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Sample records for rna isolation method

  1. Comparison of RNA isolation methods from insect larvae.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, J A; Timm, A E

    2014-01-01

    Isolating RNA from insects is becoming increasingly important in molecular entomology. Four methods including three commercial kits RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen), SV Total RNA isolation system (Promega), TRIzol reagent (Invitrogen), and a cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based method were compared regarding their ability to isolate RNA from whole-body larvae of Thaumatotibia leucotreta (Meyrick), Thanatophilus micans (F.), Plutella xylostella (L.), and Tenebrio molitor (L.). A difference was observed among the four methods regarding RNA quality but not quantity. However, RNA quality and quantity obtained was not dependent on the insect species. The CTAB-based method produced low-quality RNA and the Trizol reagent produced partially degraded RNA, whereas the RNeasy Mini Kit and SV Total RNA isolation system produced RNA of consistently high quality. However, after reverse transcription to cDNA, RNA produced using all four extraction methods could be used to successfully amplify a 708 bp fragment of the cytochrome oxidase I gene. Of the four methods, the SV Total RNA isolation system showed the least amount of DNA contamination with the highest RNA integrity number and is thus recommended for stringent applications where high-quality RNA is required. This is the first comparison of RNA isolation methods among different insect species and the first to compare RNA isolation methods in insects in the last 20 years. PMID:25527580

  2. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable.

  3. Improved method for the isolation of RNA from plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Logemann, J; Schell, J; Willmitzer, L

    1987-05-15

    A fast and efficient method for the isolation of RNA from plant tissues is described. Tuber tissue is homogenized in a guanidine hydrochloride-containing buffer followed by direct extraction with phenol/chloroform. The RNA is precipitated from the aqueous phase, washed with 3 M sodium acetate and 70% ethanol, and finally dissolved in water. The yield of RNA is up to 500 micrograms/g of tissue and several tests indicate intact and nondegraded RNA. This method can be adapted to a small-scale version by the use of 1.5-ml tubes, allowing rapid isolation of RNA from a larger number of samples. Finally, this method is of particular use for isolating RNA from tissues with a high polysaccharide and nuclease content such as wounded potato tubers. PMID:2441623

  4. Method for microRNA isolation from clinical serum samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Kowdley, Kris V

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of intracellular noncoding RNA molecules that have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Because of their high stability in blood, microRNAs released into circulation could be potentially utilized as noninvasive biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis. Current microRNA isolation protocols are specifically designed for solid tissues and are impractical for biomarker development utilizing small-volume serum samples on a large scale. Thus, a protocol for microRNA isolation from serum is needed to accommodate these conditions in biomarker development. To establish such a protocol, we developed a simplified approach to normalize sample input by using single synthetic spike-in microRNA. We evaluated three commonly used commercial microRNA isolation kits for the best performance by comparing RNA quality and yield. The manufacturer's protocol was further modified to improve the microRNA yield from 200μl of human serum. MicroRNAs isolated from a large set of clinical serum samples were tested on the miRCURY LNA real-time PCR panel and confirmed to be suitable for high-throughput microRNA profiling. In conclusion, we have established a proven method for microRNA isolation from clinical serum samples suitable for microRNA biomarker development.

  5. Spermatozoa input concentrations and RNA isolation methods on RNA yield and quality in bull (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Parthipan, Sivashanmugam; Selvaraju, Sellappan; Somashekar, Lakshminarayana; Kolte, Atul P; Arangasamy, Arunachalam; Ravindra, Janivara Parameswaraiah

    2015-08-01

    Sperm RNA can be used to understand the past spermatogenic process, future successful fertilization, and embryo development. To study the sperm RNA composition and function, isolation of good quality RNA with sufficient quantity is essential. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of sperm input concentrations and RNA isolation methods on RNA yield and quality in bull sperm. The fresh semen samples from bulls (n = 6) were snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C. The sperm RNA was isolated using membrane-based methods combined with TRIzol (RNeasy+TRIzol and PureLink+TRIzol) and conventional methods (TRIzol, Double TRIzol, and RNAzol RT). Based on fluorometric quantification, combined methods resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) higher total RNA yields (800-900 ng/30-40 × 10(6)) as compared with other methods and yielded 20 to 30 fg of RNA/spermatozoon. The quality of RNA isolated by membrane-based methods was superior to that isolated by conventional methods. The sperm RNA was observed to be intact as well as fragmented (50-2000 bp). The study revealed that the membrane-based methods with a cocktail of lysis solution and an optimal input concentration of 30 to 40 million sperm were optimal for maximum recovery of RNA from bull spermatozoa.

  6. A microRNA isolation method from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Samadi, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be novel molecular biomakers that could be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. The present study aimed to develop an efficient miRNA isolation method from different clinical specimens. Methods: Total RNAs were isolated by Trizol reagent followed by precipitation of the large RNAs with potassium acetate (KCH3COOH), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 and 6000, and lithium chloride (LiCl). Then, small RNAs were enriched and recovered from the supernatants by applying a combination of LiCl and ethanol. The efficiency of the method was evaluated through the quality, quantity, and integrity of the recovered RNAs using the A260/280 absorbance ratio, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR). Results: Comparison of different RNA isolation methods based on the precipitation of DNA and large RNAs, high miRNA recovery and PCR efficiency revealed that applying potassium acetate with final precipitation of small RNAs using 2.5 M LiCl plus ethanol can provide high yield and quality small RNAs that can be exploited for clinical purposes. Conclusion: The current isolation method can be applied for most clinical samples including cells, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and even body fluids with a wide applicability in molecular biology investigations. PMID:27340621

  7. Evaluation of isolation methods for bacterial RNA quantitation in Dickeya dadantii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dickeya dadantii is a difficult source for RNA of a sufficient quality for real-time qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression. Three RNA isolation methods were evaluated for their ability to produce high-quality RNA from this bacterium. Bacterial lysis with Trizol using standard protocols consistently ga...

  8. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA...

  9. Comparison of RNA isolation and associated methods for extracellular RNA detection by high-throughput quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mikhalev, Ekaterina; Tanriverdi, Selim E; Lee, Rosalind; Ambros, Victor R; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-05-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that function in RNA silencing and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. miRNAs in biofluids are being used for clinical diagnosis as well as disease prediction. Efficient and reproducible isolation methods are crucial for extracellular RNA detection. To determine the best methodologies for miRNA detection from plasma, the performance of four RNA extraction kits, including an in-house kit, were determined with miScript miRNA assay technology; all were measured using a high-throughput quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) platform (BioMark System) with 90 human miRNA assays. In addition, the performances of complementary DNA (cDNA) and preamplification kits for TaqMan miRNA assays and miScript miRNA assays were compared using the same 90 miRNAs on the BioMark System. There were significant quantification cycle (Cq) value differences for the detection of miRNA targets between isolation kits. cDNA, preamplification, and qPCR performances were also varied. In summary, this study demonstrates differences among RNA isolation methods as measured by reverse transcription (RT)-qPCR. Importantly, differences were also noted in cDNA and preamplification performance using TaqMan and miScript. The in-house kit performed better than the other three kits. These findings demonstrate significant variability between isolation and detection methods for low-abundant miRNA detection from biofluids. PMID:26969789

  10. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Dang, Phat M; Chen, Charles Y

    2013-02-01

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA isolation from plant seeds is a prerequisite for many seed specific gene expression studies and DNA is necessary in marker-assisted selection and other genetic studies. We describe a modified method to isolate both RNA and DNA from the same seed tissue and have been successful with several oil seeds including peanut, soybean, sunflower, canola, and oil radish. An additional LiCl precipitation step was added to isolate both RNA and DNA from the same seed tissues. High quality nucleic acids were observed based on A(260)/A(280) and A(260)/A(230) ratios above 2.0 and distinct bands on gel-electrophoresis. RNA was shown to be suitable for reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction based on actin or 60S ribosomal primer amplification and DNA was shown to have a single band on gel-electrophoresis analysis. This result shows that RNA and DNA isolated using this method can be appropriate for molecular studies in peanut and other oil containing seeds.

  11. StreptoTag: a novel method for the isolation of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, M; Schroeder, R; von Ahsen, U

    1999-01-01

    We describe a fast and simple one-step affinity-purification method for the isolation of specific RNA-binding proteins. An in vitro-transcribed hybrid RNA consisting of an aptamer sequence with high binding specificity to the antibiotic streptomycin and a putative protein-binding RNA sequence is incubated with crude extract. After complex formation, the sample is applied to an affinity column containing streptomycin immobilized to Sepharose. The binding of the in vitro-assembled RNA-protein complex to streptomycin-Sepharose is mediated by the aptamer RNA and the specifically bound proteins are recovered from the affinity matrix by elution with the antibiotic. Employing two well-characterized RNA-protein interactions, we tested the performance of this new method. The spliceosomal U1A protein and the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein could be isolated via their appropriate RNA motif containing hybrid RNA from crude yeast extracts in high yield and purity after only one round of affinity purification. As the purification principle is independent of the extract source, this new affinity chromatography strategy that makes use of an in vitro-selected antibiotic-binding RNA as a tag, "StreptoTag," should be applicable to extracts from other organisms as well. Therefore, we propose StreptoTag to be a versatile tool for the isolation of unknown RNA-binding proteins. PMID:10580480

  12. Rapid and effective method of RNA isolation from green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran; Omar, Hishamuddin; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Chi, Vu Thi Quynh; Noroozi, Mostafa; Ky, Huynh; Napis, Suhaimi

    2009-10-01

    The rapid and effective method for the isolation of RNA from green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus based on homogenization in a simple CTAB buffer and selective precipitation of RNA with lithium chloride is developed. This procedure avoids the use of toxic chaotropic agents and phenol while high concentration of dithiothreitol is used to inhibit RNase activity and prevent oxidative cross-linking of nucleic acids by phenolics. The extraction procedure was able to produce high quality and intact RNA from A. convolutus. The yield of total RNA was 0.69-0.73 mg/g of fresh weight, with A(260)/A(280) ratio of 1.79-1.86. The obtained RNA was of sufficient quality and suitable for downstream application such as RT-PCR and cDNA library construction. The procedure may also have wider applicability for total RNA isolation from other green microalgae species.

  13. Effect of ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolation methods on putative reference genes messenger RNA abundance in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barragán, M; Martínez, A; Llonch, S; Pujol, A; Vernaeve, V; Vassena, R

    2015-07-01

    Although the male gamete participates in a significant proportion of infertility cases, there are currently no proven molecular markers of sperm quality. The search for significant gene expression markers is partially hindered by the lack of a recognized set of reference genes (RGs) to normalize reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) data across studies. The aim of this study is to define a set of RGs in assisted reproduction patients undergoing different sample collection and RNA isolation methods. Twenty-two normozoospermic men were included in the study. From each man, semen was either cryopreserved by slow freezing or analyzed fresh, and, for each, RNA was extracted with either phenol-free or phenol-based methods. In two cases, both methods were used to isolate RNA. Twenty putative RGs were analyzed and their mRNA abundance across samples was estimated by RT-qPCR. To determine the genes whose steady-state mRNA abundance remains unchanged, three different algorithms (geNorm, BestKeeper and NormFinder) were applied to the qPCR data. We found that RGs such as GAPDH or ACTB, useful in other biological contexts, cannot be used as reference for human spermatozoa. It is possible to compare gene expression from fresh and cryopreserved sperm samples using the same isolation method, while the mRNA abundance of expressed genes becomes different depending on the RNA isolation technique employed. In our conditions, the most appropriate RGs for RT-qPCR analysis were RPLP1, RPL13A, and RPLP2. Published discrepancies in gene expression studies in human spermatozoa may be due in part to inappropriate RGs selection, suggesting a possible different interpretation of PCR data in several reports, which were normalized using unstable RGs.

  14. Evaluating methods for isolating total RNA and predicting the success of sequencing phylogenetically diverse plant transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marc T J; Carpenter, Eric J; Tian, Zhijian; Bruskiewich, Richard; Burris, Jason N; Carrigan, Charlotte T; Chase, Mark W; Clarke, Neil D; Covshoff, Sarah; Depamphilis, Claude W; Edger, Patrick P; Goh, Falicia; Graham, Sean; Greiner, Stephan; Hibberd, Julian M; Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid; Kutchan, Toni M; Leebens-Mack, James; Melkonian, Michael; Miles, Nicholas; Myburg, Henrietta; Patterson, Jordan; Pires, J Chris; Ralph, Paula; Rolf, Megan; Sage, Rowan F; Soltis, Douglas; Soltis, Pamela; Stevenson, Dennis; Stewart, C Neal; Surek, Barbara; Thomsen, Christina J M; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Wu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yong; Deyholos, Michael K; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing plays a central role in the characterization and quantification of transcriptomes. Although numerous metrics are purported to quantify the quality of RNA, there have been no large-scale empirical evaluations of the major determinants of sequencing success. We used a combination of existing and newly developed methods to isolate total RNA from 1115 samples from 695 plant species in 324 families, which represents >900 million years of phylogenetic diversity from green algae through flowering plants, including many plants of economic importance. We then sequenced 629 of these samples on Illumina GAIIx and HiSeq platforms and performed a large comparative analysis to identify predictors of RNA quality and the diversity of putative genes (scaffolds) expressed within samples. Tissue types (e.g., leaf vs. flower) varied in RNA quality, sequencing depth and the number of scaffolds. Tissue age also influenced RNA quality but not the number of scaffolds ≥ 1000 bp. Overall, 36% of the variation in the number of scaffolds was explained by metrics of RNA integrity (RIN score), RNA purity (OD 260/230), sequencing platform (GAIIx vs HiSeq) and the amount of total RNA used for sequencing. However, our results show that the most commonly used measures of RNA quality (e.g., RIN) are weak predictors of the number of scaffolds because Illumina sequencing is robust to variation in RNA quality. These results provide novel insight into the methods that are most important in isolating high quality RNA for sequencing and assembling plant transcriptomes. The methods and recommendations provided here could increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of RNA sequencing for individual labs and genome centers.

  15. Evaluation of Existing Methods for Human Blood mRNA Isolation and Analysis for Large Studies

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Anke; Paroni, Federico; Günther, Kathrin; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Kelm, Sørge; Maedler, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Prior to implementing gene expression analyses from blood to a larger cohort study, an evaluation to set up a reliable and reproducible method is mandatory but challenging due to the specific characteristics of the samples as well as their collection methods. In this pilot study we optimized a combination of blood sampling and RNA isolation methods and present reproducible gene expression results from human blood samples. Methods The established PAXgeneTM blood collection method (Qiagen) was compared with the more recent TempusTM collection and storing system. RNA from blood samples collected by both systems was extracted on columns with the corresponding Norgen and PAX RNA extraction Kits. RNA quantity and quality was compared photometrically, with Ribogreen and by Real-Time PCR analyses of various reference genes (PPIA, β-ACTIN and TUBULIN) and exemplary of SIGLEC-7. Results Combining different sampling methods and extraction kits caused strong variations in gene expression. The use of PAXgeneTM and TempusTM collection systems resulted in RNA of good quality and quantity for the respective RNA isolation system. No large inter-donor variations could be detected for both systems. However, it was not possible to extract sufficient RNA of good quality with the PAXgeneTM RNA extraction system from samples collected by TempusTM collection tubes. Comparing only the Norgen RNA extraction methods, RNA from blood collected either by the TempusTM or PAXgeneTM collection system delivered sufficient amount and quality of RNA, but the TempusTM collection delivered higher RNA concentration compared to the PAXTM collection system. The established Pre-analytix PAXgeneTM RNA extraction system together with the PAXgeneTM blood collection system showed lowest CT-values, i.e. highest RNA concentration of good quality. Expression levels of all tested genes were stable and reproducible. Conclusions This study confirms that it is not possible to mix or change sampling or

  16. Improved Method for Isolation of Microbial RNA from Biofuel Feedstock for Metatranscriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Hailan; Markillie, Lye Meng; Culley, David E.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Hess, Matthias

    2013-03-28

    Metatranscriptomics—gene express profiling via DNA sequencing—is a powerful tool to identify genes that are ac- tively expressed and might contribute to the phenotype of individual organisms or the phenome (the sum of several phenotypes) of a microbial community. Furthermore, metatranscriptome studies can result in extensive catalogues of genes that encode for enzymes of industrial relevance. In both cases, a major challenge for generating a high quality metatranscriptome is the extreme lability of RNA and its susceptibility to ubiquitous RNAses. The microbial commu- nity (the microbiome) of the cow rumen efficiently degrades lignocelullosic biomass, generates significant amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas twenty times more potent than carbon dioxide, and is of general importance for the physio- logical wellbeing of the host animal. Metatranscriptomes of the rumen microbiome from animals kept under different conditions and from various types of rumen-incubated biomass can be expected to provide new insights into these highly interesting phenotypes and subsequently provide the framework for an enhanced understanding of this socio- economically important ecosystem. The ability to isolate large amounts of intact RNA will significantly facilitate accu- rate transcript annotation and expression profiling. Here we report a method that combines mechanical disruption with chemical homogenization of the sample material and consistently yields 1 mg of intact RNA from 1 g of rumen-in- cubated biofuel feedstock. The yield of total RNA obtained with our method exceeds the RNA yield achieved with pre- viously reported isolation techniques, which renders RNA isolated with the method presented here as an ideal starting material for metatranscriptomic analyses and other molecular biology applications that require significant amounts of starting material.

  17. A method for isolating high quality RNA from mouse cortical and cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Natalie H; Schimenti, John C; Patrick Ross, F; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2014-11-01

    The high incidence of fragility fractures in cortico-cancellous bone locations, plus the fact that individual skeletal sites exhibit different responsiveness to load and disease, emphasizes the need to document separately gene expression in cortical and cancellous bone. A further confounding factor is marrow contamination since its high cellularity may effect gene expression measurements. We isolated RNA from cortical and cancellous bone of intact mouse tibiae, and also after marrow removal by flushing or centrifugation. RNA isolated from cancellous bone by each method was sufficient for gene expression analysis. Centrifugation removed contaminating cells more efficiently than flushing, as indexed by histology and decreased expression of Icam4, a highly expressed erythroid gene. In contrast, centrifuged cortical bone had 12- and 13- fold higher expression of the bone-related genes Col1a1 and Bglap, while levels in marrow-free cancellous bone were 30- and 31-fold higher when compared to bone where marrow was left intact. Furthermore, cortical bone had higher expression of Col1a1 and Bglap than cancellous bone. Thus, RNA isolated by this novel approach can reveal site-specific changes in gene expression in cortical and cancellous bone sites. PMID:25073031

  18. Isolation of HIV-1 RNA from plasma: evaluation of seven different methods for extraction (part two).

    PubMed

    Fransen, K; Mortier, D; Heyndrickx, L; Verhofstede, C; Janssens, W; van der Groen, G

    1998-12-01

    Some new commercial methods for the extraction of viral RNA have been introduced recently. In addition to the study published previously (Verhofstede, C., Reniers, S., Van Wanzeele. F., Plum J., 1996. AIDS 8, 1421-1427), seven different methods (four newly developed and three reference methods) for extraction of HIV-1 RNA from plasma have been evaluated. The RNA preparation method that gave the best results (acceptable reproducibility, highest sensitivity, reasonable price, fast and easy to perform), was the QIAamp Viral RNA kit from QIAgen. The High Pure Viral RNA Kit (Boehringer Mannheim) as well as the non-commercialised extraction kits were also very sensitive. The non-commercial tests seem less suitable for routine use and for the processing of large number of samples. Two methods, RNA Insta-Pure LS (Eurogentec) and PANext RNA extraction kit 1 (NTL, PANsystems GmbH) are not adapted for HIV plasma extraction. The single step methods using glass fibre or silica column are rapid (from 60 to 75 min depending on the number of wash steps) and although the price is high they are cheaper than the Boom extraction methods: High Pure Viral RNA Kit (Boehringer Mannheim) ($3.3/sample), QIAamp Viral RNA Kit (Qiagen) ($3.6/sample), Boom extraction ($5/sample). The Qiagen kit is the only kit that combines sensitivity with reproducibility, it is commercialised, rapid and affordable in price and can be automated. For most of the methods evaluated the inter-test variability was acceptable (mean variation coefficient between duplicate extractions varied between 26.4 and 48.6%).

  19. Fast and Simplified Method for High Through-put Isolation of miRNA from Highly Purified High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Seneshaw, Mulugeta; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Min, Hae-Ki; Asgharpour, Amon; Mirshahi, Shervin; Daita, Kalyani; Boyett, Sherry; Santhekadur, Prasanna K.; Fuchs, Michael; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in a variety of human diseases including metabolic syndromes. They may be utilized as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis or may serve as targets for drug development, respectively. Recently it has been shown that miRNAs are carried in lipoproteins, particularly high density lipoproteins (HDL) and are delivered to recipient cells for uptake. This raises the possibility that miRNAs play a critical and pivotal role in cellular and organ function via regulation of gene expression as well as messenger for cell-cell communications and crosstalk between organs. Current methods for miRNA isolation from purified HDL are impractical when utilizing small samples on a large scale. This is largely due to the time consuming and laborious methods used for lipoprotein isolation. We have developed a simplified approach to rapidly isolate purified HDL suitable for miRNA analysis from plasma samples. This method should facilitate investigations into the role of miRNAs in health and disease and in particular provide new insights into the variety of biological functions, outside of the reverse cholesterol transport, that have been ascribed to HDL. Also, the miRNA species which are present in HDL can provide valuable information of clinical biomarkers for diagnosis of various diseases. PMID:27501005

  20. A quick, efficient, and cost-effective method for isolating high-quality total RNA from tomato fruits, suitable for molecular biology studies.

    PubMed

    Sabzevari, Alireza Ghannad; Hosseini, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is the primary model for the study of fleshy fruits, and research on this species has elucidated many aspects of fruit physiology, development, and metabolism. However, for advancing such studies at molecular biology levels, the RNA isolation from fruit tissues is often essential. The RNA isolation from tomato fruits is complicated because of the presence of high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenolics, pigments, and secondary metabolites and also the varying water content during development. Here, we present an optimized protocol for the isolation of total RNA from the fruit tissues at different developmental stages. In comparison to the previous methods described for the RNA isolation from tomato fruit, this method has the advantages that it does not involve the use of guanidine salts, lyophilizers, and commercial reagents, reduces the time and cost of extraction, overcomes the high water content problem, and promotes RNA quality by inhibiting RNA degradation and minimizing the gDNA, polyphenolic and polysaccharide contaminations. Using this method, high yields of high-purity and intact RNA samples were obtained as confirmed by the spectrophotometric readings and the electrophoresis on denaturing agarose gels. The isolated RNA was employed as a robust template for cDNA synthesis, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and temporal gene expression analysis. The functionality of the isolated RNA was further demonstrated through cloning full-length cDNAs encoding β-galactosidase proteins by RT-PCR and sequencing.

  1. Comparison of different methods of RNA isolation for plum pox virus detection by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Faggioli, F; Pasquini, G; Barba, M

    1998-09-01

    The diagnosis of plum pox virus (PPV) is still considered one of the most important aspects of the "sharka" problem. In fact, different studies demonstrated an uneven distribution of the virus in infected trees due to a high variability in virus concentration. These aspects complicate the PPV diagnosis. To date, biological, serological and molecular assays have been successively developed in order to obtain sensitive and efficient PPV detection techniques. In particular, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique seems to be promising and can be considered the most sensitive and reliable one. Preparation of viral RNA is still a fundamental step in reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique, especially when applied to large scale testing, i.e., for certification purposes. In order to find the most rapid and efficient procedure, we have compared three different procedures of extraction of viral RNA to be processed RT-PCR. Their common characteristics is their capacity to extract the RNA from a small amount of plant tissue without organic solvents in the extraction fluid. The procedures were as follows: an immuno-capture (IC) method using a specific antiserum, a silica-capture (SC) method using a non-specific matrix, and a simple and rapid RNA extraction (RE) method. They all were followed by one-tube RT-PCR. The obtained results show that all the three techniques allowed a successful amplification and detection of PPV in tested samples except the SC-PCR method which proved less effective. In fact, the IC-PCR and RE-PCR methods amplified and detected PPV in all isolates tested, while the SC-PCR method was able to reveal the presence of the virus in apricot and infected control samples only.

  2. Nuclear RNA Isolation and Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Navroop K; Mitchell, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Most transcriptome studies involve sequencing and quantification of steady-state mRNA by isolating and sequencing poly (A) RNA. Although this type of sequencing data is informative to determine steady-state mRNA levels it does not provide information on transcriptional output and thus may not always reflect changes in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Furthermore, sequencing poly (A) RNA may miss transcribed regions of the genome not usually modified by polyadenylation which includes many long noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe nuclear-RNA sequencing (nucRNA-seq) which investigates the transcriptional landscape through sequencing and quantification of nuclear RNAs which are both unspliced and spliced transcripts for protein-coding genes and nuclear-retained long noncoding RNAs.

  3. The single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction: twenty-something years on.

    PubMed

    Chomczynski, Piotr; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2006-01-01

    Since its introduction, the 'single-step' method has become widely used for isolating total RNA from biological samples of different sources. The principle at the basis of the method is that RNA is separated from DNA after extraction with an acidic solution containing guanidinium thiocyanate, sodium acetate, phenol and chloroform, followed by centrifugation. Under acidic conditions, total RNA remains in the upper aqueous phase, while most of DNA and proteins remain either in the interphase or in the lower organic phase. Total RNA is then recovered by precipitation with isopropanol and can be used for several applications. The original protocol, enabling the isolation of RNA from cells and tissues in less than 4 hours, greatly advanced the analysis of gene expression in plant and animal models as well as in pathological samples, as demonstrated by the overwhelming number of citations the paper gained over 20 years. PMID:17406285

  4. A simple and efficient Triton X-100 boiling and chloroform extraction method of RNA isolation from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kidon; Khan, Saeed A; Nawaz, Mohamed S; Khan, Ashraf A

    2003-12-01

    A fast, reliable, and inexpensive Triton X-100 boiling procedure for RNA isolation from both the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was developed. The yield of RNA was 0.2-2 mg per 10 ml bacterial culture. The method was tested on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria of eight genera and nine species and yielded reproducible results. In parallel experiments, the Qiagen and hot phenol extraction methods both yielded RNA that contained contaminating 16S and 23S rRNA. The Triton X-100 boiling method reported here yielded RNA that was free from 16S and 23S rRNA, contained full-length transcripts and did not require additional purification. The presence of specific mRNA in one of the RNA samples obtained by this procedure was demonstrated by partial amplification of a 732 bp vancomycin resistance gene, vanA, by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The presence of a full-length transcript (1031 bases) of the vanA gene was verified by Northern hybridization and probing with a digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled vanA PCR partial product. The method provides a rapid, reliable, and simple tool for the isolation of good quality RNA suitable for various molecular biology experiments. PMID:14659548

  5. RNA isolation and fractionation with compaction agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. C.; Fox, G. E.; Willson, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to the isolation of RNA from bacterial lysates employs selective precipitation by compaction agents, such as hexammine cobalt and spermidine. Using 3.5 mM hexammine cobalt, total RNA can be selectively precipitated from a cell lysate. At a concentration of 2 mM hexammine cobalt, rRNA can be fractionated from low molecular weight RNA. The resulting RNA mixture is readily resolved to pure 5S and mixed 16S/23S rRNA by nondenaturing anion-exchange chromatography. Using a second stage of precipitation at 8 mM hexammine cobalt, the low molecular weight RNA fraction can be isolated by precipitation. Compaction precipitation was also applied to the purification of an artificial stable RNA derived from Escherichia coli 5S rRNA and to the isolation of an Escherichia coli-expressed ribozyme. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Comparative analyses of phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA, khe, rpoB genes sequencing for identification of clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    He, Yanxia; Guo, Xianguang; Xiang, Shifei; Li, Jiao; Li, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Hui; He, Jinlei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate 16S rRNA, khe and rpoB gene sequencing for the identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae in comparison with phenotypic methods. Fifteen clinical isolates were examined, which were initially identified as K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae using the automated VITEK 32 system in two hospitals in Enshi City, China. Their identity was further supported by conventional phenotypic methods on the basis of morphological and biochemical characteristics. Using Bayesian phylogenetic analyses and haplotypes network reconstruction, 13 isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae, whereas the other two isolates (K19, K24) were classified as Shigella sp. and Enterobacter sp., respectively. Of the three genes, 16S rRNA and khe gene could discriminate the clinical isolates at the genus level, whereas rpoB could discriminate Klebsiella at the species and even subspecies level. Overall, the gene tree based on rpoB is more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Klebsiella than those based on 16S rRNA and khe genes, showing that rpoB can be a powerful tool for identification of K. pneumoniae isolates. Above all, our study challenges the utility of khe as a species-specific marker for identification of K. pneumoniae.

  7. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from feces by a simple method and difference between HIV-1 subpopulations in feces and serum.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoek, L; Boom, R; Goudsmit, J; Snijders, F; Sol, C J

    1995-01-01

    A simple method for the isolation and subsequent detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from feces is described. Viral RNA was isolated by the method developed by Boom et al. (R. Boom, C.J.A. Sol, M.M.M. Salimans, C.L. Jansen, P.M.E. Wertheim-van Dillen, and J. van der Noordaa, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:495-503, 1990), which was adapted for feces. HIV-1 RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT) followed by a nested PCR encompassing the V3 region. Reconstruction experiments revealed that the efficiencies of the extraction technique and the subsequent RT-PCR were not considerably affected by the varied composition of feces. The method was applied on fecal specimens from 18 HIV-1-infected individuals, among which were samples that had been stored for 9 years. It appeared that HIV-1 RNA was detectable in the feces of 12 persons (67%). Viral RNA was present in the feces of persons who fulfilled the criteria for CDC class II and CDC class III HIV infection as well as in patients who were diagnosed with AIDS (CDC class IV). Direct sequencing of amplimers obtained from paired fecal and serum specimens showed that differences in sequence heterogeneity existed. In one patient a remarkable difference in the HIV-1 sequences between isolates from feces and serum was observed. In conclusion, HIV-1 RNA is frequently present in the feces of HIV-1-infected individuals, and in some cases the HIV-1 subpopulation in feces differs from the HIV-1 subpopulation in serum. PMID:7751361

  8. The isolation of RNA from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruit.

    PubMed

    Jones, C S; Iannetta, P P; Woodhead, M; Davies, H V; McNicol, R J; Taylor, M A

    1997-12-01

    Previous attempts to extract high-quality, total RNA from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruits using published protocols have proven to be unsuccessful. Even the use of protocols developed for the extraction of RNA from other fruit tissue has resulted in low yields (1) or the isolation of degraded RNA (2). Here, we report on the development of a quick and simple method of extracting total RNA from raspberry fruit. Using this method, high yields of good quality, undegraded RNA were obtained from fruit at all stages of ripening. The RNA is of sufficient quality for northern analysis and cDNA library construction.

  9. Multiple isoform recovery (MIR)-PCR: a simple method for the isolation of related mRNA isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, A; Gabbiani, G; Pascolini, R; Neuville, P

    1998-01-01

    We present a rapid and efficient method for the detection of related transcripts with different expression levels. This approach combines the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method with a cDNA subtractive technique. The strategy is based on successive subtractions of prevalent isoforms resulting in enrichment of less expressed transcripts. For each subtraction, a biotinylated primer specific for the prevalent isoform is hybridized on the total cDNA and the hybrid is retained on a streptavidin affinity column. The unbound cDNA serves as a template for subsequent isoform identification. To illustrate its application we describe the isolation of three new actin cDNA isoforms in the freshwater planarian Dugesia (S) polychroa. PMID:9518500

  10. Protocol for miRNA isolation from biofluids.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Bryzgunova, Olga E; Vlassov, Valentin V; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as promising biomarkers in cancer and other diseases. Packaging of miRNAs into vesicles and complexes with proteins ensures their stability in biological fluids but also complicates their isolation. Conventional protocols used to isolate cell-free RNA are generally successful in overcoming these difficulties; however, they are costly, labor-intensive, or heavily reliant on the use of hazardous chemicals. Here we describe a protocol that is suitable for isolating miRNAs from biofluids, including blood plasma and urine. The protocol is based on precipitation of proteins, denaturation of miRNA-containing complexes with octanoic acid and guanidine isothiocyanate, and subsequent purification of miRNA on spin columns. The efficacy of miRNA extraction by phenol-chloroform extraction, miRCURY RNA isolation kit--biofluids (Exiqon), and the proposed protocol was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR of miR-16 and miR-126. The proposed protocol was slightly more effective for isolating miRNA from plasma and significantly superior to the other two methods for miRNA isolation from urine. Spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE data suggest that the disparity in performance between miRCURY Biofluids and the proposed protocol can be attributed to differences in precipitation mechanisms, as confirmed by the retention of different proteins in the supernatant. PMID:26874020

  11. In situ dissection of RNA functional subunits by domain-specific chromatin isolation by RNA purification (dChIRP).

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jeffrey J; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe domain-specific chromatin isolation by RNA purification (dChIRP), a technique for dissecting the functional domains of a target RNA in situ. For an RNA of interest, dChIRP can identify domain-level intramolecular and intermolecular RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and RNA-DNA interactions and maps the RNA's genomic binding sites with higher precision than domain-agnostic methods. We illustrate how this technique has been applied to the roX1 lncRNA to resolve its domain-level architecture, discover its protein- and chromatin-interacting domains, and map its occupancy on the X chromosome.

  12. Isolation of high-quality RNA from apple (Malus domestica) fruit.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mehar; Trivedi, Prabodh; Solomos, Theophanes; Tucker, Mark

    2006-07-26

    It is difficult to isolate sufficient quantities of high-quality RNA from apple fruit. An abundance of polyphenolic compounds and polysaccharides and a relatively low concentration of RNA in the fruit tissue create conditions that hamper RNA isolation when standard techniques are used. We have developed two RNA isolation methods that include an initial homogenization and extraction with acetone or ethanol. These in turn remove the interfering compounds and precipitate the protein and nucleic acids for subsequent RNA extraction. The quality of RNA was satisfactory with both acetone and ethanol preparations; however, the acetone powder produced consistently higher quantities of RNA.

  13. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S.; McBee, Megan E.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria. PMID:25539917

  14. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides.

    PubMed

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S; McBee, Megan E; Dedon, Peter C

    2015-03-11

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria.

  15. New quick method for isolating RNA from laser captured cells stained by immunofluorescent immunohistochemistry; RNA suitable for direct use in fluorogenic TaqMan one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Jack M; Kawashima, Kenji; Lucero, Ginger; Ackermann, Mark R

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new approach for reliably isolating one-step real-time quantitative RT-PCR-quality RNA from laser captured cells retrieved from frozen sections previously subjected to immunofluorescent immunohistochemistry (IF-IHC) and subsequently subjected to fluorogenic one-step real-time RT-PCR analysis without the need for costly, time-consuming linear amplification. One cell's worth of RNA can now be interrogated with confidence. This approach represents an amalgam of technologies already offered commercially by Applied Biosystems, Arcturus and Invitrogen. It is the primary focus of this communication to expose the details and execution of an important new LCM RNA isolation technique, but also provide a detailed account of the IF-IHC procedure preceding RNA isolation, and provide information regarding our approach to fluorogenic one-step real-time RT-PCR in general. Experimental results shown here are meant to supplement the primary aim and are not intended to represent a complete scientific study. It is important to mention, that since LCM-RT-PCR is still far less expensive than micro-array analysis, we feel this approach to isolating RNA from LCM samples will be of continuing use to many researchers with limited budgets in the years ahead. PMID:16136226

  16. New quick method for isolating RNA from laser captured cells stained by immunofluorescent immunohistochemistry; RNA suitable for direct use in fluorogenic TaqMan one-step real-time RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Kenji; Lucero, Ginger; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new approach for reliably isolating one-step real-time quantitative RT-PCR-quality RNA from laser captured cells retrieved from frozen sections previously subjected to immunofluorescent immunohistochemistry (IF-IHC) and subsequently subjected to fluorogenic one-step real-time RT-PCR analysis without the need for costly, time-consuming linear amplification. One cell’s worth of RNA can now be interrogated with confidence. This approach represents an amalgam of technologies already offered commercially by Applied Biosystems, Arcturus and Invitrogen. It is the primary focus of this communication to expose the details and execution of an important new LCM RNA isolation technique, but also provide a detailed account of the IF-IHC procedure preceding RNA isolation, and provide information regarding our approach to fluorogenic one-step real-time RT-PCR in general. Experimental results shown here are meant to supplement the primary aim and are not intended to represent a complete scientific study. It is important to mention, that since LCM-RT-PCR is still far less expensive than micro-array analysis, we feel this approach to isolating RNA from LCM samples will be of continuing use to many researchers with limited budgets in the years ahead. PMID:16136226

  17. Isolation of high-quality RNA from grains of different maize varieties.

    PubMed

    Messias, Rafael da Silva; Galli, Vanessa; Buss, Julieti Huch; Borowski, Joyce Moura; Nora, Leonardo; e Silva, Sérgio Delmar dos Anjos; Margis, Rogério; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2014-10-01

    The study of gene expression in maize varieties represents a powerful tool aiming to increase vitamin A precursors. However, the isolation of RNA from different maize varieties is challenging because these varieties show different levels of polysaccharides, and most methods available for RNA isolation are inappropriate for grain samples. The polysaccharides co-purify and co-precipitate with RNA during isolation, resulting in low-quality RNA, compromising the use of RNA in subsequent applications. Thus, a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based method was adapted in this study and compared with six methods for RNA isolation, including commercial reagents and RNA and DNA isolation kits, in order to identify the most appropriate for maize grains from different varieties. Most of the methods evaluated were considered inadequate due to limitations in terms of purity and/or quantity of the isolated RNA, which affected the efficiency of subsequent RT-qPCR analysis, resulting in nonamplification of β-carotene hydroxylase gene (HYD3) or high deviation among replicates. However, the CTAB modified method allowed the study to obtain intact RNA, with high quality and quantity, from 25 maize varieties. Furthermore, this RNA was successfully used to evaluate the expression of HYD3 gene by real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and thus represents a simple, efficient, and low-cost strategy.

  18. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  19. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Voss, Thorsten; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Wyrich, Ralf; Thykjaer, Thomas; Orntoft, Torben F.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood and recovery of small RNA species that are otherwise lost. The procedure presented here is suitable for large-scale experiments and is amenable to further automation. Procured total RNA and DNA was tested using Affymetrix Expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism GeneChips, respectively, and isolated microRNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis. PMID:17690207

  20. RNA isolation from mouse pancreas: a ribonuclease-rich tissue.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pouly, Ana Clara P; Elgamal, Ola A; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2014-08-02

    Isolation of high-quality RNA from ribonuclease-rich tissue such as mouse pancreas presents a challenge. As a primary function of the pancreas is to aid in digestion, mouse pancreas may contain as much a 75 mg of ribonuclease. We report modifications of standard phenol/guanidine thiocyanate lysis reagent protocols to isolate RNA from mouse pancreas. Guanidine thiocyanate is a strong protein denaturant and will effectively disrupt the activity of ribonuclease under most conditions. However, critical modifications to standard protocols are necessary to successfully isolate RNA from ribonuclease-rich tissues. Key steps include a high lysis reagent to tissue ratio, removal of undigested tissue prior to phase separation and inclusion of a ribonuclease inhibitor to the RNA solution. Using these and other modifications, we routinely isolate RNA with RNA Integrity Number (RIN) greater than 7. The isolated RNA is of suitable quality for routine gene expression analysis. Adaptation of this protocol to isolate RNA from ribonuclease rich tissues besides the pancreas should be readily achievable.

  1. Evaluation of DNA and RNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Edwin Shiaw, C S; Shiran, M S; Cheah, Y K; Tan, G C; Sabariah, A R

    2010-06-01

    This study was done to evaluate various DNA and RNA extractions from archival FFPE tissues. A total of 30 FFPE blocks from the years of 2004 to 2006 were assessed with each modified and adapted method. Extraction protocols evaluated include the modified enzymatic extraction method (Method A), Chelex-100 extraction method (Method B), heat-induced retrieval in alkaline solution extraction method (Methods C and D) and one commercial FFPE DNA Extraction kit (Qiagen, Crawley, UK). For RNA extraction, 2 extraction protocols were evaluated including the enzymatic extraction method (Method 1), and Chelex-100 RNA extraction method (Method 2). Results show that the modified enzymatic extraction method (Method A) is an efficient DNA extraction protocol, while for RNA extraction, the enzymatic method (Method 1) and the Chelex-100 RNA extraction method (Method 2) are equally efficient RNA extraction protocols.

  2. Cellular Fractionation and Isolation of Chromatin-Associated RNA.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the synthesis, processing, and functions of RNA molecules are confined to distinct subcellular compartments. Biochemical fractionation of cells prior to RNA isolation thus enables the analysis of distinct steps in the lifetime of individual RNA molecules that would be masked in bulk RNA preparations from whole cells. Here, we describe a simple two-step differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of cytoplasmic, nucleoplasmic, and chromatin-associated RNA that can be used in downstream applications such as qPCR or deep sequencing. We discuss various aspects of this fractionation protocol, which can be readily applied to many mammalian cell types. For the study of long noncoding RNAs and enhancer RNAs in regulation of transcription especially the preparation of chromatin-associated RNA can contribute significantly to further developments.

  3. Cellular Fractionation and Isolation of Chromatin-Associated RNA.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the synthesis, processing, and functions of RNA molecules are confined to distinct subcellular compartments. Biochemical fractionation of cells prior to RNA isolation thus enables the analysis of distinct steps in the lifetime of individual RNA molecules that would be masked in bulk RNA preparations from whole cells. Here, we describe a simple two-step differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of cytoplasmic, nucleoplasmic, and chromatin-associated RNA that can be used in downstream applications such as qPCR or deep sequencing. We discuss various aspects of this fractionation protocol, which can be readily applied to many mammalian cell types. For the study of long noncoding RNAs and enhancer RNAs in regulation of transcription especially the preparation of chromatin-associated RNA can contribute significantly to further developments. PMID:27662865

  4. Isolation of High-Quality Total RNA from Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook).

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihui; Huang, Binlong; Xu, Shanshan; Chen, Yu; Li, Shubin; Lin, Sizu

    2015-01-01

    RNA isolation with RNA in a high quantity is a basic analytical method in plant genetics, molecular biology and related physiological investigations. To understand the genetic and molecular biology of Chinese fir, sufficient high-quality total RNA must be obtained for cDNA library construction and other downstream molecular applications. However, extracting RNA from Chinese fir is difficult and often requires the modification of existing protocols. Chinese fir tissues containing large amounts of polysaccharides and polyphenol compounds and are one of the most difficult plant tissues for RNA isolation. Therefore, we developed a simple method for extracting high-quality RNA from Chinese fir tissues. RNA isolations were performed within two hours, RNA quality was measured for yield and purity. Total RNA obtained from this procedure was successfully used for cDNA library construction, RT-PCR and transcriptome sequencing. It was proven that extracted RNA was intact and suitable for downstream molecular applications, including RT-PCR and qPCR, and other downstream molecular applications. Thus, this protocol represents a simple, efficient, and low-cost method. PMID:26083257

  5. Evaluations of methods for the isolation of high quality RNA from bovine and cervine hide biopsies for use in gene expression studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular investigations of the ruminant response to ectoparasites at the parasite-host interface are critically dependent upon the quality of RNA. The complexity of ruminant skin decreases the capacity to obtain high quality RNA from biopsy samples, which directly affects the reliability of data pr...

  6. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  7. RNA isolation from loquat and other recalcitrant woody plants with high quality and yield.

    PubMed

    Morante-Carriel, Jaime; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Martínez-Esteso, María José; Luque, Ignacio; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2014-05-01

    RNA isolation is difficult in plants that contain large amounts of polysaccharides and polyphenol compounds. To date, no commercial kit has been developed for the isolation of high-quality RNA from tissues with these characteristics, especially for fruit. The common protocols for RNA isolation are tedious and usually result in poor yields when applied to recalcitrant plant tissues. Here an efficient RNA isolation protocol based on cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and two successive precipitations with 10 M lithium chloride (LiCl) was developed specifically for loquat fruits, but it was proved to work efficiently in other tissues of loquat and woody plants. The RNA isolated by this improved protocol was not only of high purity and integrity (A260/A280 ratios ranged from 1.90 to 2.04 and A260/A230 ratios were>2.0) but also of high yield (up to 720 μg on average [coefficient of variation=21%] total RNA per gram fresh tissue). The protocol was tested on loquat fruit (different stages of development, postharvest, ripening, and bruising), leaf, root, flower, stem, and bud; quince fruit and root; grapevine cells in liquid culture; and rose petals. The RNA obtained with this method is amenable to enzymatic treatments and can be efficiently applied for research on gene characterization, expression, and function.

  8. Isolation and Profiling of MicroRNA-containing Exosomes from Human Bile.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Piontek, Klaus B; Kumbhari, Vivek; Ishida, Masaharu; Selaru, Florin M

    2016-01-01

    Exosome research in the last three years has greatly extended the scope towards identification and characterization of biomarkers and their therapeutic uses. Exosomes have recently been shown to contain microRNAs (miRs). MiRs themselves have arisen as valuable biomarkers for diagnostic purposes. As specimen collection in clinics and hospitals is quite variable, miRNA isolation from whole bile varies substantially. To achieve robust, accurate and reproducible miRNA profiles from collected bile samples in a simple manner required the development of a high-quality protocol to isolate and characterize exosomes from bile. The method requires several centrifugations and a filtration step with a final ultracentrifugation step to pellet the isolated exosomes. Electron microscopy, Western blots, flow cytometry and multi-parameter nanoparticle optical analysis, where available, are crucial characterization steps to validate the quality of the exosomes. For the isolation of miRNA from these exosomes, spiking the lysate with a non-specific, synthetic miRNA from a species like Caenorhabditis elegans, i.e., Cel-miR-39, is important for normalization of RNA extraction efficiency. The isolation of exosome from bile fluid following this method allows the successful miRNA profiling from bile samples stored for several years at -80 °C. PMID:27341293

  9. Isolation of high-quality total RNA from lipid-rich seeds.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tianying; Yao, Bo; Shen, Ye; Wang, Xi'an

    2013-07-01

    Obtaining high-quality RNA from lipid-rich seeds has been a challenge, since lipids can interfere with tissue disruption and block cells from extraction buffer, and polysaccharides, polyphenols, and other secondary metabolites can bind or coprecipitate with RNA. Using an improved CTAB-based extraction buffer and modified grinding and incubation method, we developed a protocol that is able to minimize the negative effects caused by lipids and other compounds. Using this protocol, we obtained high-quality and high-quantity RNA from six species of lipid-rich seeds within 3 hours. The isolated RNA was demonstrated to be suitable for downstream applications.

  10. Isolation of high-quality RNA from polyphenol-, polysaccharide- and lipid-rich seeds.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Kranner, Ilse

    2006-01-01

    Seed polyphenols, polysaccharides and lipids often interfere with or degrade RNA, restricting its yield and quality. Existing RNA isolation methods specifically alleviate one or two of these challenges, but are usually designed for a single species rather than for a broad biodiversity. Many protocols also do not eliminate chromosomal DNA, which causes false positives in gene expression studies. The method reported here addresses all of the above challenges. The concentration of the phenol blocker polyvinylpyrrolidone in the extraction buffer was optimised for use on a broader range of species. DNase I was added to eliminate chromosomal DNA and the timing of this step was optimised. Lipids were removed by centrifugation. Polysaccharides and proteins, including excess DNase I, were separated from RNA during ethanol precipitation of nucleic acids. In seeds of five plant species from four taxonomically distant families, significant amounts of RNA were isolated in less than half the time typically required by previously reported methods. Colorimetric tests showed that the isolated RNA was free from interfering contaminants. In addition, reverse transcription-PCR confirmed that the isolated RNA was of appropriate quality and integrity for gene expression studies.

  11. Techniques for the isolation of high-quality RNA from cells encapsulated in chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Claire; Young, Stuart; Russo, Valerio; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2013-11-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from hydrogels containing polysaccharide components is challenging, as traditional RNA isolation techniques designed for cells and tissues can have limited yields and purity due to physiochemical interactions between the nucleic acids and the biomaterials. In this study, a comparative analysis of several different RNA isolation methods was performed on human adipose-derived stem cells photo-encapsulated within methacrylated glycol chitosan hydrogels. The results demonstrated that RNA isolation methods with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) buffer followed by purification with an RNeasy® mini kit resulted in low yields of RNA, except when the samples were preminced directly within the buffer. In addition, genomic DNA contamination during reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was observed in the hydrogels processed with the CTAB-based methods. Isolation methods using TRIzol® in combination with one of a Qiaex® gel extraction kit, an RNeasy® mini kit, or an extended solvent purification method extracted RNA suitable for gene amplification, with no evidence of genomic contamination. The latter two methods yielded the best results in terms of yield and amplification efficiency. Predigestion of the scaffolds with lysozyme was investigated as a possible means of enhancing RNA extraction from the polysaccharide gels, with no improvements observed in terms of the purity, yield, or amplification efficiency. Overall, this work highlights the application of a TRIzol®+extended solvent purification method for optimizing RNA extraction that can be applied to obtain reliable and accurate gene expression data in studies investigating cells seeded in chitosan-based scaffolds. PMID:23448167

  12. Techniques for the Isolation of High-Quality RNA from Cells Encapsulated in Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Claire; Young, Stuart; Russo, Valerio; Amsden, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from hydrogels containing polysaccharide components is challenging, as traditional RNA isolation techniques designed for cells and tissues can have limited yields and purity due to physiochemical interactions between the nucleic acids and the biomaterials. In this study, a comparative analysis of several different RNA isolation methods was performed on human adipose-derived stem cells photo-encapsulated within methacrylated glycol chitosan hydrogels. The results demonstrated that RNA isolation methods with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) buffer followed by purification with an RNeasy® mini kit resulted in low yields of RNA, except when the samples were preminced directly within the buffer. In addition, genomic DNA contamination during reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was observed in the hydrogels processed with the CTAB-based methods. Isolation methods using TRIzol® in combination with one of a Qiaex® gel extraction kit, an RNeasy® mini kit, or an extended solvent purification method extracted RNA suitable for gene amplification, with no evidence of genomic contamination. The latter two methods yielded the best results in terms of yield and amplification efficiency. Predigestion of the scaffolds with lysozyme was investigated as a possible means of enhancing RNA extraction from the polysaccharide gels, with no improvements observed in terms of the purity, yield, or amplification efficiency. Overall, this work highlights the application of a TRIzol®+extended solvent purification method for optimizing RNA extraction that can be applied to obtain reliable and accurate gene expression data in studies investigating cells seeded in chitosan-based scaffolds. PMID:23448167

  13. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Nucleolar Small RNAs: RNA Isolation and Library Preparation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Baoyan; Laiho, Marikki

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a subcellular compartment with a key essential function in ribosome biogenesis. The nucleolus is rich in noncoding RNAs, mostly the ribosomal RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. Surprisingly, also several miRNAs have been detected in the nucleolus, raising the question as to whether other small RNA species are present and functional in the nucleolus. We have developed a strategy for stepwise enrichment of nucleolar small RNAs from the total nucleolar RNA extracts and subsequent construction of nucleolar small RNA libraries which are suitable for deep sequencing. Our method successfully isolates the small RNA population from total RNAs and monitors the RNA quality in each step to ensure that small RNAs recovered represent the actual small RNA population in the nucleolus and not degradation products from larger RNAs. We have further applied this approach to characterize the distribution of small RNAs in different cellular compartments. PMID:27576723

  14. Evolution of host specificity drives reproductive isolation among RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Siobain; Burch, Christina L; Turner, Paul E

    2007-11-01

    Ecological speciation hypotheses claim that assortative mating evolves as a consequence of divergent natural selection for ecologically important traits. Reproductive isolation is expected to be particularly likely to evolve by this mechanism in species such as phytophagous insects that mate in the habitats in which they eat. We tested this expectation by monitoring the evolution of reproductive isolation in laboratory populations of an RNA virus that undergoes genetic exchange only when multiple virus genotypes coinfect the same host. We subjected four populations of the RNA bacteriophage phi6 to 150 generations of natural selection on a novel host. Although there was no direct selection acting on host range in our experiment, three of the four populations lost the ability to infect one or more alternative hosts. In the most extreme case, one of the populations evolved a host range that does not contain any of the hosts infectible by the wild-type phi6. Whole genome sequencing confirmed that the resulting reproductive isolation was due to a single nucleotide change, highlighting the ease with which an emerging RNA virus can decouple its evolutionary fate from that of its ancestor. Our results uniquely demonstrate the evolution of reproductive isolation in allopatric experimental populations. Furthermore, our data confirm the biological credibility of simple "no-gene" mechanisms of assortative mating, in which this trait arises as a pleiotropic effect of genes responsible for ecological adaptation.

  15. The genomic RNA1 and RNA2 sequences of the tobacco rattle virus isolates found in Polish potato fields.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhimin; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Michalak, Krystyna; Chrzanowska, Mirosława; Zimnoch-Guzowska, Ewa

    2014-06-24

    Four tobacco rattle virus (TRV) isolates were identified from tobacco bait seedlings planted in soil samples from Polish potato fields. Sequence analysis of the genomic RNA1 of the isolates revealed significant similarity to the isolates Ho and AL recently found in Germany. Multiple sequence alignments of the genomic RNA2 indicated that the two isolates from northern Poland (Deb57 and Slu24) are in a cluster with the isolates PSG and PLB found in the Netherlands. The remaining two isolates, from central Poland (11r21 and Mlo7), are in a distinct group with the unique isolate SYM found in England. The RNA2 sequences of the studied isolates range from 1998 nt to 2739 nt in length, and all carry deletions of the 2b and/or 2c genes. The isolate Mlo7 has an atypical RNA2 structure, having its cp gene located in its central region. PMID:24637409

  16. Isolation of high-quality RNA from various tissues of Jatropha curcas for downstream applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Raja Krishna; Eswaran, Nalini; Johnson, T Sudhakar

    2011-06-01

    A method for isolating transcriptionally active RNA for downstream applications from diverse tissues of Jatropha curcas, a plant rich in latex, lipids, waxes, polysaccharide, polyphenols, and secondary metabolites, is described. The described method uses alkaline borate buffer during tissue homogenization to negate the formation of viscous gel observed in guanidium-salt-containing methods. By this method, quality RNA was extracted from leaf, immature inflorescence, endosperm, and root tissues with yields ranging from 1.80 to 7.80mg/100mg fresh weight (FW). The total RNA obtained was found to be suitable for poly(A)(+)RNA purification, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, cloning of full-length cDNA, and cDNA library construction.

  17. Increased sensitivity of RT-PCR for Potato virus Y detection using RNA isolated by a procedure with differential centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Nie, Xianzhou; Boquel, Sébastien; Al-Daoud, Fadi; Pelletier, Yvan

    2015-12-01

    The sensitivity of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for virus detection is influenced by many factors such as specificity of primers and quality of templates. These factors become extremely important for successful detection when virus concentration is low. Total RNA isolated from Potato virus Y (PVY)-infected potato plants using the sodium sulfite RNA isolation method or RNeasy plant mini kit contains a high proportion of host RNA and may also contain trace amount of phenolic and polysaccharide residues, which may inhibit RT-PCR. The goal of this study was to enhance the sensitivity of PVY detection by reducing host RNA in the extract by differential centrifugation followed by extraction using an RNeasy mini kit (DCR method). One-step RT-PCR had relatively low amplification efficiency for PVY RNA when a high proportion of plant RNA was present. SYBR Green-based real time RT-PCR showed that the RNA isolated by the DCR method had a higher cycle threshold value (Ct) for the elongation factor 1-α mRNA (Ef1α) of potato than the Ct value of the RNA extracted using the RNeasy plant mini kit, indicating that the DCR method significantly reduced the proportion of potato RNA in the extract. The detectable amount of RNA extracted using the DCR method was <0.001ng when plant sap from 10 PVY-infected and PVY-free potato leaflets in a 1.5:100 fresh weight ratio was extracted, compared with 0.01 and 0.02ng of RNA using the RNeasy plant mini kit and sodium sulfite RNA isolation methods, respectively. PMID:26210699

  18. Isolation of high quality RNA from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) fruit.

    PubMed

    Jaakola, L; Pirttilä, A M; Halonen, M; Hohtola, A

    2001-10-01

    A simple and efficient method is described for isolating high quality RNA from bilberry fruit. The procedure is based on the use of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and beta-mercaptoethanol in an extraction buffer in order to eliminate the polysaccharides and prevent the oxidation of phenolic compounds. This method is a modification of the one described for pine trees, and yields high-quality RNA suitable for cDNA based methodologies. This method is applicable for a variety of plant tissues.

  19. Comparison of Ribosomal RNA Removal Methods for Transcriptome Sequencing Workflows in Teleost Fish.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Jason; Overturf, Ken

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is becoming the standard for transcriptome analysis. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a priority in the preparation of libraries suitable for sequencing. These methods have been well documented in mammals but typically require some optimization for lower vertebrates. Three commercial kits, including Dynabeads mRNA Purification Kit, RiboMinus Eukaryote System v2, and Ribo-Zero Gold rRNA Removal Kit were examined for the ability to remove rRNAs from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) RNA isolations. Total RNA was isolated from liver and muscle tissue samples (n = 24) and rRNAs removed using one of the three kits. Samples were analyzed visually on the Agilent Bioanalyzer and by Illumina RNA-seq, screening for Oncorhynchus rRNAs. There were significant differences between the kits in regards to their ability to remove rRNA, ranging from 2.74% - 10.94% rRNA sequences left behind per kit on average. Using the Bioanalyzer to evaluate ribosomal contamination in rRNA-depleted samples for RNA-Seq was good for detecting samples with higher concentrations of rRNA (>5%), but not very accurate at lower levels. Although all three kits were able to remove a substantial portion of the rRNA from different fish tissues, the Ribo-Zero Gold rRNA Removal Kit eliminated significantly more contaminating ribosomal RNAs than the others.

