with a frequency of ~5%, and increasing or decreasing this frequency may result in a decrease in viral replication. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput screen designed to find small molecules that bind to the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA. Out of 34,500 compounds screened, 202 were identified as positive hits. We show that one of these compounds, doxorubicin, binds the HIV-1 RNA with low micromolar affinity (Kd = 2.8 μM). This binding was confirmed and localized to the RNA using NMR. Further analysis revealed that this compound increased the RNA stability by approximately 5 °C and decreased translational frameshifting by 28% (±14%), as measured in vitro. PMID:19673541

  5. PUB1: a major yeast poly(A)+ RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Matunis, M J; Matunis, E L; Dreyfuss, G

    1993-01-01

    The expression of RNA polymerase II transcripts can be regulated at the posttranscriptional level by RNA-binding proteins. Although extensively characterized in metazoans, relatively few RNA-binding proteins have been characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three major proteins are cross-linked by UV light to poly(A)+ RNA in living S. cerevisiae cells. These are the 72-kDa poly(A)-binding protein and proteins of 60 and 50 kDa (S.A. Adam, T.Y. Nakagawa, M.S. Swanson, T. Woodruff, and G. Dreyfuss, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2932-2943, 1986). Here, we describe the 60-kDa protein, one of the major poly(A)+ RNA-binding proteins in S. cerevisiae. This protein, PUB1 [for poly(U)-binding protein 1], was purified by affinity chromatography on immobilized poly(rU), and specific monoclonal antibodies to it were produced. UV cross-linking demonstrated that PUB1 is bound to poly(A)+ RNA (mRNA or pre-mRNA) in living cells, and it was detected primarily in the cytoplasm by indirect immunofluorescence. The gene for PUB1 was cloned and sequenced, and the sequence was found to predict a 51-kDa protein with three ribonucleoprotein consensus RNA-binding domains and three glutamine- and asparagine-rich auxiliary domains. This overall structure is remarkably similar to the structures of the Drosophila melanogaster elav gene product, the human neuronal antigen HuD, and the cytolytic lymphocyte protein TIA-1. Each of these proteins has an important role in development and differentiation, potentially by affecting RNA processing. PUB1 was found to be nonessential in S. cerevisiae by gene replacement; however, further genetic analysis should reveal important features of this class of RNA-binding proteins. Images PMID:8413213

  6. G-quadruplex RNA binding and recognition by the lysine-specific histone demethylase-1 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Alexander; Martin, William J; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Reiter, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an essential epigenetic regulator in metazoans and requires the co-repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (CoREST) to efficiently catalyze the removal of mono- and dimethyl functional groups from histone 3 at lysine positions 4 and 9 (H3K4/9). LSD1 interacts with over 60 regulatory proteins and also associates with lncRNAs (TERRA, HOTAIR), suggesting a regulatory role for RNA in LSD1 function. We report that a stacked, intramolecular G-quadruplex (GQ) forming TERRA RNA (GG[UUAGGG]8UUA) binds tightly to the functional LSD1-CoREST complex (Kd ≈ 96 nM), in contrast to a single GQ RNA unit ([UUAGGG]4U), a GQ DNA ([TTAGGG]4T), or an unstructured single-stranded RNA. Stabilization of a parallel-stranded GQ RNA structure by monovalent potassium ions (K(+)) is required for high affinity binding to the LSD1-CoREST complex. These data indicate that LSD1 can distinguish between RNA and DNA as well as structured versus unstructured nucleotide motifs. Further, cross-linking mass spectrometry identified the primary location of GQ RNA binding within the SWIRM/amine oxidase domain (AOD) of LSD1. An ssRNA binding region adjacent to this GQ binding site was also identified via X-ray crystallography. This RNA binding interface is consistent with kinetic assays, demonstrating that a GQ-forming RNA can serve as a noncompetitive inhibitor of LSD1-catalyzed demethylation. The identification of a GQ RNA binding site coupled with kinetic data suggests that structured RNAs can function as regulatory molecules in LSD1-mediated mechanisms.

  7. Role of double-stranded RNA-binding proteins in RNA silencing and antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants as well as in animals, the intracellular presence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers a signal transduction pathway that uses the sequence information of dsRNA to direct silencing of homologous genes. This process, designated RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi), relies on a family...

  8. Binding by TRBP-dsRBD2 Does Not Induce Bending of Double-Stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Roderico; Evans, Declan; Penrod, Katheryn A; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-06-21

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to a variety of biological processes, many of which involve large-scale conformational changes that lead to bending of the nucleic acid helix. Here, we focus on the nonsequence-specific protein TRBP, whose double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) interact with the A-form geometry of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Crystal structures of dsRBD-dsRNA interactions suggest that the dsRNA helix must bend in such a way that its major groove expands to conform to the dsRBD's binding surface. We show through isothermal titration calorimetry experiments that dsRBD2 of TRBP binds dsRNA with a temperature-independent observed binding affinity (KD ∼500 nM). Furthermore, a near-zero observed heat capacity change (ΔCp = 70 ± 40 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) suggests that large-scale conformational changes do not occur upon binding. This result is bolstered by molecular-dynamics simulations in which dsRBD-dsRNA interactions generate only modest bending of the RNA along its helical axis. Overall, these results suggest that this particular dsRBD-dsRNA interaction produces little to no change in the A-form geometry of dsRNA in solution. These results further support our previous hypothesis, based on extensive gel-shift assays, that TRBP preferentially binds to sites of nearly ideal A-form structure while being excluded from sites of local deformation in the RNA helical structure. The implications of this mechanism for efficient micro-RNA processing will be discussed.

  9. Binding by TRBP-dsRBD2 Does Not Induce Bending of Double-Stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Roderico; Evans, Declan; Penrod, Katheryn A; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-06-21

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to a variety of biological processes, many of which involve large-scale conformational changes that lead to bending of the nucleic acid helix. Here, we focus on the nonsequence-specific protein TRBP, whose double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) interact with the A-form geometry of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Crystal structures of dsRBD-dsRNA interactions suggest that the dsRNA helix must bend in such a way that its major groove expands to conform to the dsRBD's binding surface. We show through isothermal titration calorimetry experiments that dsRBD2 of TRBP binds dsRNA with a temperature-independent observed binding affinity (KD ∼500 nM). Furthermore, a near-zero observed heat capacity change (ΔCp = 70 ± 40 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) suggests that large-scale conformational changes do not occur upon binding. This result is bolstered by molecular-dynamics simulations in which dsRBD-dsRNA interactions generate only modest bending of the RNA along its helical axis. Overall, these results suggest that this particular dsRBD-dsRNA interaction produces little to no change in the A-form geometry of dsRNA in solution. These results further support our previous hypothesis, based on extensive gel-shift assays, that TRBP preferentially binds to sites of nearly ideal A-form structure while being excluded from sites of local deformation in the RNA helical structure. The implications of this mechanism for efficient micro-RNA processing will be discussed. PMID:27332119

  10. FUS regulates genes coding for RNA-binding proteins in neurons by binding to their highly conserved introns

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Tadashi; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Maragkakis, Manolis; Chang, Alexandra; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2013-01-01

    Dominant mutations and mislocalization or aggregation of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), an RNA-binding protein (RBP), cause neuronal degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), two incurable neurological diseases. However, the function of FUS in neurons is not well understood. To uncover the impact of FUS in the neuronal transcriptome, we used high-throughput sequencing of immunoprecipitated and cross-linked RNA (HITS–CLIP) of FUS in human brains and mouse neurons differentiated from embryonic stem cells, coupled with RNA-seq and FUS knockdowns. We report conserved neuronal RNA targets and networks that are regulated by FUS. We find that FUS regulates splicing of genes coding for RBPs by binding to their highly conserved introns. Our findings have important implications for understanding the impact of FUS in neurodegenerative diseases and suggest that perturbations of FUS can impact the neuronal transcriptome via perturbations of RBP transcripts. PMID:23389473

  11. Protein kinase A stimulates binding of multiple proteins to a U-rich domain in the 3'-untranslated region of lactate dehydrogenase A mRNA that is required for the regulation of mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Tian, D; Huang, D; Brown, R C; Jungmann, R A

    1998-10-23

    We have explored the molecular basis of the cAMP-induced stabilization of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) mRNA and identified four cytoplasmic proteins of 96, 67, 52, and 50 kDa that specifically bind to a 30-nucleotide uridine-rich sequence in the LDH 3'-untranslated region with a predicted stem-loop structure. Mutational analysis revealed that specific protein binding is dependent upon an intact primary nucleotide sequence in the loop as well as integrity of the adjoining double-stranded stem structure, thus indicating a high degree of primary and secondary structure specificity. The critical stem-loop region is located between nucleotides 1473 and 1502 relative to the mRNA cap site and contains a previously identified cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) required for LDH-A mRNA stability regulation by the protein kinase A pathway. The 3'-untranslated region binding activity of the proteins is up-regulated after protein kinase A activation, whereas protein dephosphorylation is associated with a loss of binding activity. These results imply a cause and effect relationship between LDH-A mRNA stabilization and CSR-phosphoprotein binding activity. We propose that the U-rich CSR is a recognition signal for CSR-binding proteins and for an mRNA processing pathway that specifically stabilizes LDH mRNA in response to activation of the protein kinase A signal transduction pathway.

  12. Widespread generation of alternative UTRs contributes to sex-specific RNA binding by UNR

    PubMed Central

    Mihailovich, Marija; Wurth, Laurence; Zambelli, Federico; Abaza, Irina; Militti, Cristina; Mancuso, Francesco M.; Roma, Guglielmo; Pavesi, Giulio; Gebauer, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    Upstream of N-ras (UNR) is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA translation and stability by binding to sites generally located in untranslated regions (UTRs). In Drosophila, sex-specific binding of UNR to msl2 mRNA and the noncoding RNA roX is believed to play key roles in the control of X-chromosome dosage compensation in both sexes. To investigate broader sex-specific functions of UNR, we have identified its RNA targets in adult male and female flies by high-throughput RNA binding and transcriptome analysis. Here we show that UNR binds to a large set of protein-coding transcripts and to a smaller set of noncoding RNAs in a sex-specific fashion. The analyses also reveal a strong correlation between sex-specific binding of UNR and sex-specific differential expression of UTRs in target genes. Validation experiments indicate that UNR indeed recognizes sex-specifically processed transcripts. These results suggest that UNR exploits the transcript diversity generated by alternative processing and alternative promoter usage to bind and regulate target genes in a sex-specific manner. PMID:22101243

  13. Widespread generation of alternative UTRs contributes to sex-specific RNA binding by UNR.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Marija; Mihailovich, Marija; Wurth, Laurence; Zambelli, Federico; Abaza, Irina; Militti, Cristina; Mancuso, Francesco M; Roma, Guglielmo; Pavesi, Giulio; Gebauer, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    Upstream of N-ras (UNR) is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA translation and stability by binding to sites generally located in untranslated regions (UTRs). In Drosophila, sex-specific binding of UNR to msl2 mRNA and the noncoding RNA roX is believed to play key roles in the control of X-chromosome dosage compensation in both sexes. To investigate broader sex-specific functions of UNR, we have identified its RNA targets in adult male and female flies by high-throughput RNA binding and transcriptome analysis. Here we show that UNR binds to a large set of protein-coding transcripts and to a smaller set of noncoding RNAs in a sex-specific fashion. The analyses also reveal a strong correlation between sex-specific binding of UNR and sex-specific differential expression of UTRs in target genes. Validation experiments indicate that UNR indeed recognizes sex-specifically processed transcripts. These results suggest that UNR exploits the transcript diversity generated by alternative processing and alternative promoter usage to bind and regulate target genes in a sex-specific manner.

  14. Tobacco rattle virus 16K silencing suppressor binds ARGONAUTE 4 and inhibits formation of RNA silencing complexes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calvino, Lourdes; Martínez-Priego, Llúcia; Szabo, Edit Z; Guzmán-Benito, Irene; González, Inmaculada; Canto, Tomás; Lakatos, Lóránt; Llave, César

    2016-01-01

    The cysteine-rich 16K protein of tobacco rattle virus (TRV), the type member of the genus Tobravirus, is known to suppress RNA silencing. However, the mechanism of action of the 16K suppressor is not well understood. In this study, we used a GFP-based sensor strategy and an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay in Nicotiana benthamiana to show that 16K was unable to inhibit the activity of existing small interfering RNA (siRNA)- and microRNA (miRNA)-programmed RNA-induced silencing effector complexes (RISCs). In contrast, 16K efficiently interfered with de novo formation of miRNA- and siRNA-guided RISCs, thus preventing cleavage of target RNA. Interestingly, we found that transiently expressed endogenous miR399 and miR172 directed sequence-specific silencing of complementary sequences of viral origin. 16K failed to bind small RNAs, although it interacted with ARGONAUTE 4, as revealed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation and immunoprecipitation assays. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that highly conserved cysteine residues within the N-terminal and central regions of the 16K protein are required for protein stability and/or RNA silencing suppression. PMID:26498945

  15. A G-quadruplex-containing RNA activates fluorescence in a GFP-like fluorophore

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hao; Suslov, Nikolai B.; Li, Nan-Sheng; Shelke, Sandip A.; Evans, Molly E.; Koldobskaya, Yelena; Rice, Phoebe A.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-08-21

    Spinach is an in vitro–selected RNA aptamer that binds a GFP-like ligand and activates its green fluorescence. Spinach is thus an RNA analog of GFP and has potentially widespread applications for in vivo labeling and imaging. We used antibody-assisted crystallography to determine the structures of Spinach both with and without bound fluorophore at 2.2-Å and 2.4-Å resolution, respectively. Spinach RNA has an elongated structure containing two helical domains separated by an internal bulge that folds into a G-quadruplex motif of unusual topology. The G-quadruplex motif and adjacent nucleotides comprise a partially preformed binding site for the fluorophore. The fluorophore binds in a planar conformation and makes extensive aromatic stacking and hydrogen bond interactions with the RNA. Our findings provide a foundation for structure-based engineering of new fluorophore-binding RNA aptamers.

