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Sample records for road traffic injuries

  1. Road traffic injuries: a stocktaking.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh

    2008-08-01

    Once we accept that road traffic injury control is a public health problem, and that we have an ethical responsibility to arrange for the safety of individuals, then it follows that health and medical professionals have to assume responsibility for participating in efforts to control this pandemic. Over 1.2 million people die of road traffic crashes annually. Road traffic injuries are among the second to the sixth leading causes of death in the age groups 15-60 years in all countries around the world. Control of road traffic injuries is going to require very special efforts as patterns are different in high- and lower-income countries, and while some countermeasures are applicable internationally, others will need further research and innovation. We will need to focus on the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists and motorcyclists, speed control, and prevention of driving under the influence of alcohol.

  2. Road traffic injuries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deysi Yasmin; Fernández, Francisco José; Acero Velásquez, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are a leading public health problem in Colombia. Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, especially in the main urban centers of Bogotá, Medellin and Cali. Data analyzed in this report include official statistics from the National Police and the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences for 1996-2000, and results of a study conducted at the National University of Colombia in 2000. Methods from the Highway Capacity Manual were used for determining physical and technical variables, and a Geographical Information System tool was used for the location and spatial analysis of the road traffic crashes. Pedestrians accounted for close to 32% of injuries and 40% of the deaths from road traffic crashes. The problem of road traffic crashes existed predominately in urban areas. In the main urban centers, pedestrians constituted nearly 68% of road traffic crash victims. The high level of risky road use behaviors demonstrated by pedestrians and drivers, and inadequate infrastructure for safe mobility of pedestrians in some sections of the road network were the main contributing factors. Major improvements were achieved in Bogotá following enhancements to the municipal transport system and other policies introduced since 1995. In conclusion, policies and programs for improving road safety, in particular pedestrian safety, and strengthening urban planning are top priority.

  3. Global collaboration on road traffic injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Peden, Margie

    2005-06-01

    Worldwide, nearly 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes every year and 20 million to 50 million more are injured or disabled. These injuries account for 2.1% of global mortality and 2.6% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. Low- and middle-income countries account for about 85% of the deaths and 90% of the DALYs lost annually. Without appropriate action, by 2020, road traffic injuries are predicted to be the third leading contributor to the global burden of disease. The economic cost of road traffic crashes is enormous. Globally it is estimated that US$518 billion is spent on road traffic crashes with low- and middle-income countries accounting for US$65 billion--more than these countries receive in development assistance. But these costs are just the tip of the iceberg. For everyone killed, injured or disabled by a road traffic crash there are countless others deeply affected. Many families are driven into poverty by the expenses of prolonged medical care, loss of a family breadwinner or the added burden of caring for the disabled. There is an urgent need for global collaboration on road traffic injury prevention. Since 2000, WHO has stepped up its response to the road safety crisis by firstly developing a 5-year strategy for road traffic injury prevention and following this by dedicating World Health Day 2004 to road safety and launching the WHO/World Bank World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention at the global World Health Day event in Paris, France. This short article highlights the main messages from the World Report and the six recommendations for action on road safety at a national and international level. It goes on to briefly discuss other international achievements since World Health Day and calls for countries to take up the challenge of implementing the recommendations of the World Report.

  4. Iranian road traffic injury project: assessment of road traffic injuries in Iran in 2012.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Ali; Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Sabbagh, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-05-01

    To assess the status of road traffic injuries in Iran. The retrospective study was conducted in Iran and comprised all reported traffic accidents from March 2011 to March 2012 that were recorded in the national traffic accident database. The information collected included demographic data specific to road traffic accidents and injuries. The data was summarised and presented using frequencies and percentages. There were a total of 452192 road traffic accidents with 252246 victims in the one-year period. The highest number of accidents, 110348(47%), involved individuals in the 15-30 year age group. Among the gender-identified injured, 206171(78.4%) were male and 56639 (21.6%) were female. Besides, 298750(73.2%) accidents took place between 6am and 6pm. In terms of location, the province of Semnan had the highest rates of injury and death (913 per 100000 and 41per 100000, respectively), while the lowest rate of injury was in Alborz (131 per 100000) and lowest rate of death was in Tehran (5 per 100000). The majority of accidents 301516(66.7%) occurred on inner city roads. Although the total number of victims in inner city roads (180893) was higher than outer the city roads (2.2:1), the number of deaths (8615) on outer roads was higher (3:1). Road traffic injuries placed a heavy burden on the Iranian population, especially on young men. Comprehensive strategies and policies must be implemented for effective prevention of road accidents in Iran.

  5. Seatbelts and road traffic collision injuries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Modification of seatbelts and their legislation played an important role in reducing morbidity and mortality of occupants in road traffic collisions. We aimed to review seatbelt development, its mechanism of action and its effects. Seatbelts reduce injury by preventing the occupant from hitting the interior parts of the vehicle or being ejected from the car. We have made a linear regression correlation between the overall seatbelt compliance and road traffic death rates in 46 high income countries to study the relationship between seatbelt use and mortality. There was a very highly significant negative correlation between the seatbelt compliance and road traffic death rates (R = - 0.77, F = 65.5, p < 0.00001). Seatbelt-related injuries include spinal, abdominal or pelvic injuries. The presence of a seatbelt sign must raise the suspicion of an intra-abdominal injury. These injuries can be reduced if seatbelts were applied correctly. Although seatbelts were recognized as an important safety measure, it still remains underused in many countries. Enforcement of seatbelt usage by law is mandatory so as to reduce the toll of death of road traffic collisions. PMID:21619677

  6. Injuries to pedestrians in road traffic accidents.

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, R. M.; Turner, W. H.; Duthie, R. B.; Wilde, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Although there have been many reports on injuries to occupants of cars in road traffic accidents, there have been few prospective studies of injuries to pedestrians in such accidents. For this reason a two year prospective study of pedestrians in road traffic accidents in the Oxford region was carried out. The incidence of death in pedestrians was significantly higher than in car occupants or motorcyclists. The principal determinant of death was the weight of the vehicle concerned. The most common site of injury was the head because of a high incidence of brief concussion, but the most common site of serious injuries was the leg. Injuries to all regions of the body increased with age and with the weight of the vehicle in the collision. Accidents most often concerned young children or the elderly. PMID:3147003

  7. Road traffic injuries in Rawalpindi city, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farooq, U; Bhatti, J A; Siddiq, M; Majeed, M; Malik, N; Razzak, J A; Khan, M M

    2011-09-01

    Data on road traffic accident (RTA) injuries and their outcome are scarce in Pakistan. This study assessed patterns of RTA injuries reported in Rawalpindi city using standard surveillance methods. All RTA injury patients presenting to emergency departments of 3 tertiary care facilities from July 2007 to June 2008 were included. RTA injuries (n = 19 828) accounted for 31.7% of all injuries. Among children aged 0-14 years females suffered twice as many RTA injuries as males (21.3% versus 11.4%), whereas this trend reversed for the age group 15-24 years (41.9% versus 21.7%). One-fifth of injuries were either fractures or concussion. Severity and outcome of injuries were worse for the age group 45 years and older. For every road traffic death in Rawalpindi city, 29 more people were hospitalized and 177 more received emergency department care. These results suggest the need for better RTA injury surveillance to identify preventive and control measures for the increasingly high road disease burden in this city.

  8. Penetrating eye injuries in road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Patel, B C; Morgan, L H

    1988-03-01

    A review of all penetrating eye injuries treated by the Manchester Eye Hospital over four years (1 February 1982-31 January 1986) was undertaken. One hundred and ninety-six penetrating eye injuries were seen, of which 16 (8.2%) were due to road traffic accidents. Eight patients (nine eyes) were seen in the 12 months prior to the introduction of the seat-belt legislation on 1 February 1983. None of these patients was wearing a seat-belt whereas two of the eight patients (10 eyes) seen after the seat-belt legislation were. Both these patients suffered severe visual loss due to intraocular glass from shattered windscreens. Three patients had bilateral penetrating eye injuries, one before and two after the seat-belt legislation. Two of the nine eyes involved prior to the legislation and three of the 10 eyes after the legislation had an eventual visual acuity of 6/12 or better. In the majority of patients, failure to wear seat-belts or defective use is to blame. Flying glass from shattered toughened windscreens is a preventable danger. Nine of the 16 patients were first seen in the general accident and emergency department and, of these, seven did not have visual acuities recorded prior to referral to an ophthalmologist. The importance of measurement of the visual acuity and detection of an afferent pupillary defect is stressed based on these findings.

  9. Road traffic injuries: social change and development.

    PubMed

    Borowy, Iris

    2013-01-01

    In the course of the twentieth century road traffic injuries (RTIs) became a major public health burden. RTI deaths first increased in high-income countries and declined after the 1970s, and they soared in low- and middle-income countries from the 1980s onwards. As motorisation took off in North America and then spread to Europe and to the rest of the world discussions on RTIs have reflected and influenced international interpretations of the costs and benefits of 'development', as conventionally understood. Using discourse analysis, this paper explores how RTIs have been constructed in ways that have served regional and global development agendas and how 'development' has been (re-)negotiated through the discourse of RTIs and vice versa. For this purpose, this paper analyses a selection of key publications of organisations in charge of international health or transport and places them in the context of (a) the surrounding scientific discussion of the period and (b) of relevant data regarding RTI mortality, development funding, and road and other transport infrastructure. Findings suggest that constructions of RTIs have shifted from being a necessary price to be paid for development to being a sign of development at an early stage or of an insufficiently coordinated development. In recent years, RTI discussions have raised questions about development being misdirected and in need of fundamental rethinking. At present, discussions are believed to be at a crossroads between different evaluations of developmental conceptualisations for the future.

  10. Pattern of road traffic injuries in Lublin County, Poland.

    PubMed

    Goniewicz, Mariusz; Nogalski, Adam; Khayesi, Meleckidzedeck; Lübek, Tomasz; Zuchora, Beata; Goniewicz, Krzysztof; Miśkiewicz, Paulina

    2012-06-01

    Road traffic injury patients admitted to 35 hospitals in Lublin region. To describe the pattern of road traffic injuries in Lublin county, Poland. Review of medical records for the period from January 2004 to December 2005. Pedestrians accounted for the largest share of the Road traffic crash (RTC) injury cases (35.8%) and 46.4% of deaths. The highest mortality was observed in motorcycle occupants (7.1%) and victims with abdominal injuries (9.8%). Vulnerable road users represented 71.4% of all RTC deaths, with mortality 5.8%. Early transfers accounted for 82.5% of cases. Mortality in early transfers is 4 times higher than in late transfers. Poland ranks as one of the worst European countries in terms of severity and fatal outcomes of road traffic injuries. Groups of road users in Poland at the highest risk are pedestrians, cyclists, children and young male drivers. The highest mortality rate occurs among road users affected by multiple trauma and head/vertebral column injuries. Alleviation of consequences of road traffic injuries in Poland may be achieved by coordinated efforts and collective responsibility of government, central level agencies, rescue team members and community groups.

  11. Effect on road traffic injuries of criminalizing road traffic offences: a time–series study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Katherine; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Borrell, Carme

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the effect of criminalizing some traffic behaviours, after the reform of the Spanish penal code in 2007, on the number of drivers involved in injury collisions and of people injured in traffic collisions in Spain. Methods This study followed an interrupted times–series design in which the number of drivers involved in injury collisions and of people injured in traffic collisions in Spain before and after the criminalization of offences were compared. The data on road traffic injuries in 2000–2009 were obtained from the road traffic collision database of the General Traffic Directorate. The dependent variables were stratified by sex, age, injury severity, type of road user, road type and time of collision. Quasi-Poisson regression models were fitted with adjustments for time trend, seasonality, previous interventions and national fuel consumption. Findings The overall number of male drivers involved in injury collisions dropped (relative risk, RR: 0.93; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.89–0.97) after the reform of the penal code, but among women no change was observed (RR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.95–1.03). In addition, 13 891 men (P < 0.01) were prevented from being injured. Larger reductions were observed among young male drivers and among male motorcycle or moped riders than among the drivers of other vehicles. Conclusion The findings suggest that criminalizing certain traffic behaviours can improve road safety by reducing both the number of drivers involved in injury collisions and the number of people injured in such collisions. PMID:21673858

  12. Work-related road traffic injury: a multilevel systems protocol

    PubMed Central

    Newnam, Sharon; Sheppard, Dianne M; Griffin, Mark A; McClure, Roderick J; Heller, Gillian; Sim, Malcolm R; Stevenson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Background Although road traffic injury is reported as the leading cause of work-related death in Australia, it is not clear, due to limitations in previous methods used, just how large a burden it is. Many organisations are unaware of the extent of work-related road traffic injury and, importantly, what can be done to reduce the burden. The proposed research will (i) estimate the prevalence of work-related road traffic injury and (ii) identify the organisational determinants associated with work-related road traffic injury. Methods and design The current study is designed to enumerate the problem and identify the individual driver-level, the supervisor-level and organisational-level factors associated with work-related road traffic injury. The multilevel systems protocol will involve a series of cross-sectional surveys administered to drivers of fleet vehicles (n=1200), supervisors of the drivers (n=1200) and senior managers (n=300) within the same organisation. Discussion The novel use of the multilevel systems protocol is critical to be able to accurately assess the specific determinants of driving safety within each context of an organisation. Results The results are expected to highlight that reducing injury in the workplace requires more than just individual compliance with safety procedures. It will also establish, for the first time, an occupational translation taskforce to ensure that the research findings are adopted into work-place practice and thereby directly contribute to reductions in work-related road traffic injury. PMID:24478230

  13. Factors associated with severity of road traffic injuries, Thika, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mogaka, Eric Osoro; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Oundo, Joseph; Omolo, Jared; Luman, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Road traffic injuries continue to exert a huge burden on the health care system in Kenya. Few studies on the severity of road traffic injuries have been conducted in Kenya. We carried out a cross-sectional study to determine factors associated with severity of road traffic injuries in a public hospital in Thika district, Kenya. Road crash victims attending the Thika district hospital, a 265-bed public hospital, emergency room were recruited consecutively between 10th August 2009 and 15th November 2009. Epidemiologic and clinical information was collected from medical charts and through interview with the victims or surrogates using a semi-structured questionnaire. Injuries were graded as severe or non-severe based on the Injury Severity Score (ISS). Independent factors associated with injury severity were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. The mean age of participants was 32.4 years, three quarters were between 20-49 years-old and 73% (219) were male. Nineteen percent (56/300) of the victims had severe injury. Five percent (15) had head injury while 38% (115) had fractures. Vulnerable road users (pedestrians and two-wheel users) comprised 33% (99/300) of the victims. Vulnerable road users (OR=2.0, 95%CI=1.0-3.9), road crashes in rainy weather (OR=2.9, 95%CI=1.3-6.5) and night time crashes (OR=2.0, 95%CI=-1.1-3.9) were independent risk factors for sustaining severe injury. Severe injury was associated with vulnerable road users, rainy weather and night time crashes. Interventions and measures such as use of reflective jackets and helmets by two wheel users and enhanced road visibility could help reduce the severity of road traffic injuries.

  14. Factors associated with road traffic injuries in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Respicious; Museru, Lawrence; Kiloloma, Othman; Munthali, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Injuries represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and road traffic crashes accounts for a significant proportion of these injuries. Tanzania is among the countries with high rates of road traffic crashes. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern, associated factors and management of road traffic injury patients in Tanzania. A cross-sectional study of patients involved in motor traffic crashes and attended in six public hospitals of Tanzania mainland between April 2014 and September 2014. A total of 4675 road traffic injury patients were seen in studied hospitals, 76.6% were males. Majority (70.2%) were between 18 - 45 years age group. Motorcycles were the leading cause of road traffic crashes (53.4%), and drivers (38.3%) accounted for majority of victims. Fractures accounted for 34.1%, and injuries were severe in 2.2% as determined by the Kampala trauma score II (KTS II). Majorities 57.4% were admitted and 2.2% died at the casualty. Factors associated with mortality were; using police vehicles to hospital (P = 0.000), receiving medical attention within 2 to 10 hours after injury (P = 0.000), 18 - 45 years age group (P = 0.019), not using helmet (P = 0.007), severe injuries (P = 0.000) and sustaining multiple injury (P = 0.000). Road traffic Injuries in Tanzania are an important public health problem, predominantly in adult males, mostly due to motorcycle crashes. It is therefore important to reinforce preventive measures and pre-hospital emergency service is urgently needed.

  15. Factors associated with road traffic injuries in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Respicious; Museru, Lawrence; Kiloloma, Othman; Munthali, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Injuries represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and road traffic crashes accounts for a significant proportion of these injuries. Tanzania is among the countries with high rates of road traffic crashes. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern, associated factors and management of road traffic injury patients in Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients involved in motor traffic crashes and attended in six public hospitals of Tanzania mainland between April 2014 and September 2014. Results A total of 4675 road traffic injury patients were seen in studied hospitals, 76.6% were males. Majority (70.2%) were between 18 - 45 years age group. Motorcycles were the leading cause of road traffic crashes (53.4%), and drivers (38.3%) accounted for majority of victims. Fractures accounted for 34.1%, and injuries were severe in 2.2% as determined by the Kampala trauma score II (KTS II). Majorities 57.4% were admitted and 2.2% died at the casualty. Factors associated with mortality were; using police vehicles to hospital (P = 0.000), receiving medical attention within 2 to 10 hours after injury (P = 0.000), 18 - 45 years age group (P = 0.019), not using helmet (P = 0.007), severe injuries (P = 0.000) and sustaining multiple injury (P = 0.000). Conclusion Road traffic Injuries in Tanzania are an important public health problem, predominantly in adult males, mostly due to motorcycle crashes. It is therefore important to reinforce preventive measures and pre-hospital emergency service is urgently needed. PMID:27217872

  16. Biomechanics of road traffic collision injuries: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Eid, H O; Abu-Zidan, F M

    2007-07-01

    Understanding the biomechanics of road traffic collision injuries is important for diagnosing and managing road traffic injured patients. As road traffic collisions may entail high-energy trauma, the degree of injury will depend on the mass and speed of the collided vehicles. Collisions can be front impact, back impact, side impact; the vehicle may turn over or the patient may be ejected from the vehicle. Each of these mechanisms has a specific pattern of injury. The injury will vary depending on whether the passenger was restrained with a seat belt or not. Seat belts tend to reduce head injuries and increase the abdominal injuries. Compression injuries of the intestines and urinary bladder tend to be more severe, causing rupture of these hollow organs if pressure within these organs was high. Pedestrian injuries consist of three phases: the bumper impact, hood and windscreen impact, and ground impact. The injury pattern and impact of motor vehicle collisions with large animals will depend on the size, height and weight of the animal. Clinical examples of road traffic collision patients will highlight the value of understanding biomechanics in patient management.

  17. Neighborhood Social Inequalities in Road Traffic Injuries: The Influence of Traffic Volume and Road Design

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Lise; Plante, Céline; Fournier, Michel; Morency, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the extent to which differential traffic volume and road geometry can explain social inequalities in pedestrian, cyclist, and motor vehicle occupant injuries across wealthy and poor urban areas. Methods. We performed a multilevel observational study of all road users injured over 5 years (n = 19 568) at intersections (n = 17 498) in a large urban area (Island of Montreal, Canada). We considered intersection-level (traffic estimates, major roads, number of legs) and area-level (population density, commuting travel modes, household income) characteristics in multilevel Poisson regressions that nested intersections in 506 census tracts. Results. There were significantly more injured pedestrians, cyclists, and motor vehicle occupants at intersections in the poorest than in the richest areas. Controlling for traffic volume, intersection geometry, and pedestrian and cyclist volumes greatly attenuated the event rate ratios between intersections in the poorest and richest areas for injured pedestrians (−70%), cyclists (−44%), and motor vehicle occupants (−44%). Conclusions. Roadway environment can explain a substantial portion of the excess rate of road traffic injuries in the poorest urban areas. PMID:22515869

  18. Neighborhood social inequalities in road traffic injuries: the influence of traffic volume and road design.

    PubMed

    Morency, Patrick; Gauvin, Lise; Plante, Céline; Fournier, Michel; Morency, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    We examined the extent to which differential traffic volume and road geometry can explain social inequalities in pedestrian, cyclist, and motor vehicle occupant injuries across wealthy and poor urban areas. We performed a multilevel observational study of all road users injured over 5 years (n=19,568) at intersections (n=17,498) in a large urban area (Island of Montreal, Canada). We considered intersection-level (traffic estimates, major roads, number of legs) and area-level (population density, commuting travel modes, household income) characteristics in multilevel Poisson regressions that nested intersections in 506 census tracts. There were significantly more injured pedestrians, cyclists, and motor vehicle occupants at intersections in the poorest than in the richest areas. Controlling for traffic volume, intersection geometry, and pedestrian and cyclist volumes greatly attenuated the event rate ratios between intersections in the poorest and richest areas for injured pedestrians (-70%), cyclists (-44%), and motor vehicle occupants (-44%). Roadway environment can explain a substantial portion of the excess rate of road traffic injuries in the poorest urban areas.

  19. [Epidemiological characteristics of road traffic injuries in AP Vojvodina].

    PubMed

    Durić, Predrag; Miladinov-Mikov, Marica

    2009-01-01

    Traffic accidents are one of the leading epidemiological problems in developed countries as well as in developing ones. It is estimated that every day in the world 1308 person die in car accidents. Causes of traffic accidents are factors of road, vehicle and human factors, the latter one being the cause of more than 90% car accidents, isolated or linked with other factors. Data from the Ministry of Internal Affairs - Department in Novi Sad were collected for the period 1992-2001 and analyzed. All road traffic accidents were divided into those with and without injured persons. All injured were divided in three categories: slightly injured, severely injured and killed. Categorization was done by the Ministry of Internal Affairs (police). Average number of road traffic accidents in AP Vojvodina is 13,191, and 3502 with injured persons per year. Avarage incidence is 174 accidents per 100,000 population, and 301 injured per 100,000 population. Mortality rate is 30.6 per 100,000 population. Number of killed in road traffic accidents per 10,000 vehicles is 6.91. During the 1992-2001 period, morbidity and mortality rates of traffic accidents in AP Vojvodina were high. Participating of bicycle drivers, car passengers and pedestrians is higher than in developed countries. Injured persons are mostly 20-29 y.o., but rates of killed persons are the same in all age groups older than 19. Men are more in danger than women. Majority of accidents happen during the early autumn months, on Fridays and Saturdays, in early evening hours. Most persons have been injured or killed in city accidents, along Subotica-Belgrade highway. AP Vojvodina had the highest mortality rate of road traffic injuries per ten thousand vehicles in Europe -- 6.91. Effective preventive measures are needed to decrease rates of road traffic accidents.

  20. [Biomechanics and injury prevention in road traffic].

    PubMed

    Walz, E

    1997-05-01

    The main predicting factor for the injury severity is "speed". This fact is predominantly important with regard to the protection of pedestrians and two wheelers. Today's safety features such as new steering and breaking systems, car body construction, seat belts, head restraints and crash helmets etc. let us sometimes overlook the hazards on the road. However, further improvements can be expected from advanced restraint system combinations, reinforced frontal and lateral car structures and padding, perhaps side air bags and automatically adjusted head restraint systems. Collision reconstruction and assessment of causality are needed, e.g., in cases of soft tissue neck injuries, questionable overrunning, walking direction of impacted pedestrians, uncertain belt or helmet wearing etc. Considerable legal problems arise if the causality is judged only from clinical point of view while the important criterion of collision mechanics is not taken into account in acceptable quantitative detail. Therefore it is recommended that determining the causality of a mechanical event should be left to specially trained professionals.

  1. Temporal Patterns of Road Traffic Injuries in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, Ali; Ainy, Elaheh; Hashemi Nazari, Seyed Saeed; Soori, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the main causes of death and disability in Iran. However, very few studies about the temporal variations of RTIs have been published to date. Objectives This study was conducted to investigate the temporal pattern of RTIs in Iran in 2012. Materials and Methods All road traffic accidents (RTAs) reported to traffic police during a one-year period (March 21, 2012 through March 21, 2013) were investigated after obtaining permission from the law enforcement force of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Distributions of RTAs were obtained for season, month, week, and hour scales, and for long holidays (more than one day) and the day prior to long holidays (DPLH). The final analysis was carried out using the Poisson regression model to calculate incidence rate ratios for RTIs. All analyses were conducted using STATA 13.1 and Excel software; statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results A total of 452,192 RTAs were examined. The estimated rate of all accidents was 219 per 10,000 registered vehicles, or 595 per 100,000 people. About 28% of all RTAs, and more than one third of fatal RTAs, occurred during the summer months. The incidence rate for all traffic accidents on DPLH was 1.20, compared to workdays as a reference category, and it was 1.40 for fatal crashes. The rate of fatal road traffic accidents in outer cities was 3.2 times higher than in inner ones. Conclusions Our findings reveal that there are temporal variations in traffic accidents, and long holidays significantly influence accident rates. Traffic injuries have different patterns on outer/inner city roads, based on weekday and holiday status. Thus, these findings could be used to create effective initiatives aimed at traffic management. PMID:27703958

  2. Temporal Patterns of Road Traffic Injuries in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Ali; Ainy, Elaheh; Hashemi Nazari, Seyed Saeed; Soori, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the main causes of death and disability in Iran. However, very few studies about the temporal variations of RTIs have been published to date. This study was conducted to investigate the temporal pattern of RTIs in Iran in 2012. All road traffic accidents (RTAs) reported to traffic police during a one-year period (March 21, 2012 through March 21, 2013) were investigated after obtaining permission from the law enforcement force of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Distributions of RTAs were obtained for season, month, week, and hour scales, and for long holidays (more than one day) and the day prior to long holidays (DPLH). The final analysis was carried out using the Poisson regression model to calculate incidence rate ratios for RTIs. All analyses were conducted using STATA 13.1 and Excel software; statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. A total of 452,192 RTAs were examined. The estimated rate of all accidents was 219 per 10,000 registered vehicles, or 595 per 100,000 people. About 28% of all RTAs, and more than one third of fatal RTAs, occurred during the summer months. The incidence rate for all traffic accidents on DPLH was 1.20, compared to workdays as a reference category, and it was 1.40 for fatal crashes. The rate of fatal road traffic accidents in outer cities was 3.2 times higher than in inner ones. Our findings reveal that there are temporal variations in traffic accidents, and long holidays significantly influence accident rates. Traffic injuries have different patterns on outer/inner city roads, based on weekday and holiday status. Thus, these findings could be used to create effective initiatives aimed at traffic management.

  3. Road traffic injury on rural roads in Tanzania: measuring the effectiveness of a road safety program.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Karen; Jinadasa, Deepani; Maegga, Bertha; Guerrero, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health burden, especially in low- and middle-income countries. There is limited data on RTIs in low-volume, rural African settings. This study attempted to survey all individuals living in households within 200 m of two low-volume rural roads in Tanzania and to collect data on RTIs. Local communities and users of the Bago to Talawanda road (intervention site) and Kikaro to Mihuga road (control site) were targeted and received an intensive program of road safety measures tailored using the crash characteristics of the baseline sample. Demographic data on all household members were collected, and those individuals who suffered an RTI in the previous 3 months had comprehensive information collected about the crash characteristics and the socioeconomic impact. The follow-up data collection occurred nine months after the baseline data were collected. The majority of crashes that caused an RTI involved a motorcycle (71%) and the majority of victims were male (82%) with an average age of 27. Injuries to the legs (55%) were most common and the average length of time away from normal activity was 27 (±33) days. RTI incidence at the intervention site increased during the course of the study (incidence before vs. incidence after) and was unchanged in the community control (incidence before vs. incidence after). The incidence of RTIs in the low-volume rural setting is unacceptably high and most commonly associated with motorcycles. The change in incidence is unreliable due to logistic restraints of the project and more research is needed to quantify the impact of various RTI prevention strategies in this setting. This study provides insight into road traffic injuries on low-volume rural roads, areas where very little research has been captured. Additionally, it provides a replicable study design for those interested in collecting similar data on low-volume rural roads.

  4. [Road traffic injuries in developing countries: research and action agenda].

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Min; Lunnen, Jeffrey C; Miranda, J Jaime; Hyder, Adnan A

    2010-06-01

    Road traffic injury (RTI) is the leading cause of death in persons aged 10-24 worldwide and accounts for about 15% of all male deaths. The burden of RTI is unevenly distributed amongst countries with over eighty-fold differences between the highest and lowest death rates. Thus the unequal risk of RTI occurring in the developing world, due to many reasons, including but not limited to rapid motorization and poor infrastructure, is a major global challenge. This editorial highlights a number of key issues that must inform programs designed to prevent RTI in the developing world, where the epidemic is all the more insidious. Firstly, road safety is a development issue; secondly, road traffic injury is a major health issue; thirdly, road traffic injuries can be prevented by the implementation of scientific measures; fourth, pre-hospital and hospital emergency care is needed; and fifth, research on RTI is neglected in low-income and middle-income countries. The repercussion of such progress to Peru is also discussed.

  5. Road traffic injuries: a new agenda for child health.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Asma Fozia; Bose, Anuradha; Anjum, Qudsia

    2004-12-01

    This paper reviews literature related to morbidity and mortality in South Asian children due to Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs), almost all of which are preventable. In South Asia after males 15-44 years, RTIs are most common in children 0-15 years old. Under-five fatality rates are about six times higher than in the developed world. Most injuries in low income countries occur in urban areas, where pedestrians, passengers, and cyclists account for around 90% of deaths due to RTIs. This higher fatality among pedestrians is probably due to wider traffic mix and lack of safe pedestrian walking areas. The WHO estimates that RTIs cost countries between 1 and 2% of their Gross Domestic Product. This has critical financial consequences. Vital statistics in South Asia are not reliable, and this leads to an underestimation of the magnitude of RTIs that hampers efforts for its acceptance as a preventable public health problem. Rapid urbanization, high motorization rates and failure to institute preventive measures predict a substantial increase in road traffic deaths in the coming years. Creating a safer environment is important. Use of child passenger restraints, bicycle helmets and targeted education campaigns are effective preventive measures. Legislation and implementation of traffic rules and regulations, road engineering and safe pedestrian areas would help reduce injuries. These measures are in accordance with the WHO's five-year strategy to address RTIs worldwide. This strategy includes national and local capacity building, inclusion of RTI in the public health agendas in the world for prevention and control of the health consequences. Child health in South Asia needs to integrate the new challenge of road traffic injuries for the region. It is critical that interventions for reducing this burden are developed, tested and implemented.

  6. Road Traffic Injury in Lagos, Nigeria: Assessing Prehospital Care.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nasiru A; Ajani, Abdul Wahab O; Mustafa, Ibrahim A; Balogun, Rufai A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Idowu, Olufemi E; Solagberu, Babatunde A

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Injuries are the third most important cause of overall deaths globally with one-quarter resulting from road traffic crashes. Majority of these deaths occur before arrival in the hospital and can be reduced with prompt and efficient prehospital care. The aim of this study was to highlight the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in Lagos, Nigeria and assess the effectiveness of prehospital care, especially the role of Lagos State Ambulance Service (LASAMBUS) in providing initial care and transportation of the injured to the hospital. A three-year, retrospective review of road traffic injured patients seen at the Surgical Emergency Room (SER) of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja, Nigeria, from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 was conducted. Parameters extracted from the Institution Trauma Registry included bio-data, date and time of injury, date and time of arrival in SER, host status, type of vehicle involved, and region(s) injured. Information on how patients came to the hospital and outcome in SER also were recorded. Results were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS; IBM Corporation; Armonk, New York USA) version 16. A total of 23,537 patients were seen during the study period. Among them, 16,024 (68.1%) had trauma. Road traffic crashes were responsible in 5,629 (35.0%) of trauma cases. Passengers constituted 42.0% of the injured, followed by pedestrians (34.0%). Four wheelers were the most frequent vehicle type involved (54.0%), followed by motor cycles (30.0%). Regions mainly affected were head and neck (40.0%) and lower limb (29.0%). Less than one-quarter (24.0%) presented to the emergency room within an hour, while one-third arrived between one and six hours following injury. Relatives brought 55.4%, followed by bystanders (21.4%). Only 2.3% had formal prehospital care and were brought to the hospital by LASAMBUS. They also had significantly shorter arrival time. One hundred and nine patients

  7. Human resources for the control of road traffic injury.

    PubMed

    Mock, Charles; Kobusingye, Olive; Anh, Le Vu; Afukaar, Francis; Arreola-Risa, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    The definition of the ideal numbers and distribution of human resources required for control of road traffic injury (RTI) is not as advanced as for other health problems. We can nonetheless identify functions that need to be addressed across the spectrum of injury control: surveillance; road safety (including infrastructure, vehicle design, and behaviour); and trauma care. Many low-cost strategies to improve these functions in low- or middle-income countries can be identified. For all these strategies, there is need for adequate institutional capacity, including funding, legal authority, and human resources. Several categories of human resources need to be developed: epidemiologists who can handle injury data, design surveillance systems, and undertake research; engineers and planners versed in safety aspects of road design, traffic flow, urban planning, and vehicle design; police and lawyers who understand the health impact of traffic law; clinicians who can develop cost-effective improvements in the entire system of trauma treatment; media experts to undertake effective behaviour change and social marketing; and economists to assist with cost-effectiveness evaluations. RTI control can be strengthened by enhancing such training in these disciplines, as well as encouraging retention of those who have the needed skills. Mechanisms to enhance collaboration between these different fields need to be promoted. Finally, the burden of RTI is borne disproportionately by the poor; in addition to technical issues, more profound equity issues must be addressed. This mandates that people from all professional backgrounds who work for RTI control should develop skills in advocacy and politics.