  20. Torsional vibration isolator and method

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.A.; Durrett, V.D.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a multicylinder internal combustion engine having a rotatable crankshaft and a rotatable flywheel which together define an inertial system rotating about a predetermined axis of rotation. An improvement is described here which facilitates avoiding destructive effects on the crankshaft of stress induced by torsional vibration. The method comprises an elastomeric annulus coupling means operatively interposed between the crankshaft and flywheel for coupling the crankshaft and flywheel together for rotation of the flywheel with the crankshaft. The coupling means has a torsional spring rate of less than 20,000 in lb/radian effective to permit substantial angular displacement between the flywheel and the crankshaft for isolating the rotating inertia of the flywheel from the rotating inertia of the crankshaft after engine startup. The coupling means avoids dampening while preventing torsional vibration from being transferred between the flywheel and the crankshaft.

  1. Osteocyte isolation and culture methods.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karan M; Stern, Matt M; Stern, Amber R; Pathak, Janak L; Bravenboer, Nathalie; Bakker, Astrid D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present several popular methods for in vitro culture of osteocytes and osteocyte cell lines. Osteocytes are located extremely suitably within the calcified bone matrix to sense mechanical signals, and are equipped with a multitude of molecular features that allow mechanosensing. However, osteocytes are more than specialized mechanosensing cells. Several signaling molecules are preferentially produced by osteocytes, and osteocytes hold a tight reign over osteoblast and osteoclast formation and activity, but also have a role as endocrine cell, communicating with muscles or organs as remote as the kidneys. In order to facilitate further research into this fascinating cell type, three protocols will be provided in this paper. The first protocol will be on the culture of mouse (early) osteocyte cell lines, the second on the isolation and culture of primary mouse bone cells, and the third on the culture of fully embedded human osteocytes within their own three-dimensional bone matrix. PMID:27648260

  2. Multiscale methods for computational RNA enzymology

    PubMed Central

    Panteva, Maria T.; Dissanayake, Thakshila; Chen, Haoyuan; Radak, Brian K.; Kuechler, Erich R.; Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA catalysis is of fundamental importance to biology and yet remains ill-understood due to its complex nature. The multi-dimensional “problem space” of RNA catalysis includes both local and global conformational rearrangements, changes in the ion atmosphere around nucleic acids and metal ion binding, dependence on potentially correlated protonation states of key residues and bond breaking/forming in the chemical steps of the reaction. The goal of this article is to summarize and apply multiscale modeling methods in an effort to target the different parts of the RNA catalysis problem space while also addressing the limitations and pitfalls of these methods. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, reference interaction site model (RISM) calculations, constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) simulations, Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (HREMD) and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations will be discussed in the context of the study of RNA backbone cleavage transesterification. This reaction is catalyzed by both RNA and protein enzymes, and here we examine the different mechanistic strategies taken by the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) and RNase A. PMID:25726472

  3. A modified protocol for RNA extraction from different peach tissues suitable for gene isolation and real-time PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhaoguo; Qu, Shenchun; Zhang, Jiyu; Wang, Fei; Tao, Jianmin; Gao, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhen

    2012-03-01

    RNA extraction is the first step in the study of gene isolation and expression. However, it is difficult to extract high quantity and quality RNA from tissues containing large quantities of polysaccharides and polyphenols. Peach (Prunus persica), in addition to containing high levels of polysaccharides and polyphenols, is a challenging starting material for RNA isolation using a single method because of different amounts of those substances in diverse tissues. Based on three reported methods, we developed a modified RNA isolation protocol to solve this problem, leading to high quality and quantity of total RNA from peach mesocarp tissues of fruits which were sampled from all developmental stages and different storage periods, as well as from other tissues including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots. With our modified method, 28-650 μg of total RNA was routinely obtained from per gram of fresh material, gave at least a 1.16-fold improvement by compared with those isolated by other seven methods. The RNA extracts were successfully used in downstream applications such as RT-PCR, RACE, and real-time PCR.

  4. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Samuel E; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing "minigene" in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest.

  5. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants.

  6. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants. PMID:26600686

  7. Physical isolation of nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II: evidence for cotranscriptional splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Wuarin, J; Schibler, U

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine whether splicing can occur cotranscriptionally in mammalian nuclei, we mapped exon-intron boundaries on nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II. A procedure that allows fractionation of nuclei into a chromatin pellet containing DNA, histones, and ternary transcription complexes and a supernatant containing the bulk of the nonhistone proteins and RNAs that are released from their DNA templates was developed. The transcripts of the genes encoding DBP, a transcriptional activator protein, and HMG coenzyme A reductase recovered from the chromatin pellet and the supernatant were analyzed by S1 nuclease mapping. The large majority of the RNA molecules from the pellet appeared to be nascent transcripts, since, in contrast to the transcripts present in the supernatant, they were not cleaved at the polyadenylation site but rather contained heterogeneous 3' termini encompassing this site. Splicing intermediates could be detected among nascent and released transcripts, suggesting that splicing occurs both cotranscriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Our results also indicate that polyadenylation is not required for the splicing of the last DBP intron. In addition to allowing detailed structural analysis of nascent RNA chains, the physical isolation of nascent transcripts also yields reliable measurements of relative transcription rates. Images PMID:7523861

  8. Addition of β-mercaptoethanol is a prerequisite for high-quality RNA isolation using QIAsymphony technology as demonstrated by detection of molecular aberrations in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    van der Poel-van de Luytgaarde, Sonja C P A M; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Goudswaard, Chantal S; Hogenbirk-Hupkes, Pauline E; van Hoven-Beijen, M Antoinette; van de Werf, Marloes; Chu, Isabel W T; van Kapel, Jan; Valk, Peter J M

    2013-06-01

    The isolation of high-quality RNA and DNA from various specimens is essential to perform reliable molecular diagnostic assays. In routine diagnostics of hematologic malignancies isolation of high-quality RNA is a prerequisite. We used QIAsymphony technology (QST) using a customized RNA CT 800 V6 protocol for automated semi-high-throughput isolation of RNA from human specimens and compared the results for breakpoint cluster region-c-abl oncogene 1 (BCR-ABL1) quantification by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) and detection of JAK2 V617F mutations by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) on QST RNA with RNA isolation performed with our routine manual method using RNA-Bee (RB). QST RNA was isolated with and without the addition of β-mercaptoethanol (BME). Addition of BME to the lysis buffer RLT Plus resulted in consistently lower Ct values in analyses of the reference gene porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). Further, the BCR-ABL1 mRNA levels of the QST RNA isolation were highly consistent with RB RNA isolation, only when the lysis buffer RLT Plus in addition contained BME. Moreover, cases of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) with low levels of JAK2 V617F mRNA were even missed in QST when lysis buffer RLT Plus was used, but they were readily detected after addition of BME.

  9. An improved method for extraction of high-quality total RNA from oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Rayani, Azadeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Seeds of oilseed plants that contain large amounts of oil, polysaccharides, proteins and polyphenols are not amenable to conventional RNA isolation protocols. The presence of these substances affects the quality and quantity of isolated nucleic acids. Here, a rapid and efficient RNA isolation protocol that, in contrast to other methods tested, allows high purify, integrity and yield of total RNA from seeds of sesame, corn, sunflower, flax and rapeseed was developed. The average yields of total RNA from 70 mg oil seeds ranged from 84 to 310 µg with A260/A280 between 1.9 and 2.08. The RNA isolated with this protocol was verified to be suitable for PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, cDNA synthesis and expression analysis.

  10. An effective method for extracting total RNA from Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Liao, C M; Li, J; Liu, X H; Zhang, Y S

    2014-01-21

    Dioscorea opposita Thunb., included in the genus Dioscorea of the family Dioscoreaceae, is an important herb with great edible and medicinal value. In this study, the total RNA from leaves of Lichuan Dioscorea opposita Thunb. was isolated by an improved Trizol method. The results showed that the RNA extracted by the improved Trizol method had good integrity, and the RNA could be used for down-stream molecular biology operations including reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

  11. Aphid Transmission Alters the Genomic and Defective RNA Populations of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Martí, M R; Guerri, J; de Mendoza, A H; Laigret, F; Ballester-Olmos, J F; Moreno, P

    2000-02-01

    ABSTRACT A total of 14 Spanish isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and 1 isolate from Japan were transmitted by Aphis gossypii, and the subisolates obtained were compared with the source isolates for symptom expression and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) pattern. Of the 14 Spanish isolates, 9 showed altered dsRNA patterns after aphid transmission but only minor variations in the intensity of symptoms induced on Mexican lime. Northern blot hybridization with complementary DNA (cDNA) probes corresponding to both the 5' and the 3' termini of the CTV genomic RNA (gRNA) showed that the dsRNA bands that could be used to discriminate between the dsRNA pattern of the source and the aphid-transmitted isolates were the replicative forms of defective RNAs (D-RNAs). Conversely, the Japanese isolate and two subisolates obtained from it by aphid transmission had the same dsRNA pattern, but one of the subisolates induced milder symptoms in several hosts. Dot-blot hybridization with cDNA probes representing several regions of the gRNA showed that most of the aphid-transmitted isolates differed from the corresponding source isolate by their hybridization pattern. Our results indicate that aphid transmission often sorts the populations of gRNA variants and D-RNAs present in CTV isolates. PMID:18944601

  12. RNASwift: A rapid, versatile RNA extraction method free from phenol and chloroform.

    PubMed

    Nwokeoji, Alison O; Kilby, Peter M; Portwood, David E; Dickman, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    RNASwift is an inexpensive, versatile method for the rapid extraction of RNA. Existing RNA extraction methods typically use hazardous chemicals including phenol, chloroform and formamide which are often difficult to completely remove from the extracted RNA. RNASwift uses sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulphate to lyse the cells and isolate the RNA from the abundant cellular components in conjunction with solid phase extraction or isopropanol precipitation to rapidly purify the RNA. Moreover, the purified RNA is directly compatible with downstream analysis. Using spectrophotometry in conjunction with ion pair reverse phase chromatography to analyse the extracted RNA, we show that RNASwift extracts and purifies RNA of higher quality and purity in comparison to alternative RNA extraction methods. The RNASwift method yields approximately 25 μg of RNA from only 10(8)Escherichia coli cells. Furthermore, RNASwift is versatile; the same simple reagents can be used to rapidly extract RNA from a variety of different cells including bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. In addition to the extraction of total RNA, the RNASwift method can also be used to extract double stranded RNA from genetically modified E. coli in higher yields compared to alternative methods. PMID:27495141

  13. RNASwift: A rapid, versatile RNA extraction method free from phenol and chloroform.

    PubMed

    Nwokeoji, Alison O; Kilby, Peter M; Portwood, David E; Dickman, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    RNASwift is an inexpensive, versatile method for the rapid extraction of RNA. Existing RNA extraction methods typically use hazardous chemicals including phenol, chloroform and formamide which are often difficult to completely remove from the extracted RNA. RNASwift uses sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulphate to lyse the cells and isolate the RNA from the abundant cellular components in conjunction with solid phase extraction or isopropanol precipitation to rapidly purify the RNA. Moreover, the purified RNA is directly compatible with downstream analysis. Using spectrophotometry in conjunction with ion pair reverse phase chromatography to analyse the extracted RNA, we show that RNASwift extracts and purifies RNA of higher quality and purity in comparison to alternative RNA extraction methods. The RNASwift method yields approximately 25 μg of RNA from only 10(8)Escherichia coli cells. Furthermore, RNASwift is versatile; the same simple reagents can be used to rapidly extract RNA from a variety of different cells including bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. In addition to the extraction of total RNA, the RNASwift method can also be used to extract double stranded RNA from genetically modified E. coli in higher yields compared to alternative methods.

  14. Evaluation of optimal extracellular vesicle small RNA isolation and qRT-PCR normalisation for serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Rachel E; Norden, Jean; Bibby, Louis A; Davis, Joanna; Dickinson, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs are small regulatory molecules that demonstrate useful biomarker potential. They have been recognised in biofluids, where they are protected from degradation by encapsulation into extracellular vesicles (EVs). A number of commercial products are available for the isolation of EVs and their RNA content; however, extensive protocol comparisons are lacking. Furthermore, robust qRT-PCR assessment of microRNA expression within EVs is problematic, as endogenous controls (ECs) previously used in cellular samples may not be present. This study compares EV isolation and RNA extraction methods (EV precipitation reagents, RNA isolation kits and ultracentrifugation) from serum or urine samples and evaluates suitable ECs for incorporation into qRT-PCR analysis. Results were assessed by electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis and bioanalyzer concentrations. The stability of 8 ECs was compared for both serum and urine EV RNA and retrospectively validated in independent cohorts (serum n=55, urine n=50). The Life Technologies precipitation reagent gave superior serum EV recovery compared to SBI reagent, as assessed by NTA size distribution, increased RNA concentration, and lower small RNA Ct values. Similarly, the Norgen Biotek Urine Exosome RNA Isolation Kit gave improved results for urine EV isolation compared to ultracentrifugation, when determined by the same parameters. The Qiagen miRNeasy™ RNA isolation kit gave suitable serum EV RNA concentrations compared to other kits, as assessed by Bioanalyzer and small RNA qRT-PCR. Small RNAs HY3 (S.D=1.77, CoV=6.2%) and U6 (S.D=2.14, CoV=8.6%) were selected as optimal ECs for serum EV microRNA expression analysis, while HY3 (S.D=1.67, CoV=6.5%) and RNU48 (S.D=1.85, CoV=5.3%) were identified as suitable for urine studies. In conclusion, this study identifies optimal methods for isolation of serum and urine EV RNA, and suitable ECs for normalisation of qRT-PCR studies. Such reports should aid in the

  15. Characterization of the partial RNA1 and RNA2 3' untranslated region of tomato ringspot virus isolates from North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 3' non-translated regions (NTRs) of RNA1 and RNA2 of Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) are long and virtually identical. In this study, sequences containing most of the 3’ NTRs (1168-1265 bp) were determined from 18 ToRSV isolates collected from fruit trees, small fruits, and grapevines in North Am...

  16. The paraffin-embedded RNA metric (PERM) for RNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Cho, Hanbyoul; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    RNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is commonly evaluated in both investigative and diagnostic pathology. However, the quality of the data is directly impacted by RNA quality. The RNA integrity number (RIN), an algorithm based on a combination of electrophoretic features, is widely applied to RNA isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue, but it is a poor indicator of the quality of that RNA. Here we describe the novel paraffin-embedded RNA metric (PERM) for quantifying the quality of RNA from FFPE tissue. The PERM is based on a formula that approximates a weighted area-under-the-curve analysis of an electropherogram of the extracted RNA. Using biochemically degraded RNAs prepared from experimentally fixed mouse kidney specimens, we demonstrate that PERM values correlate with mRNA transcript measurements determined using the QuantiGene system. Furthermore, PERM values correlate with real-time PCR data. Our results demonstrate that the PERM can be used to qualify RNA for different end-point studies and may be a valuable tool for molecular studies using RNA extracted from FFPE tissue.

  17. Assessing Social Isolation: Pilot Testing Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Harry Owen; Herbers, Stephanie; Talisman, Samuel; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Social isolation is a significant public health problem among many older adults; however, most of the empirical knowledge about isolation derives from community-based samples. There has been less attention given to isolation in senior housing communities. The objectives of this pilot study were to test two methods to identify socially isolated residents in low-income senior housing and compare findings about the extent of isolation from these two methods. The first method, self-report by residents, included 47 out of 135 residents who completed in-person interviews. To determine self-report isolation, residents completed the Lubben Social Network Scale 6 (LSNS-6). The second method involved a staff member who reported the extent of isolation on all 135 residents via an online survey. Results indicated that 26% of residents who were interviewed were deemed socially isolated by the LSNS-6. Staff members rated 12% of residents as having some or a lot of isolation. In comparing the two methods, staff members rated 2% of interviewed residents as having a lot of isolation. The combination of self-report and staff report could be more informative than just self-report alone, particularly when participation rates are low. However, researchers should be aware of the potential discrepancy between these two methods. PMID:27276687

  18. Assessing Social Isolation: Pilot Testing Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Harry Owen; Herbers, Stephanie; Talisman, Samuel; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Social isolation is a significant public health problem among many older adults; however, most of the empirical knowledge about isolation derives from community-based samples. There has been less attention given to isolation in senior housing communities. The objectives of this pilot study were to test two methods to identify socially isolated residents in low-income senior housing and compare findings about the extent of isolation from these two methods. The first method, self-report by residents, included 47 out of 135 residents who completed in-person interviews. To determine self-report isolation, residents completed the Lubben Social Network Scale 6 (LSNS-6). The second method involved a staff member who reported the extent of isolation on all 135 residents via an online survey. Results indicated that 26% of residents who were interviewed were deemed socially isolated by the LSNS-6. Staff members rated 12% of residents as having some or a lot of isolation. In comparing the two methods, staff members rated 2% of interviewed residents as having a lot of isolation. The combination of self-report and staff report could be more informative than just self-report alone, particularly when participation rates are low. However, researchers should be aware of the potential discrepancy between these two methods.

  19. Species-level identification of staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis in Brazil using partial 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lange, Carla C; Brito, Maria A V P; Reis, Daniele R L; Machado, Marco A; Guimarães, Alessandro S; Azevedo, Ana L S; Salles, Érica B; Alvim, Mariana C T; Silva, Fabiana S; Meurer, Igor R

    2015-04-17

    Staphylococci isolated from bovine milk and not classified as Staphylococcus aureus represent a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that are frequently associated with bovine mastitis. The identification of these microorganisms is important, although it is difficult and relatively costly. Genotypic methods add precision in the identification of Staphylococcus species. In the present study, partial 16S rRNA sequencing was used for the species identification of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis. Two hundred and two (95%) of the 213 isolates were successfully identified at the species level. The assigning of an isolate to a particular species was based on ≥99% identity with 16S rRNA sequences deposited in GenBank. The identified isolates belonged to 13 different Staphylococcus species; Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the most frequently identified species. Eight isolates could not be assigned to a single species, as the obtained sequences showed 99% or 100% similarity to sequences from two or three different Staphylococcus species. The relatedness of these isolates with the other isolates and reference strains was visualized using a cladogram. In conclusion, 16S rRNA sequencing was an objective and accurate method for the proper identification of Staphylococcus species isolated from bovine mastitis. Additional target genes could be used in non-conclusive cases for the species-level identification of these microorganisms.

  20. Species-level identification of staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis in Brazil using partial 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lange, Carla C; Brito, Maria A V P; Reis, Daniele R L; Machado, Marco A; Guimarães, Alessandro S; Azevedo, Ana L S; Salles, Érica B; Alvim, Mariana C T; Silva, Fabiana S; Meurer, Igor R

    2015-04-17

    Staphylococci isolated from bovine milk and not classified as Staphylococcus aureus represent a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that are frequently associated with bovine mastitis. The identification of these microorganisms is important, although it is difficult and relatively costly. Genotypic methods add precision in the identification of Staphylococcus species. In the present study, partial 16S rRNA sequencing was used for the species identification of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis. Two hundred and two (95%) of the 213 isolates were successfully identified at the species level. The assigning of an isolate to a particular species was based on ≥99% identity with 16S rRNA sequences deposited in GenBank. The identified isolates belonged to 13 different Staphylococcus species; Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the most frequently identified species. Eight isolates could not be assigned to a single species, as the obtained sequences showed 99% or 100% similarity to sequences from two or three different Staphylococcus species. The relatedness of these isolates with the other isolates and reference strains was visualized using a cladogram. In conclusion, 16S rRNA sequencing was an objective and accurate method for the proper identification of Staphylococcus species isolated from bovine mastitis. Additional target genes could be used in non-conclusive cases for the species-level identification of these microorganisms. PMID:25704228

  1. Isolation of RNA from field-grown jute (Corchorus capsularis) plant in different developmental stages for effective downstream molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Pradipta; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Das, Subrata; Joshi, Alpana; Sen, Soumitra K; Basu, Asitava

    2011-10-01

    Jute (Corchorus capsularis), as a natural fibre producing plant species, ranks next to cotton only. Today, biotechnological approach has been considered as most accepted means for any genetic improvement of plant species. However, genetic control of the fibre development in jute has not yet been explored sufficiently for desired genetic improvement. One of the major impediments in exploring the genetic architecture in this crop at molecular level is the availability of good quality RNA from field-grown plant tissues mostly due to the presence of high amount of mucilage and phenolics. Development of a suitable RNA isolation method is becoming essential for deciphering developmental stage-specific gene expression pattern related to fibre formation in this crop species. A combination of modified hot borate buffer followed by isopycnic centrifugation (termed as HBIC) was adopted and found to be the best isolation method yielding sufficient quantity (~350-500 μg/gm fresh tissue) and good quality (A(260/280) ratio 1.88 to 1.91) RNA depending on the developmental stage of stem tissue from field-grown jute plant. The poly A(+) RNA purified from total RNA isolated by the present method was found amenable to efficient RT-PCR and cDNA library construction. The present development of RNA isolation was found to be appropriate for gene expression analysis related to fibre formation in this economically important jute plant in near future.

  2. Rapid and reliable method of extracting DNA and RNA from sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L). Lam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hyung; Hamada, Tatsuro

    2005-12-01

    A quick, simple and reliable method of extracting DNA from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) has been developed. The method was applied successfully for extraction of total DNA from leaves and total RNA from leaves and various tissues. The yield of DNA extracted by this procedure was high (about 1 mg/g leaf tissue). The extracted DNA was completely digested by restriction endonucleases indicating the absence of common contaminating compounds. The absorbancy ratios of A260/A230 and A260/A280 of isolated RNA were approx. 2 and the yield was about 0.2 mg/g fresh wt. CIPK and tublin genes were successfully amplified by RT-PCR, suggesting the integrity of isolated RNA. The total DNA and RNA isolated by this method was of sufficient quality for subsequent molecular analysis.

  3. Step-by-step protocol to perfuse and dissect the mouse parotid gland and isolation of high-quality RNA from murine and human parotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Watermann, Christoph; Valerius, Klaus Peter; Wagner, Steffen; Wittekindt, Claus; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Karnati, Srikanth

    2016-04-01

    Macroscopic identification and surgical removal of the mouse parotid gland is demanding because of its anatomic location and size. Moreover, the mouse parotid gland contains high concentrations of RNases, making it difficult to isolate high-quality RNA. So far, appropriate methods for optimal perfusion-fixation and dissection of mouse parotid glands, as well as the isolation of high quality RNA from this tissue, are not available. Here we present a simple, optimized, step-by-step surgical method to perfuse and isolate murine parotid glands. We also compared two common RNA extraction methods (RNeasy Mini Kit versus TRIzol) for their yields of high-quality, intact RNA from human and murine parotid gland tissues that were either snap-frozen or immersed in RNAlater stabilization solution. Mouse parotid tissue that was perfused and immersed in RNAlater and human samples immersed in RNAlater exhibited the best RNA quality, independent of the isolation method. PMID:27071609

  4. Comparison of DNA and RNA extraction methods for mummified tissues.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Nami; Lebwohl, Eve; Zhang, David

    2002-12-01

    Nucleic acids extracted from mummified tissues are valuable materials for the study of ancient human beings. Significant difficulty in extracting nucleic acids from mummified tissues has been reported due to chemical modification and degradation. The goal of this study was to determine a method that is more efficient for DNA and RNA extraction from mummified tissues. Twelve mummy specimens were analyzed with 9 different nucleic acid extraction methods, including guanidium thiocyanate (GTC) and proteinase K/detergent based methods prepared in our laboratory or purchased. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase DNA and beta-actin RNA were used as markers for the presence of adequate DNA and RNA, respectively, for PCR and RT-PCR amplification. Our results show that 5 M GTC is more efficient of releasing nucleic acids from mummified tissue than proteinase K/detergent, and phenol/chloroform extraction with an additional chloroform step is more efficient than phenol/chloroform along. We were able to isolate DNAs from all 12 specimens and RNAs from 8 of 12 specimens, and the nucleic acids were sufficient for PCR and RT-PCR analysis. We further tested hepatitis viruses including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis G virus, and TT virus DNA, and fail to detect these viruses in all 12 specimens.

  5. Comparative evaluation of different extraction and quantification methods for forensic RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Grabmüller, Melanie; Madea, Burkhard; Courts, Cornelius

    2015-05-01

    Since about 2005, there is increasing interest in forensic RNA analysis whose versatility may very favorably complement traditional DNA profiling in forensic casework. There is, however, no method available specifically dedicated for extraction of RNA from forensically relevant sample material. In this study we compared five commercially available and commonly used RNA extraction kits and methods (mirVana™ miRNA Isolation Kit Ambion; Trizol® Reagent, Invitrogen; NucleoSpin® miRNA Kit Macherey-Nagel; AllPrep DNA/RNA Mini Kit and RNeasy® Mini Kit both Qiagen) to assess their relative effectiveness of yielding RNA of good quality and their compatibility with co-extraction of DNA amenable to STR profiling. We set up samples of small amounts of dried blood, liquid saliva, semen and buccal mucosa that were aged for different time intervals for co-extraction of RNA and DNA. RNA quality was assessed by determination of 'RNA integrity number' (RIN) and quantitative PCR based expression analysis. DNA quality was assessed via monitoring STR typing success rates. By comparison, the different methods exhibited considerable differences between RNA and DNA yields, RNA quality values and expression levels, and STR profiling success, with the AllPrep DNA/RNA Mini Kit and the NucleoSpin® miRNA Kit excelling at DNA co-extraction and RNA results, respectively. Overall, there was no 'best' method to satisfy all demands of comprehensible co-analysis of RNA and DNA and it appears that each method has specific merits and flaws. We recommend to cautiously choose from available methods and align its characteristics with the needs of the experimental setting at hand.

  6. Isolation of high quality RNA from Phyllanthus emblica and its evaluation by downstream applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avneesh; Singh, Kashmir

    2012-11-01

    Next generation sequencing is a high-throughput technique widely used for transcriptome profiling. Isolation of high quality RNA is a prerequisite for such large scale transcriptome analysis. Phyllanthus emblica is an important medicinal plant having high amount of metabolites like vitamin C, flavonoids, polyphenolic compounds, tannins, which are responsible for its wondered medicinal properties. High concentration of secondary metabolites like polysaccharides and polyphenols proved to be an obstacle in isolating RNA of good quality. Any compromise with quality of RNA affects the downstream applications and requires extra cleaning steps that further reduce RNA quantity. We have developed a protocol for isolation of high quality RNA from P. embilca. RNA was successfully assessed for downstream applications like reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, rapid amplification of cDNA ends, mRNA library preparation, and sequencing using HiSeq(™) 2000 sequencing technology. The protocol is simple and can be completed in 4-5 h.

  7. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Syun-ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  8. Isolation of RNA from blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) fruit.

    PubMed

    Woodhead, M; Taylor, M A; Davies, H V; Brennan, R M; McNicol, R J

    1997-02-01

    Extraction of high-quality RNA from blackcurrant fruit has hitherto proved difficult, probably owing to high levels of phenolic and polysaccharide components in the berries. The procedure described here is a modification of one described for grape berries, and yields RNA suitable for in vitro translations, RNA blot analysis, and cDNA library construction.

  9. Intraspecific 16S rRNA gene diversity among clinical isolates of Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Hassen, Assia Ben

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, nearly the entire 16S rRNA gene sequences of 46 clinical samples of Neisseria spp. were determined, and the aligned sequences were analyzed to investigate the diversity of 16S rRNA genes in each commensal Neisseria species. Two 16S rRNA types were identified in two Neisseria sicca strains, three 16S rRNA types in five Neisseria macacae strains, fourteen 16S rRNA types in twenty Neisseria flavescens isolates, and fourteen 16S rRNA types in nineteen Neisseria mucosa isolates. The number of nucleotides that were different between 16S rRNA sequences within specie ranged from 1 to 15. We found high intraspecific sequence variation in 16S rRNA genes of Neisseria spp. strains.

  10. Genomic characterization of M and S RNA segments of hantaviruses isolated from bats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y T; Kim, G R

    1995-09-01

    Genomic analysis of three Hantaan-like virus isolates from bats was performed. Cleavage patterns of reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products and nucleotide sequences of G2 region of M RNA segment and N protein region of S RNA segment of the isolates were compared to that of Hantaan 76-118 strain. Genomic characteristics of the bat isolates were identical to that of Hantaan virus. PMID:8825306

  11. Evaluation of the semen swim-up method for bovine sperm RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Han, C M; Chen, R; Li, T; Chen, X L; Zheng, Y F; Ma, M T; Gao, Q H

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of high-quality RNA is important for assessing sperm gene expression, and semen purification methods may affect the integrity of the isolated RNA. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the sperm swim-up method for seminal RNA isolation. Frozen semen samples in straws from three bulls of proven fertility were purified by the swim-up method. RNA extraction was carried out using the E.Z.N.A.(TM) Total RNA kit II, with non-swim-up sperm as a control. Total sperm RNA was analyzed by UV spectrophotometry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and agarose gel electrophoresis, and expression of the sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY), leptin (LEP), and ribosomal protein subunit 23 (RPS23) genes, were determined. 18S RNA was used as a positive control. Fewer somatic cells were found in sperm swim-up samples than in the non-swim-up counterparts (0 x 10(3) vs 17.33 ± 2.52 x 10(3) sperm, P < 0.05). In addition, high-quality RNA was obtained in about 2 h, with no significant difference between groups. Interestingly, the yields of RNA fragments containing ≥200 nucleotides were significantly reduced in sperm swim-up samples (0.92 ± 0.41 x 10(7) sperm) compared with the non-swim-up samples (1.36 ± 0.33 x 10(7) sperm, P < 0.05). After RT-PCR, clear bands representing SRY, LEP, and RPS23 in sperm cDNA were observed on agarose gel electrophoresis. Finally, no bands corresponding to 18S RNA were found in RNA samples from the sperm swim-up group. Our findings suggest that small amounts of sperm RNA can be efficiently extracted from frozen straw semen samples using the swim-up technique. PMID:27173315

  12. [An efficient method for isolation of mitochondrial DNA in wheat].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qiang; Zhang, Gai-Sheng; Wang, Kui; Niu, Na; Pan, Dong-Liang

    2007-06-01

    An efficient method for isolation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from etiolated tissues of wheat was developed. The protocol consists of mitochondria isolation with differential centrifugation, Dnase I treatment, lysis with SDS and proteinase K, removing protein by TE-saturated phenol/chloroform extraction and a final RNase A treatment for obtaining mtDNA. The mtDNA samples were tested using spectrophotometry and agarose gel electrophoresis. It was proved that the mtDNA isolated by this method not only have the high yield but also structural complete, and contains no impurities, such as nuclear DNA, RNA and protein. The result showed that this high quality mtDNA can be successfully used in PCR and other genetic studies. In addition, it was found that adjusting the lysis temperature has a noticeable effect on the mtDNA yield.

  13. A novel method of plasmid isolation using laundry detergent.

    PubMed

    Yadav, P; Yadav, A; Garg, V; Datta, T K; Goswami, S L; De, S

    2011-07-01

    Since the discovery of plasmid, various methods have been developed to isolate plasmid DNA. All the methods have one common and important target of isolating plasmid DNA of high quality and quantity in less time. These methods are not completely safe because of use of toxic chemicals compounds. The developed protocol for plasmid extraction is based on the alkaline lysis method of plasmid preparation (extraction atpH 8.0) with slight modifications. Cell lysis reagent sodium dodecyl sulfate is replaced by lipase enzyme present in laundry detergent. A good plasmid preparation can be made, which is well suited for subsequent molecular biology applications. By taking safety measures on count, contaminants like, RNA and protein can be completely avoided with maximized plasmid yield. The resultant plasmid quality and quantity can be well comparable to other prevalent methods.

  14. A North American hypovirulent isolate of the chestnut blight fungus with European isolate-related dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Hillman, B I; Tian, Y; Bedker, P J; Brown, M P

    1992-03-01

    We have synthesized and mapped a cDNA library representing the one major dsRNA element associated with hypovirulence in strain NB58 of the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectira (=Endothia) parasitica, which was isolated from recovering chestnut trees in New Jersey, U.S.A. The linear dsRNA has a size of approximately 12.5 kbp and is polyadenylated at the 3' terminus of one strand. Molecular hybridization experiments indicate that there is sequence similarity between the NB58 dsRNA and dsRNAs from European isolates of C. parasitica, but not among dsRNAs of NB58 and those associated with other North American isolates. Hybridization experiments with mapped cDNA clones representing different regions of the 12.5 kbp dsRNA indicate that the termini and the 3'-proximal two-thirds (relative to the plus strand) are more conserved among NB58 and the European isolates than the rest of the 5'-proximal one-third. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the termini of NB58 dsRNA suggests common organizational features between it and the dsRNA from French-derived strain EP713.

  15. Two modified RNA extraction methods compatible with transcript profiling and gene expression analysis for cotton roots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chengjian; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Xingyong

    2013-01-01

    Efficient isolation of high-quality RNA is of prime importance for optimal transcript profiling results and further gene expression analysis. However, it is difficult for cotton roots because of lower-than-average RNA content and high content of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and other secondary metabolites. To develop simple and reliable protocols for high-quality RNA extraction from cotton roots for transcript profiling and gene expression analysis, some modifications were introduced to a reported plant RNA isolation protocol and a reagent kit method. Using method A, we successfully extracted high-quality RNA for transcript profiling from cotton roots. Gel electrophoresis analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated that RNA had good integrity without protein and genomic DNA contamination. Furthermore, the A260/280 (1.9) and A260/230 (1.6) ratios indicated that the isolated RNA was of high purity. Using method B, about 7 µg total RNA of high quality could be obtained from 0.1 g samples from cotton roots, which can be used for reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The two RNA extraction methods were used to investigate different gene expression of cotton roots (Gossypium hirsutum) infected by weak pathogenic Verticillium dahliae and the results showed they can satisfy the transcript profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR requirements for RNA. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology to view the supplemental file.

  16. Understanding RNA-Chromatin Interactions Using Chromatin Isolation by RNA Purification (ChIRP).

    PubMed

    Chu, Ci; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    ChIRP is a novel and easy-to-use technique for studying long noncoding RNA (lncRNA)-chromatin interactions. RNA and chromatin are cross-linked in vivo using formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde, and purified using biotinylated antisense oligonucleotides that hybridize to the target RNA. Co-precipitated DNA is then purified and analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) or high-throughput sequencing. PMID:27659979

  17. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification. PMID:27312552

  18. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification.

  19. Isolation and purification of RNA from tissues rich in polyphenols, polysaccharides, and pigments of annatto (Bixa orellana L.).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Simone M; Soares, Virgínia L F; de Oliveira, Tahise M; Gesteira, Abelmon S; Otoni, Wagner C; Costa, Marcio G C

    2007-11-01

    The tropical plant Bixa orellana L. (annatto) produces an array of natural products, including the pigment bixin used in the food and cosmetics industries. In order to understand the biochemical and molecular basis of the biosynthesis of these natural products, a reliable method for isolating high yields of high-quality RNA is required. Here we described a successful and reproducible method for isolation and purification of high-quantity and high-quality RNA from different tissues of annatto. This protocol overcomes the usual problems associated with large amounts of polyphenols, polysaccharides, pigments, and other secondary metabolites that are not easily removed by conventional extraction procedures. Furthermore, the proposed protocol can be easily carried out in any laboratory and it could also be extended to isolate RNA from other plant species showing similar abundance of compounds that interfere with RNA extractions. The yield and quality of the RNA were monitored by spectrophotometric analysis, separation on agarose gel, Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), and construction of a cDNA library. PMID:17952668

  20. Gold nanoparticle interference study during the isolation, quantification, purity and integrity analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Natasha M; Vetten, Melissa; Andraos, Charlene; Boodhia, Kailen; Gulumian, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Investigations have been conducted regarding the interference of nanoparticles (NPs) with different toxicological assay systems, but there is a lack of validation when conducting routine tests for nucleic acid isolation, quantification, integrity, and purity analyses. The interference of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated herein. The AuNPs were added to either BEAS-2B bronchial human cells for 24 h, the isolated pure RNA, or added during the isolation procedure, and the resultant interaction was assessed. Total RNA that was isolated from untreated BEAS-2B cells was spiked with various concentrations (v/v%) of AuNPs and quantified. A decrease in the absorbance spectrum (220-340 nm) was observed in a concentration-dependent manner. The 260 and 280 nm absorbance ratios that traditionally infer RNA purity were also altered. Electrophoresis was performed to determine RNA integrity, but could not differentiate between AuNP-exposed samples. However, the spiked post-isolation samples did produce differences in spectra (190-220 nm), where shifts were observed at a shorter wavelength. These shifts could be due to alterations to chromophores found in nucleic acids. The co-isolation samples, spiked with 100 µL AuNP during the isolation procedure, displayed a peak shift to a longer wavelength and were similar to the results obtained from a 24 h AuNP treatment, under non-cytotoxic test conditions. Moreover, hyperspectral imaging using CytoViva dark field microscopy did not detect AuNP spectral signatures in the RNA isolated from treated cells. However, despite the lack of AuNPs in the final RNA product, structural changes in RNA could still be observed between 190-220 nm. Consequently, full spectral analyses should replace the traditional ratios based on readings at 230, 260, and 280 nm. These are critical points of analyses, validation, and optimization for RNA-based techniques used to assess AuNPs effects.

  1. Characterization of Rhizobial Isolates of Phaseolus vulgaris by Staircase Electrophoresis of Low-Molecular-Weight RNA

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Encarna; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce Nombre; Trujillo, Martha E.; Daza, Antonio; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; van Berkum, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA molecules were analyzed to characterize rhizobial isolates that nodulate the common bean growing in Spain. Since LMW RNA profiles, determined by staircase electrophoresis, varied across the rhizobial species nodulating beans, we demonstrated that bean isolates recovered from Spanish soils presumptively could be characterized as Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae and bv. trifolii, and Sinorhizobium fredii. PMID:11157280

  2. Isolation of high-quality total RNA from leaves of Myrciaria dubia "CAMU CAMU".

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juan Carlos Castro; Reátegui, Alina Del Carmen Egoavil; Flores, Julián Torres; Saavedra, Roberson Ramírez; Ruiz, Marianela Cobos; Correa, Sixto Alfredo Imán

    2013-01-01

    Myrciaria dubia is a main source of vitamin C for people in the Amazon region. Molecular studies of M. dubia require high-quality total RNA from different tissues. So far, no protocols have been reported for total RNA isolation from leaves of this species. The objective of this research was to develop protocols for extracting high-quality total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. Total RNA was purified following two modified protocols developed for leaves of other species (by Zeng and Yang, and by Reid et al.) and one modified protocol developed for fruits of the studied species (by Silva). Quantity and quality of purified total RNA were assessed by spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analysis. Additionally, quality of total RNA was evaluated with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). With these three modified protocols we were able to isolate high-quality RNA (A260nm/A280nm >1.9 and A260nm/A230nm >2.0). Highest yield was produced with the Zeng and Yang modified protocol (384±46µg ARN/g fresh weight). Furthermore, electrophoretic analysis showed the integrity of isolated RNA and the absence of DNA. Another proof of the high quality of our purified RNA was the successful cDNA synthesis and amplification of a segment of the M. dubia actin 1 gene. We report three modified protocols for isolation total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. The modified protocols are easy, rapid, low in cost, and effective for high-quality and quantity total RNA isolation suitable for cDNA synthesis and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:23742085

  3. A Method to Predict the Structure and Stability of RNA/RNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA/RNA interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization and regulation of gene expression. Intermolecular loop-loop base pairing is a widespread and functionally important tertiary structure motif in RNA machinery. However, computational prediction of intermolecular loop-loop base pairing is challenged by the entropy and free energy calculation due to the conformational constraint and the intermolecular interactions. In this chapter, we describe a recently developed statistical mechanics-based method for the prediction of RNA/RNA complex structures and stabilities. The method is based on the virtual bond RNA folding model (Vfold). The main emphasis in the method is placed on the evaluation of the entropy and free energy for the loops, especially tertiary kissing loops. The method also uses recursive partition function calculations and two-step screening algorithm for large, complicated structures of RNA/RNA complexes. As case studies, we use the HIV-1 Mal dimer and the siRNA/HIV-1 mutant (T4) to illustrate the method. PMID:27665593

  4. A comprehensive comparison of general RNA-RNA interaction prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Lai, Daniel; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2016-04-20

    RNA-RNA interactions are fast emerging as a major functional component in many newly discovered non-coding RNAs. Basepairing is believed to be a major contributor to the stability of these intermolecular interactions, much like intramolecular basepairs formed in RNA secondary structure. As such, using algorithms similar to those for predicting RNA secondary structure, computational methods have been recently developed for the prediction of RNA-RNA interactions. We provide the first comprehensive comparison comprising 14 methods that predict general intermolecular basepairs. To evaluate these, we compile an extensive data set of 54 experimentally confirmed fungal snoRNA-rRNA interactions and 102 bacterial sRNA-mRNA interactions. We test the performance accuracy of all methods, evaluating the effects of tool settings, sequence length, and multiple sequence alignment usage and quality. Our results show that-unlike for RNA secondary structure prediction--the overall best performing tools are non-comparative energy-based tools utilizing accessibility information that predict short interactions on this data set. Furthermore, we find that maintaining high accuracy across biologically different data sets and increasing input lengths remains a huge challenge, causing implications for de novo transcriptome-wide searches. Finally, we make our interaction data set publicly available for future development and benchmarking efforts.

  5. siRNA Transfection and EMSA Analyses on Freshly Isolated Human Villous Cytotrophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lokossou, Adjimon Gatien; Toufaily, Chirine; Vargas, Amandine; Barbeau, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Human primary villous cytotrophoblasts are a very useful source of primary cells to study placental functions and regulatory mechanisms, and to comprehend diseases related to pregnancy. In this protocol, human primary villous cytotrophoblasts freshly isolated from placentas through a standard DNase/trypsin protocol are microporated with small interfering RNA (siRNA). This approach provided greater efficiency for siRNA transfection when compared to a lipofection-based method. Transfected cells can subsequently be analyzed by standard Western blot within a time frame of 3-4 days post-transfection. In addition, using cultured primary villous cytotrophoblasts, Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) analysis was optimized and performed on extracts from days 1 to 4. The use of these cultured primary cells and the protocol described allow for an evaluation of the implication of specific genes and transcription factors in the process of villous cytotrophoblast differentiation into a syncytiotrophoblast-like cell layer. However, the limited time span allowable in culture precludes the use of methods requiring more time, such as generation of a stable cell population. Therefore testing of this cell population requires highly optimized gene transfer protocols. PMID:27685614

  6. Identification of extracellular miRNA in archived serum samples by next-generation sequencing from RNA extracted using multiple methods.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Kumar, Raina; Dimitrov, George; Hoke, Allison; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs act as important regulators of gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation or by attenuating protein translation. Since miRNAs are stably expressed in bodily fluids, there is growing interest in profiling these miRNAs, as it is minimally invasive and cost-effective as a diagnostic matrix. A technical hurdle in studying miRNA dynamics is the ability to reliably extract miRNA as small sample volumes and low RNA abundance create challenges for extraction and downstream applications. The purpose of this study was to develop a pipeline for the recovery of miRNA using small volumes of archived serum samples. The RNA was extracted employing several widely utilized RNA isolation kits/methods with and without addition of a carrier. The small RNA library preparation was carried out using Illumina TruSeq small RNA kit and sequencing was carried out using Illumina platform. A fraction of five microliters of total RNA was used for library preparation as quantification is below the detection limit. We were able to profile miRNA levels in serum from all the methods tested. We found out that addition of nucleic acid based carrier molecules had higher numbers of processed reads but it did not enhance the mapping of any miRBase annotated sequences. However, some of the extraction procedures offer certain advantages: RNA extracted by TRIzol seemed to align to the miRBase best; extractions using TRIzol with carrier yielded higher miRNA-to-small RNA ratios. Nuclease free glycogen can be carrier of choice for miRNA sequencing. Our findings illustrate that miRNA extraction and quantification is influenced by the choice of methodologies. Addition of nucleic acid- based carrier molecules during extraction procedure is not a good choice when assaying miRNA using sequencing. The careful selection of an extraction method permits the archived serum samples to become valuable resources for high-throughput applications. PMID:27510798

  7. Identification of extracellular miRNA in archived serum samples by next-generation sequencing from RNA extracted using multiple methods.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Kumar, Raina; Dimitrov, George; Hoke, Allison; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs act as important regulators of gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation or by attenuating protein translation. Since miRNAs are stably expressed in bodily fluids, there is growing interest in profiling these miRNAs, as it is minimally invasive and cost-effective as a diagnostic matrix. A technical hurdle in studying miRNA dynamics is the ability to reliably extract miRNA as small sample volumes and low RNA abundance create challenges for extraction and downstream applications. The purpose of this study was to develop a pipeline for the recovery of miRNA using small volumes of archived serum samples. The RNA was extracted employing several widely utilized RNA isolation kits/methods with and without addition of a carrier. The small RNA library preparation was carried out using Illumina TruSeq small RNA kit and sequencing was carried out using Illumina platform. A fraction of five microliters of total RNA was used for library preparation as quantification is below the detection limit. We were able to profile miRNA levels in serum from all the methods tested. We found out that addition of nucleic acid based carrier molecules had higher numbers of processed reads but it did not enhance the mapping of any miRBase annotated sequences. However, some of the extraction procedures offer certain advantages: RNA extracted by TRIzol seemed to align to the miRBase best; extractions using TRIzol with carrier yielded higher miRNA-to-small RNA ratios. Nuclease free glycogen can be carrier of choice for miRNA sequencing. Our findings illustrate that miRNA extraction and quantification is influenced by the choice of methodologies. Addition of nucleic acid- based carrier molecules during extraction procedure is not a good choice when assaying miRNA using sequencing. The careful selection of an extraction method permits the archived serum samples to become valuable resources for high-throughput applications.

  8. New Site of Modification of 23S rRNA Associated with Clarithromycin Resistance of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Carla; Favaro, Marco; Minelli, Silvia; Criscuolo, Anna Angela; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Galante, Alberto; Favalli, Cartesio

    2002-01-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin occurs with a prevalence ranging from 0 to 15%. This has an important clinical impact on dual and triple therapies, in which clarithromycin seems to be the better choice to achieve H. pylori eradication. In order to evaluate the possibility of new mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance, a PCR assay that amplified a portion of 23S rRNA from H. pylori isolates was used. Gastric tissue biopsy specimens from 230 consecutive patients were cultured for H. pylori isolation. Eighty-six gastric biopsy specimens yielded H. pylori-positive results, and among these 12 isolates were clarithromycin resistant. The latter were studied to detect mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. Sequence analysis of the 1,143-bp PCR product (portion of the 23S rRNA gene) did not reveal mutation such as that described at position 2142 to 2143. On the contrary, our findings show, for seven isolates, a T-to-C transition at position 2717. This mutation conferred a low level of resistance, equivalent to the MIC for the isolates, selected using the E-test as well as using the agar dilution method: 1 μg/ml. Moreover, T2717C transition is located in a highly conserved region of the 23S RNA associated with functional sites: domain VI. This fact has a strong effect on the secondary structure of the 23S RNA and on its interaction with macrolide. Mutation at position 2717 also generated an HhaI restriction site; therefore, restriction analysis of the PCR product also permits a rapid detection of resistant isolates. PMID:12435674

  9. Synthesis of poly(A)-containing RNA by isolated spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bartolf, M; Price, C A

    1979-05-01

    Chloroplasts were isolated from spinach leaves and the intact chloroplasts separated by centrifugation on gradients of silica sol. Chloroplasts prepared in this way were almost completely free of cytoplasmic rRNA. The purified chloroplasts were incubated with 32PO4 in the light. The nucleic acids were then extracted and the RNA was fractionated into poly(A)-lacking RNA and poly(A)-containing RNA (poly(A)-RNA) via oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography. The poly(A)-RNA had a mean size of approximately 18--20 S as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The poly(A)-RNA was digested with RNase A and RNase T1, and the resulting poly(A) segments were subjected to electrophoresis on a 10% w/v polyacrylamide gel 98% v/v formamide). Radioactivity was incorporated into both poly(A)-RNA and poly(A)-lacking RNA and into the poly(A) segments themselves. The poly(A) segments were between 10 and 45 residues long and alkaline hydrolysis of poly(A) segments followed by descending paper chromatography showed that they were composed primarily of adenine residues. There was no 32PO4 incorporation into acid-insoluble material in the dark. We conclude that isolated chloroplasts are capable of synthesizing poly(A)-RNA. PMID:435477

  10. End-targeting proteomics of isolated chromatin segments of a mammalian ribosomal RNA gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Satoru; Dejardin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The unbiased identification of proteins associated with specific loci is crucial for understanding chromatin-based processes. The proteomics of isolated chromatin fragment (PICh) method has previously been developed to purify telomeres and identify associated proteins. This approach is based on the affinity capture of endogenous chromatin segments by hybridization with oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acids. However, PICh is only efficient with highly abundant genomic targets, limiting its applicability. Here we develop an approach for identifying factors bound to the promoter region of the ribosomal RNA genes that we call end-targeting PICh (ePICh). Using ePICh, we could specifically enrich the RNA polymerase I pre-initiation complex, including the selectivity factor 1. The high purity of the ePICh material allowed the identification of ZFP106, a novel factor regulating transcription initiation by targeting RNA polymerase I to the promoter. Our results demonstrate that ePICh can uncover novel proteins controlling endogenous regulatory elements in mammals. PMID:25812914

  11. Isolation of genes involved in colorectal metastasis by differential display of mRNA species

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, C.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antalis, T.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic events that give rise to malignant colorectal tumors have been determined in some detail. Much less is known about the genes involved in metastasis of these neoplasms. A useful resource to study this process is the pair of cell lines, SW480 and SW620, which are derived from the primary and metastatic components, respectively, of the same colorectal tumor. We are using the method of differential display of mRNA species to isolate genes that are differentially expressed in these two cell lines. Differential display is carried out in triplicate, using three different RNA extractions from each cell line. Only fragments that are consistently up- or down-regulated in one cell line compared to another are examined further. Less than 1% of fragments are differentially expressed. These are cloned, sequenced, and used for Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-PCR in order to examine their differential expression further. The RNA sources for this expression analysis are (i) SW480 and SW620 cells, (ii) other pairs of primary and metastatic colorectal cell lines, (iii) primary and metastatic tissue from patients with colorectal cancer.

  12. End-targeting proteomics of isolated chromatin segments of a mammalian ribosomal RNA gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Ide, Satoru; Dejardin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The unbiased identification of proteins associated with specific loci is crucial for understanding chromatin-based processes. The proteomics of isolated chromatin fragment (PICh) method has previously been developed to purify telomeres and identify associated proteins. This approach is based on the affinity capture of endogenous chromatin segments by hybridization with oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acids. However, PICh is only efficient with highly abundant genomic targets, limiting its applicability. Here we develop an approach for identifying factors bound to the promoter region of the ribosomal RNA genes that we call end-targeting PICh (ePICh). Using ePICh, we could specifically enrich the RNA polymerase I pre-initiation complex, including the selectivity factor 1. The high purity of the ePICh material allowed the identification of ZFP106, a novel factor regulating transcription initiation by targeting RNA polymerase I to the promoter. Our results demonstrate that ePICh can uncover novel proteins controlling endogenous regulatory elements in mammals. PMID:25812914

  13. An assessment of some methodological criticisms of studies of RNA efflux from isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S

    1983-09-15

    RNA efflux from isolated nuclei can be studied either as a means of elucidating the general mechanism of nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport, or as part of an investigation of the processing and utilization of particular gene transcripts. The present paper describes an assessment of three methodological criticisms of RNA-efflux measurements that are made for the former reason: for such measurements, it is sufficient to show that the post-incubation supernatant RNA is similar overall to homologous cytoplasmic mRNA, rather than to nuclear RNA, that is nevertheless of intranuclear origin, and that alterations to the medium during experiments do not markedly perturb this general nuclear restriction. The results seem to justify the following conclusions. (1) Although degradation of the nuclear RNA occurs during incubation in vitro, this process does not account for the appearance of RNA in the postnuclear supernatant. The degradation can be largely prevented by the addition of serine-proteinase inhibitors without altering the RNA efflux rate. (2) Some adsorption of labelled cytoplasmic RNA to the nuclear surface occurs during both isolation and incubation of the nuclei, and some desorption occurs during incubation. However, these effects introduce errors of less than 10% into the measurements of efflux rates. (3) Exogenous acidic polymers, including polyribonucleotides, disrupt nuclei and increase the apparent RNA efflux rate by causing leakage of nuclear contents. However, this effect can largely be overcome by including the nuclear stabilizers spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+ in the medium. In terms of this assessment, it appears that RNA efflux from isolated nuclei in media containing nuclear stabilizers serves as a reasonable model for transport in vivo.

  14. An assessment of some methodological criticisms of studies of RNA efflux from isolated nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, P S

    1983-01-01

    RNA efflux from isolated nuclei can be studied either as a means of elucidating the general mechanism of nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport, or as part of an investigation of the processing and utilization of particular gene transcripts. The present paper describes an assessment of three methodological criticisms of RNA-efflux measurements that are made for the former reason: for such measurements, it is sufficient to show that the post-incubation supernatant RNA is similar overall to homologous cytoplasmic mRNA, rather than to nuclear RNA, that is nevertheless of intranuclear origin, and that alterations to the medium during experiments do not markedly perturb this general nuclear restriction. The results seem to justify the following conclusions. (1) Although degradation of the nuclear RNA occurs during incubation in vitro, this process does not account for the appearance of RNA in the postnuclear supernatant. The degradation can be largely prevented by the addition of serine-proteinase inhibitors without altering the RNA efflux rate. (2) Some adsorption of labelled cytoplasmic RNA to the nuclear surface occurs during both isolation and incubation of the nuclei, and some desorption occurs during incubation. However, these effects introduce errors of less than 10% into the measurements of efflux rates. (3) Exogenous acidic polymers, including polyribonucleotides, disrupt nuclei and increase the apparent RNA efflux rate by causing leakage of nuclear contents. However, this effect can largely be overcome by including the nuclear stabilizers spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+ in the medium. In terms of this assessment, it appears that RNA efflux from isolated nuclei in media containing nuclear stabilizers serves as a reasonable model for transport in vivo. PMID:6194787

  15. Description of an unusual Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing and expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Specific 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Marion; Skvoretz, Rhonda; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Jonas, Vivian; Brentano, Steve

    2013-10-01

    An apparently rare Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing one copy of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA gene is described herein. This isolate was identified as N. meningitidis by biochemical identification methods but generated a positive signal with Gen-Probe Aptima assays for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the purified isolate revealed mixed bases in signature regions that allow for discrimination between N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. The mixed bases were resolved by sequencing individually PCR-amplified single copies of the genomic 16S rRNA gene. A total of 121 discrete sequences were obtained; 92 (76%) were N. meningitidis sequences, and 29 (24%) were N. gonorrhoeae sequences. Based on the ratio of species-specific sequences, the N. meningitidis strain seems to have replaced one of its four intrinsic 16S rRNA genes with the gonococcal gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes specific for meningococcal and gonococcal rRNA were used to demonstrate the expression of the rRNA genes. Interestingly, the clinical isolate described here expresses both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA genes, as shown by positive FISH signals with both probes. This explains why the probes for N. gonorrhoeae in the Gen-Probe Aptima assays cross-react with this N. meningitidis isolate. The N. meningitidis isolate described must have obtained N. gonorrhoeae-specific DNA through interspecies recombination.

  16. Comparison and evaluation of RNA quantification methods using viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic RNA over a 10(4) concentration range.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Roman; Dineen, Shauna M; Craig, Rhonda L; Guerrieri, Richard A; Robertson, James M

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of RNA is essential for various molecular biology studies. In this work, three quantification methods were evaluated: ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, microcapillary electrophoresis (MCE), and fluorescence-based quantification. Viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic RNA were measured in the 500 to 0.05-ng microl(-1) range via an ND-1000 spectrophotometer (UV), Agilent RNA 6000 kits (MCE), and Quant-iT RiboGreen assay (fluorescence). The precision and accuracy of each method were assessed and compared with a concentration derived independently using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Cost, operator time and skill, and required sample volumes were also considered in the evaluation. Results indicate an ideal concentration range for each quantification technique to optimize accuracy and precision. The ND-1000 spectrophotometer exhibits high precision and accurately quantifies a 1-microl sample in the 500 to 5-ng microl(-1) range. The Quant-iT RiboGreen assay demonstrates high precision in the 1 to 0.05-ng microl(-1) range but is limited to lower RNA concentrations and is more costly than the ND-1000 spectrophotometer. The Agilent kits exhibit less precision than the ND-1000 spectrophotometer and Quant-iT RiboGreen assays in the 500 to 0.05-ng microl(-1) range. However, the Agilent kits require 1 microl of sample and can determine the integrity of the RNA, a useful feature for verifying whether the isolation process was successful. PMID:19454255

  17. A method for extracting RNA from dormant and germinating Bacillus subtilis strain 168 endospores.

    PubMed

    Moeller, R; Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Mollenkopf, H-J; Stackebrandt, E; Nicholson, W L

    2006-09-01

    RNA was extracted from dormant and germinating Bacillus subtilis 168 spores (intact spores and chemically decoated spores) by using rapid rupture followed by acid-phenol extraction. Spore germination progress was monitored by assaying colony forming ability before and after heat shock and by reading the optical density at 600 nm. The purity, yield, and composition of the extracted RNA were determined spectrophotometrically from the ratio of absorption at 260 nm to that at 280 nm; in a 2100 BioAnalyzer, giving the RNA yield/10(8) spores or cells and the distribution pattern of rRNA components. The method reported here for the extraction of RNA from dormant spores, as well as during different phases of germination and outgrowth, has proven to be fast, efficient and simple to handle. RNA of a high purity was obtained from dormant spores and during all phases of germination and growth. There was a significant increase in RNA yield during the transition from dormant spores to germination and subsequent outgrowth. Chemically decoated spores were retarded in germination and outgrowth compared with intact spores, and less RNA was extracted; however, the differences were not significant. This method for RNA isolation of dormant, germinating, and outgrowing bacterial endospores is a valuable prerequisite for gene expression studies, especially in studies on the responses of spores to hostile environmental conditions.