  16. A G-Quadruplex-Containing RNA Activates Fluorescence in a GFP-Like Fluorophore

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Suslov, Nikolai B.; Li, Nan-Sheng; Shelke, Sandip A.; Evans, Molly E.; Koldobskaya, Yelena; Rice, Phoebe A.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Spinach is an in vitro selected RNA aptamer that binds a GFP-like ligand and activates its green fluorescence.Spinach is thus an RNA analog of GFP, and has potentially widespread applications for in vivo labeling and imaging. We used antibody-assisted crystallography to determine the structures of Spinach both with and without bound fluorophore at 2.2 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. Spinach RNA has an elongated structure containing two helical domains separated by an internal bulge that folds into a G-quadruplex motif of unusual topology. The G-quadruplex motif and adjacent nucleotides comprise a partially pre-formed binding site for the fluorophore.The fluorophore binds in a planar conformation and makes extensive aromatic stacking and hydrogen bond interactions with the RNA. Our findings provide a foundation for structure-based engineering of new fluorophore-binding RNA aptamers. PMID:24952597

  17. Informational Complexity and Functional Activity of RNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Carothers, James M.; Oestreich, Stephanie C.; Davis, Jonathan H.

    2004-01-01

    Very little is known about the distribution of functional DNA, RNA, and protein molecules in sequence space. The question of how the number and complexity of distinct solutions to a particular biochemical problem varies with activity is an important aspect of this general problem. Here we present a comparison of the structures and activities of eleven distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers). By experimentally measuring the amount of information required to specify each optimal binding structure, we show that defining a structure capable of 10-fold tighter binding requires approximately 10 additional bits of information. This increase in information content is equivalent to specifying the identity of five additional nucleotide positions and corresponds to an ∼1000-fold decrease in abundance in a sample of random sequences. We observe a similar relationship between structural complexity and activity in a comparison of two catalytic RNAs (ribozyme ligases), raising the possibility of a general relationship between the complexity of RNA structures and their functional activity. Describing how information varies with activity in other heteropolymers, both biological and synthetic, may lead to an objective means of comparing their functional properties. This approach could be useful in predicting the functional utility of novel heteropolymers. PMID:15099096

  18. Conserved RNA-Binding Proteins Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Antonacci, Simona; Forand, Daniel; Wolf, Margaret; Tyus, Courtney; Barney, Julia; Kellogg, Leah; Simon, Margo A.; Kerr, Genevieve; Wells, Kristen L.; Younes, Serena; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Olesnicky, Eugenia C.; Killian, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of dendritic branching is critical for sensory reception, cell−cell communication within the nervous system, learning, memory, and behavior. Defects in dendrite morphology are associated with several neurologic disorders; thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern dendrite morphogenesis is important. Recent investigations of dendrite morphogenesis have highlighted the importance of gene regulation at the posttranscriptional level. Because RNA-binding proteins mediate many posttranscriptional mechanisms, we decided to investigate the extent to which conserved RNA-binding proteins contribute to dendrite morphogenesis across phyla. Here we identify a core set of RNA-binding proteins that are important for dendrite morphogenesis in the PVD multidendritic sensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homologs of each of these genes were previously identified as important in the Drosophila melanogaster dendritic arborization sensory neurons. Our results suggest that RNA processing, mRNA localization, mRNA stability, and translational control are all important mechanisms that contribute to dendrite morphogenesis, and we present a conserved set of RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes in diverse animal species. Furthermore, homologs of these genes are expressed in the human brain, suggesting that these RNA-binding proteins are candidate regulators of dendrite development in humans. PMID:25673135

  19. The NS3 protein of Rice hoja blanca tenuivirus suppresses RNA silencing in plant and insect hosts by efficiently binding both siRNAs and miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hemmes, Hans; Lakatos, Lóránt; Goldbach, Rob; Burgyán, József; Prins, Marcel

    2007-07-01

    RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense as well as in developmental processes in plants and insects. Negative strand RNA viruses such as the plant virus Rice hoja blanca tenuivirus (RHBV) replicate in plants and in their insect transmission vector. Like most plant-infecting viruses, RHBV encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the NS3 protein, and here it is demonstrated that this protein is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in both plants and insect cells. Biochemical analyses showed that NS3 efficiently binds siRNA as well as miRNA molecules. Binding of NS3 is greatly influenced by the size of small RNA molecules, as 21 nucleotide (nt) siRNA molecules are bound > 100 times more efficiently than 26 nt species. Competition assays suggest that the activity of NS3 is based on binding to siRNAs prior to strand separation during the assembly of the RNA-induced silencing complex. In addition, NS3 has a high affinity for miRNA/miRNA* duplexes, indicating that its activity might also interfere with miRNA-regulated gene expression in both insects and plants. PMID:17513697

  20. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  1. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  2. THUMP--a predicted RNA-binding domain shared by 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine synthases and RNA methylases.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    2001-04-01

    Sequence profile searches were used to identify an ancient domain in ThiI-like thiouridine synthases, conserved RNA methylases, archaeal pseudouridine synthases and several uncharacterized proteins. We predict that this domain is an RNA-binding domain that adopts an alpha/beta fold similar to that found in the C-terminal domain of translation initiation factor 3 and ribosomal protein S8.

  3. STarMir Tools for Prediction of microRNA Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Kanoria, Shaveta; Rennie, William; Liu, Chaochun; Carmack, C Steven; Lu, Jun; Ding, Ye

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous short noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting messenger RNAs (mRNAs), which results in translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. As regulatory molecules, miRNAs are involved in many mammalian biological processes and also in the manifestation of certain human diseases. As miRNAs play central role in the regulation of gene expression, understanding miRNA-binding patterns is essential to gain an insight of miRNA mediated gene regulation and also holds promise for therapeutic applications. Computational prediction of miRNA binding sites on target mRNAs facilitates experimental investigation of miRNA functions. This chapter provides protocols for using the STarMir web server for improved predictions of miRNA binding sites on a target mRNA. As an application module of the Sfold RNA package, the current version of STarMir is an implementation of logistic prediction models developed with high-throughput miRNA binding data from cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) studies. The models incorporated comprehensive thermodynamic, structural, and sequence features, and were found to make improved predictions of both seed and seedless sites, in comparison to the established algorithms (Liu et al., Nucleic Acids Res 41:e138, 2013). Their broad applicability was indicated by their good performance in cross-species validation. STarMir is freely available at http://sfold.wadsworth.org/starmir.html . PMID:27665594

  4. Binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) to the hepatitis delta virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Thibault, Catherine St-Laurent; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2006-12-20

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has a very limited protein coding capacity and must rely on host proteins for its replication. A ribonucleoprotein complex was detected following UV cross-linking between HeLa nuclear proteins and an RNA corresponding to the right terminal stem-loop domain of HDV genomic RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis of the complex revealed the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) as a novel HDV RNA-interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the interaction between HDV RNA and PSF both in vitro in HeLa nuclear extract and in vivo within HeLa cells containing both polarities of the HDV genome. Analysis of the binding of various HDV-derived RNAs to purified, recombinant PSF further confirmed the specificity of the interaction and revealed that PSF directly binds to the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Our findings provide evidence of the involvement of a host mRNA processing protein in the HDV life cycle.

  5. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S-mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release. PMID:26586091

  6. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S–mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release. PMID:26586091

  7. SERF: in vitro election of random RNA fragments to identify protein binding sites within large RNAs.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, U; Nierhaus, K H

    2001-11-01

    In vitro selection experiments have various goals depending on the composition of the initial pool and the selection method applied. We developed an in vitro selection variant (SERF, selection of random RNA fragments) that is useful for the identification of short RNA fragments originating from large RNAs that bind specifically to a protein. A pool of randomly fragmented RNA is constructed from a large RNA, which is the natural binding partner for a protein. Such a pool contains all the potential binding sites and is therefore used as starting material for affinity selection with the purified protein to find its natural target. Here we provide a detailed experimental protocol of the method. SERF has been developed for ribosomal systems and is a general approach providing a basis for functional and structural characterization of RNA-protein interactions in large ribonucleoprotein particles.

  8. MKP-1 mRNA Stabilization and Translational Control by RNA-Binding Proteins HuR and NF90▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Yuki; Kim, Hyeon Ho; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Pullmann, Rudolf; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Gorospe, Myriam

    2008-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) plays a major role in dephosphorylating and thereby inactivating the MAP kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here, we examine the posttranscriptional events underlying the robust MKP-1 induction by oxidants in HeLa cells. H2O2 treatment potently stabilized the MKP-1 mRNA and increased the association of MKP-1 mRNA with the translation machinery. Four RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) that influence mRNA turnover and/or translation (HuR, NF90, TIAR, and TIA-1) were found to bind to biotinylated transcripts spanning the MKP-1 AU-rich 3′ untranslated region. By using ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation analysis, we showed that H2O2 treatment increased the association of MKP-1 mRNA with HuR and NF90 and decreased its association with the translational repressors TIAR and TIA-1. HuR or NF90 silencing significantly diminished the H2O2-stimulated MKP-1 mRNA stability; HuR silencing also markedly decreased MKP-1 translation. In turn, lowering MKP-1 expression in HuR-silenced cultures resulted in substantially elevated phosphorylation of JNK and p38 after H2O2 treatment. Collectively, MKP-1 upregulation by oxidative stress is potently influenced by increased mRNA stability and translation, mediated at least in part by the RNA-BPs HuR and NF90. PMID:18490444

  9. The mRNA of the translationally controlled tumor protein P23/TCTP is a highly structured RNA, which activates the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed Central

    Bommer, Ulrich-Axel; Borovjagin, Anton V; Greagg, Martin A; Jeffrey, Ian W; Russell, Paul; Laing, Kenneth G; Lee, Melanie; Clemens, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    The dsRNA-activated protein kinase PKR is involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate cellular processes as diverse as cell growth and differentiation, the stress response, and apoptosis. PKR was originally described as an interferon-inducible elF2alpha kinase involved in the antiviral defense mechanism of the cell. The interaction of the kinase with specific viral RNAs has been studied in much detail, but information about cellular mRNAs, which are able to bind and activate PKR, is scarce. In search for such cellular mRNAs, we developed a cloning strategy to identify individual mRNA species from the dsRNA-rich fraction of Daudi cell poly(A)+ RNA. Two out of five cDNA clones we obtained contained sequences derived from the mRNA of the translationally controlled tumor protein P23/TCTP, indicating that this mRNA is present in the dsRNA-rich fraction. Secondary structure predictions and gel electrophoretic mobility investigations on P23/TCTP transcripts confirmed the potential of this mRNA to form extensive secondary structure. A full-length P23 transcript, but not a truncated version thereof, was able to bind to PKR in vitro and in vivo. Transient transfection experiments in human 293 cells showed that coexpression of full-length P23 mRNA leads to partial inhibition of the expression of a beta-galactosidase reporter gene in trans. Additional coexpression of a dominant negative mutant of PKR or of adenovirus VA1 RNA suppressed this inhibition, indicating that it is mediated by PKR. Studies on P23/TCTP expression in cells from PKR-knockout mice suggest that P23/TCTP mRNA translation is regulated by PKR. Hence, our results demonstrate that the mRNA of P23/TCTP may both activate PKR and be subject to translational regulation by this kinase. PMID:11991642

  10. Extra double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) in a squid RNA editing enzyme confers resistance to high salt environment.