  8. Road traffic injuries: hidden epidemic in less developed countries.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Alyson; Ehiri, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity, disability and mortality in less developed countries. Globally in 2002, 1.2 million deaths resulted from RTIs, and about 10 times that were injured. RTIs are often preventable, and the technology and knowledge to achieve success in this area exist. In spite of this, it is projected that given the current trend and without adequate intervention, RTIs will rank third of all major causes of morbidity and mortality globally by 2020. Although > 85% of the global deaths and injuries from road traffic crashes occur in less developed countries, traffic safety attracts little public health attention in these nations, due in part to a plethora of other equally important problems, including infectious diseases. Unfortunately, the public health and economic impact of traffic-related injuries and disabilities can be incalculable in these countries, owing to their poorly developed trauma care systems and nonexistent social welfare infrastructures to accommodate the needs of the injured and the disabled. In this paper, we highlight the problem posed to public health in less developed countries by RTIs and examine contributing factors. To engender debate and action to address the problem, we reviewed interventions that have proven effective in industrialized nations and discussed potential barriers to their replication in less developed countries. PMID:16532982

  9. Traffic calming for the prevention of road traffic injuries: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, F; Collier, T; Frost, C; Ker, K; Roberts, I; Wentz, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether area-wide traffic calming schemes can reduce road crash related deaths and injuries. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources: Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts Science (and social science) citation index, National Technical Information service, Psychlit, Transport Research Information Service, International Road Research Documentation, and Transdoc, and web sites of road safety organisation were searched; experts were contacted, conference proceedings were handsearched, and relevant reference lists were checked. Inclusion criteria: Randomised controlled trials, and controlled before/after studies of area-wide traffic calming schemes designed to discourage and slow down through traffic on residential roads. Methods: Data were collected on road user deaths, injuries, and traffic crashes. For each study rate ratios were calculated, the ratio of event rates before and after intervention in the traffic calmed area divided by the corresponding ratio of event rates in the control area, which were pooled to give an overall estimate using a random effects model. Findings: Sixteen controlled before/after studies met our inclusion criteria. Eight studies reported the number of road user deaths: pooled rate ratio 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14 to 2.59). Sixteen studies reported the number of injuries (fatal and non-fatal): pooled rate ratio 0.89 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.00). All studies were in high income countries. Conclusion: Area-wide traffic calming in towns and cities has the potential to reduce road traffic injuries. However, further rigorous evaluations of this intervention are needed, especially in low and middle income countries. PMID:12966005

  10. Speed enforcement detection devices for preventing road traffic injuries.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C; Willis, C; Hendrikz, J K; Bellamy, N

    2006-04-19

    It is estimated that by 2020, road traffic crashes will have moved from ninth to third in the world ranking of burden of disease, as measured in disability adjusted life years. The identification of effective strategies for the prevention of road traffic injuries is of global public health importance. Measures aimed at reducing traffic speed are considered essential to preventing road injuries; the use of speed enforcement detection devices (including speed cameras and radar and laser devices) is one such measure. To assess whether the use of speed enforcement detection devices (SEDs) reduces the incidence of speeding, road traffic crashes, injuries and deaths. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science (and Social Science) Citation Index, TRANSPORT, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EconLit. We searched the websites of road safety and motoring associations, as well as general internet searches. We handsearched selected journals and conference proceedings, and contacted experts in the field. The searches were conducted during May to November 2004. Randomised controlled trials and controlled before-after studies that assessed the impact of speed enforcement detection devices on speeding, road crashes, injuries and deaths were eligible for inclusion. For studies involving co-interventions, SEDs had to be the major intervention focus of the study to be eligible. We independently screened search results, assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Due to variability between and within included studies, a pooled analysis was not appropriate. No randomised controlled trials were identified. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria, of which 22 were controlled before-after trials incorporating a distinct control or comparison group(s) and four were interrupted time series designs with a comparison group(s). Fourteen studies reported speed and crash outcomes, seven reported crash outcomes

  11. [Development of forecasting models for fatal road traffic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tan, Aichun; Tian, Danping; Huang, Yuanxiu; Gao, Lin; Deng, Xin; Li, Li; He, Qiong; Chen, Tianmu; Hu, Guoqing; Wu, Jing

    2014-02-01

    To develop the forecasting models for fatal road traffic injuries and to provide evidence for predicting the future trends on road traffic injuries. Data on the mortality of road traffic injury including factors as gender and age in different countries, were obtained from the World Health Organization Mortality Database. Other information on GDP per capita, urbanization, motorization and education were collected from online resources of World Bank, WHO, the United Nations Population Division and other agencies. We fitted logarithmic models of road traffic injury mortality by gender and age group, including predictors of GDP per capita, urbanization, motorization and education. Sex- and age-specific forecasting models developed by WHO that including GDP per capita, education and time etc. were also fitted. Coefficient of determination(R(2)) was used to compare the performance between our modes and WHO models. 2 626 sets of data were collected from 153 countries/regions for both genders, between 1965 and 2010. The forecasting models of road traffic injury mortality based on GDP per capita, motorization, urbanization and education appeared to be statistically significant(P < 0.001), and the coefficients of determination for males at the age groups of 0-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65+ were 22.7% , 31.1%, 51.8%, 52.3%, 44.9%, 41.8%, 40.1%, 25.5%, respectively while the coefficients for these age groups in women were 22.9%, 32.6%, 51.1%, 49.3%, 41.3%, 35.9%, 30.7%, 20.1%, respectively. The WHO models that were based on the GDP per capita, education and time variables were statistically significant (P < 0.001)and the coefficients of determination were 14.9% , 22.0%, 31.5%, 33.1% , 30.7%, 28.5%, 27.7% and 17.8% for males, but 14.1%, 20.6%, 30.4%, 31.8%, 26.7%, 24.3%, 17.3% and 8.8% for females, respectively. The forecasting models that we developed seemed to be better than those developed by WHO.

  12. Reporting on road traffic injury: content analysis of injuries and prevention opportunities in Ghanaian newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Yankson, Isaac Kofi; Browne, Edmund N L; Tagbor, H; Donkor, Peter; Quansah, Robert; Asare, George Ernest; Mock, Charles N; Ebel, Beth E

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyse traffic injury reporting in Ghanaian newspapers and identify opportunities for improving road safety, the content of 240 articles on road traffic injury was reviewed from 2005 to 2006 editions of two state-owned and two privately owned newspapers. The articles comprised reports on vehicle crashes (37%), commentaries (33%), informational pieces (12%), reports on pedestrian injury (10%), and editorials (8%). There was little coverage of pedestrian injuries, which account for half of the traffic fatalities in Ghana, but only 22% of newspaper reports. Only two articles reported on seatbelt use. Reporting patterns were similar between public and private papers, but private papers more commonly recommended government action (50%) than did public papers (32%, p=0.006). It is concluded that Ghanaian papers provide detailed coverage of traffic injury. Areas for improvement include pedestrian injury and attention to preventable risk factors such as road risk factors, seatbelt use, speed control, and alcohol use. PMID:20570987

  13. Alcohol and Hospitalized Road Traffic Injuries in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Lydia R.; Ruiz, Roberto Andres Llanes

    2014-01-01

    Each year, there are approximately 1.24 million deaths due to road traffic injuries, the majority of which occur in low- and middle-income countries. Since 2008, 35 countries have passed legislation to implement road safety strategies. However, many countries have yet to pass comprehensive legislation while others lack adequate enforcement of current policies. The annual global mortality rate due to road trauma remains unacceptably high and reflects the need for governments to prioritize the passage and implementation of road safety legislation. Alcohol is a leading risk factor for road trauma globally and the leading cause of death and disability in the Western Pacific region. Despite the overwhelming evidence that strict enforcement of drunk-driving policies can lead to a drastic reduction in alcohol-related road incidents, many countries in the Western Pacific lack sufficient data that could facilitate the design of appropriate drunk-driving interventions. This paper provides an analysis of the current status of policies and attitudes related to alcohol and road injuries throughout the Western Pacific region, with a specific focus on the Philippines. Following the passage of drunk-driving legislation in 2013, a medical records review of alcohol-related road trauma patients in Manila Doctors Hospital was conducted. The findings of this pilot project further highlight the pervasive problem of missing or unreliable data regarding alcohol’s role in road trauma. Assessing the burden of drunk driving is an important step in designing effective interventions and systematically changing attitudes about driving under the influence. PMID:25191146

  14. Human resources for the control of road traffic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Charles; Kobusingye, Olive; Anh, Le Vu; Afukaar, Francis; Arreola-Risa, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The definition of the ideal numbers and distribution of human resources required for control of road traffic injury (RTI) is not as advanced as for other health problems. We can nonetheless identify functions that need to be addressed across the spectrum of injury control: surveillance; road safety (including infrastructure, vehicle design, and behaviour); and trauma care. Many low-cost strategies to improve these functions in low- or middle-income countries can be identified. For all these strategies, there is need for adequate institutional capacity, including funding, legal authority, and human resources. Several categories of human resources need to be developed: epidemiologists who can handle injury data, design surveillance systems, and undertake research; engineers and planners versed in safety aspects of road design, traffic flow, urban planning, and vehicle design; police and lawyers who understand the health impact of traffic law; clinicians who can develop cost-effective improvements in the entire system of trauma treatment; media experts to undertake effective behaviour change and social marketing; and economists to assist with cost-effectiveness evaluations. RTI control can be strengthened by enhancing such training in these disciplines, as well as encouraging retention of those who have the needed skills. Mechanisms to enhance collaboration between these different fields need to be promoted. Finally, the burden of RTI is borne disproportionately by the poor; in addition to technical issues, more profound equity issues must be addressed. This mandates that people from all professional backgrounds who work for RTI control should develop skills in advocacy and politics. PMID:15868021

  15. Road traffic injuries as seen in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Madubueze, Christian C; Chukwu, Christian O Onyebuchi; Omoke, Njoku I; Oyakhilome, Odion P; Ozo, Chidi

    2011-05-01

    Trauma is a major problem in both developing and developed countries. World wide road-traffic injuries (RTIs) represent 25% of all trauma deaths. Injuries cause 12% of the global disease burden and are the third commonest cause of death globally. In our own environment, trauma is also important, with RTIs being a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There is limited data on RTIs in West African countries, and this necessitated our study. We aimed to find common causative factors and proffer solutions. This was a one year prospective study examining all cases of trauma from RTIs seen at the Accident and Emergency Department of the Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital (EBSUTH), Abakaliki, Nigeria. Three hundred and sixty-three patients were studied. There was a male/female ratio of 3.4:1, with the modal age being 25 years. Most injuries involved motorcycles (54%). Passengers from cars and buses were also commonly affected (34.2%). Most of accidents occurred from head-on collisions (38.8%). Soft-tissue injuries and fractures accounted for 83.5% of injuries. The head and neck region was the commonest injury site (41.1%), and the most commonly fractured bones were the tibia and fibula (5.8%). Death occurred in 17 patients (4.7%), and 46 (12.7%) patients discharged themselves against medical advice. Improvements in road safety awareness, proper driver education-especially motorcycle drivers-and proper hospital care are needed in our subregion.

  16. The Burden of Road Traffic Injuries in Yazd Province - Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Mahmood; Mirzaei, Mohsen; Pirdehghan, Azar; Sadeghian, Mohamadreza; Jafarizadeh, Majid; Alimi, Mojtaba; Naderian, Shadi; Aghakoochak, Arezoo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the Disabled-adjusted Life Years (DALYs) of Road Traffic Accidents in patients referred to hospitals in Yazd Province, central Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Yazd province during 2010. To calculate the Years of Life Lost (YLL) due to premature death and to calculate the incidence of non-fatal injuries and Years Lost due to Disability (YLD), the data were collected from Yazd death registration system and hospital records. The causes of death and nature of non-fatal injuries were classified using International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). We estimated Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) on the guidelines of the Global Burden of Disease Study (discount rate: 0.03, age weight: 0.04, constant age weight correction factor: 0.165). Age and sex composition was taken from the National Statistical Center for the year 2010. Results: During 2009, 483 deaths were caused by traffic accidents in Yazd Province, 382 (79.09%) of which were males, and 101 (20.91%) were females. The mortality rates for males and females were 70.98 and 20.15 in 100,000, respectively. The years of life lost due to premature deaths were 15.84/1000 in men and 4.75/1,000 in women. Total YLLs caused by traffic accidents were 10,908 years. The injuries caused by traffic accidents were calculated as 15.21 and 3.73/1,000 in males and females, respectively. The total YLDs was calculated 1.51/1,000. The total burden of Road Traffic Injuries in Yazd province was 12478 years (DALYs), 87.41% of which was due to premature death, and 12.59% was related to disability. Also, 78.32% was lost in males. The age specific peak of burden was in 15-29 year. Conclusion: This study showed that traffic accidents in Yazd impose a high burden. It seems that it is one of the health sector priorities. It is recommended to revise laws on use of motorcycles, especially on helmet use for motorcyclists, enforce strict laws in residential areas, and review social determinant

  17. The road most travelled: the geographic distribution of road traffic injuries in England

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both road safety campaigns and epidemiological research into social differences in road traffic injury risk often assume that road traffic injuries occur close to home. While previous work has examined distance from home to site of collision for child pedestrians in local areas, less is known about the geographic distribution of road traffic injuries from other modes. This study explores the distribution of the distance between home residence and collision site (crash distance) by mode of transport, geographic area, and social characteristics in England. Methods Using 10 years of road casualty data collected by the police, we examined the distribution of crash distance by age, sex, injury severity, area deprivation, urban/rural status, year, day of week, and, in London only, ethnic group. Results 54% of pedestrians, 39% of cyclists, 17% of powered two-wheeler riders and 16% of car occupants were injured within 1 km of home. 82% of pedestrians, 83% of cyclists, 54% of powered two-wheeler and 53% of car occupants were injured within 5 km of home. We found some social and geographic differences in crash distance: for all transport modes injuries tended to occur closer to home in more deprived or urban areas; younger and older pedestrians and cyclists were also injured closer to home. Crash distance appears to have increased over time for pedestrian, cyclist and car occupant injuries, but has decreased over time for powered two-wheeler injuries. Conclusions Injuries from all travel modes tend to occur quite close to home, supporting assumptions made in epidemiological and road safety education literature. However, the trend for increasing crash distance and the social differences identified may have methodological implications for future epidemiological studies on social differences in injury risk. PMID:23738624

  18. Risk of injurious road traffic crash after prescription of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Ludivine; Queinec, Raphaëlle; Philip, Pierre; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Delorme, Bernard; Moore, Nicholas; Suissa, Samy; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2012-08-01

    To estimate the risk of road traffic crash associated with prescription of antidepressants. Data were extracted and matched from 3 French national databases: the national health care insurance database, police reports, and the national police database of injurious crashes. A case-control analysis comparing 34,896 responsible versus 37,789 nonresponsible drivers was conducted. Case-crossover analysis was performed to investigate the acute effect of medicine exposure. 72,685 drivers, identified by their national health care number, involved in an injurious crash in France from July 2005 to May 2008 were included. 2,936 drivers (4.0%) were exposed to at least 1 antidepressant on the day of the crash. The results showed a significant association between the risk of being responsible for a crash and prescription of antidepressants (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.22-1.47). The case-crossover analysis showed no association with treatment prescription, but the risk of road traffic crash increased after an initiation of antidepressant treatment (OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.24-1.79) and after a change in antidepressant treatment (OR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.09-1.60). Patients and prescribers should be warned about the risk of crash during periods of treatment with antidepressant medication and about particularly high vulnerability periods such as those when a treatment is initiated or modified. © Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  19. Initial results of Pakistan's first road traffic injury surveillance project.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Shahzad; Razzak, Junaid A; Jooma, Rashid; Khan, Uzma

    2011-09-01

    Our aim is to report the findings of the initial three years of road traffic injuries (RTI) surveillance at Karachi and to compare it with previously published RTI-related data from Pakistan and other low-and middle-income countries. Data were collected through the RTI surveillance programme at Karachi (RTIRP) from the five biggest emergency departments of the city, which receive almost all the major emergencies of the city for the period September 2006 till September 2009. A total of 99,272 victims were enlisted by the RTIRP during the study period. Annual incidence of RTI is calculated to be 184.3 per 100,000 populations and mortality is 5.7 per 100,000 populations. Eighty nine per cent of victims are male and 73% are between 15 and 44 years of age. Commonest road user to be affected is riders of two wheelers (45%). Only 7% of affected motorcyclists were found to be wearing helmets at the time of the accident. Trends of injuries remained uniform over the years. Most frequent injuries were external wounds, followed by orthopaedic injuries. On the basis of our surveillance system, we have presented the largest RTI-related data from a metropolitan city of Pakistan to date.

  20. The association of road safety knowledge and risk behaviour with paediatric road traffic injury in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaomei; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Wang, Shengyong; Chen, Xiongfei; Chi, Guibo; Ramirez, Marizen

    2017-01-01

    Background This study describes road traffic injuries among school-aged children in Guangzhou, China, and examines the effect of road safety knowledge and risk behaviours on road traffic injuries. Methods A stratified cluster sample of 3747 children from six primary schools and six middle schools in Guangzhou, China, was surveyed. Data were collected on sociodemographic factors and road traffic injuries during the past year. Knowledge about road safety rules was assessed using a 14-item road safety knowledge index, and risky road safety behaviours were measured using a 25-item road safety behaviour index. Results A total of 403 (10.8%) students reported having at least one road traffic injury during the past 12 months. A high proportion of injuries was found among children who were boys, in primary school and from the suburbs. Bicycle-related injuries were the most common (46.0% of all injuries). Motor vehicle-related injuries had higher hospitalisation rates and worse psychological impact than bicycle or pedestrian injuries. Children with low and medium road safety knowledge had 1.5 to 3 times the odds of injury compared with students with high road safety knowledge. Students with high scores on the risky road behaviour index had twice the odds of injury (OR 2.04, 95% CI 11.47 to 2.84) compared with students with low scores. Conclusion Better road safety knowledge and the avoidance of walking or cycling-related risk behaviours are protective factors for road traffic injuries among Chinese school children. More injury prevention programmes are needed to improve road safety knowledge and reduce risk behaviours. PMID:20876769

  1. Individual and areal risk factors for road traffic injury deaths: nationwide study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Kunhee; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Yoon; Kwon, Soonman

    2010-07-01

    This study determines the individual and areal risk factors for road traffic injury deaths in South Korea. The risk factors that influence road traffic injury deaths are defined by multilevel Poisson regression analysis. It is seen that not only demographic factors but also individual educational level, which represents socioeconomic status, influences road traffic injury deaths. The material deprivation index, which represents areal socioeconomic status, and W statistics, as a measure of the quality of the emergency medical system in an area, also influence road traffic injury deaths. Based on this study, the most vulnerable group for road traffic injury deaths is elderly men with a low level of education who live in the most deprived areas.Therefore, preventive policies focusing on both these areas and this population demographic should be established.

  2. Road traffic injuries in the People's Republic of China, 1951-2008.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xujun; Xiang, Huiyun; Jing, Ruiwei; Tu, Zhibin

    2011-12-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) have become the leading cause of injury deaths in China. This article analyzed the trends in all crashes, nonfatal injuries, and fatalities from road traffic crashes from 1951 to 2008 and compared the crash frequency, crash severity, and crash patterns by provinces, types of road, and injured road users. Road traffic crash data were obtained from the Bureau of Traffic Management at the Ministry of Public Security and National Bureau of Statistics of China. Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted. Over the past 5 decades, road traffic injuries have increased substantially in China. From 1951 to 2008, the total number of road traffic crashes, nonfatal injuries, and fatalities increased by 43-fold, 58-fold, and 85-fold, respectively. Linear regression suggested a significant decline of 30.1 percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.8-35.3) in the mortality rate per 100,000 people during the period 2002 to 2008. From 2004 to 2008, road traffic crash mortality rate per 100,000 people varied greatly in China from the lowest of 3.0 in Henan in 2008 to the highest of 21.7 in Xizang in 2004. RTIs in China disproportionally affected the following populations: males, persons 21 to 50 years of age, pedestrians, and motorcyclists/bicyclists. Adults aged more than 65 years accounted for approximately 10 percent of total road traffic deaths. Road types and RTIs severity were closely related; highways were associated with greater mortality rates. Road traffic injuries have become a burgeoning public health problem in China. Programs need to be developed to prevent nonfatal injuries and fatalities caused by road traffic crashes in this emerging country.

  3. Does Temperature Modify the Effects of Rain and Snow Precipitation on Road Traffic Injuries?

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Kyung; Lee, Hye-Ah; Hwang, Seung-sik; Kim, Ho; Lim, Youn-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Ha, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2015-01-01

    There are few data on the interaction between temperature and snow and rain precipitation, although they could interact in their effects on road traffic injuries. The integrated database of the Korea Road Traffic Authority was used to calculate the daily frequency of road traffic injuries in Seoul. Weather data included rain and snow precipitation, temperature, pressure, and fog from May 2007 to December 2011. Precipitation of rain and snow were divided into nine and six temperature range categories, respectively. The interactive effects of temperature and rain and snow precipitation on road traffic injuries were analyzed using a generalized additive model with a Poisson distribution. The risk of road traffic injuries during snow increased when the temperature was below freezing. Road traffic injuries increased by 6.6% when it was snowing and above 0 °C, whereas they increased by 15% when it was snowing and at or below 0 °C. In terms of heavy rain precipitation, moderate temperatures were related to an increased prevalence of injuries. When the temperature was 0-20 °C, we found a 12% increase in road traffic injuries, whereas it increased by 8.5% and 6.8% when it was <0 °C and >20 °C, respectively. The interactive effect was consistent across the traffic accident subtypes. The effect of adverse weather conditions on road traffic injuries differed depending on the temperature. More road traffic injuries were related to rain precipitation when the temperature was moderate and to snow when it was below freezing.

  4. Does Temperature Modify the Effects of Rain and Snow Precipitation on Road Traffic Injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Kyung; Lee, Hye-Ah; Hwang, Seung-sik; Kim, Ho; Lim, Youn-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Ha, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few data on the interaction between temperature and snow and rain precipitation, although they could interact in their effects on road traffic injuries. Methods The integrated database of the Korea Road Traffic Authority was used to calculate the daily frequency of road traffic injuries in Seoul. Weather data included rain and snow precipitation, temperature, pressure, and fog from May 2007 to December 2011. Precipitation of rain and snow were divided into nine and six temperature range categories, respectively. The interactive effects of temperature and rain and snow precipitation on road traffic injuries were analyzed using a generalized additive model with a Poisson distribution. Results The risk of road traffic injuries during snow increased when the temperature was below freezing. Road traffic injuries increased by 6.6% when it was snowing and above 0°C, whereas they increased by 15% when it was snowing and at or below 0°C. In terms of heavy rain precipitation, moderate temperatures were related to an increased prevalence of injuries. When the temperature was 0–20°C, we found a 12% increase in road traffic injuries, whereas it increased by 8.5% and 6.8% when it was <0°C and >20°C, respectively. The interactive effect was consistent across the traffic accident subtypes. Conclusions The effect of adverse weather conditions on road traffic injuries differed depending on the temperature. More road traffic injuries were related to rain precipitation when the temperature was moderate and to snow when it was below freezing. PMID:26073021

  5. [Road traffic injuries in Mexico: evidences to strengthen the Mexican road safety strategy].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Híjar, Martha; Celis, Alfredo; Hidalgo-Solórzano, Elisa

    2014-05-01

    Based on a review of secondary data and the scientific literature and an analysis of the ENSANut-2012 database, the current study provides a comprehensive overview of the current burden of road traffic injuries (RTI) in Mexico and analyzes the country's social response to RTI. The high collision, injury, mortality, and disability rates associated with this public health problem represent a high cost for Mexican society, especially for families. The paper argues that the Mexican response has focused on vehicle occupants while overlooking vulnerable road users and has prioritized strategies with limited effectiveness. Although the country's existing legislation addresses the main risk factors, enforcement has been limited. Finally, the paper makes some recommendations for strengthening the Mexican strategy to prevent RTI, such as safe, equitable, healthy, and sustainable mobility for all types of road users. Despite some strides in RTI prevention, there are still challenges and opportunities to be addressed in the future.

  6. The Economic Burden of Road Traffic Injuries on Households in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Khurshid; Mahal, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Globally, road traffic injuries accounted for about 1.36 million deaths in 2015 and are projected to become the fourth leading cause of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost by 2030. One-fifth of these deaths occurred in South Asia where road traffic injuries are projected to increase by 144% by 2020. Despite this rapidly increasing disease burden there is limited evidence on the economic burden of road traffic injuries on households in South Asia. We applied a novel coarsened exact matching method to assess the household economic burden of road traffic injuries using nationally representative World Health Survey data from five South Asian countries- Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka collected during 2002–2003. We examined the impact of road traffic injuries on household out-of-pocket (OOP) health spending, household non-medical consumption expenditure and the employment status of the traffic injury-affected respondent. We exactly matched a household (after ‘coarsening’) where a respondent reported being involved in a road traffic injury to households where the respondent did not report a road traffic injury on each of multiple observed household characteristics. Our analysis found that road traffic injury-affected households had significantly higher levels of OOP health spending per member (I$0.75, p<0.01), higher OOP spending on drugs per member (I$0.30, p = 0.03), and higher OOP hospital spending per member (I$0.29, p<0.01) in the four weeks preceding the survey. Indicators of “catastrophic spending” were also significantly higher in road traffic injury-affected households: 6.45% (p<0.01) for a threshold of OOP health spending to total household spending ratio of 20%, and 7.40% (p<0.01) for a threshold of OOP health spending to household ‘capacity to pay’ ratio of 40%. However, no statistically significant effects were observed for household non-medical consumption expenditure, and employment status of the road traffic injury

  7. [Equity and social determinants of road traffic injuries in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Fillol, Amandine; Bonnet, Emmanuel; Bassolé, Joanny; Lechat, Lucie; Djiguinde, Amadou; Rouamba, George; Ridde, Valery

    2016-11-25

    This pilot study shows that it is possible to create an effective framework to obtain data concerning the social determinants of health for road traffic injuries, and that actions in favour of equity must be initiated..

  8. Strategies for prevention of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Pakistan: situational analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adeel Ahmed; Fatmi, Zafar

    2014-05-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are one of the leading causes of death among productive age group. Using systems approach framework (SAF), current preventive strategies for RTI control were reviewed in Pakistan. A review of the literature was done using four international search engines. Only ten studies on preventive strategies for RTI stemming from Pakistan were found. The first Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) surveillance system for road traffic injuries was established in urban city (Karachi) in Pakistan has shown promise for injury control and should be scaled up to other cities. Enforcement of traffic laws on seat-belt and helmet wearing is poor. National Highway and Motorway Police Ordinance (2000) was one of the few legislative measure so far taken in Pakistan. Using SAF, efforts are required to implement interventions targeting human, vehicle design and also making environment safer for road users.

  9. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety. PMID:24284810

  10. Gender differences in road traffic injury rate using time travelled as a measure of exposure.

    PubMed

    Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Pérez, Katherine; Olabarria, Marta; Novoa, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    There is no consensus on whether the risk of road traffic injury is higher among men or among women. Comparison between studies is difficult mainly due to the different exposure measures used to estimate the risk. The measures of exposure to the risk of road traffic injury should be people's mobility measures, but frequently authors use other measures such population or vehicles mobility. We compare road traffic injury risk in men and women, by age, mode of transport and severity, using the time people spend travelling as the exposure measure, in Catalonia for the period 2004-2008. This is a cross-sectional study including all residents aged over 3 years. The road traffic injury rate was calculated using the number of people injured, from the Register of Accidents and Victims of the National Traffic Authority as numerator, and the person-hours travelled, from the 2006 Daily Mobility Survey carried out by the Catalan regional government, as denominator. Sex and age specific rates by mode of transport and severity were calculated, and Poisson regression models were fitted. Among child pedestrians and young drivers, males present higher risk of slight and severe injury, and in the oldest groups women present higher risk. The death rate is always higher in men. There exists interaction between sex and age in road traffic injury risk. Therefore, injury risk is higher among men in some age groups, and among women in other groups, but these age groups vary depending on mode of transport and severity.

  11. Pediatric craniomaxillofacial injuries after road traffic crashes: characteristics of injuries and protective equipment use.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Siti Salmiah Mohd; Ngeow, Wei Cheong; Ramli, Roszalina

    2015-09-01

    A cross-sectional study to determine the pattern of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) injuries among children involved in road traffic crashes was performed. The association of protective equipment use with the CMF injuries was evaluated. Retrospective records of children treated in the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, after road traffic crashes between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 were reviewed, and, after that, telephone interviews were made. Seventy-one children were included in this study. Fifty-two (73.6%) were involved in a motorcycle injury and 19 (23.4%) in a car crash. Their mean age was 6.02 years; SD, 3.46 (range between 0 to 13 years old). More male children were observed (52.1%) compared with females (47.9%). Thirty-nine point four percent of the children sustained CMF injuries, 33.8% body injuries, and 23.9% had both CMF and other body parts injuries. The highest injury severity score was 26, whereas the lowest was 0. Many children did not use protective equipment during traveling, 44.2% of children among motorcycle pillion riders, and 78.9% among car passengers. The association between helmet use and CMF injuries was shown to be statistically significant (P < .001). Craniomaxillofacial injuries could be prevented with the use of motorcycle helmet and seat belt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of life following road traffic injury: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Ritva; Berg, Hans-Yngve; Hasselberg, Marie

    2017-09-19

    To assess and provide a systematic overview of current knowledge about the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and road traffic injury, and to appraise how QoL is affected by road traffic injury. A systematic review of the literature published since 1990 on QoL after a road traffic injury, including adult and paediatric populations, from three databases (Pubmed, PsychInfo and SafetyLit) was undertaken. The methodological quality was assessed according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Thirty articles were included and assessed for quality. The QoL scores of those injured were similar to population norms at the first assessment, followed by a drop at the second assessment. An increase of QoL from the second to third assessment was reported, but participants never reached the population norms at the last follow-up (range six weeks to two years), with an exception of those claiming compensation and those with lower extremity fractures. Age, gender, socioeconomic status, injury severity, injury type and post-traumatic stress disorder were associated with reduced QoL. Available literature regarding QoL among injured in road traffic crashes is heterogeneous with regard to aims and tools used for assessment. Our review confirmed that independent of measure, the overall QoL was significantly reduced after a road traffic injury compared to the general population norms. Persons who are older, of female gender, lower socioeconomic status, diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, with more severe injuries or injuries to the lower limbs are more vulnerable to loss of QoL following road traffic injury compared to other patient groups injured in road traffic crashes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mortality and potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries in Brazil, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; de Mello-Jorge, Maria Helena Prado

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries three years after the beginning of the Decade of Action for Traffic Safety. METHODS We analyzed the data of the Sistema de Informações sobre Mortalidade (SIM – Mortality Information System) related to road traffic injuries, in 2013. We estimated the crude and standardized mortality rates for Brazil and geographic regions. We calculated, for the Country, the proportional mortality according to age groups, education level, race/skin color, and type or quality of the victim while user of the public highway. We estimated the potential years of life lost according to sex. RESULTS The mortality rate in 2013 was of 21.0 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants for the Country. The Midwest region presented the highest rate (29.9 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants). Most of the deaths by road traffic injuries took place with males (34.9 deaths per 100,000 males). More than half of the people who have died because of road traffic injuries were of black race/skin color, young adults (24.2%), individuals with low schooling (24.0%), and motorcyclists (28.5%). The mortality rate in the triennium 2011-2013 decreased 4.1%, but increased among motorcyclists. Across the Country, more than a million of potential years of life were lost, in 2013, because of road traffic injuries, especially in the age group of 20 to 29 years. CONCLUSIONS The impact of the high mortality rate is of over a million of potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries, especially among adults in productive age (early mortality), in only one year, representing extreme social cost arising from a cause of death that could be prevented. Despite the reduction of mortality by road traffic injuries from 2011 to 2013, the mortality rates increased among motorcyclists. PMID:27706375

  14. Policy Analysis of Road Traffic Injury Prevention in Iran.

    PubMed

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Shabaninejad, Hosein; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2017-01-01

    Due to the large number of Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs) in Iran, authorities have implemented a number of policies for the prevention of RTIs. However, a scientific analysis of these policies has thus far been neglected. Therefore, this study was conducted for policy analysis of RTIs prevention in Iran. This qualitative study with a case study approach was conducted in Iran during 2016 in two phases: First, by reviewing literature and documents of the past ten years, policies that have been executed to prevent RTIs in Iran were identified. In the second phase of the study, the identified policies were ranked by prioritization matrices. The two policies with the highest scores were selected. 'Policy triangle framework' was used for Policy analyzing. Stakeholders of these policies (42 people) were interviewed. Data were analyzed manually by implementing Content-Analysis methods. The policies of "pupil liaisons" and "safety belt" were selected for analysis from thirteen potential identified polices. The results of some studies revealed that safety belts had not been properly used in Iran (less than 80%). There was an eight-year hiatus between the approval of the safety belts policy and implementation of this policy. Eight actors were identified for safety belts policy. Lack of diligence in implementation of the policy, failing to pay adequate attention to education and the culture of driving, and failing to select an organization for the implementation of the policy, were identified as the main weaknesses of this policy. For 'pupil liaisons' policy, five actors were identified. Following the implementation of this policy, the number of penalties was reduced (17.9%). Neglecting scientific findings and individual-based nature of the policy were identified as the primary weaknesses of this policy. Taking serious measures to properly execute the policy, educating people, selecting an efficient organization that is responsible for the implementation of the policies, and

  15. Necessity of an integrated road traffic injuries surveillance system: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Vafaee, Reza; Haddadi, Mashianeh; Abdalvand, Ali; Soori, Hamid

    2011-08-01

    A prerequisite to improving the situation of traffic accidents and injury prevention is to set up a road traffic accident and victim information system (RTAVIS), which does not exist in Iran. The objective of this study was to compare the 3 major sources of information, including police, emergency medical services (EMS), and hospitals, to show the necessity of an integrated road traffic injury surveillance system. This prospective cohort study was performed by pursuing all road traffic accident (RTA) cases during one year (May 2008 to May 2009) within 30 days of their occurrence by a draft questionnaire and data pooling from participating sources. After pooling the data from all organizations, it was revealed that during one year, 245 road traffic accidents occurred in Tehran-Abali route (with a 45-km radius) in which 434 people were either injured or deceased. Out of these crash injuries, police and EMS were unaware of 67 and 51 cases, respectively. In other words, police, pre-hospital emergency services and hospitals reported 56.2, 82.9, and 76.4 percent of the entire number of injuries or deaths, respectively. None of the organizations investigated, that is, police, EMS, and health care facilities, have complete records on injuries and deaths caused by traffic accidents. We recommend the formulation and implementation of an integrated and multidisciplinary data collection system of national traffic accidents with the collaboration of police, Ministry of Health and Medical Education (EMS and hospitals), forensic medicine, and the Iranian Red Crescent.

  16. Pattern of Injuries from Road Traffic Accidents Presented at a Rural Teaching Institution of Karachi.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study is to study the pattern of injuries from road traffic accidents presented at the emergency department of a rural teaching institution in Karachi. This descriptive case series was conducted prospectively in the Emergency Department of Fatima Hospital and Baqai Medical University from 1 January 2012 to 21 March 2013. There were 385 patients in the series. All of the patients with recent injuries from road traffic accidents were included. Cases with injuries more than 72 h old were excluded. The majority of patients had lower limb injuries 172 (44.7%), followed by head and neck injuries 107 (27.8%), multiple injuries 62 (16.1%), upper limb injuries 22 (5.7%), abdominoperineal injuries 19 (5%), and chest injuries 3 (0.8%). Majority (229, 59.5%) of patients were given first aid treatment and discharged, while 151 (39.3%) patients were either admitted or referred to better equipped hospitals. Three patients were brought dead, and two patients left against medical advice. The lower limb injuries were the commonest road traffic accidental injuries, followed by head and neck injuries, multiple injuries, upper limb injuries, abdominoperineal injuries, and chest injuries.