  18. AmiRNA Designer - new method of artificial miRNA design.

    PubMed

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Sarzynska, Joanna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that have been found in most of the eukaryotic organisms. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in a sequence specific manner. MiRNAs are produced from their precursors by Dicer-dependent small RNA biogenesis pathway. Involvement of miRNAs in a wide range of biological processes makes them excellent candidates for studying gene function or for therapeutic applications. For this purpose, different RNA-based gene silencing techniques have been developed. Artificially transformed miRNAs (amiRNAs) targeting one or several genes of interest represent one of such techniques being a potential tool in functional genomics. Here, we present a new approach to amiRNA*design, implemented as AmiRNA Designer software. Our method is based on the thermodynamic analysis of the native miRNA/miRNA* and miRNA/target duplexes. In contrast to the available automated tools, our program allows the user to perform analysis of natural miRNAs for the organism of interest and to create customized constraints for the design stage. It also provides filtering of the amiRNA candidates for the potential off-targets. AmiRNA Designer is freely available at http://www.cs.put.poznan.pl/arybarczyk/AmiRNA/. PMID:26784022

  19. Computational Methods for RNA Structure Validation and Improvement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Richardson, David C; Richardson, Jane S

    2015-01-01

    With increasing recognition of the roles RNA molecules and RNA/protein complexes play in an unexpected variety of biological processes, understanding of RNA structure-function relationships is of high current importance. To make clean biological interpretations from three-dimensional structures, it is imperative to have high-quality, accurate RNA crystal structures available, and the community has thoroughly embraced that goal. However, due to the many degrees of freedom inherent in RNA structure (especially for the backbone), it is a significant challenge to succeed in building accurate experimental models for RNA structures. This chapter describes the tools and techniques our research group and our collaborators have developed over the years to help RNA structural biologists both evaluate and achieve better accuracy. Expert analysis of large, high-resolution, quality-conscious RNA datasets provides the fundamental information that enables automated methods for robust and efficient error diagnosis in validating RNA structures at all resolutions. The even more crucial goal of correcting the diagnosed outliers has steadily developed toward highly effective, computationally based techniques. Automation enables solving complex issues in large RNA structures, but cannot circumvent the need for thoughtful examination of local details, and so we also provide some guidance for interpreting and acting on the results of current structure validation for RNA. PMID:26068742

  20. A raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolate from Ecuadorean Rubus glaucus contains an additional RNA that is a rearrangement of RNA-2.

    PubMed

    Quito-Avila, D F; Ibarra, M A; Alvarez, R; Peralta, E L; Martin, R R

    2014-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete genome of a raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolate from Rubus glaucus in Ecuador revealed that its RNA-1 and RNA-2 were 5449 and 2231 nucleotides (nt) long, respectively, and phylogenetically closest to isolates from Sweden and Slovenia. In dsRNA analysis of infected plants, an additional band of 3 kbp was observed. Sequencing of this band revealed that it was 3279 nt long. BLAST searches revealed that this band contained a modified version of RNA-2, which consisted of RNA-2 (2231 nt) plus an additional 1048-nt fragment that was concatenated in a reverse-complement fashion to its 5' terminus.

  1. Isolation of an Asymmetric RNA Uncoating Intermediate for a Single-Stranded RNA Plant Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Saskia E.; Ford, Robert J.; Barker, Amy M.; Robottom, Janice; Saunders, Keith; Pearson, Arwen R.; Ranson, Neil A.; Stockley, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structures of both native and expanded forms of turnip crinkle virus (TCV), using cryo-electron microscopy, which allows direct visualization of the encapsidated single-stranded RNA and coat protein (CP) N-terminal regions not seen in the high-resolution X-ray structure of the virion. The expanded form, which is a putative disassembly intermediate during infection, arises from a separation of the capsid-forming domains of the CP subunits. Capsid expansion leads to the formation of pores that could allow exit of the viral RNA. A subset of the CP N-terminal regions becomes proteolytically accessible in the expanded form, although the RNA remains inaccessible to nuclease. Sedimentation velocity assays suggest that the expanded state is metastable and that expansion is not fully reversible. Proteolytically cleaved CP subunits dissociate from the capsid, presumably leading to increased electrostatic repulsion within the viral RNA. Consistent with this idea, electron microscopy images show that proteolysis introduces asymmetry into the TCV capsid and allows initial extrusion of the genome from a defined site. The apparent formation of polysomes in wheat germ extracts suggests that subsequent uncoating is linked to translation. The implication is that the viral RNA and its capsid play multiple roles during primary infections, consistent with ribosome-mediated genome uncoating to avoid host antiviral activity. PMID:22306464

  2. Rotaviruses: Extraction and Isolation of RNA, Reassortant Strains, and NSP4 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yakshe, Krystle A; Franklin, Zachary D; Ball, Judith M

    2015-05-01

    Rotavirus (RV) contains 11 double-stranded RNA segments that encode for twelve structural and nonstructural proteins. The separation and isolation of viral RNA is a necessary precursor for many experimental techniques and can be useful for rapid RV RNA typing and sequencing of different rotavirus strains. The segmented genome enables RV to recombine easily. These recombinant viruses are essential for many purposes, including generation of potential vaccine strains. Rotavirus gene 10 expresses the viral enterotoxin, NSP4, which has been the focus of several studies due to the influence of NSP4 on rotavirus replication, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis. This unit will describe the isolation and separation of viral RNAs, the production characterization of recombinant RV in culture, and the expression and isolation of NSP4 in mammalian and insect cells.

  3. Isolation of Microarray-Quality RNA from Primary Human Cells after Intracellular Immunostaining and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Marchionni, Luigi; Romerio, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have made it possible to perform high-throughput, genome-wide analyses of RNA expression from an extremely wide range of sources. This technology relies on the ability to obtain RNA of sufficient quantity and quality for this type of application. While there are means to circumvent limitations in the former, recovery of RNA suitable for microarray analysis still represents a major issue when working with some biological samples, particularly those treated with and preserved in nucleic acid-modifying organic reagents. In the present report we describe a procedure for the isolation of RNA suitable for microarray analysis from cells purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting after fixation, permeabilization and intracellular staining with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies. We show that – although the RNA isolated from these samples presented some degradation – it performed remarkably well in microarray analysis. The method we describe here makes it available to genome-wide expression profiling a variety of biological samples that so far were confined to single-gene analysis. PMID:23434645

  4. A simple and efficient method for isolating small RNAs from different plant species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Small RNAs emerged over the last decade as key regulators in diverse biological processes in eukaryotic organisms. To identify and study small RNAs, good and efficient protocols are necessary to isolate them, which sometimes may be challenging due to the composition of specific tissues of certain plant species. Here we describe a simple and efficient method to isolate small RNAs from different plant species. Results We developed a simple and efficient method to isolate small RNAs from different plant species by first comparing different total RNA extraction protocols, followed by streamlining the best one, finally resulting in a small RNA extraction method that has no need of first total RNA extraction and is not based on the commercially available TRIzol® Reagent or columns. This small RNA extraction method not only works well for plant tissues with high polysaccharide content, like cactus, agave, banana, and tomato, but also for plant species like Arabidopsis or tobacco. Furthermore, the obtained small RNA samples were successfully used in northern blot assays. Conclusion Here we provide a simple and efficient method to isolate small RNAs from different plant species, such as cactus, agave, banana, tomato, Arabidopsis, and tobacco, and the small RNAs from this simplified and low cost method is suitable for downstream handling like northern blot assays. PMID:21349188

  5. Double-stranded RNA viral infection of Trichomonas vaginalis and correlation with genetic polymorphism of isolates.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jorge; Rojas, Lazara; Sariego, Idalia; Fernández-Calienes, Ayme

    2011-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis can be infected with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses known as T. vaginalis virus (TVV). This viral infection may have important implications for trichomonal virulence and disease pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the possible correlation between the T. vaginalis genetic polymorphism and the isolate infection with TVV. The Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to determine genetic differences among 37 isolates of T. vaginalis using a panel of 30 random primers and these genetic data were correlated with the infection of isolates with TVV. The trees drawn based on RAPD data showed significantly association with the presence of TVV (P = 0.028) demonstrating the existence of concordance between the genetic relatedness and the presence of TVV in T. vaginalis isolates. This result could point to a predisposition of T. vaginalis for the viral enters and/or survival. PMID:20875411

  6. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas: Computational methods for extraction, organization and evaluation of RNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Parlea, Lorena G; Sweeney, Blake A; Hosseini-Asanjan, Maryam; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2016-07-01

    RNA 3D motifs occupy places in structured RNA molecules that correspond to the hairpin, internal and multi-helix junction "loops" of their secondary structure representations. As many as 40% of the nucleotides of an RNA molecule can belong to these structural elements, which are distinct from the regular double helical regions formed by contiguous AU, GC, and GU Watson-Crick basepairs. With the large number of atomic- or near atomic-resolution 3D structures appearing in a steady stream in the PDB/NDB structure databases, the automated identification, extraction, comparison, clustering and visualization of these structural elements presents an opportunity to enhance RNA science. Three broad applications are: (1) identification of modular, autonomous structural units for RNA nanotechnology, nanobiology and synthetic biology applications; (2) bioinformatic analysis to improve RNA 3D structure prediction from sequence; and (3) creation of searchable databases for exploring the binding specificities, structural flexibility, and dynamics of these RNA elements. In this contribution, we review methods developed for computational extraction of hairpin and internal loop motifs from a non-redundant set of high-quality RNA 3D structures. We provide a statistical summary of the extracted hairpin and internal loop motifs in the most recent version of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. We also explore the reliability and accuracy of the extraction process by examining its performance in clustering recurrent motifs from homologous ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structures. We conclude with a summary of remaining challenges, especially with regard to extraction of multi-helix junction motifs. PMID:27125735

  7. Isolation of novel ribozymes that ligate AMP-activated RNA substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, A. J.; Szostak, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protein enzymes RNA ligase and DNA ligase catalyze the ligation of nucleic acids via an adenosine-5'-5'-pyrophosphate 'capped' RNA or DNA intermediate. The activation of nucleic acid substrates by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) may be a vestige of 'RNA world' catalysis. AMP-activated ligation seems ideally suited for catalysis by ribozymes (RNA enzymes), because an RNA motif capable of tightly and specifically binding AMP has previously been isolated. RESULTS: We used in vitro selection and directed evolution to explore the ability of ribozymes to catalyze the template-directed ligation of AMP-activated RNAs. We subjected a pool of 10(15) RNA molecules, each consisting of long random sequences flanking a mutagenized adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer, to ten rounds of in vitro selection, including three rounds involving mutagenic polymerase chain reaction. Selection was for the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 5'-capped active pool RNA species. Many different ligase ribozymes were isolated; these ribozymes had rates of reaction up to 0.4 ligations per hour, corresponding to rate accelerations of approximately 5 x10(5) over the templated, but otherwise uncatalyzed, background reaction rate. Three characterized ribozymes catalyzed the formation of 3'-5'-phosphodiester bonds and were highly specific for activation by AMP at the ligation site. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of a new class of ligase ribozymes is consistent with the hypothesis that the unusual mechanism of the biological ligases resulted from a conservation of mechanism during an evolutionary replacement of a primordial ribozyme ligase by a more modern protein enzyme. The newly isolated ligase ribozymes may also provide a starting point for the isolation of ribozymes that catalyze the polymerization of AMP-activated oligonucleotides or mononucleotides, which might have been the prebiotic analogs of nucleoside triphosphates.

  8. 16SrRNA sequencing of Dye decolorizing bacteria isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Avnish; Asthana, Monika; Gupta, Poonam; Yadav, Shweta; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Km Neeraj; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Dye׳s residues in textile effluents are hazardous for humans and animals health. Such pollutants can be degraded into non-harmful molecules using biological approaches that are considered cheaper and ecologically safer. Isolated 15 bacterial cultures from soil that could be used in biological system were showed decolorization capacity for Acid Green dye (33.9% to 94.0%) using thin layer chromatography and broth culture method. The most promising cultures (AMC3) to decolorize Acid green Dye (94.6%) was re-coded as NSDSUAM for submitting at IMTECH, Chandigarh for sequencing. The 16SrRNA sequencing suggested that it can be a variant of Pseudomonas geniculata (99.85% identical similarity) with difference of 2 base pairs to reference strain Pseudomonas geniculata ATCC 19374(T). Thus present study proposed dye decolorizing efficiency of the isolated strain of Pseudomonas geniculata that was previously unnoticed. The sequence is deposited in NCBI GenBank with the accession number KP238100. PMID:25780272

  9. 16SrRNA sequencing of Dye decolorizing bacteria isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avnish; Asthana, Monika; Gupta, Poonam; Yadav, Shweta; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Km Neeraj; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Dye׳s residues in textile effluents are hazardous for humans and animals health. Such pollutants can be degraded into non-harmful molecules using biological approaches that are considered cheaper and ecologically safer. Isolated 15 bacterial cultures from soil that could be used in biological system were showed decolorization capacity for Acid Green dye (33.9% to 94.0%) using thin layer chromatography and broth culture method. The most promising cultures (AMC3) to decolorize Acid green Dye (94.6%) was re-coded as NSDSUAM for submitting at IMTECH, Chandigarh for sequencing. The 16SrRNA sequencing suggested that it can be a variant of Pseudomonas geniculata (99.85% identical similarity) with difference of 2 base pairs to reference strain Pseudomonas geniculata ATCC 19374(T). Thus present study proposed dye decolorizing efficiency of the isolated strain of Pseudomonas geniculata that was previously unnoticed. The sequence is deposited in NCBI GenBank with the accession number KP238100.

  10. Method of vibration isolating an aircraft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Stanley I. (Inventor); Butler, Lawrence (Inventor); Dawes, Peter W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for coupling an engine to a support frame for mounting to a fuselage of an aircraft using a three point vibration isolating mounting system in which the load reactive forces at each mounting point are statically and dynamically determined. A first vibration isolating mount pivotably couples a first end of an elongated support beam to a stator portion of an engine with the pivoting action of the vibration mount being oriented such that it is pivotable about a line parallel to a center line of the engine. An aft end of the supporting frame is coupled to the engine through an additional pair of vibration isolating mounts with the mounts being oriented such that they are pivotable about a circumference of the engine. The aft mounts are symmetrically spaced to each side of the supporting frame by 45 degrees. The relative orientation between the front mount and the pair of rear mounts is such that only the rear mounts provide load reactive forces parallel to the engine center line, in support of the engine to the aircraft against thrust forces. The forward mount is oriented so as to provide only radial forces to the engine and some lifting forces to maintain the engine in position adjacent a fuselage. Since each mount is connected to provide specific forces to support the engine, forces required of each mount are statically and dynamically determinable.

  11. Validation of two ribosomal RNA removal methods for microbial metatranscriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shaomei; Wurtzel, Omri; Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff L; Yilmaz, Suzan; Tringe, Susannah G; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Feng; Lindquist, Erika A; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-10-01

    The predominance of rRNAs in the transcriptome is a major technical challenge in sequence-based analysis of cDNAs from microbial isolates and communities. Several approaches have been applied to deplete rRNAs from (meta)transcriptomes, but no systematic investigation of potential biases introduced by any of these approaches has been reported. Here we validated the effectiveness and fidelity of the two most commonly used approaches, subtractive hybridization and exonuclease digestion, as well as combinations of these treatments, on two synthetic five-microorganism metatranscriptomes using massively parallel sequencing. We found that the effectiveness of rRNA removal was a function of community composition and RNA integrity for these treatments. Subtractive hybridization alone introduced the least bias in relative transcript abundance, whereas exonuclease and in particular combined treatments greatly compromised mRNA abundance fidelity. Illumina sequencing itself also can compromise quantitative data analysis by introducing a G+C bias between runs.

  12. Isolation of the protein and RNA content of active sites of transcription from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Svitlana; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Brant, Lilija; Carr, Ian M; Rippe, Karsten; Cook, Peter R; Papantonis, Argyris

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian cell nuclei contain three RNA polymerases (RNAP I, RNAP II and RNAP III), which transcribe different gene subsets, and whose active forms are contained in supramolecular complexes known as 'transcription factories.' These complexes are difficult to isolate because they are embedded in the 3D structure of the nucleus. Factories exchange components with the soluble nucleoplasmic pool over time as gene expression programs change during development or disease. Analysis of their content can provide information on the nascent transcriptome and its regulators. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of large factory fragments under isotonic salt concentrations in <72 h. It relies on DNase I-mediated detachment of chromatin from the nuclear substructure of freshly isolated, unfixed cells, followed by caspase treatment to release multi-megadalton factory complexes. These complexes retain transcriptional activity, and isolation of their contents is compatible with downstream analyses by mass spectrometry (MS) or RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to catalog the proteins and RNA associated with sites of active transcription. PMID:26914315

  13. Isolation of retro-transcribed RNA from in vitro Mycosphaerella fijiensis-infected banana leaves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, C M; Peraza-Echeverría, L; Islas-Flores, I R; Canto-Canché, B B; Grijalva-Arango, R

    2010-07-27

    High polyphenol and polysaccharide levels in plant tissues such as banana fruit and leaves constitute a significant challenge to the extraction of sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA required for cDNA library synthesis and molecular analysis. To determine their comparative effectiveness at eliminating polyphenols, polysaccharides and proteins, three protocols for RNA extraction from in vitro banana plantlet leaves were tested: Concert(TM) Plant RNA isolation kit, a small-scale protocol based on Valderrama-Cháirez, and a modified version of the Valderrama-Cháirez protocol. RNA quantity and purity were evaluated by UV-spectrophotometry using DEPC-treated water and Tris-HCl, pH 7.5. Purity was greater using Tris-HCl. The Concert(TM) Plant protocol produced the poorest quality RNA. Reverse transcription into cDNAs from RNA isolated from in vitro banana plantlet leaves infected with Mycosphaerella fijiensis using the modified Valderrama-Cháirez protocol, followed by PCR using primers designed against gamma-actin from banana and M. fijiensis, yielded products of the anticipated size. In addition, this protocol reduced the processing time, lowered costs, used less expensive equipment, and could be used for other plants that have the same problems with high polyphenol and polysaccharide levels.

  14. Meeting report: discussions and preliminary findings on extracellular RNA measurement methods from laboratories in the NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Louise C.; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Balaj, Leonora; Breakefield, Xandra; Carlson, Elizabeth; Carter, Bob S.; Majem, Blanca; Chen, Clark C.; Cocucci, Emanuele; Danielson, Kirsty; Courtright, Amanda; Das, Saumya; Elmageed, Zakaria Y. Abd; Enderle, Daniel; Ezrin, Alan; Ferrer, Marc; Freedman, Jane; Galas, David; Gandhi, Roopali; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall; Kalani, Yashar; Kim, Yong; Krichevsky, Anna M.; Lai, Charles; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Laurent, Clara D.; Leonardo, Trevor; Li, Feng; Malenica, Ivana; Mondal, Debasis; Nejad, Parham; Patel, Tushar; Raffai, Robert L.; Rubio, Renee; Skog, Johan; Spetzler, Robert; Sun, Jie; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Vickers, Kasey; Wang, Liang; Wang, Yaoyu; Wei, Zhiyun; Weiner, Howard L.; Wong, David; Yan, Irene K.; Yeri, Ashish; Gould, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) have been identified in all tested biofluids and have been associated with a variety of extracellular vesicles, ribonucleoprotein complexes and lipoprotein complexes. Much of the interest in exRNAs lies in the fact that they may serve as signalling molecules between cells, their potential to serve as biomarkers for prediction and diagnosis of disease and the possibility that exRNAs or the extracellular particles that carry them might be used for therapeutic purposes. Among the most significant bottlenecks to progress in this field is the lack of robust and standardized methods for collection and processing of biofluids, separation of different types of exRNA-containing particles and isolation and analysis of exRNAs. The Sample and Assay Standards Working Group of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium is a group of laboratories funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop such methods. In our first joint endeavour, we held a series of conference calls and in-person meetings to survey the methods used among our members, placed them in the context of the current literature and used our findings to identify areas in which the identification of robust methodologies would promote rapid advancements in the exRNA field. PMID:26320937

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Mexican Babesia bovis isolates using msa and ssrRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Genis, Alma D; Mosqueda, Juan J; Borgonio, Verónica M; Falcón, Alfonso; Alvarez, Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Figueroa, Julio V

    2008-12-01

    Variable merozoite surface antigens of Babesia bovis are exposed glycoproteins having a role in erythrocyte invasion. Members of this gene family include msa-1 and msa-2 (msa-2c, msa-2a(1), msa-2a(2), and msa-2b). Small subunit ribosomal (ssr)RNA gene is subject to evolutive pressure and has been used in phylogenetic studies. To determine the phylogenetic relationship among B. bovis Mexican isolates using different genetic markers, PCR amplicons, corresponding to msa-1, msa-2c, msa-2b, and ssrRNA genes, were cloned and plasmids carrying the corresponding inserts were sequenced. Comparative analysis of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed distinct degrees of variability and identity among the coding gene sequences obtained from 12 geographically different B. bovis isolates and a reference strain. Overall sequence identities of 47.7%, 72.3%, 87.7%, and 94% were determined for msa-1, msa-2b, msa-2c, and ssrRNA, respectively. A robust phylogenetic tree was obtained with msa-2b sequences. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that Mexican B. bovis isolates group in clades not concordant with the Mexican geography. However, the Mexican isolates group together in an American clade separated from the Australian clade. Sequence heterogeneity in msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c coding regions of Mexican B. bovis isolates present in different geographical regions can be a result of either differential evolutive pressure or cattle movement from commercial trade.

  16. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Steven William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  17. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Steven William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-05-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  18. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-09-06

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  19. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-05-11

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  20. Type C oncornavirus isolation studies in systemic lupus erythematosus. II. Attempted detection by viral RNA-dependent DNA polymerase assay.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P E; Hargrave-Granda, R

    1978-01-01

    Isolation of type C oncornavirus was attempted from 20 tissues and cell cultures of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Chemical inducers, cocultivation and fusion with cells from multiple other species, prolonged subculturing, and the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase assay for virus detection were used. A type C virus was isolated, but was shown to be the endogenous rat virus. Thus the methods, although generally appropriate, were not specifically permissive for replication of a human type C virus. This agrees with the failure of other investigators to isolate a virus of undisputed human origin. Combining available evidence, a fundamental role for type C viruses in lupus erythematosus remains an attractive hypothesis. Images PMID:80159

  1. An optimized preparation method to obtain high-quality RNA from dry sunflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Ma, X B; Yang, J

    2011-02-01

    In an attempt to isolate high-quality, intact total RNA from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of mutations, we tested various procedures, using kits, including RNAiso Plus, RNAiso Plus+RNAiso-mate for Plant Tissue, Trizol, and the Qi method, but no high-quality total RNA of high integrity was obtained with any of these methods, probably due to the high content of polyphenols, polysaccharides, and secondary metabolites in mature sunflower seeds. Modifications were made to the Qi method. To avoid polyphenol oxidation, frozen dry seeds free of the seedcase were ground in a mortar with an equal amount of PVP30, and the fine ground powder was transferred to an extraction buffer with 2% PVP30 (w/v), 5% β-mercaptoethanol (v/v) and LiCl (8 M). A sample homogenate was extracted with chloroform prior to acidic phenol-chloroform extraction. The total RNA was precipitated with 1/4 volume of NaAc and 2 volumes of absolute ethanol to prevent contamination by polysaccharides. The yield of total RNA was 29.95 μg/100 mg husked dry seeds; the ratios of A260/A230 and A260/A280 were 2.44 and 2.09, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis clearly showed 28S and 18S ribosomal RNA bands. Using the extracted RNA, a fragment of the actin gene was successfully expressed by RT-PCR. This modified protocol is suitable for isolating high-quality total RNA from sunflower seeds for molecular research.

  2. Identification of Lactobacillus Isolates from the Gastrointestinal Tract, Silage, and Yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Ng, J.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PMID:10473450

  3. System and Method for Isolation of Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye (Inventor); Wu, Honglu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for isolating samples are provided. The system comprises a first membrane and a second membrane disposed within an enclosure. First and second reservoirs can also be disposed within the enclosure and adapted to contain one or more reagents therein. A first valve can be disposed within the enclosure and in fluid communication with the first reservoir, the second reservoir, or both. The first valve can also be in fluid communication with the first or second membranes or both. The first valve can be adapted to selectively regulate the flow of the reagents from the first reservoir, through at least one of the first and second membranes, and into the second reservoir.

  4. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  5. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  6. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  7. Modified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region restriction endonuclease analysis for species identification of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs, compared with identification using classical methods and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Banach, Tomasz; Kowalski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of bacteria to at least the species level is currently the basis for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections. This is particularly important in the case of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, whose resistance profile is often correlated with their species (e.g. resistance to vancomycin). In this study, we evaluated restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region for species identification of Enterococcus. The utility of the method was compared with that of phenotypic methods [biochemical profile evaluation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)]. Identification was based on 21 Enterococcus reference strains, of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. casseliflavus, E. gallinarum, E. avium, E. cecorum and E. columbae, and 47 Enterococcus field strains isolated from pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the ITS-PCR product using HinfI, RsaI and MboI, in the order specified, enabled species differentiation of the Enterococcus reference and field strains, and in the case of the latter, the results of species identification were identical (47/47) to those obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, as a result of digestion with MboI, a unique restriction profile was also obtained for the strains (3/3) identified by MALDI-TOF MS as E. thailandicus. In our opinion, restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region of Enterococcus may be a simple and relatively fast (less than 4 h) alternative method for identifying the species occurring most frequently in humans and animals.

  8. Isolation and characterization of homologous TRBP cDNA for RNA interference in Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lishi; Li, Xiaolan; Huang, Jianhua; Zhou, Falin; Su, Tianfeng; Jiang, Shigui

    2013-02-01

    The transactivation response RNA-binding protein (TRBP) interacts with Dicer and binds to double-stranded RNA as a critical component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, which is a key complex in the RNA interference pathway. The full-length cDNA of TRBP from the tiger prawn, Penaeus monodon, (PmTRBP; 1548 bp long with a 1029 bp coding region) was isolated. The encoded polypeptide of 343 amino acids had a predicted molecular mass of 36.8 kDa. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis indicated that PmTRBP was evolutionarily closest to TRBP1 from Litopenaeus vannamei, with the three double-stranded RNA-binding motifs that were typical of the TRBP family. Tissue expression profile analysis by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that PmTRBP1 was constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues, with a predominant expression in the lymphatic organs and with the weakest expression in the ovaries. Significantly upregulated PmTRBP1 expression was elicited by systemic injections of Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio vulnificus, and white spot syndrome virus, thereby revealing its pathogen inducibility. Furthermore, exogenous viral nucleoside analogs (high-molecular-weight poly(I:C) dsRNAs as well as R484 single-stranded RNA) were remarkably induced PmTRBP1 transcription at 48 h and 9 h post-injection, respectively, which suggested that PmTRBP1 might function in tiger prawn antibacterial and antiviral response.

  9. Isolating Influenza RNA from Clinical Samples Using Microfluidic Oil-Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cui, Francis R; Wang, Jingjing; Opal, Steven M; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    The effective and robust separation of biomolecules of interest from patient samples is an essential step in diagnostic applications. We present a platform for the fast extraction of nucleic acids from clinical specimens utilizing paramagnetic PMPs, an oil-water interface, a small permanent magnet and a microfluidic channel to separate and purify captured nucleic acids from lysate in less than one minute, circumventing the need for multiple washing steps and greatly simplifying and expediting the purification procedure. Our device was able to isolate influenza RNA from clinical nasopharyngeal swab samples with high efficiency when compared to the Ambion® MagMAXTM Viral RNA Isolation Kit, sufficiently separating nucleic acid analytes from PCR-inhibiting contaminants within the lysate while also critically maintaining high integrity of the viral genome. We find that this design has great potential for rapid, efficient and sensitive nucleic acid separation from patient sample. PMID:26886007

  10. Isolating Influenza RNA from Clinical Samples Using Microfluidic Oil-Water Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Francis R.; Wang, Jingjing; Opal, Steven M.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    The effective and robust separation of biomolecules of interest from patient samples is an essential step in diagnostic applications. We present a platform for the fast extraction of nucleic acids from clinical specimens utilizing paramagnetic PMPs, an oil-water interface, a small permanent magnet and a microfluidic channel to separate and purify captured nucleic acids from lysate in less than one minute, circumventing the need for multiple washing steps and greatly simplifying and expediting the purification procedure. Our device was able to isolate influenza RNA from clinical nasopharyngeal swab samples with high efficiency when compared to the Ambion® MagMAXTM Viral RNA Isolation Kit, sufficiently separating nucleic acid analytes from PCR-inhibiting contaminants within the lysate while also critically maintaining high integrity of the viral genome. We find that this design has great potential for rapid, efficient and sensitive nucleic acid separation from patient sample. PMID:26886007

  11. Effects of social isolation on mRNA expression for corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptors in prairie voles

    PubMed Central

    Pournajafi-Nazarloo, Hossein; Partoo, Leila; Yee, Jason; Stevenson, Jennifer; Sanzenbacher, Lisa; Kenkel, William; Mohsenpour, Seyed Ramezan; Hashimoto, Kozo; Carter, C. Sue

    2011-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have demonstrated that various type of stressors modulate messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for type 1 corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor (CRH-R1 mRNA) and type 2 CRH receptor (CRH-R2 mRNA). The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of social isolation stress of varying durations on the CRH, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNAs expression in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and pituitary of socially monogamous female and male prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). Isolation for 1 hr (single isolation) or 1 hr of isolation every day for 4 weeks (repeated isolation) was followed by a significant increase in plasma corticosterone levels. Single or repeated isolation increased hypothalamic CRH mRNA expression, but no changes in CRH-R1 mRNA in the hypothalamus were observed. Continuous isolation for 4 weeks (chronic isolation) showed no effect on hypothalamic CRH or CRH-R1 mRNAs in female or male animals. However, hypothalamic CRH-R2 mRNA was significantly reduced in voles exposed to chronic isolation. Single or repeated isolation, but not chronic isolation, significantly increased CRH-R1 mRNA and decreased CRH-R2 mRNA in the pituitary. Despite elevated CRH mRNA expression, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNAs were not modulated in the hippocampus following single or repeated isolation. Although, chronic isolation did not affect hippocampal CRH or CRH-R1 mRNAs, it did increase CRH-R2 mRNA expression in females and males. The results of the present study in prairie voles suggest that social isolation has receptor subtype and species-specific consequences for the modulation of gene expression for CRH and its receptors in brain and pituitary. Previous studies have revealed a female-biased increase in oxytocin in response to chronic isolation; however, we did not find a sex difference in CRH or its receptors following single, repeated or chronic social isolation, suggesting that sexually-dimorphic processes beyond the CRH system, possibly involving

  12. Inverse PCR-based method for isolating novel SINEs from genome.

    PubMed

    Han, Yawei; Chen, Liping; Guan, Lihong; He, Shunping

    2014-04-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are moderately repetitive DNA sequences in eukaryotic genomes. Although eukaryotic genomes contain numerous SINEs copy, it is very difficult and laborious to isolate and identify them by the reported methods. In this study, the inverse PCR was successfully applied to isolate SINEs from Opsariichthys bidens genome in Eastern Asian Cyprinid. A group of SINEs derived from tRNA(Ala) molecular had been identified, which were named Opsar according to Opsariichthys. SINEs characteristics were exhibited in Opsar, which contained a tRNA(Ala)-derived region at the 5' end, a tRNA-unrelated region, and AT-rich region at the 3' end. The tRNA-derived region of Opsar shared 76 % sequence similarity with tRNA(Ala) gene. This result indicated that Opsar could derive from the inactive or pseudogene of tRNA(Ala). The reliability of method was tested by obtaining C-SINE, Ct-SINE, and M-SINEs from Ctenopharyngodon idellus, Megalobrama amblycephala, and Cyprinus carpio genomes. This method is simpler than the previously reported, which successfully omitted many steps, such as preparation of probes, construction of genomic libraries, and hybridization. PMID:24122282

  13. A Simple Protocol for High Efficiency Protein Isolation After RNA Isolation from Mouse Thyroid and Other Very Small Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Ziros, Panos G; Chartoumpekis, Dionysios V; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P

    2016-01-01

    As a dedicated hormone-secreting organ, the thyroid gland possesses a complement of proteostatic systems, including antioxidant, unfolded protein, and autophagic responses. The vast majority of animal investigations of thyroid physiology and, more recently, proteostasis, have utilized as model the rat, rather than the mouse. This is due to the very small size of the thyroid gland in the latter, with a total weight of ~2 mg (~1 mg per thyroid lobe). However, this strategy has limited the utilization of genetic approaches, such as taking advantage of the various transgenic and knockout mouse models. Here, we describe a simple and highly efficient protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mRNA, micro-RNA and 150-200 μg of protein from as little as 1 mg of mouse thyroid tissue, the average weight of one of the two thyroid lobes, thus preserving the other lobe for immunohistochemical or other analyses. While our workflow is similar to other protocols published in the literature and/or proposed by commercial reagent providers, we have introduced a key modification that addresses efficiently the most challenging step of the protein isolation process: the solubilization of the protein pellet after RNA extraction and protein precipitation. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach and its utility for downstream analyses (including Western blotting) that facilitate the comparative study of proteostatic pathways in the mouse thyroid. We have also successfully applied this protocol on samples from mouse liver, brown and white adipose tissue, as well as from rodent cell lines. PMID:27613051

  14. Characterization of RNA isolated from eighteen different human tissues: results from a rapid human autopsy program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas G; Whetzel, Alexis M; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I; Lue, Lih-Fen; Beach, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Many factors affect the integrity of messenger RNA from human autopsy tissues including postmortem interval (PMI) between death and tissue preservation and the pre-mortem agonal and disease states. In this communication, we describe RNA isolation and characterization of 389 samples from 18 different tissues from elderly donors who were participants in a rapid whole-body autopsy program located in Sun City, Arizona ( www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org ). Most tissues were collected within a PMI of 2-6 h (median 3.15 h; N = 455), but for this study, tissue from cases with longer PMIs (1.25-29.25 h) were included. RNA quality was assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN) and total yield (ng RNA/mg tissue). RIN correlated with PMI for heart (r = -0.531, p = 0.009) and liver (r = -558, p = 0.0017), while RNA yield correlated with PMI for colon (r = -485, p = 0.016) and skin (r = -0.460, p = 0.031). RNAs with the lowest integrity were from skin and cervix where 22.7 and 31.4 % of samples respectively failed to produce intact RNA; by contrast all samples from esophagus, lymph node, jejunum, lung, stomach, submandibular gland and kidney produced RNA with measurable RINs. Expression levels in heart RNA of 4 common housekeeping normalization genes showed significant correlations of Ct values with RIN, but only one gene, glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase, showed a correlation of Ct with PMI. There were no correlations between RIN values obtained for liver, adrenal, cervix, esophagus and lymph node and those obtained from corresponding brain samples. We show that high quality RNA can be produced from most human autopsy tissues, though with significant differences between tissues and donors. The RNA stability and yield did not depend solely on PMI; other undetermined factors are involved, but these do not include the age of the donor.

  15. A modified method using TRIzol reagent and liquid nitrogen produces high-quality RNA from rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmin; Ren, Wuchao; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Feimiao; Gao, Yu; Ning, Qilan; Han, Yan; Song, Tianbao; Lu, Shemin

    2009-08-01

    To establish an economical and reproducible method for the high-quality RNA extraction from pancreas, we isolated total RNA from rat pancreas with TRIzol reagent and liquid nitrogen. In the initial stage, we optimized three influential factors, the way to homogenize pancreas, the time to collect the pancreatic tissue from animals, and the weight of the pancreatic tissue in 1 ml of TRIzol reagent. The RNA quality was determined by detecting total RNA content and its absorbance at 260/280 nm wavelength, visualizing RNA in non-denatured agarose gel and performing RT-PCR of pancreas-specific genes. The A (260)/A (280) ratio of the total RNA extracted by grinding 20-30 mg of rat pancreatic tissue removed from the rats in liquid nitrogen within 1 min and then immersed in 1 ml of the TRIzol Reagent was 1.75-1.89, and the ratio of 28S/18S ribosomal RNA bands was more than 1.8. Furthermore, full length of Pdx1 open-reading frame was amplified with RNA extracted from the grinding group rather than from the conventional group. The RT-PCR products of pancreas-specific genes from both exocrine and endocrine parts of pancreas were successfully derived from the extracted RNA. The results suggested that we successfully provided an economical, fast, and reproducible method to obtain the high-quality and intact RNA from rat pancreas with TRIzol Reagent and liquid nitrogen.

  16. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  17. The isolation of an RNA aptamer targeting to p53 protein with single amino acid mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Awan, Hassaan M.; Wu, Mingming; Liu, An; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Tao; Luo, Zhaofeng; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    p53, known as a tumor suppressor, is a DNA binding protein that regulates cell cycle, activates DNA repair proteins, and triggers apoptosis in multicellular animals. More than 50% of human cancers contain a mutation or deletion of the p53 gene, and p53R175 is one of the hot spots of p53 mutation. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that are able to bind various targets, and they are typically isolated from an experimental procedure called systematic evolution of ligand exponential enrichment (SELEX). Using a previously unidentified strategy of contrast screening with SELEX, we have isolated an RNA aptamer targeting p53R175H. This RNA aptamer (p53R175H-APT) has a significantly stronger affinity to p53R175H than to the wild-type p53 in both in vitro and in vivo assays. p53R175H-APT decreased the growth rate, weakened the migration capability, and triggered apoptosis in human lung cancer cells harboring p53R175H. Further analysis actually indicated that p53R175H-APT might partially rescue or correct the p53R175H to function more like the wild-type p53. In situ injections of p53R175H-APT to the tumor xenografts confirmed the effects of this RNA aptamer on p53R175H mutation in mice. PMID:26216949

  18. Drop-on-Demand Single Cell Isolation and Total RNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sangjun; Kim, Yun-Gon; Dong, Lingsheng; Lombardi, Michael; Haeggstrom, Edward; Jensen, Roderick V.; Hsiao, Li-Li; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Technologies that rapidly isolate viable single cells from heterogeneous solutions have significantly contributed to the field of medical genomics. Challenges remain both to enable efficient extraction, isolation and patterning of single cells from heterogeneous solutions as well as to keep them alive during the process due to a limited degree of control over single cell manipulation. Here, we present a microdroplet based method to isolate and pattern single cells from heterogeneous cell suspensions (10% target cell mixture), preserve viability of the extracted cells (97.0±0.8%), and obtain genomic information from isolated cells compared to the non-patterned controls. The cell encapsulation process is both experimentally and theoretically analyzed. Using the isolated cells, we identified 11 stem cell markers among 1000 genes and compare to the controls. This automated platform enabling high-throughput cell manipulation for subsequent genomic analysis employs fewer handling steps compared to existing methods. PMID:21412416

  19. Comparison of 16S rRNA sequencing with biochemical testing for species-level identification of clinical isolates of Neisseria spp.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Ben Hassen, Assia

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to compare accuracy of genus and species level identification of Neisseria spp. using biochemical testing and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. These methods were evaluated using 85 Neisseria spp. clinical isolates initially identified to the genus level by conventional biochemical tests and API NH system (Bio-Mérieux(®)). In 34 % (29/85), more than one possibility was given by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. In 6 % (5/85), one of the possibilities offered by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, agreed with the result given by biochemical testing. In 4 % (3/85), the same species was given by both methods. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results did not correlate well with biochemical tests.

  20. Topology of mRNA chain in isolated eukaryotic double-row polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Afonina, Zh A; Myasnikov, A G; Khabibullina, N F; Belorusova, A Yu; Menetret, J-F; Vasiliev, V D; Klaholz, B P; Shirokov, V A; Spirin, A S

    2013-05-01

    In the process of protein synthesis, the translating ribosomes of eukaryotic cells form polyribosomes that are found to be multiplex functional complexes possessing elements of ordered spatial organization. As revealed by a number of electron microscopy studies, the predominant visible configurations of the eukaryotic polyribosomes are circles (circular polyribosomes) and two-stranded formations (so-called double-row polyribosomes). The "long" (i.e. heavy loaded) polyribosomes are usually represented by double-row structures, which can be interpreted as either topologically circular ("collapsed rings"), or topologically linear (zigzags or helices). In the present work we have analyzed the mRNA path within the eukaryotic polyribosomes, isolated from a wheat germ cell-free translation system, by integrating two approaches: the visualization of mRNA ends in polyribosomes by marking them with gold nanoparticles (3'-end) and initiating 40S subunits (5'-end), as well as by the cryoelectron tomography. Examination of the location of the mRNA markers in polyribosomes and mutual orientation of ribosomes in them has shown that the double-row polyribosomes of the same sample can have both circular and linear arrangements of their mRNA.

  1. A simple method for amplifying RNA targets (SMART).

    PubMed

    McCalla, Stephanie E; Ong, Carmichael; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel and simple method for amplifying RNA targets (named by its acronym, SMART), and for detection, using engineered amplification probes that overcome existing limitations of current RNA-based technologies. This system amplifies and detects optimal engineered ssDNA probes that hybridize to target RNA. The amplifiable probe-target RNA complex is captured on magnetic beads using a sequence-specific capture probe and is separated from unbound probe using a novel microfluidic technique. Hybridization sequences are not constrained as they are in conventional target-amplification reactions such as nucleic acid sequence amplification (NASBA). Our engineered ssDNA probe was amplified both off-chip and in a microchip reservoir at the end of the separation microchannel using isothermal NASBA. Optimal solution conditions for ssDNA amplification were investigated. Although KCl and MgCl(2) are typically found in NASBA reactions, replacing 70 mmol/L of the 82 mmol/L total chloride ions with acetate resulted in optimal reaction conditions, particularly for low but clinically relevant probe concentrations (≤100 fmol/L). With the optimal probe design and solution conditions, we also successfully removed the initial heating step of NASBA, thus achieving a true isothermal reaction. The SMART assay using a synthetic model influenza DNA target sequence served as a fundamental demonstration of the efficacy of the capture and microfluidic separation system, thus bridging our system to a clinically relevant detection problem. PMID:22691910

  2. NMR Methods for Characterization of RNA Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA secondary structure is often sufficient to identify relationships between the structure of RNA and processing pathways, and the design of therapeutics. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can identify types of nucleotide base pairs and the sequence, thus limiting possible secondary structures. Because NMR experiments, like chemical mapping, are performed in solution, not in single crystals, experiments can be initiated as soon as the biomolecule is expressed and purified. This chapter summarizes NMR methods that permit rapid identification of RNA secondary structure, information that can be used as supplements to chemical mapping, and/or as preliminary steps required for 3D structure determination. The primary aim is to provide guidelines to enable a researcher with minimal knowledge of NMR to quickly extract secondary structure information from basic datasets. Instrumental and sample considerations that can maximize data quality are discussed along with some details for optimal data acquisition and processing parameters. Approaches for identifying base pair types in both unlabeled and isotopically labeled RNA are covered. Common problems, such as missing signals and overlaps, and approaches to address them are considered. Programs under development for merging NMR data with structure prediction algorithms are briefly discussed. PMID:27665604

  3. A Simple Method for Amplifying RNA Targets (SMART)

    PubMed Central

    McCalla, Stephanie E.; Ong, Carmichael; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel and simple method for amplifying RNA targets (named by its acronym, SMART), and for detection, using engineered amplification probes that overcome existing limitations of current RNA-based technologies. This system amplifies and detects optimal engineered ssDNA probes that hybridize to target RNA. The amplifiable probe-target RNA complex is captured on magnetic beads using a sequence-specific capture probe and is separated from unbound probe using a novel microfluidic technique. Hybridization sequences are not constrained as they are in conventional target-amplification reactions such as nucleic acid sequence amplification (NASBA). Our engineered ssDNA probe was amplified both off-chip and in a microchip reservoir at the end of the separation microchannel using isothermal NASBA. Optimal solution conditions for ssDNA amplification were investigated. Although KCl and MgCl2 are typically found in NASBA reactions, replacing 70 mmol/L of the 82 mmol/L total chloride ions with acetate resulted in optimal reaction conditions, particularly for low but clinically relevant probe concentrations (≤100 fmol/L). With the optimal probe design and solution conditions, we also successfully removed the initial heating step of NASBA, thus achieving a true isothermal reaction. The SMART assay using a synthetic model influenza DNA target sequence served as a fundamental demonstration of the efficacy of the capture and microfluidic separation system, thus bridging our system to a clinically relevant detection problem. PMID:22691910

  4. Activated charcoal-mediated RNA extraction method for Azadirachta indica and plants highly rich in polyphenolics, polysaccharides and other complex secondary compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High quality RNA is a primary requisite for numerous molecular biological applications but is difficult to isolate from several plants rich in polysaccharides, polyphenolics and other secondary metabolites. These compounds either bind with nucleic acids or often co-precipitate at the final step and many times cannot be removed by conventional methods and kits. Addition of vinyl-pyrollidone polymers in extraction buffer efficiently removes polyphenolics to some extent, but, it failed in case of Azadirachta indica and several other medicinal and aromatic plants. Findings Here we report the use of adsorption property of activated charcoal (0.03%–0.1%) in RNA isolation procedures to remove complex secondary metabolites and polyphenolics to yield good quality RNA from Azadirachta indica. We tested and validated our modified RNA isolation method across 21 different plants including Andrographis paniculata, Aloe vera, Rosa damascena, Pelargonium graveolens, Phyllanthus amarus etc. from 13 other different families, many of which are considered as tough system for isolating RNA. The A260/280 ratio of the extracted RNA ranged between 1.8-2.0 and distinct 28S and 18S ribosomal RNA bands were observed in denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Analysis using Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer revealed intact total RNA yield with very good RNA Integrity Number. Conclusions The RNA isolated by our modified method was found to be of high quality and amenable for sensitive downstream molecular applications like subtractive library construction and RT-PCR. This modified RNA isolation procedure would aid and accelerate the biotechnological studies in complex medicinal and aromatic plants which are extremely rich in secondary metabolic compounds. PMID:23537338

  5. Novel Acanthamoeba 18S rRNA gene sequence type from an environmental isolate.

    PubMed

    Magnet, A; Henriques-Gil, N; Galván-Diaz, A L; Izquiedo, F; Fenoy, S; del Aguila, C

    2014-08-01

    The free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba, can act as opportunistic parasites on a wide range of vertebrates and are becoming a serious threat to human health due to the resistance of their cysts to harsh environmental conditions, disinfectants, some water treatment practices, and their ubiquitous distribution. Subgenus classification based on morphology is being replaced by a classification based on the sequences of the 18S rRNA gene with a total of 18 different genotypes (T1-T18). A new environmental strain of Acanthamoeba isolated from a waste water treatment plant is presented in this study as a candidate for the description of the novel genotype T19 after phylogenetic analysis.

  6. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy ' Genetic Disease; Metabolism PMID:24480542

  7. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a South African Isolate of Grapevine Fanleaf Virus and Its Associated Satellite RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lamprecht, Renate L.; Spaltman, Monique; Stephan, Dirk; Wetzel, Thierry; Burger, Johan T.

    2013-01-01

    The complete sequences of RNA1, RNA2 and satellite RNA have been determined for a South African isolate of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV-SACH44). The two RNAs of GFLV-SACH44 are 7,341 nucleotides (nt) and 3,816 nt in length, respectively, and its satellite RNA (satRNA) is 1,104 nt in length, all excluding the poly(A) tail. Multiple sequence alignment of these sequences showed that GFLV-SACH44 RNA1 and RNA2 were the closest to the South African isolate, GFLV-SAPCS3 (98.2% and 98.6% nt identity, respectively), followed by the French isolate, GFLV-F13 (87.3% and 90.1% nt identity, respectively). Interestingly, the GFLV-SACH44 satRNA is more similar to three Arabis mosaic virus satRNAs (85%–87.4% nt identity) than to the satRNA of GFLV-F13 (81.8% nt identity) and was most distantly related to the satRNA of GFLV-R2 (71.0% nt identity). Full-length infectious clones of GFLV-SACH44 satRNA were constructed. The infectivity of the clones was tested with three nepovirus isolates, GFLV-NW, Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV)-NW and GFLV-SAPCS3. The clones were mechanically inoculated in Chenopodium quinoa and were infectious when co-inoculated with the two GFLV helper viruses, but not when co-inoculated with ArMV-NW. PMID:23867805

  8. Isolation and characterization of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA-ribonucleoprotein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.D.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of cells to UV light of sufficient intensity brings about crosslinking of RNA to proteins which are in direct contact with it in vivo. The major (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins which become crosslinked to poly(A)/sup +/hnRNA in HeLa cells are of 120K, 68K, 53K, 43K, 41K, 38K, and 36K (K = kilodaltons). By immunizing mice with UV crosslinked complexes two monoclonal antibodies (2B12 and 4F4) against the C proteins (41K and 43K) and one (3G6) against the 120K protein of the hnRNP complex were obtained. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that the C proteins and 120K are segregated to the nucleus and are not associated with nucleoli or chromatin. The two C proteins are highly related to each other antigenically. Monoclonal antibody 4F4 identifies the C proteins of the hnRNP complex in widely divergent species from human to lizard. The C proteins are phosphorylated and are in contact with hnRNA in vivo. The hnRNP complex was isolated from vertebrate cell nuclei by immunoprecipitation with these monoclonal antibodies. This complex contains proteins and hnRNA of up to approx.10 kb. The major steady state labeled (/sup 35/S)methionine labeled proteins of the isolated complex from HeLa cells are of 34K, 36K, 36K (A1 and A2), 37K, 38K (B1 and B2), 41K, 43K (C1 and C2) and doublets at 68K and at 120K. These proteins are organized into a 30S particle. Large hnRNP complexes are composed of multiples of 30S particles which are connected by highly nuclease sensitive stretches of hnRNA. It it concluded that the hnRNP structure is an integral component of the mRNA formation pathway in the eukaryotic cell.

  9. Comparison of functional limbal epithelial stem cell isolation methods.

    PubMed

    López-Paniagua, Marina; Nieto-Miguel, Teresa; de la Mata, Ana; Dziasko, Marc; Galindo, Sara; Rey, Esther; Herreras, José M; Corrales, Rosa M; Daniels, Julie T; Calonge, Margarita

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) cultured in vitro is a great advance in the treatment of patients suffering from LESC deficiency. However, the optimal technique for LESC isolation from a healthy limbal niche has not yet been established. Our aim was to determine which isolation method renders the highest recovery of functional LESCs from the human limbus. To achieve this purpose, we compared limbal primary cultures (LPCs) obtained from explants and cell suspensions on plastic culture plates. Cell morphology was observed by phase contrast and transmission electron microscopy. LESC, corneal epithelial cell, fibroblast, endothelial cell, melanocyte, and dendritic cell markers were analyzed by real time by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and/or immunofluorescence. In addition, colony forming efficiency (CFE) and the presence of holoclones, meroclones, and paraclones were studied. We observed that LPC cells obtained from both methods had cuboidal morphology, desmosomes, and prominent intermediate filaments. The expression of LESC markers (K14, K15, ABCG2, p63α) was similar or higher in LPCs established through cell suspensions, except the expression of p63α mRNA, and there were no significant differences in the expression of corneal epithelial markers (K3, K12). Endothelial cell (PECAM), melanocyte (MART-1), and dendritic cell (CD11c) proteins were not detected, while fibroblast-protein (S100A4) was detected in all LPCs. The CFE was significantly higher in LPCs from cell suspensions. Cells from confluent LPCs produced by explants generated only paraclones (100%), while the percentage of paraclones from LPCs established through cell suspensions was 90% and the remaining 10% were meroclones. In conclusion, LPCs established from cell suspensions have a cell population richer in functional LESCs than LPCs obtained from explants. These results suggest that in a clinical situation in which it is possible to choose between either

  10. RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei of lactating mammary cells in presence of unmodified and mercury-labeled CTP.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Banerjee, M R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated nuclei of lactating mouse mammary gland were capable of supporting DNA-dependent RNA synthesis in vitro in presence of unmodified and mercurated CTP (Hg-CTP) at high ionic condition at 25 degrees C. In presence of unmodified CTP, [3H]UMP incorporation into RNA increased linearly upto 180 min. The kinetic pattern of the reaction and the rate of RNA synthesis were essentially similar when CTP was replaced by Hg-CTP. Both in unmodified and Hg-CTP containing reactions, 70-80% of RNA synthesis was inhibited by alpha-amanitin. Presence of poly(A) in a small portion of the in vitro synthesized messenger-like RNA was detectable by oligo(dT) cellulose chromatography. Both poly(A)+ and poly(A)- RNAs sedimented with a clear peak around 15S region in a formamide-sucrose denaturing gradient. The Hg-RNA after separation from endogenous nuclear RNA by SH-agarose affinity column chromatography also sedimented around 15S region in a formamide-sucrose gradient. The Hg-RNA synthesized in the isolated mammary cell nuclei in vitro should now permit monitoring hormonal regulation of specific gene (casein) transcription in the mammary cells by molecular hybridization of the Hg-RNA with cDNA to casein mRNA. PMID:724523

  11. RNA synthesis and turnover in the molluscan nervous system studied by Click-iT method.

    PubMed

    Ierusalimsky, Victor N; Balaban, Pavel M

    2016-02-15

    RNA synthesis can be detected by means of the in vivo incorporation of 5-ethynyluridine (EU) in newly-synthesized RNA with the relatively simple Click-iT method. We used this method to study the RNA synthesis in the CNS tissue of adult and juvenile terrestrial snails Helix lucorum L. Temporally, first labeled neurons were detected in the adult CNS after 4-h of isolated CNS incubation in EU solution, while 12-h of incubation led to extensive labeling of most CNS neurons. The EU labeling was present as the nuclear and nucleolar staining. The cytoplasm staining was observed after 2-3 days of CNS washout following the EU exposure for 16 h. In juvenile CNS, the first staining reaction was apparent as the staining of apical region in the procerebral lobe of cerebral ganglia after 1h of CNS incubation in EU, while the maximum pattern of staining was obtained after 4h of CNS incubation. Thus, age-related differences in RNA synthesis are present. Activation of neurons elicited by serotonin and caffeine applications noticeably increased the intensity of staining. EU readily penetrates into the bodies of juvenile snails immersed in the EU solution. When the intact juvenile animals were immersed in the EU solution for 1h, the procerebrum staining, similar to the one detected in the incubated juvenile CNS, was observed. PMID:26749075

  12. Application of an RNA amplification method for reliable single-cell transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suslov, Oleg; Silver, Daniel J.; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Orjalo, Arturo; Ptitsyn, Andrey; Steindler, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cell types have unique transcriptional signatures that are best interrogated at single-cell resolution. Here we describe a novel RNA amplification approach that allows for high fidelity gene profiling of individual cells. This technique significantly diminishes the problem of 3′ bias, enabling detection of all regions of transcripts, including the recognition of mRNA with short or completely absent poly(A) tails, identification of noncoding RNAs, and discovery of the full array of splice isoforms from any given gene product. We assess this technique using statistical and bioinformatics analyses of microarray data to establish the limitations of the method. To demonstrate applicability, we profiled individual cells isolated from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ)—a well-characterized, discrete yet highly heterogeneous neural structure involved in persistent neurogenesis. Importantly, this method revealed multiple splice variants of key germinal zone gene products within individual cells, as well as an unexpected coexpression of several mRNAs considered markers of distinct and separate SVZ cell types. These findings were independently confirmed using RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH), contributing to the utility of this new technology that offers genomic and transcriptomic analysis of small numbers of dynamic and clinically relevant cells. PMID:26345506

  13. Sequence complementarity of sonchus yellow net virus RNA with RNA isolated from the polysomes of infected tobacco.

    PubMed

    Milner, J J; Jackson, A O

    1979-08-01

    Polyribosomal RNA from tobacco infected with sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV) contained sequences which hybridized to 125I-labeled SYNV RNA and which were complementary to 80 to 100% of the viral RNA genome. The poly(A)-containing RNA from polyribosomes was complementary to over 90% of the viral genome but the polyribosomal RNA lacking poly(A) hybridized to approximately 40-60% of the genome. The kinetics of hybridization of all three fractions are best explained by the presence of a single abundance class of viral-complementary RNA. However, titration hybridization of poly(A)+ RNA to an excess of SYNV RNA suggested that viral-complementary sequences which contain poly(A) may vary in concentration over a factor of about fivefold. About 1.5 to 4.6% of the fraction containing poly(A), 0.02 to 0.06% of the fraction lacking poly(A) and 0.04 to 0.18% of the total polyribosomal RNA was complementary to viral RNA as estimated from the kinetics of hybridization. The viral complementary RNA(vcRNA) was heterogeneous in size with a modal sedimentation coefficient of 12 S and a profile in sucrose density gradients similar to the polyadenylated polyribosomal RNA.