    PubMed

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Correa-Rojas, Rodrigo A; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2012-05-18

    A-to-I RNA editing is particularly common in coding regions of squid mRNAs. Previously, we isolated a squid editing enzyme (sqADAR2) that shows a unique structural feature when compared with other ADAR2 family members: an additional double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain (dsRBD). Alternative splicing includes or excludes this motif, generating a novel or a conventional variant termed sqADAR2a and sqADAR2b, respectively. The extra dsRBD of sqADAR2a increases its editing activity in vitro. We hypothesized that the high activity is due to an increase in the affinity of the enzyme for dsRNA. This may be important because protein-RNA interactions can be influenced by physical factors. We became particularly interested in analyzing the effects of salt on interactions between sqADAR2 and RNA because squid cells have a ∼3-fold higher ionic strength and proportionally more Cl(-) than vertebrate cells. To date, in vitro biochemical analyses of adenosine deamination have been conducted using vertebrate-like ionic strength buffers containing chloride as the major anion, although the vast majority of cellular anions are known to be organic. We found that squid-like salt conditions severely impair the binding affinity of conventional ADAR2s for dsRNA, leading to a decrease in nonspecific and site-specific editing activity. Inhibition of editing was mostly due to high Cl(-) levels and not to the high concentrations of K(+), Na(+), and organic anions like glutamate. Interestingly, the extra dsRBD in sqADAR2a conferred resistance to the high Cl(-) levels found in squid neurons. It does so by increasing the affinity of sqADAR2 for dsRNA by 30- or 100-fold in vertebrate-like or squid-like conditions, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis of squid ADAR2a showed that its increased affinity and editing activity are directly attributable to the RNA binding activity of the extra dsRBD.

  11. The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein of Bacillus subtilis regulates translation of the tryptophan transport gene trpP (yhaG) by blocking ribosome binding.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Helen; Zhang, Hong; Yakhnin, Alexander V; Babitzke, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis tryptophan biosynthetic genes (trpEDCFBA and pabA [trpG]) is regulated in response to tryptophan by TRAP, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein. TRAP-mediated regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes includes a transcription attenuation and two distinct translation control mechanisms. TRAP also regulates translation of trpP (yhaG), a single-gene operon that encodes a putative tryptophan transporter. Its translation initiation region contains triplet repeats typical of TRAP-regulated mRNAs. We found that regulation of trpP and pabA is unaltered in a rho mutant strain. Results from filter binding and gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that TRAP binds specifically to a segment of the trpP transcript that includes the untranslated leader and translation initiation region. While the affinities of TRAP for the trpP and pabA transcripts are similar, TRAP-mediated translation control of trpP is much more extensive than for pabA. RNA footprinting revealed that the trpP TRAP binding site consists of nine triplet repeats (five GAG, three UAG, and one AAG) that surround and overlap the trpP Shine-Dalgarno (S-D) sequence and translation start codon. Results from toeprint and RNA-directed cell-free translation experiments indicated that tryptophan-activated TRAP inhibits TrpP synthesis by preventing binding of a 30S ribosomal subunit. Taken together, our results establish that TRAP regulates translation of trpP by blocking ribosome binding. Thus, TRAP coordinately regulates tryptophan synthesis and transport by three distinct mechanisms: attenuation transcription of the trpEDCFBA operon, promoting formation of the trpE S-D blocking hairpin, and blocking ribosome binding to the pabA and trpP transcripts. PMID:14702295

  12. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveal Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelyhood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  13. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  14. Tethered Function Assays as Tools to Elucidate the Molecular Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bos, Tomas J; Nussbacher, Julia K; Aigner, Stefan; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of RNA molecules is critical to the survival and development of cells. Messenger RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus as intron-containing pre-mRNAs and bound by RNA-binding proteins, which control their fate by regulating RNA stability, splicing, polyadenylation, translation, and cellular localization. Most RBPs have distinct mRNA-binding and functional domains; thus, the function of an RBP can be studied independently of RNA-binding by artificially recruiting the RBP to a reporter RNA and then measuring the effect of RBP recruitment on reporter splicing, stability, translational efficiency, or intracellular trafficking. These tethered function assays therefore do not require prior knowledge of the RBP's endogenous RNA targets or its binding sites within these RNAs. Here, we provide an overview of the experimental strategy and the strengths and limitations of common tethering systems. We illustrate specific examples of the application of the assay in elucidating the function of various classes of RBPs. We also discuss how classic tethering assay approaches and insights gained from them have been empowered by more recent technological advances, including efficient genome editing and high-throughput RNA-sequencing. PMID:27256382

  15. Tethered Function Assays as Tools to Elucidate the Molecular Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bos, Tomas J; Nussbacher, Julia K; Aigner, Stefan; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of RNA molecules is critical to the survival and development of cells. Messenger RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus as intron-containing pre-mRNAs and bound by RNA-binding proteins, which control their fate by regulating RNA stability, splicing, polyadenylation, translation, and cellular localization. Most RBPs have distinct mRNA-binding and functional domains; thus, the function of an RBP can be studied independently of RNA-binding by artificially recruiting the RBP to a reporter RNA and then measuring the effect of RBP recruitment on reporter splicing, stability, translational efficiency, or intracellular trafficking. These tethered function assays therefore do not require prior knowledge of the RBP's endogenous RNA targets or its binding sites within these RNAs. Here, we provide an overview of the experimental strategy and the strengths and limitations of common tethering systems. We illustrate specific examples of the application of the assay in elucidating the function of various classes of RBPs. We also discuss how classic tethering assay approaches and insights gained from them have been empowered by more recent technological advances, including efficient genome editing and high-throughput RNA-sequencing.

  16. Binding of DNA-binding alkaloids berberine and palmatine to tRNA and comparison to ethidium: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Pandya, Prateek; Chowdhury, Sebanti Roy; Kumar, Surat; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of two natural protoberberine plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine with tRNA phe was studied using various biophysical techniques and molecular modeling and the data were compared with the binding of the classical DNA intercalator, ethidium. Circular dichroic studies revealed that the tRNA conformation was moderately perturbed on binding of the alkaloids. The cooperative binding of both the alkaloids and ethidium to tRNA was revealed from absorbance and fluorescence studies. Fluorescence quenching studies advanced a conclusion that while berberine and palmatine are partially intercalated, ethidium is fully intercalated on the tRNA molecule. The binding of the alkaloids as well as ethidium stabilized the tRNA melting, and the binding constant evaluated from the averaged optical melting temperature data was in agreement with fluorescence spectral-binding data. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the tRNA melting showed three close transitions that were affected on binding of these small molecules. Molecular docking calculations performed showed the preferred regions of binding of these small molecules on the tRNA. Taken together, the results suggest that the binding of the alkaloids berberine and palmatine on the tRNA structure appears to be mostly by partial intercalation while ethidium intercalates fully on the tRNA. These results further advance our knowledge on the molecular aspects on the interaction of these alkaloids to tRNA.

  17. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  18. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26821996

  19. The prokaryotic enhancer binding protein NTRC has an ATPase activity which is phosphorylation and DNA dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1992-01-01

    The prokaryotic activator protein NTRC binds to enhancer-like elements and activates transcription in response to nitrogen limitation by catalysing open complex formation by sigma 54 RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Formation of open complexes requires the phosphorylated form of NTRC and the reaction is ATP dependent. We find that NTRC has an ATPase activity which is activated by phosphorylation and is strongly stimulated by the presence of DNA containing specific NTRC binding sites. Images PMID:1534752

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide binding to a structured mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, S Patrick; Stephanopoulos, Gregory N; Yarmush, Martin L; Roth, Charles M

    2002-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides act as exogenous inhibitors of gene expression by binding to a complementary sequence on the target mRNA, preventing translation into protein. Antisense technology is being applied successfully as a research tool and as a molecular therapeutic. However, a quantitative understanding of binding energetics between short oligonucleotides and longer mRNA targets is lacking, and selecting a high-affinity antisense oligonucleotide sequence from the many possibilities complementary to a particular RNA is a critical step in designing an effective antisense inhibitor. Here, we report measurements of the thermodynamics and kinetics of hybridization for a number of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the rabbit beta-globin (RBG) mRNA using a binding assay that facilitates rapid separation of bound from free species in solution. A wide range of equilibrium dissociation constants were observed, and association rate constants within the measurable range correlated strongly with binding affinity. In addition, a significant correlation was observed of measured binding affinities with binding affinity values predicted using a thermodynamic model involving DNA and RNA unfolding, ODN hybridization, and RNA restructuring to a final free energy minimum. In contrast to the behavior observed for hybridization of short strands, the association rate constant increased with temperature, suggesting that the kinetics of association are related to disrupting the native structure of the target RNA. The rate of cleavage of the RBG mRNA in the presence of ribonuclease H and ODNs of varying association kinetics displayed apparent first-order kinetics, with the rate constant exhibiting binding-limited behavior at low association rates and reaction-limited behavior at higher rates. Implications for the rational design of effective antisense reagents are discussed. PMID:11751323

  1. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes. PMID:27151193

  2. Crystal structure of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein–RNA complex reveals a gating mechanism for RNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Kathryn M.; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; King, Liam B.; Ngo, Nhi; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Woods, Virgil L.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause disease in industrialized and developing nations alike. Among them, the hemorrhagic fever virus Lassa is responsible for ∼300,000–500,000 infections/y in Western Africa. The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) forms the protein scaffold of the genomic ribonucleoprotein complexes and is critical for transcription and replication of the viral genome. Here, we present crystal structures of the RNA-binding domain of Lassa virus NP in complex with ssRNA. This structure shows, in contrast to the predicted model, that RNA binds in a deep, basic crevice located entirely within the N-terminal domain. Furthermore, the NP-ssRNA structures presented here, combined with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/MS and functional studies, suggest a gating mechanism by which NP opens to accept RNA. Directed mutagenesis and functional studies provide a unique look into how the arenavirus NPs bind to and protect the viral genome and also suggest the likely assembly by which viral ribonucleoprotein complexes are organized. PMID:22084115

  3. Degenerate In Vitro Genetic Selection Reveals Mutations That Diminish Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA Replication without Affecting Coat Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3′-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5′ hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3′-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3′ RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3′ hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  4. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  5. A deep learning framework for modeling structural features of RNA-binding protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sai; Zhou, Jingtian; Hu, Hailin; Gong, Haipeng; Chen, Ligong; Cheng, Chao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the post-transcriptional control of RNAs. Identifying RBP binding sites and characterizing RBP binding preferences are key steps toward understanding the basic mechanisms of the post-transcriptional gene regulation. Though numerous computational methods have been developed for modeling RBP binding preferences, discovering a complete structural representation of the RBP targets by integrating their available structural features in all three dimensions is still a challenging task. In this paper, we develop a general and flexible deep learning framework for modeling structural binding preferences and predicting binding sites of RBPs, which takes (predicted) RNA tertiary structural information into account for the first time. Our framework constructs a unified representation that characterizes the structural specificities of RBP targets in all three dimensions, which can be further used to predict novel candidate binding sites and discover potential binding motifs. Through testing on the real CLIP-seq datasets, we have demonstrated that our deep learning framework can automatically extract effective hidden structural features from the encoded raw sequence and structural profiles, and predict accurate RBP binding sites. In addition, we have conducted the first study to show that integrating the additional RNA tertiary structural features can improve the model performance in predicting RBP binding sites, especially for the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), which also provides a new evidence to support the view that RBPs may own specific tertiary structural binding preferences. In particular, the tests on the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) segments yield satisfiable results with experimental support from the literature and further demonstrate the necessity of incorporating RNA tertiary structural information into the prediction model. The source code of our approach can be found in https

  6. TRAP binding to the Bacillus subtilis trp leader region RNA causes efficient transcription termination at a weak intrinsic terminator.

    PubMed

    Potter, Kristine D; Merlino, Natalie M; Jacobs, Timothy; Gollnick, Paul

    2011-03-01

    The Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon is regulated by a transcription attenuation mechanism controlled by the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). TRAP binds to 11 (G/U)AG repeats in the trp leader transcript and prevents formation of an antiterminator, which allows formation of an intrinsic terminator (attenuator). Previously, formation of the attenuator RNA structure was believed to be solely responsible for signaling RNA polymerase (RNAP) to halt transcription. However, base substitutions that prevent formation of the antiterminator, and thus allow the attenuator structure to form constitutively, do not result in efficient transcription termination. The observation that the attenuator requires the presence of TRAP bound to the nascent RNA to cause efficient transcription termination suggests TRAP has an additional role in causing termination at the attenuator. We show that the trp attenuator is a weak intrinsic terminator due to low GC content of the hairpin stem and interruptions in the U-stretch following the hairpin. We also provide evidence that termination at the trp attenuator requires forward translocation of RNA polymerase and that TRAP binding to the nascent transcript can induce this activity. PMID:21097886

  7. Evidence That Antibiotics Bind to Human Mitochondrial Ribosomal RNA Has Implications for Aminoglycoside Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seoyeon; Harris, Kimberly A; Fanning, Kathryn D; Sarachan, Kathryn L; Frohlich, Kyla M; Agris, Paul F

    2015-07-31

    Aminoglycosides are a well known antibiotic family used to treat bacterial infections in humans and animals, but which can be toxic. By binding to the decoding site of helix44 of the small subunit RNA of the bacterial ribosome, the aminoglycoside antibiotics inhibit protein synthesis, cause misreading, or obstruct peptidyl-tRNA translocation. Although aminoglycosides bind helix69 of the bacterial large subunit RNA as well, little is known about their interaction with the homologous human helix69. To probe the role this binding event plays in toxicity, changes to thermal stability, base stacking, and conformation upon aminoglycoside binding to the human cytoplasmic helix69 were compared with those of the human mitochondrial and Escherichia coli helix69. Surprisingly, binding of gentamicin and kanamycin A to the chemically synthesized terminal hairpins of the human cytoplasmic, human mitochondrial, and E. coli helix69 revealed similar dissociation constants (1.3-1.7 and 4.0-5.4 μM, respectively). In addition, aminoglycoside binding enhanced conformational stability of the human mitochondrial helix69 by increasing base stacking. Proton one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR suggested significant and specific conformational changes of human mitochondrial and E. coli helix69 upon aminoglycoside binding, as compared with human cytoplasmic helix69. The conformational changes and similar aminoglycoside binding affinities observed for human mitochondrial helix69 and E. coli helix69, as well as the increase in structural stability shown for the former, suggest that this binding event is important to understanding aminoglycoside toxicity. PMID:26060252

  8. PPM1D phosphatase, a target of p53 and RBM38 RNA-binding protein, inhibits p53 mRNA translation via dephosphorylation of RBM38.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Xu, E; Zhang, J; Chen, X

    2015-11-26

    PPM1D phosphatase, also called wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1, promotes tumor development by inactivating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. RBM38 RNA-binding protein, also called RNPC1 and a target of p53, inhibits p53 messenger RNA (mRNA) translation, which can be reversed by GSK3 protein kinase via phosphorylation of RBM38 at serine 195. Here we showed that ectopic expression of RBM38 increases, whereas knockdown of RBM38 inhibits, PPM1D mRNA translation. Consistent with this, we found that RBM38 directly binds to PPM1D 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and promotes expression of a heterologous reporter gene that carries PPM1D 3'-UTR in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, we showed that PPM1D directly interacts with and dephosphorylates RBM38 at serine 195. Furthermore, we showed that PPM1D modulates p53 mRNA translation and p53-dependent growth suppression through dephosphorylation of RBM38. These findings provide evidence that the crosstalk between PPM1D and RBM38, both of which are targets and modulators of p53, has a critical role in p53 expression and activity.