  17. Road Traffic Deaths and Injuries Are Under-Reported in Ethiopia: A Capture-Recapture Method

    PubMed Central

    Abegaz, Teferi; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Assrat, Abebe; Assefa, Abebayehu

    2014-01-01

    In low and middle income countries road traffic injuries are commonly under-reported. This problem is significantly higher among those less severely injured road users. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and the level of ascertainment of road traffic injuries and deaths by traffic police and hospital registry. In this study two-sample capture-recapture method was applied using data from traffic police and hospital injury surveillance, through June 2012 to May 2013. The study was conducted on one of the busiest highways in Ethiopia, the Addis Ababa – Hawassa highway. Primary data were collected by accident investigators and hospital emergency nurses using a structured checklist. Four matching variables; name of the victim, sex, place and time of the accidents was used to get the matched cases. During the study period the police independently reported 224 deaths and 446 injuries/billion vehicle kilometer while hospitals reported 123 deaths and 1,046 injuries/billion vehicle kilometer. Both sources in common captured 73 deaths and 248 injuries/billion vehicle kilometer. Taking the two data sources into consideration, the capture-recapture model estimated the incidence of deaths and injuries ranged 368–390 and 1,869–1,895 per billion vehicle kilometer, respectively. The police source captured 57.4%–60.9% of deaths and 23.5%–23.9% of injuries while the hospital sources captured 31.5%–33.4% of deaths and 55.2%–56% of injuries. Deaths and injuries among females, younger age victims, cyclists/motorcyclists and pedestrians were under-reported by traffic police. In conclusion neither of the two sources independently provided accurate coverage of road traffic incident related deaths and injuries. Strengthening both systems is necessary to obtain accurate information on road accidents and human causalities. PMID:25054440

  18. Road traffic deaths and injuries are under-reported in Ethiopia: a capture-recapture method.

    PubMed

    Abegaz, Teferi; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Assrat, Abebe; Assefa, Abebayehu

    2014-01-01

    In low and middle income countries road traffic injuries are commonly under-reported. This problem is significantly higher among those less severely injured road users. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and the level of ascertainment of road traffic injuries and deaths by traffic police and hospital registry. In this study two-sample capture-recapture method was applied using data from traffic police and hospital injury surveillance, through June 2012 to May 2013. The study was conducted on one of the busiest highways in Ethiopia, the Addis Ababa - Hawassa highway. Primary data were collected by accident investigators and hospital emergency nurses using a structured checklist. Four matching variables; name of the victim, sex, place and time of the accidents was used to get the matched cases. During the study period the police independently reported 224 deaths and 446 injuries/billion vehicle kilometer while hospitals reported 123 deaths and 1,046 injuries/billion vehicle kilometer. Both sources in common captured 73 deaths and 248 injuries/billion vehicle kilometer. Taking the two data sources into consideration, the capture-recapture model estimated the incidence of deaths and injuries ranged 368-390 and 1,869-1,895 per billion vehicle kilometer, respectively. The police source captured 57.4%-60.9% of deaths and 23.5%-23.9% of injuries while the hospital sources captured 31.5%-33.4% of deaths and 55.2%-56% of injuries. Deaths and injuries among females, younger age victims, cyclists/motorcyclists and pedestrians were under-reported by traffic police. In conclusion neither of the two sources independently provided accurate coverage of road traffic incident related deaths and injuries. Strengthening both systems is necessary to obtain accurate information on road accidents and human causalities.

  19. The impact of the Thai motorcycle transition on road traffic injury: Thai Cohort Study results.

    PubMed

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Kelly, Matthew; McClure, Roderick; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of motorcycle to car transitioning and urbanisation on traffic injury rates in Thailand. Analysis of two consecutive surveys of a large national cohort study. Thailand. The data derived from 57,154 Thai Cohort Study (TCS) participants who provided relevant data on both the 2005 and 2009 surveys. Motorcycle and car traffic crash injury self-reported in 2009, with twelve months' recall. In 2009, 5608(10%) participants reported a traffic crash injury. Most crashes involved a motorcycle (74%). Car access increased and motorcycle use decreased between 2005 and 2009. Among those who used a motorcycle at both time points, traffic injury incidence was 2.8 times greater compared to those who did not use a motorcycle at either time point. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to test longitudinal and cross sectional factors associated with traffic crash injury: in the adjusted model, cars were negatively and motorcycles positively associated with injury. Living in an urban area was not injury protective in the adjusted model of traffic crash injury. Ongoing urbanisation in Thailand can be expected to lead to further reductions in road traffic injuries based on transition from motorcycles to cars in urban areas. Cities, however, do not provide an intrinsically safer traffic environment. To accommodate a safe transition to car use in Thailand, traffic infrastructural changes anticipating the growing car density in urban areas is warranted.

  20. The Impact of the Thai Motorcycle Transition on Road Traffic Injury: Thai Cohort Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Kelly, Matthew; McClure, Roderick; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of motorcycle to car transitioning and urbanisation on traffic injury rates in Thailand. Design Analysis of two consecutive surveys of a large national cohort study. Setting Thailand. Participants The data derived from 57,154 Thai Cohort Study (TCS) participants who provided relevant data on both the 2005 and 2009 surveys. Primary and secondary outcome measures Motorcycle and car traffic crash injury self-reported in 2009, with twelve months’ recall. Results In 2009, 5608(10%) participants reported a traffic crash injury. Most crashes involved a motorcycle (74%). Car access increased and motorcycle use decreased between 2005 and 2009. Among those who used a motorcycle at both time points, traffic injury incidence was 2.8 times greater compared to those who did not use a motorcycle at either time point. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to test longitudinal and cross sectional factors associated with traffic crash injury: in the adjusted model, cars were negatively and motorcycles positively associated with injury. Living in an urban area was not injury protective in the adjusted model of traffic crash injury. Conclusions Ongoing urbanisation in Thailand can be expected to lead to further reductions in road traffic injuries based on transition from motorcycles to cars in urban areas. Cities, however, do not provide an intrinsically safer traffic environment. To accommodate a safe transition to car use in Thailand, traffic infrastructural changes anticipating the growing car density in urban areas is warranted. PMID:25826214

  1. Association between mandatory seatbelt laws and road traffic injuries in Iran.

    PubMed

    Soori, H; Nasermoadeli, A; Ainy, E; Hassani, S A; Mehmandar, M R

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of mandatory seatbelt legislation on traffic injuries and intensity of road traffic injuries (RTIs). We carried out a before- after interventional study. Data regarding road traffic accidents and injuries one year before and one and two years after the implementation of mandatory seatbelt legislation were obtained from the traffic police database. Traffic accident mortality was 13.0% of all RTIs during the year prior to implementation. This decreased to 9.7% and 11.4% during the first and second years after implementation, respectively (p < 0.001). The mortality rate was not consistent for seatbelt use since there was a slight increase in the mortality rate in second year after implementation of mandatory seatbelt use although this level was lower than the pre- implementation rate. Our findings suggest mandatory seatbelt use reduces the intensity of RTIs and reduces the crude number of RTIs.

  2. Road traffic injuries to children during the school commute in Hyderabad, India: cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Tetali, Shailaja; Murthy, G V S; Roberts, I

    2016-01-01

    Background India is motorising rapidly. With increasing motorisation, road traffic injuries are predicted to increase. A third of a billion children travel to school every day in India, but little is known about children's safety during the school commute. We investigated road traffic injury to children during school journeys. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Hyderabad using a two-stage stratified cluster sampling design. We used school travel questionnaires to record any road injury in the past 12 months that resulted in at least 1 day of school missed or required treatment by a doctor or nurse. We estimated the prevalence of road injury by usual mode of travel and distance to school. Results The total sample was 5842 children, of whom 5789 (99.1%) children answered the question on road injury. The overall prevalence of self-reported road injury in the last 12 months during school journeys was 17% (95% CI 12.9% to 21.7%). A higher proportion of boys (25%) reported a road injury than girls (11%). There was a strong association between road injury, travel mode and distance to school. Children who cycled to school were more likely to be injured compared with children who walked (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.0). Travel by school bus was safer than walking (OR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3 to 0.9). Conclusions A sixth of the children reported a road traffic injury in the past 12 months during school journeys in Hyderabad. Injury prevention interventions should focus on making walking and cycling safer for children. PMID:26701985

  3. Policy Analysis of Road Traffic Injury Prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Shabaninejad, Hosein; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Due to the large number of Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs) in Iran, authorities have implemented a number of policies for the prevention of RTIs. However, a scientific analysis of these policies has thus far been neglected. Therefore, this study was conducted for policy analysis of RTIs prevention in Iran. Methods This qualitative study with a case study approach was conducted in Iran during 2016 in two phases: First, by reviewing literature and documents of the past ten years, policies that have been executed to prevent RTIs in Iran were identified. In the second phase of the study, the identified policies were ranked by prioritization matrices. The two policies with the highest scores were selected. ‘Policy triangle framework’ was used for Policy analyzing. Stakeholders of these policies (42 people) were interviewed. Data were analyzed manually by implementing Content-Analysis methods. Results The policies of “pupil liaisons” and “safety belt” were selected for analysis from thirteen potential identified polices. The results of some studies revealed that safety belts had not been properly used in Iran (less than 80%). There was an eight-year hiatus between the approval of the safety belts policy and implementation of this policy. Eight actors were identified for safety belts policy. Lack of diligence in implementation of the policy, failing to pay adequate attention to education and the culture of driving, and failing to select an organization for the implementation of the policy, were identified as the main weaknesses of this policy. For ‘pupil liaisons’ policy, five actors were identified. Following the implementation of this policy, the number of penalties was reduced (17.9%). Neglecting scientific findings and individual-based nature of the policy were identified as the primary weaknesses of this policy. Conclusions Taking serious measures to properly execute the policy, educating people, selecting an efficient organization that is

  4. Traffic injury mortality trends in children and adolescents in Lithuania among road users.

    PubMed

    Strukcinskiene, Birute; Uğur-Baysal, Serpil; Raistenskis, Juozas

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes traffic mortality trends among road users from 1998 to 2012 in children and adolescents aged 0-19 years in Lithuania. National mortality data of pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, and car occupants were used to compare trend lines. The study revealed that 56% of the deceased in road traffic crashes were car occupants, while 24% were pedestrians. The incidence of death from traffic injury was 2.5 times higher in boys than girls. Traffic injury mortality and pedestrian mortality rates declined significantly in the total group. There was also a significant decline in mortality among cyclists for the total group and female subgroup. Trends in mortality rates among motorcyclists and car occupants showed no significant changes. A long-term decline is more likely to be affected by efforts in the promotion of sustainable and permanent road safety. The reduced risk exposure may also have been influenced by the economic recession.

  5. Economic burden of road traffic injuries: a micro-costing approach.

    PubMed

    Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Piyauthakit, Piyanuch; Chaikledkaew, Usa

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the economic burden incurred from road traffic injuries in Thailand. It was designed as a prevalence-based cost-of-illness analysis from a societal perspective, employing a micro-costing bottom-up approach. It covered direct medical cost, direct non-medical cost, and indirect cost or productivity loss. Productivity loss covers the costs of work absence or death due to road traffic injuries suffered by persons of working age. We collected data on road traffic injuries and resource utilization which occurred in the fiscal year 2004. A simple random sampling was used to select 200 patients for analysis. The average cost of road traffic injuries per patient was USD 2,596 at 2004 prices. This can be divided into direct cost (USD 102, or 4%) and indirect cost (USD 2,494, or 96%). From these results, we can see that the indirect cost far outweighed the direct cost. To base decisions regarding road safety campaigns on savings of direct costs, particularly direct medical costs, is inadequate. Therefore, data on the complete cost of illness should be taken into account in the planning and creation of a road safety policy.

  6. Forecasting mortality of road traffic injuries in China using seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xujun; Pang, Yuanyuan; Cui, Mengjing; Stallones, Lorann; Xiang, Huiyun

    2015-02-01

    Road traffic injuries have become a major public health problem in China. This study aimed to develop statistical models for predicting road traffic deaths and to analyze seasonality of deaths in China. A seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model was used to fit the data from 2000 to 2011. Akaike Information Criterion, Bayesian Information Criterion, and mean absolute percentage error were used to evaluate the constructed models. Autocorrelation function and partial autocorrelation function of residuals and Ljung-Box test were used to compare the goodness-of-fit between the different models. The SARIMA model was used to forecast monthly road traffic deaths in 2012. The seasonal pattern of road traffic mortality data was statistically significant in China. SARIMA (1, 1, 1) (0, 1, 1)12 model was the best fitting model among various candidate models; the Akaike Information Criterion, Bayesian Information Criterion, and mean absolute percentage error were -483.679, -475.053, and 4.937, respectively. Goodness-of-fit testing showed nonautocorrelations in the residuals of the model (Ljung-Box test, Q = 4.86, P = .993). The fitted deaths using the SARIMA (1, 1, 1) (0, 1, 1)12 model for years 2000 to 2011 closely followed the observed number of road traffic deaths for the same years. The predicted and observed deaths were also very close for 2012. This study suggests that accurate forecasting of road traffic death incidence is possible using SARIMA model. The SARIMA model applied to historical road traffic deaths data could provide important evidence of burden of road traffic injuries in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-month pattern of road traffic injuries at a Kenyan level 4 hospital

    PubMed Central

    Matheka, Duncan Mwangangi; Kitonyi, Mercy Nzilani; Alkizim, Faraj Omar

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries continue to exert a huge burden on the health care system in Kenya. Few studies on the pattern of road traffic injuries have been conducted in Kenya. We therefore carried out a retrospective study to determine the pattern of road traffic injuries seen in a public hospital in Naivasha district, Kenya. A retrospective study on surgical patients admitted at Naivasha District Hospital over a three month period was carried out. Eighty two percent of all patients injured in the crashes were men, and eighty percent were aged between 20-49 years. Most of the patients sustained lower limb injuries (41.5%) followed by head injuries (35.4%). Thirty one percent were pedestrians, 27.7% cyclists, 24.6% passengers and 16.9% motor vehicle drivers at the time of injury. Road traffic crashes are a growing pandemic, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Efforts need to be taken to prevent injuries, long term complications and loss of lives that are robbing communities off loved ones, bread winners and productive manpower. PMID:26090036

  8. Clinical consequences of road traffic injuries among the elderly in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries among the elderly have recently become a public health issue; therefore, we investigated the clinical characteristics of such injuries among the elderly in Japan. Methods A retrospective study was performed using data from a medium-sized hospital emergency department. Data were extracted from medical records for one year, and patients were categorized into groups ages 18-64, 65-74 and 75+. Variables included demographic characteristics, injury circumstances, and nature of injury. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistical analyses were performed, and multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate injury severity and hospital admission by age groups. Results A total of 1,656 patients were studied. Patients aged 65+ had more chest wall injury, intracranial injury, lower extremity fracture, and intrathoracic injury than patients aged 18-64. Conclusions Injury circumstances and nature of injuries associated with traffic incidents showed different patterns by age groups, particularly among the elderly. PMID:20584283

  9. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of road traffic injuries on disability rates and long-term care costs in Spain.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Ramon; Ayuso, Mercedes; Guillén, Montserrat

    2013-11-01

    Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of increasing disability-adjusted life expectancy. We analyze long-term care needs associated with motor vehicle crash-related disability in Spain and conclude that needs attributable traffic injuries are most prevalent during victims' mid-life years, they create a significant burden for both families and society as a whole given that public welfare programmes supporting these victims need to be maintained over a long time frame. High socio-economic costs of road traffic accidents (in Spain 0.04% of the GDP in 2008) are clearly indicative of the need for governments and policymakers to strengthen road accident preventive measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Road traffic injuries among children and adolescents in Singapore - Who is at greatest risk?

    PubMed

    Chong, Shu-Ling; Tyebally, Arif; Chew, Su Yah; Lim, Yang Chern; Feng, Xun Yi; Chin, Sock Teng; Lee, Lois K

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric road traffic injuries remain a significant cause of death and disability in many countries in Asia, despite the implementation of road traffic safety laws. We aim to describe the injuries, the use of restraints among road users, and risk factors associated with severe injuries for children in Singapore. We performed a retrospective chart review of road traffic injuries presenting to the only two pediatric tertiary care hospitals in Singapore, from January 2012 to April 2016. We included children <16years old presenting to the emergency departments within 24h after injury (pedestrian, bicycle, motorcycle, motor vehicle). We calculated the frequencies for specific injury mechanisms, injury severity scores (ISS), and in-hospital outcomes of severe injuries (death, urgent resuscitation and emergent surgery). We performed a multivariate logistic regression to determine risk factors associated with severe injury. There were 2468 patients during the study period. The mean age was 7.9 years (SD 4.7); 60.1% of road injuries involved motor vehicle occupants (1483/2468). Most bicyclist/motorcyclists were not wearing helmets (70.0%, 245/350) and 51.1% of motor vehicle passengers (758/1483) were not restrained. Compared to motor vehicle passengers, pedestrians (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.41-3.99), bicyclists (adjusted OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.04-4.32) and motorcyclists (adjusted OR 6.09, 95% CI 2.04-18.24) were more likely to sustain severe injuries. Child pedestrians, bicyclists and motorcyclists are especially vulnerable for severe injures. Further injury prevention efforts must focus on the enforcement of legislation to protect these high-risk groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adverse health outcomes of road traffic injuries in Iran after rapid motorization.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Mohsen; Shahraz, Saeid; Bhalla, Kavi; Jafari, Nahid; Pourmalek, Farshad; Bartels, David; Puthenpurakal, Jerry Abraham; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmail

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies have made it clear that Iran has too many road traffic injuries (RTI). This paper explains the reasons for high traffic injury rates and points to solutions. It also provides detailed data on the burden of traffic injury in Iran in 2005. Traffic injury rates have rapidly risen out of control because for a variety of possible reasons such as increasing number of non-standard cars and motorcycles, low gas price, decreasing ratio of travels via public transportation than with private vehicles, and problems with safety design. Besides a high need for a system safety approach, Iran needs to deal with the problem of producing a high number of cars and motorcycles. Providing safe mobility for the people of Iran needs to be a top priority of the government.

  13. Epidemiologic study of road traffic injuries by road user type characteristics and road environment in Iran: a community-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hatamabadi, Hamidreza; Vafaee, Reza; Hadadi, Mashyaneh; Abdalvand, Ali; Esnaashari, Hamidreza; Soori, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Crash injuries in traffic accidents are affected by a variety of factors. In this study we analyzed road user type information based on different contributing factors. Data from all of the road traffic victims on a road extending from the east of the city of Tehran to Mazandaran province were included prospectively over a one-year period (May 2008 to May 2009). Data collected included the crash time, patient's age and sex, road user category, helmet or seat belt use, anatomical site of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and mortality. Prevalence and cross-tabulations were included in the analysis. There were 433 patients, of whom 345 were hospitalized and 33 died either before or after arriving at the hospital. Sixty-nine percent of injured patients were vehicle occupants. Mean and median of ISS were higher for pedestrians, who accounted for 49 percent of the deaths. Head injury was the most common injury and injury to upper and lower extremities was the most common cause of admission. A significant difference in lower extremity injuries between vehicle occupants and nonoccupants was found. Sex and age group did not have a significant effect on mortality. Mortality was significantly higher in pedestrians (P < .001) when data were analyzed based on road user type. Because pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, stricter legislation and law enforcement should be used to protect them. Greater protection can also be reached by holding effective public awareness campaigns on how to use different roads safely. On the other hand, because rear seat passengers are at the same risk for road traffic injuries as front seat passengers, employment of newer laws and preventive measures targeting this group of occupants can prevent many road traffic injuries (RTIs).

  14. Prevalence and regional correlates of road traffic injury among Chinese urban residents: A 21-city population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Ian R H; Jiang, Shuhan; Yang, Qian; Yang, Tingzhong; Yang, Xiaozhao Y; Peng, Sihui; Yu, Lingwei

    2017-08-18

    This study estimated the prevalence of road traffic injury among Chinese urban residents and examined individual and regional-level correlates. A cross-sectional multistage process was used to sample residents from 21 selected cities in China. Survey respondents reported their history of road traffic injury in the past 12 months through a community survey. Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify injury correlates. Based on a retrospective 12-month reporting window, road traffic injury prevalence among urban residents was 13.2%. Prevalence of road traffic injury, by type, was 8.7, 8.7, 8.5, and 7.7% in the automobile, bicycle, motorcycle, and pedestrian categories, respectively. Multilevel analysis showed that prevalence of road traffic injury was positively associated with minority status, income, and mental health disorder score at the individual level. Regionally, road traffic injury was associated with geographic location of residence and prevalence of mental health disorders. Both individual and regional-level variables were associated with road traffic injury among Chinese urban residents, a finding whose implications transcend wholesale imported generic solutions. This descriptive research demonstrates an urgent need for longitudinal studies across China on risk and protective factors, in order to inform injury etiology, surveillance, prevention, treatment, and evaluation.

  15. Extent and determinants of cost of road traffic injuries in an Indian city.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G M M; Negandhi, Himanshu; Singh, Dalbir; Singh, Amarjeet J

    2009-12-01

    Studies aimed at estimating losses that are incurred as a result of road traffic injuries (RTIs), especially at the family level, are very limited. To ascertain the direct and productivity costs of road traffic injuries and their determinants. This study was a cross-sectional survey of all the road traffic crashes recorded by traffic police during 2004 in Chandigarh, a modern planned city of north India. All road traffic crashes recorded by the traffic police during the year 1st January to 31st December 2004 were included in the study. The houses of all the victims were visited. The direct costs included the immediate medical costs (i.e., emergency and hospital care, follow-up care, medicines and appliances, doctor bills, etc.), and nonmedical costs (transportation, property damage cost, etc.). Work productivity and activity questionnaire (WPAI-SHP), the health and labor questionnaire (HLQ) and Human Capital Method were used for estimating the productivity costs. Percentage, mean, standard deviation of the outcome parameters were calculated. Of the 121 crash victims listed, 95 agreed to participate in the study. The net direct costs incurred were Rs. 8,55,644 ($19,991). The vehicle repair costs constituted more than half of such cost. Surgery, which was conducted in 28 cases, constituted 14.5% of the direct costs. The total productivity cost incurred was Rs. 8,06,24,530 ($1,883,750). Costs incurred due to premature mortality constituted over 99% of these productivity losses suffered by society. Lost wages due to the crash constituted less than 1% [Rs. 1,40,230 ($3276)] of the total productivity loss. Road traffic injuries are a significant financial drag on the society. The productivity costs far outweigh the direct costs. Premature mortality, vehicle damage and medical costs constituted the major share of the cost of RTIs.

  16. Road traffic crash injuries and fatalities in the city of Kerman, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Ghorbanali

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate road traffic crash injuries and fatalities. Cases of 3902 road traffic injuries (1709 drivers, 891 passengers, 376 pedestrians and 926 motorcyclists) and 1564 road traffic fatalities (RTFs; 1222 males and 342 females) were collected from 2005 to 2008 using the database of the police forces and Department of Forensic Medicine in Kerman, respectively. Results showed that 66% of the injuries were related to car occupants (drivers and passengers) and men/women ratio was 5:1. The highest men/women ratio was (12.2:1) for drivers, while the lowest ratio (1.8:1) was for pedestrians. Most of the injuries had taken place at 16:01-20:00 h followed by 08:01-12:00 h. Highest numbers of injuries were found in male with the age groups of 18-24 years. The highest fatality rate of 79 per 100,000 population occurred in 2007-2008. Fatality ratio indicated higher male ratio, four times higher than females. The victims were 39% male between 30 and 55 years of age. Head injuries were present in 69% of the cases. In our series of forensic autopsy cases, head injuries were more frequent in motor vehicle occupants, pedestrians and motorcyclists. On average, two people died per day in RTFs in Kerman.

  17. The burden of road traffic crashes, injuries and deaths in Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jacqueline Y; Akanbi, Moses A; Azuh, Dominic; Samuel, Victoria; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Ayo, Charles K

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the burden of road traffic injuries and deaths for all road users and among different road user groups in Africa. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, Google Scholar, websites of African road safety agencies and organizations for registry- and population-based studies and reports on road traffic injury and death estimates in Africa, published between 1980 and 2015. Available data for all road users and by road user group were extracted and analysed. We conducted a random-effects meta-analysis and estimated pooled rates of road traffic injuries and deaths. Findings We identified 39 studies from 15 African countries. The estimated pooled rate for road traffic injury was 65.2 per 100 000 population (95% confidence interval, CI: 60.8–69.5) and the death rate was 16.6 per 100 000 population (95% CI: 15.2–18.0). Road traffic injury rates increased from 40.7 per 100 000 population in the 1990s to 92.9 per 100 000 population between 2010 and 2015, while death rates decreased from 19.9 per 100 000 population in the 1990s to 9.3 per 100 000 population between 2010 and 2015. The highest road traffic death rate was among motorized four-wheeler occupants at 5.9 per 100 000 population (95% CI: 4.4–7.4), closely followed by pedestrians at 3.4 per 100 000 population (95% CI: 2.5–4.2). Conclusion The burden of road traffic injury and death is high in Africa. Since registry-based reports underestimate the burden, a systematic collation of road traffic injury and death data is needed to determine the true burden. PMID:27429490

  18. Speed cameras for the prevention of road traffic injuries and deaths.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cecilia; Willis, Charlene; Hendrikz, Joan K; Le Brocque, Robyne; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2010-10-06

    It is estimated that by 2020, road traffic crashes will have moved from ninth to third in the world ranking of burden of disease, as measured in disability adjusted life years. The prevention of road traffic injuries is of global public health importance. Measures aimed at reducing traffic speed are considered essential to preventing road injuries; the use of speed cameras is one such measure. To assess whether the use of speed cameras reduces the incidence of speeding, road traffic crashes, injuries and deaths. We searched the following electronic databases covering all available years up to March 2010; the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (WebSPIRS), EMBASE (WebSPIRS), TRANSPORT, IRRD (International Road Research Documentation), TRANSDOC (European Conference of Ministers of Transport databases), Web of Science (Science and Social Science Citation Index), PsycINFO, CINAHL, EconLit, WHO database, Sociological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts, Index to Theses. Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series and controlled before-after studies that assessed the impact of speed cameras on speeding, road crashes, crashes causing injury and fatalities were eligible for inclusion. We independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed methodological quality, reported study authors' outcomes and where possible, calculated standardised results based on the information available in each study. Due to considerable heterogeneity between and within included studies, a meta-analysis was not appropriate. Thirty five studies met the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls, the relative reduction in average speed ranged from 1% to 15% and the reduction in proportion of vehicles speeding ranged from 14% to 65%. In the vicinity of camera sites, the pre/post reductions ranged from 8% to 49% for all crashes and 11% to 44% for fatal and serious injury crashes. Compared with controls, the relative improvement in pre/post injury crash proportions ranged from 8% to

  19. Analysis of factors associated with traffic injury severity on rural roads in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Kashani, Ali; Shariat-Mohaymany, Afshin; Ranjbari, Andishe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Iran is a country with one of the highest rates of traffic crash fatality and injury, and seventy percent of these fatalities happen on rural roads. The objective of this study is to identify the significant factors influencing injury severity among drivers involved in crashes on two kinds of major rural roads in Iran: two-lane, two-way roads and freeways. Methods: According to the dataset, 213569 drivers were involved in rural road crashes in Iran, over the 3 years from 2006 to 2008. The Classification And Regression Tree method (CART) was applied for 13 independent variables, and one target variable of injury severity with 3 classes of no-injury, injury and fatality. Some of the independent variables were cause of crash, collision type, weather conditions, road surface conditions, driver's age and gender and seat belt usage. The CART model was trained by 70% of these data, and tested with the rest. Results: It was indicated that seat belt use is the most important safety factor for two-lane, two-way rural roads, but on freeways, the importance of this variable is less. Cause of crash, also turned out to be the next most important variable. The results showed that for two-lane, two-way rural roads, "improper overtaking" and "speeding", and for rural freeways, "inattention to traffic ahead", "vehicle defect", and "movement of pedestrians, livestock and unauthorized vehicles on freeways" are the most serious causes of increasing injury severity. Conclusions: The analysis results revealed seat belt use, cause of crash and collision type as the most important variables influencing the injury severity of traffic crashes. To deal with these problems, intensifying police enforcement by means of mobile patrol vehicles, constructing overtaking lanes where necessary, and prohibiting the crossing of pedestrians and livestock and the driving of unauthorized vehicles on freeways are necessary. Moreover, creating a rumble strip on the two edges of roads

  20. Analysis of factors associated with traffic injury severity on rural roads in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Ali Tavakoli; Shariat-Mohaymany, Afshin; Ranjbari, Andishe

    2012-01-01

    Iran is a country with one of the highest rates of traffic crash fatality and injury, and seventy percent of these fatalities happen on rural roads. The objective of this study is to identify the significant factors influencing injury severity among drivers involved in crashes on two kinds of major rural roads in Iran: two-lane, two-way roads and freeways. According to the dataset, 213569 drivers were involved in rural road crashes in Iran, over the 3 years from 2006 to 2008. The Classification And Regression Tree method (CART) was applied for 13 independent variables, and one target variable of injury severity with 3 classes of no-injury, injury and fatality. Some of the independent variables were cause of crash, collision type, weather conditions, road surface conditions, driver's age and gender and seat belt usage. The CART model was trained by 70% of these data, and tested with the rest. It was indicated that seat belt use is the most important safety factor for two-lane, two-way rural roads, but on freeways, the importance of this variable is less. Cause of crash, also turned out to be the next most important variable. The results showed that for two-lane, two-way rural roads, "improper overtaking" and "speeding", and for rural freeways, "inattention to traffic ahead", "vehicle defect", and "movement of pedestrians, livestock and unauthorized vehicles on freeways" are the most serious causes of increasing injury severity. The analysis results revealed seat belt use, cause of crash and collision type as the most important variables influencing the injury severity of traffic crashes. To deal with these problems, intensifying police enforcement by means of mobile patrol vehicles, constructing overtaking lanes where necessary, and prohibiting the crossing of pedestrians and livestock and the driving of unauthorized vehicles on freeways are necessary. Moreover, creating a rumble strip on the two edges of roads, and paying attention to the design consistency of

  1. Road traffic injuries and data systems in Egypt: addressing the challenges.

    PubMed

    Puvanachandra, P; Hoe, C; El-Sayed, H F; Saad, R; Al-Gasseer, N; Bakr, M; Hyder, A A

    2012-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major cause of global mortality and morbidity, killing approximately 1.3 million people and injuring 20 to 50 million each year. The significance of this public health threat is most pronounced in low- and middle-income countries where 90 percent of the world's road traffic-related fatalities take place. Current estimates for Egypt show a road traffic fatality rate of 42 deaths per 100,000 population-one of the highest in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. RTIs are also responsible for 1.8 percent of all deaths and 2.4 percent of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost in the country. Despite this, studies surrounding this topic are scarce, and reliable data are limited. The overall goal of this article is to define the health impact of RTIs in Egypt and to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each data source for the purpose of improving the current RTI data systems. A 2-pronged approach was undertaken to assess the burden of RTIs in Egypt. First, a thorough literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase, ISIS Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Articles pertaining to Egypt and road traffic injuries were selected for screening. With assistance from Egyptian colleagues, a comprehensive exploration of data sources pertaining to RTIs in Egypt was undertaken and secondary data from these sources were procured for analysis. The literature review yielded a total of 20 studies, of which 6 were multi-country and 5 were hospital-based studies. None examined risk factors such as speeding, alcohol, or seat belt use. Secondary data sources were acquired from national hospital-based injury surveillance; a community-based health survey; pre-hospital injury surveillance; the Ministry of Transport; the General Authority for Roads, Bridges and Land Transport; death certificates; and the central agency for public motorization and statistics. Risk factor data are also limited from these sources. The results of this article

  2. Estimating the burden of road traffic injuries among children and adolescents in urban South Asia.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Adnan Ali; Amach, Omar Hussein; Garg, Nitin; Labinjo, Mariam Temitope

    2006-07-01

    Over a million people died from road traffic injuries (RTI) globally in the year 2000 and as many as 50 million were injured. Yet there has been little work focused on the South Asia region, let alone the vulnerable segments of population such as children and adolescents. This study aims at measuring the burden of disease caused by urban road traffic injuries among children and adolescents in South Asia. This study selected 26 studies for review and data extraction out of 1505 published articles. Data from the studies were pooled to calculate the proportion and characteristics of child and adolescent RTI, regional RTI incidence and mortality rates, and an estimate of the burden of disease caused by these injuries through the use of the healthy life years lost (HeaLY) composite measure. Our findings showed that the majority of injuries occurred in males (67-80%) and the most frequent age group injured was between ages 0 and 9 representing 40% of cases. Children and adolescents represent an average of 22% of all those with RTI whom seek care. Children and adolescents represented an average of 13% of all RTI deaths. Regional RTI incidence rate was calculated at 880 per 100,000 urban persons aged 0-19. Mortality due to RTI was at 17 deaths per 100,000 urban persons aged 0-19 in South Asia. Burden of disease was calculated 16 HeaLYs per 1000 general population from road traffic mortality alone. With disability data added, then 27.7 HeaLYs per 1000 general population are lost from road traffic injuries in South Asia. The increasing burden of RTI in young persons in South Asia is a call for considering appropriate research and effective interventions. This relatively high loss of healthy life from RTI needs to be addressed by public health systems in South Asia.

  3. What is the potential of trauma registry data to be used for road traffic injury surveillance and informing road safety policy?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Williamson, Ann; Curtis, Kate

    2011-10-01

    Information from hospital trauma registries is increasingly being used to support injury surveillance efforts. This research examines the potential of using trauma registry data for road traffic injury surveillance for different types of road users in terms of both the information collected and how representative trauma data are compared to two population-based road traffic injury data collections. The three data collections were assessed against recommended variables to be collected for injury surveillance purposes and the representativeness of the distribution of road traffic-related injury data from the trauma registry was compared to hospital admission and road traffic authority data collections. Data from the trauma registry was largely not representative of the distribution of age groups or activities compared to the two population-based collections, but was representative for gender for some road user groups to at least one population-based data collection. Trauma data could be used to supplement information from population-based data collections to inform road safety efforts. Road safety policy makers should be aware of the potential and the limitations of using trauma registry data for road traffic injury surveillance. Copyright © 2011 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimating cost of road traffic injuries in Iran using willingness to pay (WTP) method.

    PubMed

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Le, Henry; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to use the willingness to pay (WTP) method to calculate the cost of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 846 randomly selected road users. WTP data was collected for four scenarios for vehicle occupants, pedestrians, vehicle drivers, and motorcyclists. Final analysis was carried out using Weibull and maximum likelihood method. Mean WTP was 2,612,050 Iranian rials (IRR). Statistical value of life was estimated according to 20,408 fatalities 402,314,106,073,648 IRR (US$13,410,470,202 based on purchasing power parity at (February 27th, 2014). Injury cost was US$25,637,870,872 (based on 318,802 injured people in 2013, multiple daily traffic volume of 311, and multiple daily payment of 31,030 IRR for 250 working days). The total estimated cost of injury and death cases was 39,048,341,074$. Gross national income of Iran was, US$604,300,000,000 in 2013 and the costs of traffic injuries constituted 6·46% of gross national income. WTP was significantly associated with age, gender, monthly income, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, trip mileage, drivers and occupants from road users. The costs of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013 accounted for 6.64% of gross national income, much higher than the global average. Policymaking and resource allocation to reduce traffic-related death and injury rates have the potential to deliver a huge economic benefit.