  14. Full-Length gene enrichment by using an optimized RNA isolation protocol in Bixa orellana recalcitrant tissues.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Avila, N L; Narváez-Zapata, J A; Aguilar-Espinosa, M L; Rivera-Madrid, R

    2009-05-01

    A reliable protocol is described for isolation of large full-length cDNA from Bixa orellana mature tissues containing large quantities of pigments, phenols, and polysaccharides. This protocol involves the optimization of a commercial RNA extraction protocol in combination with a long distance reverse transcript PCR protocol. The principal advantages of this protocol are its high RNA yield and quality. The resulting RNA is suitable for RNA expression evaluation and production of large, full-length cDNA. This is the first time RNA has been isolated from all mature tissues in the tropical perennial plant B. orellana and has been proved viable for downstream applications, especially important for molecular biology studies on this economically important pigment-producing plant. PMID:19107604

  15. Isolation of a hyperthermophilic archaeum predicted by in situ RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Barns, S M; Rossnagel, P; Stetter, K O

    1995-07-01

    A variety of hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea have been isolated from high-temperature environments by plating and serial dilutions. However, these techniques allow only the small percentage of organisms able to form colonies, or those that are predominant within environmental samples, to be obtained in pure culture. Recently, in situ 16S ribosomal RNA analyses of samples from the Obsidian hot pool at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, revealed a variety of archaeal sequences, which were all different from those of previously isolated species. This suggests substantial diversity of archaea with so far unknown morphological, physiological and biochemical features, which may play an important part within high-temperature ecosystems. Here we describe a procedure to obtain pure cultures of unknown organisms harbouring specific 16S rRNA sequences identified previously within the environment. It combines visual recognition of single cells by phylogenetic staining and cloning by 'optical tweezers'. Our result validates polymerase chain reaction data on the existence of large archael communities. PMID:7541115

  16. Isolation of a hyperthermophilic archaeum predicted by in situ RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Barns, S M; Rossnagel, P; Stetter, K O

    1995-07-01

    A variety of hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea have been isolated from high-temperature environments by plating and serial dilutions. However, these techniques allow only the small percentage of organisms able to form colonies, or those that are predominant within environmental samples, to be obtained in pure culture. Recently, in situ 16S ribosomal RNA analyses of samples from the Obsidian hot pool at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, revealed a variety of archaeal sequences, which were all different from those of previously isolated species. This suggests substantial diversity of archaea with so far unknown morphological, physiological and biochemical features, which may play an important part within high-temperature ecosystems. Here we describe a procedure to obtain pure cultures of unknown organisms harbouring specific 16S rRNA sequences identified previously within the environment. It combines visual recognition of single cells by phylogenetic staining and cloning by 'optical tweezers'. Our result validates polymerase chain reaction data on the existence of large archael communities.

  17. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  18. Comparison of phenotypic and genotypic methods for the species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates from bovine intramammary infections

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Youn; Fox, Lawrence K.; Seo, Keun Seok; McGuire, Mark A.; Park, Yong Ho; Rurangirwa, Fred R.; Sischo, William M.; Bohach, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated pathogens from cows with intramammary infection (IMI). Although API STAPH ID 20, a commercially available identification system, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the gap gene (gap PCR-RFLP) have been successfully applied for the identification of CNS isolates from human specimens, their accuracy in the identification of veterinary isolates has not been fully established. In this study, we identified 263 CNS isolates from bovine IMI at species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as the definitive test. Species identification obtained using partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was compared to results from the API STAPH ID 20 and gap PCR-RFLP analysis. Eleven different CNS species were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Only 76.0 % (200 / 263) of the species identification results obtained by API STAPH ID 20 matched those obtained by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, whereas 97.0 % (255 / 263) of the species identification results obtained by the gap PCR-RFLP analysis matched those obtained by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The gap PCR-RFLP analysis could be a useful and reliable alternative method for the species identification of CNS isolates from bovine IMI and appears to be a more accurate method of species identification than the API STAPH ID 20 system. PMID:20667671

  19. Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from ovine milk samples by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA and gap genes.

    PubMed

    Onni, T; Sanna, G; Cubeddu, G P; Marogna, G; Lollai, S; Leori, G; Tola, S

    2010-08-26

    The identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) causing ovine infections remains problematic, although these bacteria are considered the main etiologic agents of subclinical mastitis in sheep and goats. In this study, 226 CNS isolates were collected from 2201 milking sarda sheep belonging to 15 flocks with high somatic cell count scores. All isolates were subjected to identification with the API Staph ID test, and then to the amplification of staphylococcal 16S rRNA and gap genes by PCR assays. The gap gene was subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with the restriction endonuclease AluI, whereas the 16S rRNA gene was subjected to ribosomal fingerprinting with the restriction endonucleases RsaI, PstI and AluI. When PCR-RFLP patterns of CNS isolates were different from those of their reference strains, gap gene amplicons were sequenced for definitive identification. The API Staph ID test, in alternative to the genotypic identification method, produced considerably different results in terms of species identified within each group. Using the PCR-RFLP assay, most of the isolates clustered together with the Staphylococcus epidermidis type strain (131, corresponding to 57.9%), followed by S. caprae (34, corresponding to 15%) and S. chromogenes (30, corresponding to 13.2%). In conclusion, the PCR-RFLP assay of 16S rRNA and gap genes is a more reliable and reproducible method than the API Staph ID test for the identification of CNS causing sheep mastitis. PMID:20167442

  20. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Nivens, David E.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  1. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Nivens, D.E.; Applegate, B.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method is disclosed for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification. 4 figs.

  2. Isolation of Additional Bacteriophages with Genomes of Segmented Double-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Mindich, Leonard; Qiao, Xueying; Qiao, Jian; Onodera, Shiroh; Romantschuk, Martin; Hoogstraten, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Eight different bacteriophages were isolated from leaves of Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Lycopersicon esculentum, Daucus carota sativum, Raphanus sativum, and Ocimum basilicum. All contain three segments of double-stranded RNA and have genomic-segment sizes that are similar but not identical to those of previously described bacteriophage φ6. All appear to have lipid-containing membranes. The base sequences of some of the viruses are very similar but not identical to those of φ6. Three of the viruses have little or no base sequence identity to φ6. Two of the viruses, φ8 and φ12, contain proteins with a size distribution very different from that of φ6 and do not package genomic segments of φ6. Whereas φ6 attaches to host cells by means of a pilus, several of the new isolates attach directly to the outer membrane. Although the normal hosts of these viruses seem to be pseudomonads, those viruses that attach directly to the outer membrane can establish carrier states in Escherichia coli or Salmonella typhimurium. One of the isolates, φ8, can form plaques on heptoseless strains of S. typhimurium. PMID:10419946

  3. Genetic Variability and Evolutionary Implications of RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes in RNA1 of Sweet Potato Chlorotic Stunt Virus Isolates Infecting Sweetpotato and Related Wild Species

    PubMed Central

    Tugume, Arthur K.; Amayo, Robert; Weinheimer, Isabel; Mukasa, Settumba B.; Rubaihayo, Patrick R.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae) encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3), a putative hydrophobic protein (p7) and a 22-kDa protein (p22) from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae) in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA) strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae) and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b) encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3) able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. Conclusions/Significance SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in sweetpotato. A

  4. Methods for Evaluating Cell-Specific, Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Luiza I.; Flenker, Katie S.; Hernandez, Frank J.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; II, James O. McNamara; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) highlight the need for robust delivery technologies that will facilitate the successful application of these therapeutics to humans. Arguably, cell targeting by conjugation to cell-specific ligands provides a viable solution to this problem. Synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) represent an emerging class of pharmaceuticals with great potential for targeted therapeutic applications. For targeted delivery of siRNAs with aptamers, the aptamer-siRNA conjugate must be taken up by cells and reach the cytoplasm. To this end, we have developed cell-based selection approaches to isolate aptamers that internalize upon binding to their cognate receptor on the cell surface. Here we describe methods to monitor for cellular uptake of aptamers. These include: (1) antibody amplification microscopy, (2) microplate-based fluorescence assay, (3) a quantitative and ultrasensitive internalization method (“QUSIM”) and (4) a way to monitor for cytoplasmic delivery using the ribosome inactivating protein-based (RNA-RIP) assay. Collectively, these methods provide a toolset that can expedite the development of aptamer ligands to target and deliver therapeutic siRNAs in vivo. PMID:23894227

  5. [Transport of RNA from rat liver cell nuclei in vitro. Effect of superoxide dismutase on the release of rapidly labeled RNA from isolated nuclei].

    PubMed

    Koen, Ia M; Peskin, A V; Baru, V A; Fedorchenko, V V; Zbarskiĭ, I B; Konstantinov, A A

    1978-12-01

    Purified superoxide dismutase from beaf and rat liver cytosol was found to inhibit in vitro a release of the newly synthesized poly(A)-containing RNA from isolated hepatocyte nuclei in a cell-free system. The inhibition was concentration-dependent. Similar effect was observed with Cu2+ and coppertyrosine complex, which possess SOD-like type catalytic activity. The effectiveness of the complex and of Cu2+ however was an order smaller than that of SOD. The inhibitory effects of SOD and the two other copper-containing compounds could be abolished by potassium cyanide and reduced glutathione as far as by gomologous cytosol. Catalase failed to effect the RNA release. Although serum albumin itself did not affect release of RNA it was capable to abolish the inhibitory effects of Cu2+ and of copper-tyrosine, but not that of SOD. Possible mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of SOD on RNA transfer across the nuclear envelope are discussed. PMID:743506

  6. Overview of methods in RNA nanotechnology: synthesis, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology encompasses the use of RNA as a construction material to build homogeneous nanostructures by bottom-up self-assembly with defined size, structure, and stoichiometry; this pioneering concept demonstrated in 1998 (Guo et al., Molecular Cell 2:149-155, 1998; featured in Cell) has emerged as a new field that also involves materials engineering and synthetic structural biology (Guo, Nature Nanotechnology 5:833-842, 2010). The field of RNA nanotechnology has skyrocketed over the last few years, as evidenced by the burst of publications in prominent journals on RNA nanostructures and their applications in nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Rapid advances in RNA chemistry, RNA biophysics, and RNA biology have created new opportunities for translating basic science into clinical practice. RNA nanotechnology holds considerable promise in this regard. Increased evidence also suggests that substantial part of the 98.5 % of human genome (Lander et al. Nature 409:860-921, 2001) that used to be called "junk DNA" actually codes for noncoding RNA. As we understand more on how RNA structures are related to function, we can fabricate synthetic RNA nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. This chapter provides a brief overview of the field regarding the design, construction, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles for diverse applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicince.

  7. Overview of methods in RNA nanotechnology: synthesis, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology encompasses the use of RNA as a construction material to build homogeneous nanostructures by bottom-up self-assembly with defined size, structure, and stoichiometry; this pioneering concept demonstrated in 1998 (Guo et al., Molecular Cell 2:149-155, 1998; featured in Cell) has emerged as a new field that also involves materials engineering and synthetic structural biology (Guo, Nature Nanotechnology 5:833-842, 2010). The field of RNA nanotechnology has skyrocketed over the last few years, as evidenced by the burst of publications in prominent journals on RNA nanostructures and their applications in nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Rapid advances in RNA chemistry, RNA biophysics, and RNA biology have created new opportunities for translating basic science into clinical practice. RNA nanotechnology holds considerable promise in this regard. Increased evidence also suggests that substantial part of the 98.5 % of human genome (Lander et al. Nature 409:860-921, 2001) that used to be called "junk DNA" actually codes for noncoding RNA. As we understand more on how RNA structures are related to function, we can fabricate synthetic RNA nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. This chapter provides a brief overview of the field regarding the design, construction, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles for diverse applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicince. PMID:25895992

  8. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  9. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  10. Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Species Isolated from Water Samples Using Phenotypic and Molecular Methods and Determination of their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns by E- Test Method, in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Sharareh; Sarikhani, Ensieh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Faghri, Jamshid

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have shown epidemiological links between strains isolated in tap water, and those isolated from patients. Molecular methods linked to PCR are more reliable and faster for identification of non- tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). In this study molecular methods were used for identification and typing of NTM. Materials and Methods Five hundred ml of 85 water samples was passed through 0.45 μm filters. The filters were transferred directly onto 7H10 Middle Brook solid media, containing 15% OADC. PCR for 16S rRNA was done and the PCR product (1500 bp) was sequenced. PRA of the hsp65 gene was investigated to identify the species of isolates. For evaluation of susceptibility of NTM to antimycobacterial agents, E-test method was used. Result The genus of 26 isolated NTM was confirmed by 16s rRNA sequence based method. Nineteen isolates of Mycobacteria were differentiated using hsp65 genes PRA. The dominant isolates were M. fortuitum (26.7%), M. chelonae like organism (13.3%) and M. mucogenicum (13.3%). Seventy one percent of NTM species were resistant to isoniazid, 64% to rifampin, 57% to ethambutol, 35% to tetracycline, 14 % to azithromycin and 7.1 % to amikacin. Conclusion The results showed that E-test method is not a proper technique for antimycobacterial assay because some NTM species are slow in growing and have no growth on Muller Hinton agar. Regarding the 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the identification of isolates was restricted to the genus level, because 99% similarity within 16S rRNA of two isolates may or may not determine the same species. PMID:23493797

  11. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  12. miRge - A Multiplexed Method of Processing Small RNA-Seq Data to Determine MicroRNA Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jason R.; Gupta, Simone; Weng, Lien-Chun; Ashton, John M.; Cornish, Toby C.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Halushka, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA RNA-seq for microRNAs (miRNAs) is a rapidly developing field where opportunities still exist to create better bioinformatics tools to process these large datasets and generate new, useful analyses. We built miRge to be a fast, smart small RNA-seq solution to process samples in a highly multiplexed fashion. miRge employs a Bayesian alignment approach, whereby reads are sequentially aligned against customized mature miRNA, hairpin miRNA, noncoding RNA and mRNA sequence libraries. miRNAs are summarized at the level of raw reads in addition to reads per million (RPM). Reads for all other RNA species (tRNA, rRNA, snoRNA, mRNA) are provided, which is useful for identifying potential contaminants and optimizing small RNA purification strategies. miRge was designed to optimally identify miRNA isomiRs and employs an entropy based statistical measurement to identify differential production of isomiRs. This allowed us to identify decreasing entropy in isomiRs as stem cells mature into retinal pigment epithelial cells. Conversely, we show that pancreatic tumor miRNAs have similar entropy to matched normal pancreatic tissues. In a head-to-head comparison with other miRNA analysis tools (miRExpress 2.0, sRNAbench, omiRAs, miRDeep2, Chimira, UEA small RNA Workbench), miRge was faster (4 to 32-fold) and was among the top-two methods in maximally aligning miRNAs reads per sample. Moreover, miRge has no inherent limits to its multiplexing. miRge was capable of simultaneously analyzing 100 small RNA-Seq samples in 52 minutes, providing an integrated analysis of miRNA expression across all samples. As miRge was designed for analysis of single as well as multiple samples, miRge is an ideal tool for high and low-throughput users. miRge is freely available at http://atlas.pathology.jhu.edu/baras/miRge.html. PMID:26571139

  13. First complete genome sequence of a capsicum chlorosis tospovirus isolate from Australia with an unusually large S RNA intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Widana Gamage, Shirani; Persley, Denis M; Higgins, Colleen M; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    The first complete genome sequence of capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) from Australia was determined using a combination of Illumina HiSeq RNA and Sanger sequencing technologies. Australian CaCV had a tripartite genome structure like other CaCV isolates. The large (L) RNA was 8913 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a single open reading frame (ORF) of 8634 nt encoding a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in the viral-complementary (vc) sense. The medium (M) and small (S) RNA segments were 4846 and 3944 nt in length, respectively, each containing two non-overlapping ORFs in ambisense orientation, separated by intergenic regions (IGR). The M segment contained ORFs encoding the predicted non-structural movement protein (NSm; 927 nt) and precursor of glycoproteins (GP; 3366 nt) in the viral sense (v) and vc strand, respectively, separated by a 449-nt IGR. The S segment coded for the predicted nucleocapsid (N) protein (828 nt) and non-structural suppressor of silencing protein (NSs; 1320 nt) in the vc and v strand, respectively. The S RNA contained an IGR of 1663 nt, being the largest IGR of all CaCV isolates sequenced so far. Comparison of the Australian CaCV genome with complete CaCV genome sequences from other geographic regions showed highest sequence identity with a Taiwanese isolate. Genome sequence comparisons and phylogeny of all available CaCV isolates provided evidence for at least two highly diverged groups of CaCV isolates that may warrant re-classification of AIT-Thailand and CP-China isolates as unique tospoviruses, separate from CaCV.

  14. Biological activities of some Acacia spp. (Fabaceae) against new clinical isolates identified by ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Fawzy; Alrumman, Sulaiman Abdullah; Hesham, Abd El-Latif

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays,most of the pathogenic bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore,the pharmaceutical properties of the natural plant extracts have become of interest to researchers as alternative antimicrobial agents. In this study,antibacterial activities of extract gained from Acacia etbaica, Acacia laeta, Acacia origena and Acacia pycnantha have been evaluated against isolated pathogenic bacteria (Strains MFM-01, MFM-10 and AH-09) using agar well diffusion methods.The bacterial strains were isolated from infected individuals,and their exact identification was detected on the basis of 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequence determination. Alignment results and the comparison of 16 SrRN A gene sequences of the isolates to 16 SrRN A gene sequences available in Gen Bank data base as well as the phylogenetic analysis confirmed the accurate position of the isolates as Klebsiella oxytoca strain MFM-01, Staphylococcus aureus strain MFM-10 and Klebsiella pneumoniae strain AH-09. Except for cold water, all tested solvents (Chloroform, petroleum ether, methanol, diethyl ether, and acetone) showed variation in their activity against studied bacteria. GC-MS analysis of ethanol extracts showed that four investigated Acacia species have different phyto components. Eight important pharmaceutical components were found in the legume of Acacia etbaica, seven in the legume of Acacia laeta, fifteen in the legume of Acacia origena and nine in the leaves of Acacia pycnantha. A dendrogram was constructed based on chemical composition, revealed that Acacia laeta is more closely related to Acacia etbaica forming on eclade, whereas Acacia origena less similar to other species. Our results demonstrated that, investigated plants and chemical compounds present could be used as promising antibacterial agents.

  15. Biological activities of some Acacia spp. (Fabaceae) against new clinical isolates identified by ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Fawzy; Alrumman, Sulaiman Abdullah; Hesham, Abd El-Latif

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays,most of the pathogenic bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore,the pharmaceutical properties of the natural plant extracts have become of interest to researchers as alternative antimicrobial agents. In this study,antibacterial activities of extract gained from Acacia etbaica, Acacia laeta, Acacia origena and Acacia pycnantha have been evaluated against isolated pathogenic bacteria (Strains MFM-01, MFM-10 and AH-09) using agar well diffusion methods.The bacterial strains were isolated from infected individuals,and their exact identification was detected on the basis of 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequence determination. Alignment results and the comparison of 16 SrRN A gene sequences of the isolates to 16 SrRN A gene sequences available in Gen Bank data base as well as the phylogenetic analysis confirmed the accurate position of the isolates as Klebsiella oxytoca strain MFM-01, Staphylococcus aureus strain MFM-10 and Klebsiella pneumoniae strain AH-09. Except for cold water, all tested solvents (Chloroform, petroleum ether, methanol, diethyl ether, and acetone) showed variation in their activity against studied bacteria. GC-MS analysis of ethanol extracts showed that four investigated Acacia species have different phyto components. Eight important pharmaceutical components were found in the legume of Acacia etbaica, seven in the legume of Acacia laeta, fifteen in the legume of Acacia origena and nine in the leaves of Acacia pycnantha. A dendrogram was constructed based on chemical composition, revealed that Acacia laeta is more closely related to Acacia etbaica forming on eclade, whereas Acacia origena less similar to other species. Our results demonstrated that, investigated plants and chemical compounds present could be used as promising antibacterial agents. PMID:26826814

  16. Development of a Novel Self-Enclosed Sample Preparation Device for DNA/RNA Isolation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish K.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    Modern biology techniques present potentials for a wide range of molecular, cellular, and biochemistry applications in space, including detection of infectious pathogens and environmental contaminations, monitoring of drug-resistant microbial and dangerous mutations, identification of new phenotypes of microbial and new life species. However, one of the major technological blockades in enabling these technologies in space is a lack of devices for sample preparation in the space environment. To overcome such an obstacle, we constructed a prototype of a DNA/RNA isolation device based on our novel designs documented in the NASA New Technology Reporting System (MSC-24811-1/3-1). This device is self-enclosed and pipette free, purposely designed for use in the absence of gravity. Our design can also be modified easily for preparing samples in space for other applications, such as flowcytometry, immunostaining, cell separation, sample purification and separation according to its size and charges, sample chemical labeling, and sample purification. The prototype of our DNA/RNA isolation device was tested for efficiencies of DNA and RNA isolation from various cell types for PCR analysis. The purity and integrity of purified DNA and RNA were determined as well. Results showed that our developed DNA/RNA isolation device offers similar efficiency and quality in comparison to the samples prepared using the standard protocol in the laboratory.

  17. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3′ end of dengue virus (DENV) 5′–3′ UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions. PMID:26389898

  18. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-09-16

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3' end of dengue virus (DENV) 5'-3' UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions.

  19. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelfarb, H J; Simpson, E M; Friesen, J D

    1987-01-01

    Three independent, recessive, temperature-sensitive (Ts-) conditional lethal mutations in the largest subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) have been isolated after replacement of a portion of the wild-type gene (RPO21) by a mutagenized fragment of the cloned gene. Measurements of cell growth, viability, and total RNA and protein synthesis showed that rpo21-1, rpo21-2, and rpo21-3 mutations caused a slow shutoff of RNAP II activity in cells shifted to the nonpermissive temperature (39 degrees C). Each mutant displayed a distinct phenotype, and one of the mutant enzymes (rpo21-1) was completely deficient in RNAP II activity in vitro. RNAP I and RNAP III in vitro activities were not affected. These results were consistent with the notion that the genetic lesions affect RNAP II assembly or holoenzyme stability. DNA sequencing revealed that in each case the mutations involved nonconservative amino acid substitutions, resulting in charge changes. The lesions harbored by all three rpo21 Ts- alleles lie in DNA sequence domains that are highly conserved among genes that encode the largest subunits of RNAP from a variety of eucaryotes; one mutation lies in a possible Zn2+ binding domain. PMID:3299061

  20. Integrity of prokaryotic mRNA isolated from complex samples for in vivo bacterial transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Machado, A B; Freitas, M C R; Saji, G R Q; Rezende, A B; Almeida, P E; Cesar, D E; Resende, J A; Nicólas, M F; Silva, V L; Diniz, C G

    2015-01-01

    Even though several in vitro studies have focused on bacterial biology, the extent of such knowledge is not complete when considering an actual infection. As culture-independent microbiology methods such as high-throughput sequencing became available, important aspects of host-bacterium interactions will be elucidated. Based on microbiological relevance, we considered Bacteroides fragilis in a murine experimental infection as a model system to evaluate the in vivo bacterial transcriptome in host exudates. A disproportionate number of reads belonging to the host genome were retrieved in the first round of pyrosequencing, even after depletion of ribosomal RNA; the average number of reads related to the eukaryotic genome was 71.924-67.7%, whereas prokaryotic reads represented 34.338-32.3% in host exudates. Thus, different treatments were used to improve the prokaryotic RNA yield: i) centrifugation; ii) ultrasonic treatment; and iii) ultrasonic treatment followed by centrifugation. The latter treatment was found to be the most efficient in generating bacterial yields, as it resulted in a higher number of Bacteroides cells. However, the RNA extracted after this treatment was not of sufficient quality to be used in cDNA synthesis. Our results suggest that the methodology routinely used for RNA extraction in transcriptional analysis is not appropriate for in vivo studies in complex samples. Furthermore, the most efficient treatment for generating good bacterial cell yields was not suitable to retrieve high-quality RNA. Therefore, as an alternative methodological approach to enable in vivo studies on host-bacterium interactions, we advise increasing the sequencing depth despite the high costs.

  1. A method for in vivo identification of bacterial small RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jonathan; Djapgne, Louise; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-12-01

    Small bacterial regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) have gained immense appreciation over the last decade for their roles in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation of numerous physiological processes. Several proteins contribute to sRNA stability and regulation, most notably the Hfq RNA-binding protein. However, not all sRNAs rely on Hfq for their stability. It is therefore likely that other proteins contribute to the stability and function of certain bacterial sRNAs. Here, we describe a methodology for identifying in vivo-binding proteins of sRNAs, developed using the iron-responsive PrrF and PrrH sRNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. RNA was isolated from iron-depleted cultures, which were irradiated to cross-link nucleoprotein complexes. Subsequently, PrrF- and PrrH-protein complexes were enriched using cDNA "bait", and enriched RNA-protein complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify PrrF and PrrH associated proteins. This method identified Hfq as a potential PrrF- and PrrH-binding protein. Interestingly, Hfq was identified more often in samples probed with the PrrF cDNA "bait" as compared to the PrrH cDNA "bait", suggesting Hfq has a stronger binding affinity for the PrrF sRNAs in vivo. Hfq binding to the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs was validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified Hfq protein from P. aeruginosa. As such, this study demonstrates that in vivo cross-linking coupled with sequence-specific affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SSAC-MS/MS) is an effective methodology for unbiased identification of bacterial sRNA-binding proteins.

  2. A method for in vivo identification of bacterial small RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Jonathan; Djapgne, Louise; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-01-01

    Small bacterial regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) have gained immense appreciation over the last decade for their roles in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation of numerous physiological processes. Several proteins contribute to sRNA stability and regulation, most notably the Hfq RNA-binding protein. However, not all sRNAs rely on Hfq for their stability. It is therefore likely that other proteins contribute to the stability and function of certain bacterial sRNAs. Here, we describe a methodology for identifying in vivo-binding proteins of sRNAs, developed using the iron-responsive PrrF and PrrH sRNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. RNA was isolated from iron-depleted cultures, which were irradiated to cross-link nucleoprotein complexes. Subsequently, PrrF- and PrrH-protein complexes were enriched using cDNA “bait”, and enriched RNA-protein complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify PrrF and PrrH associated proteins. This method identified Hfq as a potential PrrF- and PrrH-binding protein. Interestingly, Hfq was identified more often in samples probed with the PrrF cDNA “bait” as compared to the PrrH cDNA “bait”, suggesting Hfq has a stronger binding affinity for the PrrF sRNAs in vivo. Hfq binding to the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs was validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified Hfq protein from P. aeruginosa. As such, this study demonstrates that in vivo cross-linking coupled with sequence-specific affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SSAC-MS/MS) is an effective methodology for unbiased identification of bacterial sRNA-binding proteins. PMID:25351924

  3. Simultaneous isolation of high-quality DNA, RNA, miRNA and proteins from tissues for genomic applications

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Brugarolas, James

    2014-01-01

    Genomic technologies have revolutionized our understanding of complex Mendelian diseases and cancer. Solid tumors present several challenges for genomic analyses, such as tumor heterogeneity and tumor contamination with surrounding stroma and infiltrating lymphocytes. We developed a protocol to (i) select tissues of high cellular purity on the basis of histological analyses of immediately flanking sections and (ii) simultaneously extract genomic DNA (gDNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), noncoding RNA (ncRNA; enriched in microRNA (miRNA)) and protein from the same tissues. After tissue selection, about 12–16 extractions of DNA/RNA/protein can be obtained per day. Compared with other similar approaches, this fast and reliable methodology allowed us to identify mutations in tumors with remarkable sensitivity and to perform integrative analyses of whole-genome and exome data sets, DNA copy numbers (by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays), gene expression data (by transcriptome profiling and quantitative PCR (qPCR)) and protein levels (by western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis) from the same samples. Although we focused on renal cell carcinoma, this protocol may be adapted with minor changes to any human or animal tissue to obtain high-quality and high-yield nucleic acids and proteins. PMID:24136348

  4. Compressed sensing methods for DNA microarrays, RNA interference, and metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aditya; P, Deepthi; Renumadhavi, C H; Chandra, M Girish; Srinivasan, Rajgopal

    2015-02-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a sparse signal sampling methodology for efficiently acquiring and reconstructing a signal from relatively few measurements. Recent work shows that CS is well-suited to be applied to problems in genomics, including probe design in microarrays, RNA interference (RNAi), and taxonomic assignment in metagenomics. The principle of using different CS recovery methods in these applications has thus been established, but a comprehensive study of using a wide range of CS methods has not been done. For each of these applications, we apply three hitherto unused CS methods, namely, l1-magic, CoSaMP, and l1-homotopy, in conjunction with CS measurement matrices such as randomly generated CS m matrix, Hamming matrix, and projective geometry-based matrix. We find that, in RNAi, the l1-magic (the standard package for l1 minimization) and l1-homotopy methods show significant reduction in reconstruction error compared to the baseline. In metagenomics, we find that l1-homotopy as well as CoSaMP estimate concentration with significantly reduced time when compared to the GPSR and WGSQuikr methods.

  5. Complete genome sequence of a novel dsRNA mycovirus isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zili; Zhu, Heqin; Li, Zhifang; Shi, Yongqiang; Zhao, Lihong; Liu, Lijiang; Jiang, Daohong

    2013-12-01

    A novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus, designated Verticillium dahliae partitivirus 1 (VdPV1), was isolated from a strain of the fungus Verticillium dahliae. The VdPV1 genome has two dsRNA genome segments. The larger segment (1768 bp) has a single open reading frame (ORF) with a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) domain. The smaller segment (1587 bp) contains a single ORF encoding a putative coat protein. Analysis of its genomic structure indicated that VdPV1 is a new member of the genus Partitivirus. We report the full-length sequence of this partitivirus that infects Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of verticillium wilt of cotton.

  6. Broad-spectrum detection and quantitation methods of Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Vaïanopoulos, Céline; Legrève, Anne; Moreau, Virginie; Bragard, Claude

    2009-08-01

    A broad-spectrum reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for detecting Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus (SBCMV) isolates, responsible for mosaic diseases in Europe, using primers targeting the highly conserved 3'-untranslated region of RNA-1 and RNA-2 of SBCMV. The 3'-end region is a privileged target for the detection of a wide range of isolates, because of sequence conservation, of the tRNA-like structure, the major role in viral replication and the signal amplification due to the presence of numerous genomic and subgenomic RNAs. The primers were also designed for virus quantitation using real-time RT-PCR with SYBR-Green chemistry. No cross-reaction with Wheat spindle streak mosaic virus, frequently associated with SBCMV, was observed. The use of RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR allowed a more sensitive detection and quantitation of SBCMV to be made than was the case with ELISA. The methods enabled European isolates of SBCMV from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the UK to be detected and quantified. Real-time RT-PCR represents a new tool for comparing soil inoculum potential as well as cultivar resistance to SBCMV.

  7. Isolation, structure and expression of mammalian genes for histidyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, F W; Siminovitch, L

    1987-01-01

    A full length cDNA clone that codes for human histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HRS) and cDNA clones that span the full length transcript of hamster HRS have been isolated. The full length human HRS cDNA was expressed after transfection into Cos 1 cells and a CHO ts mutant defective in the gene for HRS. The complete nucleotide sequence of the hamster and human gene were obtained and extensive homologies were observed in three regions on comparing these sequences between themselves and with the sequence of HRS derived from yeast. These results provide unequivocal evidence that we have indeed cloned the hamster and human gene for HRS. Three overlapping phage recombinants containing the complete hamster chromosomal gene for HRS have also been isolated. The genomic HRS is divided into 13 exons. The precise locations of each of the 5' and 3' exon-intron boundaries were defined by sequencing the appropriate regions of the cloned genomic DNA and aligning them with the sequence of HRS cDNAs. These studies provide the basis for future structural and functional analysis of the gene for HRS. In particular, it will be of interest to examine if different exons of HRS correlate to different domains of the HRS polypeptide. Images PMID:3554142

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a Single-Stranded RNA Virus Infecting the Bloom-Forming Diatom Chaetoceros socialis▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, Yuji; Takao, Yoshitake; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are very significant primary producers in the world's oceans. Various environmental factors affect the depletion of diatom populations. The importance of viruses as a potential mortality source has recently been recognized. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Chaetoceros socialis f. radians RNA virus [CsfrRNAV]) causing the lysis of the bloom-forming species Chaetoceros socialis Lauder f. radians (Schütt) Proschkina-Lavrenko. The virus infectious to C. socialis f. radians was isolated from water samples collected in Hiroshima Bay. Here we show the physiology, morphology, and genome characteristics of the virus clone. Virions were 22 nm in diameter and accumulated in the cytoplasm of the host cells. The latent period and the burst size were estimated to be <48 h and 66 infectious units per host cell, respectively. CsfrRNAV harbors a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome and encodes at least three polypeptides of 32.0, 28.5, and 25.0 kDa. Sequencing analysis shows the length of the genome is 9,467 bases, excluding a poly(A) tail. The monophyly of CsfrRNAV and other diatom-infecting RNA viruses, Rhizosolenia setigera RNA virus and Chaetoceros tenuissimus RNA virus, was strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domains. This suggested a new ssRNA virus family, Bacillariornaviridae. This discovery of CsfrRNAV may aid in further understanding the ecological dynamics of the C. socialis f. radians population in nature and the relationships between ssRNA diatom viruses and their hosts. PMID:19233955

  9. Non-viral Methods for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kun; Huang, Leaf

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) as a mechanism to selectively degrade messenger RNA (mRNA) expression has emerged as a potential novel approach for drug target validation and the study of functional genomics. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA) therapeutics has developed rapidly and already there are clinical trials ongoing or planned. Although other challenges remain, delivery strategies for siRNA become the main hurdle that must be resolved prior to the full-scale clinical development of siRNA therapeutics. This article provides an overview of the current delivery strategies for synthetic siRNA, focusing on the targeted, self-assembled nanoparticles which show potential to become a useful and efficient tool in cancer therapy. PMID:19115957

  10. Avian Pneumovirus (APV) RNA from Wild and Sentinel Birds in the United States Has Genetic Homology with RNA from APV Isolates from Domestic Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Jin; Njenga, M. Kariuki; McComb, Brian; Halvorson, David A.; Nagaraja, Kakambi V.

    2000-01-01

    Nasal turbinates or swabs were collected from wild ducks, geese, owls, sparrows, swallows, and starlings and from sentinel ducks placed next to turkey farms experiencing avian pneumovirus (APV) infections and were analyzed for APV genome and infectious particles. APV RNA was detected in samples examined from geese, sparrows, and starlings. APV RNA and antibodies were also detected in two different groups of sentinel ducks. Infectious APV was recovered from sentinel duck samples. The APV M gene isolated from the wild birds had over 96% predicted amino acid identity with APV/Minnesota 2A, which was isolated earlier from domestic turkeys showing respiratory illness, suggesting that wild birds may be involved in spreading APV infection. PMID:11060113

  11. Comparison of MALDI-TOF MS, Housekeeping Gene Sequencing, and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Identification of Aeromonas Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Bong; Yoon, Jihoon; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Myung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The genus Aeromonas is a pathogen that is well known to cause severe clinical illnesses, ranging from gastroenteritis to sepsis. Accurate identification of A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii is important for the care of patients. However, species identification remains difficult using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different methods of identifying Aeromonas at the species level: a biochemical method, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rRNA sequencing, and housekeeping gene sequencing (gyrB, rpoB). Materials and Methods We analyzed 65 Aeromonas isolates recovered from patients at a university hospital in Korea between 1996 and 2012. The isolates were recovered from frozen states and tested using the following four methods: a conventional biochemical method, 16S rRNA sequencing, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis, and MALDI-TOF MS. Results The conventional biochemical method and 16S rRNA sequencing identified Aeromonas at the genus level very accurately, although species level identification was unsatisfactory. MALDI-TOF MS system correctly identified 60 (92.3%) isolates at the species level and an additional four (6.2%) at the genus level. Overall, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis was found to be the most accurate in identifying Aeromonas at the species level. Conclusion The most accurate method of identification of Aeromonas to species level is by housekeeping gene sequencing, although high cost and technical difficulty hinder its usage in clinical settings. An easy-to-use identification method is needed for clinical laboratories, for which MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate. PMID:25684008

  12. Genetic analysis of RNA1 and RNA2 of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) isolated from India.

    PubMed

    NaveenKumar, Singaiah; Shekar, Malathi; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2013-05-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) is responsible for the newly emerging catastrophic disease known as white tail disease (WTD) in M. rosenbergii. The complete sequence of RNA2 (1175 bp) and 3126 bp region of RNA1 of an Indian strain of MrNV was generated. Sequence analysis of RNA2 revealed the presence of a single ORF encoding a capsid protein of 371 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass and pI of 41.5 kDa and 8.97 respectively. RNA1 contained two ORFs, one encoding a partial RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of length 1034 amino acids and another a B2-like protein with a length 133 amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of the capsid protein, to related nodavirus sequences suggests the establishment of new genotypes within the Nodaviridae family and we suggest the name should be genus Gammanodavirus. A new reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay has been developed and optimized for the detection of shrimp nodavirus with a sensitivity to detect up to 24 copy numbers of plasmid construct. PMID:23318596

  13. Genetic analysis of RNA1 and RNA2 of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) isolated from India.

    PubMed

    NaveenKumar, Singaiah; Shekar, Malathi; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2013-05-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) is responsible for the newly emerging catastrophic disease known as white tail disease (WTD) in M. rosenbergii. The complete sequence of RNA2 (1175 bp) and 3126 bp region of RNA1 of an Indian strain of MrNV was generated. Sequence analysis of RNA2 revealed the presence of a single ORF encoding a capsid protein of 371 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass and pI of 41.5 kDa and 8.97 respectively. RNA1 contained two ORFs, one encoding a partial RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of length 1034 amino acids and another a B2-like protein with a length 133 amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of the capsid protein, to related nodavirus sequences suggests the establishment of new genotypes within the Nodaviridae family and we suggest the name should be genus Gammanodavirus. A new reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay has been developed and optimized for the detection of shrimp nodavirus with a sensitivity to detect up to 24 copy numbers of plasmid construct.

  14. Mitochondrial Structure and Function Are Disrupted by Standard Isolation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; Taivassalo, Tanja; Ritchie, Darmyn; Wright, Kathryn J.; Thomas, Melissa M.; Romestaing, Caroline; Hepple, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria regulate critical components of cellular function via ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, Ca2+ handling and apoptotic signaling. Two classical methods exist to study mitochondrial function of skeletal muscles: isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers. Whereas mitochondrial isolation removes a portion of the mitochondria from their cellular environment, myofiber permeabilization preserves mitochondrial morphology and functional interactions with other intracellular components. Despite this, isolated mitochondria remain the most commonly used method to infer in vivo mitochondrial function. In this study, we directly compared measures of several key aspects of mitochondrial function in both isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers of rat gastrocnemius muscle. Here we show that mitochondrial isolation i) induced fragmented organelle morphology; ii) dramatically sensitized the permeability transition pore sensitivity to a Ca2+ challenge; iii) differentially altered mitochondrial respiration depending upon the respiratory conditions; and iv) dramatically increased H2O2 production. These alterations are qualitatively similar to the changes in mitochondrial structure and function observed in vivo after cellular stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, but are generally of much greater magnitude. Furthermore, mitochondrial isolation markedly altered electron transport chain protein stoichiometry. Collectively, our results demonstrate that isolated mitochondria possess functional characteristics that differ fundamentally from those of intact mitochondria in permeabilized myofibers. Our work and that of others underscores the importance of studying mitochondrial function in tissue preparations where mitochondrial structure is preserved and all mitochondria are represented. PMID:21512578

  15. Examining the Interactions of the Splicing Factor MBNL1 with Target RNA Sequences via a Label-Free, Multiplex Method

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Amrita R.; Mace, Charles R.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    The near-ubiquity of the involvement of RNA in crucial biological processes is accepted. It is important, therefore, to study and understand the biophysical principles that regulate the function of RNA and its interactions with other molecules (e.g., proteins and antibiotics). Methods enabling the high-throughput determination of RNA–protein binding kinetics and thermodynamics would greatly accelerate understanding of these interactions. To that end, we describe the development of a real-time biomolecular interaction analysis platform based on arrayed imaging reflectometry (AIR) for multiplex analysis of RNA–protein interactions. We demonstrate the use of aqueous AIR by measuring the binding kinetics between muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1), a splicing regulator protein that plays a pivotal role in the Myotonic Dystrophies and Huntington's Disease, and several of its RNA targets simultaneously on a microarrayed chip. Using this approach, we observe that the kinetics of MBNL1 binding isolated CUG and repeat CUG RNA sequences (as models for “normal” and “pathogenic” RNA, respectively) are different even though their steady state binding constants are similar. The ability to compare binding kinetics between RNA sequences rapidly and easily may provide insight into the molecular basis of MBNL1-RNA binding, and more generally suggests that AIR can be a powerful tool to enable the label-free, real-time analysis of biomolecular interactions in a high throughput format. PMID:24377303

  16. Identification of nine sequence types of the 16S rRNA genes of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni isolated from broilers

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Ingrid; Persson, Marianne; Svensson, Linda; Engvall, Eva Olsson; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Campylobacter is the most commonly reported bacterial cause of enteritis in humans in the EU Member States and other industrialized countries. One significant source of infection is broilers and consumption of undercooked broiler meat. Campylobacter jejuni is the Campylobacter sp. predominantly found in infected humans and colonized broilers. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene is very useful for identification of bacteria to genus and species level. The objectives in this study were to determine the degree of intraspecific variation in the 16S rRNA genes of C. jejuni and C. coli and to determine whether the 16S rRNA sequence types correlated with genotypes generated by PFGE analysis of SmaI restricted genomic DNA of the strains. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 45 strains of C. jejuni and two C. coli strains isolated from broilers were sequenced and compared with 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from the Ribosomal Database Project or GenBank. The strains were also genotyped by PFGE after digestion with SmaI. Results Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes revealed nine sequence types of the Campylobacter strains and the similarities between the different sequence types were in the range 99.6–99.9%. The number of nucleotide substitutions varied between one and six among the nine 16S rRNA sequence types. One of the nine 16S rRNA sequence profiles was common to 12 of the strains from our study and two of these were identified as Campylobacter coli by PCR/REA. The other 10 strains were identified as Campylobacter jejuni. Five of the nine sequence types were also found among the Campylobacter sequences deposited in GenBank. The three 16S rRNA genes in the analysed strains were identical within each individual strain for all 47 strains. Conclusion C. jejuni and C. coli seem to lack polymorphisms in their 16S rRNA gene, but phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences was not always sufficient for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli. The strains

  17. RNA 3D Structure Modeling by Combination of Template-Based Method ModeRNA, Template-Free Folding with SimRNA, and Refinement with QRNAS.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Pawel; Kasprzak, Joanna M; Kumar, Deepak; Magnus, Marcin; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-01-01

    RNA encompasses an essential part of all known forms of life. The functions of many RNA molecules are dependent on their ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. To address this problem, computational structure prediction methods were developed that either utilize information derived from known structures of other RNA molecules (by way of template-based modeling) or attempt to simulate the physical process of RNA structure formation (by way of template-free modeling). All computational methods suffer from various limitations that make theoretical models less reliable than high-resolution experimentally determined structures. This chapter provides a protocol for computational modeling of RNA 3D structure that overcomes major limitations by combining two complementary approaches: template-based modeling that is capable of predicting global architectures based on similarity to other molecules but often fails to predict local unique features, and template-free modeling that can predict the local folding, but is limited to modeling the structure of relatively small molecules. Here, we combine the use of a template-based method ModeRNA with a template-free method SimRNA. ModeRNA requires a sequence alignment of the target RNA sequence to be modeled with a template of the known structure; it generates a model that predicts the structure of a conserved core and provides a starting point for modeling of variable regions. SimRNA can be used to fold small RNAs (<80 nt) without any additional structural information, and to refold parts of models for larger RNAs that have a correctly modeled core. ModeRNA can be either downloaded, compiled and run locally or run through a web interface at http://genesilico.pl/modernaserver/ . SimRNA is currently available to download for local use as a precompiled

  18. RNA 3D Structure Modeling by Combination of Template-Based Method ModeRNA, Template-Free Folding with SimRNA, and Refinement with QRNAS.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Pawel; Kasprzak, Joanna M; Kumar, Deepak; Magnus, Marcin; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-01-01

    RNA encompasses an essential part of all known forms of life. The functions of many RNA molecules are dependent on their ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. To address this problem, computational structure prediction methods were developed that either utilize information derived from known structures of other RNA molecules (by way of template-based modeling) or attempt to simulate the physical process of RNA structure formation (by way of template-free modeling). All computational methods suffer from various limitations that make theoretical models less reliable than high-resolution experimentally determined structures. This chapter provides a protocol for computational modeling of RNA 3D structure that overcomes major limitations by combining two complementary approaches: template-based modeling that is capable of predicting global architectures based on similarity to other molecules but often fails to predict local unique features, and template-free modeling that can predict the local folding, but is limited to modeling the structure of relatively small molecules. Here, we combine the use of a template-based method ModeRNA with a template-free method SimRNA. ModeRNA requires a sequence alignment of the target RNA sequence to be modeled with a template of the known structure; it generates a model that predicts the structure of a conserved core and provides a starting point for modeling of variable regions. SimRNA can be used to fold small RNAs (<80 nt) without any additional structural information, and to refold parts of models for larger RNAs that have a correctly modeled core. ModeRNA can be either downloaded, compiled and run locally or run through a web interface at http://genesilico.pl/modernaserver/ . SimRNA is currently available to download for local use as a precompiled

  19. RNA-Seq analysis of isolate- and growth phase-specific differences in the global transcriptomes of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli prototype isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Shetty, Amol; Mahurkar, Anup A.; White, Owen; Kaper, James B.; Rasko, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are a leading cause of diarrheal illness among infants in developing countries. E. coli isolates classified as typical EPEC are identified by the presence of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) and the bundle-forming pilus (BFP), and absence of the Shiga-toxin genes, while the atypical EPEC also encode LEE but do not encode BFP or Shiga-toxin. Comparative genomic analyses have demonstrated that EPEC isolates belong to diverse evolutionary lineages and possess lineage- and isolate-specific genomic content. To investigate whether this genomic diversity results in significant differences in global gene expression, we used an RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach to characterize the global transcriptomes of the prototype typical EPEC isolates E2348/69, B171, C581-05, and the prototype atypical EPEC isolate E110019. The global transcriptomes were characterized during laboratory growth in two different media and three different growth phases, as well as during adherence of the EPEC isolates to human cells using in vitro tissue culture assays. Comparison of the global transcriptomes during these conditions was used to identify isolate- and growth phase-specific differences in EPEC gene expression. These analyses resulted in the identification of genes that encode proteins involved in survival and metabolism that were coordinately expressed with virulence factors. These findings demonstrate there are isolate- and growth phase-specific differences in the global transcriptomes of EPEC prototype isolates, and highlight the utility of comparative transcriptomics for identifying additional factors that are directly or indirectly involved in EPEC pathogenesis. PMID:26124752

  20. Modified Method of rRNA Structure Analysis Reveals Novel Characteristics of Box C/D RNA Analogues.

    PubMed

    Filippova, J A; Stepanov, G A; Semenov, D V; Koval, O A; Kuligina, E V; Rabinov, I V; Richter, V A

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation is a complex process that involves chemical modifications of the bases or sugar residues of specific nucleotides. One of the most abundant types of rRNA modifications, ribose 2'-O-methylation, is guided by ribonucleoprotein complexes containing small nucleolar box C/D RNAs. Since the majority of 2'-O-methylated nucleotides are located in the most conserved regions of rRNA that comprise functionally important centers of the ribosome, an alteration in a 2'-O-methylation profile can affect ribosome assembly and function. One of the key approaches for localization of 2'-O-methylated nucleotides in long RNAs is a method based on the termination of reverse transcription. The current study presents an adaptation of this method for the use of fluorescently labeled primers and analysis of termination products by capillary gel electrophoresis on an automated genetic analyzer. The developed approach allowed us to analyze the influence of the synthetic analogues of box C/D RNAs on post-transcriptional modifications of human 28S rRNA in MCF-7 cells. It has been established that the transfection of MCF-7 cells with a box C/D RNA analogue leads to an enhanced modification level of certain native sites of 2'-O-methylation in the target rRNA. The observed effect of synthetic RNAs on the 2'-O-methylation of rRNA in human cells demonstrates a path towards targeted regulation of rRNA post-transcriptional maturation. The described approach can be applied in the development of novel diagnostic methods for detecting diseases in humans. PMID:26085946

  1. SimRNA: a coarse-grained method for RNA folding simulations and 3D structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Boniecki, Michal J.; Lach, Grzegorz; Dawson, Wayne K.; Tomala, Konrad; Lukasz, Pawel; Soltysinski, Tomasz; Rother, Kristian M.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules play fundamental roles in cellular processes. Their function and interactions with other biomolecules are dependent on the ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. Here, we present SimRNA: a new method for computational RNA 3D structure prediction, which uses a coarse-grained representation, relies on the Monte Carlo method for sampling the conformational space, and employs a statistical potential to approximate the energy and identify conformations that correspond to biologically relevant structures. SimRNA can fold RNA molecules using only sequence information, and, on established test sequences, it recapitulates secondary structure with high accuracy, including correct prediction of pseudoknots. For modeling of complex 3D structures, it can use additional restraints, derived from experimental or computational analyses, including information about secondary structure and/or long-range contacts. SimRNA also can be used to analyze conformational landscapes and identify potential alternative structures. PMID:26687716

  2. Isolation of XAB2 complex involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Isao; Ito, Shinsuke; Wada, Tadashi; Hayashida, Mika; Lee, Lily; Saijo, Masafumi; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Matsumoto, Megumi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Handa, Hiroshi; Qin, Jun; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2008-01-11

    Nucleotide excision repair is a versatile repair pathway that counteracts the deleterious effects of various DNA lesions. In nucleotide excision repair, there is a transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway that focuses on DNA damage that blocks RNA polymerase IIo in transcription elongation. XAB2 (XPA-binding protein 2), containing tetratricopeptide repeats, has been isolated by virtue of its ability to interact with xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA). Moreover, XAB2 has been shown to interact with Cockayne syndrome group A and B proteins (CSA and CSB) and RNA polymerase II, as well as XPA, and is involved in TCR and transcription. Here we purified XAB2 as a multimeric protein complex consisting of hAquarius, XAB2, hPRP19, CCDC16, hISY1, and PPIE, which are involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Knockdown of XAB2 with small interfering RNA in HeLa cells resulted in a hypersensitivity to killing by UV light and a decreased recovery of RNA synthesis after UV irradiation and regular RNA synthesis. Enhanced interaction of XAB2 with RNA polymerase IIo or XPA was observed in cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, indicating DNA damage-responsive activity of the XAB2 complex. These results indicated that the XAB2 complex is a multifunctional factor involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and TCR. PMID:17981804

  3. Updated 16S rRNA-RFLP method for the identification of all currently characterised Arcobacter spp

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arcobacter spp. (family Campylobacteraceae) are ubiquitous zoonotic bacteria that are being increasingly recognised as a threat to human health. A previously published 16S rRNA-RFLP Arcobacter spp. identification method produced specific RFLP patterns for the six species described at that time, using a single endonuclease (MseI). The number of characterised Arcobacter species has since risen to 17. The aim of the present study was to update the 16S rRNA-RFLP identification method to include all currently characterised species of Arcobacter. Results Digestion of the 16S rRNA gene with the endonuclease MseI produced clear, distinctive patterns for 10 of the 17 species, while the remaining species shared a common or very similar RFLP pattern. Subsequent digestion of the 16S rRNA gene from these species with the endonucleases MnlI and/or BfaI generated species-specific RFLP patterns. Conclusions 16S rRNA-RFLP analysis identified 17 Arcobacter spp. using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis. Microheterogeneities within the 16S rRNA gene, which interfered with the RFLP identification, were also documented for the first time in this genus, particularly in strains of Arcobacter cryaerophilus isolated from animal faeces and aborted foetuses. PMID:23244705

  4. Simultaneous identification of two cyclohexanone oxidation genes from an environmental Brevibacterium isolate using mRNA differential display.

    PubMed

    Brzostowicz, P C; Gibson, K L; Thomas, S M; Blasko, M S; Rouvière, P E

    2000-08-01

    The technique of mRNA differential display was used to identify simultaneously two metabolic genes involved in the degradation of cyclohexanone in a new halotolerant Brevibacterium environmental isolate. In a strategy based only on the knowledge that cyclohexanone oxidation was inducible in this strain, the mRNA population of cells exposed to cyclohexanone was compared to that of control cells using reverse transcription-PCR reactions primed with a collection of 81 arbitrary oligonucleotides. Three DNA fragments encoding segments of flavin monooxygenases were isolated with this technique, leading to the identification of the genes of two distinct cyclohexanone monooxygenases, the enzymes responsible for the oxidation of cyclohexanone. Each monooxygenase was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. This work validates the application of mRNA differential display for the discovery of new microbial metabolic genes.

  5. Detection of reduced RNA synthesis in UV-irradiated Cockayne syndrome group B cells using an isolated nuclear system.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ayumi; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2002-10-21

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human hereditary disorder characterized by UV sensitivity, developmental abnormalities and premature aging. CS cells display a selective deficiency in transcription-coupled repair (TCR), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) that preferentially removes lesions from transcribed strands. Following UV irradiation, the recovery of RNA synthesis is abnormally delayed in CS cells in conjunction with TCR deficiency. To date, TCR has been detected in cultured cells, but not in cell-free systems. In this study, we constructed an assay system using isolated nuclei. RNA synthesis catalyzed by RNA polymerases (pol I and II) was measured in nuclei prepared from UV-irradiated cells. In nuclei isolated from HeLa and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group C cells, RNA synthesis was relatively resistant to UV irradiation. In contrast, RNA synthesis by pol I and, in particular, pol II in CS-B nuclei was significantly inhibited upon UV irradiation. Our data support the utility of this assay system for the in vitro detection of the recovery of RNA synthesis in cultured cells. PMID:12379475

  6. Isolation and purification of functional total RNA from different organs of cacao tree during its interaction with the pathogen Crinipellis perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Gesteira, Abelmon da Silva; Micheli, Fabienne; Ferreira, Cláudia Fortes; Cascardo, Júlio Cézar de Mattos

    2003-09-01

    Witches' broom disease, caused by Crinipellis perniciosa, is one of the major fungal diseases causing severe losses to cacao tree (Theobroma cacao L.) plantations in South America. One of the challenges associated with the understanding of the cacao and Crinipellis interaction in genomic studies is the isolation of intact nucleic acids. In this report, we describe a new, successful, and reliable procedure for the isolation of RNA from tissues of cacao tree, both infected and uninfected by Crinipellis. This protocol overcomes the problems associated with the very high amount of polyphenols and polysaccharides present in cacao organs that are not easily removed by conventional extraction procedures. The protocol requires few reagents, uses ultracentrifugation and inexpensive consumables, and can be easily applied in any laboratory. This method produced high-quality RNA that was suitable for subsequent purposes, such as reverse transcription PCR and cDNA library construction. We also report the first evidence of RNA isolation from cacao organs infected by C. perniciosa such as meristems and fruits.

  7. An automatic and effective tooth isolation method for dental radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.-L.; Huang, P.-W.; Cho, Y. S.; Kuo, C.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Tooth isolation is a very important step for both computer-aided dental diagnosis and automatic dental identification systems, because it will directly affect the accuracy of feature extraction and, thereby, the final results of both types of systems. This paper presents an effective and fully automatic tooth isolation method for dental X-ray images, which contains up-per-lower jaw separation, single tooth isolation, over-segmentation verification, and under-segmentation detection. The upper-lower jaw separation mechanism is based on a gray-scale integral projection to avoid possible information loss and incorporates with the angle adjustment to handle skewed images. In a single tooth isolation, an adaptive windowing scheme for locating gap valleys is proposed to improve the accuracy. In over-segmentation, an isolation-curve verification scheme is proposed to remove excessive curves; and in under-segmentation, a missing-teeth detection scheme is proposed. The experimental results demonstrate that our method achieves the accuracy rates of 95.63% and 98.71% for the upper and lower jaw images, respectively, from the test database of 60 bitewing dental radiographs, and performs better for images with severe teeth occlusion, excessive dental works, and uneven illumination than that of Nomir and Abdel-Mottaleb's method. The method without upper-lower jaw separation step also works well for panoramic and periapical images.

  8. Isolation of Legionella from water samples using various culture methods.

    PubMed

    Kusnetsov, J M; Jousimies-Somer, H R; Nevalainen, A I; Martikainen, P J

    1994-02-01

    The efficacy of a non-selective medium and two selective media were compared for the isolation of legionellas from water samples. The effect of acid wash treatment for decontamination of the water samples on the isolation frequency of legionellas was also studied. The 236 samples were taken from cooling, humidifying and drinking water systems; 21% were legionella-positive when inoculated directly on modified Wadowsky-Yee (MWY) medium and 26% were positive when concentrated (x 200) before cultivation on MWY or CCVC media. Inoculation on MWY medium after concentration followed by decontamination by the acid-wash technique gave the highest isolation frequency (31%). The lowest frequency (8%) was found with the non-selective BCYE alpha medium. An isolation frequency of 28% was achieved with the BCYE alpha medium after concentration and acid-wash treatment of the samples. Forty per cent of the samples were positive for legionellas when the results from all the culture methods were combined. Not all the legionella-positive samples were identified by a single culture method. Ninety-three of the 95 positive samples were detected with the two best combinations of three culture methods. The best culture method for detecting legionellas depended on the source of the water sample. Some water quality characteristics, like temperature and organic matter content, affected the isolation frequency of Legionella spp.