  9. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U) RNA.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tiago Antonio; Soprano, Adriana Santos; de Lira, Nayara Patricia Vieira; Quaresma, Alexandre José Christino; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC), a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX), a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2), a high mobility group (CsHMG) and two poly(A)-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2), interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U) RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  10. Evidence for tertiary structural RNA-RNA interactions within the protein S4 binding site at the 5'-end of 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli.+.

    PubMed Central

    Ungewickell, E; Ehresmann, C; Stiegler, P; Garrett, R

    1975-01-01

    Evidence is presented for tertiary structural interaction(s) (interactions(s) between two regions of an RNA molecule that are widely separated in the RNA sequence) within the 5'-one third of the 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli that constitutes the binding site of protein S4. The two main interacting RNA regions were separated by about 120 nucleotides (sections Q to M) of the 16S RNA sequence. A second, smaller gap, of 13 nucleotides, occurred within section C". The two main interacting regions contain about 150 nucleotides (sections H" to Q) and 160 nucleotides (sections M to C"). They are folded back on one another and, especially in the presence of protein S4, are strongly protected against ribonuclease digestion. The intermediate region (sections Q to M), however, is relatively accessible to ribonucleases in the S4-RNP. By partial removal of subfragments from the RNA complex it was possible to localise the two main interacting sites within sections H" - H and sections I" - C". Three main criteria for the specificity of the RNA-RNA interactions were invoked and satisfied. The possibility of other tertiary structural RNA-RNA interactions occurring in other regions of the 16S RNA is discussed. Finally, all the structural information on the S4-RNP is summarised and a tentative model is proposed. Images PMID:1103089

  11. Cellular RNA Binding Proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K Regulate Influenza A Virus RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W.; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression. PMID:23825951

  12. Aminoglycosylation Can Enhance the G-Quadruplex Binding Activity of Epigallocatechin

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Ping; Ho, Hing-Man; Ma, Dik-Lung; Yang, Hui; Fu, Wai-Chung; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of enhancing G-quadruplex binding activity, two new glucosaminosides (16, 18) of penta-methylated epigallocatechin were synthesized by chemical glycosylation. Subsequent ESI-TOF-MS analysis demonstrated that these two glucosaminoside derivatives exhibit much stronger binding activity to human telomeric DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes than their parent structure (i.e., methylated EGC) (14) as well as natural epigallocatechin (EGC, 6). The DNA G-quadruplex binding activity of 16 and 18 is even more potent than strong G-quadruplex binder quercetin, which has a more planar structure. These two synthetic compounds also showed a higher binding strength to human telomeric RNA G-quadruplex than its DNA counterpart. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship revealed that the more basic compound, 16, has a higher binding capacity with DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes than its N-acetyl derivative, 18, suggesting the importance of the basicity of the aminoglycoside for G-quadruplex binding activity. Molecular docking simulation predicted that the aromatic ring of 16 π-stacks with the aromatic ring of guanine nucleotides, with the glucosamine moiety residing in the groove of G-quadruplex. This research indicates that glycosylation of natural products with aminosugar can significantly enhance their G-quadruplex binding activities, thus is an effective way to generate small molecules targeting G-quadruplexes in nucleic acids. In addition, this is the first report that green tea catechin can bind to nucleic acid G-quadruplex structures. PMID:23335983

  13. PSF and p54nrb bind a conserved stem in U5 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rui; Dye, Billy T; Pérez, Ismael; Barnard, Daron C; Thompson, Amanda B; Patton, James G

    2002-01-01

    PTB-associated splicing factor (PSF) has been implicated in both early and late steps of pre-mRNA splicing, but its exact role in this process remains unclear. Here we show that PSF interacts with p54nrb, a highly related protein first identified based on cross-reactivity to antibodies against the yeast second-step splicing factor Prpl8. We performed RNA-binding experiments to determine the preferred RNA-binding sequences for PSF and p54nrb, both individually and in combination. In all cases, iterative selection assays identified a purine-rich sequence located on the 3' side of U5 snRNA stem 1b. Filter-binding assays and RNA affinity selection experiments demonstrated that PSF and p54nrb bind U5 snRNA with both the sequence and structure of stem 1b contributing to binding specificity. Sedimentation analyses show that both proteins associate with spliceosomes and with U4/U6.U5 tri-snPNP. PMID:12403470

  14. Two RNA-binding motifs in eIF3 direct HCV IRES-dependent translation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaomin; Querol-Audí, Jordi; Mortimer, Stefanie A.; Arias-Palomo, Ernesto; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Nogales, Eva; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of protein synthesis plays an essential regulatory role in human biology. At the center of the initiation pathway, the 13-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) controls access of other initiation factors and mRNA to the ribosome by unknown mechanisms. Using electron microscopy (EM), bioinformatics and biochemical experiments, we identify two highly conserved RNA-binding motifs in eIF3 that direct translation initiation from the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) RNA. Mutations in the RNA-binding motif of subunit eIF3a weaken eIF3 binding to the HCV IRES and the 40S ribosomal subunit, thereby suppressing eIF2-dependent recognition of the start codon. Mutations in the eIF3c RNA-binding motif also reduce 40S ribosomal subunit binding to eIF3, and inhibit eIF5B-dependent steps downstream of start codon recognition. These results provide the first connection between the structure of the central translation initiation factor eIF3 and recognition of the HCV genomic RNA start codon, molecular interactions that likely extend to the human transcriptome. PMID:23766293

  15. Functional Advantages of Conserved Intrinsic Disorder in RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Zsolyomi, Fruzsina; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proteins form large macromolecular assemblies with RNA that govern essential molecular processes. RNA-binding proteins have often been associated with conformational flexibility, yet the extent and functional implications of their intrinsic disorder have never been fully assessed. Here, through large-scale analysis of comprehensive protein sequence and structure datasets we demonstrate the prevalence of intrinsic structural disorder in RNA-binding proteins and domains. We addressed their functionality through a quantitative description of the evolutionary conservation of disordered segments involved in binding, and investigated the structural implications of flexibility in terms of conformational stability and interface formation. We conclude that the functional role of intrinsically disordered protein segments in RNA-binding is two-fold: first, these regions establish extended, conserved electrostatic interfaces with RNAs via induced fit. Second, conformational flexibility enables them to target different RNA partners, providing multi-functionality, while also ensuring specificity. These findings emphasize the functional importance of intrinsically disordered regions in RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26439842

  16. MicroRNA binding site polymorphisms as biomarkers of cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Cory; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are well established as global gene regulators and thus, slight alterations in miRNA levels as well as their ability to regulate their targets may cause important cellular changes leading to cancer risk. 3′ untranslated region (UTR) miRNA binding site single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have added another layer of possible genetic variation involved in the complex process of oncogenesis. Identifying these key genetically inherited effectors of miRNA functioning has improved our understanding of the complexity of disease. Interest in the field has grown rapidly in only the last 5 years, with several studies reporting on the role of 3′UTR binding site SNPs as genetic markers of increased cancer susceptibility, as well as biomarkers of cancer type, outcome and response to therapy. Currently, there are numerous known miRNA binding site SNPs associated with multiple cancer subtypes. PMID:20843204

  17. Organic additives stabilize RNA aptamer binding of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Chi, Hong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Marks, Robert S; Steele, Terry W J

    2016-11-01

    Aptamer-ligand binding has been utilized for biological applications due to its specific binding and synthetic nature. However, the applications will be limited if the binding or the ligand is unstable. Malachite green aptamer (MGA) and its labile ligand malachite green (MG) were found to have increasing apparent dissociation constants (Kd) as determined through the first order rate loss of emission intensity of the MGA-MG fluorescent complex. The fluorescent intensity loss was hypothesized to be from the hydrolysis of MG into malachite green carbinol base (MGOH). Random screening organic additives were found to reduce or retain the fluorescence emission and the calculated apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding. The protective effect became more apparent as the percentage of organic additives increased up to 10% v/v. The mechanism behind the organic additive protective effects was primarily from a ~5X increase in first order rate kinetics of MGOH→MG (kMGOH→MG), which significantly changed the equilibrium constant (Keq), favoring the generation of MG, versus MGOH without organic additives. A simple way has been developed to stabilize the apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding over 24h, which may be beneficial in stabilizing other triphenylmethane or carbocation ligand-aptamer interactions that are susceptible to SN1 hydrolysis.

  18. Organic additives stabilize RNA aptamer binding of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Chi, Hong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Marks, Robert S; Steele, Terry W J

    2016-11-01

    Aptamer-ligand binding has been utilized for biological applications due to its specific binding and synthetic nature. However, the applications will be limited if the binding or the ligand is unstable. Malachite green aptamer (MGA) and its labile ligand malachite green (MG) were found to have increasing apparent dissociation constants (Kd) as determined through the first order rate loss of emission intensity of the MGA-MG fluorescent complex. The fluorescent intensity loss was hypothesized to be from the hydrolysis of MG into malachite green carbinol base (MGOH). Random screening organic additives were found to reduce or retain the fluorescence emission and the calculated apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding. The protective effect became more apparent as the percentage of organic additives increased up to 10% v/v. The mechanism behind the organic additive protective effects was primarily from a ~5X increase in first order rate kinetics of MGOH→MG (kMGOH→MG), which significantly changed the equilibrium constant (Keq), favoring the generation of MG, versus MGOH without organic additives. A simple way has been developed to stabilize the apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding over 24h, which may be beneficial in stabilizing other triphenylmethane or carbocation ligand-aptamer interactions that are susceptible to SN1 hydrolysis. PMID:27591602

  19. Three-dimensional model of a selective theophylline-binding RNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Oprea, T.I.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.

    1995-07-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) model for an RNA molecule that selectively binds theophylline but not caffeine. This RNA, which was found using SELEX [Jenison, R.D., et al., Science (1994) 263:1425] is 10,000 times more specific for theophylline (Kd=320 nM) than for caffeine (Kd=3.5 mM), although the two ligands are identical except for a methyl group substituted at N7 (present only in caffeine). The binding affinity for ten xanthine-based ligands was used to derive a Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) model (R{sup 2} = 0.93 for 3 components, with cross-validated R{sup 2} of 0.73), using the SYBYL and GOLPE programs. A pharmacophoric map was generated to locate steric and electrostatic interactions between theophylline and the RNA binding site. This information was used to identify putative functional groups of the binding pocket and to generate distance constraints. Based on a model for the secondary structure (Jenison et al., idem), the 3D structure of this RNA was then generated using the following method: each helical region of the RNA molecule was treated as a rigid body; single-stranded loops with specific end-to-end distances were generated. The structures of RNA-xanthine complexes were studied using a modified Monte Carlo algorithm. The detailed structure of an RNA-ligand complex model, as well as possible explanations for the theophylline selectivity will be discussed.