  5. Estimating Cost of Road Traffic Injuries in Iran Using Willingness to Pay (WTP) Method

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Le, Henry; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to use the willingness to pay (WTP) method to calculate the cost of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 846 randomly selected road users. WTP data was collected for four scenarios for vehicle occupants, pedestrians, vehicle drivers, and motorcyclists. Final analysis was carried out using Weibull and maximum likelihood method. Mean WTP was 2,612,050 Iranian rials (IRR). Statistical value of life was estimated according to 20,408 fatalities 402,314,106,073,648 IRR (US$13,410,470,202 based on purchasing power parity at (February 27th, 2014). Injury cost was US$25,637,870,872 (based on 318,802 injured people in 2013, multiple daily traffic volume of 311, and multiple daily payment of 31,030 IRR for 250 working days). The total estimated cost of injury and death cases was 39,048,341,074$. Gross national income of Iran was, US$604,300,000,000 in 2013 and the costs of traffic injuries constituted 6·46% of gross national income. WTP was significantly associated with age, gender, monthly income, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, trip mileage, drivers and occupants from road users. The costs of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013 accounted for 6.64% of gross national income, much higher than the global average. Policymaking and resource allocation to reduce traffic-related death and injury rates have the potential to deliver a huge economic benefit. PMID:25438150

  6. Improving hospital-based trauma care for road traffic injuries in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Chokotho, Linda; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Singini, Isaac; Njalale, Yasin; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mortality rate from road traffic injuries has increased in sub-Saharan Africa as the number of motor vehicles increase. This study examined the capacity of hospitals along Malawi’s main north-south highway to provide emergency trauma care. METHODS: Structured interviews and checklists were used to evaluate the infrastructure, personnel, supplies, and equipment at all four of Malawi’s central hospitals, ten district hospitals, and one mission hospital in 2014. Most of these facilities are along the main north-south highway that spans the country. RESULTS: Between July 2013 and March 2014, more than 9 200 road traffic injuries (RTIs) and 100 RTI deaths were recorded by the participating hospitals. All of the hospitals reported staff shortages, especially during nights and weekends. Few clinicians had completed formal training in emergency trauma management, and healthcare workers reported gaps in knowledge and skills, especially at district hospitals. Most central hospitals had access to the critical supplies and medications necessary for trauma care, but district hospitals lacked some of the supplies and equipment needed for diagnosis, treatment, and personal protection. CONCLUSION: The mortality and disability burden from road traffic injuries in Malawi (and other low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa) can be reduced by ensuring that every central and district hospital has a dedicated trauma unit with qualified staff who have completed primary trauma care courses and have access to the equipment necessary to save lives. PMID:28458750

  7. Improving hospital-based trauma care for road traffic injuries in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Chokotho, Linda; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Singini, Isaac; Njalale, Yasin; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    The mortality rate from road traffic injuries has increased in sub-Saharan Africa as the number of motor vehicles increase. This study examined the capacity of hospitals along Malawi's main north-south highway to provide emergency trauma care. Structured interviews and checklists were used to evaluate the infrastructure, personnel, supplies, and equipment at all four of Malawi's central hospitals, ten district hospitals, and one mission hospital in 2014. Most of these facilities are along the main north-south highway that spans the country. Between July 2013 and March 2014, more than 9 200 road traffic injuries (RTIs) and 100 RTI deaths were recorded by the participating hospitals. All of the hospitals reported staff shortages, especially during nights and weekends. Few clinicians had completed formal training in emergency trauma management, and healthcare workers reported gaps in knowledge and skills, especially at district hospitals. Most central hospitals had access to the critical supplies and medications necessary for trauma care, but district hospitals lacked some of the supplies and equipment needed for diagnosis, treatment, and personal protection. The mortality and disability burden from road traffic injuries in Malawi (and other low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa) can be reduced by ensuring that every central and district hospital has a dedicated trauma unit with qualified staff who have completed primary trauma care courses and have access to the equipment necessary to save lives.

  8. [Economic cost of permanent disability caused by road traffic injuries in Mexico in 2012].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vallejo, Patricia G; Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Heredia-Pi, Ileana

    2015-04-01

    This study estimated the economic costs of permanent disability caused by road traffic injuries in Mexico during 2012. From the health system's perspective, a bottom-up approach was used to calculate direct medical costs (hospitalization, outpatient care, rehabilitation, and prostheses). From society's perspective, using a human capital approach, indirect costs were associated with loss of productivity for the victims and their caregivers. Permanent disability due to road traffic injuries takes a high toll on the health system and Mexican society. From the health system perspective, the cost was US$269,529,480.72, or US$1,496.33 per victim. The estimated average cost to society was US$3,445.45 during the first year. The total average cost per victim was US$4,941.77, resulting in a total economic cost of US$1,119,761,632.53 during 2012. The study's findings highlight the need to design and implement more rigorous and efficient public policies to control and prevent road traffic injuries in Mexico.

  9. Evaluation of pedestrian road traffic maxillofacial injuries in a Nigerian tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Aladelusi, T O; Akinmoladun, I V; Olusanya, O O; Akadiri, O A; Fasola, A O

    2014-12-01

    Background: Walking is the most basic form of mobility and forms an important part of daily activities; however, walking could often be associated with risks. This is more so when pedestrians share a common space with motorized vehicles especially in developing countries. Despite the frequency of road traffic crashes (RTC) related pedestrian injuries in many developing countries, there is a dearth of documentation of maxillofacial injuries in victims of pedestrian road traffic crashes. The aim of this study was to determine the causes, frequency, pattern, severity, concomitant injuries and outcome of pedestrian maxillofacial injuries observed at a tertiary trauma centre in Nigeria. Pedestrian victims of RTC were prospectively recruited from among all maxillofacial trauma patients seen at the Accident and Emergency department and the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University College Hospital, Ibadan between April 2011 and November 2011. Ethical approval was obtained from the UI/UCH Joint Ethics Review Board before the commencement of the study and informed consent was obtained from participants. Patients' demography, the crash events, types of maxillofacial injuries, and concomitant injuries were recorded. Severity of maxillofacial injury was estimated based on the Maxillofacial Injury Severity Scale (MFISS). Forty-six participants (22.9% of all victims of road traffic crashes seen within the study period) were victims of pedestrian RTC. Pedestrian RTC occurred in all age groups with almost 40% of the victims in their 1st and 2nd decades of life. The most severe MFISS was observed in the 21 - 30 year age group while the least severe injury observed was in the 71 - 80 years age group. Thirty participants (65.2%) were hit by a car or minibus while fourteen (30.4%) were knocked down by a motorcycle. Two (4.4%) were hit by a truck. Soft tissue injury was the most common maxillofacial injury and head injury was the commonest concomitant injury

  10. Comparing the impact of socio-demographic factors associated with traffic injury among older road users and the general population in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The increasing number of older road users represents a public health issue because older individuals are more susceptible to traffic injury and mortality than the general population. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic factors and traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Methods An ecological study was conducted using national data in Japan. Multivariate regression methods were applied to investigate the association of traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users with significant demographic, economic, road traffic, and medical/cultural factors. Results Income per capita, total road length, and alcohol consumption per person were significantly associated with traffic injury and traffic mortality both for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Income per capita and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic mortality for both groups. Meanwhile, for both groups, income per capita was positively associated with traffic injury, while total road length and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic injury. Conclusions The effects of socio-demographic factors on traffic injury and traffic mortality in Japan were similar for both the general population and older road users. The study results suggest that injury preventive measures designed for the general population will be beneficial also for older road users in Japan. PMID:23083429

  11. Pattern and distribution of pedestrian injuries in fatal road traffic accidental cases in Dharan, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Birendra Kumar; Yadav, Biswa Nath

    2014-07-01

    Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of death in the world. The present study aims at evaluation of pattern and distribution of injuries among pedestrians thereby planning successful measures to minimize fatalities. The present study was conducted in the Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. This study included 50 cases of pedestrian victims of fatal road traffic accident, brought for medico-legal postmortem examination. Highest number (17 or 21.3%) of fatalities occurred in the 41-50 years age group followed by the age group 31-40 years (15 or 18.7%). Male victims outnumbered female resulting in male to female ratio of 1.8:1. Most of the pedestrians were illiterate (26 or 32.5%) followed by those who were educated up to primary school (14 or 17.5%). Nearly half of the cases (38 or 47.5%), four or more wheelers - heavy vehicles - were involved. Fracture was the most common type of injuries (55 or 28.9%) followed by laceration (50 or 26.3%). In 44 (55%) cases, primary impact injuries were noted, secondary impact injuries in 55 (68.7%) cases, and secondary injuries in 62 (77.5%) cases. More than one-fourth (22 or 27.5%) of the deaths were due to pelvic and extremities injuries. Pedestrians, people who travel by foot, wheelchair, stroller, or similar means, are most vulnerable users of the road. Before head out on foot for a stroll, power walk, or errand, there are important safety tips to remember. A greater awareness about traffic rules will go a long way in curbing the incidence of fatal pedestrian accidents.

  12. Trends of Fatal Road Traffic Injuries in Iran (2004–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Bahadorimonfared, Ayad; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Delpisheh, Ali; Esmaili, Alireza; Salehi, Masoud; Bakhtiyari, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) leading to death need the most essential concern for low, middle and high income societies. Mortality rate due to traffic injuries is considerable in Iran particularly during the last decade along with the industrialization process. The present study considered the trend of traffic injuries leading to death in Iran for a period of seven-years which started from March 2004 to March 2011. The formal merged Iranian database provided by the Ministry of Roads, the Legal Medicine Organization, the Traffic Police (NAJA), and the Ministry of Health covering 146, 269 deaths due to traffic injuries between 2004 and 2011 was analyzed. The time series method was carried out to determine the death trends of RTIs in the whole country. The Poisson regression model was used to estimate the changes in the frequency of events over time adjusting for associated known risk factors. The SARIMA (0, 1, 1)×(0, 1, 1)12 model was used for fitting to the time series of death rate. The death rate due to RTIs in Iran has statistically declined from 38 in 2004 to 31 per 100,000 populations in 2011. Based on the number of vehicles, the mortality rate has also declined from 38 to 12 cases per 10,000 vehicles from 2004 to 2011 respectively. However, the mortality rate was increased from 51 to 65 cases per 1000 accidents from 2004 to March 2011 respectively. Despite minor variations in mortality trends of RTIs in Iran according to different criteria, an annual average of 21,000 deaths is considerable and needs serious attentions. Modification of traffic laws, enhancement of police controls, improving transport infrastructure, holding education courses for drivers and providing optimal healthcare services are recommended. PMID:23724132

  13. Trends of fatal road traffic injuries in Iran (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Bahadorimonfared, Ayad; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Delpisheh, Ali; Esmaili, Alireza; Salehi, Masoud; Bakhtiyari, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) leading to death need the most essential concern for low, middle and high income societies. Mortality rate due to traffic injuries is considerable in Iran particularly during the last decade along with the industrialization process. The present study considered the trend of traffic injuries leading to death in Iran for a period of seven-years which started from March 2004 to March 2011. The formal merged Iranian database provided by the Ministry of Roads, the Legal Medicine Organization, the Traffic Police (NAJA), and the Ministry of Health covering 146, 269 deaths due to traffic injuries between 2004 and 2011 was analyzed. The time series method was carried out to determine the death trends of RTIs in the whole country. The Poisson regression model was used to estimate the changes in the frequency of events over time adjusting for associated known risk factors. The SARIMA (0, 1, 1)×(0, 1, 1)12 model was used for fitting to the time series of death rate. The death rate due to RTIs in Iran has statistically declined from 38 in 2004 to 31 per 100,000 populations in 2011. Based on the number of vehicles, the mortality rate has also declined from 38 to 12 cases per 10,000 vehicles from 2004 to 2011 respectively. However, the mortality rate was increased from 51 to 65 cases per 1000 accidents from 2004 to March 2011 respectively. Despite minor variations in mortality trends of RTIs in Iran according to different criteria, an annual average of 21,000 deaths is considerable and needs serious attentions. Modification of traffic laws, enhancement of police controls, improving transport infrastructure, holding education courses for drivers and providing optimal healthcare services are recommended.

  14. Road traffic and other unintentional injuries among travelers to developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Barclay; Yankson, Isaac Kofi; Afukaar, Francis; Medina, Martha Hijar; Cuong, Pham Viet; Mock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Injuries result in nearly 6 million deaths and incur 52 million disability-adjusted life years annually, comprising 15% of the global disease burden. More than 90% of this burden occurs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Given this burden, it’s not unexpected that injuries are the leading cause of death among travelers to LMICs, namely from road traffic crashes and drowning. Opportunely, the majority of injuries are preventable. Therefore, pre-travel advice regarding foreseeable dangers and how to avoid them may significantly mitigate injury risk, such as: wearing seatbelts, helmets and personal flotation devices when appropriate; responsibly consuming alcohol; and closely supervising children. Upon return, travelers to LMICs are in a unique position; having shared injury risks while abroad, travelers can advocate for injury control initiatives that might make the world safer for travelers and local populations alike. PMID:26900117

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of road traffic injuries among young drivers in Oman, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Al Reesi, Hamed; Al Maniri, Abdullah; Adawi, Samir Al; Davey, Jeremy; Armstrong, Kerry; Edwards, Jason

    2016-07-03

    Studies from different parts of the world have indicated that the impact of road traffic incidents disproportionally affects young adults. Few known studies have been forthcoming from Arabian Gulf countries. Within Oman, a high proportion of the population is under the age of 20. Coupled with the drastic increase in motorization in recent years, there is a need to understand the state of road safety among young people in Oman. The current research aimed to explore the prevalence and characteristics of road traffic injuries among young drivers aged 17-25 years. Crash data from 2009 to 2011 were extracted from the Directorate General of Traffic, Royal Oman Police (ROP) database in Oman. The data were analyzed to explore the impact of road crashes on young people (17-25 years), the characteristics of young driver crashes, and how these differ from older drivers and to identify key predictors of fatalities in young driver crashes. Overall, young people were overrepresented in injuries and fatalities within the sample time period. Though it is true that many young people in crashes were driving at the time, it was also evident that young people were often victims in a crash caused by someone else. Thus, to reduce the impact of road crashes on young people, there is a need to generally address road safety within Oman. When young drivers were involved in crashes they were predominantly male. The types of crashes these drivers have can be broadly attributed to risk taking and inexperience. Speeding and nighttime driving were the key risk factors for fatalities. The results highlight the need to address young driver safety in Oman. From these findings, the introduction of a graduated driver licensing system with nighttime driving restrictions could significantly improve young driver safety.

  16. Prehospital road traffic injuries among the elderly in Beijing, China: data from the Beijing Emergency Medical Center, 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    An, Shuai; Zhang, Jin-jun; Zhang, Pei-xun; Yin, Xiao-feng; Kou, Yu-hui; Wang, Yan-hua; Wang, Zhen-wei; Jiang, Bao-guo; Wang, Tian-bing

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a worldwide issue associated with increasing development and motorization. However, statistical studies do not include any analyses of Beijing's geriatric population. Using data from the Beijing Emergency Medical Center, we present the main characteristics of traffic injuries involving the elderly in Beijing. We also provide objective information for those concerned with the safety of traffic systems and the prevention of traffic injuries. In a longitudinal, retrospective study, data were collected on 1706 victims aged 65 years and older who sustained traffic injuries in Beijing between 2004 and 2010. Personal information, time of injury event, emergency care response time, road user type, striking vehicle type, injury site, and severity of injury were analyzed using χ(2) tests and Logistic regression analysis. The annual rate of traffic injuries was 21.80 per 100 000 elderly people in Beijing, and the morbidity rate decreased from 2004 to 2010 (P < 0.001). The mean age was (72.92 ± 5.67) years, and 911 (53.40%) of the victims were male. The majority of victims sustained head and lower limb injuries and were classified as being of medium severity. Traffic collisions occurred most frequently in the daytime excluding rush hours; these collisions included being hit by a car (85.64%) and pedestrian victim injuries (79.19%). Our statistical analysis found three factors for injury severity: abdominal injuries (P < 0.001), number of injury sites (P = 0.027), and head injuries (P = 0.034). The decline in traffic injuries is due to a decrease in victims aged 65-74 years and pedestrians; the severity of RTIs also decreased. This study highlights the declining trend in traffic injuries among older adults in Beijing. However, traffic injuries remain a serious public health problem for the elderly and effective measures are required to reduce their incidence.

  17. Knee injuries in restrained car drivers in German road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Haasper, Carl; Otte, Dietmar; Knobloch, Karsten; Probst, Christian; Board, Timothy N; Krettek, Christian; Richter, Martinus

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of knee injuries in real world car crashes in Germany. Restrained car drivers (RCD) were included in a medical and technical analysis to create a basis for preventive measures. Technical and medical data were collected at the scene, shortly after the crash. Two time periods (group A, 1985-1993; group B, 1995-2003) were compared focusing on knee injuries [abbreviated injury scale (AISKnee)]. Technical analysis included type of collision, impact angle, and relative velocity. Medical analysis included injury pattern and severity (AIS, maximum AIS). About 5,972 RCD were included in this study from a total of 22,804 victims involved in 16,563 crashes. In total, severe injuries (AISKnee 2/3) occurred in 1.2% (82 patients) of all RCD. The knee injury prevalence significantly decreased over time (group A vs. B, p < 0.0001). A so-called dashboard injury was registered in 5.8% (n = 5). The overall prevalence for knee injuries in RCD involved in road traffic accidents was low and decreased over time. Higher loads were necessary to cause ligamentous injuries of the knee than fractures in the knee region. Because direct impact caused most of the injuries, modifications of the interior and exterior design should reduce the incidence of these injuries. A dashboard injury was very rare.

  18. The effects of seat belt legislation on road traffic injuries.

    PubMed

    Trinca, G W; Dooley, B J

    1977-04-01

    The compulsory wearing of seat belts, first introduced in the world in Victoria in 1970, has effectively reduced the number of deaths and injuries by approximately one-third for car occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes. Initially, the legislation did not apply to children under the age of eight years, but in 1975 a further law was introduced banning children from the front seat of any vehicle unless properly harnessed. Seat belts offer the best protection for front seat drivers and passengers involved in frontal impacts, but offer less protection to the recipient of a side impact. Ten per cent of car occupants admitted to hospital after a frontal impact show injuries, mostly minor, directly attibutable to the wearing of seat belts.

  19. Factors associated with single-vehicle and multi-vehicle road traffic collision injuries in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Donnelly-Swift, Erica; Kelly, Alan

    2016-12-01

    Generalised linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with fatal/serious road traffic collision injuries for single- and multi-vehicle collisions. Single-vehicle collisions and multi-vehicle collisions occurring during the hours of darkness or on a wet road surface had reduced likelihood of a fatal/serious injury. Single-vehicle 'driver with passengers' collisions occurring at junctions or on a hill/gradient were less likely to result in a fatal/serious injury. Multi-vehicle rear-end/angle collisions had reduced likelihood of a fatal/serious injury. Single-vehicle 'driver only' collisions and multi-vehicle collisions occurring on a public/bank holiday or on a hill/gradient were more likely to result in a fatal/serious injury. Single-vehicle collisions involving male drivers had increased likelihood of a fatal/serious injury and single-vehicle 'driver with passengers' collisions involving drivers under the age of 25 years also had increased likelihood of a fatal/serious injury. Findings can enlighten decision-makers to circumstances leading to fatal/serious injuries.

  20. [Monetary value of the human costs of road traffic injuries in Spain].

    PubMed

    Martínez Pérez, Jorge Eduardo; Sánchez Martínez, Fernando Ignacio; Abellán Perpiñán, José María; Pinto Prades, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    Cost-benefit analyses in the field of road safety compute human costs as a key component of total costs. The present article presents two studies promoted by the Directorate-General for Traffic aimed at obtaining official values for the costs associated with fatal and non-fatal traffic injuries in Spain. We combined the contingent valuation approach and the (modified) standard gamble technique in two surveys administered to large representative samples (n1=2,020, n2=2,000) of the Spanish population. The monetary value of preventing a fatality was estimated to be 1.4 million euros. Values of 219,000 and 6,100 euros were obtained for minor and severe non-fatal injuries, respectively. These figures are comparable to those observed in neighboring countries. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethnicity and road traffic injuries: differences between Jewish and Arab children in Israel.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Nura; Siman-Tov, Maya; Israel Trauma Group; Peleg, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the differences and characteristics of road traffic injuries (RTIs) among Jewish and Arab children, ages 0-17 years, in Israel. A retrospective study based on data from the Israeli National Trauma Registry between 2001 and 2010. This study relates specifically to traffic-related hospitalizations among children ages 0-17 years. Data include demographic, injury, and hospitalization characteristics. Descriptive statistics and adjusted logistic regression were used to examine the differences of RTIs between the two ethnic groups. A total of 18,884 children were included, of which Arab children comprised 38.2% of the total and 44.1% of the severely injured. Among Arab children 41.8% were pedestrians compared to 33.4% among Jewish children (p<0.0001). Arab children were younger, had more severe injuries and more traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to Jewish children. Adjusted logistic regression analysis shows that the probability of an Arab child, relative to a Jewish child, to undergo surgical procedures was 1.2 (p<0.0001), to be hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs) was 0.8 (p=0.003), and to be transferred to rehabilitation was 0.5 (p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in inpatient mortality between the two ethnic groups. Arab children in Israel are more likely to be hospitalized due to road accidents in comparison to Jewish children. Intervention programs should focus on Arab children and their unique characteristics.

  2. Geospatial and clinical analyses on pediatric related road traffic injury in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nik Hisamuddin; Rainis, Ruslan; Noor, Syed Hatim; Syed Mohamad, Sharifah Mastura

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main aim of this study is to utilize the geographical information system (GIS) software and perform the spatial analysis in relation to clinical data for road traffic injury (RTI) pediatric cases attending the emergency department. METHODS: The study sample included pediatric patients (age less than 18 years) with road-related injuries within a district in Malaysia who attended emergency departments of two tertiary hospitals within the district. In addition to injury, pre-hospital care and outcome data, the coordinate of the locations were obtained by the ambulance paramedics by using portable handheld GPS unit brand Garmin® model GPS 72 H. The data was transferred into the excel format which in turn underwent GIS analysis by using ARCGIS® (by ESRI) software version 10.1 licensed to the study institution. RESULTS: A total of 102 (24.8%) of all motor vehicle crash (MVC) victims involved the pediatric age group (age 18 years and below). The mean (SD) age of the pediatric victims was 14.30 years (SD 3.830). Male comprised of 68 (66.7%) of the cases. Motorcyclists [88 (88.0%)] were the most common type of victims involved. Interestingly, the majority of the severely injured victims [75 (73%)] sustained the RTI on roads with maximum speed limit of 60 km/hour. The mean (SD) length of hospital stay was 7.83 days (5.59). CONCLUSION: The pediatric related road traffic injury in Malaysia causes significant health and social burden in the country. This study showed both important clinical and geographical factors that need to be taken into consideration for future preventive action. PMID:27547282

  3. Road use pattern and risk factors for non-fatal road traffic injuries among children in urban India

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, Rakhi; Anil Kumar, G.; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Dandona, Lalit

    2011-01-01

    Objective We assessed the road use pattern and incidence and risk factors of non-fatal road traffic injuries (RTI) among children aged 5–14 years in Hyderabad, India. Methods In a cross-sectional population-based survey, data were collected on 2809 participants aged 5–14 years (98.4% participation) selected using multi-stage cluster sampling. Participants recalled non-fatal RTI during the previous 3 and 12 months. RTI was defined as an injury resulting from a road traffic crash irrespective of severity and outcome. Results Boys (11.5) had a higher mean number of road trips per day than girls (9.6), and the latter were more likely to walk and less likely to use a cycle (p < 0.001). With increasing household income quartile, the proportion of trips using cycles or motorised two-wheeled vehicles increased while trips as pedestrians decreased (p < 0.001). Based on the 3-month recall period, the age-sex-adjusted annual rate of RTI requiring recovery period of >7 days was 5.8% (95% CI 4.9–6.6). Boys and girls had similar RTI rates as pedestrians but boys had a three times higher rate as cyclists. Considering the most recent RTI in the last 12 months, children of the highest household income quartile were significantly less likely to sustain pedestrian RTI (0.26, 95% CI 0.08–0.86). The odds of overall RTI were significantly higher for those who rode a cycle (2.45, 95% CI 1.75–3.42) and who currently drove a motorised two-wheeled vehicle (2.83, 95% CI 1.60–5.00). Conclusion These findings can assist in planning appropriate road safety initiatives to reduce cycle and pedestrian RTI among children to reduce RTI burden in India. PMID:21584975

  4. Road traffic injuries in Kenya: the health burden and risk factors in two districts.

    PubMed

    Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Koradia, Pranali; Herbert, Hadley K; Mogere, Stephen; Akungah, Daniel; Nyamari, Jackim; Osoro, Eric; Maina, William; Stevens, Kent A

    2012-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) contribute to a significant proportion of the burden of disease in Kenya. They also have a significant impact on the social and economic well-being of individuals, their families, and society. However, though estimates quantifying the burden of RTIs in Kenya do exist, most of these studies date back to the early 2000s-more than one decade ago. This article aims to present the current status of road safety in Kenya. Using data from the police and vital registration systems in Kenya, we present the current epidemiology of RTIs in the nation. We also sought to assess the status of 3 well-known risk factors for RTIs-speeding and the use of helmets and reflective clothing. Data for this study were collected in 2 steps. The first step involved the collection of secondary data from the Kenya traffic police as well as the National Vital Registration System to assess the current trends of RTIs in Kenya. Following this, observational studies were conducted in the Thika and Naivasha districts in Kenya to assess the current status of speeding among all vehicles and the use of helmets and reflective clothing among motorcyclists. The overall RTI rate in Kenya was 59.96 per 100,000 population in 2009, with vehicle passengers being the most affected. Notably, injuries to motorcyclists increased at an annual rate of approximately 29 percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27-32; P < .001). The mean age of death due to road traffic crashes was 35 years. Fatalities due to RTIs increased at an annual rate of 7 percent (95% CI: 6-8; P < .001) for the period 2004 to 2009. Observational studies revealed that 69.45 percent of vehicles in Thika and 34.32 percent of vehicles in Naivasha were speeding. Helmets were used by less than one third of motorcycle drivers in both study districts, with prevalence rates ranging between 3 and 4 percent among passengers. This study highlights the significant burden of RTIs in Kenya. A renewed focus on addressing this burden

  5. The epidemiology of road traffic injury hotspots in Kigali, Rwanda from police data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anjni; Krebs, Elizabeth; Andrade, Luciano; Rulisa, Stephen; Vissoci, João Ricardo N; Staton, Catherine A

    2016-08-02

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the eighth-leading cause of death worldwide, with low- and middle-income countries sharing a disproportionate number of fatalities. African countries, like Rwanda, carry a higher burden of these fatalities and with increased economic growth, these numbers are expected to rise. We aim to describe the epidemiology of RTIs in Kigali Province, Rwanda and create a hotspot map of crashes from police data. Road traffic crash (RTC) report data from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 was collected from Kigali Traffic Police. In addition to analysis of descriptive data, locations of RTCs were mapped and analyzed through exploratory spatial data analysis to determine hotspots. A total of 2589 of RTCs were reported with 4689 total victims. The majority of victims were male (94.7 %) with an average age of 35.9 years. Cars were the most frequent vehicle involved (43.8 %), followed by motorcycles (14.5 %). Motorcycles had an increased risk of involvement in grievous crashes and pedestrians and cyclists were more likely to have grievous injuries. The hotspots identified were primarily located along the major roads crossing Kigali and the two busiest downtown areas. Despite significant headway by the government in RTC prevention, there continue to be high rates of RTIs in Rwanda, specifically with young males and a vulnerable road user population, such as pedestrians and motorcycle users. Improvements in police data and reporting by laypersons could prove valuable for further geographic information system analysis and efforts towards crash prevention and targeting education to motorcycle taxis could help reduce RTIs in a severely affected population.

  6. First Responders and Prehospital Care for Road Traffic Injuries in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Chokotho, Linda; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Singini, Isaac; Njalale, Yasin; Maliwichi-Senganimalunje, Limbika; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Road traffic collisions are a common cause of injuries and injury-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Basic prehospital care can be the difference between life and death for injured drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Problem This study examined the challenges associated with current first response practices in Malawi. In April 2014, focus groups were conducted in two areas of Malawi: Karonga (in the Northern Region) and Blantyre (in the Southern Region; both are along the M1 highway), and a qualitative synthesis approach was used to identify themes. All governmental and nongovernmental first response organizations identified by key informants were contacted, and a checklist was used to identify the services they offer. Access to professional prehospital care in Malawi is almost nonexistent, aside from a few city fire departments and private ambulance services. Rapid transportation to a hospital is usually the primary goal of roadside care because of limited first aid knowledge and a lack of access to basic safety equipment. The key informants recommended: expanding community-based first aid training; emphasizing umunthu (shared humanity) to inspire bystander involvement in roadside care; empowering local leaders to coordinate on-site responses; improving emergency communication systems; equipping traffic police with road safety gear; and expanding access to ambulance services. Prehospital care in Malawi would be improved by the creation of a formal network of community leaders, police, commercial drivers, and other lay volunteers who are trained in basic first aid and are equipped to respond to crash sites to provide roadside care to trauma patients and prepare them for safe transport to hospitals. Chokotho L , Mulwafu W , Singini I , Njalale Y , Maliwichi-Senganimalunje L , Jacobsen KH . First responders and prehospital care for road traffic injuries in Malawi. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(1):14-19.

  7. Pattern of injury in fatal road traffic accidents in a rural area of western Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Jamebaseer M; Chavan, Kalidas D; Bangal, Rajendra S; Syed, M M Aarif; Thacker, Purujit J; Alam, Shazia; Sahu, Suman; Farooqui, Anjum Ara J; Kalakoti, Piyush

    2013-01-01

    Fatal road traffic accidents (RTA) are a major cause of concern all over the world. The outcome of injuries sustained in an RTA depends on various factors including but not limited to: the location of the event, type of vehicle involved, nature of the roads, the time of accident, etc. This study aims to investigate and evaluate prospectively the socio-demographic profile and pattern of injuries in victims of RTA in the rural area of the Ahmedanagar district of Maharashtra state. This prospective study included all victims of RTA that presented to our emergency room from 1 June 2007 to 31 May 2009 and were either found dead on arrival or died during treatment. All the victims were autopsied at the post-mortem centre of Rural Medical College, Loni. Ninety-eight RTA victims were studied during the period. The most commonly affected age group was 20-39 years. Men died in RTA more than women. Fatal RTA were more prevalent on the secondary road system (47.97 per cent) and especially involved pedestrian and two wheeler vehicle users. Large numbers (n=63, 64.28%) of victims either died on the scene or during transportation. Numbers of skeletal injuries (199) and internal organ injuries (202) exceeded the total number of victims (98) clearly indicating the multiplicity of injuries. The majority of RTA victims (n=46, 46.93%) died due to head injury. The study showed that most deaths in RTA, brought to a tertiary care rural hospital, took place either on the spot or within 24 hours of injury which is very alarming and highlights the need to take urgent steps to establish good pre-hospital care and provision of trauma services at site. A computerised trauma registry is urgently needed to highlight risk factors, circumstances and chains of events leading to accidents. This would be extremely helpful in policy making and health management in India.

  8. Epidemiology of road traffic injuries in qassim region, saudi arabia: consistency of police and health data.

    PubMed

    Barrimah, Issam; Midhet, Farid; Sharaf, Fawzi

    2012-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, road traffic accidents (RTA) are becoming a serious public health problem. Police reports are designed for legal purposes with very little information on the health consequences. Also, health system data include detailed health information, but not related or linked to the data obtained police reports. Examining the consistency of these sources is vital to build an accurate surveillance system that can track the risk factors and the health consequences, as well as establishing and evaluating prevention interventions. This study is intended to: ▪ Examine the consistency of health -registration data with the data gathered by the traffic police department.▪ Elucidate the magnitude, risk factors and outcome of RTI in Qassim region of Saudi Arabia,▪ Compare the pattern of accidents in Qassim with those at different regions of the Kingdom. Health care information was collected on visits of victims of road traffic accidents to emergency and outpatients' departments of the major hospitals in Qassim region during the year 2010. The information included the patients' demographics, and clinical characteristics. Traffic Police Department information was also collected on all accidents that occurred in the study region. A Questionnaire was also developed and pilot tested to collect data from a random sample of population attending hospital outpatient and Primary Health Care clinics. Data included previous involvement in road traffic accident, and information about any injury; fatality or disability due to these RTI. During the study period, road traffic death rate based on death registration data was almost twice as high as the rate reported by the police (P < 0.05). There was also a significant decline of 27% according to police-reported data during the study period, as opposed to a non-significant increase of 8% according to health registration data during the same period. Population Survey Information showed the overall age-sex-adjusted rate for non

  9. Epidemiology of Road Traffic Injuries in Qassim Region, Saudi Arabia: Consistency of Police and Health Data

    PubMed Central

    Barrimah, Issam; Midhet, Farid; Sharaf, Fawzi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In Saudi Arabia, road traffic accidents (RTA) are becoming a serious public health problem. Police reports are designed for legal purposes with very little information on the health consequences. Also, health system data include detailed health information, but not related or linked to the data obtained police reports. Examining the consistency of these sources is vital to build an accurate surveillance system that can track the risk factors and the health consequences, as well as establishing and evaluating prevention interventions. Objectives This study is intended to: ▪ Examine the consistency of health -registration data with the data gathered by the traffic police department. ▪ Elucidate the magnitude, risk factors and outcome of RTI in Qassim region of Saudi Arabia, ▪ Compare the pattern of accidents in Qassim with those at different regions of the Kingdom. Methodology Health care information was collected on visits of victims of road traffic accidents to emergency and outpatients’ departments of the major hospitals in Qassim region during the year 2010. The information included the patients’ demographics, and clinical characteristics. Traffic Police Department information was also collected on all accidents that occurred in the study region. A Questionnaire was also developed and pilot tested to collect data from a random sample of population attending hospital outpatient and Primary Health Care clinics. Data included previous involvement in road traffic accident, and information about any injury; fatality or disability due to these RTI. Results During the study period, road traffic death rate based on death registration data was almost twice as high as the rate reported by the police (P < 0.05). There was also a significant decline of 27% according to police-reported data during the study period, as opposed to a non-significant increase of 8% according to health registration data during the same period. Population Survey Information

  10. Road traffic injuries in Kenya: a survey of commercial motorcycle drivers

    PubMed Central

    Matheka, Duncan Mwangangi; Omar, Faraj Alkizim; Kipsaina, Chebiwot; Witte, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Motorcycle injuries contribute a substantial number of deaths and hospital admissions in Kenya. There is paucity of data to inform prevention strategies to address the issue. Therefore, the current study sought to explore the characteristics of 2 and 3-wheeler related road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Kenya. Methods A cross-sectional survey of motorcycle drivers involved in a RTI in the preceding 3 months was conducted in 11 urban and rural sites in Kenya's Thika town through face- to -face structured interviews. Drivers’ demographic information, comprehensive crash characteristics and socioeconomic impact of injury data were collected. Results Of 200 drivers injured, 98% were male, with average age of 28.4 years (SD±6.6). Of these drivers, 33% were not wearing any protective equipment. Negligence was the most reported cause of crash (33%), followed by slippery roads (21.0%) and speeding (17.5%). The risk of sustaining a bodily injury was 1.3 times higher in drivers who had not received prevention education compared to those who had received such education. People injured at night were 5 times more likely to sustain a bodily injury compared to those injured during the day. Only 8.5% of the drivers reported the injury incident to the police. Conclusion Majority of motorcycle related injuries in Thika town occur among young, productive, working-age male drivers. A high proportion of injuries are due to negligence on riding while not wearing any protective equipment compounded by lack of injury prevention education. Initiatives to foster helmet wearing, provision of high-quality affordable helmets, responsible driving and advocacy for stronger legislation, are recommended. PMID:26401211

  11. Road traffic injuries in Kenya: a survey of commercial motorcycle drivers.

    PubMed

    Matheka, Duncan Mwangangi; Omar, Faraj Alkizim; Kipsaina, Chebiwot; Witte, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Motorcycle injuries contribute a substantial number of deaths and hospital admissions in Kenya. There is paucity of data to inform prevention strategies to address the issue. Therefore, the current study sought to explore the characteristics of 2 and 3-wheeler related road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Kenya. A cross-sectional survey of motorcycle drivers involved in a RTI in the preceding 3 months was conducted in 11 urban and rural sites in Kenya's Thika town through face- to -face structured interviews. Drivers' demographic information, comprehensive crash characteristics and socioeconomic impact of injury data were collected. Of 200 drivers injured, 98% were male, with average age of 28.4 years (SD±6.6). Of these drivers, 33% were not wearing any protective equipment. Negligence was the most reported cause of crash (33%), followed by slippery roads (21.0%) and speeding (17.5%). The risk of sustaining a bodily injury was 1.3 times higher in drivers who had not received prevention education compared to those who had received such education. People injured at night were 5 times more likely to sustain a bodily injury compared to those injured during the day. Only 8.5% of the drivers reported the injury incident to the police. Majority of motorcycle related injuries in Thika town occur among young, productive, working-age male drivers. A high proportion of injuries are due to negligence on riding while not wearing any protective equipment compounded by lack of injury prevention education. Initiatives to foster helmet wearing, provision of high-quality affordable helmets, responsible driving and advocacy for stronger legislation, are recommended.