  9. Messenger RNA profiling: a prototype method to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification.

    PubMed

    Juusola, Jane; Ballantyne, Jack

    2003-08-12

    Conventional methods of body fluid identification use a variety of labor-intensive, technologically diverse techniques that are performed in a series, not parallel, manner and are costly in terms of time and sample. Theoretically, the identification of a body fluid may be made by determining a sufficient number of mRNAs that are expressed exclusively in cells that collectively comprise that body fluid. Advantages of an mRNA-based approach, compared to conventional biochemical methods of analysis, include greater specificity, simultaneous and semi-automatic analysis through a common assay format, improved timeliness, decreased sample consumption and compatibility with DNA extraction methodologies. In this report, we demonstrate that RNA is stable in biological stains and can be recovered in sufficient quantity and quality for analysis. Messenger RNA from the housekeeping genes S15, beta-actin and GAPDH was detected in blood, semen and saliva stains using a sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR). Additionally, we have identified a number of candidate tissue-specific genes, statherin, histatin 3, PRB1, PRB2 and PRB3 that may be useful for the positive identification of saliva. Messenger RNAs from these genes were detectable in saliva stains but not in blood or semen stains. Collectively these findings constitute the basis of a prototype RNA based assay system that may eventually supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification.

  10. Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schalla, Ronald; Smith, Ronald M.; Hall, Stephen H.; Smart, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  11. A Novel Method to Quantify RNA-Protein Interactions In Situ Using FMTRIP and Proximity Ligation.

    PubMed

    Zurla, C; Jung, J; Blanchard, E L; Santangelo, P J

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) and small RNAs regulate the editing, localization, stabilization, translation, and degradation of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) through their interactions with specific cis-acting elements within target RNAs. Here, we describe a novel method to detect protein-mRNA interactions, which combines FLAG-peptide modified, multiply-labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes (FMTRIPs) with proximity ligation (PLA), and rolling circle amplification (RCA). This assay detects native RNA in a sequence specific and single RNA sensitive manner, and PLA allows for the quantification and localization of protein-mRNA interactions with single-interaction sensitivity. PMID:27662876

  12. Detection of RNA-DNA association by a proximity ligation-based method

    PubMed Central

    Petruk, Svetlana; Fenstermaker, Tyler K.; Black, Kathryn L.; Brock, Hugh W.; Mazo, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We describe a proximity ligation assay (PLA)-based method of assessing association of DNA and RNA in single cells during the cell cycle. Pulse-labeling of DNA with EdU and RNA with BrU and testing their close proximity by PLA demonstrates that RNA synthesis in individual cells resumes about 30–45 min after DNA replication. Consistent with this conclusion, RNA Pol II phosphorylated at Ser2 of its CTD is detected at the same time as RNA transcripts on nascent DNA. Our results also show that RNA is associated with DNA foci during all stages of mitosis. PMID:27256324

  13. Effect of soil clay content on RNA isolation and on detection and quantification of bacterial gene transcripts in soil by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Novinscak, A; Filion, M

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil clay content on RNA isolation and on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) quantification of microbial gene transcripts. The amount of clay significantly altered RNA isolation yields and qRT-PCR analyses. Recommendations are made for quantifying microbial gene transcripts in soil samples varying in clay content.

  14. Analysis of clonal relationships among isolates of Shigella sonnei by different molecular typing methods.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P Y; Lau, Y J; Hu, B S; Shyr, J M; Shi, Z Y; Tsai, W S; Lin, Y H; Tseng, C Y

    1995-01-01

    Shigella sonnei is a major cause of diarrheal disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Epidemiologic studies of this organism have been limited by the lack of a simple and effective method for comparing strains. In this study, we have compared different molecular typing methods, i.e., plasmid profile analysis, restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmids, rRNA gene restriction analysis (ribotyping), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence-based PCR (ERIC-PCR) for typing 20 clinical isolates of S. sonnei collected from six incidents of infection. PFGE and ERIC-PCR fingerprintings had the highest discriminatory power for discrimination of epidemiologically related isolates from epidemiologically unrelated strains of S. sonnei, and both gave seven distinct strain types among these isolates and the type strain of the species. Plasmid study and ribotyping produced only six and typing techniques demonstrated two distinct patterns, respectively, among these strains. All of these molecular an identical fingerprint for eight temporally related sporadic isolates. It is possible that these temporally related isolates belonged to a single bacterial clone and circulated obscurely through the community. Our results indicate that the ERIC-PCR technique represents a rapid and simple means for typing S. sonnei with a level of discrimination equivalent to that of PFGE but greater than those of plasmid profile analysis, restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmids, and ribotyping. PMID:7545179

  15. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-08-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  16. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  17. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  18. Methods to Study Long Noncoding RNA Biology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Man-Li

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in recent years. The functions of lncRNAs range broadly from regulating chromatin structure and gene expression in the nucleus to controlling messenger RNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA posttranscriptional regulation, cellular signaling, and protein activity in the cytoplasm. Experimental and computational techniques have been developed to characterize lncRNAs in high-throughput scale, to study the lncRNA function in vitro and in vivo, to map lncRNA binding sites on the genome, and to capture lncRNA-protein interactions with the identification of lncRNA-binding partners, binding sites, and interaction determinants. In this chapter, we will discuss these technologies and their applications in decoding the functions of lncRNAs. Understanding these techniques including their advantages and disadvantages and developing them in the future will be essential to elaborate the roles of lncRNAs in cancer and other diseases. PMID:27376732

  19. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology.

  20. PON-mt-tRNA: a multifactorial probability-based method for classification of mitochondrial tRNA variations

    PubMed Central

    Niroula, Abhishek; Vihinen, Mauno

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are essential for encoding the transcribed genetic information from DNA into proteins. Variations in the human tRNAs are involved in diverse clinical phenotypes. Interestingly, all pathogenic variations in tRNAs are located in mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Therefore, it is crucial to identify pathogenic variations in mt-tRNAs for disease diagnosis and proper treatment. We collected mt-tRNA variations using a classification based on evidence from several sources and used the data to develop a multifactorial probability-based prediction method, PON-mt-tRNA, for classification of mt-tRNA single nucleotide substitutions. We integrated a machine learning-based predictor and an evidence-based likelihood ratio for pathogenicity using evidence of segregation, biochemistry and histochemistry to predict the posterior probability of pathogenicity of variants. The accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of PON-mt-tRNA are 1.00 and 0.99, respectively. In the absence of evidence from segregation, biochemistry and histochemistry, PON-mt-tRNA classifies variations based on the machine learning method with an accuracy and MCC of 0.69 and 0.39, respectively. We classified all possible single nucleotide substitutions in all human mt-tRNAs using PON-mt-tRNA. The variations in the loops are more often tolerated compared to the variations in stems. The anticodon loop contains comparatively more predicted pathogenic variations than the other loops. PON-mt-tRNA is available at http://structure.bmc.lu.se/PON-mt-tRNA/. PMID:26843426

  1. Molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA virus in Trichomonas vaginalis Egyptian isolates and its association with pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    El-Gayar, Eman K; Mokhtar, Amira B; Hassan, Wael A

    2016-10-01

    Trichomoniasis is a common human sexually transmitted infection caused by Trichomonas vaginalis. The parasite can be infected with double-stranded RNA viruses (TVV). This viral infection may have important implications on trichomonal virulence and disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of T. vaginalis virus among isolates obtained from infected (symptomatic and asymptomatic) women in Ismailia City, Egypt, and to correlate the virus-infected isolates with the clinical manifestations of patients. In addition, the pathogenicity of TVV infected isolates on mice was also evaluated. T. vaginalis isolates were obtained from symptomatic and asymptomatic female patients followed by axenic cultivation in Diamond's TYM medium. The presence of T. vaginalis virus was determined from total extraction of nucleic acids (DNA-RNA) followed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Representative samples were inoculated intraperitoneally in female albino/BALB mice to assess the pathogenicity of different isolates. A total of 110 women were examined; 40 (36.3 %) samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Of these 40 isolates, 8 (20 %) were infected by TVV. Five isolates contained TVV-2 virus species, and the remaining three isolates were infected withTVV-4 variant. A significant association was found between the presence of TVV and particular clinical manifestations of trichomoniasis. Experimental mice infection showed varying degrees of pathogenicity. This is the first report on T. vaginalis infection by TVV in Egypt. The strong association detected between TVV and particular clinical features of trichomoniasis and also the degree of pathogenicity in experimentally infected mice may indicate a possible clinical significance of TVV infection of T. vaginalis isolates. PMID:27316695

  2. Isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria from Tarag in Eastern Inner Mongolia of China by 16S rRNA sequences and DGGE analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Bao, Qiuhua; Jirimutu; Qing, Manjun; Siriguleng; Chen, Xia; Sun, Ting; Li, Meihua; Zhang, Jiachao; Yu, Jie; Bilige, Menghe; Sun, Tiansong; Zhang, Heping

    2012-01-20

    Tarag is a characteristic fermented dairy product with rich microflora (especially lactic acid bacteria), developed by the people of Mongolian nationality in Inner Mongolia of China and Mongolia throughout history. One hundred and ninety-eight samples of Tarag were collected from scattered households in Eastern Inner Mongolia, and total of 790 isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated by traditional pure culture method. To identify these isolates and analyze their biodiversity, 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and PCR-DGGE were performed respectively. The results showed that 790 isolates could be classified as 31 species and subspecies. Among these isolates, Lactobacillus helveticus (153 strains, about 19.4%), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (132 strains, about 16.7%) and Lactobacillus casei (106 strains, about 11.0%) were considered as the predominated species in the traditional fermented dairy products (Tarag) in Eastern Inner Mongolia. It was shown that the biodiversity of LAB in Tarag in Inner Mongolia was very abundant, and this traditional fermented dairy product could be considered as valuable resources for LAB isolation and probiotic selection. PMID:21689912

  3. Isolation, expression and functional analysis of a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene from maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    He, Junguang; Dong, Zhigang; Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Guoying

    2010-02-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) in plants have been reported to be involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and antiviral defense. In this report, an RdRP gene from maize (ZmRdRP1) was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and RT-PCR. The mRNA of ZmRdRP1 was composed of 3785 nucleotides, including a 167 nt 5' untranslated region (UTR), a 291 nt 3'UTR and a 3327 nt open reading frame (ORF), which encodes a putative protein of 1108 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 126.9 kDa and a predicated isoelectric point (pI) of 8.37. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that ZmRdRP1 was elicited by salicylic acid (SA) treatment, methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment and sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) infection. We silenced ZmRdRP1 by constitutively expressing an inverted-repeat fragment of ZmRdRP1 (ir-RdRP1) in transgenic maize plants. Further studies revealed that the ir-RdRP1 transgenic plants were more susceptible to SCMV infection than wild type plants. Virus-infected transgenic maize plants developed more serious disease symptoms and accumulated more virus than wild type plants. These findings suggested that ZmRdRP1 was involved in antiviral defense in maize.

  4. An optimized method for the extraction of bacterial mRNA from plant roots infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Ashleigh; Birse, Louise; Jackson, Robert W.; Holden, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microbial gene expression during host colonization provides valuable information on the nature of interaction, beneficial or pathogenic, and the adaptive processes involved. Isolation of bacterial mRNA for in planta analysis can be challenging where host nucleic acid may dominate the preparation, or inhibitory compounds affect downstream analysis, e.g., quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qPCR), microarray, or RNA-seq. The goal of this work was to optimize the isolation of bacterial mRNA of food-borne pathogens from living plants. Reported methods for recovery of phytopathogen-infected plant material, using hot phenol extraction and high concentration of bacterial inoculation or large amounts of infected tissues, were found to be inappropriate for plant roots inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7. The bacterial RNA yields were too low and increased plant material resulted in a dominance of plant RNA in the sample. To improve the yield of bacterial RNA and reduce the number of plants required, an optimized method was developed which combines bead beating with directed bacterial lysis using SDS and lysozyme. Inhibitory plant compounds, such as phenolics and polysaccharides, were counteracted with the addition of high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol and hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide. The new method increased the total yield of bacterial mRNA substantially and allowed assessment of gene expression by qPCR. This method can be applied to other bacterial species associated with plant roots, and also in the wider context of food safety. PMID:25018749

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel noncoding RNA from nickel-induced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yang; Wu, Youjun; Ma, Lin; Fan, Yingying; Kang, Xuan; Shi, Hongjun; Zhang, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs have drawn significant attention in carcinogenesis. In this study, we identified a novel gene named nickel-related gene1 (NRG1) associated with nickel-induced cancer. By using rapid amplification of cDNA end PCR, we obtained the full length of the cDNA. The sequence was analyzed by using related bioinformatics software and comparative genomics methods. The results showed that NRG1 was located on chromosome 2q12, within intron2 of ADAMTS6, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs. And, NRG1 had a high level of homology (76 %) to rat LINE1 sequence RL1.3 (long interspersed middle repetitive DNA). What's more, there was no continuous open reading frame present in NRG1 sequence. Taken together, these data demonstrate that NRG1 is a novel noncoding RNA, and we predicted it may be a transposon-like gene. The identification of NRG1 emphasized the potential role of noncoding RNA in nickel carcinogenesis. PMID:22665269

  6. Comparison of two methods for RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Gan, M F; Yang, H L; Qian, J L; Wu, C S; Yuan, C X; Li, X F; Zou, J

    2016-01-01

    RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs has been extensively used in orthopedic studies. We compared two methods for extracting RNA from the nucleus pulposus: liquid nitrogen grinding and enzyme digestion. The RNA was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, and the purity was evaluated by absorbance ratio using a spectrophotometer. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) expression was assayed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Thirty human lumbar intervertebral discs were used in this study. The liquid nitrogen-grinding method was used for RNA extraction from 15 samples, and the mean RNA concentration was 491.04 ± 44.16 ng/mL. The enzyme digestion method was used on 15 samples, and the mean RNA concentration was 898.42 ± 38.64 ng/mL. The statistical analysis revealed that there was a significant difference in concentration between the different methods. Apparent 28S, 18S, and 5S bands were detectable in RNA extracted using the enzyme digestion method, whereas no 28S or 18S bands were detected in RNA extracted using the liquid nitrogen-grinding method. The GAPDH band was visible, and no non-specific band was detected in the RT-PCR assay by the enzyme digestion method. Therefore, the enzyme digestion method is an efficient and easy method for RNA extraction from the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs for further intervertebral disc degeneration-related studies. PMID:27323116

  7. RNA1-Independent Replication and GFP Expression from Tomato marchitez virus Isolate M Cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, I; Turina, M; Zamora-Macorra, E J; Falk, B W

    2016-05-01

    Tomato marchitez virus (ToMarV; synonymous with Tomato apex necrosis virus) is a positive-strand RNA virus in the genus Torradovirus within the family Secoviridae. ToMarV is an emergent whitefly-transmitted virus that causes important diseases in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in Mexico. Here, the genome sequence of the ToMarV isolate M (ToMarV-M) was determined. We engineered full-length cDNA clones of the ToMarV-M genomic RNA (RNA1 and RNA2), separately, into a binary vector. Coinfiltration of both triggered systemic infections in Nicotiana benthamiana, tomato, and tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) plants and recapitulated the biological activity of the wild-type virus. The viral progeny generated from tomato and tomatillo plants were transmissible by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci biotype B. Also, we assessed whether these infectious clones could be used for screening tomato cultivars for resistance to ToMarV and our results allowed us to differentiate resistant and susceptible tomato lines. We demonstrated that RNA1 of ToMarV-M is required for the replication of RNA2, and it can replicate independently of RNA2. From this, ToMarV-M RNA2 was used to express the green fluorescent protein in N. benthamiana plants, which allowed us to track cell-to-cell movement. The construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones of ToMarV-M provides an excellent tool to investigate virus-host-vector interactions and elucidate the functions of torradovirus-encoded proteins or the mechanisms of replication of torradovirus genomic RNA. PMID:26756828

  8. RNA1-Independent Replication and GFP Expression from Tomato marchitez virus Isolate M Cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, I; Turina, M; Zamora-Macorra, E J; Falk, B W

    2016-05-01

    Tomato marchitez virus (ToMarV; synonymous with Tomato apex necrosis virus) is a positive-strand RNA virus in the genus Torradovirus within the family Secoviridae. ToMarV is an emergent whitefly-transmitted virus that causes important diseases in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in Mexico. Here, the genome sequence of the ToMarV isolate M (ToMarV-M) was determined. We engineered full-length cDNA clones of the ToMarV-M genomic RNA (RNA1 and RNA2), separately, into a binary vector. Coinfiltration of both triggered systemic infections in Nicotiana benthamiana, tomato, and tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) plants and recapitulated the biological activity of the wild-type virus. The viral progeny generated from tomato and tomatillo plants were transmissible by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci biotype B. Also, we assessed whether these infectious clones could be used for screening tomato cultivars for resistance to ToMarV and our results allowed us to differentiate resistant and susceptible tomato lines. We demonstrated that RNA1 of ToMarV-M is required for the replication of RNA2, and it can replicate independently of RNA2. From this, ToMarV-M RNA2 was used to express the green fluorescent protein in N. benthamiana plants, which allowed us to track cell-to-cell movement. The construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones of ToMarV-M provides an excellent tool to investigate virus-host-vector interactions and elucidate the functions of torradovirus-encoded proteins or the mechanisms of replication of torradovirus genomic RNA.

  9. A new RNA-seq method to detect the transcription and non-coding RNA in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Zhong-Wei; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Jian-Ning; Yang, Ji-Wei; Li, Xian-Duo; Li, Hao; Men, Tong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a big killer in many regions especially American men, and this year, the diagnosed rate rises rapidly. We aimed to find the biomarker or any changing in prostate cancer patients. With the development of next generation sequencing, much genomic alteration has been found. Here, basing on the RNA-seq result of human prostate cancer tissue, we tried to find the transcription or non-coding RNA expressed differentially between normal tissue and prostate cancer tissue. 10 T sample data is the RNA-seq data for prostate cancer tissue in this study, we found the differential gene is TFF3-Trefoil factor 3, which was more than seven fold change from prostate cancer tissue to normal tissue, and the most outstanding transcript is C15orf21. Additionally, 9 lncRNAs were found according our method. Finally, we found the many important non-coding RNA related to prostate cancer, some of them were long non-coding RNA (lncRNA).

  10. Isolation of Cognate Cellular and Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complexes of HIV-1 RNA Applicable to Proteomic Discovery and Molecular Investigations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepali; Boeras, Ioana; Singh, Gatikrushna; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    All decisions affecting the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) RNA are executed by ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs). HIV-1 RNA cycles through a progression of host RNPs composed of RNA-binding proteins regulating all stages of synthesis, processing, nuclear transport, translation, decay, and co-localization with assembling virions. RNA affinity chromatography is a versatile method to identify RNA-binding proteins to investigate the molecular basis of viral and cellular posttranscriptional control of gene expression. The bait is a HIV-1 RNA motif immobilized on a solid support, typically magnetic or Sepharose beads. The prey is pre-formed RNPs admixed in lysate from cells or concentrated virus particles. The methodology distinguishes high-affinity RNA-protein interactions from low-affinity complexes by increases in ionic strength during progressive elution cycles. Here, we describe RNA affinity chromatography of the 5' untranslated region of HIV-1, obtaining mixtures of high-affinity RNA binding proteins suitable for mass spectrometry and proteome identification.

  11. High rates of double-stranded RNA viruses and Mycoplasma hominis in Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates in South Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Luz Becker, Débora; dos Santos, Odelta; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiological agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease (STD) in world, with 276.4 million new cases each year. T. vaginalis can be naturally infected with Mycoplasma hominis and Trichomonasvirus species. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of T. vaginalis infected with four distinct T. vaginalis viruses (TVVs) and M. hominis among isolates from patients in Porto Alegre city, South Brazil. An additional goal of this study was to investigate whether there is association between metronidazole resistance and the presence of M. hominis during TVV infection. The RNA expression level of the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) gene was also evaluated among metronidazole-resistant and metronidazole-sensitive T. vaginalis isolates. A total of 530 urine samples were evaluated, and 5.7% samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Among them, 4.51% were isolated from female patients and 1.12% were from male patients. Remarkably, the prevalence rates of M. hominis and TVV-positive T. vaginalis isolates were 56.7% and 90%, respectively. Most of the T. vaginalis isolates were metronidazole-sensitive (86.7%), and only four isolates (13.3%) were resistant. There is no statistically significant association between infection by M. hominis and infection by TVVs. Our results refute the hypothesis that the presence of the M. hominis and TVVs is enough to confer metronidazole resistance to T. vaginalis isolates. Additionally, the role of PFOR RNA expression levels in metronidazole resistance as the main mechanism of resistance to metronidazole could not be established. This study is the first report of the T. vaginalis infection by M. hominis and TVVs in a large collection of isolates from South Brazil.

  12. High rates of double-stranded RNA viruses and Mycoplasma hominis in Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates in South Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Luz Becker, Débora; dos Santos, Odelta; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiological agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease (STD) in world, with 276.4 million new cases each year. T. vaginalis can be naturally infected with Mycoplasma hominis and Trichomonasvirus species. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of T. vaginalis infected with four distinct T. vaginalis viruses (TVVs) and M. hominis among isolates from patients in Porto Alegre city, South Brazil. An additional goal of this study was to investigate whether there is association between metronidazole resistance and the presence of M. hominis during TVV infection. The RNA expression level of the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) gene was also evaluated among metronidazole-resistant and metronidazole-sensitive T. vaginalis isolates. A total of 530 urine samples were evaluated, and 5.7% samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Among them, 4.51% were isolated from female patients and 1.12% were from male patients. Remarkably, the prevalence rates of M. hominis and TVV-positive T. vaginalis isolates were 56.7% and 90%, respectively. Most of the T. vaginalis isolates were metronidazole-sensitive (86.7%), and only four isolates (13.3%) were resistant. There is no statistically significant association between infection by M. hominis and infection by TVVs. Our results refute the hypothesis that the presence of the M. hominis and TVVs is enough to confer metronidazole resistance to T. vaginalis isolates. Additionally, the role of PFOR RNA expression levels in metronidazole resistance as the main mechanism of resistance to metronidazole could not be established. This study is the first report of the T. vaginalis infection by M. hominis and TVVs in a large collection of isolates from South Brazil. PMID:26160539

  13. Selection of random RNA fragments as method for searching for a site of regulation of translation of E. coli streptomycin mRNA by ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, A M

    2008-06-01

    In E. coli cells ribosomal small subunit biogenesis is regulated by RNA-protein interactions involving protein S7. S7 initiates the subunit assembly interacting with 16S rRNA. During shift-down of rRNA synthesis level, free S7 inhibits self-translation by interacting with 96 nucleotides long specific region of streptomycin (str) mRNA between cistrons S12 and S7 (intercistron). Many bacteria do not have the extended intercistron challenging development of specific approaches for searching putative mRNA regulatory regions, which are able to interact with proteins. The paper describes application of SERF approach (Selection of Random RNA Fragments) to reveal regulatory regions of str mRNA. Set of random DNA fragments has been generated from str operon by random hydrolysis and then transcribed into RNA; the fragments being able to bind protein S7 (serfamers) have been selected by iterative rounds. S7 binds to single serfamer, 109 nucleotide long (RNA109), derived from the intercistron. After multiple copying and selection, the intercistronic mutant (RNA109) has been isolated; it has enhanced affinity to S7. RNA109 binds to the protein better than authentic intercistronic str mRNA; apparent dissociation constants are 26 +/- 5 and 60 +/- 8 nM, respectively. Location of S7 binding site on the mRNA, as well as putative mode of regulation of coupled translation of S12 and S7 cistrons have been hypothesized.

  14. A novel dsRNA element isolated from the Aspergillus foetidus mycovirus complex.

    PubMed

    Kozlakidis, Zisis; Herrero, Noemi; Ozkan, Selin; Bhatti, Muhammad F; Coutts, Robert H A

    2013-12-01

    Aspergillus foetidus virus (AfV) contains at least two icosahedral particle types named AfV-fast (-F) and AfV-slow (-S), based on relative electrophoretic mobility. AfV-F is a quadripartite double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, and AfV-S contains AfV-S1, which is a member of the genus Victorivirus in the family Totiviridae, and AfV-S2, which may be a satellite RNA or satellite virus and is described here. Analysis of the complete AfV-S2 nucleotide sequence reveals it to be significantly similar to an unclassified RNA from the fungus Rosellinia necatrix and distantly related to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of several single-stranded RNA genomes. PMID:23827976

  15. An integrated miRNA functional screening and target validation method for organ morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rebustini, Ivan T.; Vlahos, Maryann; Packer, Trevor; Kukuruzinska, Maria A.; Maas, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The relative ease of identifying microRNAs and their increasing recognition as important regulators of organogenesis motivate the development of methods to efficiently assess microRNA function during organ morphogenesis. In this context, embryonic organ explants provide a reliable and reproducible system that recapitulates some of the important early morphogenetic processes during organ development. Here we present a method to target microRNA function in explanted mouse embryonic organs. Our method combines the use of peptide-based nanoparticles to transfect specific microRNA inhibitors or activators into embryonic organ explants, with a microRNA pulldown assay that allows direct identification of microRNA targets. This method provides effective assessment of microRNA function during organ morphogenesis, allows prioritization of multiple microRNAs in parallel for subsequent genetic approaches, and can be applied to a variety of embryonic organs. PMID:26980315

  16. Detection and isolation of circulating tumor cells: principles and methods.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilsabzali, Hadi; Beischlag, Timothy V; Cox, Michael E; Parameswaran, Ash M; Park, Edward J

    2013-11-15

    Efforts to improve the clinical management of several cancers include finding better methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). However, detection and isolation of CTCs from the blood circulation is not a trivial task given their scarcity and the lack of reliable markers to identify these cells. With a variety of emerging technologies, a thorough review of the exploited principles and techniques as well as the trends observed in the development of these technologies can assist researchers to recognize the potential improvements and alternative approaches. To help better understand the related biological concepts, a simplified framework explaining cancer formation and its spread to other organs as well as how CTCs contribute to this process has been presented first. Then, based on their basic working-principles, the existing methods for detection and isolation of CTCs have been classified and reviewed as nucleic acid-based, physical properties-based and antibody-based methods. The review of literature suggests that antibody-based methods, particularly in conjunction with a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip setting, offer the highest overall performance for detection and isolation of CTCs. Further biological and engineering-related research is required to improve the existing methods. These include finding more specific markers for CTCs as well as enhancing the throughput, sensitivity, and analytic functionality of current devices.

  17. Genomic effects of cold and isolation stress on magnocellular vasopressin mRNA-containing cells in the hypothalamus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Angulo, J A; Ledoux, M; McEwen, B S

    1991-06-01

    We assessed the effects of cold and isolation stress on arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. Vasopressin mRNA levels were determined by in situ hybridization histochemistry at the cellular level. In posterior magnocellular neurons of the PVN isolation stress for 7 or 14 days increased vasopressin mRNA levels 28 and 29%, respectively, compared to group-housed controls. No significant alterations in vasopressin gene expression were observed in the SON after 7 or 14 days of isolation stress. Scattered magnocellular AVP mRNA-expressing cells of the medial parvocellular PVN showed increases of 19 and 34% after 7 and 14 days of isolation, respectively. We also studied the effect of cold or combined cold and isolation stress on vasopressin gene expression in the PVN and SON. Cold stress for 3 h daily for 4 consecutive days increased AVP mRNA levels in the posterior magnocellular PVN by 15%. Cold-isolated animals showed an increase of 21%. No significant effect on AVP mRNA levels in the SON was observed. In contrast to the posterior magnocellular PVN, cold or cold-isolation stress increased AVP mRNA in magnocellular neurons of the medial parvocellular region of the PVN by 25 and 43%, respectively, relative to control rats. These results suggest that psychological and metabolic stress may be added to the list of stressors that activate the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system.

  18. Use of 16S rRNA Sequencing for Identification of Actinobacillus ureae Isolated from a Cerebrospinal Fluid Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, A. C.; Shankland, I. M.; Elisha, B. G.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus ureae, previously Pasteurella ureae, has on rare occasions been described as a cause of human infection. Owing to its rarity, it may not be easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories by standard tests. This report describes a patient with acute bacterial meningitis due to A. ureae. The identity of the isolate was determined by means of DNA sequence analysis of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:11825992

  19. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences. PMID:26943621

  20. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences. PMID:26943621

  1. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences.

  2. A fully enzymatic method for site-directed spin labeling of long RNA.

    PubMed

    Lebars, Isabelle; Vileno, Bertrand; Bourbigot, Sarah; Turek, Philippe; Wolff, Philippe; Kieffer, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    Site-directed spin labeling is emerging as an essential tool to investigate the structural and dynamical features of RNA. We propose here an enzymatic method, which allows the insertion of a paramagnetic center at a specific position in an RNA molecule. The technique is based on a segmental approach using a ligation protocol with T4 RNA ligase 2. One transcribed acceptor RNA is ligated to a donor RNA in which a thio-modified nucleotide is introduced at its 5'-end by in vitro transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. The paramagnetic thiol-specific reagent is subsequently attached to the RNA ligation product. This novel strategy is demonstrated by introducing a paramagnetic probe into the 55 nucleotides long RNA corresponding to K-turn and Specifier Loop domains from the Bacillus subtilis tyrS T-Box leader RNA. The efficiency of the coupling reaction and the quality of the resulting spin-labeled RNA were assessed by Mass Spectrometry, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). This method enables various combinations of isotopic segmental labeling and spin labeling schemes, a strategy that will be of particular interest to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of large RNA complexes by NMR and EPR spectroscopies.

  3. A mitochondrial tRNA aspartate mutation causing isolated mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Goemans, Nathalie; Van Coster, Rudy; Givron, Patrice; Reybrouck, Tony; Sciot, Raf; Meulemans, Ann; Smet, Joel; Van Hove, Johan L K

    2005-08-30

    Several mutations in mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) genes can cause mitochondrial myopathy. We describe a young girl who presented with pronounced exercise intolerance. The anaerobic threshold and the maximal oxygen consumption were decreased. She had decreased complex I and IV enzyme activity and ragged red fibers on muscle biopsy. An A to G transition at nucleotide position 7526 in tRNA Aspartate (tRNA(Asp)) gene was heteroplasmic in several of the patient's tissues. We were unable to detect the mutation in muscle tissue from the patient's mother. This case adds a new genetic etiology for mitochondrial myopathy. It also illustrates for patients with combined deficiency of the complex I and IV enzyme activity the value of sequencing in the affected tissue muscle, and not only in blood, all mitochondrial tRNA genes including those not commonly affected, such as in this case mt tRNA(Asp).

  4. A rapid and sensitive method to detect siRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage in vivo using 5' RACE and a molecular beacon probe.

    PubMed

    Lasham, Annette; Herbert, Mike; Coppieters 't Wallant, Natacha; Patel, Rachna; Feng, Sheryl; Eszes, Marika; Cao, Helen; Reid, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Specific detection of mRNA cleavage by 5'RACE is the only method to confirm the knockdown of mRNA by RNA interference, but is rarely reported for in vivo studies. We have combined 5'-RNA-linker-mediated RACE (5'-RLM-RACE) with real-time PCR using a molecular beacon to develop a rapid and specific method termed MBRACE, which we have used to detect small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced cleavage of ApoB, RRM1 and YBX1 transcripts in vitro, and ApoB in vivo. When RNA from siRNA-transfected cells was used for 5'-RLM-RACE and a cleavage site-specific molecular beacon probe was included in subsequent real-time PCR analysis, the specific mRNA cleavage product was detected. Detection of siRNA-mediated cleavage was also observed when RNA from mouse liver following administration of ApoB-specific siRNA was analysed, even in cases where ApoB knockdown measured by real-time PCR was <10%. With its sensitivity and specificity, this variation on the 5'RACE method should prove a useful tool to detect mRNA cleavage and corroborate knockdown studies following siRNA use in vivo.

  5. Simple methods for the 3' biotinylation of RNA.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Bodo; Wahle, Elmar

    2014-03-01

    Biotinylation of RNA allows its tight coupling to streptavidin and is thus useful for many types of experiments, e.g., pull-downs. Here we describe three simple techniques for biotinylating the 3' ends of RNA molecules generated by chemical or enzymatic synthesis. First, extension with either the Schizosaccharomyces pombe noncanonical poly(A) polymerase Cid1 or Escherichia coli poly(A) polymerase and N6-biotin-ATP is simple, efficient, and generally applicable independently of the 3'-end sequences of the RNA molecule to be labeled. However, depending on the enzyme and the reaction conditions, several or many biotinylated nucleotides are incorporated. Second, conditions are reported under which splint-dependent ligation by T4 DNA ligase can be used to join biotinylated and, presumably, other chemically modified DNA oligonucleotides to RNA 3' ends even if these are heterogeneous as is typical for products of enzymatic synthesis. Third, we describe the use of 29 DNA polymerase for a template-directed fill-in reaction that uses biotin-dUTP and, thanks to the enzyme's proofreading activity, can cope with more extended 3' heterogeneities.

  6. Developmental changes in the activity of messenger RNA isolated from germinating castor bean endosperm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L M; Lord, J M

    1979-10-01

    The capacity of polyadenylated RNA from developing castor bean endosperm to program protein synthesis in a wheat germ cell-free translational system has been examined. Although the use of micrococcal nuclease-treated wheat germ extracts demonstrated a low but significant content of translatable mRNA in dry seeds, a large scale increase in total translational capacity was observed during germination. The cellular content of translatable mRNA peaked on the 4th day of germination and subsequently declined. It is concluded that protein synthesis in castor bean endosperm cells during germination is directed by newly transcribed mRNA.

  7. RNA-Based Methods Increase the Detection of Fecal Bacteria and Fecal Identifiers in Environmental Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the use of qPCR RNA-based methods in the detection of fecal bacteria in environmental waters. We showed that RNA methods can increase the detection of fecal bacteria in multiple water matrices. The data suggest that this is a viable alternative for the detection of a...

  8. Direct PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from single microbial cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg using laser microdissection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihara, Katsuhiko; Niki, Hironori; Baba, Tomoya

    2011-09-01

    Here, we describe a technique that allows the genetic linage analysis of 16S rRNA genes in bacteria observed under a microscope. The technique includes the isolation of microbial cells using a laser microdissection microscope, lysis of the cells, and amplification of the 16S rRNA genes in the isolated cells without interference by bacterial DNA contamination from the experimental environment or reagents. Using this technique, we successfully determined 15 16S rRNA gene sequences in cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg. These sequences showed 94%-100% identity to their closest strains, which included bacteria that occur in aqueous, marine, and soil environments.

  9. Genotypic heterogeneity based on 18S-rRNA gene sequences among Acanthamoeba isolates from clinical samples in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Cave, David; D' Alfonso, Rossella; Dussey Comlavi, Kodjo A; D' Orazi, Carlo; Monno, Rosa; Berrilli, Federica

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is an ocular disease caused by members of a genus of free-living amoebae and it is associated predominantly with contact lens (CL) use. This study reports 55 cases of AK diagnosed in Italy. Genotype identification was carried out by PCR assay followed by sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene using the genus specific primers JDP1 and JDP2. Genotype assignment was based on phenetic analysis of the ASA.S1 subset of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. The material has been collected at the Polyclinic Tor Vergata of Rome for a total of 19 isolates and at the Polyclinic Hospital of Bari (36 isolates). Thirty-three out of the 55 genetically characterized isolates were assigned to the genotype T4. Ten isolates were identified as belonging to the genotype T15 thus confirming the first association between the genotype T15 and human amoebic keratitis previously described from the same area. We underline the occurrence of the genotype T3 and T11 identified for the first time in the country.

  10. Methods for Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Cases of Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, Patrick; Kuhnert, Peter; Hüssy, Daniela; Schaellibaum, Melchior

    2003-01-01

    A total of 272 staphylococcal isolates from cases of bovine mastitis (159 Staphylococcus aureus) belonging to 12 different species were identified with ID32 STAPH galleries, and 51 of them were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequencing. The same isolates were examined for their hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar, DNase activity, and coagulase activity and with two rapid identification kits (Slidex Staph Plus kit and RAPIDEC Staph from Bio-Merieux). The results of this study confirm those obtained by other groups with hemolysis, DNase, and coagulase. Only 50% of S. aureus isolates from mastitis cases show coagulase activity after 4 h of incubation, and a 24-h incubation is necessary for the full sensitivity of this test. In contrast to results from other studies with human isolates, the Slidex Staph Plus kit was not sensitive enough for the identification of S. aureus from bovine mastitis samples. The aurease test of the RAPIDEC Staph kit showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Used in conjunction with hemolysis patterns, the RAPIDEC Staph kit is therefore very well adapted to rapid, efficient, and cost-effective identification of S. aureus in cultures from bovine mastitis samples. Sequencing of rrs genes also proved very efficient in identifying the Staphylococcus species encountered in these samples and confirming phenotypical identification results with unsatisfactory scores. With continuously improving technologies and decreasing costs, genetic identification methods like rrs gene sequencing will soon find a place in routine veterinary diagnostics. PMID:12574280

  11. A Tool Preference Choice Method for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by SVM with Statistical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Chiou-Yi; Yang, Chang-Biau; Chang, Chia-Hung; Tseng, Chiou-Ting; Chen, Hung-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The Prediction of RNA secondary structures has drawn much attention from both biologists and computer scientists. Many useful tools have been developed for this purpose. These tools have their individual strengths and weaknesses. As a result, based on support vector machines (SVM), we propose a tool choice method which integrates three prediction tools: pknotsRG, RNAStructure, and NUPACK. Our method first extracts features from the target RNA sequence, and adopts two information-theoretic feature selection methods for feature ranking. We propose a method to combine feature selection and classifier fusion in an incremental manner. Our test data set contains 720 RNA sequences, where 225 pseudoknotted RNA sequences are obtained from PseudoBase, and 495 nested RNA sequences are obtained from RNA SSTRAND. The method serves as a preprocessing way in analyzing RNA sequences before the RNA secondary structure prediction tools are employed. In addition, the performance of various configurations is subject to statistical tests to examine their significance. The best base-pair accuracy achieved is 75.5%, which is obtained by the proposed incremental method, and is significantly higher than 68.8%, which is associated with the best predictor, pknotsRG. PMID:23641141

  12. A rapid and sensitive non-radioactive method applicable for genome-wide analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in small RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingyan; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K

    2013-04-01

    Conventional isolation and detection methods for small RNAs from yeast cells have been designed for a limited number of samples. In order to be able to conduct a genome-wide assessment of how each gene product impacts upon small RNAs, we developed a rapid method for analysing small RNAs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type (wt) and mutants cells in the deletion and temperature-sensitive (ts) collections. Our method implements three optimized techniques: a procedure for growing small yeast cultures in 96-deepwell plates, a fast procedure for small RNA isolation from the plates, and a sensitive non-radioactive northern method for RNA detection. The RNA isolation procedure requires only 4 h for processing 96 samples, is highly reproducible and yields RNA of good quality and quantity. The non-radioactive northern method employs digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled DNA probes and chemiluminescence. It detects femtomole levels of small RNAs within 1 min exposure time. We minimized the processing time for large-scale analysis and optimized the stripping and reprobing procedures for analyses of multiple RNAs from a single membrane. The method described is rapid, sensitive, safe and cost-effective for genome-wide screens of novel genes involved in the biogenesis, subcellular trafficking and stability of small RNAs. Moreover, it will be useful to educational laboratory class venues and to research institutions with limited access to radioisotopes or robots.

  13. A sensitive method for isolating Fusobacterium necrophorum from faeces.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. R.; Barton, S. A.; Wallace, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    The isolation of Fusobacterium necrophorum present in small numbers in heavily contaminated material such as faeces or soil is hampered by the lack of an efficient selective medium and by the high minimum infective dose of the organism. A sensitive method for the detection and isolation of faecal strains of F. necrophorum type A was based on the subcutaneous injection of faeces, suspended (5% w/v) in broth culture of Actinomyces (Corynebacterium) pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus to increase fusobacterial infectivity, into mice pretreated with clostridial antitoxins. When necrobacillosis developed F. necrophorum was identified microscopically in tissue from the advancing edge of the lesion and isolated on a partly selective medium. The enhancement of fusobacterial infectivity produced by A. pyogenes and by S. aureus was high, but the latter was slightly the more efficient, enabling as few as 80 F. necrophorum organisms/g of faeces to be detected. Use of the method showed that 3 of 16 wallabies had F. necrophorum in their faeces at the time of examination. Numerous epidemiological applications are suggested. PMID:2019300

  14. Effect of RNA Integrity Determined With the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer on Bacterial RNA Quantification with RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA integrity is critical for successful RNA quantification. The level of integrity required differs among sources and extraction procedures and has not been determined for bacterial RNA. Three RNA isolation methods were evaluated for their ability to produce high quality RNA from D. dadantii. The i...

  15. Advances in Isolation Methods for Spermatogonial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Sun, Jin; Zou, Kang

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell research has led to many remarkable achievements in recent years, but progress in the study of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) has been relatively slow, partly due to the slow development of techniques for spermatogonial stem cell isolation. The major accomplishments of SSC sorting and identification occurred approximately 10 years ago, and since that time, these techniques have been widely used without major improvements. In this article, we briefly introduce the biological properties of SSCs before reviewing the development of sorting techniques for SSCs in the past decades. We then summarize recent achievements in SSC sorting and finally discuss the advantages and disadvantages of SSC isolation methods, to provide new insight into techniques and research related to spermatogonial stem cells and promote the development of reproductive biology.

  16. Prediction of MicroRNA-Disease Associations Based on Social Network Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Hong, Qingqi; Lin, Ziyu; Wu, Yun; Shi, Hua; Ju, Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute an important class of noncoding, single-stranded, ~22 nucleotide long RNA molecules encoded by endogenous genes. They play an important role in regulating gene transcription and the regulation of normal development. MicroRNAs can be associated with disease; however, only a few microRNA-disease associations have been confirmed by traditional experimental approaches. We introduce two methods to predict microRNA-disease association. The first method, KATZ, focuses on integrating the social network analysis method with machine learning and is based on networks derived from known microRNA-disease associations, disease-disease associations, and microRNA-microRNA associations. The other method, CATAPULT, is a supervised machine learning method. We applied the two methods to 242 known microRNA-disease associations and evaluated their performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and 3-fold cross-validation. Experiments proved that our methods outperformed the state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Prediction of MicroRNA-Disease Associations Based on Social Network Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Hong, Qingqi; Lin, Ziyu; Wu, Yun; Shi, Hua; Ju, Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute an important class of noncoding, single-stranded, ~22 nucleotide long RNA molecules encoded by endogenous genes. They play an important role in regulating gene transcription and the regulation of normal development. MicroRNAs can be associated with disease; however, only a few microRNA-disease associations have been confirmed by traditional experimental approaches. We introduce two methods to predict microRNA-disease association. The first method, KATZ, focuses on integrating the social network analysis method with machine learning and is based on networks derived from known microRNA-disease associations, disease-disease associations, and microRNA-microRNA associations. The other method, CATAPULT, is a supervised machine learning method. We applied the two methods to 242 known microRNA-disease associations and evaluated their performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and 3-fold cross-validation. Experiments proved that our methods outperformed the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26273645

  18. Low prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates with A2143G point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene in North India.

    PubMed

    Gehlot, Valentina; Mahant, Shweta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish Kumar; Das, Kunal; Alam, Jawed; Ghosh, Prachetash; Das, Rajashree

    2016-09-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin is associated with a single base substitution in the 23S rRNA gene. In this study, clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori isolates were analysed for the presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations. H. pylori were isolated from 68 patients suffering from various gastroduodenal diseases in North India. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the agar dilution method, and point mutations in clarithromycin-resistant strains were identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing. Clarithromycin resistance was observed in 11.8% (8/68) of the H. pylori isolates in North India. The A2143G point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene was found in 87.5% (7/8) of the clarithromycin-resistant strains, and the A2142G mutation in association with the T2182C mutation was found in 12.5% (1/8). In conclusion, the continued high prevalence of clarithromycin-sensitive H. pylori strains (88.2%) observed in this study allows the use of the triple-therapy regimen for the treatment of H. pylori infection in this region. Surveillance studies need to be conducted at regular intervals for clarithromycin resistance in the population. To our knowledge, this is the first study in India to report that point mutations at position A2143G and at A2142G in association with T2182C are associated with clarithromycin resistance, confirming reports from other parts of the world. PMID:27530837

  19. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  20. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products. PMID:26898909

  1. Evolutionary and phenotypic analysis of live virus isolates suggests arthropod origin of a pathogenic RNA virus family

    PubMed Central

    Marklewitz, Marco; Zirkel, Florian; Kurth, Andreas; Drosten, Christian; Junglen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of arboviruses are unknown because their typical dual host tropism is paraphyletic within viral families. Here we studied one of the most diversified and medically relevant RNA virus families, the Bunyaviridae, in which four of five established genera are transmitted by arthropods. We define two cardinally novel bunyavirus groups based on live isolation of 26 viral strains from mosquitoes (Jonchet virus [JONV], eight strains; Ferak virus [FERV], 18 strains). Both viruses were incapable of replicating at vertebrate-typical temperatures but replicated efficiently in insect cells. Replication involved formation of virion-sense RNA (vRNA) and mRNA, including cap-snatching activity. SDS/PAGE, mass spectrometry, and Edman degradation identified translation products corresponding to virion-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein (RdRp), glycoprotein precursor protein, glycoproteins Gn and Gc, as well as putative nonstructural proteins NSs and NSm. Distinct virion morphologies suggested ancient evolutionary divergence, with bunyavirus-typical morphology for FERV (spheres of 60–120 nm) as opposed to an unusual bimorphology for JONV (tubular virions of 60 × 600 nm and spheres of 80 nm). Both viruses were genetically equidistant from all other bunyaviruses, showing <15% amino acid identity in the RdRp palm domain. Both had different and unique conserved genome termini, as in separate bunyavirus genera. JONV and FERV define two novel sister taxons to the superclade of orthobunyaviruses, tospoviruses, and hantaviruses. Phylogenetic ancestral state reconstruction with probabilistic hypothesis testing suggested ancestral associations with arthropods at deep nodes throughout the bunyavirus tree. Our findings suggest an arthropod origin of bunyaviruses. PMID:26038576

  2. An efficient RNA extraction method for estimating gut microbial diversity by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seungha; Denman, Stuart E; Morrison, Mark; Yu, Zhongtang; McSweeney, Chris S

    2009-05-01

    An extraction method was developed to recover high-quality RNA from rumen digesta and mouse feces for phylogenetic analysis of metabolically active members of the gut microbial community. Four extraction methods were tested on different amounts of the same samples and compared for efficiency of recovery and purity of RNA. Trizol extraction after bead beating produced a higher quantity and quality of RNA than a similar method using phenol/chloroform. Dissociation solution produced a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in RNA recovery compared with phosphate-buffered saline during the dissociation of microorganisms from rumen digesta or fecal particles. The identity of metabolically active bacteria in the samples was analyzed by sequencing 87 amplicons produced using bacteria-specific 16S rDNA primers, with cDNA synthesized from the extracted RNA as the template. Amplicons representing the major phyla encountered in the rumen (Firmicutes, 43.7%; Proteobacteria, 28.7%; Bacteroidetes, 25.3%; Spirochea, 1.1%, and Synergistes, 1.1%) were recovered, showing that development of the RNA extraction method enables RNA-based analysis of metabolically active bacterial groups from the rumen and other environments. Interestingly, in rumen samples, about 30% of the sequenced random 16S rRNA amplicons were related to the Proteobacteria, providing the first evidence that this group may have greater importance in rumen metabolism than previously attributed by DNA-based analysis.

  3. A method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Anatoly; Pyrkova, Anna; Niyazova, Raigul

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of miRNA sequences is an important problem in molecular genetics associated cellular biology. Thousands of such sequences are known today through advancement in sophisticated molecular tools, sequencing techniques, computational resources and rule based mathematical models. Analysis of such large-scale miRNA sequences for inferring patterns towards deducing cellular function is a great challenge in modern molecular biology. Therefore, it is of interest to develop mathematical models specific for miRNA sequences. The process is to group (cluster) such miRNA sequences using well-defined known features. We describe a method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming. Subsequently, we illustrated the utility of the model using a dendrogram (a tree diagram) for publically known A.thaliana miRNA nucleotide sequences towards the inference of observed conserved patterns. PMID:27212839

  4. A method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming

    PubMed Central

    Ivashchenko, Anatoly; Pyrkova, Anna; Niyazova, Raigul

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of miRNA sequences is an important problem in molecular genetics associated cellular biology. Thousands of such sequences are known today through advancement in sophisticated molecular tools, sequencing techniques, computational resources and rule based mathematical models. Analysis of such large-scale miRNA sequences for inferring patterns towards deducing cellular function is a great challenge in modern molecular biology. Therefore, it is of interest to develop mathematical models specific for miRNA sequences. The process is to group (cluster) such miRNA sequences using well-defined known features. We describe a method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming. Subsequently, we illustrated the utility of the model using a dendrogram (a tree diagram) for publically known A.thaliana miRNA nucleotide sequences towards the inference of observed conserved patterns PMID:27212839

  5. Towards next generation CHO cell biology: Bioinformatics methods for RNA-Seq-based expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Monger, Craig; Kelly, Paul S; Gallagher, Clair; Clynes, Martin; Barron, Niall; Clarke, Colin

    2015-07-01

    High throughput, cost effective next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled the publication of genome sequences for Cricetulus griseus and several Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. RNA-Seq, the utilization of NGS technology to study the transcriptome, is expanding our understanding of the CHO cell biological system in areas ranging from the analysis of transcription start sites to the discovery of small noncoding RNAs. The analysis of RNA-Seq data, often comprised of several million short reads, presents a considerable challenge. If the CHO cell biology field is to fully exploit the potential of RNA-Seq, the development of robust data analysis pipelines is critical. In this manuscript, we outline bioinformatics approaches for the stages of a typical RNA-Seq expression profiling experiment including quality control, pre-processing, alignment and de novo transcriptome assembly. Algorithms for the analysis of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression as well as methods for the detection of alternative splicing from RNA-Seq data are also presented. At this relatively early stage of Cricetulus griseus genome assembly and annotation, it is likely that a combination of isoform deconvolution and raw count based methods will provide the most complete picture of transcript expression patterns in CHO cell RNA-Seq experiments. PMID:26058739

  6. Towards next generation CHO cell biology: Bioinformatics methods for RNA-Seq-based expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Monger, Craig; Kelly, Paul S; Gallagher, Clair; Clynes, Martin; Barron, Niall; Clarke, Colin

    2015-07-01

    High throughput, cost effective next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled the publication of genome sequences for Cricetulus griseus and several Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. RNA-Seq, the utilization of NGS technology to study the transcriptome, is expanding our understanding of the CHO cell biological system in areas ranging from the analysis of transcription start sites to the discovery of small noncoding RNAs. The analysis of RNA-Seq data, often comprised of several million short reads, presents a considerable challenge. If the CHO cell biology field is to fully exploit the potential of RNA-Seq, the development of robust data analysis pipelines is critical. In this manuscript, we outline bioinformatics approaches for the stages of a typical RNA-Seq expression profiling experiment including quality control, pre-processing, alignment and de novo transcriptome assembly. Algorithms for the analysis of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression as well as methods for the detection of alternative splicing from RNA-Seq data are also presented. At this relatively early stage of Cricetulus griseus genome assembly and annotation, it is likely that a combination of isoform deconvolution and raw count based methods will provide the most complete picture of transcript expression patterns in CHO cell RNA-Seq experiments.

  7. Preparation of SiO2 nanowires from rice husks by hydrothermal method and the RNA purification performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meiyan; Cao, Jianping; Meng, Xing; Liu, Yangsi; Ke, Wei; Wang, Jialiang; Sun, Ling

    2016-10-01

    In this study, SiO2 nanowires were prepared by using rice husks as silicon source via a hydrothermal method. The microstructure, thermal stability and morphology of SiO2 nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscope. SiO2 nanowires with a diameter of 30-100 nm were obtained and the formation mechanism of SiO2 nanowires during the hydrothermal reaction was proposed. The SiO2 nanowires were introduced into membrane spin columns to isolate RNA and the values of A260/280 and A260/230 were 2.0-2.1 and 1.8-2.0, respectively, which shows the SiO2 nanowires were effective for RNA purification.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships. PMID:27149706

  10. Isolation and characterization of RNA polymerase rpoB mutations that alter transcription slippage during elongation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan Ning; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Hui, Monica; Court, Carolyn; Chen, Shuo; Court, Donald L; Strathern, Jeffrey; Jin, Ding Jun; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2013-01-25

    Transcription fidelity is critical for maintaining the accurate flow of genetic information. The study of transcription fidelity has been limited because the intrinsic error rate of transcription is obscured by the higher error rate of translation, making identification of phenotypes associated with transcription infidelity challenging. Slippage of elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) on homopolymeric A/T tracts in DNA represents a special type of transcription error leading to disruption of open reading frames in Escherichia coli mRNA. However, the regions in RNAP involved in elongation slippage and its molecular mechanism are unknown. We constructed an A/T tract that is out of frame relative to a downstream lacZ gene on the chromosome to examine transcriptional slippage during elongation. Further, we developed a genetic system that enabled us for the first time to isolate and characterize E. coli RNAP mutants with altered transcriptional slippage in vivo. We identified several amino acid residues in the β subunit of RNAP that affect slippage in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, these highly clustered residues are located near the RNA strand of the RNA-DNA hybrid in the elongation complex. Our E. coli study complements an accompanying study of slippage by yeast RNAP II and provides the basis for future studies on the mechanism of transcription fidelity. PMID:23223236

  11. Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation: Different method matters?

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Chen, Yuanhong; Zhang, Fuchuang; Wu, Anqi; Shi, Yuanshuo; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Daniel, Benjamin J; Huang, Changjiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation has been routinely used in many laboratories, yet direct comparison among different methods is lacking. In this study, we compared two frequently used digestion methods and three sets of frequently used surface markers for their efficiency in enriching mammary stem and progenitor cells in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J and FVB. Our findings revealed that the slow overnight digestion method using gentle collagenase/hyaluronidase could be easily adopted and yielded reliable and consistent results in different batches of animals. In contrast, the different fast digestion protocols, as described in published studies, yielded high percent of non-epithelial cells with very few basal epithelial cells liberated in our hands. The three sets of markers tested in our hands reveal rather equally efficiency in separating luminal and basal cells if same fluorochrome conjugations were used. However, the tendency of non-epithelial cell inclusion in the basal cell gate was highest in samples profiled by CD24/CD29 and lowest in samples profiled by CD49f/EpCAM, this is especially true in mammary cells isolated from C57BL/6J mice. This finding will have significant implication when sorted basal cells are used for subsequent gene expression analysis. PMID:26933638

  12. Simultaneous Quantification of Methylated Cytidine and Adenosine in Cellular and Tissue RNA by Nano-Flow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with the Stable Isotope-dilution Method

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijuan; Amato, Nicolas J.; Wang, Pengcheng; McGowan, Sara J.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-01-01

    The rising interest in understanding the functions, regulation and maintenance of the epitranscriptome calls for robust and accurate analytical methods for the identification and quantification of post-transcriptionally modified nucleosides in RNA. Mono-methylations of cytidine and adenosine are common post-transcriptional modifications in RNA. Herein, we developed an LC-MS/MS/MS coupled with the stable isotope-dilution method for the sensitive and accurate quantifications of 5-methylcytidine (m5C), 2′-O-methylcytidine (Cm), N6-methyladenosine (m6A) and 2′-O-methyladenosine (Am) in RNA isolated from mammalian cells and tissues. Our results showed that the distributions of the four methylated nucleosides are tissue-specific. In addition, the 2′-O-methylated ribonucleosides (Cm and Am) are present at higher levels than the corresponding methylated nucleobase products (m5C and m6A) in total RNA isolated from mouse brain, pancreas and spleen, but not mouse heart. We also found that the levels of m5C, Cm and Am are significantly lower (by 6.5-43 fold) in mRNA than in total RNA isolated from HEK293T cells, whereas the level of m6A was slightly higher (by 1.6 fold) in mRNA than in total RNA. The availability of this analytical method, in combination with genetic manipulation, may facilitate the future discovery of proteins involved in the maintenance and regulation of these RNA modifications. PMID:26158405

  13. [Isolation and in vitro translation of polysomes and the RNA matrix from gibberellic acid-treated etiolated dwarf pea shoots].