  20. Reading RNA methylation codes through methyl-specific binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    N (6)-methyladenosine (m (6)A) is a prevalent modification of eukaryotic mRNAs. It regulates yeast cell fate and is essential to the development and fertility of metazoans. Although its presence in mRNA has been known since the early 1970s, the function of m (6)A remained a mystery until the spate of discoveries in the past three years. Here, we focus on the discovery of m (6)A "readers" (proteins that specifically recognize m (6)A), and their functions in tuning mRNA stability, as well as the broader significance of such m (6)A-dependent regulation of gene expression. PMID:24823649

  1. High-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding regions mediated by intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs and IDRs) lack stable 3D structure under physiological conditions in-vitro, are common in eukaryotes, and facilitate interactions with RNA, DNA and proteins. Current methods for prediction of IDPs and IDRs do not provide insights into their functions, except for a handful of methods that address predictions of protein-binding regions. We report first-of-its-kind computational method DisoRDPbind for high-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding residues located in IDRs from protein sequences. DisoRDPbind is implemented using a runtime-efficient multi-layered design that utilizes information extracted from physiochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, putative secondary structure and disorder and sequence alignment. Empirical tests demonstrate that it provides accurate predictions that are competitive with other predictors of disorder-mediated protein binding regions and complementary to the methods that predict RNA- and DNA-binding residues annotated based on crystal structures. Application in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes reveals that RNA- and DNA-binding proteins predicted by DisoRDPbind complement and overlap with the corresponding known binding proteins collected from several sources. Also, the number of the putative protein-binding regions predicted with DisoRDPbind correlates with the promiscuity of proteins in the corresponding protein-protein interaction networks. Webserver: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DisoRDPbind/.

  2. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  3. Structural basis for binding the TREX2 complex to nuclear pores, GAL1 localisation and mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Jani, Divyang; Valkov, Eugene; Stewart, Murray

    2014-06-01

    The conserved Sac3:Thp1:Sem1:Sus1:Cdc31 (TREX2) complex binds to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and, in addition to integrating mRNA nuclear export with preceding steps in the gene expression pathway, facilitates re-positioning of highly regulated actively transcribing genes (such as GAL1) to NPCs. Although TREX2 is thought to bind NPC protein Nup1, defining the precise role of this interaction has been frustrated by the complex pleiotropic phenotype exhibited by nup1Δ strains. To provide a structural framework for understanding the binding of TREX2 to NPCs and its function in the gene expression pathway, we have determined the structure of the Nup1:TREX2 interaction interface and used this information to engineer a Sac3 variant that impairs NPC binding while not compromising TREX2 assembly. This variant inhibited the NPC association of both de-repressed and activated GAL1 and also produced mRNA export and growth defects. These results indicate that the TREX2:Nup1 interaction facilitates the efficient nuclear export of bulk mRNA together with the re-positioning of GAL1 to NPCs that is required for transcriptional control that is mediated by removal of SUMO from repressors by NPC-bound Ulp1.

  4. Structural basis for binding the TREX2 complex to nuclear pores, GAL1 localisation and mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Jani, Divyang; Valkov, Eugene; Stewart, Murray

    2014-06-01

    The conserved Sac3:Thp1:Sem1:Sus1:Cdc31 (TREX2) complex binds to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and, in addition to integrating mRNA nuclear export with preceding steps in the gene expression pathway, facilitates re-positioning of highly regulated actively transcribing genes (such as GAL1) to NPCs. Although TREX2 is thought to bind NPC protein Nup1, defining the precise role of this interaction has been frustrated by the complex pleiotropic phenotype exhibited by nup1Δ strains. To provide a structural framework for understanding the binding of TREX2 to NPCs and its function in the gene expression pathway, we have determined the structure of the Nup1:TREX2 interaction interface and used this information to engineer a Sac3 variant that impairs NPC binding while not compromising TREX2 assembly. This variant inhibited the NPC association of both de-repressed and activated GAL1 and also produced mRNA export and growth defects. These results indicate that the TREX2:Nup1 interaction facilitates the efficient nuclear export of bulk mRNA together with the re-positioning of GAL1 to NPCs that is required for transcriptional control that is mediated by removal of SUMO from repressors by NPC-bound Ulp1. PMID:24705649

  5. Heme activation by DNA: isoguanine pentaplexes, but not quadruplexes, bind heme and enhance its oxidative activity

    PubMed Central

    Shumayrikh, Nisreen; Huang, Yu Chuan; Sen, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    Guanine-rich, single-stranded, DNAs and RNAs are able to fold to form G-quadruplexes that are held together by guanine base quartets. G-quadruplexes are known to bind ferric heme [Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX] and to strongly activate such bound hemes toward peroxidase (1-electron oxidation) as well as oxygenase/peroxygenase (2-electron oxidation) activities. However, much remains unknown about how such activation is effected. Herein, we investigated whether G-quadruplexes were strictly required for heme activation or whether related multi-stranded DNA/RNA structures such as isoguanine (iG) quadruplexes and pentaplexes could also bind and activate heme. We found that iG-pentaplexes did indeed bind and activate heme comparably to G-quadruplexes; however, iG-quadruplexes did neither. Earlier structural and computational studies had suggested that while the geometry of backbone-unconstrained iG-quintets templated by cations such as Na+ or NH4+ was planar, that of iG-quartets deviated from planarity. We hypothesize that the binding as well as activation of heme by DNA or RNA is strongly supported by the planarity of the nucleobase quartet or quintet that interacts directly with the heme. PMID:25824944

  6. New hypoxanthine nucleosides with RNA antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, V; Ussery, M A

    1992-08-01

    A series of novel C-2 functionalized hypoxanthine and purine ribonucleosides have been synthesized and evaluated against exotic RNA viruses of the family or genus alpha, arena, flavi, and rhabdo. Both specific and broad-spectrum antiviral activities were discovered but only with hypoxanthine nucleosides. PMID:1444325

  7. Identification of two proteins that bind to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of GAP-43 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, N; Baekelandt, V; Goritchenko, L; Benowitz, L I

    1997-01-01

    GAP-43 is a membrane phosphoprotein that is important for the development and plasticity of neural connections. In undifferentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, GAP-43 mRNA degrades rapidly ( t = 5 h), but becomes stable when cells are treated with nerve growth factor. To identify trans- acting factors that may influence mRNA stability, we combined column chromatography and gel mobility shift assays to isolate GAP-43 mRNA binding proteins from neonatal bovine brain tissue. This resulted in the isolation of two proteins that bind specifically and competitively to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of GAP-43 mRNA. Partial amino acid sequencing revealed that one of the RNA binding proteins coincides with FBP (far upstream element binding protein), previously characterized as a protein that resembles hnRNP K and which binds to a single-stranded, pyrimidine-rich DNA sequence upstream of the c -myc gene to activate its expression. The other binding protein shares sequence homology with PTB, a polypyrimidine tract binding protein implicated in RNA splicing and regulation of translation initiation. The two proteins bind to a 26 nt pyrimidine-rich sequence lying 300 nt downstream of the end of the coding region, in an area shown by others to confer instability on a reporter mRNA in transient transfection assays. We therefore propose that FBP and the PTB-like protein may compete for binding at the same site to influence the stability of GAP-43 mRNA. PMID:9092640

  8. Binding sites for abundant nuclear factors modulate RNA polymerase I-dependent enhancer function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kang, J J; Yokoi, T J; Holland, M J

    1995-12-01

    The 190-base pair (bp) rDNA enhancer within the intergenic spacer sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA cistrons activates synthesis of the 35S-rRNA precursor about 20-fold in vivo (Mestel,, R., Yip, M., Holland, J. P., Wang, E., Kang, J., and Holland, M. J. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1243-1254). We now report identification and analysis of transcriptional activities mediated by three cis-acting sites within a 90-bp portion of the rDNA enhancer designated the modulator region. In vivo, these sequences mediated termination of transcription by RNA polymerase I and potentiated the activity of the rDNA enhancer element. Two trans-acting factors, REB1 and REB2, bind independently to sites within the modulator region (Morrow, B. E., Johnson, S. P., and Warner, J. R. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 9061-9068). We show that REB2 is identical to the ABF1 protien. Site-directed mutagenesis of REB1 and ABF1 binding sites demonstrated uncoupling of RNA polymerase I-dependent termination from transcriptional activation in vivo. We conclude that REB1 and ABF1 are required for RNA polymerase I-dependent termination and enhancer function, respectively, Since REB1 and ABF1 proteins also regulate expression of class II genes and other nuclear functions, our results suggest further similarities between RNA polymerase I and II regulatory mechanisms. Two rDNA enhancers flanking a rDNA minigene stimulated RNA polymerase I transcription in a "multiplicative" fashion. Deletion mapping analysis showed that similar cis-acting sequences were required for enhancer function when positioned upstream or downstream from a rDNA minigene.

  9. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adaptive binding in the malachite green RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Jason B; Andreiev, Aurelia I; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2013-09-24

    Adaptive binding, the ability of molecules to fold themselves around the structure of a ligand and thereby incorporating it into their three-dimensional fold, is a key feature of most RNA aptamers. The malachite green aptamer (MGA) has been shown to bind several closely related triphenyl dyes with planar and nonplanar structures in this manner. Competitive binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped flow kinetics have been conducted with the aim of understanding the adaptive nature of RNA-ligand interaction. The results of these studies reveal that binding of one ligand can reduce the ability of the aptamer pocket to adapt to another ligand, even if this second ligand has a significantly higher affinity to the free aptamer. A similar effect is observed in the presence of Mg(2+) ions which stabilize the binding pocket in a more ligand bound-like conformation.

  10. Sequence-specific binding of a hormonally regulated mRNA binding protein to cytidine-rich sequences in the lutropin receptor open reading frame.

    PubMed

    Kash, J C; Menon, K M

    1999-12-21

    In previous studies, a lutropin receptor mRNA binding protein implicated in the hormonal regulation of lutropin receptor mRNA stability was identified. This protein, termed LRBP-1, was shown by RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay to specifically interact with lutropin receptor RNA sequences. The present studies have examined the specificity of lutropin receptor mRNA recognition by LRBP-1 and mapped the contact site by RNA footprinting and by site-directed mutagenesis. LRBP-1 was partially purified by cation-exchange chromatography, and the mRNA binding properties of the partially purified LRBP-1 were examined by RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hydroxyl-radical RNA footprinting. These data showed that the LRBP-1 binding site is located between nucleotides 203 and 220 of the receptor open reading frame, and consists of the bipartite polypyrimidine sequence 5'-UCUC-X(7)-UCUCCCU-3'. Competition RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that homoribopolymers of poly(rC) were effective RNA binding competitors, while poly(rA), poly(rG), and poly(rU) showed no effect. Mutagenesis of the cytidine residues contained within the LRBP-1 binding site demonstrated that all the cytidines in the bipartite sequence contribute to LRBP-1 binding specificity. Additionally, RNA gel electrophoretic mobility supershift analysis showed that LRBP-1 was not recognized by antibodies against two well-characterized poly(rC) RNA binding proteins, alphaCP-1 and alphaCP-2, implicated in the regulation of RNA stability of alpha-globin and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNAs. In summary, we show that partially purified LRBP-1 binds to a polypyrimidine sequence within nucleotides 203 and 220 of lutropin receptor mRNA with a high degree of specificity which is indicative of its role in posttranscriptional control of lutropin receptor expression.

  11. mRNA Decay of Most Arabidopsis miRNA Targets Requires Slicer Activity of AGO11[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression in animals and plants. They guide RNA-induced silencing complexes to complementary target mRNA, thereby mediating mRNA degradation or translational repression. ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins bind directly to miRNAs and may catalyze cleavage (slicing) of target mRNAs. In animals, miRNA target degradation via slicing occurs only exceptionally, and target mRNA decay is induced via AGO-dependent recruitment of deadenylase complexes. Conversely, plant miRNAs generally direct slicing of their targets, but it is unclear whether slicer-independent mechanisms of target mRNA decay also exist, and, if so, how much they contribute to miRNA-induced mRNA decay. Here, we compare phenotypes and transcript profiles of ago1 null and slicer-deficient mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We also construct conditional loss-of-function mutants of AGO1 to allow transcript profiling in true leaves. Although phenotypic differences between ago1 null and slicer-deficient mutants can be discerned, the results of both transcript profiling approaches indicate that slicer activity is required for mRNA repression of the vast majority of miRNA targets. A set of genes exhibiting up-regulation specifically in ago1 null, but not in ago1 slicer-deficient mutants was also identified, leaving open the possibility that AGO1 may have functions in gene regulation independent of small RNAs. PMID:27208258

  12. Orthogonal matrix factorization enables integrative analysis of multiple RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stražar, Martin; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Ule, Jernej; Curk, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, including splicing, transport, polyadenylation and RNA stability. To model protein–RNA interactions by considering all available sources of information, it is necessary to integrate the rapidly growing RBP experimental data with the latest genome annotation, gene function, RNA sequence and structure. Such integration is possible by matrix factorization, where current approaches have an undesired tendency to identify only a small number of the strongest patterns with overlapping features. Because protein–RNA interactions are orchestrated by multiple factors, methods that identify discriminative patterns of varying strengths are needed. Results: We have developed an integrative orthogonality-regularized nonnegative matrix factorization (iONMF) to integrate multiple data sources and discover non-overlapping, class-specific RNA binding patterns of varying strengths. The orthogonality constraint halves the effective size of the factor model and outperforms other NMF models in predicting RBP interaction sites on RNA. We have integrated the largest data compendium to date, which includes 31 CLIP experiments on 19 RBPs involved in splicing (such as hnRNPs, U2AF2, ELAVL1, TDP-43 and FUS) and processing of 3’UTR (Ago, IGF2BP). We show that the integration of multiple data sources improves the predictive accuracy of retrieval of RNA binding sites. In our study the key predictive factors of protein–RNA interactions were the position of RNA structure and sequence motifs, RBP co-binding and gene region type. We report on a number of protein-specific patterns, many of which are consistent with experimentally determined properties of RBPs. Availability and implementation: The iONMF implementation and example datasets are available at https://github.com/mstrazar/ionmf. Contact: tomaz.curk@fri.uni-lj.si Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available

  13. Probing the leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase active site with tRNA substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Krishnakumar, Kollappillil S; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Strazewski, Peter; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases post-translationally conjugate an amino acid from an aminoacyl-tRNA onto the N-terminus of a target polypeptide. The eubacterial aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase, L/F transferase, utilizes both leucyl-tRNA(Leu) and phenylalanyl-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. X-ray crystal structures with substrate analogues, the minimal substrate phenylalanyl adenosine (rA-Phe) and inhibitor puromycin, have been used to characterize tRNA recognition by L/F transferase. However analyses of these two X-ray crystal structures reveal significant differences in binding. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and enzymatic activity assays, we rationalize and demonstrate that the substrate analogues bind to L/F transferase with similar binding affinities using a series of different interactions by the various chemical groups of the analogues. Our data also demonstrates that enlarging the hydrophobic pocket of L/F transferase selectively enhances puromycin inhibition and may aid in the development of improved inhibitors for this class of enzymes.