  12. Building national estimates of the burden of road traffic injuries in developing countries from all available data sources: Iran.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, K; Naghavi, M; Shahraz, S; Bartels, D; Murray, C J L

    2009-06-01

    To use a range of existing information sources to develop a national snapshot of the burden of road traffic injuries in one developing country-Iran. The distribution of deaths was estimated by using data from the national death registration system, hospital admissions and outpatient visits from a time-limited hospital registry in 12 of 30 provinces, and injuries that received no institutional care using the 2000 demographic and health survey. Results were extrapolated to national annual incidence of health burden differentiated by age, sex, external cause, nature of injuries and institutional care. In 2005, 30,721 Iranians died annually in road traffic crashes and over one million were injured. The death rate (44 per 100,000) is the highest of any country in the world for which reliable estimates are available. Road traffic injuries are the third leading cause of death in Iran. While young adults are at high risk in non-fatal crashes, the elderly have the highest total death rates, largely due to pedestrian crashes. While car occupants lead the death count, motorized two-wheeler riders dominate hospital admissions, outpatient visits and health burden. Reliable estimates of the burden of road traffic injuries are an essential input for rational priority setting. Most low income countries are unlikely to have national injury surveillance systems for several decades. Thus national estimates of the burden of injuries should be built by collating information from all existing information sources by appropriately correcting for source specific shortcomings.

  13. Analysis of posttraumatic stress disorder in children with road traffic injury in Wenzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Meng, Wei-Yang; Hao, Chi-Zi; Zhu, Lie-Lie; Chen, Da-Qing; Lin, Lu-Yang; Wen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Road traffic accidents are the leading health threat to children and cause significant long-term mental health problems. This study aimed to characterize posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children suffering from road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Wenzhou, China. We conducted a retrospective study of 537 children (aged 1 to 13 years old) with RTIs. The epidemiological features, PTSD incidence, clinical manifestation, and risk factors were analyzed based on a customized PTSD risk factor questionnaire. The outcome factors were also evaluated by means of the logistic regression method. The PTSD incidence was 24.77% in children with RTIs. The incidence of PTSD was related to the personality, family environment, and family care of the children. It was found that early psychological intervention and reasonable family care from the family might promote physical and mental welfare as well as contribute to the development of more effective treatments to prevent PTSD. For susceptible children, in addition to dealing with the somatic injury, psychological intervention and family care should be carried out as early as possible.

  14. Epidemiology of road traffic injuries in Nepal, 2001–2013: systematic review and secondary data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karkee, Rajendra; Lee, Andy H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiology of road traffic injury (RTI) in Nepal for the period 2001–2013. Methods 2 approaches, secondary data analysis and systematic literature review, were adopted. RTI data were retrieved from traffic police records and analysed for the incidence of RTI. Electronic databases were searched for published articles that described the epidemiology of RTI in Nepal. Results A total of 95 902 crashes, 100 499 injuries and 14 512 deaths were recorded by the traffic police over the 12-year period, 2001–2013. The mortality rate increased from 4/100 000 population in 2001–2002 to 7/100 000 population in 2011–2012. There were relatively more reported crashes yet fewer deaths in Kathmandu valley than the rest of the country. Of the 20 articles related to RTI, only 11 articles met the eligibility criteria, but these were mainly descriptive case series or cross-sectional hospital-based studies. The majority of RTI were reported to occur among motorcyclists and pedestrians, in males, and in the age group 20–40 years. The common sites of injury were lower and upper extremities. Only 3 articles mentioned possible causes of accidents that include pedestrian road behaviour, alcohol consumption and improper bus driving. Conclusions Nepal suffers a heavy burden of RTI, with higher fatalities on highways out of Kathmandu valley caused by bus crashes in hilly districts. The majority of published studies on RTI are descriptive and hospital based, indicating the need for more thorough investigation of causes of RTI and systematic recording of crashes for the development of effective interventions. PMID:27084283

  15. Patterns of road traffic injuries in a vulnerable population in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, R; Kumar, G A; Raj, T S; Dandona, L

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe patterns of road traffic injuries (RTI) in a vulnerable population—pedestrians and users of motorized two‐wheeled vehicles (MTVs)—in Hyderabad, India. Methods 4019 pedestrians and 4183 MTV drivers provided information on the most recent road traffic crash (RTC) irrespective of the level of injury in the last one year for 17 454 and 17 242 household members, respectively. Crashes in which any household member was involved as a pedestrian or MTV user were analysed. Results Involvement in an RTC as a pedestrian or MTV user was reported for 1513 (4.4%, 95% CI 4.2 to 4.6%) people in the last one year. In these crashes, the person involved was an MTV user in 1264 (83.5%), aged 21–40 years in 973 (64.3%), and male in 1202 (79.4%). Six (0.4%) people died in RTCs and the cause was collision with a vehicle/person in 1133 (75%) crashes. Among the 1306 people who were injured and survived, 174 (13.3%) were treated as inpatients, 38 (2.9%) could not return fully to routine daily activities, 630 (48.2%) took leave from their regular occupation, and 13 (1%) lost their jobs following injury. Using a three month recall period, the annual incidence per 100 000 population of RTC as a pedestrian or MTV user was 2288 and of non‐fatal RTI was 1931, and that of fatal RTI using one year recall period was 17.3 in this population. Conclusions These findings on how RTI are caused, their type, and outcomes in pedestrians and MTV users can assist in identifying interventions to improve road safety for this vulnerable population in India, and can also be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of such interventions. PMID:16751450

  16. Hospital burden of road traffic injury: major concern in primary and secondary level hospitals in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mashreky, S R; Rahman, A; Khan, T F; Faruque, M; Svanström, L; Rahman, F

    2010-04-01

    To assess the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in primary and secondary level hospitals in Bangladesh, and its economic impact on affected families. Cross-sectional study. The study was carried out in February and March 2001. To estimate the burden of RTI patients and the length of stay in hospital, the discharge records of primary and secondary level hospitals were used as data sources. Records from 16 district hospitals and 45 Upazila health complexes (subdistrict level hospitals), selected at random, were included in this study. A direct interview method was adopted to estimate the patient costs of RTI; this involved interviewing patients or their attendants. In this study, patient costs included money spent by the patient for medicine, transport, food and lodging (including attendants). Approximately 33% of the beds in primary and secondary level hospitals in Bangladesh were occupied by injury-related patients, and more than 19% of the injury patients had been injured in a road traffic accident. People aged 18-45 years were the major victims of RTI, and constituted 70% of the total RTI-related admissions in primary and secondary level hospitals. More than two-thirds of RTI patients were male. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.7 days, and the average patient cost for each RTI patient was US$86 (5834 BDT). RTI is a major cause of hospital admission in Bangladesh, and represents an economic and social burden for the family and the nation. A national strategy and road safety programme need to be developed to reduce the hospital burden and minimize the economic and social impact. 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Terrorism-related injuries versus road traffic accident-related trauma: 5 years of experience in Israel.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Kobi; Savitsky, Bella

    2009-12-01

    Terrorism victims comprise the minority among trauma injured people, but this small population imposes a burden on the health care system. Thirty percent of the population injured in terrorist activities experienced severe trauma (injury severity score > or =16), more than half of them need a surgical procedure, and 25% of the population affected by terrorism had been admitted to intensive care. Furthermore, compared with patients with non-terrorism-related trauma, victims of terrorism often arrive in bulk, as part of a mass casualty event. This poses a sudden load on hospital resources and requires special organization and preparedness. The present study compared terrorism-related and road accident-related injuries and examined clinical characteristics of both groups of patients. This study is a retrospective study of all patients injured through terrorist acts and road traffic accidents from September 29, 2000 to December 31, 2005, and recorded in the Israel Trauma Registry. Data on the nature of injuries, treatment, and outcome were obtained from the registry. Medical diagnoses were extracted from the registry and classified based on International Classification of Diseases coding. Diagnoses were grouped to body regions, based on the Barell Injury Diagnosis Matrix. The study includes 2197 patients with terrorism-related injuries and 30,176 patients injured in road traffic accidents. All in all, 27% of terrorism-related casualties suffered severe to critical injuries, comparing to 17% among road traffic accident-related victims. Glasgow Coma Scale scores roads. The terrorism victims had a significantly higher rate of use of intensive care facilities (24.2% vs 12.4%). The overall inpatient death rate was 6.0% among terrorism victims and 2.4% among those injured in road traffic accidents. Casualties from terrorist events are more

  18. Mortality and potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries in Brazil, 2013.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; Mello-Jorge, Maria Helena Prado de

    2016-10-03

    To estimate the potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries three years after the beginning of the Decade of Action for Traffic Safety. We analyzed the data of the Sistema de Informações sobre Mortalidade (SIM - Mortality Information System) related to road traffic injuries, in 2013. We estimated the crude and standardized mortality rates for Brazil and geographic regions. We calculated, for the Country, the proportional mortality according to age groups, education level, race/skin color, and type or quality of the victim while user of the public highway. We estimated the potential years of life lost according to sex. The mortality rate in 2013 was of 21.0 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants for the Country. The Midwest region presented the highest rate (29.9 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants). Most of the deaths by road traffic injuries took place with males (34.9 deaths per 100,000 males). More than half of the people who have died because of road traffic injuries were of black race/skin color, young adults (24.2%), individuals with low schooling (24.0%), and motorcyclists (28.5%). The mortality rate in the triennium 2011-2013 decreased 4.1%, but increased among motorcyclists. Across the Country, more than a million of potential years of life were lost, in 2013, because of road traffic injuries, especially in the age group of 20 to 29 years. The impact of the high mortality rate is of over a million of potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries, especially among adults in productive age (early mortality), in only one year, representing extreme social cost arising from a cause of death that could be prevented. Despite the reduction of mortality by road traffic injuries from 2011 to 2013, the mortality rates increased among motorcyclists. Estimar os anos potenciais de vida perdidos por acidente de transporte terrestre após três anos do início da Década de Ação pela Segurança no Trânsito. Foram analisados os dados do Sistema de Informa

  19. The Epidemilogical Characteristics of Motorcyclists Associated Injuries in Road Traffics Accidents; A Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari-fam, Saber; Sarbazi, Ehsan; Daemi, Amin; Sarbazi, Mohammad Reza; Nikbakht, Hossein Ali; Salarilak, Shaker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the epidemiology of injuries of the motorcyclists in road traffic accidents (RTIs) between 2008 and 2014 in East Azarbayejan province of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in East Azerbaijan province in Imam Reza hospital on motorcyclists subjected to injuries in RTIs between 2008 and 2014. Demographic characteristics (age, sex), duration of hospitalization, final status of injured people after discharge from the hospital, admission ward, number of admissions due to injuries in RTIs, nature of injury, and the clinical services provided to injured people were gathered from hospital information system (HIS). Demographic characteristics (age, sex), duration of hospitalization, final status of injured people after discharge from the hospital, admission ward, number of admissions due to injuries in RTIs, injured site of the body, nature of injury, and the clinical services provided injured people were gathered from HIS. Standardized data collection form was used for uniform handling of the data. Results: Most of the victims (94.4%) were male. The most frequent injuries pertained to the age group of 18-30 with 1676 (51.4%) injuries. Head, abdomen, lower back, lumbar spine, and pelvis, were the most common injured sites, respectively. Reduction of fracture and dislocation and cranial puncture were the most common provided services. The lowest survival time belonged to the age group over 60 years old.   Conclusion: Injuries to the head are the most prevalent injuries among motorcyclists in RTIs. So it is suggested that proper interventions be implemented to ensure wearing helmet by motorcyclist and pillion passengers. PMID:27878128

  20. The requirements and challenges in preventing of road traffic injury in Iran. A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Mohammadi, Reza; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Laflamme, Lucie; Bikmoradi, Ali; Haglund, Bo J A

    2009-12-23

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health problem, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Among middle-income countries, Iran has one of the highest mortality rates from RTIs. Action is critical to combat this major public health problem. Stakeholders involved in RTI control are of key importance and their perceptions of barriers and facilitators are a vital source of knowledge. The aim of this study was to explore barriers to the prevention of RTIs and provide appropriate suggestions for prevention, based on the perceptions of stakeholders, victims and road-users as regards RTIs. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with informants in the field of RTI prevention including: police officers; public health professionals; experts from the road administrators; representatives from the General Governor, the car industry, firefighters; experts from Emergency Medical Service and the Red Crescent; and some motorcyclists and car drivers as well as victims of RTIs. A qualitative approach using grounded theory method was employed to analyze the material gathered. The core variable was identified as "The lack of a system approach to road-user safety". The following barriers in relation to RTI prevention were identified as: human factors; transportation system; and organizational coordination. Suggestions for improvement included education (for the general public and targeted group training), more effective legislation, more rigorous law enforcement, improved engineering in road infrastructure, and an integrated organization to supervise and coordinate preventive activities. The major barriers identified in this study were human factors and efforts to change human behaviour were suggested by means of public education campaigns and stricter law enforcement. However, the lack of a system approach to RTI prevention was also an important concern. There is an urgent need for both an integrated system to coordinate RTI activities and prevention

  1. The requirements and challenges in preventing of road traffic injury in Iran. A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health problem, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Among middle-income countries, Iran has one of the highest mortality rates from RTIs. Action is critical to combat this major public health problem. Stakeholders involved in RTI control are of key importance and their perceptions of barriers and facilitators are a vital source of knowledge. The aim of this study was to explore barriers to the prevention of RTIs and provide appropriate suggestions for prevention, based on the perceptions of stakeholders, victims and road-users as regards RTIs. Methods Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with informants in the field of RTI prevention including: police officers; public health professionals; experts from the road administrators; representatives from the General Governor, the car industry, firefighters; experts from Emergency Medical Service and the Red Crescent; and some motorcyclists and car drivers as well as victims of RTIs. A qualitative approach using grounded theory method was employed to analyze the material gathered. Results The core variable was identified as "The lack of a system approach to road-user safety". The following barriers in relation to RTI prevention were identified as: human factors; transportation system; and organizational coordination. Suggestions for improvement included education (for the general public and targeted group training), more effective legislation, more rigorous law enforcement, improved engineering in road infrastructure, and an integrated organization to supervise and coordinate preventive activities. Conclusion The major barriers identified in this study were human factors and efforts to change human behaviour were suggested by means of public education campaigns and stricter law enforcement. However, the lack of a system approach to RTI prevention was also an important concern. There is an urgent need for both an integrated system to

  2. Vision screening of older drivers for preventing road traffic injuries and fatalities.

    PubMed

    Desapriya, Ediriweera; Harjee, Rahana; Brubacher, Jeffrey; Chan, Herbert; Hewapathirane, D Sesath; Subzwari, Sayed; Pike, Ian

    2014-02-21

    Demographic data in North America, Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand suggest a rapid growth in the number of persons over the age of 65 years as the baby boomer generation passes retirement age. As older adults make up an increasing proportion of the population, they are an important consideration when designing future evidence-based traffic safety policies, particularly those that lead to restrictions or cessation of driving. Research has shown that cessation of driving among older drivers can lead to negative emotional consequences such as depression and loss of independence. Older adults who continue to drive tend to do so less frequently than other demographic groups and are more likely to be involved in a road traffic crash, possibly due to what is termed the "low mileage bias". Available research suggests that older driver crash risk estimates based on traditional exposure measures are prone to bias. When annual driving distances are taken in to consideration, older drivers with low driving distances have an increased crash risk, while those with average or high driving distances tend to be safer drivers when compared to other age groups. In addition, older drivers with lower distance driving tend to drive in urban areas which, due to more complex and demanding traffic patterns, tend to be more accident-prone. Failure to control for actual annual driving distances and driving locations among older drivers is referred to as "low mileage bias" in older driver mobility research. It is also important to note that older drivers are more vulnerable to serious injury and death in the event of a traffic crash due to changes in physiology associated with normal ageing. Vision, cognition, and motor functions or skills (e.g., strength, co-ordination, and flexibility) are three key domains required for safe driving. To drive safely, an individual needs to be able to see road signs, road side objects, traffic lights, roadway markings, other vulnerable road users

  3. Vision screening of older drivers for preventing road traffic injuries and fatalities.

    PubMed

    Desapriya, Ediriweera; Wijeratne, Harshani; Subzwari, Sayed; Babul-Wellar, Shelina; Turcotte, Kate; Rajabali, Fahra; Kinney, Jacqueline; Pike, Ian

    2011-03-16

    Demographic data in North America, Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand suggest a rapid growth in the number of persons over the age of 65 years as the baby boomer generation passes retirement age. As older adults make up an increasing proportion of the population, they are an important consideration when designing future evidence-based traffic safety policies, particularly those that lead to restrictions or cessation of driving. Research has shown that cessation of driving among older drivers can lead to negative emotional consequences such as loss of independence and depression. Those older adults who continue to drive tend to do so less frequently than other demographic groups and are more likely to be involved in a road traffic crash, probably due to what is termed the 'low mileage bias'. There is universal agreement among researchers that vision plays a significant role in driving performance, and that there are age-related visual changes. Vision testing of all drivers, and in particular of older drivers, is therefore an important road safety issue. The components of visual function essential for driving are acuity, field, depth perception and contrast sensitivity, which are currently not fully measured by licensing agencies. Furthermore, it is not known how effective vision screening tools are, and current vision screening regulations and cut-off values required to pass a licensing test vary from country to country. There is, therefore, a need to develop evidence-based tools for vision screening for driving, thereby increasing road safety. To assess the effects of vision screening interventions for older drivers to prevent road traffic injuries and fatalities. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid), TRANSPORT (Ovid), IBSS (International Bibliography of Social Sciences), ASSIA: Applied Social Sciences Index and

  4. Vision screening of older drivers for preventing road traffic injuries and fatalities.

    PubMed

    Subzwari, Sayed; Desapriya, Ediriweera; Babul-Wellar, Shelina; Pike, Ian; Turcotte, Kate; Rajabali, Fahra; Kinney, Jacqueline

    2009-01-21

    Demographic data in North America, Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand suggest a rapid growth in the number of persons over the age of 65 years as the baby boomer generation passes retirement age. As older adults make up an increasing proportion of the population, they are an important consideration when designing future evidence-based traffic safety policies, particularly those that lead to restrictions or cessation of driving. Research has shown that cessation of driving among older drivers can lead to negative emotional consequences such as loss of independence and depression. Those older adults who continue to drive tend to do so less frequently than other demographic groups and are more likely to be involved in a road traffic crash, probably due to what is termed the 'low mileage bias'. There is universal agreement among researchers that vision plays a significant role in driving performance, and that there are age-related visual changes. Vision testing of all drivers, and in particular of older drivers, is therefore an important road safety issue. The components of visual function essential for driving are acuity, field, depth perception and contrast sensitivity, which are currently not fully measured by licensing agencies. Furthermore, it is not known how effective vision screening tools are, and current vision screening regulations and cut-off values required to pass a licensing test vary from country to country. There is, therefore, a need to develop evidence-based tools for vision screening for driving, thereby increasing road safety. To assess the effects of vision screening interventions for older drivers to prevent road traffic injuries and fatalities. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2006, issue 3), MEDLINE, EMBASE, TRANSPORT, AgeInfo, AgeLine, the National Research Register, the Science (and Social Science) Citation Index, IBSS

  5. Differential patterns, trends and hotspots of road traffic injuries on different road networks in Vellore district, southern India.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Venkata Raghava; Sarkar, Rajiv; Abraham, Vinod Joseph; Balraj, Vinohar; Naumova, Elena N

    2015-03-01

    To describe spatial and temporal profiles of Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs) on different road networks in Vellore district of southern India. Using the information in the police maintained First Information Reports (FIRs), daily time series of RTI counts were created and temporal characteristics were analysed with respect to the vehicle, road types and time of the day for the period January 2005 to May 2007. Daily incidence and trend of RTIs were estimated using a Poisson regression analysis. Of the reported 3262 RTIs, 52% had occurred on the National Highway (NH). The overall RTI rate on the NH was 8.8/100 000 vehicles per day with significantly higher pedestrian involvement. The mean numbers of RTIs were significantly higher on weekends. Thirteen percentage of all RTIs were associated with fatalities. Hotspots are major town junctions, and RTI rates differ over different stretches of the NH. In India, FIRs form a valuable source of RTI information. Information on different vehicle profile, RTI patterns, and their spatial and temporal trends can be used by administrators to devise effective strategies for RTI prevention by concentrating on the high-risk areas, thereby optimising the use of available personnel and resources. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Severe road traffic injuries in Kenya, quality of care and access.

    PubMed

    Macharia, W M; Njeru, E K; Muli-Musiime, F; Nantulya, V

    2009-06-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTI) are on increase in developing countries. Health care facilities are poorly equipped to provide the needed services. Determine access and quality of care for RTI casualties in Kenya. Cross-sectional survey 53 large and medium size private, faith-based and public hospitals. In-patient road traffic crash casualties and health personnel in the selected hospitals were interviewed on availability of emergency care and resources. Onsite verification of status was undertaken. Out of 310 RTI casualties interviewed, 72.3%, 15.6% and 12.2% were in public, faith-based and private hospitals, respectively. Peak age of the injured was 15-49 years. First aid was availed to 16.0% of casualties. Unknown persons transported 76.5% of the injured. Police and ambulance vehicles transported 6.1% and 1.4%, respectively. 51.9% reached health facilities within 30 minutes of crash and medical care provided to 66.2% within one hour. 40.8% of recipient facilities were adequately prepared for RTI emergencies. Most RTI casualties were young and from poor backgrounds. Training of motorists and general public in first aid should be considered in RTI control initiatives. Availability of basic trauma care medical supplies in public health facilities was highly deficient.

  7. Eliciting road traffic injuries cost among Iranian drivers’ public vehicles using willingness to pay method

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: To allocate resources at the national level and ensure the safety level of roads with the aim of economic efficiency, cost calculation can help determine the size of the problem and demonstrate the economic benefits resulting from preventing such injuries. This study was carried out to elicit the cost of traffic injuries among Iranian drivers of public vehicles. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 410 drivers of public vehicles were randomly selected from all the drivers in city of Tehran, Iran. The research questionnaire was prepared based on the standard for willingness to pay (WTP) method (stated preference (SP), contingent value (CV), and revealed preference (RP) model). Data were collected along with a scenario for vehicle drivers. Inclusion criteria were having at least high school education and being in the age range of 18 to 65 years old. Final analysis of willingness to pay was carried out using Weibull model. Results: Mean WTP was 3,337,130 IRR among drivers of public vehicles. Statistical value of life was estimated 118,222,552,601,648 IRR, for according to 4,694 dead drivers, which was equivalent to 3,940,751,753 $ based on the dollar free market rate of 30,000 IRR (purchase power parity). Injury cost was 108,376,366,437,500 IRR, equivalent to 3,612,545,548 $. In sum, injury and death cases came to 226,606,472,346,449 IRR, equivalent to 7,553,549,078 $. Moreover in 2013, cost of traffic injuries among the drivers of public vehicles constituted 1.25% of gross national income, which was 604,300,000,000$. WTP had a significant relationship with gender, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, more pay to less traffic, and minibus drivers. Conclusion: Cost of traffic injuries among drivers of public vehicles included 1.25% of gross national income, which was noticeable; minibus drivers had less perception of risk reduction than others. PMID:26157655

  8. Effect of 20 mph traffic speed zones on road injuries in London, 1986-2006: controlled interrupted time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Chris; Steinbach, Rebecca; Edwards, Phil; Green, Judith; Armstrong, Ben; Wilkinson, Paul

    2009-12-10

    To quantify the effect of the introduction of 20 mph (32 km an hour) traffic speed zones on road collisions, injuries, and fatalities in London. Observational study based on analysis of geographically coded police data on road casualties, 1986-2006. Analyses were made of longitudinal changes in counts of road injuries within each of 119 029 road segments with at least one casualty with conditional fixed effects Poisson models. Estimates of the effect of introducing 20 mph zones on casualties within those zones and in adjacent areas were adjusted for the underlying downward trend in traffic casualties. London. All casualties from road collisions; those killed and seriously injured (KSI). The introduction of 20 mph zones was associated with a 41.9% (95% confidence interval 36.0% to 47.8%) reduction in road casualties, after adjustment for underlying time trends. The percentage reduction was greatest in younger children and greater for the category of killed or seriously injured casualties than for minor injuries. There was no evidence of casualty migration to areas adjacent to 20 mph zones, where casualties also fell slightly by an average of 8.0% (4.4% to 11.5%). Conclusions 20 mph zones are effective measures for reducing road injuries and deaths.

  9. Host, vehicular and environmental factors responsible for road traffic crashes in a nigerian city: identifiable issues for road traffic injury control

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Peter Oladapo; Kadri, Dotun Musiliu; Bello, Jibril Oyekunle; Ofoegbu, Chima Kingsley Pascal; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman Olajide; Adekanye, Adedeji Olugbenga; Solagberu, Babatunde Akeeb

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Road traffic injury (RTI) has assumed major public health importance world-wide and the burden is heavier on the health-care infrastructure of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Nigeria, RTI is the leading cause of trauma related morbidity and mortality. While there are some published epidemiological reports on RTI in the region, studies on the mechanism of causation of road traffic crashes (RTC) are not available. Methods Over a 9-month period, we prospectively captured the 571 victims of RTC presenting to a single tertiary health care center in Nigeria. Data collected include demographic data, Mechanism of causation of RTC, Injuries sustained and outcomes. Results Over three-quarters of the victims are young people and half were either traders (27.5%) or students (20%). Pedestrians, motorcycle riders and open truck occupants (people sitting at the rear loading compartment of trucks) often had fatal injuries. Analysis of collision patterns showed that lone crashes were the most frequent though car-to-motorcycle crashes caused a quarter of the deaths. Host factors (over-speeding driver, driver misjudgment, sleeping driver etc.) were responsible for four-fifths of the crashes while vehicular and environmental factors accounted for the remaining. On binary regression analysis, head injured victims had higher odds of dying than the non-head injured (Odds ratio = 6.5). Conclusion This paper elucidates the mechanisms of causation of and types of injuries sustained following RTC in Nigeria and thus provide opportunities for prevention and control of this unacceptable situation. PMID:25780490

  10. Outcome of road traffic injuries received in the emergency room of a teaching hospital, Southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omoke, N I; Chukwu, C O O; Madubueze, C C; Oyakhiolme, O P

    2012-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTI) are a rapidly growing public health problem in developing countries. This study was aimed at assessing the early outcome of RTIs received in our hospital emergency room. Understanding this will help to achieve optimum injury outcome. A prospective study was conducted on all patients presenting with RTIs to the emergency room of the Ebonyi University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, from 1 March 2007 to 29 February 2008. Out of 363 patients: 72.45% were treated in the emergency unit and discharged; 12.7% left against medical advice; 10.9% were admitted to the ward; and 4.7% died. Self-discharge against medical advice was significantly related to the type of injury (78.3% had fracture/dislocation) and gender (P = 0.001). The patronage of traditional bone setters, because of cultural belief that they have supernatural ability to treat fractures, was the major reason given by those who left against medical advice. The morbidity and mortality rate was significantly related to the road type (P = 0.005 - a higher rate was observed for RTIs received on intercity roads than intracity ones) and the type of crash (P = 0.03 - more than half from head on collisions). Although the mortality rate was within the expected range, the preventable death rate was high, and the majority of deaths occurred within the 'golden hour' . Improvement in pre-hospital and emergency room care of patients with RTIs, as well as public awareness of the availability and efficacy of orthodox orthopaedic trauma care, are needed in the developing countries.

  11. Prioritisation of road traffic injury interventions: results of a participative research with stakeholders in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Siller, S; Híjar, M; Mora, G

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study is to use a qualitative approach to prioritise road traffic injury (RTI) interventions for the city of Cuernavaca in Mexico. Seven focus group discussions and two nominal groups were held with participants representing different road users and social groups. All the focus group sessions were recorded and video filmed. Processing and analysis of the information gathered was done using qualitative methods. The problem of RTIs was well recognised by members of the local community, represented by participants in this study. The participants showed knowledge of the causes and related urban development dynamics. Participants identified possible interventions, and even rated them. The participatory approach utilised generated helpful insights and it enabled the researchers to identify key local actors and issues, for example, concerns of different road users, perception of certain factors and actors as causes of RTIs, and attitudes and behaviour within a specific physical environment. A prioritised list for 18 different interventions was developed. The first one will be implemented to prevent RTIs in the youth population. Understanding the social context to analyse the problem and possible solutions as seen by the community is important when analysing public health problems because it informs decision making when developing and implementing interventions.

  12. A drug cost model for injuries due to road traffic accidents

    PubMed Central

    Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Piyauthakit, Piyanuch; Srijariya, Witsanuchai; Chaikledkaew, Usa

    2007-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a drug cost model for injuries due to road traffic accidents for patients receiving treatment at a regional hospital in Thailand. Methods The study was designed as a retrospective, descriptive analysis. The cases were all from road traffic accidents receiving treatment at a public regional hospital in the fiscal year 2004. Results Three thousand seven hundred and twenty-three road accident patients were included in the study. The mean drug cost per case was USD18.20 (SD=73.49, median=2.36). The fitted drug cost model had an adjusted R2 of 0.449. The positive significant predictor variables of drug costs were prolonged length of stay, age over 30 years old, male, Universal Health Coverage Scheme, time of accident during 18:00-24:00 o’clock, and motorcycle comparing to bus. To forecast the drug budget for 2006, there were two approaches identified, the mean drug cost and the predicted average drug cost. The predicted average drug cost was calculated based on the forecasted values of statistically significant (p<0.05) predictor variables included in the fitted model; predicted total drug cost was USD44,334. Alternatively, based on the mean cost, predicted total drug cost in 2006 was USD63,408. This was 43% higher than the figure based on the predicted cost approach. Conclusions The planned budget of drug cost based on the mean cost and predicted average cost were meaningfully different. The application of a predicted average cost model could result in a more accurate budget planning than that of a mean statistic approach. PMID:25170359

  13. Health care costs and functional outcomes of road traffic injuries in the Lazio region of Italy.

    PubMed

    Chini, Francesco; Farchi, Sara; Camilloni, Laura; Giarrizzo, Maria Letizia; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The economic consequences of road traffic injuries (RTIs) are very important in terms of health care costs. The aim of this study is to provide estimates of health care costs of non-fatal RTIs and to estimate functional outcomes using in-hospital rehabilitation data. We identified all emergency department (ED) visits related to RTI during 2008 and then linked them with hospital discharges and rehabilitation admissions, health care costs following RTI were estimated from the integrated database. We performed an epidemiological evaluation of RTI with a comprehensive description of functional outcomes at 6 months. Health care costs have been estimated at about €80 million with a per person cost of €522. About 18% of the total cost was due to rehabilitation treatments. In multivariate analysis the variables that correlated better with higher total health care costs were: older age, injury severity, presence of spinal lesion. Patients requiring rehabilitation were: the elderly, patients suffering from a spinal cord injury and leg injuries. This study provides consistent health care cost estimates of RTI using administrative databases and it shows a picture of functional outcomes after RTI. Further research is needed for the estimation of other components of the total cost of RTI.

  14. Road traffic crashes in South Africa: the burden of injury to a regional trauma centre.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, F; Kent, S; Aldous, C; Oosthuizen, G; Clarke, D

    2013-09-30

    Globally, 90% of road traffic crash (RTC) deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. To document the mortality and morbidity associated with RTCs managed at a busy regional hospital in South Africa and investigate potentially preventable factors associated with RTCs. This was a prospective study of all patients presenting to Edendale Hospital following a RTC over a 10-week period from late 2011 to early 2012. All fatalities recorded at the police mortuary for the same period were included. Medical records were reviewed and all admitted patients were interviewed about the circumstances of the accident. We calculated an injury pyramid to compare our data with European data. A total of 305 patients were seen over the study period, 100 required admission and there were 45 deaths due to RTCs in the area. Of the patients admitted, 41 were pedestrians involved in pedestrian vehicle crashes (PVCs) and 59 motor vehicle occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). The majority (n=58) of crashes involved a private vehicle. Only 17% of MVC patients were wearing a seatbelt and 8 were allegedly under the influence of alcohol. On average, RTC patients spent 19 days in hospital and 62 patients required at least 1 operation. According to our injury pyramid, the number of severe and fatal injuries was higher than in Europe. Our results demonstrate a high incidence of RTCs associated with a high injury score and significant morbidity. Most crashes were associated with a number of high-risk behaviours.