    PubMed

    Kilev, S N; Evtushenko, E V; Chekurov, V M; Mertvetsov, N P

    1983-08-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on the size of polysomes (PS) and on the specific translation activity of epicotyl PS of two dwarf pea varieties was studied. It was shown that GA does not significantly alter the specific translation activity of PS and of mRNA isolated from dwarf pea epicotyl PS. Electrophoretic separation of the polypeptides synthesized in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system in PS of control and GA-treated shoots revealed no differences between them. Some minor qualitative and quantitative differences in the protein composition of the cytoplasm of control and hormone-treated shoots were found. Possible influence of GA on the composition of a definite class of mRNA and on posttranslational processing of plant proteins is discussed. PMID:6194827

  14. Isolation of ribosome bound nascent polypeptides in vitro to identify translational pause sites along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sujata S; Komar, Anton A

    2012-01-01

    The rate of translational elongation is non-uniform. mRNA secondary structure, codon usage and mRNA associated proteins may alter ribosome movement on the message(for review see 1). However, it's now widely accepted that synonymous codon usage is the primary cause of non-uniform translational elongation rates(1). Synonymous codons are not used with identical frequency. A bias exists in the use of synonymous codons with some codons used more frequently than others(2). Codon bias is organism as well as tissue specific(2,3). Moreover, frequency of codon usage is directly proportional to the concentrations of cognate tRNAs(4). Thus, a frequently used codon will have higher multitude of corresponding tRNAs, which further implies that a frequent codon will be translated faster than an infrequent one. Thus, regions on mRNA enriched in rare codons (potential pause sites) will as a rule slow down ribosome movement on the message and cause accumulation of nascent peptides of the respective sizes(5-8). These pause sites can have functional impact on the protein expression, mRNA stability and protein folding(for review see 9). Indeed, it was shown that alleviation of such pause sites can alter ribosome movement on mRNA and subsequently may affect the efficiency of co-translational (in vivo) protein folding(1,7,10,11). To understand the process of protein folding in vivo, in the cell, that is ultimately coupled to the process of protein synthesis it is essential to gain comprehensive insights into the impact of codon usage/tRNA content on the movement of ribosomes along mRNA during translational elongation. Here we describe a simple technique that can be used to locate major translation pause sites for a given mRNA translated in various cell-free systems(6-8). This procedure is based on isolation of nascent polypeptides accumulating on ribosomes during in vitro translation of a target mRNA. The rationale is that at low-frequency codons, the increase in the residence time of the

  15. Can we observe changes in mRNA “state”? Overview of methods to study mRNA interactions with regulatory proteins relevant in cancer related processes

    PubMed Central

    Zurla, C.; Jung, J.; Santangelo, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) regulate the editing, localization, stabilization, translation, and degradation of ribonucleic acids (RNA) through their interactions with specific cis-acting elements within target RNAs. Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are directly involved in the control of the immune response and stress response and their alterations play a crucial role in cancer related processes. In this review, we discuss mRNAs and RNA binding proteins relevant to tumorigenesis, current methodologies for detecting RNA interactions, and last, we describe a novel method to detect such interactions, which combines peptide modified, RNA imaging probes (FMTRIPs) with proximity ligation (PLA) and rolling circle amplification (RCA). This assay detects native RNA in a sequence specific and single RNA sensitive manner, and PLA allows for the quantification and localization of protein–mRNA interactions with single-interaction sensitivity in situ. PMID:26605378

  16. Genomic Analysis and Isolation of RNA Polymerase II Dependent Promoters from Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Bleckmann, Maren; Fritz, Markus H-Y; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Schürig, Margitta; Geffers, Robert; Benes, Vladimir; Besir, Hüseyin; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2015-01-01

    The Baculoviral Expression Vector System (BEVS) is the most commonly used method for high expression of recombinant protein in insect cells. Nevertheless, expression of some target proteins--especially those entering the secretory pathway--provides a severe challenge for the baculovirus infected insect cells, due to the reorganisation of intracellular compounds upon viral infection. Therefore, alternative strategies for recombinant protein production in insect cells like transient plasmid-based expression or stable expression cell lines are becoming more popular. However, the major bottleneck of these systems is the lack of strong endogenous polymerase II dependent promoters, as the strong baculoviral p10 and polH promoters used in BEVS are only functional in presence of the viral transcription machinery during the late phase of infection. In this work we present a draft genome and a transcriptome analysis of Sf21 cells for the identification of the first known endogenous Spodoptera frugiperda promoters. Therefore, putative promoter sequences were identified and selected because of high mRNA level or in analogy to other strong promoters in other eukaryotic organism. The chosen endogenous Sf21 promoters were compared to early viral promoters for their efficiency to trigger eGFP expression using transient plasmid based transfection in a BioLector Microfermentation system. Furthermore, promoter activity was not only shown in Sf21 cells but also in Hi5 cells. The novel endogenous Sf21 promoters were ranked according to their activity and expand the small pool of available promoters for stable insect cell line development and transient plasmid expression in insect cells. The best promoter was used to improve plasmid based transient transfection in insect cells substantially.

  17. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-01-01

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses. PMID:26782533

  18. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-12-29

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses.

  19. Pepino mosaic virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase POL Domain Is a Hypersensitive Response-Like Elicitor Shared by Necrotic and Mild Isolates.

    PubMed

    Sempere, Raquel N; Gómez-Aix, Cristina; Ruíz-Ramón, Fabiola; Gómez, Pedro; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging pathogen that represents a serious threat to tomato production worldwide. PepMV-induced diseases manifest with a wide range of symptoms, including systemic necrosis. Our results showed that PepMV accumulation depends on the virus isolate, tomato cultivar, and environmental conditions, and associates with the development of necrosis. Substitution of lysine for glutamic acid at position 67 in the triple gene block 3 (TGB3) protein, previously described as a necrosis determinant, led to increased virus accumulation and was necessary but not sufficient to induce systemic necrosis. Systemic necrosis both in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana shared hypersensitive response (HR) features, allowing the assessment of the role of different genomic regions on necrosis induction. Overexpression of both TGB3 and the polymerase domain (POL) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) resulted in necrosis, although only local expression of POL triggered HR-like symptoms. Our results also indicated that the necrosis-eliciting activity of POL resides in its highly conserved "palm" domain, and that necrosis was jasmonic acid-dependent but not salicylic acid-dependent. Altogether, our data suggest that the RdRp-POL domain plays an important role in PepMV necrosis induction, with necrosis development depending on the virus accumulation level, which can be modulated by the nature of TGB3, host genotype and environmental conditions. PMID:26667188

  20. Pepino mosaic virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase POL Domain Is a Hypersensitive Response-Like Elicitor Shared by Necrotic and Mild Isolates.

    PubMed

    Sempere, Raquel N; Gómez-Aix, Cristina; Ruíz-Ramón, Fabiola; Gómez, Pedro; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging pathogen that represents a serious threat to tomato production worldwide. PepMV-induced diseases manifest with a wide range of symptoms, including systemic necrosis. Our results showed that PepMV accumulation depends on the virus isolate, tomato cultivar, and environmental conditions, and associates with the development of necrosis. Substitution of lysine for glutamic acid at position 67 in the triple gene block 3 (TGB3) protein, previously described as a necrosis determinant, led to increased virus accumulation and was necessary but not sufficient to induce systemic necrosis. Systemic necrosis both in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana shared hypersensitive response (HR) features, allowing the assessment of the role of different genomic regions on necrosis induction. Overexpression of both TGB3 and the polymerase domain (POL) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) resulted in necrosis, although only local expression of POL triggered HR-like symptoms. Our results also indicated that the necrosis-eliciting activity of POL resides in its highly conserved "palm" domain, and that necrosis was jasmonic acid-dependent but not salicylic acid-dependent. Altogether, our data suggest that the RdRp-POL domain plays an important role in PepMV necrosis induction, with necrosis development depending on the virus accumulation level, which can be modulated by the nature of TGB3, host genotype and environmental conditions.

  1. Direct-methods structure determination of a trypanosome RNA-editing substrate fragment with translational pseudosymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Mooers, Blaine H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Using direct methods starting from random phases, the crystal structure of a 32-base-pair RNA (675 non-H RNA atoms in the asymmetric unit) was determined using only the native diffraction data (resolution limit 1.05 Å) and the computer program SIR2014. The almost three helical turns of the RNA in the asymmetric unit introduced partial or imperfect translational pseudosymmetry (TPS) that modulated the intensities when averaged by the l Miller indices but still escaped automated detection. Almost six times as many random phase sets had to be tested on average to reach a correct structure compared with a similar-sized RNA hairpin (27 nucleotides, 580 non-H RNA atoms) without TPS. More sensitive methods are needed for the automated detection of partial TPS. PMID:27050127

  2. A Meta-Path-Based Prediction Method for Human miRNA-Target Association

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cong; Ding, Pingjian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expressing, and the perturbed miRNAs are often associated with development and tumorigenesis as they have effects on their target mRNA. Predicting potential miRNA-target associations from multiple types of genomic data is a considerable problem in the bioinformatics research. However, most of the existing methods did not fully use the experimentally validated miRNA-mRNA interactions. Here, we developed RMLM and RMLMSe to predict the relationship between miRNAs and their targets. RMLM and RMLMSe are global approaches as they can reconstruct the missing associations for all the miRNA-target simultaneously and RMLMSe demonstrates that the integration of sequence information can improve the performance of RMLM. In RMLM, we use RM measure to evaluate different relatedness between miRNA and its target based on different meta-paths; logistic regression and MLE method are employed to estimate the weight of different meta-paths. In RMLMSe, sequence information is utilized to improve the performance of RMLM. Here, we carry on fivefold cross validation and pathway enrichment analysis to prove the performance of our methods. The fivefold experiments show that our methods have higher AUC scores compared with other methods and the integration of sequence information can improve the performance of miRNA-target association prediction. PMID:27703979

  3. Analysis of partial sequences of genes coding for 16S rRNA of actinomycetes isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia nodules in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Niner, B M; Brandt, J P; Villegas, M; Marshall, C R; Hirsch, A M; Valdés, M

    1996-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria isolated from surface-sterilized nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia trees in México were capable of reducing acetylene, a diagnostic test for nitrogenase, but were unable to nodulate their host. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that the Mexican isolates are not Frankia strains but members of a novel clade. PMID:8702297

  4. Genetic Characterization of Clinical Acanthamoeba Isolates from Japan using Nuclear and Mitochondrial Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Yagita, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Hussein, Amjad I.A.; Matsumura, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Because of an increased number of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) along with associated disease burdens, medical professionals have become more aware of this pathogen in recent years. In this study, by analyzing both the nuclear 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci, 27 clinical Acanthamoeba strains that caused AK in Japan were classified into 3 genotypes, T3 (3 strains), T4 (23 strains), and T5 (one strain). Most haplotypes were identical to the reference haplotypes reported from all over the world, and thus no specificity of the haplotype distribution in Japan was found. The T4 sub-genotype analysis using the 16S rRNA gene locus also revealed a clear sub-conformation within the T4 cluster, and lead to the recognition of a new sub-genotype T4i, in addition to the previously reported sub-genotypes T4a-T4h. Furthermore, 9 out of 23 strains in the T4 genotype were identified to a specific haplotype (AF479533), which seems to be a causal haplotype of AK. While heterozygous nuclear haplotypes were observed from 2 strains, the mitochondrial haplotypes were homozygous as T4 genotype in the both strains, and suggested a possibility of nuclear hybridization (mating reproduction) between different strains in Acanthamoeba. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci of Acanthamoeba spp. possess different unique characteristics usable for the genotyping analyses, and those specific features could contribute to the establishment of molecular taxonomy for the species complex of Acanthamoeba. PMID:24039282

  5. DNA and RNA Synthesis in Animal Cells in Culture--Methods for Use in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godsell, P. M.; Balls, M.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the experimental procedures used for detecting DNA and RNA synthesis in xenopus cells by autoradiography. The method described is suitable for senior high school laboratory classes or biology projects, if supervised by a teacher qualified to handle radioisotopes. (JR)

  6. Method for localizing and isolating an errant process step

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Ferrell, Regina K.

    2003-01-01

    A method for localizing and isolating an errant process includes the steps of retrieving from a defect image database a selection of images each image having image content similar to image content extracted from a query image depicting a defect, each image in the selection having corresponding defect characterization data. A conditional probability distribution of the defect having occurred in a particular process step is derived from the defect characterization data. A process step as a highest probable source of the defect according to the derived conditional probability distribution is then identified. A method for process step defect identification includes the steps of characterizing anomalies in a product, the anomalies detected by an imaging system. A query image of a product defect is then acquired. A particular characterized anomaly is then correlated with the query image. An errant process step is then associated with the correlated image.

  7. Characterizing a novel and sensitive method to measure dsRNA in soil.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Joshua R; Zapata, Fatima; Dubelman, Samuel; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Jensen, Peter D; Levine, Steven L

    2016-10-01

    Performing environmental assessments for double-stranded RNA-based agricultural products require the development of sensitive and selective methods to measure biodegradation rates of dsRNAs. We developed and characterized a novel analytical procedure that uses a molecular hybridization assay (QuantiGene(®)) to accurately measure dsRNA extracted from diverse soils. In this report, we utilize this method to demonstrate that two dsRNAs with distinct size, structure, and sequence degrade rapidly in soil with indistinguishable kinetics.

  8. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  9. A METHOD FOR DETERMINING TOTAL PROTEIN OF ISOLATED CELLULAR ELEMENTS AND CORRESPONDING TRITIUM RADIOACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Edward

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the microanalysis of protein, obtained from isolated tissue elements, in the range of 500 µµg-500 mµg. The method entails solubilization of cellular protein with phosphoric acid and heat after extraction of acid-soluble compounds, lipids, and RNA. A procedure for the extraction and recovery of cellular RNA by the use of 40% trichloroacetic acid is presented. The solubilized protein, in the form of a microdroplet, is photomicrographed with monochromatic light at 230 mµ. Total density in the microdroplet is determined from calibrated photographic plates by microdensitometry, and is converted to protein mass by using an experimentally determined average specific absorbance value. A solubilized protein labeled with tritium can be recovered after photomicrography, combusted, and reduced to generate tritiated gas for high-efficiency tritium radiometry. Total protein was analyzed in (a) nerve cells of three different sizes from Deiters' nucleus of the rabbit; and the whole rod cell and rod cell nucleus of the rabbit retina. PMID:5664225

  10. A comprehensive comparison of general RNA–RNA interaction prediction methods

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Daniel; Meyer, Irmtraud M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA–RNA interactions are fast emerging as a major functional component in many newly discovered non-coding RNAs. Basepairing is believed to be a major contributor to the stability of these intermolecular interactions, much like intramolecular basepairs formed in RNA secondary structure. As such, using algorithms similar to those for predicting RNA secondary structure, computational methods have been recently developed for the prediction of RNA–RNA interactions. We provide the first comprehensive comparison comprising 14 methods that predict general intermolecular basepairs. To evaluate these, we compile an extensive data set of 54 experimentally confirmed fungal snoRNA–rRNA interactions and 102 bacterial sRNA–mRNA interactions. We test the performance accuracy of all methods, evaluating the effects of tool settings, sequence length, and multiple sequence alignment usage and quality. Our results show that—unlike for RNA secondary structure prediction—the overall best performing tools are non-comparative energy-based tools utilizing accessibility information that predict short interactions on this data set. Furthermore, we find that maintaining high accuracy across biologically different data sets and increasing input lengths remains a huge challenge, causing implications for de novo transcriptome-wide searches. Finally, we make our interaction data set publicly available for future development and benchmarking efforts. PMID:26673718

  11. Niemeyer Virus: A New Mimivirus Group A Isolate Harboring a Set of Duplicated Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Arantes, Thalita S.; Silva, Lorena C. F.; Assis, Felipe L.; Kroon, Erna G.; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that gene duplication/acquisition is a key factor for molecular evolution, being directly related to the emergence of new genetic variants. The importance of such phenomena can also be expanded to the viral world, with impacts on viral fitness and environmental adaptations. In this work we describe the isolation and characterization of Niemeyer virus, a new mimivirus isolate obtained from water samples of an urban lake in Brazil. Genomic data showed that Niemeyer harbors duplicated copies of three of its four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes (cysteinyl, methionyl, and tyrosyl RS). Gene expression analysis showed that such duplications allowed significantly increased expression of methionyl and tyrosyl aaRS mRNA by Niemeyer in comparison to APMV. Remarkably, phylogenetic data revealed that Niemeyer duplicated gene pairs are different, each one clustering with a different group of mimivirus strains. Taken together, our results raise new questions about the origins and selective pressures involving events of aaRS gain and loss among mimiviruses. PMID:26635738

  12. Simple method of isolating humic acids from organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, O.

    2009-04-01

    Humic substances particularly humic acids (HA) play a major role in soil conditioning e.g. erosion control, soil cation exchange capacity, complexation of heavy metal ions and pesticides, carbon and nitrogen cycles, plant growth and reduction of ammonia volatilization from urea. Humified substances such as coal, composts, and peat soils have substantial amounts of HA but the isolation of these acids is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Factors that affect the quality and yield of HA isolated from these materials include extraction, fractionation, and purification periods. This work developed a simple, rapid, and cost effective method of isolating HA from peat soils. There was a quadratic relationship between extraction period and HA yield. Optimum extraction period was estimated at 4 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 48 h. There was no relationship between fractionation period and HA yield. As such 2 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 24 h fractionation period could be considered optimum. Low ash content (5%), remarkable reduction in K, coupled with the fact that organic C, E4/E6, carboxylic COOH, phenolic OH, and total acidity values of the HA were consistent with those reported by other authors suggest that the HA dealt with were free from mineral matter. This was possible because the distilled water used to purify the HA served as Bronsted-Lowry acid during the purification process of the HA. Optimum purification period using distilled waster was 1 h instead of the usual range of 1 and 7 days (uses HF and HCl and dialysis). Humic acids could be isolated from tropical peat soils within 7 h (i.e. 4 h extraction, 2 h fractionation, and 1 h purification) instead of the existing period of 2 and 7 days. This could facilitate the idea of producing organic fertilizers such as ammonium-humate and potassium-humate from humified substances since techniques devised in this study did not alter the true nature of the HA. Besides, the technique is rapid, simple

  13. The complete nucleotide sequence of bluetongue virus serotype 1 RNA3 and a comparison with other geographic serotypes from Australia, South Africa and the United States of America, and with other orbivirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gould, A R

    1987-04-01

    The sequence of the RNA segment 3 of bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 1 from Australia is presented along with its deduced amino acid sequence. DNA copies of this genome segment were inserted either into the E. coli plasmid pBR322 by homopolymeric tailing or by direct insertion of double-stranded DNA fragments generated by restriction endonuclease cleavage into the appropriate M13 bacteriophage vectors (Vieira, J. and Messing, J., 1982, Gene 19, 259-268). Direct comparisons were made to the nucleotide sequence data of Purdy, M. et al., 1984 (J. Virol. 51, 754-759) and Ghiasi, H. et al., 1985 (Virus Res. 3, 181-190) for the United States of America (US) isolates of BTV, serotypes 10 and 17, respectively. A method for the rapid cloning, sequencing and alignment of orbivirus RNA 3 segments was utilised to compare other geographical isolates of BTV, as well as those of other orbivirus serotypes, in particular, epizootic haemorrhagic disease of deer virus (EHDV) and Warrego. The comparison of this sequence data reveals that BTV isolates can be separated into distinct geographical types which in turn are distinct from the other orbivirus isolates studied. The sequence conservation at the amino acid level for the gene product of RNA3 (VP3) does not enable distinctions to be made amongst the BTV isolates at a geographical level, but does afford easy distinction into the different orbivirus groups. A possible evolutionary schematic is presented for the orbiviruses studied.

  14. A method to convert mRNA into a gRNA library for CRISPR/Cas9 editing of any organism.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The clustered regularly interspersed palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system is a powerful tool for genome editing that can be used to construct a guide RNA (gRNA) library for genetic screening. For gRNA design, one must know the sequence of the 20-mer flanking the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), which seriously impedes experimentally making gRNA. I describe a method to construct a gRNA library via molecular biology techniques without relying on bioinformatics. Briefly, one synthesizes complementary DNA from the mRNA sequence using a semi-random primer containing a PAM complementary sequence and then cuts out the 20-mer adjacent to the PAM using type IIS and type III restriction enzymes to create a gRNA library. The described approach does not require prior knowledge about the target DNA sequences, making it applicable to any species.

  15. A method to convert mRNA into a gRNA library for CRISPR/Cas9 editing of any organism.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The clustered regularly interspersed palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system is a powerful tool for genome editing that can be used to construct a guide RNA (gRNA) library for genetic screening. For gRNA design, one must know the sequence of the 20-mer flanking the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), which seriously impedes experimentally making gRNA. I describe a method to construct a gRNA library via molecular biology techniques without relying on bioinformatics. Briefly, one synthesizes complementary DNA from the mRNA sequence using a semi-random primer containing a PAM complementary sequence and then cuts out the 20-mer adjacent to the PAM using type IIS and type III restriction enzymes to create a gRNA library. The described approach does not require prior knowledge about the target DNA sequences, making it applicable to any species. PMID:27574704

  16. A method to convert mRNA into a gRNA library for CRISPR/Cas9 editing of any organism

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspersed palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system is a powerful tool for genome editing that can be used to construct a guide RNA (gRNA) library for genetic screening. For gRNA design, one must know the sequence of the 20-mer flanking the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), which seriously impedes experimentally making gRNA. I describe a method to construct a gRNA library via molecular biology techniques without relying on bioinformatics. Briefly, one synthesizes complementary DNA from the mRNA sequence using a semi-random primer containing a PAM complementary sequence and then cuts out the 20-mer adjacent to the PAM using type IIS and type III restriction enzymes to create a gRNA library. The described approach does not require prior knowledge about the target DNA sequences, making it applicable to any species. PMID:27574704

  17. Tethered particle motion method for studying transcript elongation by a single RNA polymerase molecule.

    PubMed

    Yin, H; Landick, R; Gelles, J

    1994-12-01

    Schafer et al. (Nature 352:444-448 (1991)) devised the tethered particle motion (TPM) method to detect directly the movement of single, isolated molecules of a processive nucleic acid polymerase along a template DNA molecule. In TPM studies, the polymerase molecule is immobilized on a glass surface, and a particle (e.g., a 0.23 microns diameter polystyrene bead) is attached to one end of the enzyme-bound DNA molecule. Time-resolved measurements of the DNA contour length between the particle and the immobilized enzyme (the "tether length") are made by determining the magnitude of the Brownian motion of the DNA-tethered particle using light microscopy and digital image processing. We report here improved sample preparation methods that permit TPM data collection on transcript elongation by the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase at rates (approximately 10(2)-fold higher than those previously obtained) sufficient for practical use of microscopic kinetics techniques to analyze polymerase reaction mechanisms. In earlier TPM experiments, calculation of tether length from the observed Brownian motion was based on an untested numerical simulation of tethered bead Brownian motion. Using the improved methods, we have now empirically validated the TPM technique for tether lengths of 308-1915 base pairs (bp) using calibration specimens containing particles tethered by individual DNA molecules of known lengths. TPM analysis of such specimens yielded a linear calibration curve relating observed Brownian motion to tether length and allowed determination of the accuracy of the technique and measurement of how temporal bandwidth, tether length, and other experimental variables affect measurement precision. Under a standard set of experimental conditions (0.23 microns diameter bead, 0.23 Hz bandwidth, 23 degrees), accuracy is 108 and 258 bp r.m.s. at tether lengths of 308 and 1915 bp, respectively. Precision improves linearly with decreasing tether length to an extrapolated

  18. Isolation of a class C transcription factor which forms a stable complex with tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruet, A; Camier, S; Smagowicz, W; Sentenac, A; Fromageot, P

    1984-01-01

    A yeast extract was fractionated to resolve the factors involved in the transcription of yeast tRNA genes. An in vitro transcription system was reconstituted with two separate protein fractions and purified RNA polymerase C (III). Optimal conditions for tRNA synthesis have been determined. One essential component, termed tau factor, was partially purified by conventional chromatographic methods on heparin-agarose and DEAE-Sephadex; it sedimented as a large macromolecule in glycerol gradients (mol. wt. approximately 300 000). tau factor was found to form a stable complex with the tRNA gene in the absence of other transcriptional components. Complex formation is very fast, is not temperature dependent between 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C and does not require divalent cations. The factor-DNA complex is stable for at least 30 min at high salt concentration (0.1 M ammonium sulfate). These results indicate that gene recognition by a specific factor is a primary event in tRNA synthesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:6370678

  19. Synchronous fluorescence/matrix isolation method for trace organic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pardue, H.L.

    1987-11-01

    The primary object involved the development and evaluation of two-dimensional imaging detectors for synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy with adaptation to determination of trace amounts of organics such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). A secondary objective was adaptation of chromatographic and matrix-isolation methods to this detection mode. The general plan was to illuminate (excite) the sample with several different wavelengths along its vertical axis and to use a polychromator at 90/sup 0/ to the excitation axis to resolve the fluorescent radiation. A two-dimensional imaging detector was used to monitor the resulting two-dimensional pattern of resolved fluorescence spectra (horizontal axis) at each of several excitation wavelengths (vertical axis). Data along one or more diagonal axes of the two-dimensional pattern were used as the synchronous fluorescence spectra at one or more wavelength differences (..delta..lambda) between excitation and emission spectra. 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  1. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, Patrick W.

    1985-10-22

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  2. Accurate transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in a soluble extract from isolated mammalian nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Dignam, J D; Lebovitz, R M; Roeder, R G

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for preparing extracts from nuclei of human tissue culture cells that directs accurate transcription initiation in vitro from class II promoters. Conditions of extraction and assay have been optimized for maximum activity using the major late promoter of adenovirus 2. The extract also directs accurate transcription initiation from other adenovirus promoters and cellular promoters. The extract also directs accurate transcription initiation from class III promoters (tRNA and Ad 2 VA). Images PMID:6828386

  3. A whole-mount in situ hybridization method for microRNA detection in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andachi, Yoshiki; Kohara, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) is an outstanding method to decipher the spatiotemporal expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs) and provides important clues for elucidating their functions. The first WISH method for miRNA detection was developed in zebrafish. Although this method was quickly adapted for other vertebrates and fruit flies, WISH analysis has not been successfully used to detect miRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans Here, we show a novel WISH method for miRNA detection in C. elegans Using this method, mir-1 miRNA was detected in the body-wall muscle where the expression and roles of mir-1 miRNA have been previously elucidated. Application of the method to let-7 family miRNAs, let-7, mir-48, mir-84, and mir-241, revealed their distinct but partially overlapping expression patterns, indicating that miRNAs sharing a short common sequence were distinguishably detected. In pash-1 mutants that were depleted of mature miRNAs, signals of mir-48 miRNA were greatly reduced, suggesting that mature miRNAs were detected by the method. These results demonstrate the validity of WISH to detect mature miRNAs in C. elegans. PMID:27154969

  4. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    PubMed

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions.

  5. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    PubMed

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions. PMID:25967062

  6. Transcriptional activities of the chloroplast-nuclei and proplastid-nuclei isolated from tobacco exhibit different sensitivities to tagetitoxin: implication of the presence of distinct RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sakai, A; Saito, C; Inada, N; Kuroiwa, T

    1998-09-01

    We examined the effects of tagetitoxin, a potent inhibitor of RNA polymerases from chloroplasts and Escherichia coli, on the transcriptional activities of chloroplast- and proplastid-nuclei (nucleoids) isolated from mature tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves and cultured tobacco cells (line BY-2), respectively. Transcription by the isolated chloroplast-nuclei was effectively inhibited by tagetitoxin (95-99% reduction at 10 microM tagetitoxin), but transcription by the isolated proplastid-nuclei was only partially inhibited (40-50% reduction) by this compound. Southern hybridization experiments revealed that the transcription of various plastid genes (psbA, atpA, rpoB, psaA/B, atpB, rbcL, petB, rpl16, and rrn23) was sensitive to tagetitoxin in the isolated chloroplast-nuclei, whereas the transcription of the same genes was relatively resistant to this compound in the isolated proplastid-nuclei. These results suggest that; (i) distinct RNA polymerase activities with different sensitivities to tagetitoxin are present in plastids, (ii) a tagetitoxin-sensitive RNA polymerase is the major RNA polymerase in chloroplasts whereas a tagetitoxin-insensitive enzyme is major in proplastids, and (iii) both RNA polymerases can transcribe various plastid genes.

  7. Improved RNA extraction method using the BioMasher and BioMasher power-plus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakashima, Kentaro; Maruta, Yukio; Kiriyama, Tomomi; Sasaki, Michi; Sugiyama, Shunpei; Suzuki, Kana; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Sasaki, Jun; Kaku-Ushiki, Yuko; Tanida, Masatoshi; Irie, Shinkichi; Hattori, Shunji

    2012-12-01

    The BioMasher is a disposable homogenizer that was developed to homogenize bovine brain tissue for bovine spongiform encephalopathy diagnosis. Capable of preventing the biohazard risk from infectious samples, it also prevents cross-contamination among samples. The BioMasher is thus widely used in biochemical research, especially for RNA extraction. Here, we tested a novel BioMasher application for RNA extraction from animal and plant tissues. We also developed a grinding machine specific for the BioMasher, named the BioMasher Power-Plus. We developed RNA extraction protocols using the BioMasher combined with the BioMasher Power-Plus. We compared RNA extraction efficiency of the BioMasher with that of the FastPrep and the glass homogenizer. Though the RNA extraction efficiency by the BioMasher was nearly equivalent to that of the FastPrep and the glass homogenizer, sample preparation time was shorter for the BioMasher. The utility of RNA extraction by the BioMasher was examined in mouse, rat, and tomato tissue samples. In the rodent tissues, the highest extraction efficiency of total RNA was from liver, with lowest efficiency from fibrous tissues such as muscle. The quality of extracted total RNA was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis which produced highly visible clear bands of 18S and 28S rRNAs. Reproducibility among different operators in RNA extraction from tomato roots was improved by using the BioMasher Power-Plus. The BioMasher and BioMasher Power-Plus provide an effective and easy homogenization method for total RNA extraction from some rodent and plant tissues. PMID:22813946

  8. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Posner, Richard G.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Hammond, Mark L.; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Method for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand.

  9. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Posner, R.G.; Marrone, B.L.; Hammond, M.L.; Simpson, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    A method is described for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand. 4 figures.

  10. NSMAP: A method for spliced isoforms identification and quantification from RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of techniques for sequencing the messenger RNA (RNA-Seq) enables it to study the biological mechanisms such as alternative splicing and gene expression regulation more deeply and accurately. Most existing methods employ RNA-Seq to quantify the expression levels of already annotated isoforms from the reference genome. However, the current reference genome is very incomplete due to the complexity of the transcriptome which hiders the comprehensive investigation of transcriptome using RNA-Seq. Novel study on isoform inference and estimation purely from RNA-Seq without annotation information is desirable. Results A Nonnegativity and Sparsity constrained Maximum APosteriori (NSMAP) model has been proposed to estimate the expression levels of isoforms from RNA-Seq data without the annotation information. In contrast to previous methods, NSMAP performs identification of the structures of expressed isoforms and estimation of the expression levels of those expressed isoforms simultaneously, which enables better identification of isoforms. In the simulations parameterized by two real RNA-Seq data sets, more than 77% expressed isoforms are correctly identified and quantified. Then, we apply NSMAP on two RNA-Seq data sets of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) samples and one normal sample in order to identify differentially expressed known and novel isoforms in MDS disease. Conclusions NSMAP provides a good strategy to identify and quantify novel isoforms without the knowledge of annotated reference genome which can further realize the potential of RNA-Seq technique in transcriptome analysis. NSMAP package is freely available at https://sites.google.com/site/nsmapforrnaseq. PMID:21575225

  11. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  12. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  13. Molecular characterization of multiple-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from northwestern Russia and analysis of rifampin resistance using RNA/RNA mismatch analysis as compared to the line probe assay and sequencing of the rpoB gene.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Filliol, Ingrid; Legrand, Eric; Sola, Christophe; Otten, Tatiana; Vyshnevskaya, Elena; Limeschenko, Elena; Vyshnevskiy, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga; Rastogi, Nalin

    2002-05-01

    This investigation evaluated the potential of RNA/RNA mismatch analysis for the detection of rifampin resistance among 38 multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from northwestern Russia. The results obtained were compared with a commercialized line probe assay and rpoB sequencing, and the genetic diversity of the isolates was also investigated in parallel using spoligotyping and variable number of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR). The mismatch analysis revealed 3 distinct RNA cleavage profiles permitting the subdivision of the strains into mutation groups 1 to 3, the most common being group 1 (28 of 38 isolates) that contained a majority of strains with a TCG531>TTG (Ser->Leu) mutation, followed by group 2 (6 of 38 isolates) characterized by different mutations in the codon CAC526 (His), and group 3 (4 of 38 isolates), all characterized by a GAC516(Asp) mutation. Spoligotyping revealed the Beijing type to be the most prevalent among mismatch group 1 (24 out of 28 strains), suggesting that the most frequent rpoB mutation among the Beijing family in our setting was TCG531 >TTG (Ser->Leu). All the Beijing type isolates were also characterized by a unique VNTR pattern made up of exact tandem repeats (ETR)-A to E of 42435. We conclude that the Beijing genotype constitutes the major family of MDR-TB isolates currently circulating in northwestern Russia, and that the in-house RNA/RNA mismatch analysis may be successfully used for rapid and reliable diagnosis of rifampin-resistant tuberculosis in this setting. PMID:12066892

  14. Evaluation of RNA Amplification Methods to Improve DC Immunotherapy Antigen Presentation and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G; Raney, Alexa; Lewis, Whitney E; DeBenedette, Mark A; Nicolette, Charles A; Tcherepanova, Irina Y

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with total amplified tumor cell RNA have the potential to induce broad antitumor immune responses. However, analytical methods required for quantitatively assessing the integrity, fidelity, and functionality of the amplified RNA are lacking. We have developed a series of assays including gel electrophoresis, northern blot, capping efficiency, and microarray analysis to determine integrity and fidelity and a model system to assess functionality after transfection into human DCs. We employed these tools to demonstrate that modifications to our previously reported total cellular RNA amplification process including the use of the Fast Start High Fidelity (FSHF) PCR enzyme, T7 Powerswitch primer, post-transcriptional capping and incorporation of a type 1 cap result in amplification of longer transcripts, greater translational competence, and a higher fidelity representation of the starting total RNA population. To study the properties of amplified RNA after transfection into human DCs, we measured protein expression levels of defined antigens coamplified with the starting total RNA populations and measured antigen-specific T cell expansion in autologous DC-T cell co-cultured in vitro. We conclude from these analyses that the improved RNA amplification process results in superior protein expression levels and a greater capacity of the transfected DCs to induce multifunctional antigen-specific memory T cells. PMID:23653155

  15. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). PMID:27045556

  16. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC).

  17. Isolation of full-size mRNA from ethanol-fixed cells after cellular immunofluorescence staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, C.; Kremer, J.; Hundeiker, C.; Goettlinger, C.; Radbruch, A.

    1995-12-01

    Preparation of intact, full-size RNA from tissues or cells requires stringent precautions against ubiquitous and rather stable RNases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) usually aims at the isolation of cells according to cell surface markers on living cells, from which RNA can be obtained by standard protocols. The separation of cells according to intracellular immunofluorescence markers, such as intranuclear, intracytoplasmic, or secreted molecules, requires permeation of the cell membrane for the staining antibodies, which is usually achieved by fixation. However, commonly used fixatives such as ethanol, methanol, or formaldehyde do not inactivate RNases completely, thereby hampering the analysis of complete RNA molecules from fixed cells. We report isolation of intact, full size RNA suitable for Northern blotting from cells that were fixed by 95% ethanol/5% acetic acid containing RNase inhibitors, stained intracellularly, and sorted by FACS. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Isolation Method (direct plating or enrichment) does not affect Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Campylobacter from Chicken Carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine if Campylobacter isolation method influenced antimicrobial susceptibility results, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nine antimicrobials were compared for 291 pairs of Campylobacter isolates recovered from chicken carcass rinse samples using direct plating and an enrichment...

  19. A simple "soaking method" for RNA interference in the planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Orii, Hidefumi; Mochii, Makoto; Watanabe, Kenji

    2003-04-01

    A simple method was developed for RNA interference (RNAi) in the planarian Dugesia japonica. The DjIFb ( Dugesia japonica intermediate filament b) gene was used to evaluate the effect of RNAi because both the cDNA and an antiserum against the gene product were available. After transverse cutting at the pre- and post-pharyngeal regions, the middle part of the body fragment was soaked in water containing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for about 5 h and then allowed to regenerate in water. On the 5th day of regeneration, little DjIFb protein was detected in the new tissues. When the worms were cut after soaking in dsRNA water, no RNAi effect was observed, suggesting that the dsRNA was introduced through the cut surface. A high concentration of dsRNA or repeated "cutting and soaking" resulted in more effective RNAi. This simple soaking method in combination with expressed sequence tag analysis should be very useful for high-throughput analyses of gene functions in planarian regeneration.

  20. RIP: RNA Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Miriam; Matarazzo, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of RNA-protein interactions in modulating mRNA and noncoding RNA function is increasingly appreciated and several methods have been recently developed to map them. The RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful method to study the physical association between individual proteins and RNA molecules in vivo. The basic principles of RIP are very similar to those of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a largely used tool in the epigenetic field, but with some important caveats. The approach is based on the use of a specific antibody raised against the protein of interest to pull down the RNA-binding protein (RBP) and target-RNA complexes. Any RNA that is associated with this protein complex will also be isolated and can be further analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-based methods, hybridization, or sequencing.Several variants of this technique exist and can be divided into two main classes: native and cross-linked RNA immunoprecipitation. The native RIP allows to reveal the identity of RNAs directly bound by the protein and their abundance in the immunoprecipitated sample, while cross-linked RIP leads to precisely map the direct and indirect binding site of the RBP of interest to the RNA molecule.In this chapter both the protocols applied to mammalian cells are described taking into account the caveats and considerations required for designing, performing, and interpreting the results of these experiments. PMID:27659976

  1. Comparison of Sanger and next generation sequencing performance for genotyping Cryptosporidium isolates at the 18S rRNA and actin loci.

    PubMed

    Paparini, Andrea; Gofton, Alexander; Yang, Rongchang; White, Nicole; Bunce, Michael; Ryan, Una M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important enteric pathogen that infects a wide range of humans and animals. Rapid and reliable detection and characterisation methods are essential for understanding the transmission dynamics of the parasite. Sanger sequencing, and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) on an Ion Torrent platform, were compared with each other for their sensitivity and accuracy in detecting and characterising 25 Cryptosporidium-positive human and animal faecal samples. Ion Torrent reads (n = 123,857) were obtained at both 18S rRNA and actin loci for 21 of the 25 samples. Of these, one isolate at the actin locus (Cattle 05) and three at the 18S rRNA locus (HTS 10, HTS 11 and HTS 12), suffered PCR drop-out (i.e. PCR failures) when using fusion-tagged PCR. Sanger sequences were obtained for both loci for 23 of the 25 samples and showed good agreement with Ion Torrent-based genotyping. Two samples both from pythons (SK 02 and SK 05) produced mixed 18S and actin chromatograms by Sanger sequencing but were clearly identified by Ion Torrent sequencing as C. muris. One isolate (SK 03) was typed as C. muris by Sanger sequencing but was identified as a mixed C. muris and C. tyzzeri infection by HTS. 18S rRNA Type B sequences were identified in 4/6 C. parvum isolates when deep sequenced but were undetected in Sanger sequencing. Sanger was cheaper than Ion Torrent when sequencing a small numbers of samples, but when larger numbers of samples are considered (n = 60), the costs were comparative. Fusion-tagged amplicon based approaches are a powerful way of approaching mixtures, the only draw-back being the loss of PCR efficiency on low-template samples when using primers coupled to MID tags and adaptors. Taken together these data show that HTS has excellent potential for revealing the "true" composition of species/types in a Cryptosporidium infection, but that HTS workflows need to be carefully developed to ensure sensitivity, accuracy and contamination are

  2. Polymorphism of the 5' terminal region of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) RNA: incidence of three sequence types in isolates of different origin and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, M A; López, C; Navas-Castillo, J; Garnsey, S M; Guerri, J; Flores, R; Moreno, P

    2001-01-01

    Sequences of the 5' terminal region of the genomic RNA from eight isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were previously classified into three types (I, II and III), with intragroup sequence identity higher than 88% and intergroup sequence identity as low as 44%. Sequencing of an additional 58 cDNA clones from 15 virus isolates showed that all sequences could be unequivocally assigned to one of the three types previously established. The relative frequency of each sequence type was assessed in 57 CTV isolates of different geographic origin and pathogenic characteristics by RT-PCR with sets of type-specific primers using CTV dsRNA as template. None of the isolates yielded amplification of the type I or II sequences alone, but in 19 of them type III sequences were the only amplification product detected. Within isolates containing more than one sequence type, eight had type II and III sequences, 11 had type I and III sequences, and 19 had sequences of the three types. Isolates containing only type III sequences caused only mild to moderate symptoms in Mexican lime, an indicator species for most CTV isolates, whereas isolates causing stem pitting in sweet orange an/or grapefruit, generally contained sequences type II. None of the sequence types could be traced to a precise geographic area, as all types were detected in isolates from at least nine of the 12 countries from which samples were taken. PMID:11266215

  3. Isolating RNA from precursor and mature melanocytes from human vitiligo and normal skin using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Nathaniel B; Koster, Maranke I; Hoaglin, Laura G; Wright, Michael J; Robinson, Steven E; Robinson, William A; Roop, Dennis R; Norris, David A; Birlea, Stanca A

    2016-10-01

    To characterize the gene expression profile of regenerated melanocytes in the narrow band UVB (NBUVB)-treated vitiligo epidermis and their precursors in the hair follicle, we present here a strategy of RNA isolation from in situ melanocytes using human frozen skin. We developed a rapid immunostaining protocol using the NKI-beteb antibody, which labels differentiated and precursor melanocytes, followed by fluorescent laser capture microdissection. This technique enabled the direct isolation, from melanocyte and adjacent keratinocyte populations, of satisfactory quality RNA that was successfully amplified and analysed by qRT-PCR. The melanocyte-specific gene transcripts TYR, DCT, TYRP1 and PMEL were significantly upregulated in our NBUVB-treated melanocyte samples as compared with the keratinocyte samples, while keratinocyte-specific genes (KRT5 and KRT14) were expressed significantly higher in the keratinocyte samples as compared with the melanocyte samples. Furthermore, in both NBUVB-treated vitiligo skin and normal skin, when bulge melanocytes were compared with epidermal melanocytes, we found significantly lower expression of melanocyte-specific genes and significantly higher expression of three melanocytic stem cell genes (SOX9, WIF1 and SFRP1), while ALCAM and ALDH1A1 transcripts did not show significant variation. We found significantly higher expression of melanocyte-specific genes in the epidermis of NBUVB-treated vitiligo, as compared to the normal skin. When comparing bulge melanocyte samples from untreated vitiligo, NBUVB-treated vitiligo and normal skin, we did not find significant differences in the expression of melanocyte-specific genes or melanocytic stem cell genes. These techniques offer valuable opportunities to study melanocytes and their precursors in vitiligo and other pigmentation disorders.

  4. iPBS: a universal method for DNA fingerprinting and retrotransposon isolation.

    PubMed

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Antonius, Kristiina; Smýkal, Petr; Schulman, Alan H

    2010-11-01

    Molecular markers are essential in plant and animal breeding and biodiversity applications, in human forensics, and for map-based cloning of genes. The long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are well suited as molecular markers. As dispersed and ubiquitous transposable elements, their "copy and paste" life cycle of replicative transposition leads to new genome insertions without excision of the original element. Both the overall structure of retrotransposons and the domains responsible for the various phases of their replication are highly conserved in all eukaryotes. Nevertheless, up to a year has been required to develop a retrotransposon marker system in a new species, involving cloning and sequencing steps as well as the development of custom primers. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method useful both as a marker system in its own right and for the rapid isolation of retrotransposon termini and full-length elements, making it ideal for "orphan crops" and other species with underdeveloped marker systems. The method, iPBS amplification, is based on the virtually universal presence of a tRNA complement as a reverse transcriptase primer binding site (PBS) in LTR retrotransposons. The method differs from earlier retrotransposon isolation methods because it is applicable not only to endogenous retroviruses and retroviruses, but also to both Gypsy and Copia LTR retrotransposons, as well as to non-autonomous LARD and TRIM elements, throughout the plant kingdom and to animals. Furthermore, the inter-PBS amplification technique as such has proved to be a powerful DNA fingerprinting technology without the need for prior sequence knowledge.

  5. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in Bagarius yarrelli using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Du, M; Liu, Y H; Niu, B Z

    2015-01-01

    The yellow sisorid catfish (Bagarius yarrelli) is a vulnerable fish species. In this study, seven polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers for yellow sisorid catfish were described, using RNA-Seq methodology. In B. yarrelli (N = 44) from a Hekou wild population, allelic frequency, and observed and expected heterozygosities per locus varied from two to six, 0.0333 to 0.6793, and 0.0333 to 0.6004, respectively. One locus (Baya153) denoted notable separation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, after sequential Bonferroni correction (P < 0.05). The microsatellite markers described here will be useful for investigating population structure and genetic resource of B. yarrelli from different geographical locations. PMID:26662424

  6. Method and Apparatus for Automated Isolation of Nucleic Acids from Small Cell Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaram, Shivshankar; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Pant, Kapil; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    RNA isolation is a ubiquitous need, driven by current emphasis on microarrays and miniaturization. With commercial systems requiring 100,000 to 1,000,000 cells for successful isolation, there is a growing need for a small-footprint, easy-to-use device that can harvest nucleic acids from much smaller cell samples (1,000 to 10,000 cells). The process of extraction of RNA from cell cultures is a complex, multi-step one, and requires timed, asynchronous operations with multiple reagents/buffers. An added complexity is the fragility of RNA (subject to degradation) and its reactivity to surface. A novel, microfluidics-based, integrated cartridge has been developed that can fully automate the complex process of RNA isolation (lyse, capture, and elute RNA) from small cell culture samples. On-cartridge cell lysis is achieved using either reagents or high-strength electric fields made possible by the miniaturized format. Traditionally, silica-based, porous-membrane formats have been used for RNA capture, requiring slow perfusion for effective capture. In this design, high efficiency capture/elution are achieved using a microsphere-based "microfluidized" format. Electrokinetic phenomena are harnessed to actively mix microspheres with the cell lysate and capture/elution buffer, providing important advantages in extraction efficiency, processing time, and operational flexibility. Successful RNA isolation was demonstrated using both suspension (HL-60) and adherent (BHK-21) cells. Novel features associated with this development are twofold. First, novel designs that execute needed processes with improved speed and efficiency were developed. These primarily encompass electric-field-driven lysis of cells. The configurations include electrode-containing constructs, or an "electrode-less" chip design, which is easy to fabricate and mitigates fouling at the electrode surface; and the "fluidized" extraction format based on electrokinetically assisted mixing and contacting of microbeads

  7. An RNA secondary structure prediction method based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haoyue; Yang, Lianping; Zhang, Xiangde

    2015-09-01

    The function of an RNA-molecule is mainly determined by its tertiary structures. And its secondary structure is an important determinant of its tertiary structure. The comparative methods usually give better results than the single-sequence methods. Based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures, the paper presents a novel method for predicting conserved secondary structure of a group of related RNAs. In the method, the information from the known RNA structures is used as training data in a SVM (Support Vector Machine) classifier. Our method has been tested on the benchmark dataset given by Puton et al. The results show that the average sensitivity of our method is higher than that of other comparative methods such as CentroidAlifold, MXScrana, RNAalifold, and TurboFold. PMID:26100179

  8. Characterizing a novel and sensitive method to measure dsRNA in soil.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Joshua R; Zapata, Fatima; Dubelman, Samuel; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Jensen, Peter D; Levine, Steven L

    2016-10-01

    Performing environmental assessments for double-stranded RNA-based agricultural products require the development of sensitive and selective methods to measure biodegradation rates of dsRNAs. We developed and characterized a novel analytical procedure that uses a molecular hybridization assay (QuantiGene(®)) to accurately measure dsRNA extracted from diverse soils. In this report, we utilize this method to demonstrate that two dsRNAs with distinct size, structure, and sequence degrade rapidly in soil with indistinguishable kinetics. PMID:27441991

  9. [Detection of norovirus RNA in bivalve molluscs by using bacteria-culture-employed method (A3T method)].

    PubMed

    Akiba, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Nagano, Miyuki; Mori, Kohji; Hayashi, Yukinao; Obata, Hiromi; Chiba, Takashi; Ikuta, Yasuhisa; Kamiya, Yoriko; Nakama, Akiko; Hosaka, Mitsugu; Kai, Akemi

    2010-01-01

    Norovirus (NV) RNA has rarely been detected in foods despite the use of highly sensitive methods such as RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. In the modified method (A3T method) reported previously, a bacterial culture process was introduced into the standard protocol for NV detection to remove some inhibitor(s) present in food ingredients. To confirm the efficiency of the A3T method and to examine NV contamination in bivalve molluscs, we tried to detect NV RNA in bivalve molluscs on the market and in oyster samples associated with foodborne outbreaks by using the standard method and the A3T method. NV RNAs were detected in 20 samples (18.0%) of 111 bivalve molluscs, including oysters, on the market by use of the A3T method, while only one sample (0.9%) was positive according to the standard method. NV RNA was also detected in 10 of 35 oyster samples related to foodborne outbreaks by the A3T method. Those results show that the A3T method is suitable for the detection of NV in bivalve molluscs in general laboratories.

  10. Isolation, crystallization, and investigation of ribosomal protein S8 complexed with specific fragments of rRNA of bacterial or archaeal origin.

    PubMed

    Tishchenko, S V; Vassilieva, J M; Platonova, O B; Serganov, A A; Fomenkova, N P; Mudrik, E S; Piendl, W; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Garber, M B

    2001-09-01

    The core ribosomal protein S8 binds to the central domain of 16S rRNA independently of other ribosomal proteins and is required for assembling the 30S subunit. It has been shown with E. coli ribosomes that a short rRNA fragment restricted by nucleotides 588-602 and 636-651 is sufficient for strong and specific protein S8 binding. In this work, we studied the complexes formed by ribosomal protein S8 from Thermus thermophilus and Methanococcus jannaschii with short rRNA fragments isolated from the same organisms. The dissociation constants of the complexes of protein S8 with rRNA fragments were determined. Based on the results of binding experiments, rRNA fragments of different length were designed and synthesized in preparative amounts in vitro using T7 RNA-polymerase. Stable S8-RNA complexes were crystallized. Crystals were obtained both for homologous bacterial and archaeal complexes and for hybrid complexes of archaeal protein with bacterial rRNA. Crystals of the complex of protein S8 from M. jannaschii with the 37-nucleotide rRNA fragment from the same organism suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained.

  11. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, C V; Alemany, A; Ritort, F

    2012-08-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na(+)]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg(2+) salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  12. Comparative evaluation of total RNA extraction methods in Theobroma cacao using shoot apical meristems.

    PubMed

    Silva, D V; Branco, S M J; Holanda, I S A; Royaert, S; Motamayor, J C; Marelli, J P; Corrêa, R X

    2016-01-01

    Theobroma cacao is a species of great economic importance with its beans used for chocolate production. The tree has been a target of various molecular studies. It contains many polyphenols, which complicate the extraction of nucleic acids with the extraction protocols requiring a large amount of plant material. These issues, therefore, necessitate the optimization of the protocols. The aim of the present study was to evaluate different methods for extraction of total RNA from shoot apical meristems of T. cacao 'CCN 51' and to assess the influence of storage conditions for the meristems on the extraction. The study also aimed to identify the most efficient protocol for RNA extraction using a small amount of plant material. Four different protocols were evaluated for RNA extraction using one shoot apical meristem per sample. Among these protocols, one that was more efficient was then tested to extract RNA using four different numbers of shoot apical meristems, subjected to three different storage conditions. The best protocol was tested for cDNA amplification using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; the cDNA quality was determined to be satisfactory for molecular analyses. The study revealed that with the best RNA extraction protocol, one shoot apical meristem was sufficient for extraction of high-quality total RNA. The results obtained might enable advances in genetic analyses and molecular studies using reduced amount of plant material. PMID:26985935

  13. A method for obtaining RNA from Hemileia vastatrix appressoria produced in planta, suitable for transcriptomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Andreia; Gil Azinheira, Helena; do Céu Silva, Maria; Talhinhas, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    Appressoria are the first infection structures developed by rust fungi and require specific topographic signals from the host for their differentiation. The ease in obtaining appressoria in vitro for these biotrophic fungi led to studies concerning gene expression and gene discovery at appressorial level, avoiding the need to distinguish plant and fungal transcripts. However, in some pathosystems, it was observed that gene expression in appressoria seems to be influenced by host-derived signals, suggesting that transcriptomic analyses performed from in planta differentiated appressoria would be potentially more informative than those from in vitro differentiated appressoria. Nevertheless analysing appressorial RNA obtained from in planta samples is often hampered by an excessive dilution of fungal RNA within plant RNA, besides uncertainty regarding the fungal or plant origin of RNA from highly conserved genes. To circumvent these difficulties, we have recovered Hemileia vastatrix appressoria from Arabica coffee leaf surface using a film of nitrocellulose dissolved in butyl and ethyl acetates (nail polish), and extracted fungal RNA from the polish peel. RNA thus obtained is of good quality and usable for cDNA synthesis and transcriptomic (quantitative PCR) studies. This method could provide the means to investigate specific host-induced appressoria-related fungal pathogenicity factors. PMID:26466882

  14. Mod-seq: A High-Throughput Method for Probing RNA Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yizhu; May, Gemma E; Joel McManus, C

    2015-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that large RNA molecules, especially long noncoding RNAs, function in almost all gene regulatory processes (Cech & Steitz, 2014). Many large RNAs appear to be structural scaffolds for assembly of important RNA/protein complexes. However, the structures of most large cellular RNA molecules are currently unknown (Hennelly & Sanbonmatsu, 2012). While chemical probing can reveal single-stranded regions of RNA, traditional approaches to identify sites of chemical modification are time consuming. Mod-seq is a high-throughput method used to map chemical modification sites on RNAs of any size, including complex mixtures of RNA. In this protocol, we describe preparation of Mod-seq high-throughput sequencing libraries from chemically modified RNA. We also describe a software package "Mod-seeker," which is a compilation of scripts written in Python, for the analysis of Mod-seq data. Mod-seeker returns statistically significant modification sites, which can then be used to aid in secondary structure prediction. PMID:26068740

  15. Evaluation of isolator system and large-volume centrifugation method for culturing body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, H R; Wang, M; Philip, A

    1990-01-01

    The Isolator system was compared with the large-volume centrifugation method for processing and recovering organisms from body fluids other than blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. A total of 155 body fluid samples were processed for the recovery of clinically significant organisms. Of the 55 positive cultures, Isolator detected 94% and the large-volume centrifugation method detected 64%. The time necessary to indicate positivity was not significantly different in the two methods; however, in five cases, the Isolator system yielded clinically significant organisms 24 h sooner than the conventional method. The Isolator system was found to be a more sensitive alternative than the conventional large-volume centrifugation method. PMID:2405006

  16. Comparison and optimization of methods for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vorreiter, Fränze; Richter, Silke; Peter, Michel; Baumann, Sven; von Bergen, Martin; Tomm, Janina M

    2016-09-01

    The challenge of performing a time-resolved comprehensive analysis of molecular systems has led to the quest to optimize extraction methods. When the size of a biological sample is limited, there is demand for the simultaneous extraction of molecules representing the four areas of "omics": genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Here we optimized a protocol for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites and compared it with two existing protocols. Our optimization comprised the addition of a methanol/chloroform metabolite purification before the separation of DNA/RNA and proteins. Extracted DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites were quantitatively and/or qualitatively analyzed. Of the three methods, only the newly developed protocol yielded all biomolecule classes of adequate quantity and quality. PMID:27237373

  17. An efficient RNA isolation procedure and identification of reference genes for normalization of gene expression in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Tripti; Johnson, Lisa Klima; Malladi, Anish

    2011-12-01

    Application of transcriptomics approaches can greatly enhance our understanding of blueberry physiology. The success of transcriptomics approaches is dependent on the extraction of high-quality RNA which is complicated by the abundance of polyphenolics and polysaccharides in blueberry. Additionally, transcriptomics requires the accurate quantification of transcript abundance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a robust method to determine transcript abundance. Normalization of gene expression using stably expressed reference genes is essential in qRT-PCR. An evaluation of the stability of expression of reference genes has not yet been reported in blueberry. The objectives of this study were to develop an effective procedure for extracting RNA from different organs and to evaluate potential reference genes for qRT-PCR analyses in blueberry. RNA of high quality and yield was extracted from eight and six organs of rabbiteye and southern highbush blueberry, respectively, using a modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-based method. The expression stability of 12 reference genes was evaluated. UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYME (UBC28), RNA HELICASE-LIKE (RH8), CLATHRIN ADAPTER COMPLEXES MEDIUM SUBUNIT FAMILY PROTEIN (CACSa), and POLYUBIQUITIN (UBQ3b) were the most stably expressed genes across multiple organs in both blueberry species. Further, the expression stability of the reference genes in the branch abscission zone following treatment with fruit abscission-inducing compounds was analyzed. CACSa, RH8, and UBC28 were the most stably expressed genes in the abscission zone under abscission-inducing conditions. We suggest a preliminary evaluation of UBC28, CACSa, RH8, and UBQ3b to identify the most suitable reference genes for the experimental conditions under consideration in blueberry.