  14. RNA binding by a novel helical fold of b2 protein from wuhan nodavirus mediates the suppression of RNA interference and promotes b2 dimerization.

    PubMed

    Qi, Nan; Cai, Dawei; Qiu, Yang; Xie, Jiazheng; Wang, Zhaowei; Si, Jie; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhou, Xi; Hu, Yuanyang

    2011-09-01

    Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) is a newly identified member of the Nodaviridae family with a bipartite genome of positive-sense RNAs. A nonstructural protein encoded by subgenomic RNA3 of nodaviruses, B2, serves as a potent RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) by sequestering RNA duplexes. We have previously demonstrated that WhNV B2 blocks RNA silencing in cultured Drosophila cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which WhNV B2 functions remains unknown. Here, we successfully established an RNA silencing system in cells derived from Pieris rapae, a natural host of WhNV, by introducing into these cells double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-expressing plasmids or chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Using this system, we revealed that the WhNV B2 protein inhibited Dicer-mediated dsRNA cleavage and the incorporation of siRNA into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) by sequestering dsRNA and siRNA. Based on the modeled B2 3-dimensional structure, serial single alanine replacement mutations and N-terminal deletion analyses showed that the RNA-binding domain of B2 is formed by its helices α2 and α3, while helix α1 mediates B2 dimerization. Furthermore, positive feedback between RNA binding and B2 dimerization was uncovered by gel shift assay and far-Western blotting, revealing that B2 dimerization is required for its binding to RNA, whereas RNA binding to B2 in turn promotes its dimerization. All together, our findings uncovered a novel RNA-binding mode of WhNV B2 and provided evidence that the promotion effect of RNA binding on dimerization exists in a viral RSS protein. PMID:21734038

  15. RNA Binding by a Novel Helical Fold of B2 Protein from Wuhan Nodavirus Mediates the Suppression of RNA Interference and Promotes B2 Dimerization ▿

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Nan; Cai, Dawei; Qiu, Yang; Xie, Jiazheng; Wang, Zhaowei; Si, Jie; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhou, Xi; Hu, Yuanyang

    2011-01-01

    Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) is a newly identified member of the Nodaviridae family with a bipartite genome of positive-sense RNAs. A nonstructural protein encoded by subgenomic RNA3 of nodaviruses, B2, serves as a potent RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) by sequestering RNA duplexes. We have previously demonstrated that WhNV B2 blocks RNA silencing in cultured Drosophila cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which WhNV B2 functions remains unknown. Here, we successfully established an RNA silencing system in cells derived from Pieris rapae, a natural host of WhNV, by introducing into these cells double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-expressing plasmids or chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Using this system, we revealed that the WhNV B2 protein inhibited Dicer-mediated dsRNA cleavage and the incorporation of siRNA into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) by sequestering dsRNA and siRNA. Based on the modeled B2 3-dimensional structure, serial single alanine replacement mutations and N-terminal deletion analyses showed that the RNA-binding domain of B2 is formed by its helices α2 and α3, while helix α1 mediates B2 dimerization. Furthermore, positive feedback between RNA binding and B2 dimerization was uncovered by gel shift assay and far-Western blotting, revealing that B2 dimerization is required for its binding to RNA, whereas RNA binding to B2 in turn promotes its dimerization. All together, our findings uncovered a novel RNA-binding mode of WhNV B2 and provided evidence that the promotion effect of RNA binding on dimerization exists in a viral RSS protein. PMID:21734038

  16. Insights into the Recognition, Binding and Reactivity of Catalytic Metallodrugs Targeting Stem Loop IIb of Hepatitis C IRES RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Seth S.; Ross, Martin James; Fidai, Insiya; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex Cu-GGHYrFK-amide (1-Cu) was previously reported as a novel metallotherapeutic that catalytically inactivates stem loop IIb of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Internal Ribosomal Entry Site (IRES) RNA and demonstrates significant antiviral activity in a cellular HCV replicon assay. Herein are described additional studies focused on understanding the cleavage mechanism, as well as the relationship of catalyst configuration to structural recognition and site-selective cleavage of the structured RNA motif. These are advanced by use of a combination of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, melting temperature determination, and computational analysis to develop a structural model for binding and reactivity toward SLIIb of the IRES RNA. In addition, the binding, reactivity, and structural chemistry of the all d-amino acid form of this metallopeptide, complex 2-Cu, is reported and compared to complex 1-Cu. In vitro RNA binding and cleavage assays for complex 2-Cu show a KD of 76 ± 3 nM, and Michaelis-Menten parameters of kcat of 0.14 ± 0.01 min−1 and KM of 7.9 ± 1.2 µM, with a turnover number exceeding 40. In a luciferase-based cellular replicon assay Cu-GGhyrfk-amide shows activity similar to the parent peptide, complex 1-Cu, with IC50 of 1.9 ± 0.4 µM and cytotoxicity exceeding 100 µM. RT-PCR experiments confirm a significant reduction in HCV RNA levels in replicon assays for up to nine days when treated with complex 1-Cu in three day dosing increments. This study shows the influence that the α-carbon stereocenter has for this the new class of compounds, while detailed mass spectrometry and computational analysis provide new insights into the mechanisms of recognition, binding, and reactivity. PMID:24756921

  17. RNA-binding protein DUS16 plays an essential role in primary miRNA processing in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomohito; Onishi, Masayuki; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Cerutti, Heriberto; Ohama, Takeshi

    2016-09-20

    Canonical microRNAs (miRNAs) are embedded in duplexed stem-loops in long precursor transcripts and are excised by sequential cleavage by DICER nuclease(s). In this miRNA biogenesis pathway, dsRNA-binding proteins play important roles in animals and plants by assisting DICER. However, these RNA-binding proteins are poorly characterized in unicellular organisms. Here we report that a unique RNA-binding protein, Dull slicer-16 (DUS16), plays an essential role in processing of primary-miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii In animals and plants, dsRNA-binding proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis harbor two or three dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs), whereas DUS16 contains one dsRBD and also an ssRNA-binding domain (RRM). The null mutant of DUS16 showed a drastic reduction in most miRNA species. Production of these miRNAs was complemented by expression of full-length DUS16, but the expression of RRM- or dsRBD-truncated DUS16 did not restore miRNA production. Furthermore, DUS16 is predominantly localized to the nucleus and associated with nascent (unspliced form) pri-miRNAs and the DICER-LIKE 3 protein. These results suggest that DUS16 recognizes pri-miRNA transcripts cotranscriptionally and promotes their processing into mature miRNAs as a component of a microprocessor complex. We propose that DUS16 is an essential factor for miRNA production in Chlamydomonas and, because DUS16 is functionally similar to the dsRNA-binding proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis in animals and land plants, our report provides insight into this mechanism in unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27582463

  18. spongeScan: A web for detecting microRNA binding elements in lncRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Furió-Tarí, Pedro; Tarazona, Sonia; Gabaldón, Toni; Enright, Anton J.; Conesa, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA transcripts such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important genetic regulators. However, the functions of many of these transcripts are still not clearly understood. Recently, it has become apparent that there is significant crosstalk between miRNAs and lncRNAs and that this creates competition for binding between the miRNA, a lncRNA and other regulatory targets. Indeed, various competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) have already been identified where a lncRNA acts by sequestering miRNAs. This implies the down-regulation in the interaction of the miRNAs with their mRNA targets, what has been called a sponge effect. Multiple approaches exist for the prediction of miRNA targets in mRNAs. However, few methods exist for the prediction of miRNA response elements (MREs) in lncRNAs acting as ceRNAs (sponges). Here, we present spongeScan (http://spongescan.rc.ufl.edu), a graphical web tool to compute and visualize putative MREs in lncRNAs, along with different measures to assess their likely behavior as ceRNAs. PMID:27198221

  19. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  20. RNA-Binding Efficacy of N-Phenylbenzohydroxamic Acid: An Invitro and Insilico Approach.

    PubMed

    Khilari, Rubi; Thakur, Yamini; Pardhi, Manish; Pande, Rama

    2015-01-01

    RNA has attracted recent attention for its key role in gene expression and hence targeting by small molecules for therapeutic intervention. This study is aimed to elucidate the specificity of RNA binding affinity of parent compound of N-arylhydroxamic acids series, N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid trivially named as PBHA,C6H5NOH.C6H5C˭O. The binding behavior was examined by various biophysical methods such as absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. Molecular docking was also done. The value of affinity constant and overall binding constant was calculated 5.79±0.03×10(4) M(-1) and K'=1.09±0.03×10(5) M(-1), respectively. The Stern-Volmer constant Ksv obtained was 2.28±0.04×10(4) M(-1). The compound (PBHA) shows a concentration-based enhancement of fluorescence intensity with increasing RNA concentration. Fluorescence quenching of PBHA-RNA complex in presence of K4 [Fe(CN)6] was also observed. Viscometric studies complimented the UV results where a continuous increase in relative viscosity of the RNA solution was observed with added optimal PBHA concentration. All the experimental evidences indicate that PBHA can strongly bind to RNA through an intercalative mode. PMID:25874942

  1. Human importin alpha and RNA do not compete for binding to influenza A virus nucleoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Boulo, Sebastien; Akarsu, Hatice; Lotteau, Vincent; Mueller, Christoph W.; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Baudin, Florence

    2011-01-05

    Influenza virus has a segmented genome composed of eight negative stranded RNA segments. Each segment is covered with NP forming ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and carries a copy of the heterotrimeric polymerase complex. As a rare phenomenon among the RNA viruses, the viral replication occurs in the nucleus and therefore implies interactions between host and viral factors, such as between importin alpha and nucleoprotein. In the present study we report that through binding with the human nuclear receptor importin {alpha}5 (Imp{alpha}5), the viral NP is no longer oligomeric but maintained as a monomer inside the complex. In this regard, Imp{alpha}5 acts as a chaperone until NP is delivered in the nucleus for viral RNA encapsidation. Moreover, we show that the association of NP with the host transporter does not impair the binding of NP to RNA. The complex human Imp{alpha}5-NP binds RNA with the same affinity as wt NP alone, whereas engineered monomeric NP through point mutations binds RNA with a strongly reduced affinity.

  2. Mechanism of Coupled Folding and Binding in the siRNA-PAZ Complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Feng

    2008-08-01

    The PAZ domain plays a key role in gene silencing pathway. The PAZ domain binds with siRNAs to form the multimeric RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC identifies mRNAs homologous to the siRNAs and promotes their degradation. It was found that binding with siRNA significantly enhances apo-PAZ folding. However, the mechanism by which folding is coupled to binding is poorly understood. Thus, the coupling relationship between binding and folding is very important for understanding the function of gene silencing. We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) of both bound and apo-PAZ to study the coupling mechanism between binding and folding in the siRNA-PAZ complex. Room-temperature MD simulations suggest that both PAZ and siRNA become more rigid and stable upon siRNA binding. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature MD simulations shows that both bound and apo-PAZ unfold via a two-state process. The unfolding pathways are different between bound and apo-PAZ: the order of helix III and helices I & II unfolding is switched. Furthermore, transition probability was used to determine the transition state ensemble for both bound and apo-PAZ. It was found that the transition state of bound PAZ is more compact than that of apo-PAZ. The predicted Φ-values suggest that the Φ-values of helix III and sheets of β3-β7 for bound PAZ are more native-like than those of apo-PAZ upon the binding of siRNA. The results can help us to understand the mechanism of gene silencing.