  15. Preventive Effects of Seat Belt on Clinical Outcomes for Road Traffic Injuries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proper seat belt use saves lives; however, the use rate decreased in Korea. This study aimed to measure the magnitude of the preventive effect of seat belt on case-fatality across drivers and passengers. We used the Emergency Department based Injury In-depth Surveillance (EDIIS) database from 17 EDs between 2011 and 2012. All of adult injured patients from road traffic injuries (RTI) in-vehicle of less than 10-seat van were eligible, excluding cases with unknown seat belt use and outcomes. Primary and secondary endpoints were in-hospital mortality and intracranial injury. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of seat belt use and driving status for study outcomes adjusting for potential confounders. Among 23,698 eligible patients, 15,304 (64.6%) wore seat belts. Driver, middle aged (30-44 yr), male, daytime injured patients were more likely to use seat belts (all P < 0.001). In terms of clinical outcome, no seat belt group had higher proportions of case-fatality and intracranial injury compared to seat belt group (both P < 0.001). Compared to seat belt group, AORs (95% CIs) of no seat belt group were 10.43 (7.75-14.04) for case-fatality and 2.68 (2.25-3.19) for intracranial injury respectively. In the interaction model, AORs (95% CIs) of no seat belt use for case-fatality were 11.71 (8.45-16.22) in drivers and 5.52 (2.83-14.76) in non-driving passengers, respectively. Wearing seat belt has significantly preventive effects on case-fatality and intracranial injury. Public health efforts to increase seat belt use are needed to reduce health burden from RTIs. PMID:26713066

  16. Cost Estimation of Road Traffic Injuries Among Iranian Motorcyclists Using the Willingness to Pay Method

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Basirat, Behzad; Haddadi, Mashyaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background Motorcycle riders are amongst some of the most vulnerable road users. The burden of motorcycles injuries from low and middle income countries is under-reported. Objectives In this study, the cost of traffic injuries among motorcyclists was calculated using the willingness to pay (WTP) method in Iran in 2013. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study, 143 motorcyclists were randomly selected. The research questionnaire was prepared based on the standard WTP method [stated preference (SP), contingent value (CV) and revealed preference (RP) models] taking into consideration perceived risks, especially those in Iran. Data were collected by a scenario for motorcyclists. The criteria for inclusion in the study consisted of having at least a high school education and being in the age range of 18 - 65 years. The final analysis of the WTP data was performed using the Weibull model. Results The mean WTP was 888,110 IRR (Iranian Rial) among motorcyclists. The statistical value of life was estimated according to 4694 death cases as 3,146,225,350,943 IRR, which was equivalent to USD 104,874,178 based on the dollar free market rate of 30,000 IRR (purchasing power parity). The cost of injury was 6,903,839,551,000 IRR, equivalent to USD 230,127,985 (based upon 73,325 injured motorcyclists in 2013, a daily traffic volume of 311, and a daily payment of 12,110 IRR for 250 working days). In total, injury and death cases came to 10,050,094,901,943 IRR, equivalent to USD 335,003,163. Willingness to pay had a significant relationship with having experienced an accident, the length of the daily trip (in km), and helmet use (P < 0.001). Conclusions Willingness to pay can be affected by experiencing an accident, the distance of the daily trip, and helmet use. The cost of traffic injuries among motorcyclists shows that this rate is much higher than the global average. Thus, expenditure should be made on effective initiatives such as the safety of motorcyclists. PMID:27679784

  17. The Road Traffic Injuries Research Network: a decade of research capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Adnan A; Norton, Robyn; Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Mojarro-Iñiguez, Francisco R; Peden, Margie; Kobusingye, Olive

    2016-02-27

    Road traffic crashes have been an increasing threat to the wellbeing of road users worldwide; an unacceptably high number of people die or become disabled from them. While high-income countries have successfully implemented effective interventions to help reduce the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in their countries, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have not yet achieved similar results. Both scientific research and capacity development have proven to be useful for preventing RTIs in high-income countries. In 1999, a group of leading researchers from different countries decided to join efforts to help promote research on RTIs and develop the capacity of professionals from LMICs. This translated into the creation of the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) - a partnership of over 1,100 road safety professionals from 114 countries collaborating to facilitate reductions in the burden of RTIs in LMICs by identifying and promoting effective, evidenced-based interventions and supporting research capacity building in road safety research in LMICs. This article presents the work that RTIRN has done over more than a decade, including production of a dozen scientific papers, support of nearly 100 researchers, training of nearly 1,000 people and 35 scholarships granted to researchers from LMICs to attend world conferences, as well as lessons learnt and future challenges to maximize its work.

  18. Alcohol-related road traffic injuries in Al-Ain City, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Osman, Ossama T; Abbas, Alaa K; Eid, Hani O; Salem, Mohamed O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to prospectively study the demography, severity of injury and outcome of alcohol-related road traffic collision (RTC) injuries in the United Arab Emirates. Data of RTC Registry of Al-Ain City were prospectively collected from Al-Ain and Tawam hospitals during the period of April 2006 to October 2007. It included all RTC trauma patients who were admitted or those who died after arrival to these hospitals. Car occupants with complete data on alcohol use were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups, those who reported using alcohol and those who did not. Out of the 771 car occupants, sixteen (16) used alcohol (2.1%), 15 (94%) of them were males. The median (range) age of the alcohol group was significantly higher than those without alcohol (35 (15-53) years compared with 26 (1-78) years, p = 0.02). The UAE nationals were significantly more (P = 0.01) and the revised trauma score was significantly less in the alcohol group (P = 0.03). Head/face was the most commonly injured region in the alcohol group (94%). Self reported alcohol-related car collisions in Al-Ain City had a low incidence. It affected older Emirati male nationals and was associated with lower revised trauma score, mainly due to head injury. There is a need for a national registry with data on alcohol abuse so as to assess its effects and strategies for its prevention.

  19. Incidence of Road Traffic Injury and Associated Factors among Patients Visiting the Emergency Department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tiruneh, Bewket Tadesse; Dachew, Berihun Assefa; Bifftu, Berhanu Boru

    2014-01-01

    Background. Road traffic injuries are a major public health issue. The problem is increasing in Africa. Objective. To assess the incidence of road traffic injury and associated factors among patients visiting the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. Institutional based cross-sectional study design was conducted. A total of 356 systematically selected study subjects were included in the study. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify associated factors with road traffic injury. Odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the level of significance. Results. The incidence of road traffic injury in the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital was 36.8%. Being a farmer (AOR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.06–10.13), conflict with family members (AOR = 7.7; 95% CI = 3.49–8.84), financial problem (AOR = 9.91; 95% CI = 4.79–6.48), psychological problem (AOR = 17.58; 95% CI = 7.70–12.14), and alcohol use (AOR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.61–5.27) were independently associated with road traffic injury. Conclusion and Recommendation. In this study the incidence of road traffic injury was high. Alcohol is one of the most significant factors associated with Road Traffic Injury. Thus urgent education on the effect of alcohol is recommended. PMID:25165583

  20. The association between meteorological factors and road traffic injuries: a case analysis from Shantou city, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinghong; Chen, Xiaojun; Woodward, Alistair; Liu, Xiaobo; Wu, Haixia; Lu, Yaogui; Li, Liping; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-11-01

    Few studies examined the associations of meteorological factors with road traffic injuries (RTIs). The purpose of the present study was to quantify the contributions of meteorological factors to RTI cases treated at a tertiary level hospital in Shantou city, China. A time-series diagram was employed to illustrate the time trends and seasonal variation of RTIs, and correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were conducted to investigate the relationships between meteorological parameters and RTIs. RTIs followed a seasonal pattern as more cases occurred during summer and winter months. RTIs are positively correlated with temperature and sunshine duration, while negatively associated with wind speed. Temperature, sunshine hour and wind speed were included in the final linear model with regression coefficients of 0.65 (t = 2.36, P = 0.019), 2.23 (t = 2.72, P = 0.007) and ‑27.66 (t = ‑5.67, P < 0.001), respectively, accounting for 19.93% of the total variation of RTI cases. The findings can help us better understand the associations between meteorological factors and RTIs, and with potential contributions to the development and implementation of regional level evidence-based weather-responsive traffic management system in the future.

  1. The association between meteorological factors and road traffic injuries: a case analysis from Shantou city, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinghong; Chen, Xiaojun; Woodward, Alistair; Liu, Xiaobo; Wu, Haixia; Lu, Yaogui; Li, Liping; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Few studies examined the associations of meteorological factors with road traffic injuries (RTIs). The purpose of the present study was to quantify the contributions of meteorological factors to RTI cases treated at a tertiary level hospital in Shantou city, China. A time-series diagram was employed to illustrate the time trends and seasonal variation of RTIs, and correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were conducted to investigate the relationships between meteorological parameters and RTIs. RTIs followed a seasonal pattern as more cases occurred during summer and winter months. RTIs are positively correlated with temperature and sunshine duration, while negatively associated with wind speed. Temperature, sunshine hour and wind speed were included in the final linear model with regression coefficients of 0.65 (t = 2.36, P = 0.019), 2.23 (t = 2.72, P = 0.007) and −27.66 (t = −5.67, P < 0.001), respectively, accounting for 19.93% of the total variation of RTI cases. The findings can help us better understand the associations between meteorological factors and RTIs, and with potential contributions to the development and implementation of regional level evidence-based weather-responsive traffic management system in the future. PMID:27853316

  2. Determinants of road traffic injury among adult motorcyclists in Malé, Maldives.

    PubMed

    Waseela, Mariyam; Laosee, Orapin

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the incidence of nonfatal road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Malé, the capital city of the Maldives, and identifies risk factors associated with RTIs. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among young adult motorcyclists in 3 public areas. A total of 350 self-administered questionnaires were distributed to the motorcycle riders who visited the study areas between December 2012 and January 2013. The incidence of RTIs for the previous 12 months was 39.8% among the 294 respondents who returned a completed questionnaire. About half (49.6%) of those were caused by the riders. The majority of riders were male (96.6%). None of the motorcycle riders wore a helmet. RTIs had a significant association with sex, age, and attitude. Young riders were 1.6 times more likely to be involved in an RTI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.94-2.95). Having a negative attitude about road safety was a risk factor of RTIs (AOR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.11-3.03). Based on the results of the present study, it is important to promote safe riding attitudes in young riders.

  3. Severe road traffic injuries and youth: a 4-year analysis for the city of Belgrade.

    PubMed

    Bumbasirevic, Marko; Lesic, Aleksandar; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Zagorac, Slavisa; Milosevic, Ivan; Simic, Marko; Markovic-Denic, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe severe road traffic injuries (RTIs) in the population under 18 years in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. We analysed both severe non-fatal and fatal RTIs in children and adolescents under 18 years old in the Belgrade area, during the period 2008-2011. Data sources were the official statistics of the Public Health Institute in Belgrade and forensic-medical records from two paediatric university hospitals and five university hospitals for adults. Using descriptive statistical methods, demographic characteristics, mechanism, type and time of injuries, surgical treatment procedures, injury severity scores (ISS), length of stay and outcome were evaluated. The admission and mortality rates were calculated. Among the total of 379 injured, 256 (67.5%) were male; the average age was 13.0 ± 4.7 (range: 0-18 years). The annual hospital admission rate of RTIs for both sexes decreased in average by 12.6% (95% CI = 9.3%-15.9%). The mean percentage of annual changes of mortality rates was 2.0 %; 95% CI = 1.3%-5.3% (5.7 per 100,000 in 2008, 5.6 in 2009, 4.7 in 2010 and 5.9 in 2011). The highest admission rates and mortality rates were for pedestrians, followed by passengers and cyclists. Accidents occurred most commonly on Monday (18.7%). Among children hospitalised for traffic injuries, 57.8% had head and neck trauma, 30.6% extremity fractures, 5% abdominal injuries, 4.2% chest and 2.4% multiple injuries. The average ISS was 22.4 (SD = 20.4), ranging from 1 to 75. Alcohol in blood was confirmed in 7.4% males and 3.3% females (p > 0.05). The average time of hospital stay was 8.8 days (SD = 16.7), ranging from 1 to 14. The increased rates require implementation of a well-defined national strategy in our country.

  4. Increased morbidity associated with weekend paediatric road traffic injuries: 10-year analysis of trauma registry data.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Brett; Fauteux-Lamarre, Emmanuelle; As, Arjan Bastiaan van

    2016-06-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a significant cause of paediatric morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a disproportionate number of these injuries occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Adult data from LMICs suggest that weekends are particularly high-risk for RTIs, but whether children are at increased risk of RTI on weekends has not previously been investigated in any setting. This study sought to assess patterns in paediatric RTI presentations using hospital-based trauma surveillance data in Cape Town, South Africa. Data was analysed from Childsafe South Africa's prospectively collected trauma registry for injured children below 13 years of age presenting to a tertiary paediatric referral Trauma Department between 2004 and 2013. During the 10-year study period, a total of 71,180 patients presented with traumatic injuries, of which 8,815 (12.4%) resulted from RTIs. RTI patients had a mean age of 5.2±3.6 years, and were predominantly males and pedestrians. RTIs were more common on weekends than weekdays (2.98 vs. 2.19 patients/day, p<0.001), representing a greater proportion of daily all-cause trauma (15.5% vs. 11.2%, p<0.001). Moreover, weekend RTI patients sustained more severe injuries than on weekdays, and compared to weekend all-cause trauma patients (injury score 1.66 vs. 1.46 and 1.43, both p<0.001). RTI patients were more likely to require admission to both the trauma ward (1.14 vs. 0.79 patients/day, p<0.001) and the PICU (0.10 vs. 0.07 patients/day, p<0.05) on weekends than on weekdays. Weekend RTI patients most frequently required admission to the trauma ward (p<0.001) and the PICU (p<0.05) during the last annual quarter. In a LMIC-setting, paediatric RTI patients are more frequently brought to medical attention, sustain more severe injuries and more frequently require hospital admission during the weekend. Weekends during the last annual quarter were particularly high-risk for paediatric RTIs. These findings highlight the

  5. Incidence and trend of road traffic injuries and related deaths in Kuwait: 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Ziyab, Ali H; Akhtar, Saeed

    2012-12-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs), disabilities and deaths are recognised as a major public health problem worldwide. This study aimed to quantify the magnitude and the trends of RTI-related fatal and non-fatal injuries in Kuwait for the period 2000-2009. Data on road traffic crashes and related events (i.e., fatal and non-fatal minor and severe injuries) were obtained from police records, and the population data were sought from Ministry of Interior, Kuwait. From 2000 to 2009, 11,591 non-fatal RTIs and 3891 RTIs-related deaths occurred in Kuwait. Non-fatal severe RTIs accounted for 28.2% of the total non-fatal RTIs. Of the 2945 RTI-related deaths that occurred from 2003 to 2009, majority were amongst males (87.3%) and in the age range of 20-59 years (70.8%). The mean (SD) annual mortality rates for the 10-year study period (2000-2009) were 14 (1) per 100,000 population and 36 (2) per 100,000 registered vehicles. From 2000 to 2009, population-based and registered vehicle-based overall RTI-related crude mortality rates decreased by 20% and 29%, respectively. However, Poisson regression analyses showed that the overall slightly decreasing trends were statistically non-significant both for population-based crude mortality rate (trend coefficient=-0.016; p(trend)=0.587) and registered vehicle-based crude mortality rate (trend coefficient=-0.024; p(trend)=0.192). Furthermore, the trend in population-based age-adjusted RTI-related mortality rate for 2003-2009 was also statistically non-significant (trend coefficient=-0.050; p(trend)=0.284). For non-fatal severe RTIs, the overall mean (SD) annual rates per 100,000 population and 100,000 registered vehicles were 44 (23) and 113 (60) with corresponding total reduction of 61% and 66% from 2000 to 2009. The overall declining trends in minor and severe RTI rates (both population based and registered vehicles based) were statistically significant (p(trend)<0.001). Despite declined minor and severe RTI rates, the RTI-related crude

  6. Road Traffic Injury Prevention Initiatives: A Systematic Review and Metasummary of Effectiveness in Low and Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Staton, Catherine; Vissoci, Joao; Gong, Enying; Toomey, Nicole; Wafula, Rebeccah; Abdelgadir, Jihad; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Chen; Pei, Fengdi; Zick, Brittany; Ratliff, Camille D.; Rotich, Claire; Jadue, Nicole; de Andrade, Luciano; von Isenburg, Megan; Hocker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a growing but neglected global health crisis, requiring effective prevention to promote sustainable safety. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) share a disproportionately high burden with 90% of the world’s road traffic deaths, and where RTIs are escalating due to rapid urbanization and motorization. Although several studies have assessed the effectiveness of a specific intervention, no systematic reviews have been conducted summarizing the effectiveness of RTI prevention initiatives specifically performed in LMIC settings; this study will help fill this gap. Methods In accordance with PRISMA guidelines we searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, TRID, Lilacs, Scielo and Global Health. Articles were eligible if they considered RTI prevention in LMICs by evaluating a prevention-related intervention with outcome measures of crash, RTI, or death. In addition, a reference and citation analysis was conducted as well as a data quality assessment. A qualitative metasummary approach was used for data analysis and effect sizes were calculated to quantify the magnitude of emerging themes. Results Of the 8560 articles from the literature search, 18 articles from 11 LMICs fit the eligibility and inclusion criteria. Of these studies, four were from Sub-Saharan Africa, ten from Latin America and the Caribbean, one from the Middle East, and three from Asia. Half of the studies focused specifically on legislation, while the others focused on speed control measures, educational interventions, enforcement, road improvement, community programs, or a multifaceted intervention. Conclusion Legislation was the most common intervention evaluated with the best outcomes when combined with strong enforcement initiatives or as part of a multifaceted approach. Because speed control is crucial to crash and injury prevention, road improvement interventions in LMIC settings should carefully consider how the

  7. Exploring data sources for road traffic injury in Cameroon: Collection and completeness of police records, newspaper reports, and a hospital trauma registry.

    PubMed

    Juillard, Catherine; Kouo Ngamby, Marquise; Ekeke Monono, Martin; Etoundi Mballa, Georges Alain; Dicker, Rochelle A; Stevens, Kent A; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-04-10

    Road traffic injury surveillance systems are a cornerstone of organized efforts at injury control. Although high-income countries rely on established trauma registries and police databases, in low- and middle-income countries, the data source that provides the best collection of road traffic injury events in specific low- and middle-income country contexts without mature surveillance systems is unclear. The objective of this study was to compare the information available on road traffic injuries in 3 data sources used for surveillance in the sub-Saharan African country of Cameroon, providing potential insight on data sources for road traffic injury surveillance in low- and middle-income countries. We assessed the number of events captured and the information available in Yaoundé, Cameroon, from 3 separate sources of data on road traffic injuries: trauma registry, police records, and newspapers. Data were collected from a single-hospital trauma registry, police records, and the 6 most widely circulated newspapers in Yaoundé during a 6-month period in 2009. The number of road traffic injury events, mortality, and other variables included commonly in injury surveillance systems were recorded. We compared these sources using descriptive analysis. Hospital, police, and newspaper sources recorded 1,686, 273, and 480 road traffic injuries, respectively. The trauma registry provided the most complete data for the majority of variables explored; however, the newspaper data source captured 2, mass casualty, train crash events unrecorded in the other sources. Police data provided the most complete information on first responders to the scene, missing in only 7%. Investing in the hospital-based trauma registry may yield the best surveillance for road traffic injuries in some low- and middle-income countries, such as Yaoundé, Cameroon; however, police and newspaper reports may serve as alternative data sources when specific information is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  8. Road Traffic Injury as a Major Public Health Issue in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: A Review.

    PubMed

    DeNicola, Erica; Aburizaize, Omar S; Siddique, Azhar; Khwaja, Haider; Carpenter, David O

    2016-01-01

    Injury was the largest single cause of disability-adjusted life years and death in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 2013. The vast majority of injury-related fatalities are deaths caused by road traffic. Measures to control this serious public health issue, which has significant consequences for both Saudi families and the Saudi economy as a whole, have been underway for years but with little success. Most attempts at intervening revolve around attempts for enforcing stricter traffic laws and by installing automated traffic monitoring systems that will catch law breakers on camera and issue tickets and fines. While there has been much research on various factors that play a role in the high rate of road traffic injury in The Kingdom (e.g., driver behavior, animal collisions, disobeying traffic and pedestrian signals, environmental elements), virtually no attention has been given to examining why Saudi drivers behave the way that they do. This review provides a thorough account of the present situation in Saudi Arabia and discusses how health behavior theory can be used to gain a better understanding of driver behavior.

  9. Road Traffic Injury as a Major Public Health Issue in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    DeNicola, Erica; Aburizaize, Omar S.; Siddique, Azhar; Khwaja, Haider; Carpenter, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Injury was the largest single cause of disability-adjusted life years and death in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 2013. The vast majority of injury-related fatalities are deaths caused by road traffic. Measures to control this serious public health issue, which has significant consequences for both Saudi families and the Saudi economy as a whole, have been underway for years but with little success. Most attempts at intervening revolve around attempts for enforcing stricter traffic laws and by installing automated traffic monitoring systems that will catch law breakers on camera and issue tickets and fines. While there has been much research on various factors that play a role in the high rate of road traffic injury in The Kingdom (e.g., driver behavior, animal collisions, disobeying traffic and pedestrian signals, environmental elements), virtually no attention has been given to examining why Saudi drivers behave the way that they do. This review provides a thorough account of the present situation in Saudi Arabia and discusses how health behavior theory can be used to gain a better understanding of driver behavior. PMID:27747208

  10. A new approach to managing work-related road traffic injury: The development of a health investment framework.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, Amanda; Newnam, Sharon; Sheppard, Dianne; Griffin, Mark; Stevenson, Mark

    2017-08-18

    Statistics indicate that employees commuting or traveling as part of their work are overrepresented in workplace injury and death. Despite this, many organizations are unaware of the factors within their organizations that are likely to influence potential reductions in work-related road traffic injury. This article presents a multilevel conceptual framework that identifies health investment as the central feature in reducing work-related road traffic injury. Within this framework, we explore factors operating at the individual driver, workgroup supervisor, and organizational senior management levels that create a mutually reinforcing system of safety. The health investment framework identifies key factors at the senior manager, supervisor, and driver levels to cultivating a safe working environment. These factors are high-performance workplace systems, leader-member exchange and autonomy, trust and empowerment, respectively. The framework demonstrates the important interactions between these factors and how they create a self-sustaining organizational safety system. The framework aims to provide insight into the future development of interventions that are strategically aligned with the organization and target elements that facilitate and enhance driver safety and ultimately reduce work-related road traffic injury and death.

  11. Impact of the Penalty Points System on Road Traffic Injuries in Spain: A Time–Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Ana M.; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Ferrando, Josep; Peiró, Rosana; Tobías, Aurelio; Zori, Pilar; Borrell, Carme

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effectiveness of the penalty points system (PPS) introduced in Spain in July 2006 in reducing traffic injuries. Methods. We performed an evaluation study with an interrupted time–series design. We stratified dependent variables—numbers of drivers involved in injury collisions and people injured in traffic collisions in Spain from 2000 to 2007 (police data)—by age, injury severity, type of road user, road type, and time of collision, and analyzed variables separately by gender. The explanatory variable (the PPS) compared the postintervention period (July 2006 to December 2007) with the preintervention period (January 2000 to June 2006). We used quasi-Poisson regression, controlling for time trend and seasonality. Results. Among men, we observed a significant risk reduction in the postintervention period for seriously injured drivers (relative risk [RR] = 0.89) and seriously injured people (RR = 0.89). The RRs among women were 0.91 (P = .095) and 0.88 (P < .05), respectively. Risk reduction was greater among male drivers, moped riders, and on urban roads. Conclusions. The PPS was associated with reduced numbers of drivers involved in injury collisions and people injured by traffic collisions in Spain. PMID:20864703

  12. A multinomial logit analysis of risk factors influencing road traffic injury severities in the Erzurum and Kars Provinces of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ali Kemal; Oktay, Erkan

    2014-11-01

    A retrospective cross-sectional study is conducted analysing 11,771 traffic accidents reported by the police between January 2008 and December 2013 which are classified into three injury severity categories: fatal, injury, and no injury. Based on this classification, a multinomial logit analysis is performed to determine the risk factors affecting the severity of traffic injuries. The estimation results reveal that the following factors increase the probability of fatal injuries: drivers over the age of 65; primary-educated drivers; single-vehicle accidents; accidents occurring on state routes, highways or provincial roads; and the presence of pedestrian crosswalks. The results also indicate that accidents involving cars or private vehicles or those occurring during the evening peak, under clear weather conditions, on local city streets or in the presence of traffic lights decrease the probability of fatal injuries. This study comprises the most comprehensive database ever created for a Turkish sample. This study is also the first attempt to use an unordered response model to determine risk factors influencing the severity of traffic injuries in Turkey. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Injury pattern, hospital triage, and mortality of 1250 patients with severe traumatic brain injury caused by road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Leijdesdorff, Henry A; van Dijck, Jeroen T J M; Krijnen, Pieta; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Schipper, Inger B

    2014-03-01

    This epidemiological study analyzed the incidence, risk factors, hospital triage, and outcome of patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (sTBIs) caused by road traffic accidents (RTAs) admitted to hospitals in the Trauma Center West-Netherlands (TCWN) region. Trauma registry data were used to identify TBI in all RTA victims admitted to hospitals in the mid-West region of the Netherlands from 2003 to 2011. Type of head injury and severity were classified using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Head injuries with AIS severity scores ≥ 3 were considered sTBI. Ten percent of all 12,503 hospital-admitted RTA victims sustained sTBI, ranging from 5.4% in motorcyclists, 7.4% in motorists, 9.6% in cyclists, and 12.7% in moped riders to 15.1% in pedestrians (p<0.0001). Among RTA victims admitted to hospital, sTBI was most prevalent in pedestrians (odds ratio [OR], 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-2.86) and moped riders (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.51-2.30). Injury patterns differed between road user groups. Incidence of contusion ranged from 46.6% in cyclists to 74.2% in motorcyclists, whereas basilar and open-skull fractures were least common in motorcyclists (22.6%) and most common in moped riders (51.5%). Hemorrhage incidence ranged from 44.9% (motorists) to 63.6% (pedestrians). Subdural and -arachnoid bleedings were most frequent. Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and type of hemorrhage were independent prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality after sTBI. In-hospital mortality ranged from 4.2% in moped riders to 14.1% in motorists. Pedestrians have the highest risk to sustain sTBI and, more specifically, intracranial hemorrhage. Hemorrhage and contusion both occur in over 50% of patients with sTBI. Specific brain injury patterns can be distinguished for specific road user groups, and independent prognostic risk factors for sTBI were identified. This knowledge may be used to improve vigilance for particular injuries in specific patient groups and stimulate

  14. The effect of seatbelt legislation on hospital admissions with road traffic injuries in an oil-rich, fast-developing country.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Al Humoud, Suhail M Q; Price, Penny; Azhar, Abdulaziz; Khalid, Muayad K; Rysavy, Martin; Crundall, David

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of seat-belt legislation on hospital admissions with road traffic injuries and was designed as a retrospective descriptive study. All motor vehicle crashes recorded during the period 2001 - 2004 were extracted from the Emergency Medical Service Department. Details of the crashes, injuries and safety devices used were studied. The present study revealed that safety belt usage rates have increased from 8% in 2001 to 67% in 2004 among patients admitted to hospital with injury after road traffic crashes. The admission rate of patients with road traffic injuries per 100 000 population reduced by 17.7%. The enforcement of the seat-belt legislation played a vital role in reduction of hospital admissions due to road traffic crashes.

  15. Profile of non-fatal injuries due to road traffic accidents from a industrial town in India.

    PubMed

    Bayan, Pankaj; Bhawalkar, J S; Jadhav, S L; Banerjee, Amitav

    2013-01-01

    India has one of the highest road traffic accident rates in the world. To lessen this burden, information on the contributing factors is necessary. We studied a series of cases of non-fatal road traffic accidents in two tertiary care hospitals in Pimpri, Pune, India. A total of 212 non-fatal road traffic accidents admitted over a period of one year in these two hospitals constituted the study sample. The study variables were, the gender of the accident victims, mode of accident, days of week on which the accident took place, time of day when the injury was sustained, part of the body injured, nature of injury, and self-reported reasons for the accident. data were summarized using percentages. The Chi-square test for goodness of fit was applied, to see whether there was any association between the different weekdays or time of day and the accidents. MALE : female ratio was almost 5 : 1, which was statistically significant (Chi-Square for goodness of fit = 95.11, df = 1, P < 0.0001). The maximum accidents occurred on Sundays and Mondays and the least around midweek (Wednesday). This pattern was also statistically significant (Chi-square for goodness of fit = 30.09, df = 6, P < 0.001). Pedestrians were the most vulnerable group, followed by drivers and pillions of two wheelers. These categories of road users contributed to almost 80% of the cases of Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs). Accidents were more likely in the time zone of 8 pm to midnight, followed by 4 pm to 8 pm (Chi-square for goodness of fit = 89.58, df = 5, P < 0.0001). A majority of the patients sustained multiple injuries followed by injuries to the lower limbs. A majority reported impaired visibility and fatigue as the cause of accident. Almost half (46.22%) of the injured admitted to drinking alcohol on a regular basis. Wide pavements and safe zebra crossings should be provided for pedestrians, as the highest casualty in this study were pedestrians. More accidents occurred on Sundays and Mondays and in the

  16. Profile of non-fatal injuries due to road traffic accidents from a industrial town in India

    PubMed Central

    Bayan, Pankaj; Bhawalkar, J. S.; Jadhav, S. L.; Banerjee, Amitav

    2013-01-01

    Background: India has one of the highest road traffic accident rates in the world. To lessen this burden, information on the contributing factors is necessary. Materials and Methods: We studied a series of cases of non-fatal road traffic accidents in two tertiary care hospitals in Pimpri, Pune, India. A total of 212 non-fatal road traffic accidents admitted over a period of one year in these two hospitals constituted the study sample. The study variables were, the gender of the accident victims, mode of accident, days of week on which the accident took place, time of day when the injury was sustained, part of the body injured, nature of injury, and self-reported reasons for the accident. Statistical Analysis: data were summarized using percentages. The Chi-square test for goodness of fit was applied, to see whether there was any association between the different weekdays or time of day and the accidents. Results: Male : female ratio was almost 5 : 1, which was statistically significant (Chi-Square for goodness of fit = 95.11, df = 1, P < 0.0001). The maximum accidents occurred on Sundays and Mondays and the least around midweek (Wednesday). This pattern was also statistically significant (Chi-square for goodness of fit = 30.09, df = 6, P < 0.001). Pedestrians were the most vulnerable group, followed by drivers and pillions of two wheelers. These categories of road users contributed to almost 80% of the cases of Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs). Accidents were more likely in the time zone of 8 pm to midnight, followed by 4 pm to 8 pm (Chi-square for goodness of fit = 89.58, df = 5, P < 0.0001). A majority of the patients sustained multiple injuries followed by injuries to the lower limbs. A majority reported impaired visibility and fatigue as the cause of accident. Almost half (46.22%) of the injured admitted to drinking alcohol on a regular basis. Conclusion: Wide pavements and safe zebra crossings should be provided for pedestrians, as the highest casualty in this

  17. Promoting road traffic injuries research in South Asia: capacity strengthening in health research.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Harun Ar

    2004-12-01

    Ideally, health policies should be based on valid scientific evidence and such evidence requires health research. Health research is also an essential tool for achieving equity in health and development. Although the need to carry out health research is now well accepted, South Asian countries still lag behind and do not make any meaningful contributions to health research and development. This paucity in research work is due to a lack of incentives, shortage of skilled manpower, poor exposure and insufficient orientation to the methods and materials of biomedical research. Research capacity is a tool to help a country deal with its national health problems in as effective and efficient a manner as possible. It is, therefore, part of the national health system and should be integrated in a comprehensive national health plan for the promotion of health and the delivery of health services to the country. Capacity strengthening is recognized as a crucial step in the process of integrating the use of research for decision-making in the health system of a country. This is especially true for conditions such as road traffic injuries, which present a new challenge for existing health systems.

  18. Promoting road traffic injuries research in South Asia: capacity strengthening in health research.

    PubMed

    Harun-Ar-Rashid

    2004-12-01

    Ideally, health policies should be based on valid scientific evidence and such evidence requires health research. Health research is also an essential tool for achieving equity in health and development. Although the need to carry out health research is noe well accepted, South Asia countries still lag behind and do not make any meaningful contribution to health research and development, This paucity in research work is due to a lack of incentives, shortage of skilled manpower, poor exposure and insufficient orientation to the methods and materials of biomedical research. Research capacity is a tool to help a country deal with it's national health problems in as effective and efficient a manner as possible. It is, therefore, part of the national health system ans should be integrated in a comprehensive national health plan for the promotion of health and the delivery of health services to the country. Capacity strengthening is recognized as a crucial step in the process of integrating the use od research doe decision-making in the health system of a country. This is especially true for conditions such as road traffic injuries, which present a new challenge for existing health systems.

  19. Expected years of life lost through road traffic injuries in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Zamora, Efrén; Mendoza-Cano, Oliver; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamín; Guzmán-Esquivel, José; Medina-González, Alfredo; Huerta, Miguel; Sánchez-Piña, Ramón Alberto; Lugo-Radillo, Agustin

    2017-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a leading cause of premature mortality, mainly in low- and middle-income countries Objective: To estimate the 2014 burden of RTIs in Mexico calculating years of life lost (YLL) and age-standardized YLL rates (ASYLL), and to evaluate sex, age, and region-related differences in premature mortality. Mortality data were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography and 14,637 deaths of individuals 15 years of age and older were analyzed. The YLL and ASYLL were computed. The overall burden of RTIs was 332,922 YLL and 82.4% of the deaths occurred in males. Males from 25 to 34 years of age and females from 15 to 24 years of age showed the highest age-adjusted YLL rates (933 and 158 YLL per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). The national ASYLL rate was 416 per 100,000 inhabitants and the highest state-stratified mortality rates were observed in Tabasco (851), Sinaloa (709), Durango (656), Zacatecas (642), and Baja California Sur (570). RTIs contributed to the premature mortality rate in the study population. Our findings may be useful from a health policy perspective for designing and prioritizing interventions focused on the prevention of premature loss of life.

  20. [Assessment of the structure, dynamics and monitoring of information systems for road traffic injuries in Peru--2009].

    PubMed

    Miranda, J Jaime; Paca-Palao, Ada; Najarro, Lizzete; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Luna, Diego; Lopez, Luis; Huicho, Luis

    2010-06-01

    A baseline assessment of the structure, dynamics, and monitoring capabilities of the information systems for road traffic injuries was conducted in three Peruvian cities: Lima, Huamanga and Pucallpa. 50 in-depth interviews were performed with key stakeholders, including managers and operators of information systems. The instrument was developed taking into account international standards and recommendations for information systems. Six information systems were identified, some of which contain integrated operational systems enabling the recollection, processing, aggregation and data analysis following automated processes. These systems are considered valuable by different stakeholders because of their ability to present data in an organized manner. A low level of collaboration and exchange of information between institutions in the diverse aspects of data collection, processing and usage was observed. Officially, formal collaboration agreements between institutions do exist, potentially enabling more collaborative work. An interest was expressed in establishing an integrated information system due to the need for detailed and solid/trusted information that maximizes the use of existing resources. Current information systems for road traffic injuries have limitations. The actual use and utility of the information for decision-making for prevention of road traffic injuries nationwide is limited.

  1. Road Traffic Accidents in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    AUBAKIROVA, Alma; KOSSUMOV, Alibek; IGISSINOV, Nurbek

    2013-01-01

    Background: The article provides the analysis of death rates in road traffic accidents in Kazakhstan from 2004 to 2010 and explores the use of sanitary aviation. Methods: Data of fatalities caused by road traffic accidents were collected and analysed. Descriptive and analytical methods of epidemiology and biomedical statistics were applied. Results: Totaly 27,003 people died as a result of road traffic accidents in this period. The death rate for the total population due to road traffic accidents was 25.0±2.10/0000. The death rate for men was (38.3±3.20/0000), which was higher (P<0.05) than that for women (12.6±1.10/0000). High death rates in the entire male population were identified among men of 30–39 years old, whereas the highest rates for women were attributed to the groups of 50–59 years old and 70–79 years old. In time dynamics, death rates tended to decrease: the total population (Tdec=−2.4%), men (Tdec=−2.3%) and women (Tdec=−1.4%). When researching territorial relevance, the rates were established as low (to 18.30/0000), average (between 18.3 and 24.00/0000) and high (from 24.00/0000 and above). Thus, the regions with high rates included Akmola region (24.30/0000), Mangistau region (25.90/0000), Zhambyl region (27.30/0000), Almaty region (29.30/0000) and South Kazakhstan region (32.40/0000). Conclusion: The identified epidemiological characteristics of the population deaths rates from road traffic accidents should be used in integrated and targeted interventions to enhance prevention of injuries in accidents. PMID:23641400

  2. Direct and indirect costs of nonfatal road traffic injuries in Iran: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hasti; Soleyman-Jahi, Saeed; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh; Sharifi, Vandad; Hajebi, Ahmad; Saadat, Soheil; Akbari Sari, Ali; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-05-19

    The objective of this study was to assess the incidence rate as well as direct and indirect costs of nonfatal road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Iran in 2011. Data from the 2011 national household survey were used. In this survey, data on demographics, history, and costs of injury were obtained in 2 steps: first, direct face-to-face interview and second, telephone calls. We estimated the incidence rate of nonfatal RTIs in this year. The direct costs included medical care as well as nonmedical costs paid by the patient or insurance services. The indirect costs were estimated by considering the cost of absence from work or education. We also used logistic regression analyses to investigate risk factors of nonfatal RTIs. We found 76 nonfatal RTI cases (0.96%) out of 7,886 whole reference study cases. These 76 injured patients had a history of RTI in the preceding 3 months. The annual incidence of RTIs was estimated at 3.84%. The mean age of RTI cases was 28.5 ± 10.6 and 88.16% of them were male. Male gender was a major risk factor (odds ratio [OR] = 9.64, 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.79-19.41) and marriage was a protective factor (OR = 0.44, 95% CI, 0.28-0.70) for RTI. The medians of direct, indirect, and total costs were US$214, US$163, and US$387, respectively. The total cost of nonfatal RTIs in Iran was estimated at 1.29% of the gross domestic product (GDP) in 2011. In Iran, nonfatal RTIs imposed a total cost of almost US$7 billion to the country for one year. Extension and more serious implementation of preventive measurements seem necessary to decrease this notable burden of RTIs.