  18. "Per cell" normalization method for mRNA measurement by quantitative PCR and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Jun; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Ono, Atsushi; Kodama, Yukio; Nagao, Taku

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcriptome data from quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and DNA microarrays are typically obtained from a fixed amount of RNA collected per sample. Therefore, variations in tissue cellularity and RNA yield across samples in an experimental series compromise accurate determination of the absolute level of each mRNA species per cell in any sample. Since mRNAs are copied from genomic DNA, the simplest way to express mRNA level would be as copy number per template DNA, or more practically, as copy number per cell. Results Here we report a method (designated the "Percellome" method) for normalizing the expression of mRNA values in biological samples. It provides a "per cell" readout in mRNA copy number and is applicable to both quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and DNA microarray studies. The genomic DNA content of each sample homogenate was measured from a small aliquot to derive the number of cells in the sample. A cocktail of five external spike RNAs admixed in a dose-graded manner (dose-graded spike cocktail; GSC) was prepared and added to each homogenate in proportion to its DNA content. In this way, the spike mRNAs represented absolute copy numbers per cell in the sample. The signals from the five spike mRNAs were used as a dose-response standard curve for each sample, enabling us to convert all the signals measured to copy numbers per cell in an expression profile-independent manner. A series of samples was measured by Q-PCR and Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays using this Percellome method, and the results showed up to 90 % concordance. Conclusion Percellome data can be compared directly among samples and among different studies, and between different platforms, without further normalization. Therefore, "percellome" normalization can serve as a standard method for exchanging and comparing data across different platforms and among different laboratories. PMID:16571132

  19. 3'READS+, a sensitive and accurate method for 3' end sequencing of polyadenylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dinghai; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of the 3' end of poly(A)(+) RNA identifies cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs) and measures transcript expression. We previously developed a method, 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), to address mispriming issues that often plague 3' end sequencing. Here we report a new version, named 3'READS+, which has vastly improved accuracy and sensitivity. Using a special locked nucleic acid oligo to capture poly(A)(+) RNA and to remove the bulk of the poly(A) tail, 3'READS+ generates RNA fragments with an optimal number of terminal A's that balance data quality and detection of genuine pAs. With improved RNA ligation steps for efficiency, the method shows much higher sensitivity (over two orders of magnitude) compared to the previous version. Using 3'READS+, we have uncovered a sizable fraction of previously overlooked pAs located next to or within a stretch of adenylate residues in human genes and more accurately assessed the frequency of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in HeLa cells (∼50%). 3'READS+ will be a useful tool to accurately study APA and to analyze gene expression by 3' end counting, especially when the amount of input total RNA is limited. PMID:27512124

  20. 3'READS+, a sensitive and accurate method for 3' end sequencing of polyadenylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dinghai; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of the 3' end of poly(A)(+) RNA identifies cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs) and measures transcript expression. We previously developed a method, 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), to address mispriming issues that often plague 3' end sequencing. Here we report a new version, named 3'READS+, which has vastly improved accuracy and sensitivity. Using a special locked nucleic acid oligo to capture poly(A)(+) RNA and to remove the bulk of the poly(A) tail, 3'READS+ generates RNA fragments with an optimal number of terminal A's that balance data quality and detection of genuine pAs. With improved RNA ligation steps for efficiency, the method shows much higher sensitivity (over two orders of magnitude) compared to the previous version. Using 3'READS+, we have uncovered a sizable fraction of previously overlooked pAs located next to or within a stretch of adenylate residues in human genes and more accurately assessed the frequency of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in HeLa cells (∼50%). 3'READS+ will be a useful tool to accurately study APA and to analyze gene expression by 3' end counting, especially when the amount of input total RNA is limited.

  1. Comparison of RNA Extraction Methods for Molecular Analysis of Oral Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Padín-Iruegas, Maria-Elena; Reboiras-López, Maria Dolores; Suarez-Peńaranda, José Manuel; López-López, Rafael; Carta, Celina Faig Lima; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; García-García, Abel; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2016-01-01

    Objective of work The aim of this study was to compare three methods of RNA extraction for molecular analysis of oral cytology to establish the best technique, considering its concentration and purity for molecular tests of oral lesions such as real-time reverse transcriptase reaction. Material and methods The sample included exfoliative cytology from the oral cavity mucosa of patients with no visible clinical changes, using Orcellex Rovers Brush®. The extraction of total RNA was performed using the following three techniques: 30 samples were extracted by Trizol® technique, 30 by the Direct-zolTM RNA Miniprep system and 30 by the RNeasy mini Kit. The absorbance was measured by spectrophotometer to estimate the purity. The estimated RNA concentration was obtained by multiplying the value of A260 (ng/mL) by 40. Statistical analysis of the obtained data was performed using GraphPad Prism 5.03 software with Student t, analysis of variance and Bonferroni tests, considering p ≤0.05. Results Trizol® group revealed higher average concentration, followed by Direct-zolTM and Rneasy group. It was observed that the RNA Direct-zolTM group had the highest purity, followed by RNeasy and Trizol® groups, allowing for the two ratios. Conclusion Considering all aspects, concentration, purity and time spent in the procedures, the Direct-zolTM group showed the best results. PMID:27789907

  2. Species-level identification of isolates of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer region.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsien Chang; Wei, Yu Fang; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Tang, Chung Tao; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2005-04-01

    The species Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, genomic species 3, and genomic species 13TU included in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex are genetically highly related and difficult to distinguish phenotypically. Except for A. calcoaceticus, they are all important nosocomial species. In the present study, the usefulness of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer (ITS) sequence for the differentiation of (genomic) species in the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex was evaluated. The ITSs of 11 reference strains of the complex and 17 strains of other (genomic) species of Acinetobacter were sequenced. The ITS lengths (607 to 638 bp) and sequences were highly conserved for strains within the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. Intraspecies ITS sequence similarities ranged from 0.99 to 1.0, whereas interspecies similarities varied from 0.86 to 0.92. By using these criteria, 79 clinical isolates identified as A. calcoaceticus (18 isolates) or A. baumannii (61 isolates) with the API 20 NE system (bioMerieux Vitek, Marcy l'Etoile, France) were identified as A. baumannii (46 isolates), genomic species 3 (19 isolates), and genomic species 13TU (11 isolates) by ITS sequencing. An identification rate of 96.2% (76 of 79 isolates) was obtained by using ITS sequence analysis for identification of isolates in the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, and the accuracy of the method was confirmed for a subset of strains by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis and genomic DNA analysis by AFLP analysis by using libraries of profiles of reference strains. In conclusion, ITS sequence-based identification is reliable and provides a promising tool for elucidation of the clinical significance of the different species of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex.

  3. A mass spectrometry-based method for direct determination of pseudouridine in RNA.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Nobe, Yuko; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Higo, Daisuke; Yamagishi, Yoko; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Taoka, Masato

    2016-04-01

    Pseudouridine (5-ribosyluracil, Ψ) is the only 'mass-silent' nucleoside produced by post-transcriptional RNA modification. We describe here a novel mass spectrometry (MS)-based method for direct determination of Ψ in RNA. The method assigns a Ψ-containing nucleolytic RNA fragment by an accurate measurement of a signature doubly dehydrated nucleoside anion ([C9H7N2O4](1-),m/z207.04) produced by collision-induced dissociation MS, and it determines the Ψ-containing nucleotide sequence by pseudo-MS(3), i.e. in-source fragmentation followed by MS(2) By applying this method, we identified all of the known Ψs in the canonical human spliceosomal snRNAs and, unexpectedly, found two previously unknown Ψs in the U5 and U6 snRNAs. Because the method allows direct determination of Ψ in a subpicomole quantity of RNA, it will serve as a useful tool for the structure/function studies of a wide variety of non-coding RNAs.

  4. A mass spectrometry-based method for direct determination of pseudouridine in RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Nobe, Yuko; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Higo, Daisuke; Yamagishi, Yoko; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Taoka, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Pseudouridine (5-ribosyluracil, Ψ) is the only ‘mass-silent’ nucleoside produced by post-transcriptional RNA modification. We describe here a novel mass spectrometry (MS)-based method for direct determination of Ψ in RNA. The method assigns a Ψ-containing nucleolytic RNA fragment by an accurate measurement of a signature doubly dehydrated nucleoside anion ([C9H7N2O4]1−, m/z 207.04) produced by collision-induced dissociation MS, and it determines the Ψ-containing nucleotide sequence by pseudo-MS3, i.e. in-source fragmentation followed by MS2. By applying this method, we identified all of the known Ψs in the canonical human spliceosomal snRNAs and, unexpectedly, found two previously unknown Ψs in the U5 and U6 snRNAs. Because the method allows direct determination of Ψ in a subpicomole quantity of RNA, it will serve as a useful tool for the structure/function studies of a wide variety of non-coding RNAs. PMID:26673725

  5. A highly sensitive and selective viral protein detection method based on RNA oligonucleotide nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun; Lee, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang-Eun; Jo, Sung-Kee

    2010-01-01

    Globally, approximately 170 million people (representing approximately 3% of the population worldwide), are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and at risk of serious liver disease, including chronic hepatitis. We propose a new quantum dots (QDs)-supported RNA oligonucleotide approach for the specific and sensitive detection of viral protein using a biochip. This method was developed by immobilizing a HCV nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) on the surface of a glass chip via the formation of a covalent bond between an amine protein group and a ProLinker™ glass chip. The QDs-supported RNA oligonucleotide was conjugated via an amide formation reaction from coupling of a 5′-end-amine-modified RNA oligonucleotide on the surface of QDs displaying carboxyl groups via standard EDC coupling. The QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide was interacted to immobilized viral protein NS5B on the biochip. The detection is based on the variation of signal of QDs-supported RNA oligonucleotide bound on an immobilized biochip. It was demonstrated that the value of the signal has a linear relationship with concentrations of the HCV NS5B viral protein in the 1 μg mL−1 to 1 ng mL−1 range with a detection limit of 1 ng mL−1. The major advantages of this RNA-oligonucleotide nanoparticle assay are its good specificity, ease of performance, and ability to perform one-spot monitoring. The proposed method could be used as a general method of HCV detection and is expected to be applicable to other types of diseases as well. PMID:20517476

  6. Identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of an Actinomyces hongkongensis isolate recovered from a patient with pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, A N; Lyndon, C A; Church, D L

    2013-08-01

    A case of Actinomyces hongkongensis pelvic actinomycosis in an adult woman is described. Conventional phenotypic tests failed to identify the Gram-positive bacillus isolated from a fluid aspirate of a pelvic abscess. The bacterium was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and analysis using the SmartGene Integrated Database Network System software.

  7. RNA-sequencing data analysis of uterus in ovariectomized rats fed with soy protein isolate,17B-estradiol and casein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This data file describes the bioinformatics analysis of uterine RNA-seq data comparing genome wide effects of feeding soy protein isolate compared to casein to ovariectomized female rats age 64 days relative to treatment of casein fed rats with 5 ug/kg/d estradiol and relative to rats treated with e...

  8. Methods and Devices for Micro-Isolation, Extraction, and/or Analysis of Microscale Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartalov, Emil P. (Inventor); Shibata, Darryl (Inventor); Taylor, Clive (Inventor); Wade, Lawrence A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are devices and methods for the micro-isolation of biological cellular material. A micro-isolation apparatus described can comprise a photomask that protects regions of interest against DNA-destroying illumination. The micro-isolation apparatus can further comprise photosensitive material defining access wells following illumination and subsequent developing of the photosensitive material. The micro-isolation apparatus can further comprise a chambered microfluidic device comprising channels providing access to wells defined in photosensitive material. The micro-isolation apparatus can comprise a chambered microfluidic device without access wells defined in photosensitive material where valves control the flow of gases or liquids through the channels of the microfluidic device. Also included are methods for selectively isolating cellular material using the apparatuses described herein, as are methods for biochemical analysis of individual regions of interest of cellular material using the devices described herein. Further included are methods of making masking arrays useful for the methods described herein.

  9. Variations in the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer of fibrolytic Butyrivibrio isolates from the reindeer rumen.

    PubMed

    Præsteng, Kirsti E; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O; Mathiesen, Svein D; Sundset, Monica A

    2011-07-01

    Strains of Butyrivibrio are principal cellulytic bacteria in the rumen of the High Arctic Svalbard reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus ). According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Butyrivibrio can be divided into three subgroups within the Clostridia class of the phylum Firmicutes, but the current phenotypic and genotypic differentiation within the family Lachnospiraceae is insufficient. This current study describes the sequence diversity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of Butyrivibrio isolates from reindeer. A total of 17 different ITS sequences with sizes between 449 and 784 nt were obtained. Genes encoding tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) were identified in four of the sequences. Phylogenetic neighbor-joining trees were constructed based on the ITS sequence and compared with a phylogenetic neighbor-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences previously obtained for the same isolates. These comparisons indicated a better differentiation between strains in the ITS sequence than the 16S rRNA gene based tree. Through this study, a better means for identifying and tracking fibrolytic and potentially probiotic Butyrivibrio strains in reindeer and other ruminants has been provided.

  10. Isolation and expression analysis of four HD-ZIP III family genes targeted by microRNA166 in peach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C H; Zhang, B B; Ma, R J; Yu, M L; Guo, S L; Guo, L

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA166 (miR166) is known to have highly conserved targets that encode proteins of the class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) family, in a broad range of plant species. To further understand the relationship between HD-ZIP III genes and miR166, four HD-ZIP III family genes (PpHB14, PpHB15, PpHB8, and PpREV) were isolated from peach (Prunus persica) tissue and characterized. Spatio-temporal expression profiles of the genes were analyzed. Genes of the peach HD-ZIP III family were predicted to encode five conserved domains. Deduced amino acid sequences and tertiary structures of the four peach HD-ZIP III genes were highly conserved, with corresponding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression level of four targets displayed the opposite trend to that of miR166 throughout fruit development, with the exception of PpHB14 from 35 to 55 days after full bloom (DAFB). This finding indicates that miR166 may negatively regulate its four targets throughout fruit development. As for leaf and phloem, the same trend in expression level was observed between four targets and miR166 from 75 to 105 DAFB. However, the opposite trend was observed for the transcript level between four targets and miR166 from 35 to 55 DAFB. miRNA166 may negatively regulate four targets in some but not all developmental stages for a given tissue. The four genes studied were observed to have, exactly or generally, the same change tendency as individual tissue development, a finding that suggests genes of the HD-ZIP III family in peach may have complementary or cooperative functions in various tissues.

  11. Isolation and expression analysis of four HD-ZIP III family genes targeted by microRNA166 in peach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C H; Zhang, B B; Ma, R J; Yu, M L; Guo, S L; Guo, L

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA166 (miR166) is known to have highly conserved targets that encode proteins of the class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) family, in a broad range of plant species. To further understand the relationship between HD-ZIP III genes and miR166, four HD-ZIP III family genes (PpHB14, PpHB15, PpHB8, and PpREV) were isolated from peach (Prunus persica) tissue and characterized. Spatio-temporal expression profiles of the genes were analyzed. Genes of the peach HD-ZIP III family were predicted to encode five conserved domains. Deduced amino acid sequences and tertiary structures of the four peach HD-ZIP III genes were highly conserved, with corresponding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression level of four targets displayed the opposite trend to that of miR166 throughout fruit development, with the exception of PpHB14 from 35 to 55 days after full bloom (DAFB). This finding indicates that miR166 may negatively regulate its four targets throughout fruit development. As for leaf and phloem, the same trend in expression level was observed between four targets and miR166 from 75 to 105 DAFB. However, the opposite trend was observed for the transcript level between four targets and miR166 from 35 to 55 DAFB. miRNA166 may negatively regulate four targets in some but not all developmental stages for a given tissue. The four genes studied were observed to have, exactly or generally, the same change tendency as individual tissue development, a finding that suggests genes of the HD-ZIP III family in peach may have complementary or cooperative functions in various tissues. PMID:26535732

  12. An improved method for absolute quantification of mRNA using multiplex polymerase chain reaction: determination of renin and angiotensinogen mRNA levels in various tissues.

    PubMed

    Dostal, D E; Rothblum, K N; Baker, K M

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a multiplex, competitive, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method which measures absolute levels of renin, angiotensinogen, and the housekeeping transcript elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) mRNA. Sample RNA was simultaneously titrated with serial dilutions of renin, angiotensinogen, and EF-1 alpha competitor RNAs which flanked the endogenous concentrations of target transcripts. The samples were coreverse transcribed in the presence of random primers and resulting first-strand cDNA was coamplified for 10-15 cycles with [32P]-dCTP and primers for renin angiotensinogen, after which EF-1 alpha primers were added. Amplified DNA was separated by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel and radioactivity in the bands was quantified by direct radioanalytical scanning. Three conditions were necessary to obtain absolute quantification of renin and angiotensinogen mRNA levels: (a) exogenous competitor RNA was used to control for tube-to-tube variability in the efficiencies of reverse transcription and amplification; (b) Sample RNA was titrated with flanking concentrations of competitor RNA to correct for intraassay differences in the efficiency of amplification due to concentration differences between competitor and target templates; and (c) a housekeeping transcript EF-1 alpha was used to control for tube-to-tube differences in RNA loading and/or degradation. We show that the multiplex RT-PCR method is precise and accurate over approximately three logs of transcript concentration and sensitive to less than 5 and 0.5 fg for renin and angiotensinogen mRNA, respectively. This method will be useful for absolute quantification of target mRNAs, especially when the amount of sample RNA is limited or unknown and/or the gene expression is low. PMID:7887470

  13. Methods for visualizing RNA processing and transport pathways in living cells.

    PubMed

    Dirks, R W; Molenaar, C; Tanke, H J

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, imaging, and probe technology provided possibilities to study the spatial and temporal distribution of RNA species in living cells. While some methods have been developed to localize all nascent or poly (A) containing transcripts others have been developed to study the in vivo distribution of specific RNA species. Irrespective of the method that has been used, the results of these studies provided important information concerning the localization and the cellular transport pathways of RNAs. Also, the picture emerges that RNA molecules travel through the nucleus at much faster speed, equaling that of free diffusion, than previously anticipated. Still, a major challenge proves to be the development of a microscopic detection technique that allows specific, in vivo, detection of low levels of RNA species by fluorescence in situ hybridization, without interfering fluorescent background signals derived from non-hybridized probe sequences and autofluorescent cell components. By applying photoactivatable caged fluorochrome-, molecular beacon-, or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based detection methods an important step in the future of living cell analysis has already been made.

  14. Messenger RNA profiling: a novel method for body fluid identification by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Christa; Gharehbaghi-Schnell, Elisabeth; Korschineck, Irina

    2006-03-10

    Conventional methods for the identification of different body fluids like blood, semen and saliva from biological stains involve immunological or enzymatic detection of certain proteins. In this study, we investigated potential RNA markers with the aim of developing Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods to allow differentiation between several body fluids. Total RNA samples from artificially stained swabs and from various pieces of evidence from case work were extracted, amplified and analyzed with several RNA markers. Three assays detecting the body fluids of interest were selected: hemoglobin-alpha locus 1 (HBA), kallikrein 3 (KLK) and mucin 4 (MUC). With this approach, we demonstrate that specific Real-Time PCR assays are useful in identifying the source of the biological stain. Furthermore, RNA profiling of various body fluids was even possible on samples stored over a long period of time at ambient temperature. The stability and sensitivity of the applied method outlines a novel application for Real-Time PCR within the forensic field.

  15. The genetic diversity of genus Bacillus and the related genera revealed by 16s rRNA gene sequences and ardra analyses isolated from geothermal regions of turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Arzu Coleri; Tekin, Nilgun; Ozcan, Birgul; Cokmus, Cumhur

    2012-01-01

    Previously isolated 115 endospore-forming bacilli were basically grouped according to their temperature requirements for growth: the thermophiles (74%), the facultative thermophiles (14%) and the mesophiles (12%). These isolates were taken into 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, and they were clustered among the 7 genera: Anoxybacillus, Aeribacillus, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Thermoactinomycetes. Of these bacilli, only the thirty two isolates belonging to genera Bacillus (16), Brevibacillus (13), Paenibacillus (1) and Thermoactinomycetes (2) were selected and presented in this paper. The comparative sequence analyses revealed that the similarity values were ranged as 91.4–100 %, 91.8- 99.2 %, 92.6- 99.8 % and 90.7 - 99.8 % between the isolates and the related type strains from these four genera, respectively. Twenty nine of them were found to be related with the validly published type strains. The most abundant species was B. thermoruber with 9 isolates followed by B. pumilus (6), B. lichenformis (3), B. subtilis (3), B. agri (3), B. smithii (2), T. vulgaris (2) and finally P. barengoltzii (1). In addition, isolates of A391a, B51a and D295 were proposed as novel species as their 16S rRNA gene sequences displayed similarities ≤ 97% to their closely related type strains. The AluI-, HaeIII- and TaqI-ARDRA results were in congruence with the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The ARDRA results allowed us to differentiate these isolates, and their discriminative restriction fragments were able to be determined. Some of their phenotypic characters and their amylase, chitinase and protease production were also studied and biotechnologically valuable enzyme producing isolates were introduced in order to use in further studies. PMID:24031834

  16. A novel method to scale up fungal endophyte isolations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimations of species diversity are influenced by sampling intensity which in turn is influenced by methodology. For fungal endophyte diversity studies, the methodology includes surface-sterilization prior to isolation of endophytes. Surface-sterilization is an essential component of fungal endophy...

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence of the RNA2 of the crinivirus tomato infectious chlorosis virus: isolates from North America and Europe are essentially identical.

    PubMed

    Orílio, Anelise F; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the RNA2 of two isolates of Tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV, genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) from the United States and Spain, respectively, were determined. The sequences of both isolates were found to be nearly identical. TICV RNA2 consisted of 7,914 nucleotides in both isolates and contains eight open reading frames that encompass the Closteroviridae hallmark gene array represented by a heat shock protein 70 family homologue, a protein of 59 kDa, the major coat protein, and a divergent copy of the coat protein. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that TICV is most similar to Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV), the type species of the genus Crinivirus. PMID:19288051

  18. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-01-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available production strains, and 34 closely related relevant strains (as negative controls) were tested. All tested bifidobacteria showed distinct positive signals by colony hybridization, whereas all negative controls showed no distinct dots except Gardnerella vaginalis DSM4944 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii DSM4902, which gave slight signals. Furthermore, we established a method for isolation and identification of bifidobacteria from food by using a PCR assay without prior isolation of DNA but breaking the cells with proteinase K. By this method, all Bifidobacterium strains lead to a DNA product of the expected size. We also established a quick assay to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium counts in food and feces by dilution plating and colony hybridization. We were able to demonstrate that 2.1 x 10(6) to 2.3 x 10(7) colonies/g of sour milk containing bifidobacteria hybridized with the specific nucleotide probe. With these two methods, genus-specific colony hybridization and genus-specific PCR, it is now possible to readily and accurately detect any bifidobacteria in food and fecal samples and to discriminate between them and members of other genera. PMID:9097423

  19. MicroRNA fate upon targeting with anti-miRNA oligonucleotides as revealed by an improved Northern-blot-based method for miRNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adrian G.; Fabani, Martin M.; Vigorito, Elena; Gait, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in fine-tuning of gene regulation. Antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) are promising tools as anti-miRNA (anti-miR) agents toward therapeutic applications and to uncover miRNA function. Such anti-miR ONs include 2′-O-methyl (OMe), cationic peptide nucleic acids like K-PNA-K3, and locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based anti-miRs such as LNA/DNA or LNA/OMe. Northern blotting is a widely used and robust technique to detect miRNAs. However, miRNA quantification in the presence of anti-miR ONs has proved to be challenging, due to detection artifacts, which has led to poor understanding of miRNA fate upon anti-miR binding. Here we show that anti-miR ON bound to miR-122 can prevent the miRNA from being properly precipitated into the purified RNA fraction using the standard RNA extraction protocol (TRI-Reagent), yielding an RNA extract that does not reflect the real cellular levels of the miRNA. An increase in the numbers of equivalents of isopropanol during the precipitation step leads to full recovery of the targeted miRNA back into the purified RNA extract. Following our improved protocol, we demonstrate by Northern blotting, in conjunction with a PNA decoy strategy and use of high denaturing PAGE, that high-affinity anti-miRs (K-PNA-K3, LNA/DNA, and LNA/OMe) sequester miR-122 without causing miRNA degradation, while miR-122 targeting with a lower-affinity anti-miR (OMe) seems to promote degradation of the miRNA. The technical issues explored in this work will have relevance for other hybridization-based techniques for miRNA quantification in the presence of anti-miR ONs. PMID:21441346

  20. Selecting rRNA binding sites for the ribosomal proteins L4 and L6 from randomly fragmented rRNA: application of a method called SERF.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, U; Spahn, C M; Nierhaus, K H

    2000-04-25

    Two-thirds of the 54 proteins of the Escherichia coli ribosome interact directly with the rRNAs, but the rRNA binding sites of only a very few proteins are known. We present a method (selection of random RNA fragments; SERF) that can identify the minimal binding region for proteins within ribonucleo-protein complexes such as the ribosome. The power of the method is exemplified with the ribosomal proteins L4 and L6. Binding sequences are identified for both proteins and characterized by phosphorothioate footprinting. Surprisingly, the binding region of L4, a 53-nt rRNA fragment of domain I of 23S rRNA, can simultaneously and independently bind L24, one of the two assembly initiator proteins of the large subunit.

  1. DNA and RNA polymerase activities of nuclei and hypotonic extracts of nuclei isolated from tomato golden mosaic virus infected tobacco leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, R H; Buck, K W

    1985-01-01

    Nuclei and hypotonically leached extracts of nuclei prepared from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves have been used in in vitro DNA and RNA polymerisation reactions. The synthesis of virus-specific DNA was resistant to aphidicolin, sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and dideoxy TTP, and stimulated by KC1 and ATP. Variably virion (+) and complementary (-) strand DNA of both the A and B genomic components were synthesised. Virus-specific RNA was synthesised in reactions which were initiated prior to nuclei isolation and leaching. From inhibitor studies and salt requirements RNA synthesis appeared to be catalysed by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase type II enzyme. Both components of the TGMV genome were transcribed in a bidirectional fashion with a prevalence in some experiments of transcripts derived from DNA component A. Images PMID:4069999

  2. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons.

    PubMed

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the "in vivo" transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs.

  3. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I.; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the “in vivo” transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs. PMID:27047347

  4. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons.

    PubMed

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the "in vivo" transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs. PMID:27047347

  5. Prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase, modifying enzyme, and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenru; Ling, Baodong; Zhou, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a worldwide problem, and methylation of 16S rRNA has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance to aminoglycosides, which is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases. 16S rRNA methylase confers a high-level resistance to all 4,6-substituted deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides that are currently used in clinical practice. Some of the A. baumannii isolates have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), contributing to their multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to detect the determinants of the 16S rRNA methylase genes armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA, the modifying enzyme genes aac(6')-Ib, ant(3″)-Ia, aph(3')-I, and the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes bla(TEM), bla(SHV), and bla(CTX-M-3) among A. baumannii isolates in northeastern Sichuan, China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 21 different antimicrobial agents against the A. baumannii isolates were determined. The clinical isolates showed a high level of resistance (MIC≧256 μg/ml) to aminoglycosides, which ranged from 50·1 to 83·8%. The resistances to meropenem and imipenem, two of the beta-lactam antibiotics and the most active antibiotics against A. baumannii, were 9·1 and 8·2%, respectively. Among 60 amikacin-resistant isolates, only the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA was found to be prevalent (66·7%), but the other 16S rRNA methylase genes rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA were not detected. The prevalences of the modifying enzyme genes aac (6')-Ib, ant (3″)-Ia, and aph (3')-I were 51·7, 81·7, and 58·3%, respectively, which are different from a previous study in which the occurrences of these genes were 3, 64, and 72%, respectively. Among the 40 isolates that were armA-positive, the prevalences of bla(TEM), bla(SHV), and bla(CTX-M-3) genes were detected for the first time in China, and their occurrences were 45, 65, and 52·5%, respectively. In all, A

  6. Diversity of endophytic bacteria in Malaysian plants as revealed by 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence based method of bacterial identification☆

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Chye Ying; Tan, Yin Yin; Rohani, Rahim; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial endophytes do have several potential applications in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotech industry. The main objective of this study was to understand types of bacterial endophytes associated with dicotyledonous (dicot) and monocotyledonous (monocot) plant species. Isolation of the endophytic bacteria was performed using surface-sterilized various tissue samples, and identification of the endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) was completed using 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence similarity based method. In total, 996 EBIs were isolated and identified from 1055 samples of 31 monocot and 65 dicot plant species from Peninsular Malaysia. The 996 EBIs represented 71 different types of bacterial species. Twelve (12) out of 71 species are reported as endophytes for the first time. We conclude that diverse types of bacterial endophytes are associated with dicot and monocot plants, and could be useful in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotechnology for various potential applications. PMID:24396249

  7. High diversity of the 'Spumella-like' flagellates: an investigation based on the SSU rRNA gene sequences of isolates from habitats located in six different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Boenigk, Jens; Pfandl, Karin; Stadler, Peter; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2005-05-01

    We isolated 28 strains of 'Spumella-like' flagellates from different freshwater and soil habitats in Austria, People's Republic of China, Nepal, New Zealand, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Hawaii by use of a modified filtration-acclimatization method. 'Spumella-like' flagellates were found in all of the samples and were often among the dominant bacterivorous flagellates in the respective environments. The small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequence of the isolates was determined and aligned with previously published sequences of members belonging to the Chrysophyceae sensu stricto. Phylogenetic analysis of the 28 new sequences confirmed their position within the Chrysophyceae sensu stricto and positioned them within different clades. Most of the sequences grouped within clade C and formed several subclusters separated from each other by green taxa including flagellates belonging to Ochromonas, Dinobryon, Poterioochromonas and others. All soil isolates clustered together (subcluster C1) with the soil strain Spumella elongata and the undescribed soil strain 'Spumella danica'. Aquatic isolates were affiliated with at least two branches (C2 and C3). Sequence similarity to the closest related member of the Chrysophyceae ranged between 92% and 99.6%, sequence divergence among the 'Spumella-like' flagellates was as high as 10%. We conclude that (i) the 'Spumella-like' flagellates are a diverse group both in terms of sequence dissimilarity between isolates and in terms of the number of genotypes, (ii) Spumella and Ochromonas are polyphyletic, and (iii) based on the SSU rRNA gene no biogeographical restriction of certain branches could be observed even though different ecotypes may be represented by the same genotype.

  8. Methods for the isolation of cellulose-degrading microorganisms.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Rooks, David J; McCarthy, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    The biodegradation of lignocellulose, the most abundant organic material in the biosphere, is a feature of many aerobic, facultatively anaerobic and obligately anaerobic bacteria and fungi. Despite widely recognized difficulties in the isolation and cultivation of individual microbial species from complex microbial populations and environments, significant progress has been made in recovering cellulolytic taxa from a range of ecological niches including the human, herbivore, and termite gut, and terrestrial, aquatic, and managed environments. Knowledge of cellulose-degrading microbial taxa is of significant importance with respect to nutrition, biodegradation, biotechnology, and the carbon-cycle, providing insights into the metabolism, physiology, and functional enzyme systems of the cellulolytic bacteria and fungi that are responsible for the largest flow of carbon in the biosphere. In this chapter, several strategies employed for the isolation and cultivation of cellulolytic microorganisms from oxic and anoxic environments are described.

  9. High-quality RNA extraction from small cardamom tissues rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Nadiya, Fasiludeen; Anjali, Narayanannair; Gangaprasad, Appukuttannair; Sabu, Kalluvettankuzhy Krishnannair

    2015-09-15

    Due to the presence of a diverse array of metabolites, no standard method of RNA isolation is available for plants. We noted that polysaccharide and polyphenol contents of cardamom tissues critically hinder the RNA extraction procedure. Hence, we attempted several methods for obtaining intact mRNA and small RNA from various cardamom tissues. It was found that protocols involving a combination of commercial kits and conventional CTAB (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) methods yielded RNA with good purity, higher yield, and good integrity. The total RNA isolated through this approach was found to be amenable for transcriptome and small RNA analysis through next-generation sequencing platforms. PMID:26048648

  10. High-quality RNA extraction from small cardamom tissues rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Nadiya, Fasiludeen; Anjali, Narayanannair; Gangaprasad, Appukuttannair; Sabu, Kalluvettankuzhy Krishnannair

    2015-09-15

    Due to the presence of a diverse array of metabolites, no standard method of RNA isolation is available for plants. We noted that polysaccharide and polyphenol contents of cardamom tissues critically hinder the RNA extraction procedure. Hence, we attempted several methods for obtaining intact mRNA and small RNA from various cardamom tissues. It was found that protocols involving a combination of commercial kits and conventional CTAB (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) methods yielded RNA with good purity, higher yield, and good integrity. The total RNA isolated through this approach was found to be amenable for transcriptome and small RNA analysis through next-generation sequencing platforms.

  11. A general method for rapid and cost-efficient large-scale production of 5′ capped RNA

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anna-Lisa; Neu, Ancilla; Sprangers, Remco

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic mRNA 5′ cap structure is indispensible for pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export, translation initiation, and mRNA stability. Despite this importance, structural and biophysical studies that involve capped RNA are challenging and rare due to the lack of a general method to prepare mRNA in sufficient quantities. Here, we show that the vaccinia capping enzyme can be used to produce capped RNA in the amounts that are required for large-scale structural studies. We have therefore designed an efficient expression and purification protocol for the vaccinia capping enzyme. Using this approach, the reaction scale can be increased in a cost-efficient manner, where the yields of the capped RNA solely depend on the amount of available uncapped RNA target. Using a large number of RNA substrates, we show that the efficiency of the capping reaction is largely independent of the sequence, length, and secondary structure of the RNA, which makes our approach generally applicable. We demonstrate that the capped RNA can be directly used for quantitative biophysical studies, including fluorescence anisotropy and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In combination with 13C-methyl-labeled S-adenosyl methionine, the methyl groups in the RNA can be labeled for methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy. Finally, we show that our approach can produce both cap-0 and cap-1 RNA in high amounts. In summary, we here introduce a general and straightforward method that opens new means for structural and functional studies of proteins and enzymes in complex with capped RNA. PMID:27368341

  12. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  13. A method of isolating treadmill shock and vibration on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.

    1989-01-01

    A major problem is currently felt to exist in the implementation of materials processing on a spacecraft. Crystal growers place requirements of one micro-g or less on the vehicle. Simple math produces startling figures for such a restriction e.g., for each ton of vehicle mass with 10(-6) g acceleration limit; Perturbing Force limit, F = .002 lb. For each 10(5) lbs F = 0.1 lb. For each 10(6) lbs F = 1.0 lb. Forces generated by normal human movement on spacecraft of 5x10(5) pounds weight are on an order-of-magnitude greater than allowed by this specification and forces generated by locomotion on a treadmill are more than two orders-of-magnitude greater. Other exercises and normal onboard functions generate forces in between. To accommodate many essential functions it is obvious that even on a vehicle as large as Space Station, a reduction of more than two orders of magnitude in force is required. Commonly used passive shock and vibration isolation devices are complex, heavy, and also would have difficulty meeting the requirements. However, by a new arrangement, adequate isolation can be obtained. Isolation of the treadmill will be treated since it is considered the most significant disturbance at this time.

  14. Sensor fusion methods for high performance active vibration isolation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, C.; Matichard, F.

    2015-04-01

    Sensor noise often limits the performance of active vibration isolation systems. Inertial sensors used in such systems can be selected through a wide variety of instrument noise and size characteristics. However, the most sensitive instruments are often the biggest and the heaviest. Consequently, high-performance active isolators sometimes embed many tens of kilograms in instrumentation. The weight and size of instrumentation can add unwanted constraint on the design. It tends to lower the structures natural frequencies and reduces the collocation between sensors and actuators. Both effects tend to reduce feedback control performance and stability. This paper discusses sensor fusion techniques that can be used in order to increase the control bandwidth (and/or the stability). For this, the low noise inertial instrument signal dominates the fusion at low frequency to provide vibration isolation. Other types of sensors (relative motion, smaller but noisier inertial, or force sensors) are used at higher frequencies to increase stability. Several sensor fusion configurations are studied. The paper shows the improvement that can be expected for several case studies including a rigid equipment, a flexible equipment, and a flexible equipment mounted on a flexible support structure.

  15. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2.

  16. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2. PMID:27473993

  17. Standardization of sample collection, isolation and analysis methods in extracellular vesicle research

    PubMed Central

    Witwer, Kenneth W.; Buzás, Edit I.; Bemis, Lynne T.; Bora, Adriana; Lässer, Cecilia; Lötvall, Jan; Nolte-‘t Hoen, Esther N.; Piper, Melissa G.; Sivaraman, Sarada; Skog, Johan; Théry, Clotilde; Wauben, Marca H.; Hochberg, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of publications on extracellular RNA (exRNA) and extracellular vesicles (EV) has highlighted the potential of these molecules and vehicles as biomarkers of disease and therapeutic targets. These findings have created a paradigm shift, most prominently in the field of oncology, prompting expanded interest in the field and dedication of funds for EV research. At the same time, understanding of EV subtypes, biogenesis, cargo and mechanisms of shuttling remains incomplete. The techniques that can be harnessed to address the many gaps in our current knowledge were the subject of a special workshop of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) in New York City in October 2012. As part of the “ISEV Research Seminar: Analysis and Function of RNA in Extracellular Vesicles (evRNA)”, 6 round-table discussions were held to provide an evidence-based framework for isolation and analysis of EV, purification and analysis of associated RNA molecules, and molecular engineering of EV for therapeutic intervention. This article arises from the discussion of EV isolation and analysis at that meeting. The conclusions of the round table are supplemented with a review of published materials and our experience. Controversies and outstanding questions are identified that may inform future research and funding priorities. While we emphasize the need for standardization of specimen handling, appropriate normative controls, and isolation and analysis techniques to facilitate comparison of results, we also recognize that continual development and evaluation of techniques will be necessary as new knowledge is amassed. On many points, consensus has not yet been achieved and must be built through the reporting of well-controlled experiments. PMID:24009894

  18. A Method to Target and Isolate Airway-innervating Sensory Neurons in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kaelberer, Melanie Maya; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory nerves transduce thermal, mechanical, chemical, and noxious stimuli caused by both endogenous and environmental agents. The cell bodies of these afferent neurons are located within the sensory ganglia. Sensory ganglia innervate a specific organ or portion of the body. For instance, the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are located in the vertebral column and extend processes throughout the body and limbs. The trigeminal ganglia are located in the skull and innervate the face, and upper airways. Vagal afferents of the nodose ganglia extend throughout the gut, heart, and lungs. The nodose neurons control a diverse array of functions such as: respiratory rate, airway irritation, and cough reflexes. Thus, to understand and manipulate their function, it is critical to identify and isolate airway specific neuronal sub-populations. In the mouse, the airways are exposed to a fluorescent tracer dye, Fast Blue, for retrograde tracing of airway-specific nodose neurons. The nodose ganglia are dissociated and fluorescence activated cell (FAC) sorting is used to collect dye positive cells. Next, high quality ribonucleic acid (RNA) is extracted from dye positive cells for next generation sequencing. Using this method airway specific neuronal gene expression is determined. PMID:27168016

  19. Correlation between genotypes of tRNA-linked short tandem repeats in Entamoeba nuttalli isolates and the geographical distribution of host rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Feng, Meng; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Cheng, Xunjia; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several polymorphic markers, including serine-rich protein genes, have been used for the genotyping of isolates from the morphologically indistinguishable protozoan parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba nuttalli. Genotypes of tRNA-linked short tandem repeats (STRs) are highly polymorphic, but the correlation with geographical distribution is unknown. We have recently isolated 15 E. nuttalli strains from wild rhesus macaques in four locations in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The sequences of the serine-rich protein genes of the E. nuttalli strains differed among the four locations. In this study, we analyzed tRNA-linked STRs in six loci of the 15 strains. Two genotypes were found in loci N-K2, R-R, and S(TGA)-D, three in locus S-Q, and five in locus D-A. In locus A-L, one major genotype and ten minor genotypes were found, resulting in mixtures of two to six genotypes in eight strains. By combination of the main genotypes in the six loci, the 15 strains were divided into nine genotypes. The genotypes observed in E. nuttalli strains were quite different from those in E. histolytica and E. dispar. A phylogenetic tree constructed from tRNA-linked STRs in the six loci reflected the different places of isolation. These results suggest that sequence diversity of tRNA-linked STRs in E. nuttalli occurs with relatively high frequency and might be a marker of geographical distribution of host rhesus macaques, even in limited areas.

  20. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  1. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade.

  2. A Screening Method for the Isolation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Producing Purple Non-sulfur Photosynthetic Bacteria from Natural Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of biopolyesters accumulated by a variety of microorganisms as carbon and energy storage under starvation conditions. We focused on marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria as host microorganisms for PHA production and developed a method for their isolation from natural seawater. To identify novel PHA-producing marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, natural seawaters were cultured in nutrient-rich medium for purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, and twelve pink- or red-pigmented colonies were picked up. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis revealed that four isolates synthesized PHA at levels ranging from 0.5 to 24.4 wt% of cell dry weight. The 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis revealed that one isolate (HM2) showed 100% identity to marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria. In conclusion, we have demonstrated in this study that PHA-producing marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria can be isolated from natural seawater under nutrient-rich conditions. PMID:27708640

  3. A method to distinguish morphologically similar Peromyscus species using extracellular RNA and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Veronica A; Clarke, Benjamin L; Crossland, Janet P; Bemis, Lynne T

    2016-09-01

    A method applying high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis to PCR products copied and amplified from extracellular RNA (exRNA) has been developed to distinguish two morphologically similar Peromyscus species: Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus. P. leucopus is considered the primary reservoir host of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent for Lyme disease in North America. In northern Minnesota the habitat ranges of P. leucopus overlaps with that of P. maniculatus. Serum samples from live mice of both species were collected from cheek bleeds, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was extracted, copied using reverse transcription and amplified by PCR followed by HRM analysis. A circulating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was identified which differed at seven nucleotides between the two species and a method of HRM analysis was developed allowing rapid species confirmation. In the future, this HRM based method may be adapted for additional species. PMID:27349513

  4. A method to distinguish morphologically similar Peromyscus species using extracellular RNA and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Veronica A; Clarke, Benjamin L; Crossland, Janet P; Bemis, Lynne T

    2016-09-01

    A method applying high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis to PCR products copied and amplified from extracellular RNA (exRNA) has been developed to distinguish two morphologically similar Peromyscus species: Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus. P. leucopus is considered the primary reservoir host of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent for Lyme disease in North America. In northern Minnesota the habitat ranges of P. leucopus overlaps with that of P. maniculatus. Serum samples from live mice of both species were collected from cheek bleeds, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was extracted, copied using reverse transcription and amplified by PCR followed by HRM analysis. A circulating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was identified which differed at seven nucleotides between the two species and a method of HRM analysis was developed allowing rapid species confirmation. In the future, this HRM based method may be adapted for additional species.

  5. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation.

  6. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation. PMID:27613736

  7. A novel min-cost flow method for estimating transcript expression with RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Through transcription and alternative splicing, a gene can be transcribed into different RNA sequences (isoforms), depending on the individual, on the tissue the cell is in, or in response to some stimuli. Recent RNA-Seq technology allows for new high-throughput ways for isoform identification and quantification based on short reads, and various methods have been put forward for this non-trivial problem. Results In this paper we propose a novel radically different method based on minimum-cost network flows. This has a two-fold advantage: on the one hand, it translates the problem as an established one in the field of network flows, which can be solved in polynomial time, with different existing solvers; on the other hand, it is general enough to encompass many of the previous proposals under the least sum of squares model. Our method works as follows: in order to find the transcripts which best explain, under a given fitness model, a splicing graph resulting from an RNA-Seq experiment, we find a min-cost flow in an offset flow network, under an equivalent cost model. Under very weak assumptions on the fitness model, the optimal flow can be computed in polynomial time. Parsimoniously splitting the flow back into few path transcripts can be done with any of the heuristics and approximations available from the theory of network flows. In the present implementation, we choose the simple strategy of repeatedly removing the heaviest path. Conclusions We proposed a new very general method based on network flows for a multiassembly problem arising from isoform identification and quantification with RNA-Seq. Experimental results on prediction accuracy show that our method is very competitive with popular tools such as Cufflinks and IsoLasso. Our tool, called Traph (Transcrips in gRAPHs), is available at: http://www.cs.helsinki.fi/gsa/traph/. PMID:23734627

  8. Comparative RNA-seq-Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Virulence Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Strains Isolated from Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Natacha; Belas, Adriana; Oliveira, Manuela; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is often associated with pyoderma, which can turn into a life-threatening disease. The dissemination of highly resistant isolates has occurred in the last 10 years and has challenged antimicrobial treatment of these infections considerably. We have compared the carriage of virulence genes and biofilm formation between methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MRSP and MSSP, respectively) isolates and their in vitro gene expression profiles by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). Isolates were relatively unevenly distributed among the four agr groups, and agr type III predominated in MRSP. Five virulence genes were detected in all isolates. Only the spsO gene was significantly associated with MSSP isolates (P = 0.04). All isolates produced biofilm in brain heart infusion broth (BHIB)–4% NaCl. MSSP isolates produced more biofilm on BHIB and BHIB–1% glucose media than MRSP isolates (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02, respectively). Virulence genes encoding surface proteins and toxins (spsA, spsB, spsD, spsK, spsL, spsN, nucC, coa, and luk-I) and also prophage genes (encoding phage capsid protein, phage infection protein, two phage portal proteins, and a phage-like protein) were highly expressed in the MRSP isolate (compared with the MSSP isolate), suggesting they may play a role in the rapid and widespread dissemination of MRSP. This study indicates that MRSP may upregulate surface proteins, which may increase the adherence of MRSP isolates (especially sequence type 71 [ST71]) to corneocytes. MSSP isolates may have an increased ability to form biofilm under acidic circumstances, through upregulation of the entire arc operon. Complete understanding of S. pseudintermedius pathogenesis and host-pathogen signal interaction during infections is critical for the treatment and prevention of S. pseudintermedius infections. PMID:26621622

  9. A new method for discovering disease-specific MiRNA-target regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Baglioni, Miriam; Russo, Francesco; Geraci, Filippo; Rizzo, Milena; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Pellegrini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Genes and their expression regulation are among the key factors in the comprehension of the genesis and development of complex diseases. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators that play an important role in gene expression since they are frequently deregulated in pathologies like cardiovascular disease and cancer. In vitro validation of miRNA--targets regulation is often too expensive and time consuming to be carried out for every possible alternative. As a result, a tool able to provide some criteria to prioritize trials is becoming a pressing need. Moreover, before planning in vitro experiments, the scientist needs to evaluate the miRNA-target genes interaction network. In this paper we describe the miRable method whose purpose is to identify new potentially relevant genes and their interaction networks associate to a specific pathology. To achieve this goal miRable follows a system biology approach integrating together general-purpose medical knowledge (literature, Protein-Protein Interaction networks, prediction tools) and pathology specific data (gene expression data). A case study on Prostate Cancer has shown that miRable is able to: 1) find new potential miRNA-targets pairs, 2) highlight novel genes potentially involved in a disease but never or little studied before, 3) reconstruct all possible regulatory subnetworks starting from the literature to expand the knowledge on the regulation of miRNA regulatory mechanisms.

  10. Evaluation of the impact of RNA preservation methods of spiders for de novo transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kono, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yusuke; Tomita, Masaru; Arakawa, Kazuharu

    2016-05-01

    With advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, de novo transcriptome sequencing and assembly has become a cost-effective method to obtain comprehensive genetic information of a species of interest, especially in nonmodel species with large genomes such as spiders. However, high-quality RNA is essential for successful sequencing, and sample preservation conditions require careful consideration for the effective storage of field-collected samples. To this end, we report a streamlined feasibility study of various storage conditions and their effects on de novo transcriptome assembly results. The storage parameters considered include temperatures ranging from room temperature to -80°C; preservatives, including ethanol, RNAlater, TRIzol and RNAlater-ICE; and sample submersion states. As a result, intact RNA was extracted and assembly was successful when samples were preserved at low temperatures regardless of the type of preservative used. The assemblies as well as the gene expression profiles were shown to be robust to RNA degradation, when 30 million 150-bp paired-end reads are obtained. The parameters for sample storage, RNA extraction, library preparation, sequencing and in silico assembly considered in this work provide a guideline for the study of field-collected samples of spiders. PMID:26561354

  11. Differential Expression Analysis for RNA-Seq: An Overview of Statistical Methods and Computational Software

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huei-Chung; Niu, Yi; Qin, Li-Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing has recently emerged as a powerful alternative to microarrays for the high-throughput profiling of gene expression. In order to account for the discrete nature of RNA sequencing data, new statistical methods and computational tools have been developed for the analysis of differential expression to identify genes that are relevant to a disease such as cancer. In this paper, it is thus timely to provide an overview of these analysis methods and tools. For readers with statistical background, we also review the parameter estimation algorithms and hypothesis testing strategies used in these methods. PMID:26688660

  12. Methods for isolation and viability assessment of biological organisms

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia Edith; Baker, Sarah Elyse; Bond, Tiziana; Chang, Allan Shih-Ping

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of biological or chemical organisms can be accomplished using a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) system. The SERS system can be a single or a stacked plurality of photonic crystal membranes with noble-metal lined through pores for flowing analyte potentially containing the biological or chemical organisms. The through pores can be adapted to trap individual biological or chemical organisms and emit SERS spectra, which can then be detected by a detector and further analyzed for viability of the biological or chemical organism.

  13. Rapid method for isolating targeted organic chemicals from biological matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, J.E.; Griest, W.H.; Watson, A.P.; Buchanan, M.V. ); Hazen, K.H. )

    1994-01-01

    The initial development is reported for a novel countercurrent filtration/dialysis and solid phase extractant system for the rapid isolation of low molecular weight target compounds from biological media. Except for piperazine (a highly water-soluble drug), recoveries of 50 - 95% were achieved for chemical warfare agent simulants and anthelmintic drugs extracted from meat, grain, or milk. The results suggest the potential for broad applications to complex samples such as environmental media and physiological specimens which traditionally require extensive fractionation prior to analysis.

  14. Isolation of RNA from milk somatic cells as an alternative to biopsies of mammary tissue for nutrigenomic studies in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Suárez-Vega, A; Arranz, J J; Frutos, P

    2016-10-01

    Nutrigenomic studies of mammary lipogenesis in ruminants often rely on the use of mammary tissue (MT) collected either by biopsy or at slaughter. However, isolating RNA from milk would be a useful and cost-effective technique that may avoid distress to the animal and facilitate the collection of samples in time series experiments. This assay was therefore conducted to test the hypothesis that RNA extracted from milk somatic cells (MSC) in dairy sheep would be a feasible alternative to the performance of MT biopsies for nutrigenomic analyses. To meet this objective, 8 lactating Assaf ewes were divided in 2 groups and offered a total mixed ration without supplementation (control) or supplemented with 2.4% dry matter of fish oil, which was known not only to elicit milk fat depression but also to downregulate the expression of some candidate genes involved in mammary lipogenesis. Total RNA was extracted from MSC and biopsied MT to examine whether the potential changes in the abundance of transcripts was similarly detected with both RNA sources. Milk fatty acid profile was also analyzed by gas chromatography, and variations in mRNA abundance were determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Values of RNA integrity number were always ≥7.7. The expected and designed decrease of milk fat concentration with fish oil (-29%), was associated with a lower transcript abundance of genes coding for enzymes involved in fatty acid activation (ACSS1), de novo synthesis (ACACA and FASN), uptake from plasma lipids (LPL), and esterification of fatty acids to glycerol (LPIN1), as well as of a transcription factor that may regulate their expression (INSIG1). Stable mRNA levels were showed in other candidate genes, such as FABP3, GPAT4, or SCD. Changes due to the dietary treatment were similarly detected with both RNA sources (MSC and MT biopsies), which supports the initial hypothesis and would validate the use of milk as an alternative RNA source for nutrigenomic analyses in

  15. Isolation of RNA from milk somatic cells as an alternative to biopsies of mammary tissue for nutrigenomic studies in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Suárez-Vega, A; Arranz, J J; Frutos, P

    2016-10-01

    Nutrigenomic studies of mammary lipogenesis in ruminants often rely on the use of mammary tissue (MT) collected either by biopsy or at slaughter. However, isolating RNA from milk would be a useful and cost-effective technique that may avoid distress to the animal and facilitate the collection of samples in time series experiments. This assay was therefore conducted to test the hypothesis that RNA extracted from milk somatic cells (MSC) in dairy sheep would be a feasible alternative to the performance of MT biopsies for nutrigenomic analyses. To meet this objective, 8 lactating Assaf ewes were divided in 2 groups and offered a total mixed ration without supplementation (control) or supplemented with 2.4% dry matter of fish oil, which was known not only to elicit milk fat depression but also to downregulate the expression of some candidate genes involved in mammary lipogenesis. Total RNA was extracted from MSC and biopsied MT to examine whether the potential changes in the abundance of transcripts was similarly detected with both RNA sources. Milk fatty acid profile was also analyzed by gas chromatography, and variations in mRNA abundance were determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Values of RNA integrity number were always ≥7.7. The expected and designed decrease of milk fat concentration with fish oil (-29%), was associated with a lower transcript abundance of genes coding for enzymes involved in fatty acid activation (ACSS1), de novo synthesis (ACACA and FASN), uptake from plasma lipids (LPL), and esterification of fatty acids to glycerol (LPIN1), as well as of a transcription factor that may regulate their expression (INSIG1). Stable mRNA levels were showed in other candidate genes, such as FABP3, GPAT4, or SCD. Changes due to the dietary treatment were similarly detected with both RNA sources (MSC and MT biopsies), which supports the initial hypothesis and would validate the use of milk as an alternative RNA source for nutrigenomic analyses in

  16. A simple and efficient DNA isolation method for Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, Jelena M; Stojanović, Danilo; Banović, Bojana; Jančić, Radiša

    2012-12-01

    We report an efficient, simple, and cost-effective protocol for the isolation of genomic DNA from an aromatic medicinal plant, common sage (Salvia officinalis L.). Our modification of the standard CTAB protocol includes two polyphenol adsorbents (PVP 10 and activated charcoal), high NaCl concentrations (4 M) for removing polysaccharides, and repeated Sevag treatment to remove proteins and other carbohydrate contaminants. The mean DNA yield obtained with our Protocol 2 was 330.6 μg DNA g(-1) of dry leaf tissue, and the absorbance ratios 260/280 and 260/230 nm averaged 1.909 and 1.894, respectively, revealing lack of contamination. PCR amplifications of one nuclear (26S rDNA) and one chloroplast (rps16-trnK) locus indicated that our DNA isolation protocol may be used in common sage and other aromatic and medicinal plants containing essential oil for molecular biologic and biotechnological studies and for population genetics, phylogeographic, and conservation surveys in which nuclear or chloroplast genomes would be studied in large numbers of individuals.

  17. Selective amplification and sequencing of cyclic phosphate-containing RNAs by the cP-RNA-seq method

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Shozo; Morichika, Keisuke; Kirino, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    RNA digestions catalyzed by many ribonucleases generate RNA fragments containing a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate (cP) at their 3′-termini. However, standard RNA-seq methods are unable to accurately capture cP-containing RNAs because the cP inhibits the adapter ligation reaction. We recently developed a method named “cP-RNA-seq” that is able to selectively amplify and sequence cP-containing RNAs. Here we describe the cP-RNA-seq protocol in which the 3′-termini of all RNAs, except those containing a cP, are cleaved through a periodate treatment after phosphatase treatment, hence subsequent adapter ligation and cDNA amplification steps are exclusively applied to cP-containing RNAs. cP-RNA-seq takes ~6 d, excluding the time required for sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, such downstream assays are not covered in detail in this protocol. Biochemical validation of the existence of cP in the identified RNAs takes ~3 d. Even though the cP-RNA-seq method was developed to identify angiogenin-generating 5′-tRNA halves as a proof of principle, the method should be applicable to global identification of cP-containing RNA repertoires in various transcriptomes. PMID:26866791

  18. Selective amplification and sequencing of cyclic phosphate-containing RNAs by the cP-RNA-seq method.

    PubMed

    Honda, Shozo; Morichika, Keisuke; Kirino, Yohei

    2016-03-01

    RNA digestions catalyzed by many ribonucleases generate RNA fragments that contain a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate (cP) at their 3' termini. However, standard RNA-seq methods are unable to accurately capture cP-containing RNAs because the cP inhibits the adapter ligation reaction. We recently developed a method named cP-RNA-seq that is able to selectively amplify and sequence cP-containing RNAs. Here we describe the cP-RNA-seq protocol in which the 3' termini of all RNAs, except those containing a cP, are cleaved through a periodate treatment after phosphatase treatment; hence, subsequent adapter ligation and cDNA amplification steps are exclusively applied to cP-containing RNAs. cP-RNA-seq takes ∼6 d, excluding the time required for sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, which are not covered in detail in this protocol. Biochemical validation of the existence of cP in the identified RNAs takes ∼3 d. Even though the cP-RNA-seq method was developed to identify angiogenin-generating 5'-tRNA halves as a proof of principle, the method should be applicable to global identification of cP-containing RNA repertoires in various transcriptomes.

  19. Systems and methods for bi-directional energy delivery with galvanic isolation

    DOEpatents

    Kajouke, Lateef A.

    2013-06-18

    Systems and methods are provided for bi-directional energy delivery. A charging system comprises a first bi-directional conversion module, a second bi-directional conversion module, and an isolation module coupled between the first bi-directional conversion module and the second bi-directional conversion module. The isolation module provides galvanic isolation between the first bi-directional conversion module and the second bi-directional conversion module.

  20. A simple and effective method for high quality co-extraction of genomic DNA and total RNA from low biomass Ectocarpus siliculosus, the model brown alga.

    PubMed

    Greco, Maria; Sáez, Claudio A; Brown, Murray T; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model species distributed worldwide in temperate coastal ecosystems. Over 1500 strains of E. siliculosus are available in culture from a broad range of geographic locations and ecological niches. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying its capacity to cope with different environmental and biotic stressors, genomic and transcriptomic studies are necessary; this requires the co-isolation of genomic DNA and total RNA. In brown algae, extraction of nucleic acids is hindered by high concentrations of secondary metabolites that co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Here, we propose a reliable, rapid and cost-effective procedure for the co-isolation of high-quality nucleic acids using small quantities of biomass (25-, 50- and 100 mg) from strains of E. siliculosus (RHO12; LIA4A; EC524 and REP10-11) isolated from sites with different environmental conditions. The procedure employs a high pH extraction buffer (pH 9.5) which contains 100 mM Tris-HCl and 150 mM NaCl, with the addition of 5 mM DTT and 1% sarkosyl to ensure maximum solubility of nucleic acids, effective inhibition of nuclease activity and removal of interfering contaminants (e.g. polysaccharides, polyphenols). The use of sodium acetate together with isopropanol shortened precipitation time and enhanced the yields of DNA/RNA. A phenol:chlorophorm:isoamyl alcohol step was subsequently used to purify the nucleic acids. The present protocol produces high yields of nucleic acids from only 25 mg of fresh algal biomass (0.195 and 0.284 µg mg(-1) fresh weigh of RNA and DNA, respectively) and the high quality of the extracted nucleic acids was confirmed through spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analyses. The isolated RNA can be used directly in downstream applications such as RT-PCR and the genomic DNA was suitable for PCR, producing reliable restriction enzyme digestion patterns. Co-isolation of DNA/RNA from different strains indicates that this method

  1. A simple and effective method for high quality co-extraction of genomic DNA and total RNA from low biomass Ectocarpus siliculosus, the model brown alga.