  3. Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli uses the same determinants to bind 16S ribosomal RNA and its messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli binds to the lower half of the 3′ major domain of 16S rRNA and initiates its folding. It also binds to its own mRNA, the str mRNA, and represses its translation. Using filter binding assays, we show in this study that the same mutations that interfere with S7 binding to 16S rRNA also weaken its affinity for its mRNA. This suggests that the same protein regions are responsible for mRNA and rRNA binding affinities, and that S7 recognizes identical sequence elements within the two RNA targets, although they have dissimilar secondary structures. Overexpression of S7 is known to inhibit bacterial growth. This phenotypic growth defect was relieved in cells overexpressing S7 mutants that bind poorly the str mRNA, confirming that growth impairment is controlled by the binding of S7 to its mRNA. Interestingly, a mutant with a short deletion at the C-terminus of S7 was more detrimental to cell growth than wild-type S7. This suggests that the C-terminal portion of S7 plays an important role in ribosome function, which is perturbed by the deletion. PMID:11160889

  4. Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli uses the same determinants to bind 16S ribosomal RNA and its messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Robert, F; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2001-02-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli binds to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA and initiates its folding. It also binds to its own mRNA, the str mRNA, and represses its translation. Using filter binding assays, we show in this study that the same mutations that interfere with S7 binding to 16S rRNA also weaken its affinity for its mRNA. This suggests that the same protein regions are responsible for mRNA and rRNA binding affinities, and that S7 recognizes identical sequence elements within the two RNA targets, although they have dissimilar secondary structures. Overexpression of S7 is known to inhibit bacterial growth. This phenotypic growth defect was relieved in cells overexpressing S7 mutants that bind poorly the str mRNA, confirming that growth impairment is controlled by the binding of S7 to its mRNA. Interestingly, a mutant with a short deletion at the C-terminus of S7 was more detrimental to cell growth than wild-type S7. This suggests that the C-terminal portion of S7 plays an important role in ribosome function, which is perturbed by the deletion.

  5. Structural basis of RNA recognition and activation by innate immune receptor RIG-I

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Fuguo; Ramanathan, Anand; Miller, Matthew T.; Tang, Guo-Qing; Gale, Jr., Michael; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2012-05-29

    Retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I; also known as DDX58) is a cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motifs to differentiate between viral and cellular RNAs. RIG-I is activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNA with or without a 5'-triphosphate (ppp), by single-stranded RNA marked by a 5'-ppp and by polyuridine sequences. Upon binding to such PAMP motifs, RIG-I initiates a signalling cascade that induces innate immune defences and inflammatory cytokines to establish an antiviral state. The RIG-I pathway is highly regulated and aberrant signalling leads to apoptosis, altered cell differentiation, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The helicase and repressor domains (RD) of RIG-I recognize dsRNA and 5'-ppp RNA to activate the two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) for signalling. Here, to understand the synergy between the helicase and the RD for RNA binding, and the contribution of ATP hydrolysis to RIG-I activation, we determined the structure of human RIG-I helicase-RD in complex with dsRNA and an ATP analogue. The helicase-RD organizes into a ring around dsRNA, capping one end, while contacting both strands using previously uncharacterized motifs to recognize dsRNA. Small-angle X-ray scattering, limited proteolysis and differential scanning fluorimetry indicate that RIG-I is in an extended and flexible conformation that compacts upon binding RNA. These results provide a detailed view of the role of helicase in dsRNA recognition, the synergy between the RD and the helicase for RNA binding and the organization of full-length RIG-I bound to dsRNA, and provide evidence of a conformational change upon RNA binding. The RIG-I helicase-RD structure is consistent with dsRNA translocation without unwinding and cooperative binding to RNA. The structure yields unprecedented insight into innate immunity and has a broader impact on other areas of biology, including RNA

  6. Identification of the sequences recognized by phage phi 29 transcriptional activator: possible interaction between the activator and the RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Barthelemy, I; Salas, M

    1991-05-11

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 late genes requires the transcriptional activator protein p4. This activator binds to a region of the late A3 promoter spanning nucleotides -56 to -102 relative to the transcription start site, generating a strong bending Tin the DNA. In this work the target sequences recognized by protein p4 in the phage phi 29 late A3 promoter have been characterized. The binding of protein p4 to derivatives of the late A3 promoter harbouring deletions in the protein p4 binding site has been studied. When protein p4 recognition sequences were altered, the activator could only bind to the promoter in the presence of RNA polymerase. This strong cooperativity in the binding of protein p4 and RNA polymerase to the promoter suggests the presence of direct protein-protein contacts between them.

  7. Negative regulation of RNA-binding protein HuR by tumor-suppressor ECRG2.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, C; Sheikh, M S; Huang, Y

    2016-05-19

    Esophageal cancer-related gene 2 (ECRG2) is a newer tumor suppressor whose function in the regulation of cell growth and apoptosis remains to be elucidated. Here we show that ECRG2 expression was upregulated in response to DNA damage, and increased ECRG2 expression induced growth suppression in cancer cells but not in non-cancerous epithelial cells. ECRG2-mediated growth suppression was associated with activation of caspases and marked reduction in the levels of apoptosis inhibitor, X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). ECRG2, via RNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR), regulated XIAP mRNA stability and expression. Furthermore, ECRG2 increased HuR ubiquitination and degradation but was unable to modulate the non-ubiquitinable mutant form of HuR. We also identified missense and frame-shift ECRG2 mutations in various human malignancies and noted that, unlike wild-type ECRG2, one cancer-derived ECRG2 mutant harboring glutamic acid instead of valine at position 30 (V30E) failed to induce cell death and activation of caspases. This naturally occurring V30E mutant also did not suppress XIAP and HuR. Importantly, the V30E mutant overexpressing cancer cells acquired resistance against multiple anticancer drugs, thus suggesting that ECRG2 mutations appear to have an important role in the acquisition of anticancer drug resistance in a subset of human malignancies.

  8. MicroRNA modules prefer to bind weak and unconventional target sites

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in gene regulation. Although it is well known that multiple miRNAs may work as miRNA modules to synergistically regulate common target mRNAs, the understanding of miRNA modules is still in its infancy. Results: We employed the recently generated high throughput experimental data to study miRNA modules. We predicted 181 miRNA modules and 306 potential miRNA modules. We observed that the target sites of these predicted modules were in general weaker compared with those not bound by miRNA modules. We also discovered that miRNAs in predicted modules preferred to bind unconventional target sites rather than canonical sites. Surprisingly, contrary to a previous study, we found that most adjacent miRNA target sites from the same miRNA modules were not within the range of 10–130 nucleotides. Interestingly, the distance of target sites bound by miRNAs in the same modules was shorter when miRNA modules bound unconventional instead of canonical sites. Our study shed new light on miRNA binding and miRNA target sites, which will likely advance our understanding of miRNA regulation. Availability and implementation: The software miRModule can be freely downloaded at http://hulab.ucf.edu/research/projects/miRNA/miRModule. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: haihu@cs.ucf.edu or xiaoman@mail.ucf.edu. PMID:25527098

  9. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katja; Koester, Tino; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance. PMID:26213982

  10. STarMirDB: A database of microRNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Rennie, William; Kanoria, Shaveta; Liu, Chaochun; Mallick, Bibekanand; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Lu, Jun; Ding, Ye

    2016-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of ∼22 nucleotides (nts) in length. These small regulatory molecules are involved in diverse developmental, physiological and pathological processes. miRNAs target mRNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. Predictions of miRNA binding sites facilitate experimental validation of miRNA targets. Models developed with data from CLIP studies have been used for predictions of miRNA binding sites in the whole transcriptomes of human, mouse and worm. The prediction results have been assembled into STarMirDB, a new database of miRNA binding sites available at http://sfold.wadsworth.org/starmirDB.php . STarMirDB can be searched by miRNAs or mRNAs separately or in combination. The search results are categorized into seed and seedless sites in 3' UTR, CDS and 5' UTR. For each predicted site, STarMirDB provides a comprehensive list of sequence, thermodynamic and target structural features that are known to influence miRNA: target interaction. A high resolution PDF diagram of the conformation of the miRNA:target hybrid is also available for visualization and publication. The results of a database search are available through both an interactive viewer and downloadable text files. PMID:27144897

  11. Constitutive patterns of gene expression regulated by RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA-binding proteins regulate a number of cellular processes, including synthesis, folding, translocation, assembly and clearance of RNAs. Recent studies have reported that an unexpectedly large number of proteins are able to interact with RNA, but the partners of many RNA-binding proteins are still uncharacterized. Results We combined prediction of ribonucleoprotein interactions, based on catRAPID calculations, with analysis of protein and RNA expression profiles from human tissues. We found strong interaction propensities for both positively and negatively correlated expression patterns. Our integration of in silico and ex vivo data unraveled two major types of protein–RNA interactions, with positively correlated patterns related to cell cycle control and negatively correlated patterns related to survival, growth and differentiation. To facilitate the investigation of protein–RNA interactions and expression networks, we developed the catRAPID express web server. Conclusions Our analysis sheds light on the role of RNA-binding proteins in regulating proliferation and differentiation processes, and we provide a data exploration tool to aid future experimental studies. PMID:24401680

  12. Binding of tryptophanyl-tRNA to the reverse transcriptase of replication-defective avian sarcoma viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Panet, A; Weil, G; Friis, R R

    1978-01-01

    The ability of reverse transcriptase to bind to [3H]tryptophanyl-tRNA and to function as DNA polymerase was compared for five temperature-sensitive mutants of avian sarcoma virus. Both activities of the reverse transcriptase were found to be heat labile in LA 335 and LA 336 as compared with the wild-type parents. For the other mutant viruses, LA 338, LA 343, and LA 672, grown at the permissive temperature, the reverse transcriptase was nearly as heat stable as for the wild-type parents in terms of tRNA binding and DNA polymerase. LA 338, LA 343, and LA 672 showed characteristic defects in their reverse transcriptase when propagated at the nonpermissive temperature; namely, tryptophanyl-tRNA binding and DNA polymerase activities were coordinately decreased in these virions. The reduced enzymatic activities were not entirely due to an inactive reverse transcriptase present in the virions, however, but rather lower amounts of enzyme protein incorporated into the virions contributed to the effect, according to assays of reverse transcriptase antigen by radioimmune competition. PMID:82623

  13. Combining structure probing data on RNA mutants with evolutionary information reveals RNA-binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Reinharz, Vladimir; Ponty, Yann; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-06-20

    Systematic structure probing experiments (e.g. SHAPE) of RNA mutants such as the mutate-and-map (MaM) protocol give us a direct access into the genetic robustness of ncRNA structures. Comparative studies of homologous sequences provide a distinct, yet complementary, approach to analyze structural and functional properties of non-coding RNAs. In this paper, we introduce a formal framework to combine the biochemical signal collected from MaM experiments, with the evolutionary information available in multiple sequence alignments. We apply neutral theory principles to detect complex long-range dependencies between nucleotides of a single stranded RNA, and implement these ideas into a software called aRNhAck We illustrate the biological significance of this signal and show that the nucleotides networks calculated with aRNhAck are correlated with nucleotides located in RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, RNA-DNA and RNA-ligand interfaces. aRNhAck is freely available at http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/arnhack. PMID:27095200

  14. Drosophila TDP-43 RNA-Binding Protein Facilitates Association of Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins with Genes, Enhancers and Polycomb Response Elements

    PubMed Central

    Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Rickels, Ryan A; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex mediates sister chromatid cohesion and participates in transcriptional control of genes that regulate growth and development. Substantial reduction of cohesin activity alters transcription of many genes without disrupting chromosome segregation. Drosophila Nipped-B protein loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and together Nipped-B and cohesin occupy essentially all active transcriptional enhancers and a large fraction of active genes. It is unknown why some active genes bind high levels of cohesin and some do not. Here we show that the TBPH and Lark RNA-binding proteins influence association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and gene regulatory sequences. In vitro, TBPH and Lark proteins specifically bind RNAs produced by genes occupied by Nipped-B and cohesin. By genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation these RNA-binding proteins also bind to chromosomes at cohesin-binding genes, enhancers, and Polycomb response elements (PREs). RNAi depletion reveals that TBPH facilitates association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and regulatory sequences. Lark reduces binding of Nipped-B and cohesin at many promoters and aids their association with several large enhancers. Conversely, Nipped-B facilitates TBPH and Lark association with genes and regulatory sequences, and interacts with TBPH and Lark in affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments. Blocking transcription does not ablate binding of Nipped-B and the RNA-binding proteins to chromosomes, indicating transcription is not required to maintain binding once established. These findings demonstrate that RNA-binding proteins help govern association of sister chromatid cohesion proteins with genes and enhancers. PMID:27662615

  15. Ability to adapt: different generations of PAMAM dendrimers show different behaviors in binding siRNA.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Giovanni M; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Danani, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports a molecular dynamic study to explore the diverse behavior of different generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers in binding siRNA. Our models show good accordance with experimental measurements. Simulations demonstrate that the molecular flexibility of PAMAMs plays a crucial role in the binding event, which is controlled by the modulation between enthalpy and entropy of binding. Importantly, the ability of dendrimers to adapt to siRNA is strongly dependent on the generation and on the pH due to backfolding. While G4 demonstrates good adaptability to siRNA, G6 behaves like a rigid sphere with a consistent loss in the binding affinity. G5 shows a hybrid behavior, maintaining rigid and flexible aspects, with a strong dependence of its properties on the pH. To define the "best binder", the mere energetic definition of binding affinity appears to be no longer effective and a novel concept of "efficiency" should be considered, being the balance between enthalpy and entropy of binding indivisible from the structural flexibility. With this aim, we propose an original criterion to define and rank the ability of these molecules to adapt their structure to bind a charged target. PMID:20146540