  3. The psychological impact of traffic injuries sustained in a road crash by bicyclists: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Craig, A; Elbers, N A; Jagnoor, J; Gopinath, B; Kifley, A; Dinh, M; Pozzato, I; Ivers, R Q; Nicholas, M; Cameron, I D

    2017-04-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psychological impact of traffic injuries in bicyclists (cyclists) in comparison to car occupants who also sustained traffic injuries. Factors predictive of elevated psychological distress were also investigated. An inception cohort prospective design was used. Participants included cyclists aged ≥17 years (mean age 41.7 years) who sustained a physical injury (n = 238) assessed within 28 days of the crash, following medical examination by a registered health care practitioner. Injury included musculoskeletal and soft tissue injuries and minor/moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI), excluding severe TBI, spinal cord injury, and severe multiple fractures. Assessment also occurred 6 months postinjury. Telephone-administered interviews assessed a suite of measures including sociodemographic, preinjury health and injury factors. Psychological impact was measured by pain catastrophization, trauma-related distress, and general psychological distress. The psychological health of the cyclists was compared to that of the car occupants (n = 234; mean age 43.1 years). A mixed model repeated measures analysis, adjusted for confounding factors, was used to determine differences between groups and regression analyses were used to determine contributors to psychological health in the cyclists 6 months postinjury. Cyclists had significantly better psychological health (e.g., lower pain catastrophizing, lower rates of probable posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], and lower general distress levels) compared to car occupants at baseline and 6 months postinjury. Factors predictive of cyclists' psychological distress included younger age, greater perceived danger of death, poorer preinjury health, and greater amount of time in hospital after the injury. These data provide insight into how cyclists perceive and adjust to their traffic injuries compared to drivers and passengers who sustain traffic injuries, as well as direction for

  4. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Alinia, Shahrokh; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Maddah, Sadat Seyed Bagher; Negarandeh, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents. The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure, Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries.

  5. Road Traffic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckenbauer, Thomas

    Road traffic is the most interfering noise source in developed countries. According to a publication of the European Union (EU) at the end of the twentieth century [1], about 40% of the population in 15 EU member states is exposed to road traffic noise at mean levels exceeding 55 dB(A). Nearly 80 million people, 20% of the population, are exposed to levels exceeding 65 dB(A) during daytime and more than 30% of the population is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during night time. Such high noise levels cause health risks and social disorders (aggressiveness, protest, and helplessness), interference of communication and disturbance of sleep; the long- and short-term consequences cause adverse cardiovascular effects, detrimental hormonal responses (stress hormones), and possible disturbance of the human metabolism (nutrition) and the immune system. Even performance at work and school could be impaired.

  6. Differences in risk-adjusted outcome of road traffic injuries in urban tertiary care centers of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Amber; Razzak, Junaid Abdul; Mir, Mohammed Umer; Jooma, Rashid

    2015-09-01

    To assess the differences in road injury survival in three tertiary care hospitals in an urban setting. The study was conducted in and comprised all road traffic injury victims presenting to the three state-run tertiary care centres in Karachi from September 2006 to October 2009. Patients' age, gender, mode, and delay in arrival, severity of injury were noted. Data was stratified by hospital of presentation. A logistic regression model was developed and probability of survival was assessed after adjusting for various risk factors, including patient characteristics and injury severity. There were 93,657victims in the study, but complete information was missing in 6,458(6.89%) study subjects, including survival information. Overall, 83,837(89.5%) were males; 64,269(74%) were aged between 16 and 45 years; 84,016(95%) had injury severity score of ?15; and overall survival was 84,141(96.5%). Significant differences existed in risk-adjusted survival of road injury victims presenting to public hospitals of Karachi. These differences pointed to variations in the process of care, and highlighted opportunities for improvement.

  7. A retrospective study on the unseen epidemic of road traffic injuries and deaths due to accidents in Mwanza City - Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ngallaba, S E; Majinge, C; Gilyoma, J; Makerere, D J; Charles, E

    2013-06-01

    Sixty percent of the global deaths and injuries occur in the developing world and mostly are due to Road traffic accidents (RTAs. looking at the etiological related factors which include, carelessness of the driver, condition of the vehicle or motorcycle, poor condition of roads, risky behavior of the driver, most of these factors can be prevented to some extent. This study therefore, determined the pattern of cases and deaths due to traffic road accidents in Mwanza City Tanzania. In this retrospective study, records, registers and case notes In the surgical ward and causality, medical records and central police station from 2008 to 2011 were used. The study focused on the two referral hospitals (Sekouture regional hospital and Bugando Medical Center). There were 3450 cases due to accidents reported at both centers (Sekouture regional hospital and Bugando Medical Center of which 3224 (93.4%) had complete information for analysis.2225 (69%) were male and 999 (31%) were female, and the most affected group were male. Among the RTAs2809 cases (87%) were due to motor cycle accidents which were the leading cause of RTAs with case fatality rate of 5% while motor vehicle has case fatality rate of 24% which is 5 times that of motor cycle. Among all RTAs the leading cause of injuries is Motor cycle traffic accidents followed by motor vehicle. RTAs are on increase particularly the motor cycle traffic accidents and has claimed a good number of innocent people's lives however most of them are preventable, therefore driving course to be introduced to motor cycle drivers with emphasize on the road posters signal, rules and regular checkup of their motor cycles especially commercial motor cycle.

  8. Road traffic injuries in northern Laos: trends and risk factors of an underreported public health problem.

    PubMed

    Slesak, Günther; Inthalath, Saythong; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Barennes, Hubert

    2015-11-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTI) have become a leading cause for admissions at Luang Namtha Provincial Hospital (LNPH) in rapidly developing northern Laos. Objectives were to investigate trends, risk factors and better estimates of RTI. Repeated annual surveys were conducted with structured questionnaires among all RTI patients at LNPH from 2007 to 2011. Hospital and police data were combined by capture-recapture method. The majority of 1074 patients were young [median 22 years (1-88)], male (68%), motorcyclists (76%), drove without licence (85%) and without insurance (95%). Most accidents occurred during evenings and Lao New Year. Serious motorbike injuries were associated with young age (1-15 years), male sex (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.6) and drivers (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.3); more serious head injuries with alcohol consumption (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.7), male sex (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.7) and no helmet use (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4). No helmet use was associated with young age, time period, pillion passengers (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.6-4.7), alcohol (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-2.8) and no driver license (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.1-3.4). Main reasons not to wear helmets were not possessing one, and being pillion passenger. Capture-recapture analysis showed four times higher RTI estimates than officially reported. Mortality rate was 11.6/100.000 population (95% CI 5.1-18.1/100.000). RTI were substantially underestimated. Combining hospital with police data can provide better estimates in resource-limited settings. Preventive programmes and law enforcement have to target male drivers, alcohol, licensing and helmet use, especially among children and pillion passengers. Increased efforts are needed during evening time and special festivals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of interventions on road traffic injuries in Peru: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evaluation of interventions on road traffic injuries (RTI) going beyond the assessment of impact to include factors underlying success or failure is an important complement to standard impact evaluations. We report here how we used a qualitative approach to assess current interventions implemented to reduce RTIs in Peru. Methods We performed in-depth interviews with policymakers and technical officers involved in the implementation of RTI interventions to get their insight on design, implementation and evaluation aspects. We then conducted a workshop with key stakeholders to analyze the results of in-depth interviews, and to further discuss and identify key programmatic considerations when designing and implementing RTI interventions. We finally performed brainstorming sessions to assess potential system-wide effects of a selected intervention (Zero Tolerance), and to identify adaptation and redesign needs for this intervention. Results Key programmatic components were consistently identified that should be considered when designing and implementing RTI interventions. They include effective and sustained political commitment and planning; sufficient and sustained budget allocation; training, supervision, monitoring and evaluation of implemented policies; multisectoral participation; and strong governance and accountability. Brainstorming sessions revealed major negative effects of the selected intervention on various system building blocks. Conclusions Our approach revealed substantial caveats in current RTI interventions in Peru, and fundamental negative effects on several components of the sectors and systems involved. It also highlighted programmatic issues that should be applied to guarantee an effective implementation and evaluation of these policies. The findings from this study were discussed with key stakeholders for consideration in further designing and planning RTI control interventions in Peru. PMID:22269578

  10. Evaluation of interventions on road traffic injuries in Peru: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    Huicho, Luis; Adam, Taghreed; Rosales, Edmundo; Paca-Palao, Ada; López, Luis; Luna, Diego; Miranda, J Jaime

    2012-01-23

    Evaluation of interventions on road traffic injuries (RTI) going beyond the assessment of impact to include factors underlying success or failure is an important complement to standard impact evaluations. We report here how we used a qualitative approach to assess current interventions implemented to reduce RTIs in Peru. We performed in-depth interviews with policymakers and technical officers involved in the implementation of RTI interventions to get their insight on design, implementation and evaluation aspects. We then conducted a workshop with key stakeholders to analyze the results of in-depth interviews, and to further discuss and identify key programmatic considerations when designing and implementing RTI interventions. We finally performed brainstorming sessions to assess potential system-wide effects of a selected intervention (Zero Tolerance), and to identify adaptation and redesign needs for this intervention. Key programmatic components were consistently identified that should be considered when designing and implementing RTI interventions. They include effective and sustained political commitment and planning; sufficient and sustained budget allocation; training, supervision, monitoring and evaluation of implemented policies; multisectoral participation; and strong governance and accountability. Brainstorming sessions revealed major negative effects of the selected intervention on various system building blocks. Our approach revealed substantial caveats in current RTI interventions in Peru, and fundamental negative effects on several components of the sectors and systems involved. It also highlighted programmatic issues that should be applied to guarantee an effective implementation and evaluation of these policies. The findings from this study were discussed with key stakeholders for consideration in further designing and planning RTI control interventions in Peru.

  11. Socioeconomic impact of road traffic injuries in West Africa: exploratory data from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Juillard, Catherine; Labinjo, Mariam; Kobusingye, Olive; Hyder, Adnan A

    2010-12-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are increasingly contributing to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa, yet little is known about the economic consequences and disability associated with them. To explore cost and disability consequences of RTIs in Nigeria. A population-based survey using two-stage stratified cluster sampling. SUBJECT/SETTING: Information on care-seeking choice, cost of treatment, ability to work, reduction in earnings, and disability were collected on 127 subjects who had suffered an RTI, of 3082 study subjects in seven Nigerian states. Univariate analysis was used to estimate frequency of disability, types of care sought, and trends for work lost, functional ability and cost of treatment. Unadjusted bivariate analysis was performed to explore care-seeking, cost of care, and work lost among disabled and non-disabled people. RTIs resulted in disability for 29.1% of subjects, while 13.5% were unable to return to work. Of the disabled people, 67.6% were unable to perform activities of daily living, 16.7% consequently lost their jobs, and 88.6% had a reduction in earnings. Private physician and hospital treatment were the most common forms of initial treatment sought, but traditional treatment was the most common second form of care sought. Average direct costs of informal and formal treatment were US$6.65 and US$35.64, respectively. Disabled people were more likely to seek formal care (p=0.003) and be unable to work (p=0.002). Economic and functional ramifications must be included in the spectrum of consequences of RTIs to fully appreciate the extent of the burden of disease, implying that health systems should not only address the clinical consequences of RTIs, but the financial ones as well.

  12. Traumatic aortic incompetence following road traffic accident

    PubMed Central

    Irving, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    This case report describes the presentation and treatment of a case of aortic incompetence, resulting from a road traffic accident. The relevant literature is briefly reviewed. Aortic incompetence due to trauma has been described following non-penetrating chest injuries, such as kicks from horses (Barie, 1881), falls from heights and crushing accidents (Kissane, Koons and Clark, 1948; Levine, Roberts and Morrow, 1962). Despite the frequency of road traffic accidents, there have been no recent reports of traumatic aortic valve damage. PMID:4467876

  13. Pattern, severity and circumtances of injuries sustained in road traffic accidents: a tertiary care hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjana; Singh, Hemant Kumar; Gupta, S C; Kumar, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Expansion in road network, motorization, and urbanization in the country has been accompanied by a rise in road accidents leading to road traffic injuries (RTIs). Today RTIs are one of the leading causes of deaths, disabilities, and hospitalizations with severe socioeconomic costs across the world. The following study analyses the: Age and sex distribution of injured in road traffic accidents (RTAs).Circumstances leading to RTA.Pattern and severity of injuries sustained in RTAs cases. Retrospective record-based study. The aim of this study was to audit retrospectively the circumstances, severity, and pattern of injury sustained by vehicle occupants presenting to the Saraswathi Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS) hospital Hapur, for a period of one year. Data were collected using the case sheets of 347 patients from the medical records section of hospital and analyzed using SPSS computer software version 16.0. Results are interpreted in terms of percentage, mean, chi-square, and z-test. The pattern and severity of injuries sustained by 347 vehicle occupants admitted to the emergency department of SIMS, Hapur were retrospectively documented. Male victims 258 (74.35%) were more commonly involved than females 89 (25.65%) and majority of victims 141 (40.63%) were in age group of 20-30 years. Urban victims 222 (64.00%) outnumbered rural. The most frequently injured body regions were the extremities 499 (53.54%), followed by maxillofacial180(19.31%).. Out of total 802 external injuries, the most common type of injury was lacerations 307 (38.28%), abrasions 306 (38.15%)and followed by bruises 154 (19.20%). Multiple external injuries were more common on upper limb 216 (26.93%), lower limbs 210 (26.18%) and face 170 (21.20%), while crush injuries were more predominently seen in both the limbs. While laceration were common on face 120 (38.83%). Injuries to the chest 19 (2.36%), abdomen13 (1.61%), and spine 11 (1.36%) were seen in roughy equal proprotion of victims. The bones

  14. Alcohol and Road Traffic Injuries in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Case-Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Borges, Guilherme; Monteiro, Maristela; Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Orozco, Ricardo; Ye, Yu; Poznyak, Vladimir; Peden, Margie; Pechansky, Flavio; Cremonte, Mariana; Reid, Sandra D; Mendez, Jesus

    2017-10-01

    This study reports dose-response estimates for the odds ratio (OR) and population attributable risk of acute alcohol use and road traffic injury (RTI). Data were analyzed on 1,119 RTI patients arriving at 16 emergency departments (EDs) in Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Guyana, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and Trinidad and Tobago. Case-crossover analysis, pair-matching the number of standard drinks consumed within the 6 hours prior to the RTI with 2 control periods (prior d/wk), was performed using fractional polynomial analysis for dose-response. About 1 in 6 RTI patients in EDs were positive for self-reported alcohol 6 hours prior to the injury (country range 8.6 to 24.1%). The likelihood of an RTI with any drinking prior (compared to not drinking) was 5 times higher (country range OR 2.50 to 15.00) and the more a person drinks the higher the risk. Every drink (12.8 g alcohol) increased the risk of an RTI by 13%, even 1 to 2 drinks were associated with a sizable increase in risk of an RTI and a dose-response was found. Differences in ORs for drivers (OR = 3.51; 95% CI = 2.25 to 5.45), passengers (OR = 8.12; 95% CI = 4.22 to 15.61), and pedestrians (OR = 6.30; 95% CI = 3.14 to 12.64) and attributable fractions were noted. Acute use of alcohol was attributable to 14% of all RTIs, varying from 7% for females to 19% for being injured as a passenger. The finding that the presence of alcohol increases risk among drivers and nondrivers alike may further help to urge interventions targeting passengers and pedestrians. Routine screening and brief interventions in all health services could also have a beneficial impact in decreasing rates of RTIs. Higher priority should be given to alcohol as a risk factor for RTIs, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  15. Prehospital trauma care systems: potential role toward reducing morbidities and mortalities from road traffic injuries in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeloye, Davies

    2012-12-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) and attendant fatalities on Nigerian roads have been on an increasing trend over the past three decades. Mortality from RTIs in Nigeria is estimated to be 162 deaths/100,000 population. This study aims to compare and identify best prehospital trauma care practices in Nigeria and some other African countries where prehospital services operate. A review of secondary data, grey literature, and pertinent published articles using a conceptual framework to assess: (1) policies; (2) structures; (3) first responders; (4) communication facilities; (5) transport and ambulance facilities, and (6) roadside emergency trauma units. There is no national prehospital trauma care system (PTCS) in Nigeria. The lack of a national emergency health policy is a factor in this absence. The Nigerian Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) mainly has been responsible for prehospital services. South Africa, Zambia, Kenya, and Ghana have improved prehospital services in Africa. Commercial drivers, laypersons, military, police, a centrally controlled communication network, and government ambulance services are feasible delivery models that can be incorporated into the Nigerian prehospital system. Prehospital trauma services have been useful in reducing morbidities and mortalities from traffic injuries, and appropriate implementation of this study's recommendations may reduce this burden in Nigeria.

  16. Road Traffic Related Injury Severity in Truck Drivers: A Prospective Medical and Technical Analysis of 582 Truck Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sebastian; Otte, Dietmar; Muller, Christian Walter; Omar, Mohamed; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl; Brand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background While cyclists and pedestrians are known to be at significant risk for severe injuries when exposed to road traffic accidents (RTA) involving trucks, little is known about RTA injury risk for truck drivers. Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze the injury severity in truck drivers following RTAs. Patients and Methods Our local accident research unit prospectively documented 43000 RTAs involving 582 trucks between 2000 and 2011. Injury severity, including the abbreviated injury scale (AIS) and the maximum abbreviated injury scale (MAIS) were analyzed. Technical parameters (e.g. delta-v, direction of impact), the location of accident, and its dependency on the road type were also taken into consideration. Results Thirteen percent (77/582) of truck drivers were injured. Extremities were found to be at highest risk of injury with the lower extremities (36x) being injured most severely (10x: AIS 2 and 3). Death occurred only after collisions with other trucks, and severity of injuries increased with an increased speed limit. The maximum abbreviated injury scale was higher in the crash opponents (56x MAIS ≥ 3) compared to the truck drivers (8x MAIS ≥ 3). Overall, 82% of the crash opponents were injured. Conclusions The safety of truck drivers is assured by their vehicles, the consequence being that the risk of becoming injured is likely to be low. However, the legs especially are at high risk for severe injuries during RTAs. This probability increases in the instance of a collision with another truck. Nevertheless, in RTAs involving trucks and regular passenger vehicles, the other party is in higher risk of injury. PMID:27679790

  17. Impact of the 2011 Libyan conflict on road traffic injuries in Benghazi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Bodalal, Zuhir; Bendardaf, Riyad; Ambarek, Mohammed; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health concern in Libya. In the light of the armed conflict in Libya that broke out on February 2011 and the subsequent instability, the rate and pattern of RTIs was studied. RTI patient data were gathered from Al-Jalaa hospital, the main trauma center in Benghazi, from 2010 to 2011. Various parameters [i.e. age, gender, nationality, method of entry, receiving department, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, duration of stay, method of discharge, and fatalities] were compared with data from the previous year (2010), and statistical analyses were performed (t-test, chi-square, and Poisson regression). During the conflict period, 15.8% (n=2,221) of hospital admissions were RTIs, that is, a rate of 6.08 RTI cases per day, levels not seen for 5 years (t=-5.719, p<0.001). The presence of armed conflict was found to have caused a significant 28% decrease in the trend of RTIs over the previous 10 years (B=-0.327, CI=-0.38--0.28, p<0.001). February and March, the peak period of active combat in Benghazi, witnessed the lowest number of RTIs during the conflict period. The average age of an RTI decreased to 28.35±16.3 years (t=-7.257, p<0.001) with significantly more males (84.1%, n=1,755) being affected (χ(2)=4.595, p=0.032, df=1). There was an increase in the proportion of younger aged patients (from 0 to 29 years) (χ(2)=29.874, p<0.001, df=8). More patients required admission to the ICU (χ(2)=36.808, p<0.001, df=8), and the mortality of an RTI increased to 5.2% (n=116) (χ(2)=48.882, p<0.001, df=6). There were fewer RTIs during the conflict period; however, those that occurred had higher morbidity and mortality. The profile of an RTI victims also changed to an increased prominence of young males and motorcyclists. Further research is required to propose and analyze possible interventions.

  18. Impact of the 2011 Libyan conflict on road traffic injuries in Benghazi, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Bodalal, Zuhir; Bendardaf, Riyad; Ambarek, Mohammed; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health concern in Libya. In the light of the armed conflict in Libya that broke out on February 2011 and the subsequent instability, the rate and pattern of RTIs was studied. Methods RTI patient data were gathered from Al-Jalaa hospital, the main trauma center in Benghazi, from 2010 to 2011. Various parameters [i.e. age, gender, nationality, method of entry, receiving department, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, duration of stay, method of discharge, and fatalities] were compared with data from the previous year (2010), and statistical analyses were performed (t-test, chi-square, and Poisson regression). Results During the conflict period, 15.8% (n=2,221) of hospital admissions were RTIs, that is, a rate of 6.08 RTI cases per day, levels not seen for 5 years (t=−5.719, p<0.001). The presence of armed conflict was found to have caused a significant 28% decrease in the trend of RTIs over the previous 10 years (B=−0.327, CI=−0.38–−0.28, p<0.001). February and March, the peak period of active combat in Benghazi, witnessed the lowest number of RTIs during the conflict period. The average age of an RTI decreased to 28.35±16.3 years (t=−7.257, p<0.001) with significantly more males (84.1%, n=1,755) being affected (χ2=4.595, p=0.032, df=1). There was an increase in the proportion of younger aged patients (from 0 to 29 years) (χ2=29.874, p<0.001, df=8). More patients required admission to the ICU (χ2=36.808, p<0.001, df=8), and the mortality of an RTI increased to 5.2% (n=116) (χ2=48.882, p<0.001, df=6). Conclusion There were fewer RTIs during the conflict period; however, those that occurred had higher morbidity and mortality. The profile of an RTI victims also changed to an increased prominence of young males and motorcyclists. Further research is required to propose and analyze possible interventions. PMID:25673038

  19. Epidemiology of Road Traffic Injuries Treated in a Large Romanian Emergency Department in Tîrgu-Mureş Between 2009 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    MA, DIANA RUS; PEEK-ASA, CORINNE; BARAGAN, ERIKA ANDRADA; CHERECHES, RAZVAN MIRCEA; MOCEAN, FLOAREA

    2017-01-01

    Objective Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of preventable unintentional injury. The European Injury Database estimated that in European Union (EU)-27 countries, road traffic injuries account for 10% of all injuries treated in the emergency department or admitted to the hospital, accounting for 4.2 million victims each year. We examined the characteristics and outcomes of road traffic injuries treated in a large emergency department in Romania by different types of road users. Methods Secondary data analysis was conducted on a sample of patients who suffered a transport-related injury and received care at the Emergency Department of Mures County Emergency Hospital in Romania. Data was collected by 2 trained emergency physicians between March 2009 and July 2010, as part of the European Injury Database project. Information about demographics, mechanism, nature, place of occurrence, and activity of injury; treatment and follow-up; and mode of transport were described for 5 different categories of road users: animal-drawn vehicle (operator and passenger), passenger car (driver and passenger), motorcycle (driver and passenger), bicyclist, and pedestrian. Results A total of 2,782 patients were treated in the emergency department, of which 718 (25.8%) were road traffic injuries. The male-to-female ratio was 2:1. The highest percentage of patients were injured in passenger cars (49%), followed by motorcycles (16.7%). For both types of road users, the majority of patients were between the ages of 18 and 29. Pedestrian injuries accounted for 14.6%, of which a third were children up to the age of 17 and 40% were adults and elderly over the age of 50. The majority of patients were injured due to contact with a moving object (48.1%), followed by contact with static object (23.5%), then falling, stumbling, jumping, or being pushed (19.6%). Contusion and bruises (54.9%) were the most common diagnosis, followed by fractures (20.1%) and open wounds (10.2%) for all

  20. Epidemiology of Road Traffic Injuries Treated in a Large Romanian Emergency Department in Tîrgu-Mureş Between 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Rus Ma, Diana; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Baragan, Erika Andrada; Chereches, Razvan Mircea; Mocean, Floarea

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of preventable unintentional injury. The European Injury Database estimated that in European Union (EU)-27 countries, road traffic injuries account for 10% of all injuries treated in the emergency department or admitted to the hospital, accounting for 4.2 million victims each year. We examined the characteristics and outcomes of road traffic injuries treated in a large emergency department in Romania by different types of road users. Secondary data analysis was conducted on a sample of patients who suffered a transport-related injury and received care at the Emergency Department of Mures County Emergency Hospital in Romania. Data was collected by 2 trained emergency physicians between March 2009 and July 2010, as part of the European Injury Database project. Information about demographics, mechanism, nature, place of occurrence, and activity of injury; treatment and follow-up; and mode of transport were described for 5 different categories of road users: animal-drawn vehicle (operator and passenger), passenger car (driver and passenger), motorcycle (driver and passenger), bicyclist, and pedestrian. A total of 2,782 patients were treated in the emergency department, of which 718 (25.8%) were road traffic injuries. The male-to-female ratio was 2:1. The highest percentage of patients were injured in passenger cars (49%), followed by motorcycles (16.7%). For both types of road users, the majority of patients were between the ages of 18 and 29. Pedestrian injuries accounted for 14.6%, of which a third were children up to the age of 17 and 40% were adults and elderly over the age of 50. The majority of patients were injured due to contact with a moving object (48.1%), followed by contact with static object (23.5%), then falling, stumbling, jumping, or being pushed (19.6%). Contusion and bruises (54.9%) were the most common diagnosis, followed by fractures (20.1%) and open wounds (10.2%) for all road user categories. The

  1. Prescription medicine use by pedestrians and the risk of injurious road traffic crashes: A case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Marta; Contrand, Benjamin; Fourrier-Réglat, Annie; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Orriols, Ludivine

    2017-01-01

    Background While some medicinal drugs have been found to affect driving ability, no study has investigated whether a relationship exists between these medicines and crashes involving pedestrians. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the use of medicinal drugs and the risk of being involved in a road traffic crash as a pedestrian. Methods and findings Data from 3 French nationwide databases were matched. We used the case-crossover design to control for time-invariant factors by using each case as its own control. To perform multivariable analysis and limit false-positive results, we implemented a bootstrap version of Lasso. To avoid the effect of unmeasured time-varying factors, we varied the length of the washout period from 30 to 119 days before the crash. The matching procedure led to the inclusion of 16,458 pedestrians involved in an injurious road traffic crash from 1 July 2005 to 31 December 2011. We found 48 medicine classes with a positive association with the risk of crash, with median odds ratios ranging from 1.12 to 2.98. Among these, benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs, antihistamines, and anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic drugs were among the 10 medicines most consumed by the 16,458 pedestrians. Study limitations included slight overrepresentation of pedestrians injured in more severe crashes, lack of information about self-medication and the use of over-the-counter drugs, and lack of data on amount of walking. Conclusions Therapeutic classes already identified as impacting the ability to drive, such as benzodiazepines and antihistamines, are also associated with an increased risk of pedestrians being involved in a road traffic crash. This study on pedestrians highlights the necessity of improving awareness of the effect of these medicines on this category of road user. PMID:28719606

  2. Comparison of Road Traffic Injury Characteristics between Local versus Floating Migrant Patients in a Tertiary Hospital between 2007 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chungui; Wang, Yanhua; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Zhang, Dianying; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to give a description of the road traffic injuries (RTIs) characteristics of floating migrant population by comparing with those of local residents in a harbor city of China. Methods A population-based descriptive study was carried out between 2007 and 2010 with RTI patient records from the Fifth Center Hospital of Tianjin. Inpatient diagnoses of RTI patients were defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes. We analyzed the demographics and general characteristics of RTI patients that were in the hospital during the four years. In order to compare the group differences between local resident patients and floating migrant patients, the distribution of their ages, diagnoses, severity of injuries, duration of inpatient stays, hospitalization cost were analyzed. Results People between the ages of 16 and 55 were the most likely to suffer RTIs. The floating migrant patients between the ages of 16 and 45 had a higher incidence of accidents, while local resident patients between 46 and 55 had a higher incidence of accidents. Compared to local resident patients, floating migrant patients were more vulnerable to open injuries and severe traffic injuries. With the severity of injuries ranked from mild to severe, floating migrant patients had lower duration of inpatient stay, but higher hospitalization costs compared to local resident patients. Conclusions Floating migrant patients had a different age distribution, severity of injuries, diseases, inpatient duration and hospitalization cost compared with local resident patients. Compared to local resident patients, floating migrants had a higher risk to RTIs and were more vulnerable to severer traffic accidents at lower ages. PMID:24475023

  3. Comparison of road traffic injury characteristics between local versus floating migrant patients in a tertiary hospital between 2007 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chungui; Wang, Yanhua; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Zhang, Dianying; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give a description of the road traffic injuries (RTIs) characteristics of floating migrant population by comparing with those of local residents in a harbor city of China. A population-based descriptive study was carried out between 2007 and 2010 with RTI patient records from the Fifth Center Hospital of Tianjin. Inpatient diagnoses of RTI patients were defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes. We analyzed the demographics and general characteristics of RTI patients that were in the hospital during the four years. In order to compare the group differences between local resident patients and floating migrant patients, the distribution of their ages, diagnoses, severity of injuries, duration of inpatient stays, hospitalization cost were analyzed. People between the ages of 16 and 55 were the most likely to suffer RTIs. The floating migrant patients between the ages of 16 and 45 had a higher incidence of accidents, while local resident patients between 46 and 55 had a higher incidence of accidents. Compared to local resident patients, floating migrant patients were more vulnerable to open injuries and severe traffic injuries. With the severity of injuries ranked from mild to severe, floating migrant patients had lower duration of inpatient stay, but higher hospitalization costs compared to local resident patients. Floating migrant patients had a different age distribution, severity of injuries, diseases, inpatient duration and hospitalization cost compared with local resident patients. Compared to local resident patients, floating migrants had a higher risk to RTIs and were more vulnerable to severer traffic accidents at lower ages.

  4. Year-round daylight saving and serious or fatal road traffic injuries in children in the north-east of England.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jean; White, Martin; Heywood, Peter

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested that year-round daylight saving would reduce road traffic injuries. and results Using 15 years of police data from north-east England, we estimate that 6.9 (95 per cent CI 1.5-12.6) fewer serious or fatal road traffic injuries to child pedestrians would have occurred in this area over this period had year-round daylight saving operated (equivalent to 0.5 per year). The results suggest that operating daylight saving year-round would have a small but tangible effect on the number of serious and fatal road traffic injuries in children in this area. Further work is required to assess the community wide impact of year round daylight saving.

  5. Comparison of influencing factors on outcomes of single and multiple road traffic injuries: A regional study in Shanghai, China (2011-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiangyu; Kang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To identify key intervention factors and reduce road traffic injury (RTI)-associated mortality, this study compared outcomes and influencing factors of single and multiple road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Shanghai. Methods Based on the design of National Trauma Data Bank, this study collected demographic, injury, and outcome data from RTI patients treated at the four largest trauma centers in Shanghai from January 2011 to January 2015. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, univariate analysis, and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Results Among 2397 participants, 59.4% had a single injury, and 40.6% had multiple injuries. Most patients’ outcome was cure or improvement. For single-RTI patients, length of stay, body region, central nervous system injury, acute renal failure, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, bacterial infection, and coma were significantly related to outcome. For multiple-RTI patients, age, admission pathway, prehospital time, length of stay, number of body regions, body region, injury condition, injury severity score, and coma were significantly related to outcome. Conclusions Emergency rescue in road traffic accidents should focus on high-risk groups (the elderly), high-incidence body regions (head, thorax, pelvis) and number of injuries, injury condition (central nervous system injury, coma, complications, admission pathway), injury severity (critically injured patients), and time factors (particularly prehospital time). PMID:28493893

  6. Comparison of influencing factors on outcomes of single and multiple road traffic injuries: A regional study in Shanghai, China (2011-2014).

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenya; Chen, Haiping; Lv, Yipeng; Deng, Qiangyu; Kang, Peng; Zhang, Lulu

    2017-01-01

    To identify key intervention factors and reduce road traffic injury (RTI)-associated mortality, this study compared outcomes and influencing factors of single and multiple road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Shanghai. Based on the design of National Trauma Data Bank, this study collected demographic, injury, and outcome data from RTI patients treated at the four largest trauma centers in Shanghai from January 2011 to January 2015. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, univariate analysis, and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Among 2397 participants, 59.4% had a single injury, and 40.6% had multiple injuries. Most patients' outcome was cure or improvement. For single-RTI patients, length of stay, body region, central nervous system injury, acute renal failure, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, bacterial infection, and coma were significantly related to outcome. For multiple-RTI patients, age, admission pathway, prehospital time, length of stay, number of body regions, body region, injury condition, injury severity score, and coma were significantly related to outcome. Emergency rescue in road traffic accidents should focus on high-risk groups (the elderly), high-incidence body regions (head, thorax, pelvis) and number of injuries, injury condition (central nervous system injury, coma, complications, admission pathway), injury severity (critically injured patients), and time factors (particularly prehospital time).