    PubMed

    Greco, Maria; Sáez, Claudio A; Brown, Murray T; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model species distributed worldwide in temperate coastal ecosystems. Over 1500 strains of E. siliculosus are available in culture from a broad range of geographic locations and ecological niches. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying its capacity to cope with different environmental and biotic stressors, genomic and transcriptomic studies are necessary; this requires the co-isolation of genomic DNA and total RNA. In brown algae, extraction of nucleic acids is hindered by high concentrations of secondary metabolites that co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Here, we propose a reliable, rapid and cost-effective procedure for the co-isolation of high-quality nucleic acids using small quantities of biomass (25-, 50- and 100 mg) from strains of E. siliculosus (RHO12; LIA4A; EC524 and REP10-11) isolated from sites with different environmental conditions. The procedure employs a high pH extraction buffer (pH 9.5) which contains 100 mM Tris-HCl and 150 mM NaCl, with the addition of 5 mM DTT and 1% sarkosyl to ensure maximum solubility of nucleic acids, effective inhibition of nuclease activity and removal of interfering contaminants (e.g. polysaccharides, polyphenols). The use of sodium acetate together with isopropanol shortened precipitation time and enhanced the yields of DNA/RNA. A phenol:chlorophorm:isoamyl alcohol step was subsequently used to purify the nucleic acids. The present protocol produces high yields of nucleic acids from only 25 mg of fresh algal biomass (0.195 and 0.284 µg mg(-1) fresh weigh of RNA and DNA, respectively) and the high quality of the extracted nucleic acids was confirmed through spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analyses. The isolated RNA can be used directly in downstream applications such as RT-PCR and the genomic DNA was suitable for PCR, producing reliable restriction enzyme digestion patterns. Co-isolation of DNA/RNA from different strains indicates that this method

  2. A Simple and Effective Method for High Quality Co-Extraction of Genomic DNA and Total RNA from Low Biomass Ectocarpus siliculosus, the Model Brown Alga

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Maria; Sáez, Claudio A.; Brown, Murray T.; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model species distributed worldwide in temperate coastal ecosystems. Over 1500 strains of E. siliculosus are available in culture from a broad range of geographic locations and ecological niches. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying its capacity to cope with different environmental and biotic stressors, genomic and transcriptomic studies are necessary; this requires the co-isolation of genomic DNA and total RNA. In brown algae, extraction of nucleic acids is hindered by high concentrations of secondary metabolites that co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Here, we propose a reliable, rapid and cost-effective procedure for the co-isolation of high-quality nucleic acids using small quantities of biomass (25-, 50- and 100 mg) from strains of E. siliculosus (RHO12; LIA4A; EC524 and REP10–11) isolated from sites with different environmental conditions. The procedure employs a high pH extraction buffer (pH 9.5) which contains 100 mM Tris-HCl and 150 mM NaCl, with the addition of 5 mM DTT and 1% sarkosyl to ensure maximum solubility of nucleic acids, effective inhibition of nuclease activity and removal of interfering contaminants (e.g. polysaccharides, polyphenols). The use of sodium acetate together with isopropanol shortened precipitation time and enhanced the yields of DNA/RNA. A phenol:chlorophorm:isoamyl alcohol step was subsequently used to purify the nucleic acids. The present protocol produces high yields of nucleic acids from only 25 mg of fresh algal biomass (0.195 and 0.284 µg mg−1 fresh weigh of RNA and DNA, respectively) and the high quality of the extracted nucleic acids was confirmed through spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analyses. The isolated RNA can be used directly in downstream applications such as RT-PCR and the genomic DNA was suitable for PCR, producing reliable restriction enzyme digestion patterns. Co-isolation of DNA/RNA from different strains indicates that this

  3. Isolation of Inositol Hexaphosphate (IHP)-Degrading Bacteria from Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphal Compartments Using a Modified Baiting Method Involving Alginate Beads Containing IHP

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Shintaro; Saito, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Phytate (inositol hexaphosphate; IHP)-degrading microbes have been suggested to contribute to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF)-mediated P transfer from IHP to plants; however, no IHP degrader involved in AMF-mediated P transfer has been isolated to date. We herein report the isolation of IHP-degrading bacteria using a modified baiting method. We applied alginate beads as carriers of IHP powder, and used them as recoverable IHP in the AM fungal compartment of plant cultivation experiments. P transfer from IHP in alginate beads via AMF was confirmed, and extracted DNA from alginate beads was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis targeting the 16S rRNA gene and a clone library method for the beta-propeller phytase (BPP) gene. The diversities of the 16S rRNA and BPP genes of microbes growing on IHP beads were simple and those of Sphingomonas spp. and Caulobacter spp. dominated. A total of 187 IHP-utilizing bacteria were isolated and identified, and they were consistent with the results of DNA analysis. Furthermore, some isolated Sphingomonas spp. and Caulobacter sp. showed IHP-degrading activity. Therefore, we successfully isolated dominant IHP-degrading bacteria from IHP in an AMF hyphal compartment. These strains may contribute to P transfer from IHP via AMF. PMID:27383681

  4. Sequence of the Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Gene of Perkinsus atlanticus-like Isolated from Carpet Shell Clam in Galicia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Antonio; Lorenzo, Gema; Ordás, M Camino; Gouy, Manolo; Novoa, Beatriz

    2000-09-01

    Parasites identified as Perkinsus atlanticus have been reported infecting carpet shell clams in Galicia (northwest Spain). We have sequenced the 18S ribosomal RNA gene of in vitro cultured Perkinsus atlanticus-like or hypnospores from diseased clams, and compared it with the same genomic region from P. marinus and Perkinsus sp. We have also compared the sequence of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, ITS 2, and 5.8S rRNA from our isolate with the P. atlanticus GenBank sequence. The phylogenetic analysis of our cultured parasite based on the 18S gene led us to conclude that this isolate is not related to the genus Perkinsus but to the protists Anurofeca, Ichthyophonus, and Psorospermium, located near the animal-fungal divergence. These last two genera have been included, together with Dermocystidium, in the newly described DRIPs (Dermocystidium, rossete agent, Ichthyophonus, and Psorospermium) clade, recently named Mesomycetozoa.

  5. Noninvasive method of DNA isolation from fecal epithelial tissue of dairy animals.

    PubMed

    Chandra De, Bidhan; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Brahma, Biswajit; Goutam, Devika; Jaiswal, Latika; Sharma, Ashutosh; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    A novel noninvasive genomic DNA isolation protocol from fecal tissue, by the proteinase K digestion and guanidine hydrochloride extraction method, was assessed for the genotyping of cattle and buffalo. The epithelial tissues present on the surface of the feces were used as source for isolation of genomic DNA. The DNA isolated from fecal tissue was found to be similar as those obtained from other body tissues such as skin, brain, liver, kidney, and muscle. The quality of DNA was checked by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We successfully amplified a 320 bp MHC class II DRB gene and a 125 bp mt-DNA D-loop region from isolated genomic DNA of cattle. Thus, the DNA isolated using this method was suitable for common molecular biology methods, such as restriction enzyme digestion and genotyping of dairy animals through PCR.

  6. New insights from cluster analysis methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Emily; Heitsch, Christine

    2016-05-01

    A widening gap exists between the best practices for RNA secondary structure prediction developed by computational researchers and the methods used in practice by experimentalists. Minimum free energy predictions, although broadly used, are outperformed by methods which sample from the Boltzmann distribution and data mine the results. In particular, moving beyond the single structure prediction paradigm yields substantial gains in accuracy. Furthermore, the largest improvements in accuracy and precision come from viewing secondary structures not at the base pair level but at lower granularity/higher abstraction. This suggests that random errors affecting precision and systematic ones affecting accuracy are both reduced by this 'fuzzier' view of secondary structures. Thus experimentalists who are willing to adopt a more rigorous, multilayered approach to secondary structure prediction by iterating through these levels of granularity will be much better able to capture fundamental aspects of RNA base pairing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:278-294. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  7. A new heuristic method for approximating the number of local minima in partial RNA energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Andreas A; Day, Luke; Abdelhadi Ep Souki, Ouala; Steinhöfel, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of energy landscapes plays an important role in mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation. Among the main features of interest are the number and distribution of local minima within the energy landscape. Granier and Kallel proposed in 2002 a new sampling procedure for estimating the number of local minima. In the present paper, we focus on improved heuristic implementations of the general framework devised by Granier and Kallel with regard to run-time behaviour and accuracy of predictions. The new heuristic method is demonstrated for the case of partial energy landscapes induced by RNA secondary structures. While the computation of minimum free energy RNA secondary structures has been studied for a long time, the analysis of folding landscapes has gained momentum over the past years in the context of co-transcriptional folding and deeper insights into cell processes. The new approach has been applied to ten RNA instances of length between 99 nt and 504 nt and their respective partial energy landscapes defined by secondary structures within an energy offset ΔE above the minimum free energy conformation. The number of local minima within the partial energy landscapes ranges from 1440 to 3441. Our heuristic method produces for the best approximations on average a deviation below 3.0% from the true number of local minima.

  8. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  9. General principles and methods for routine automated microRNA in situ hybridization and double labeling with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Singh, U; Keirstead, N; Wolujczyk, A; Odin, M; Albassam, M; Garrido, R

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression by binding to complementary sequences on target messenger RNA transcripts. Changes in the expression levels of specific miRNAs have been associated with a variety of disease conditions. We developed a reliable and high throughput in situ hybridization (ISH) method and optimized tissue fixation conditions for formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. ISH methods were automated to visualize four miRNAs: miRNA-145 (smooth muscle cells), miRNA-126 (endothelial cells), miRNA-21 (neoplastic cells) and U6 small nuclear RNA (nuclear marker) using locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes and the Discovery Ultra Ventana(™) platform. The FFPE tissue sections were pretreated with protease 3, hybridized with probe concentrations of ≤ 25 nM; signal was detected using an enhanced, polymer-based detection method. The ISH signal was stronger and more uniform for tissue samples fixed for ≥ 48 h. To investigate the specificity of the method, we developed an automated dual ISH for miRNA-145 coupled with immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle actin, which confirmed the specific distribution of miRNA-145 to smooth muscle cells. These methods may be used routinely for exploratory studies of biomarker development, sample screening and understanding the role of miRNA in the pathophysiology of specific diseases. PMID:24106971

  10. Lysine directed cross-linking of viral DNA-RNA:DNA hybrid substrate to the isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Guaitiao, Juan P; Zúñiga, Roberto A; Roth, Monica J; Leon, Oscar

    2004-02-10

    An isolated ribonuclease H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is capable of specifically removing the tRNA primer within an oligonucleotide mimic. The determinants for substrate specificity are located in a region within the terminal octanucleotide of the acceptor stem of the tRNA. Recognition of the substrate by HIV-1 RNase H was analyzed by the introduction of a cross-linking reagent directed toward lysines on the thymine residue complementary to the scissile bond, facing the major groove of the DNA-RNA:DNA substrate. Cross-linking of the modified substrate to RNase H required the presence of Mn(2+). The Mn(2+) titration of cross-linking paralleled the Mn(2+) requirement for activity. Modified substrate quenched with glycine prior to binding of substrate was efficiently cleaved, whereas the RNA within the cross-linked product was intact. Tryptic digestion of the isolated RNase H-nucleic acid covalent complex revealed a main cross-linked peptide whose N-terminal peptide sequence is VVTLTDTTNQ, indicating that the cross-linked lysine corresponds to Lys476. Cross-linking to K476 was confirmed by analysis of K476C RNase H. Mutation of K476C disrupted the chemical cross-linking while maintaining activity. On the basis of the size of the cross-linker arm, the results indicate that K476 is in closer proximity to the tRNA mimic substrate within the isolated RNase H domain than observed for the RNase H-resistant polypurine tract (PPT) substrate within the HIV-1 RT.

  11. Design and Methods of Large-Scale RNA Interference Screens in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Tong, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila is an ideal model system for addressing important questions in biology. The use of RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown gene expression in fly tissues is both very effective and relatively simple. In the past few decades, genome-wide UAS-RNAi transgenic libraries and thousands of Gal4 strains have been generated and have facilitated large-scale in vivo RNAi screening. Here, we discuss methods for the design and performance of a large-scale in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila. Furthermore, methods for the validation of results and analysis of data will be introduced. PMID:27581292

  12. Direct identification and discernment of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare using a real-time RNA isothermal amplification and detection method.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenling; Li, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Song; Yang, Hua; Lu, Junmei; Zhu, Honglei; Hu, Zhongyi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish a real-time simultaneous amplification and testing method for identification and discernment of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare (SAT-MAC assay) and to evaluate the efficiency with which this method can detect isolated strains and clinical sputum specimens. The specific 16S rRNA sequences of M. avium and M. intracellulare were used as targets to design RNA probes and a reverse transcription primer containing T7 promoter. RNA isothermal amplification and real-time fluorescence detection were performed at 42 °C. SAT-MAC assay, culture tests on Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) culture medium and PCR-sequencing were used to test the clinical isolated strains and sputum specimens. The limit of detection (LOD) of M. avium and M. intracellulare by SAT-MAC was found to be 30 CFU/mL and 20 CFU/mL. SAT-MAC showed high specificity in 21 species of mycobacteria standard strains and 5 species of non-mycobacteria bacteria. Using PCR-sequencing as the reference method, both rates of SAT-MAC assay for identifying M. avium and M. intracellulare from clinical isolates were 100% (259/259). Consistent with the results of L-J culture combined PCR-sequencing, the coincidence rate of SAT-MAC assay in clinical sputum specimens was 100% (369/369) for M. avium and 99.19% (366/369) for Mycobacterium intracellular. The SAT-MAC assay can identify and distinguish M. avium and M. intracellulare rapidly and accurately. It may be suitable for use in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  13. Rapid RNA analysis of individual Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ly, Kien; Reid, Suzanne J; Snell, Russell G

    2015-01-01

    Traditional RNA extraction methods rely on the use of hazardous chemicals such as phenol, chloroform, guanidinium thiocyanate to disrupt cells and inactivate RNAse simultaneously. RNA isolation from Caenorhabditis elegans presents another challenge due to its tough cuticle, therefore several repeated freeze-thaw cycles may be needed to disrupt the cuticle before the cell contents are released. In addition, a large number of animals are required for successful RNA isolation. To overcome these issues, we have developed a simple and efficient method using proteinase K and a brief heat treatment to release RNA of quality suitable for quantitative PCR analysis.The benefits of the method are: •Faster and safer compared to conventional RNA extraction methods•Released RNA can be used directly for cDNA synthesis without purification•As little as a single worm is sufficient.

  14. Isolation of infectious Zika virus from saliva and prolonged viral RNA shedding in a traveller returning from the Dominican Republic to Italy, January 2016.

    PubMed

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Berto, Alessandro; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Franchin, Elisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We report the isolation of infectious Zika virus (ZIKV) in cell culture from the saliva of a patient who developed a febrile illness after returning from the Dominican Republic to Italy, in January 2016. The patient had prolonged shedding of viral RNA in saliva and urine, at higher load than in blood, for up to 29 days after symptom onset. Sequencing of ZIKV genome showed relatedness with strains from Latin America.

  15. Comparison of Subtyping Methods for Differentiating Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates Obtained from Food Animal Sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular characterization (e.g. DNA-based typing methods) of Salmonella isolates is frequently employed to compare and distinguish clinical isolates recovered from animals, foodborne disease and nosocomial infections. In this study, we compared the ability of different phenotyping and genotyping m...

  16. Isolating Viral and Host RNA Sequences from Archival Material and Production of cDNA Libraries for High-Throughput DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongli; Sheng, Zong-Mei; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2015-05-01

    The vast majority of surgical biopsy and post-mortem tissue samples are formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE), but this process leads to RNA degradation that limits gene expression analysis. As an example, the viral RNA genome of the 1918 pandemic influenza A virus was previously determined in a 9-year effort by overlapping RT-PCR from post-mortem samples. Using the protocols described here, the full genome of the 1918 virus was determined at high coverage in one high-throughput sequencing run of a cDNA library derived from total RNA of a 1918 FFPE sample after duplex-specific nuclease treatments. This basic methodological approach should assist in the analysis of FFPE tissue samples isolated over the past century from a variety of infectious diseases.

  17. Isolating Viral and Host RNA Sequences from Archival Material and Production of cDNA Libraries for High-Throughput DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongli; Sheng, Zong-Mei; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of surgical biopsy and post-mortem tissue samples are formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE), but this process leads to RNA degradation that limits gene expression analysis. As an example, the viral RNA genome of the 1918 pandemic influenza A virus was previously determined in a 9-year effort by overlapping RT-PCR from post-mortem samples. Using the protocols described here, the full genome of the 1918 virus at high coverage was determined in one high-throughput sequencing run of a cDNA library derived from total RNA of a 1918 FFPE sample after duplex-specific nuclease treatments. This basic methodological approach should assist in the analysis of FFPE tissue samples isolated over the past century from a variety of infectious diseases. PMID:26344216

  18. Establishment of mouse embryonic stem cells from isolated blastomeres and whole embryos using three derivation methods

    PubMed Central

    González, Sheyla; Ibáñez, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study is to compare three previously described mouse embryonic stem cell derivation methods to evaluate the influence of culture conditions, number of isolated blastomeres and embryonic stage in the derivation process. Methods Three embryonic stem cell derivation methods: standard, pre-adhesion and defined culture medium method, were compared in the derivation from isolated blastomeres and whole embryos at 4- and 8-cell stages. Results A total of 200 embryonic stem cell lines were obtained with an efficiency ranging from 1.9% to 72%. Conclusions Using either isolated blastomeres or whole embryos, the highest rates of mouse embryonic stem cell establishment were achieved with the defined culture medium method and efficiencies increased as development progressed. Using isolated blastomeres, efficiencies increased in parallel to the proportion of the embryo volume used to start the derivation process. PMID:20862536

  19. Leptin stimulates uncoupling protein-2 mRNA expression and Krebs cycle activity and inhibits lipid synthesis in isolated rat white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ceddia, R B; William, W N; Lima, F B; Flandin, P; Curi, R; Giacobino, J P

    2000-10-01

    The treatment of rats and mice with leptin causes dramatic body fat reduction and in some cases even disappearance of fat tissue. Here, we report the effects of leptin (10 and 100 ng.mL-1) on isolated rat adipocytes maintained for 15 h in culture. Leptin decreased the incorporation of acetate into total lipids by 30%. A reduction in this incorporation (42%) was still observed after the leptin-cultivated adipocytes were exposed to a supra-physiological insulin concentration (10 000 microU.mL-1). On the other hand, leptin increased acetate degradation by 69% and the maximal activity of citrate synthase by 50% in isolated adipocytes. It also increased oleate degradation by 35 and 50% at concentrations of 10 and 100 ng. mL-1, respectively. Eventually, leptin upregulated the uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) mRNA level by 63% and had no effect on uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) mRNA in isolated adipocytes. The upregulation of UCP2 mRNA might have contributed to the stimulation of acetate and fatty acid degradation by leptin. The peripheral effects of leptin observed in this study are in line with the general energy dissipating role postulated for this hormone and for UCP2. They suggest mechanisms by which adipocytes regulate their fat content by an autocrine pathway without the participation of the central nervous system.

  20. Prevalence of 16S rRNA Methylase Gene rmtB Among Escherichia coli Isolated from Bovine Mastitis in Ningxia, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; He, Tao; Yao, Hong; Zhang, Jin-Bao; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Rong-Ming; Wang, Gui-Qin

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the prevalence and molecular characterization of 16S rRNA methylase gene, rmtB, among Escherichia coli strains isolated from bovine mastitis in China. A total of 245 E. coli isolates were collected from bovine mastitis in China between 2013 and 2014 and were screened for 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA) by polymerase chain reaction. About 5.3% (13/245) of the isolates carried the rmtB gene; the isolates were highly resistant to amikacin. Thirteen rmtB-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M), bla(OXA), and bla(SHV)). All the isolates harbored both bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) genes and two of the isolates were also positive for bla(OXA-1). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis indicated that the nine rmtB-positive strains belonging to ST10 from one farm showed the similar PFGE pattern, indicating a clonal expansion in this farm. S1-PFGE and Southern blotting showed that 12 isolates harbored the rmtB gene in plasmids of two different sizes (≈45 kb [n=10] and ≈48 kb [n=2]), while only 1 strain harbored the rmtB gene in the chromosome. These plasmids were transferable by conjugation studies, and two isolates from two respective farms carried the same size of plasmid, suggesting that the horizontal transmission of plasmids also contributed to the spread of rmtB gene. This is the first report of prevalence of the 16S rRNA methylase gene rmtB among E. coli isolated from bovine mastitis in China, and rmtB-carrying E. coli may pose a threat to the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  1. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shengxue; Chiba, Sotaro; Kondo, Hideki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10) of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1). A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A) tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5′-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1). Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1 and FgV1. PMID:25101066

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Australian isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae using a new broth dilution method.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Märit; Oxberry, Sophy L; Hampson, David J

    2002-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 76 field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae from different states of Australia were tested in a newly developed broth dilution procedure. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, erythromycin, lincomycin and clindamycin. The results from the broth dilution susceptibility testing of 39 of the isolates were compared with results obtained for the same isolates using the agar dilution method. Amongst the isolates tested by broth dilution, 17 were from three farms and had been collected over a number of years. Their pulsed field gel electrophoresis pattern previously had been determined. The broth dilution technique was simple to use, less labor intensive than agar dilution, and gave clear end points. The results obtained using the two methods generally corresponded well, although in a few cases the MIC obtained by broth dilution were lower than those with agar dilution. For the 76 isolates tested by broth dilution, the MIC(90) (mg/l) was: tiamulin, 1; valnemulin, 0.5; tylosin>256; erythromycin>256; lincomycin, 64 and clindamycin, 16. Only minor differences in susceptibility patterns were found amongst isolates from different Australian states. Over all the isolates, and also amongst the isolates obtained from different years on the three farms, there was no trend for the susceptibility of the isolates to alter with time. PMID:11731165

  3. Persistent spread of the rmtB 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene among Escherichia coli isolates from diseased food-producing animals in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Sun, Jian; Cheng, Ke; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Zou, Meng-Ting; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-05-30

    A total of 963 non-duplicate Escherichia coli strains isolated from food-producing animals between 2002 and 2012 were screened for the presence of the 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. Among the positive isolates, resistance determinants to extended spectrum β-lactamases, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes as well as floR and fosA/A3/C2 were detected using PCR analysis. These isolates were further subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing, PCR-based plasmid replicon typing and plasmid analysis. Of the 963 E. coli isolates, 173 (18.0%), 3 (0.3%) and 2 (0.2%) were rmtB-, armA- and rmtE-positive strains, respectively. All the 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene-positive isolates were multidrug resistant and over 90% of them carried one or more type of resistance gene. IncF (especially IncFII) and non-typeable plasmids played the main role in the dissemination of rmtB, followed by the IncN plasmids. Plasmids that harbored rmtB ranged in size from 20kb to 340kb EcoRI-RFLP testing of the 109 rmtB-positive plasmids from different years and different origins suggested that horizontal (among diverse animals) and vertical transfer of IncF, non-typeable and IncN-type plasmids were responsible for the spread of rmtB gene. In summary, our findings highlight that rmtB was the most prevalent 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene, which present persistent spread in food-producing animals in China and a diverse group of plasmids was responsible for rmtB dissemination. PMID:27139028

  4. Persistent spread of the rmtB 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene among Escherichia coli isolates from diseased food-producing animals in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Sun, Jian; Cheng, Ke; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Zou, Meng-Ting; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-05-30

    A total of 963 non-duplicate Escherichia coli strains isolated from food-producing animals between 2002 and 2012 were screened for the presence of the 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. Among the positive isolates, resistance determinants to extended spectrum β-lactamases, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes as well as floR and fosA/A3/C2 were detected using PCR analysis. These isolates were further subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing, PCR-based plasmid replicon typing and plasmid analysis. Of the 963 E. coli isolates, 173 (18.0%), 3 (0.3%) and 2 (0.2%) were rmtB-, armA- and rmtE-positive strains, respectively. All the 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene-positive isolates were multidrug resistant and over 90% of them carried one or more type of resistance gene. IncF (especially IncFII) and non-typeable plasmids played the main role in the dissemination of rmtB, followed by the IncN plasmids. Plasmids that harbored rmtB ranged in size from 20kb to 340kb EcoRI-RFLP testing of the 109 rmtB-positive plasmids from different years and different origins suggested that horizontal (among diverse animals) and vertical transfer of IncF, non-typeable and IncN-type plasmids were responsible for the spread of rmtB gene. In summary, our findings highlight that rmtB was the most prevalent 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene, which present persistent spread in food-producing animals in China and a diverse group of plasmids was responsible for rmtB dissemination.

  5. MMB-GUI: a fast morphing method demonstrates a possible ribosomal tRNA translocation trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Tek, Alex; Korostelev, Andrei A.; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn

    2016-01-01

    Easy-to-use macromolecular viewers, such as UCSF Chimera, are a standard tool in structural biology. They allow rendering and performing geometric operations on large complexes, such as viruses and ribosomes. Dynamical simulation codes enable modeling of conformational changes, but may require considerable time and many CPUs. There is an unmet demand from structural and molecular biologists for software in the middle ground, which would allow visualization combined with quick and interactive modeling of conformational changes, even of large complexes. This motivates MMB-GUI. MMB uses an internal-coordinate, multiscale approach, yielding as much as a 2000-fold speedup over conventional simulation methods. We use Chimera as an interactive graphical interface to control MMB. We show how this can be used for morphing of macromolecules that can be heterogeneous in biopolymer type, sequence, and chain count, accurately recapitulating structural intermediates. We use MMB-GUI to create a possible trajectory of EF-G mediated gate-passing translocation in the ribosome, with all-atom structures. This shows that the GUI makes modeling of large macromolecules accessible to a wide audience. The morph highlights similarities in tRNA conformational changes as tRNA translocates from A to P and from P to E sites and suggests that tRNA flexibility is critical for translocation completion. PMID:26673695

  6. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Maurício; Oliveira, Rosângela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimarães, Ana Márcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16 s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas.

  7. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguti, Maurício; Oliveira, Rosângela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimarães, Ana Márcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16 s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas. PMID:26688737

  8. RNA Colony Blot Hybridization Method for Enumeration of Culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Zo, Young-Gun; Hasan, Nur A.; Ali, Afsar; Chowdhury, Wasimul B.; Islam, Atiqul; Rashid, Mohammed H.; Alam, Munirul; Morris, J. Glenn; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2009-01-01

    A species-specific RNA colony blot hybridization protocol was developed for enumeration of culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus bacteria in environmental water samples. Bacterial colonies on selective or nonselective plates were lysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate, and the lysates were immobilized on nylon membranes. A fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe targeting a phylogenetic signature sequence of 16S rRNA of V. cholerae and V. mimicus was hybridized to rRNA molecules immobilized on the nylon colony lift blots. The protocol produced strong positive signals for all colonies of the 15 diverse V. cholerae-V. mimicus strains tested, indicating 100% sensitivity of the probe for the targeted species. For visible colonies of 10 nontarget species, the specificity of the probe was calculated to be 90% because of a weak positive signal produced by Grimontia (Vibrio) hollisae, a marine bacterium. When both the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated using lake water samples amended with a bioluminescent V. cholerae strain, no false-negative or false-positive results were found, indicating 100% sensitivity and specificity for culturable bacterial populations in freshwater samples when G. hollisae was not present. When the protocol was applied to laboratory microcosms containing V. cholerae attached to live copepods, copepods were found to carry approximately 10,000 to 50,000 CFU of V. cholerae per copepod. The protocol was also used to analyze pond water samples collected in an area of cholera endemicity in Bangladesh over a 9-month period. Water samples collected from six ponds demonstrated a peak in abundance of total culturable V. cholerae bacteria 1 to 2 months prior to observed increases in pathogenic V. cholerae and in clinical cases recorded by the area health clinic. The method provides a highly specific and sensitive tool for monitoring the dynamics of V. cholerae in the environment. The RNA blot hybridization protocol can also be

  9. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  10. Guard cell purification and RNA isolation suitable for high-throughput transcriptional analysis of cell-type responses to biotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Obulareddy, Nisita; Panchal, Shweta; Melotto, Maeli

    2013-08-01

    Stomata, micro-pores on the leaf surface, are formed by a pair of guard cells. In addition to controlling water loss and gas exchange between the plant and the environment, these cells act as immunity gates to prevent pathogen invasion of the plant apoplast. Here, we report a brief procedure to obtain highly pure guard cell preparations using conditions that preserve the guard cell transcriptome as much as possible for a robust high-throughput RNA sequence analysis. The advantages of this procedure included i) substantial shortening of the time required for obtaining high yield of >97% pure guard cell protoplasts (GCP), ii) extraction of enough high quality RNA for direct sequencing, and iii) limited RNA decay during sample manipulation. Gene expression analysis by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that wound-related genes were not induced during release of guard cells from leaves. To validate our approach, we performed a high-throughput deep-sequencing of guard cell transcriptome (RNA-seq). A total of 18,994 nuclear-encoded transcripts were detected, which expanded the transcriptome by 70%. The optimized GCP isolation and RNA extraction protocols are simple, reproducible, and fast, allowing the discovery of genes and regulatory networks inherent to the guard cells under various stresses.

  11. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Yeong; Chung, Jinsoo; Kim, Jungkyu; Seo, Eun-Young; Kilcrease, James P; Bauchan, Gary R; Lim, Seungmo; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2016-08-01

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution and variability of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis sap-inoculated with three isolates of TuMV from infected radish tissue showed different symptom severities, whereas symptoms in Raphanus sativus were similar for each isolate. The helper component-protease (HC-Pro) genes of each isolate were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the three Korean isolates were clustered into the basal-BR group. The HC-Pro proteins of these isolates were tested for their RNA silencing suppressor (VSR) activity and subcellular localization in Nicotiana benthamiana. A VSR assay by co-agroinfiltration of HC-Pro with soluble-modified GFP (smGFP) showed that HC-Pro of isolate R007 and R041 showed stronger VSR activity than R065. The HC-Pros showed 98.25 % amino acid identity, and weak VSR isolate (R065) has a single variant residue in the C-terminal domain associated with protease activity and self-interaction compared to isolates with strong VSR activity. Formation of large subcellular aggregates of GFP:HC-Pro fusion proteins in N. benthamiana was only observed for HC-Pro from isolates with strong VSR activity, suggesting that R065 'weak' HC-Pro may have diminished self-association; substitution of the variant C-terminal residue largely reversed the HC-Pro aggregation and silencing suppressor characteristics. The lack of correlation between VSR efficiency and induction of systemic necrosis (SN) suggests that differences in viral accumulation due to HC-Pro are not responsible for SN.

  12. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Yeong; Chung, Jinsoo; Kim, Jungkyu; Seo, Eun-Young; Kilcrease, James P; Bauchan, Gary R; Lim, Seungmo; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2016-08-01

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution and variability of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis sap-inoculated with three isolates of TuMV from infected radish tissue showed different symptom severities, whereas symptoms in Raphanus sativus were similar for each isolate. The helper component-protease (HC-Pro) genes of each isolate were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the three Korean isolates were clustered into the basal-BR group. The HC-Pro proteins of these isolates were tested for their RNA silencing suppressor (VSR) activity and subcellular localization in Nicotiana benthamiana. A VSR assay by co-agroinfiltration of HC-Pro with soluble-modified GFP (smGFP) showed that HC-Pro of isolate R007 and R041 showed stronger VSR activity than R065. The HC-Pros showed 98.25 % amino acid identity, and weak VSR isolate (R065) has a single variant residue in the C-terminal domain associated with protease activity and self-interaction compared to isolates with strong VSR activity. Formation of large subcellular aggregates of GFP:HC-Pro fusion proteins in N. benthamiana was only observed for HC-Pro from isolates with strong VSR activity, suggesting that R065 'weak' HC-Pro may have diminished self-association; substitution of the variant C-terminal residue largely reversed the HC-Pro aggregation and silencing suppressor characteristics. The lack of correlation between VSR efficiency and induction of systemic necrosis (SN) suggests that differences in viral accumulation due to HC-Pro are not responsible for SN. PMID:27059238

  13. Isolation and identification by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of plant growth-promoting azospirilla from the rhizosphere of wheat.

    PubMed

    Ayyaz, Khadija; Zaheer, Ahmad; Rasul, Ghulam; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to isolate phytohormone-producing, phosphate-solubilizing strains of Azospirillum from wheat to be used as inoculants for plant growth promotion. Five Azospirillum strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of field-grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and it was confirmed by BOX-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that the isolates were different and not re-isolates of the same strain. Sequence analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene indicated that four isolates showed maximum similarity to Azospirillum brasilense and one isolate showed maximum similarity to Azospirillum zeae. This is the first report indicating the presence of an A. zeae like isolate in the wheat rhizosphere in Pakistan. The bacterial isolates were characterized for their plant growth-promoting traits, phosphate solubilization, and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. None of the isolates showed phosphate solubilization activity in the commonly used Pikovskaya medium. However, all strains (except AzoK4) exhibited ability to solubilize tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in modified Pikovskaya medium in which sucrose was replaced by Na-malate, as well as in TCP-supplemented Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Organic acids, such as acetic, citric, lactic, malic, and succinic acids, were detected in culture supernatants of the tested Azospirillum strains. All strains exhibited ability to produce IAA in the growth medium, except Azospirillum sp. AzoK1. Among the strains tested, the maximum IAA production (30.49±1.04mgL(-1)) and phosphate solubilization (105.50±4.93mgL(-1)) were shown by a pure culture of Azospirillum sp. AzoK2. In pot experiments, single-strain inocula of Azospirillum sp. AzoK1 and AzoK2 improved wheat plant growth. PMID:27133558

  14. Isolation and identification by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of plant growth-promoting azospirilla from the rhizosphere of wheat.

    PubMed

    Ayyaz, Khadija; Zaheer, Ahmad; Rasul, Ghulam; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to isolate phytohormone-producing, phosphate-solubilizing strains of Azospirillum from wheat to be used as inoculants for plant growth promotion. Five Azospirillum strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of field-grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and it was confirmed by BOX-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that the isolates were different and not re-isolates of the same strain. Sequence analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene indicated that four isolates showed maximum similarity to Azospirillum brasilense and one isolate showed maximum similarity to Azospirillum zeae. This is the first report indicating the presence of an A. zeae like isolate in the wheat rhizosphere in Pakistan. The bacterial isolates were characterized for their plant growth-promoting traits, phosphate solubilization, and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. None of the isolates showed phosphate solubilization activity in the commonly used Pikovskaya medium. However, all strains (except AzoK4) exhibited ability to solubilize tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in modified Pikovskaya medium in which sucrose was replaced by Na-malate, as well as in TCP-supplemented Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Organic acids, such as acetic, citric, lactic, malic, and succinic acids, were detected in culture supernatants of the tested Azospirillum strains. All strains exhibited ability to produce IAA in the growth medium, except Azospirillum sp. AzoK1. Among the strains tested, the maximum IAA production (30.49±1.04mgL(-1)) and phosphate solubilization (105.50±4.93mgL(-1)) were shown by a pure culture of Azospirillum sp. AzoK2. In pot experiments, single-strain inocula of Azospirillum sp. AzoK1 and AzoK2 improved wheat plant growth.

  15. [The Anatomical Method of Isolating Central Ganglia from Oncomelania hupensis].

    PubMed

    TAN, Ping; YU, Zhi-jun

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment the soft tissue of Oncomelania hupensis was obtained by breaking the shell with a hemostat. The central ganglia of 0. hupensis were then collected from the fresh soft tissue under a dissecting microscope. This method lays a base for studying the effects of molluscicides or various biological and physicochemical factors on the central ganglia of 0. hupensis. PMID:26931039

  16. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  17. Identification of new 18S rRNA strains of Babesia canis isolated from dogs with subclinical babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Łyp, P; Adaszek, Ł; Furmaga, B; Winiarczyk, S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR to detect and characterize B. canis from naturally infected dogs in Poland with subclinical babesiosis by amplifying and sequencing a portion of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Venous blood samples were collected from ten dogs with subclinical babesiosis. A 559-bp fragment of the B. canis 18S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR. Sequencing of the PCR products led to the identification of a new variant of Babesia canis, differing from the previously detected protozoa genotypes (18S rRNA-A and 18S rRNA-B) with nucleotide substitutions in positions 150 and 151 of the tested gene fragment. The results indicate the emergence within the Polish territory of a new, previously unencountered Babesia canis genotype responsible for the development of subclinical babesiosis. PMID:26618590

  18. Identification of new 18S rRNA strains of Babesia canis isolated from dogs with subclinical babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Łyp, P; Adaszek, Ł; Furmaga, B; Winiarczyk, S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR to detect and characterize B. canis from naturally infected dogs in Poland with subclinical babesiosis by amplifying and sequencing a portion of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Venous blood samples were collected from ten dogs with subclinical babesiosis. A 559-bp fragment of the B. canis 18S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR. Sequencing of the PCR products led to the identification of a new variant of Babesia canis, differing from the previously detected protozoa genotypes (18S rRNA-A and 18S rRNA-B) with nucleotide substitutions in positions 150 and 151 of the tested gene fragment. The results indicate the emergence within the Polish territory of a new, previously unencountered Babesia canis genotype responsible for the development of subclinical babesiosis.

  19. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  20. A rabbit pulmonary vein myocyte isolation method based on simultaneous heart and pulmonary vein perfusion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Miao-Miao; Zhang, Liang-Pin; Yang, Shu-Lin; Yao, Ke-Jun; Song, Yuan-Long

    2016-02-25

    Myocytes in the pulmonary veins (PV) play a pivotal role in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is therefore important to understand physiological characteristics of these cells. Studies on these cells are, however, markedly impeded by the fact that single PV myocytes are very difficult to obtain due to lack of effective isolation methods. In this study, we described a novel PV myocyte isolation method. The key aspect of this method is to establish a combination of retrograde heart perfusion (via the aorta) and anterograde PV perfusion (via the pulmonary artery). With this simultaneous perfusion method, a better perfusion of the PV myocytes can be obtained. As results, the output and viability of single myocytes isolated by simultaneous heart and PV perfusion method were increased compared with those in conventional retrograde heart perfusion method. PMID:26915322

  1. A simple, efficient method for coupling DNA to cellulose. Development of the method and application to mRNA purification.

    PubMed

    Moss, L G; Moore, J P; Chan, L

    1981-12-25

    A simple, efficient method to couple covalently DNA to cellulose is described. It utilizes the bifunctional oxirane 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to activate cellulose and subsequently to link DNA to the cellulose. The optimal conditions for the latter reaction included use of a dehydration technique whereby DNA and activated cellulose were allowed to react on a glass slide in 0.1 N NaOH. Initial volume of the reaction was important; less than or equal to 250 microliters/50 mg cellulose was necessary for maximum efficiency. At DNA concentrations of less than or equal to 4 micrograms/mg cellulose, efficiency of binding was 90%. Binding studies using nucleotide homopolymers indicated that the order of the relative efficiencies of binding was poly(dT) greater than poly(dC) = poly(dA) greater than poly(dG). DNAs subjected to the binding conditions had an average of 0-1 breaks/molecule (for a 915-base DNA). A cloned double-stranded cDNA was coupled to cellulose by this technique. The cDNA was coupled to cellulose by this technique. The DNA-cellulose matrix was successfully used to purify the complementary mRNA from total poly(A)-enriched RNA by affinity chromatography. This method is very simple and highly efficient and can be conveniently adapted for the covalent coupling of various DNA species to cellulose for affinity chromatography.

  2. Purification of high quality RNA from synthetic, polyethylene glycol based hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Gasparian, Alexander; Daneshian, Leily; Ji, Hao; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Shtutman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogels, with variable stiffness, are widely used in tissue engineering to investigate substrate stiffness effects on cell properties. Transcriptome analysis is a critical method for understanding cell physiology. However, significant RNA degradation was observed in the process of isolating and purifying RNA from cells encapsulated in the PEG hydrogel, thus precluding purification of high quality RNA. Here, we describe a simple protocol that prevents RNA degradation and improves the quality and yield of RNA isolated from cells cultured in PEG hydrogels. This modification produces high quality total RNA suitable for RNA sequencing and microarray analysis. PMID:25963891

  3. Improved protocols for protein and RNA isolation from three-dimensional collagen sandwich cultures of primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, F; Schulz, I; Keller, M; Behrens, S-E; Bader, A

    2009-10-01

    The sandwich culture is the most widely used long-term culture system for functional primary hepatocytes. Despite its advantages, the currently available protocols for protein and RNA extraction are either time-consuming or contain steps that may skewer the results. This paper describes improved protocols for RNA and protein extraction from sandwich cultures that are easy to perform, require short working time, and use no additional enzymatic reactions that could change the expression profile of the cells. The quality of the RNA is excellent, allowing also applications requiring high purity such as microarrays. In general, the protocols are suited for any cells in 3D collagen culture. PMID:19539596

  4. Efficient oil palm total RNA extraction with a total RNA extraction kit.

    PubMed

    Habib, S H; Saud, H M; Kausar, H

    2014-01-01

    Oil palm tissues are rich in polyphenols, polysaccharides and secondary metabolites; these can co-precipitate with RNA, causing problems for downstream applications. We compared two different methods (one conventional and a kit-based method - Easy-Blue(TM) Total RNA Extraction Kit) to isolate total RNA from leaves, roots and shoot apical meristems of tissue culture derived truncated leaf syndrome somaclonal oil palm seedlings. The quality and quantity of total RNA were compared through spectrophotometry and formaldehyde gel electrophoresis. The specificity and applicability of the protocols were evaluated for downstream applications, including cDNA synthesis and RT-PCR analysis. We found that the conventional method gave higher yields of RNA but took longer, and it was contaminated with genomic DNA. This method required extra genomic DNA removal steps that further reduced the RNA yield. The kit-based method, on the other hand, produced good yields as well as well as good quality RNA, within a very short period of time from a small amount of starting material. Moreover, the RNA from the kit-based method was more suitable for synthesizing cDNA and RT-PCR amplification than the conventional method. Therefore, we conclude that the Easy-BlueTM Total RNA Extraction Kit method is suitable and superior for isolation of total RNA from oil palm leaf, root and shoot apical meristem. PMID:24781991

  5. An extension of the Coconut Cream Agar method to screen Penicillium citrinum isolates for citrinin production.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, S; Flint, S; Palmer, J; Fletcher, G C; Pitt, J I

    2013-09-01

    A simple and rapid screening method was developed for the detection of citrinin in fungal cultures using Coconut Cream Agar (CCA) described previously for detecting aflatoxin and ochratoxin A. Fifteen isolates of Penicillium citrinum were inoculated onto CCA and incubated at 25 and 30°C for 10 days. All isolates produced a distinct yellow green fluorescence on CCA when the reverse side of the agar plates were viewed under long wavelength UV light. Detection was optimal at 25°C after four to 5 days of incubation. Isolates positive by the CCA method also tested positive for citrinin production by the TLC agar plug method after growth on CCA, Czapek yeast extract agar and yeast extract sucrose agar. Control cultures were negative by both methods, indicating that the CCA Petri dish method was suitable for screening cultures for citrinin production.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded RNA virus infecting the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros tenuissimus Meunier.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Yoko; Tomaru, Yuji; Takao, Yoshitake; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2008-07-01

    Diatoms are important components of the biological community and food web in the aquatic environment. Here, we report the characteristics of a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus (CtenRNAV01) that infects the marine diatom Chaetoceros tenuissimus Meunier (Bacillariophyceae). The ca. 31-nm virus particle is icosahedral and lacks a tail. CtenRNAV01 forms crystalline arrays occupying most of the infected host's cytoplasm. By growth experiments, the lytic cycle and the burst size were estimated to be <24 h and approximately 1 x 10(4) infectious units per host cell, respectively. Stationary-phase C. tenuissimus cultures were shown to be more sensitive to CtenRNAV01 than logarithmic-phase cultures. The most noticeable feature of this virus is its exceptionally high yields of approximately 10(10) infectious units ml(-1); this is much higher than those of any other algal viruses previously characterized. CtenRNAV01 has two molecules of ssRNA of approximately 8.9 and 4.3 kb and three major proteins (33.5, 31.5, and 30.0 kDa). Sequencing of the total viral genome has produced only one large contig [9,431 bases excluding the poly(A) tail], suggesting considerable overlapping between the two RNA molecules. The monophyly of CtenRNAV01 compared to another diatom-infecting virus, Rhizosolenia setigera RNA virus, was strongly supported in a maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree constructed based on the concatenated amino acid sequences of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domains. Although further analysis is required to determine the detailed classification and nomenclature of this virus, these data strongly suggest the existence of a diatom-infecting ssRNA virus group in natural waters.

  7. A novel cost effective and high-throughput isolation and identification method for marine microalgae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Marine microalgae are of major ecologic and emerging economic importance. Biotechnological screening schemes of microalgae for specific traits and laboratory experiments to advance our knowledge on algal biology and evolution strongly benefit from culture collections reflecting a maximum of the natural inter- and intraspecific diversity. However, standard procedures for strain isolation and identification, namely DNA extraction, purification, amplification, sequencing and taxonomic identification still include considerable constraints increasing the time required to establish new cultures. Results In this study, we report a cost effective and high-throughput isolation and identification method for marine microalgae. The throughput was increased by applying strain isolation on plates and taxonomic identification by direct PCR (dPCR) of phylogenetic marker genes in combination with a novel sequencing electropherogram based screening method to assess the taxonomic diversity and identity of the isolated cultures. For validation of the effectiveness of this approach, we isolated and identified a range of unialgal cultures from natural phytoplankton communities sampled in the Arctic Ocean. These cultures include the isolate of a novel marine Chlorophyceae strain among several different diatoms. Conclusions We provide an efficient and effective approach leading from natural phytoplankton communities to isolated and taxonomically identified algal strains in only a few weeks. Validated with sensitive Arctic phytoplankton, this approach overcomes the constraints of standard molecular characterisation and establishment of unialgal cultures. PMID:25114712

  8. Microdiversity of deep-sea Bacillales isolated from Tyrrhenian sea sediments as revealed by ARISA, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and BOX-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Ettoumi, Besma; Guesmi, Amel; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Borin, Sara; Najjari, Afef; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur

    2013-01-01

    With respect to their terrestrial relatives, marine Bacillales have not been sufficiently investigated. In this report, the diversity of deep-sea Bacillales, isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations at 3,425 to 3,580 m depth in the Tyrrhenian Sea, was investigated using PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The isolate collection (n=120) was de-replicated by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), and phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives of each ARISA haplotype (n=37). Phylogenetic analysis of isolates showed their affiliation to six different genera of low G+C% content Gram-positive Bacillales: Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Terribacillus. Bacillus was the dominant genus represented by the species B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. firmus, typically isolated from marine sediments. The most abundant species in the collection was B. licheniformis (n=85), which showed seven distinct ARISA haplotypes with haplotype H8 being the most dominant since it was identified by 63 isolates. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting to the B. licheniformis sub-collection allowed their separation into five distinct BOX genotypes, suggesting a high level of intraspecies diversity among marine B. licheniformis strains. This species also exhibited distinct strain distribution between seamount and non-seamount stations and was shown to be highly prevalent in non-seamount stations. This study revealed the great microdiversity of marine Bacillales and contributes to understanding the biogeographic distribution of marine bacteria in deep-sea sediments.

  9. Sulfur-inhibited Thermosphaera aggregans sp. nov., a new genus of hyperthermophilic archaea isolated after its prediction from environmentally derived 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Dyba, D; Huber, H; Burggraf, S; Rachel, R

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a new procedure was developed which allowed for the first time the isolation of a hyperthermophilic archaeum tracked by 165 rRNA analysis from a terrestrial hot solfataric spring ('Obsidian Pool', Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA). This novel isolate is characterized here. Cells are round cocci with a diameter of 0.2-0.8 micron, occurring singly, in pairs, short chains and in grape-like aggregates. The aggregates exhibit a weak bluish-green fluorescence under UV radiation at 420 nm. The new isolate is an anaerobic obligate heterotroph, using preferentially yeast extract for growth. The metabolic products include CO2, H2, acetate and isovalerate. Growth is observed between 65 and 90 degrees C (optimum: 85 degrees C), from pH 5.0 to 7.0 (optimum: 6.5) and up to 0.7% NaCl. The apparent activation energy for growth is about 149 kJ mol-1. Elemental sulfur or hydrogen inhibits growth. The core lipids consist mainly of acyclic and cyclic glycerol diphytanyl tetraethers. The cell envelope contains a cytoplasmic membrane covered by an amorphous layer of unknown composition; there is no evidence for a regularly arrayed surface-layer protein. The G + C content is 46 mol%. On the basis of 165 rRNA sequence comparisons in combination with morphological, physiological and biochemical properties, the isolate represents a new genus within the Desulfurococcaceae, which has been named Thermosphaera. The type species is Thermosphaera aggregans, the type strain is isolate M11TLT (= DSM 11486T). PMID:9542073

  10. Sulfur-inhibited Thermosphaera aggregans sp. nov., a new genus of hyperthermophilic archaea isolated after its prediction from environmentally derived 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Dyba, D; Huber, H; Burggraf, S; Rachel, R

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a new procedure was developed which allowed for the first time the isolation of a hyperthermophilic archaeum tracked by 165 rRNA analysis from a terrestrial hot solfataric spring ('Obsidian Pool', Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA). This novel isolate is characterized here. Cells are round cocci with a diameter of 0.2-0.8 micron, occurring singly, in pairs, short chains and in grape-like aggregates. The aggregates exhibit a weak bluish-green fluorescence under UV radiation at 420 nm. The new isolate is an anaerobic obligate heterotroph, using preferentially yeast extract for growth. The metabolic products include CO2, H2, acetate and isovalerate. Growth is observed between 65 and 90 degrees C (optimum: 85 degrees C), from pH 5.0 to 7.0 (optimum: 6.5) and up to 0.7% NaCl. The apparent activation energy for growth is about 149 kJ mol-1. Elemental sulfur or hydrogen inhibits growth. The core lipids consist mainly of acyclic and cyclic glycerol diphytanyl tetraethers. The cell envelope contains a cytoplasmic membrane covered by an amorphous layer of unknown composition; there is no evidence for a regularly arrayed surface-layer protein. The G + C content is 46 mol%. On the basis of 165 rRNA sequence comparisons in combination with morphological, physiological and biochemical properties, the isolate represents a new genus within the Desulfurococcaceae, which has been named Thermosphaera. The type species is Thermosphaera aggregans, the type strain is isolate M11TLT (= DSM 11486T).

  11. Microdiversity of deep-sea Bacillales isolated from Tyrrhenian sea sediments as revealed by ARISA, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and BOX-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Ettoumi, Besma; Guesmi, Amel; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Borin, Sara; Najjari, Afef; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur

    2013-01-01

    With respect to their terrestrial relatives, marine Bacillales have not been sufficiently investigated. In this report, the diversity of deep-sea Bacillales, isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations at 3,425 to 3,580 m depth in the Tyrrhenian Sea, was investigated using PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The isolate collection (n=120) was de-replicated by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), and phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives of each ARISA haplotype (n=37). Phylogenetic analysis of isolates showed their affiliation to six different genera of low G+C% content Gram-positive Bacillales: Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Terribacillus. Bacillus was the dominant genus represented by the species B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. firmus, typically isolated from marine sediments. The most abundant species in the collection was B. licheniformis (n=85), which showed seven distinct ARISA haplotypes with haplotype H8 being the most dominant since it was identified by 63 isolates. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting to the B. licheniformis sub-collection allowed their separation into five distinct BOX genotypes, suggesting a high level of intraspecies diversity among marine B. licheniformis strains. This species also exhibited distinct strain distribution between seamount and non-seamount stations and was shown to be highly prevalent in non-seamount stations. This study revealed the great microdiversity of marine Bacillales and contributes to understanding the biogeographic distribution of marine bacteria in deep-sea sediments. PMID:24005887

  12. Comparison of frozen and RNALater solid tissue storage methods for use in RNA expression microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, George L; Zahrieh, David; Liu, Chunmei; Neuberg, Donna; Finkelstein, David; Baker, Heather E; Warrington, Janet A

    2004-01-01

    Background Primary human tissues are an invaluable widely used tool for discovery of gene expression patterns which characterize disease states. Tissue processing methods remain unstandardized, leading to unanswered concerns of how to best store collected tissues and maintain reproducibility between laboratories. We subdivided uterine myometrial tissue specimens and stored split aliquots using the most common tissue processing methods (fresh, frozen, RNALater) before comparing quantitative RNA expression profiles on the Affymetrix U133 human expression array. Split samples and inclusion of duplicates within each processing group allowed us to undertake a formal genome-wide analysis comparing the magnitude of result variation contributed by sample source (different patients), processing protocol (fresh vs. frozen vs. 24 or 72 hours RNALater), and random background (duplicates). The dataset was randomly permuted to define a baseline pattern of ANOVA test statistic values against which the observed results could be interpreted. Results 14,639 of 22,283 genes were expressed in at least one sample. Patient subjects provided the greatest sources of variation in the mixed model ANOVA, with replicates and processing method the least. The magnitude of variation conferred by processing method (24 hours RNALater vs 72 hours RNALater vs. fresh vs frozen) was similar to the variability seen within replicates. Subset analysis of the test statistic according to gene functional class showed that the frequency of "outlier" ANOVA results within each functional class is overall no greater than expected by chance. Conclusions Ambient storage of tissues for 24 or 72 hours in RNALater did not contribute any systematic shift in quantitative RNA expression results relative to the alternatives of fresh or frozen tissue. This nontoxic preservative enables decentralized tissue collection for expression array analysis without a requirement for specialized equipment. PMID:15537428

  13. Methods of isolation and purification of outer membrane vesicles from gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Klimentová, Jana; Stulík, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles secreted by gram-negative bacteria play an important role in bacterial physiology as well as in virulence and host-pathogen interaction. Isolated vesicles of some bacteria have also been studied for their immunomodulatory potential in the vaccine development. However, the production of vesicles in sufficient amount, purity and reproducibility remains a critical challenge for subsequent analyses in most bacteria. In the present review methods of production, isolation, purification and quantification of outer membrane vesicles are summarized and discussed.

  14. Evaluation of Clarithromycin Resistance Among Iranian Helicobacter pylori Isolates by E-Test and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hakemi Vala, Mojdeh; Eyvazi, Shirin; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sarie, Hamid Reza; Gholami, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen of human gastric mucosa. Antibiotic resistance, especially resistance to clarithromycin is a major factor for treatment failure of H. pylori infections. The main mechanism of clarithromycin resistance in these bacteria is related to point mutations in three different locations of 23S rRNA gene. Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the resistance rate to clarithromycin among local H. pylori isolates by the E-test method and to determine the profile of point mutation in 23S rRNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Patients and Methods Eighty biopsy samples were collected from dyspeptic patients by endoscopy during 2011 - 2012. All samples were homogenized immediately and cultured on supplemented brucella blood agar and incubated under microaerophilic conditions. Further biochemical tests and ureC gene PCR was done for H. pylori confirmation. The H. pylori OC1096 strain was used as the control strain, simultaneously. Frequency of clarithromycin resistance was determined by the E-test method based on the clinical and laboratory standard institute (CLSI) standards. Point mutation profile was determined by real-time PCR and further analysis of melting curve, amplicon sequencing was done continuously. Results From 80 biopsy samples, 20 positive H. pylori isolates were detected and confirmed by biochemical tests and PCR method. Overall, 21.7% of the H. pylori isolates, showed clarithromycin resistance phenotype by use of the E-test. Also, the minimal inhibitory concentration of clarithromycin was determined as ≥ 0.5 mg/L by the E-test method. Only point mutation in the location of A2143G with melting temperature of 54.7°C was observed in all resistant isolates. Conclusions This study showed that the frequency of H. pylori clarithromycin resistance in Iran is relatively high. Since clarithromycin is not commonly used in Iran for H. pylori eradication, the high rate of resistance could

  15. Comparative study on human and bovine AT-SC isolation methods.

    PubMed

    Reshak, A H; Shahimin, M M; Buang, F

    2013-11-01

    Mammalian adipose tissue derived stem cells (AT-SC) have a tremendous potential in regenerative medicine for tissue engineering and somatic nuclear transfer (SNT). The isolation methods of human and bovine adipose tissue derived stem cells are compared in this paper to determine the feasibility and optimum method of isolation. The optimum isolation method will reduce the processing time, efforts and money as isolation is the first crucial and important step in stem cells research. Human abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and bovine abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue are digested in three collagenase type 1 concentration 0.075%, 0.3% and 0.6% agitated at 1 h and 2 h under 37 °C in 5% CO2 incubator. The cultures are then morphologically characterised. Human adipose tissue stem cells are found to be best isolated using abdominal subcutaneous depot, using 0.075% collagenase type 1 agitated at 1 h under 37 °C in CO2 incubator. While bovine adipose tissue derived stem cells are best isolated using abdominal subcutaneous depot, using 0.6% collagenase type 1 agitated at 2 h under 37 °C in CO2 incubator.

  16. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Mireia; Henriet, Simon; Chamontin, Célia; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since