  16. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  17. hnRNP G: sequence and characterization of a glycosylated RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Soulard, M; Della Valle, V; Siomi, M C; Piñol-Roma, S; Codogno, P; Bauvy, C; Bellini, M; Lacroix, J C; Monod, G; Dreyfuss, G

    1993-01-01

    The autoantigen p43 is a nuclear protein initially identified with autoantibodies from dogs with a lupus-like syndrome. Here we show that p43 is an RNA-binding protein, and identify it as hnRNP G, a previously described component of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes. We demonstrate that p43/hnRNP G is glycosylated, and identify the modification as O-linked N-acetylglucosamine. A full-length cDNA clone for hnRNP G has been isolated and sequenced, and the predicted amino acid sequence for hnRNP G shows that it contains one RNP-consensus RNA binding domain (RBD) at the amino terminus and a carboxyl domain rich in serines, arginines and glycines. The RBD of human hnRNP G shows striking similarities with the RBDs of several plant RNA-binding proteins. Images PMID:7692398

  18. Conserved Surface Features Form the Double-stranded RNA Binding Site of Non-structural Protein 1 (NS1) from Influenza A and B Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yin,C.; Khan, J.; Swapna, G.; Ertekin, A.; Krug, R.; Tong, L.; Montelione, G.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-{angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier 'working models' of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an {approx}45{sup o} angle relative to the axes of helices {alpha}2/{alpha}2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  19. Function of RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 in stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Hideyuki . E-mail: hidokano@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp; Kawahara, Hironori; Toriya, Masako; Nakao, Keio; Shibata, Shinsuke; Imai, Takao

    2005-06-10

    Musashi is an evolutionarily conserved family of RNA-binding proteins that is preferentially expressed in the nervous system. The first member of the Musashi family was identified in Drosophila. This protein plays an essential role in regulating the asymmetric cell division of ectodermal precursor cells known as sensory organ precursor cells through the translational regulation of target mRNA. In the CNS of Drosophila larvae, however, Musashi is expressed in proliferating neuroblasts and likely has a different function. Its probable mammalian homologue, Musashi-1, is a neural RNA-binding protein that is strongly expressed in fetal and adult neural stem cells (NSCs). Mammalian Musashi-1 augments Notch signaling through the translational repression of its target mRNA, m-Numb, thereby contributing to the self-renewal of NSCs. In addition to its functions in NSCs, the role of mammalian Musashi-1 protein in epithelial stem cells, including intestinal and mammary gland stem cells, is attracting increasing interest.

  20. Structure of a low-population binding intermediate in protein-RNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bardaro, Michael F.; Aprile, Francesco A.; Varani, Gabriele; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) and its cognate transactivation response element (TAR) RNA transactivates viral transcription and represents a paradigm for the widespread occurrence of conformational rearrangements in protein-RNA recognition. Although the structures of free and bound forms of TAR are well characterized, the conformations of the intermediates in the binding process are still unknown. By determining the free energy landscape of the complex using NMR residual dipolar couplings in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we observe two low-population intermediates. We then rationally design two mutants, one in the protein and another in the RNA, that weaken specific nonnative interactions that stabilize one of the intermediates. By using surface plasmon resonance, we show that these mutations lower the release rate of Tat, as predicted. These results identify the structure of an intermediate for RNA-protein binding and illustrate a general strategy to achieve this goal with high resolution. PMID:27286828

  1. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  2. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  3. Mutant forms of Escherichia coli protein L25 unable to bind to 5S rRNA are incorporated efficiently into the ribosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anikaev, A Y; Korepanov, A P; Korobeinikova, A V; Kljashtorny, V G; Piendl, W; Nikonov, S V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2014-08-01

    5S rRNA-binding ribosomal proteins of the L25 family are an evolutional acquisition of bacteria. Earlier we showed that (i) single replacements in the RNA-binding module of the protein of this family result in destabilization or complete impossibility to form a complex with 5S rRNA in vitro; (ii) ΔL25 ribosomes of Escherichia coli are less efficient in protein synthesis in vivo than the control ribosomes. In the present work, the efficiency of incorporation of the E. coli protein L25 with mutations in the 5S rRNA-binding region into the ribosome in vivo was studied. It was found that the mutations in L25 that abolish its ability to form the complex with free 5S rRNA do not prevent its correct and efficient incorporation into the ribosome. This is supported by the fact that even the presence of a very weakly retained mutant form of the protein in the ribosome has a positive effect on the activity of the translational machinery in vivo. All this suggests the existence of an alternative incorporation pathway for this protein into the ribosome, excluding the preliminary formation of the complex with 5S rRNA. At the same time, the stable L25-5S rRNA contact is important for the retention of the protein within the ribosome, and the conservative amino acid residues of the RNA-binding module play a key role in this.

  4. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  5. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Bai, Ge; Wang, Shu; Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  6. Identification of in vivo, conserved, TAF15 RNA binding sites reveals the impact of TAF15 on the neuronal transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadia; Maragkakis, Manolis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Maronski, Margaret A; Dichter, Marc A; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2013-02-21

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have emerged as major causative agents of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To investigate the function of TAF15, an RBP recently implicated in ALS, we explored its target RNA repertoire in normal human brain and mouse neurons. Coupling high-throughput sequencing of immunoprecipitated and crosslinked RNA with RNA sequencing and TAF15 knockdowns, we identified conserved TAF15 RNA targets and assessed the impact of TAF15 on the neuronal transcriptome. We describe a role of TAF15 in the regulation of splicing for a set of neuronal RNAs encoding proteins with essential roles in synaptic activities. We find that TAF15 is required for a critical alternative splicing event of the zeta-1 subunit of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (Grin1) that controls the activity and trafficking of NR1. Our study uncovers neuronal RNA networks impacted by TAF15 and sets the stage for investigating the role of TAF15 in ALS pathogenesis.

  7. The primary function of RNA binding by the influenza A virus NS1 protein in infected cells: Inhibiting the 2'-5' oligo (A) synthetase/RNase L pathway.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Krug, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (NS1A protein) is a multifunctional protein that counters cellular antiviral activities and is a virulence factor. Its N-terminal RNA-binding domain binds dsRNA. The only amino acid absolutely required for dsRNA binding is the R at position 38. To identify the role of this dsRNA-binding activity during influenza A virus infection, we generated a recombinant influenza A/Udorn/72 virus expressing an NS1A protein containing an RNA-binding domain in which R38 is mutated to A. This R38A mutant virus is highly attenuated, and the mutant NS1A protein, like the WT protein, is localized in the nucleus. Using the R38A mutant virus, we establish that dsRNA binding by the NS1A protein does not inhibit production of IFN-beta mRNA. Rather, we demonstrate that the primary role of this dsRNA-binding activity is to protect the virus against the antiviral state induced by IFN-beta. Pretreatment of A549 cells with IFN-beta for 6 h did not inhibit replication of WT Udorn virus, whereas replication of R38A mutant virus was inhibited 1,000-fold. Using both RNA interference in A549 cells and mouse knockout cells, we show that this enhanced sensitivity to IFN-beta-induced antiviral activity is due predominantly to the activation of RNase L. Because activation of RNase L is totally dependent on dsRNA activation of 2'-5' oligo (A) synthetase (OAS), it is likely that the primary role of dsRNA binding by the NS1A protein in virus-infected cells is to sequester dsRNA away from 2'-5' OAS.

  8. Small Molecule Binding, Docking, and Characterization of the Interaction between Pth1 and Peptidyl-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hames, Mary C; McFeeters, Hana; Holloway, W Blake; Stanley, Christopher B; Urban, Volker S; McFeeters, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial Pth1 is essential for viability. Pth1 cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and nucleotide of peptidyl-tRNA generated from aborted translation, expression of mini-genes, and short ORFs. We have determined the shape of the Pth1:peptidyl-tRNA complex using small angle neutron scattering. Binding of piperonylpiperazine, a small molecule constituent of a combinatorial synthetic library common to most compounds with inhibitory activity, was mapped to Pth1 via NMR spectroscopy. We also report computational docking results, modeling piperonylpiperazine binding based on chemical shift perturbation mapping. Overall these studies promote Pth1 as a novel antibiotic target, contributing to understanding how Pth1 interacts with its substrate, advancing the current model for cleavage, and demonstrating feasibility of small molecule inhibition.

  9. RNA helicase A activity is inhibited by oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Sajwan, Kamal; Graham, Garrett T.; Griffin, Brittany; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Youbi, Sarah E.; Kallarakal, Abraham; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Casey, John L.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases impact RNA structure and metabolism from transcription through translation, in part through protein interactions with transcription factors. However, there is limited knowledge on the role of transcription factor influence upon helicase activity. RNA helicase A (RHA) is a DExH-box RNA helicase that plays multiple roles in cellular biology, some functions requiring its activity as a helicase while others as a protein scaffold. The oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1 requires RHA to enable Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncogenesis and growth; a small molecule, YK-4-279 disrupts this complex in cells. Our current study investigates the effect of EWS-FLI1 upon RHA helicase activity. We found that EWS-FLI1 reduces RHA helicase activity in a dose-dependent manner without affecting intrinsic ATPase activity; however, the RHA kinetics indicated a complex model. Using separated enantiomers, only (S)-YK-4-279 reverses the EWS-FLI1 inhibition of RHA helicase activity. We report a novel RNA binding property of EWS-FLI1 leading us to discover that YK-4-279 inhibition of RHA binding to EWS-FLI1 altered the RNA binding profile of both proteins. We conclude that EWS-FLI1 modulates RHA helicase activity causing changes in overall transcriptome processing. These findings could lead to both enhanced understanding of oncogenesis and provide targets for therapy. PMID:25564528

  10. The RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 regulates proteasome subunit expression in breast cancer- and glioma-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Frohnen, Patricia; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Chan, Mabel; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells, similar to normal tissue stem cells, rely on developmental pathways, such as the Notch pathway, to maintain their stem cell state. One of the regulators of the Notch pathway is Musashi-1, a mRNA-binding protein. Musashi-1 promotes Notch signaling by binding to the mRNA of Numb, the negative regulator of Notch signaling, thus preventing its translation. Cancer stem cells have also been shown to down-regulate their 26S proteasome activity in several types of solid tumors, thus making them resistant to proteasome-inhibitors used as anti-cancer agents in the clinic. Interestingly, the Notch pathway can be inhibited by proteasomal degradation of the Notch intracellular domain (Notch-ICD), therefore down-regulation of the 26S proteasome activity can lead to stabilization of Notch-ICD. Here we present evidence that the down-regulation of the 26S proteasome in CSCs constitutes another level of control by which Musashi-1 promotes signaling through the Notch pathway and maintenance of the stem cell phenotype of this subpopulation of cancer cells. We demonstrate that Musashi-1 mediates the down-regulation of the 26S proteasome by binding to the mRNA of NF-YA, the transcriptional factor regulating 26S proteasome subunit expression, thus providing an additional route by which the degradation of Notch-ICD is prevented, and Notch signaling is sustained. PMID:24022895

  11. De Novo RNA Synthesis by RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Activity of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Maida, Yoshiko; Yasukawa, Mami; Masutomi, Kenkichi

    2016-04-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) plays key roles in RNA silencing to generate double-stranded RNAs. In model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Neurospora crassa, two types of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), primary siRNAs and secondary siRNAs, are expressed; RdRP produces secondary siRNAs de novo, without using either Dicer or primers, while primary siRNAs are processed by Dicer. We reported that human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) has RdRP activity and produces endogenous siRNAs in a Dicer-dependent manner. However, de novo synthesis of siRNAs by human TERT has not been elucidated. Here we show that the TERT RdRP generates short RNAs that are complementary to template RNAs and have 5'-triphosphorylated ends, which indicates de novo synthesis of the RNAs. In addition, we confirmed short RNA synthesis by TERT in several human carcinoma cell lines and found that TERT protein levels are positively correlated with RdRP activity. PMID:26830230

  12. RNA binding proteins mediate the ability of a fungus to adapt to the cold.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiguo; St Leger, Raymond J

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about how fungi adapt to chilling. In eubacteria, cold shock proteins (CSPs) facilitate translation by destabilizing RNA secondary structure. Animals and plants have homologous cold shock domains within proteins, and additional glycine-rich RNA binding proteins (GRPs), but their role in stress resistance is poorly understood. In this study, we identified GRP homologues in diverse fungi. However, only Aspergillus clavatus and Metarhizium anisopliae possessed cold shock domains. Both M. anisopliae's small eubacteria-like CSP (CRP1) and its GRP (CRP2) homologue were induced by cold. Disrupting either Crp1 or Crp2 greatly reduced metabolism and conidial germination rates at low tempera