  7. Geographic variability of fatal road traffic injuries in Spain during the period 2002–2004: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Jimenez-Puente, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to describe the inter-province variability of Road Traffic Injury (RTI) mortality on Spanish roads, adjusted for vehicle-kilometres travelled, and to assess the possible role played by the following explicative variables: sociodemographic, structural, climatic and risk conducts. Methods An ecological study design was employed. The mean annual rate of RTI deaths was calculated for the period 2002–2004, adjusted for vehicle-kilometres travelled, in the 50 provinces of Spain. The RTI death rate was related with the independent variables described above, using simple and multiple linear regression analysis with backward step-wise elimination. The level of statistical significance was taken as p < 0.05. Results In the period 2002–2004 there were 12,756 RTI deaths in Spain (an average of 4,242 per year, SD = 356.6). The mean number of deaths due to RTI per 100 million vehicle-kilometres (mvk) travelled was 1.76 (SD = 0.51), with a minimum value of 0.66 (in Santa Cruz de Tenerife) and a maximum of 3.31 (in the province of Lugo). All other variables being equal, a higher proportion of kilometres available on high capacity roads, and a higher cultural and education level were associated with lower death rates due to RTI, while the opposite was true for the rate of alcohol consumers and the road traffic volume of heavy vehicles. The variables included in the model accounted for 55.4% of the variability in RTI mortality. Conclusion Adjusting RTI mortality rates for the number of vehicle-kilometres travelled enables us to identify the high variability of this cause of death, and its relation with risk factors other than those inherent to human behaviour, such as the type of roads and the type of vehicles using them. PMID:17897449

  8. Evaluating the Impact of Criminalizing Drunk Driving on Road-Traffic Injuries in Guangzhou, China: A Time-Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ang; Chen, Renjie; Qi, Yongqing; Chen, Ailan; Chen, Xinyu; Liang, Zijing; Ye, Jianjun; Liang, Qing; Guo, Duanqiang; Li, Wanglin; Li, Shuangming; Kan, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Background Road-traffic injury (RTI) is a major public-health concern worldwide. However, the effectiveness of laws criminalizing drunk driving on the improvement of road safety in China is not known. Methods We collected daily aggregate data on RTIs from the Guangzhou First-Aid Service Command Center from 2009 to 2012. We performed an interrupted time-series analysis to evaluate the change in daily RTIs before (January 1, 2009, to April 30, 2011) and after (May 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012) the criminalization of drunk driving. We evaluated the impact of the intervention on RTIs using the overdispersed generalized additive model after adjusting for temporal trends, seasonality, day of the week, and holidays. Daytime/Nighttime RTIs, alcoholism, and non-traffic injuries were analyzed as comparison groups using the same model. Results From January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012, we identified a total of 54 887 RTIs. The standardized daily number of RTIs was almost stable in the pre-intervention period but decreased gradually in the post-intervention period. After the intervention, the standardized daily RTIs decreased 9.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.5%–12.8%). There were similar decreases for the daily daytime and nighttime RTIs. In contrast, the standardized daily cases of alcoholism increased 38.8% (95% CI, 35.1%–42.4%), and daily non-traffic injuries increased 3.6% (95% CI, 1.4%–5.8%). Conclusions This time-series study provides scientific evidence suggesting that the criminalization of drunk driving from May 1, 2011, may have led to moderate reductions in RTIs in Guangzhou, China. PMID:26947952

  9. Evaluating the Impact of Criminalizing Drunk Driving on Road-Traffic Injuries in Guangzhou, China: A Time-Series Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ang; Chen, Renjie; Qi, Yongqing; Chen, Ailan; Chen, Xinyu; Liang, Zijing; Ye, Jianjun; Liang, Qing; Guo, Duanqiang; Li, Wanglin; Li, Shuangming; Kan, Haidong

    2016-08-05

    Road-traffic injury (RTI) is a major public-health concern worldwide. However, the effectiveness of laws criminalizing drunk driving on the improvement of road safety in China is not known. We collected daily aggregate data on RTIs from the Guangzhou First-Aid Service Command Center from 2009 to 2012. We performed an interrupted time-series analysis to evaluate the change in daily RTIs before (January 1, 2009, to April 30, 2011) and after (May 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012) the criminalization of drunk driving. We evaluated the impact of the intervention on RTIs using the overdispersed generalized additive model after adjusting for temporal trends, seasonality, day of the week, and holidays. Daytime/Nighttime RTIs, alcoholism, and non-traffic injuries were analyzed as comparison groups using the same model. From January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012, we identified a total of 54 887 RTIs. The standardized daily number of RTIs was almost stable in the pre-intervention period but decreased gradually in the post-intervention period. After the intervention, the standardized daily RTIs decreased 9.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.5%-12.8%). There were similar decreases for the daily daytime and nighttime RTIs. In contrast, the standardized daily cases of alcoholism increased 38.8% (95% CI, 35.1%-42.4%), and daily non-traffic injuries increased 3.6% (95% CI, 1.4%-5.8%). This time-series study provides scientific evidence suggesting that the criminalization of drunk driving from May 1, 2011, may have led to moderate reductions in RTIs in Guangzhou, China.

  10. Road traffic crashes with fatal and non-fatal injuries in Arkhangelsk, Russia in 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander V; Nilssen, Odd; Lund, Johan; Grjibovski, Andrej M; Ytterstad, Børge

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated trends in traffic crashes with fatal and non-fatal injuries in Arkhangelsk, Russia in 2005-2010. Data were obtained from the road police. Negative binomial regression with time regressor was used to investigate trends in monthly incidence rates (IRs) of crashes, fatalities, and non-fatal injuries. During the six-year period, the police registered 4955 crashes with fatal and non-fatal injuries, which resulted in 217 fatalities and 5964 non-fatal injury cases. The IR of crashes with fatal and non-fatal injuries per total population showed no evident change, while the IR per increasing total number of motor vehicles decreased on average by 0.6% per month. Pedestrian crashes constituted 51.8% of studied crashes, and pedestrians constituted 54.6% of fatalities and 44.5% of non-fatal injuries. The IRs of pedestrian crashes and non-fatal pedestrian injuries per total population decreased on average by 0.3% per month, and these were the major trends in the data.

  11. Road Traffic Injury Trends in the City of Valledupar, Colombia. A Time Series Study from 2008 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jorge Martín; Peñaloza, Rolando Enrique; Moreno Montoya, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the behavior temporal of road-traffic injuries (RTI) in Valledupar, Colombia from January 2008 to December 2012. Methodology An observational study was conducted based on records from the Colombian National Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences Institute regional office in Valledupar. Different variables were analyzed, such as the injured person’s sex, age, education level, and type of road user; the timeframe, place and circumstances of crashes and the vehicles associated with the occurrence. Furthermore, a time series analysis was conducted using an auto-regressive integrated moving average. Results There were 105 events per month on an average, 64.9% of RTI involved men; 82.3% of the persons injured were from 18 to 59 years of age; the average age was 35.4 years of age; the road users most involved in RTI were motorcyclists (69%), followed by pedestrians (12%). 70% had up to upper-secondary education. Sunday was the day with the most RTI occurrences; 93% of the RTI occurred in the urban area. The time series showed a seasonal pattern and a significant trend effect. The modeling process verified the existence of both memory and extrinsic variables related. Conclusions An RTI occurrence pattern was identified, which showed an upward trend during the period analyzed. Motorcyclists were the main road users involved in RTI, which suggests the need to design and implement specific measures for that type of road user, from regulations for graduated licensing for young drivers to monitoring road user behavior for the promotion of road safety. PMID:26657887

  12. Assessing quality of existing data sources on road traffic injuries (RTIs) and their utility in informing injury prevention in the Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chokotho, L C; Matzopoulos, R; Myers, J E

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed whether the quality of the available road traffic injury (RTI) data was sufficient for determining the burden of RTIs in the Western Cape Province and for implementing and monitoring road safety interventions. Underreporting was assessed by comparing data reported by the South African Police Services (SAPS) in 2008 with data from 18 provincial mortuaries. Completeness of the driver death subset of all RTIs was assessed using the capture-recapture method. The mortuary and police data sets comprised 1696 and 860 fatalities respectively for the year 2008. The corresponding provincial road traffic mortality rates were as follows: 32.2 deaths/100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30.7-33.8) and 16.3 deaths/100,000 population per year (95% CI: 15.3-17.5). The police data set contained 820,960 crashes, involving 196,889 persons, indicating substantial duplication of crash events. There were varying proportions of missing data for demographic and other identifying variables, with age missing in nearly half of the cases in the police data set. The estimated total number of driver deaths/year was 588.6 (95% CI: 544.4-632.8), yielding estimated completeness of the mortuary and police data sets of 57.6 and 46.4 percent separately and 77.3 percent combined. This study found extensive data quality problems, including missing data, duplication, and significant underreporting of traffic injury deaths in the police data. Not all assumptions underlying the use of capture-recapture method were met in this study; hence, the estimates provided by this analysis should be interpreted with caution. There is a need to address the problems highlighted by this study in order to improve data utility for informing road safety policies. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Traffic Injury Prevention to view the supplemental file.

  13. Factors affecting hospital length of stay and hospital charges associated with road traffic-related injuries in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a substantial cause of mortality and disability globally. There is little published information regarding healthcare resource utilization following RTIs, especially in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). The aim of this study was to assess total hospital charges and length of stay (LOS) associated with RTIs in Iran and to explore the association with patients’ socio-demographic characteristics, insurance status and injury-related factors (e.g. type of road users and safety equipment). Method The study was based on the Iranian National Trauma Registry Database (INTRD), which includes data from 14 general hospitals in eight major cities in Iran, for the years 2000 to 2004. 8,356 patients with RTI admitted to the hospitals were included in the current study. The variables extracted for the analysis included total hospital charges and length of stay, age, gender, socio-economic and insurance status, injury characteristics, medical outcome and use of safety equipment among the patients. Univariable analysis using non-parametric methods and multivariable regression analysis were performed to identify the factors associated with total hospital charges and LOS. Results The mean hospital charges for the patients were 1,115,819 IRR (SD=1,831,647 IRR, US$128 ± US$210). The mean LOS for the patients was 6.8 (SD =8 days). Older age, being a bicycle rider, higher injury severity and longer LOS were associated with higher hospital charges. Longer LOS was associated with being male, having lower education level, having a medical insurance, being pedestrian or motorcyclist, being a blue-collar worker and having more severe injuries. The reported use of safety equipment was very low and did not have significant effect on the hospital charges and LOS. Conclusion The study demonstrated that the hospital charges and LOS associated with RTI varied by age, gender, socio-economic status, insurance status, injury characteristics and

  14. Overview of findings from a 2-year study of claimants who had sustained a mild or moderate injury in a road traffic crash: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Elbers, Nieke; Cameron, Ian D

    2017-02-01

    Studies have shown that in people injured in a road traffic crash, persistent symptoms are common and can lead to significant ongoing personal impact. Hence, elucidating factors associated with the human costs are key to reducing the socio-economic burden of road traffic injuries. Therefore, in this study we aimed to track the experience and key outcomes of persons who had sustained mild/moderate injuries as they returned to health (and work, where relevant) following a road traffic crash. It is an inception study cohort of adults who had sustained mild to moderate injuries (that is, except serious injuries) in motor vehicle crashes in New South Wales, Australia, who were recruited and interviewed at baseline (within 3 months of the crash) and at 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury. We found that minor injuries had major impacts on pain ratings, physical and mental well-being, health-related quality of life and return to work and pre-injury participation during the 24 months post-injury phase. Further, for mild to moderately severe injuries, biopsychosocial factors appear to be prognostic indicators of recovery (not the location or type of injury). Examples of key biopsychosocial factors are: age; preinjury health; quality of life; reactions to injury (catastrophising, and pain); social support and the third party insurance compensation system. This study highlights the considerable impact of apparently "minor" road traffic crash injuries at a population level and suggests targeted approaches to the tertiary prevention of long-term morbidity and disability. Study findings have also reiterated the importance of looking beyond the injury to the 'whole person'.

  15. An epidemiological study on pattern of thoraco-abdominal injuries sustained in fatal road traffic accidents of Bangalore: Autopsy-based study.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N Bayapa; Hanumantha; Madithati, Pallavi; Reddy, N Nagarjuna; Reddy, C Sainarasimha

    2014-04-01

    The statistical profile reflects a global estimate of 5.1 million deaths in 2000, which was due to injuries that accounted for 10% of deaths due to all causes. Out of this, a quarter of injury-related deaths occurred in the South-East Asian region. Road Traffic Accident (RTA) is one among the top 5 causes of morbidity and mortality in South-East Asian countries. Most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma in India is road traffic accident followed by pedestrian accidents, abdominal blows, and fall from heights. To analyze the epidemiology and pattern of fatal thoraco-abdominal injuries in road traffic accidents. An autopsy-based cross-sectional study conducted. A purposive sampling technique was applied to select the study sample of 100 post-mortems of road traffic accident between November 2008 and May 2010 subjected to medico-legal autopsy at the department of Forensic Medicine, KIMS Hospital Bangalore. The majority of the victims were aged 21 to 40 years, 50 (50.0%), most of the victims were male 92 (92.0%); and male/female ratio was 11.5:1. Commonest offending agents in heavy motor vehicles were 54 (54.0%). Bony cage sustained injuries were observed in 71; out of this, fractures of ribs were observed in 45 (63.3%) victims, clavicle in 14 (19.7%), sternum was 6 (8.4%), and vertebrae 6 (8.4%) of fatal road traffic accidents. Internal thoracic injuries were observed in 26 cases. Among internal thoracic injuries, lungs were the most commonly involved organ 24 (92.3%) followed by the heart 2 (7.6%). Lung sustained more lacerations 19 (79.1%) than contusions 5 (20.8%). Internal abdominal injuries were observed in 49 cases. In road traffic accidents, the most commonly injured abdominal organs were solid organs such as liver 16 (32.6%) followed by spleen 9 (18.3%). Majority of the times in road traffic accidents, young and productive males were injured or lost their life. This study may help the planners to take safety measures, to implement strict traffic rules, to

  16. An epidemiological study on pattern of thoraco-abdominal injuries sustained in fatal road traffic accidents of Bangalore: Autopsy-based study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, N. Bayapa; Hanumantha; Madithati, Pallavi; Reddy, N. Nagarjuna; Reddy, C. Sainarasimha

    2014-01-01

    Background: The statistical profile reflects a global estimate of 5.1 million deaths in 2000, which was due to injuries that accounted for 10% of deaths due to all causes. Out of this, a quarter of injury-related deaths occurred in the South-East Asian region. Road Traffic Accident (RTA) is one among the top 5 causes of morbidity and mortality in South-East Asian countries. Most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma in India is road traffic accident followed by pedestrian accidents, abdominal blows, and fall from heights. Aims: To analyze the epidemiology and pattern of fatal thoraco-abdominal injuries in road traffic accidents. Materials and Methods: An autopsy-based cross-sectional study conducted. A purposive sampling technique was applied to select the study sample of 100 post-mortems of road traffic accident between November 2008 and May 2010 subjected to medico-legal autopsy at the department of Forensic Medicine, KIMS Hospital Bangalore. Results: The majority of the victims were aged 21 to 40 years, 50 (50.0%), most of the victims were male 92 (92.0%); and male/female ratio was 11.5:1. Commonest offending agents in heavy motor vehicles were 54 (54.0%). Bony cage sustained injuries were observed in 71; out of this, fractures of ribs were observed in 45 (63.3%) victims, clavicle in 14 (19.7%), sternum was 6 (8.4%), and vertebrae 6 (8.4%) of fatal road traffic accidents. Internal thoracic injuries were observed in 26 cases. Among internal thoracic injuries, lungs were the most commonly involved organ 24 (92.3%) followed by the heart 2 (7.6%). Lung sustained more lacerations 19 (79.1%) than contusions 5 (20.8%). Internal abdominal injuries were observed in 49 cases. In road traffic accidents, the most commonly injured abdominal organs were solid organs such as liver 16 (32.6%) followed by spleen 9 (18.3%). Conclusions: Majority of the times in road traffic accidents, young and productive males were injured or lost their life. This study may help the planners to

  17. The Decrease in Traumatic Brain Injury Epidemics Deriving from Road Traffic Collision Following Strengthened Legislative Measures in France

    PubMed Central

    Lieutaud, Thomas; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Ndiaye, Amina; Chiron, Mireille; Viallon, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2002, France has been strengthening legislation on road traffic. This study is intended to evaluate the changes in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) incidence and mortality resulting from Road Traffic Collision (RTC) in the two 6-year periods before and after 2002. Methods We used a Registry of all RTC casualties in the Rhône Department of France. Each casualty was coded according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). The study describes changes in demographic variables, TBI (AIS ≥ 2) incidence and mortality, other body lesions (AIS ≥ 3) associated with TBI, road user types, seatbelt and helmet wearing. Findings RTC casualty occurrences decreased by 21% (from 64,312 to 50,746) during the period after 2002. TBI occurrence accounted for 8.6% and 6.7% of all RTC in both periods. This corresponds to a reduction of TBI casualty incidence (-42%), which was much more pronounced than RTC casualty incidence (-25%) (p < 0.0001). Severe and critical TBI (AIS-4 and -5) incidences were reduced by half as much (-21%), compared to TBI incidence. TBI mortality rate (among population) and lethality (among TBI related to RTC casualties) decreased 56% and 23%, respectively. This reduction particularly affected car occupants and victims who deceased. TBI incidence decreased 43% in all 10-year age classes until 60 on average, this decrease declining with age in the period after 2002. After adjustment for age, sex, road user types, and severity of lesions at the head and other body regions, logistic regression analysis displayed a protective effect of the period following 2002, on the risk of death after RTC-related TBI. Interpretation The greater reductions in the incidence, severity and mortality of TBI when compared with the reduction of casualty incidence have mainly affected car users. These results should be attributable to the improvements in standards of care, primary safety of the car fleet and general road architecture safety. However, the increased reduction

  18. The Decrease in Traumatic Brain Injury Epidemics Deriving from Road Traffic Collision Following Strengthened Legislative Measures in France.

    PubMed

    Lieutaud, Thomas; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Ndiaye, Amina; Chiron, Mireille; Viallon, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Since 2002, France has been strengthening legislation on road traffic. This study is intended to evaluate the changes in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) incidence and mortality resulting from Road Traffic Collision (RTC) in the two 6-year periods before and after 2002. We used a Registry of all RTC casualties in the Rhône Department of France. Each casualty was coded according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). The study describes changes in demographic variables, TBI (AIS ≥ 2) incidence and mortality, other body lesions (AIS ≥ 3) associated with TBI, road user types, seatbelt and helmet wearing. RTC casualty occurrences decreased by 21% (from 64,312 to 50,746) during the period after 2002. TBI occurrence accounted for 8.6% and 6.7% of all RTC in both periods. This corresponds to a reduction of TBI casualty incidence (-42%), which was much more pronounced than RTC casualty incidence (-25%) (p < 0.0001). Severe and critical TBI (AIS-4 and -5) incidences were reduced by half as much (-21%), compared to TBI incidence. TBI mortality rate (among population) and lethality (among TBI related to RTC casualties) decreased 56% and 23%, respectively. This reduction particularly affected car occupants and victims who deceased. TBI incidence decreased 43% in all 10-year age classes until 60 on average, this decrease declining with age in the period after 2002. After adjustment for age, sex, road user types, and severity of lesions at the head and other body regions, logistic regression analysis displayed a protective effect of the period following 2002, on the risk of death after RTC-related TBI. The greater reductions in the incidence, severity and mortality of TBI when compared with the reduction of casualty incidence have mainly affected car users. These results should be attributable to the improvements in standards of care, primary safety of the car fleet and general road architecture safety. However, the increased reduction in the TBI epidemics in France, when

  19. Road traffic injury mortality and its mechanisms in India: nationally representative mortality survey of 1.1 million homes

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Marvin; Malhotra, Ajai; Thakur, J S; Sheth, Jay K; Nathens, Avery B; Dhingra, Neeraj; Jha, Prabhat

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify and describe the mechanism of road traffic injury (RTI) deaths in India. Design We conducted a nationally representative mortality survey where at least two physicians coded each non-medical field staff's verbal autopsy reports. RTI mechanism data were extracted from the narrative section of these reports. Setting 1.1 million homes in India. Participants Over 122 000 deaths at all ages from 2001 to 2003. Primary and secondary outcome measures Age-specific and sex-specific mortality rates, place and timing of death, modes of transportation and injuries sustained. Results The 2299 RTI deaths in the survey correspond to an estimated 183 600 RTI deaths or about 2% of all deaths in 2005 nationally, of which 65% occurred in men between the ages 15 and 59 years. The age-adjusted mortality rate was greater in men than in women, in urban than in rural areas, and was notably higher than that estimated from the national police records. Pedestrians (68 000), motorcyclists (36 000) and other vulnerable road users (20 000) constituted 68% of RTI deaths (124 000) nationally. Among the study sample, the majority of all RTI deaths occurred at the scene of collision (1005/1733, 58%), within minutes of collision (883/1596, 55%), and/or involved a head injury (691/1124, 62%). Compared to non-pedestrian RTI deaths, about 55 000 (81%) of pedestrian deaths were associated with less education and living in poorer neighbourhoods. Conclusions In India, RTIs cause a substantial number of deaths, particularly among pedestrians and other vulnerable road users. Interventions to prevent collisions and reduce injuries might address over half of the RTI deaths. Improved prehospital transport and hospital trauma care might address just over a third of the RTI deaths. PMID:23959748

  20. Injury characteristics and outcome of road traffic accident among victims at Adult Emergency Department of Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a prospective hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Seid, Mohammed; Azazh, Aklilu; Enquselassie, Fikre; Yisma, Engida

    2015-05-20

    Road traffic injuries are the eighth leading cause of death globally, and the leading cause of death for young people. More than a million people die each year on the world's roads, and the risk of dying as a result of a road traffic injury is highest in Africa. A prospective hospital based study was undertaken to assess injury characteristics and outcome of road traffic accident among victims at Adult Emergency Department of Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A structured pre-tested questionnaire was used to gather the required data. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors of fatalities among the road traffic crash victims. A total of 230 road traffic accident victims were studied. The majority of the study subjects were men 165 (71.7%) and the male/female ratio was 2.6:1. The victims' ages ranged from 14 to 80 years with the mean and standard deviations of 32.15 and ± 14.38 years respectively. Daily laborers (95 (41.3%)) and students (28 (12.2%)) were the majority of road traffic accident victims. Head (50.4%) and musculoskeletal (extremities) (47.0%) were the most common body region injured. Fractures (78.0%) and open wounds (56.5%) were the most common type of injuries sustained. The overall length of hospital stay (LOS) ranged from 1 day to 61 days with mean (± standard deviation) of 7.12 ± 10.5 days and the mortality rate was 7.4%. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that age of the victims (ß = 0.16, p < 0.05), systolic blood pressure on admission (ß = -0.35, p < 0.001) and Glasgow coma scale (ß = -0.44, p < 0.001) were statistically significant predictors of fatalities among the victims. This study showed diverse injury characteristics and high morbidity and mortality among the victims attending Adult Emergency Department of Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The

  1. Qing-Qi Rickshaw : A Boon Or Bane For Public Transportation? A Study Of Road Traffic Injury Patterns Involving Qing-Qi Rickshaws In Karachi Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Muzzammil, Muhammad; Minhas, Muhammad Saeed; Effendi, Jahanzeb; Jahanzeb, Syed; Mughal, Ayesha; Qadir, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The three-wheeler Qing-qi and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) auto-rickshaws were introduced in Karachi to meet the transportation demand of the growing population. These vehicles have directly or indirectly been implicated in a number of road traffic violations as well as road accidents. This study aims to describe the crash characteristics and injury patterns for Qing-qi rickshaw occupants and other road users hit by Qing-qi rickshaw in Karachi, Pakistan. An Observational/ Descriptive study was conducted at Accident & Emergency and Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre, Karachi Pakistan from July 2014 to June 2015.All patients who came with Qing-qi rickshaw accident in Accident & Emergency (A&E) of JPMC were included. Crash characteristics, details of injuries, injury severity parameters and outcome were documented in detailed interviews. Four hundred and eighty-six rickshaw related injuries were noted in road traffic accidents by Qing-gi rickshaw. Age range was 2-85 (43.5±58.68). 350 injured victims were males and 136 were females. By occupation most victims were laborers and daily wage workers (45%) and students (21%). Overloading of vehicle with more than two passengers was found in (28.5%). The most common cause of injury was collision with a moving vehicle (56%), followed by fall from rickshaw. The most common contributing factor was the overloading of rickshaw and roll over on turning (61%). Injury severity on arrival were mild (49%), moderate were (32%), and severe were (19%). Injuries related to head and neck (26%), face (14%), thorax and abdomen (5%), lower extremity and pelvic girdle (31%) and upper extremity (23%) were observed. Qing-qi rickshaw injuries are common and these vehicles are vulnerable to road traffic accidents. Occupants and road users are both at risk of injuries.

  2. Pre-hospital care time intervals among victims of road traffic injuries in Iran. A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Mohammadi, Reza

    2010-07-09

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health problem, requiring concerted efforts both for their prevention and a reduction of their consequences. Timely arrival of the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) at the crash scene followed by speedy victim transportation by trained personnel may reduce the RTIs' consequences. The first 60 minutes after injury occurrence--referred to as the "golden hour"--are vital for the saving of lives. The present study was designed to estimate the average of various time intervals occurring during the pre-hospital care process and to examine the differences between these time intervals as regards RTIs on urban and interurban roads. A retrospective cross-sectional study was designed and various time intervals in relation to pre-hospital care of RTIs identified in the ambulance dispatch centre in Urmia, Iran from 20 March 2005 to 20 March 2007. All cases which resulted in ambulance dispatches were reviewed and those that had complete data on time intervals were analyzed. In total, the cases of 2027 RTI victims were analysed. Of these, 61.5% of the subjects were injured in city areas. The mean response time for city locations was 5.0 minutes, compared with 10.6 minutes for interurban road locations. The mean on-scene time on the interurban roads was longer than on city roads (9.2 vs. 6.1 minutes, p < 0.001). Mean transport times from the scene to the hospital were also significantly longer for interurban incidents (17.1 vs. 6.3 minutes, p < 0.001). The mean of total pre-hospital time was 37.2 (+/-17.2) minutes with a median of 32.0. Overall, 72.5% of the response interval time was less than eight minutes. The response, transport and total time intervals among EMS responding to RTI incidents were longer for interurban roads, compared to the city areas. More research should take place on needs-to and access-for EMS on city and interurban roads. The notification interval seems to be a hidden part of the post-crash events and

  3. Presenting a practical model for governmental political mapping on road traffic injuries in Iran in 2008: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, E; Soori, Hamid; Mahfozphoor, S; Movahedinejad, AA

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to assess political mapping in relation to road traffic injuries (RTIs) management and prevention to present a practical model for RTIs. Design A phenomenological qualitative study was developed to identify stakeholders on RTI in Iran in 2008. Setting The designed questions were discussed by systematic discussion with the relevant specialists. After receiving written consent from the main responsible stakeholders, the questionnaire was filled in by trained experts. Themes were determined and content was analysed in each part. Participants Main responsible stakeholders. Main outcome measures By comparing other countries' political mappings which were found in the library and by Internet searching, political mapping of RTI in Iran was suggested. Results Subjects were 26 experts from governmental and non-governmental organizations. The main proposed leading agencies were traffic police and presidency (13% each). Findings showed that only 31% of our political mapping was formed according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In 94% of cases, the involved organizations had unspecified roles; the reason was poor monitoring for RTI in 39% of organizations. Lack of adequate authority and suitable legislation, appropriate laws and tasks definition were 94% and 18%, respectively. The most essential policy to overcome problems was defined as appropriate legislation (21%), and the most frequent type of support needed was mentioned as adequate budgeting (25%). Conclusion Traffic police can play the leading agency role by government support, with strong leadership, appropriate legislation, defined tasks and adequate budget. PMID:22046498

  4. Analysis of Road Traffic Crashes–Related Maxillofacial Injuries Severity and Concomitant Injuries in 201 Patients Seen at the UCH, Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Aladelusi, Timothy; Akinmoladun, Victor; Olusanya, Adeola; Akadiri, Oladimeji; Fasola, Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of road traffic crashes (RTC)–related maxillofacial injuries, the concomitant injuries occurring with them, and to assess the relationship between the severity of maxillofacial and concomitant injuries. This was a prospective study involving 201 victims of RTC seen at the Accident and Emergency Department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan with maxillofacial injuries during the study period. Demographic data of the patients, the types of maxillofacial injuries, and concomitant injuries sustained were recorded. Severity of maxillofacial injury was determined using the maxillofacial injury severity scale (MFISS), while the severity of concomitant injuries was based on the ISS. Correlations between types and severity of maxillofacial injury and types and severity of concomitant injury were conducted to determine the predictability of concomitant injuries based on maxillofacial injury severity. Data were processed using SPSS Statistical software (SPSS, version 20.0 for windows, IBM SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Maxillofacial injuries constituted 25.4% of RTC-related admission by the Accident and Emergency Department. A total of 151 (75.1%) patients who presented with concomitant injuries participated in the study. Eighty-one (53.6%) sustained injuries to more than one body region. Head injury was the commonest (99, 65.6%) concomitant injury, followed by orthopedic injury (69, 45.7%). Increasing severity of maxillofacial injury showed a positive correlation with increasing ISS. Also, positive correlation was noted with increasing severity of maxillofacial injury and presence of polytrauma (p = 0.01), traumatic brain injury (p = 0.034), and eye injuries (p = 0.034). There was a high prevalence of maxillofacial injuries in victims of RTC. There was a high incidence of concomitant injuries noted with these maxillofacial injuries. Significantly, this study showed a direct relationship between the

  5. Analysis of Road Traffic Crashes-Related Maxillofacial Injuries Severity and Concomitant Injuries in 201 Patients Seen at the UCH, Ibadan.

    PubMed

    Aladelusi, Timothy; Akinmoladun, Victor; Olusanya, Adeola; Akadiri, Oladimeji; Fasola, Abiodun

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of road traffic crashes (RTC)-related maxillofacial injuries, the concomitant injuries occurring with them, and to assess the relationship between the severity of maxillofacial and concomitant injuries. This was a prospective study involving 201 victims of RTC seen at the Accident and Emergency Department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan with maxillofacial injuries during the study period. Demographic data of the patients, the types of maxillofacial injuries, and concomitant injuries sustained were recorded. Severity of maxillofacial injury was determined using the maxillofacial injury severity scale (MFISS), while the severity of concomitant injuries was based on the ISS. Correlations between types and severity of maxillofacial injury and types and severity of concomitant injury were conducted to determine the predictability of concomitant injuries based on maxillofacial injury severity. Data were processed using SPSS Statistical software (SPSS, version 20.0 for windows, IBM SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Maxillofacial injuries constituted 25.4% of RTC-related admission by the Accident and Emergency Department. A total of 151 (75.1%) patients who presented with concomitant injuries participated in the study. Eighty-one (53.6%) sustained injuries to more than one body region. Head injury was the commonest (99, 65.6%) concomitant injury, followed by orthopedic injury (69, 45.7%). Increasing severity of maxillofacial injury showed a positive correlation with increasing ISS. Also, positive correlation was noted with increasing severity of maxillofacial injury and presence of polytrauma (p = 0.01), traumatic brain injury (p = 0.034), and eye injuries (p = 0.034). There was a high prevalence of maxillofacial injuries in victims of RTC. There was a high incidence of concomitant injuries noted with these maxillofacial injuries. Significantly, this study showed a direct relationship between the

  6. Road traffic accidents and policy interventions in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bong-Min; Kim, Jinhyun

    2003-01-01

    The high rate of road traffic crashes, in conjunction with the absence of order on the road, has long been considered a critical social problem in Korea. The Korean public seems to agree that high priority ought to be placed on policies for improving road safety. Using data from government sources, this study describes what has happened in the area of road traffic crashes since 1970, the causes of traffic crashes, and the relative importance of traffic injuries as a cause of death in Korea. Road traffic crashes in Korea increased nearly eight-fold, from 37,000 in 1970 to 290,481 in 2000. The fatalities increased three-fold and injuries ten-fold over the same period. Road traffic injuries were the leading cause of death for people under 29. However, through multiple policy interventions, partly in response to the 2002 FIFA World Cup, about two thousand road traffic deaths and nine thousand traffic-related disabilities were averted in 2001 alone. The policy interventions included enforcement of penalties for seven risky driving behaviours, including drunk driving and speeding, installation of traffic-monitoring cameras, financial rewards for citizens who reported traffic violations, introduction of a road safety evaluation system, correction of accident black spots in existing roads, and road safety education programs. Through multiple policy interventions, road traffic crashes in Korea were reduced in a relatively short time period, along with their associated injuries and fatalities. However, road traffic crashes still pose a major public health problem, threatening the quality of life of the Korean people.

  7. Non-fatal injuries sustained in road traffic accidents: a pilot study in provincial hospitals in Chon Buri, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jirojwong, Sansnee; Rudtanasudjatum, Koolarb; Watcharavitoon, Pornpun; Sathitsathien, Wilai; Sangjun, Sunisa

    2002-03-01

    The characteristics of patients with non-fatal road traffic injuries who received care from non-referral hospitals are described; an assessment of the difference between the characteristics of patients who received care at a referral hospital and those of patients who were treated at non-referral hospitals is made. A retrospective study, conducted in Chon Buri Province, Thailand, reviewed information from two sources: 324 records from eight non-referral hospitals and the 1999 Injury Surveillance Report of Chon Buri Hospital, a referral hospital. A data collection tool was designed to retrieve information from the non-referral hospitals. Data were analysed descriptively and analytically. The majority of the patients of the non-referral hospitals were male (71.1%) motorcyclists (84.2%), and received ambulatory care (83.9%). Young patients had a higher risk of being admitted to these hospitals. Non-motorcyclists, pedestrians, and nonlocal persons were more likely to receive care from the referral hospital. The results were similar to those of previous studies. The different characteristics of patients who receive care at referral--and non-referral hospitals need to be taken into account when designing traffic accident reduction programs.

  8. Children at risk of residual physical problems after public road traffic injuries--a 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Eva; Bunketorp, Olle; Andersson, Anna-Lena

    2012-01-01

    To describe the residual physical problems 1 year after traffic injuries in children with respect to age, gender, extraction (Swedish or foreign), type of care, type of accident and use of protective equipment, type of injury, and the impact on daily living activities. Hospital data were analysed for children, aged 15 or under, after road traffic accidents in the Gothenburg region in 2000. Age, gender, type of road user, counterpart, use of protective equipment, type and severity of each injury, and type of care were related to follow-up data obtained by a self-completed questionnaire answered 1 year after the accident. The AIS90 was used for injury classification. Residual physical problems were specified, graded, and mapped on anatomical pictures of the body by the respondents. Logistic regression was used to explore independent factors for residual problems. A total of 341 children (81%) fulfilled the study. Cyclists dominated, 60%, followed by moped users, car occupants and pedestrians. The mean age was 11 years, 61% were boys, 16% were of foreign extraction, 26% were treated as inpatients, and 11% had at least one serious (AIS3+) injury. Residual problems were reported for 16% of the study group (n=53), and of these 31% were located to the lower extremities (mostly knee problems), upper extremities in 20%, face in 14%, neck in 14%, upper trunk in 8%, lower trunk in 8%, and skull/brain in 3%. Significant permanent impairment was reported in one case. Cyclists reported problems significantly less frequently than others. Children reporting problems tended to be older and were most often injured as moped users. Problems to the neck and the upper trunk were reported to a higher rate than the injury rate in these regions. Children with residual problems reported limitations in daily living activities after the accident more often than those without residual physical problems. Residual physical problems were reported in about one sixth of the study group, few with

  9. Characteristics associated with alcohol consumption among emergency department patients presenting with road traffic injuries in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Esser, Marissa B; Wadhwaniya, Shirin; Gupta, Shivam; Tetali, Shailaja; Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Stevens, Kent A; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-01-01

    Each year in India, road traffic crashes lead to more than 200,000 deaths and the country has seen an unprecedented rate of roadway fatalities in recent years. At the same time, alcohol consumption per capita among Indians is rising. Despite these increasing trends of road traffic injuries (RTIs) and alcohol use, alcohol is not routinely assessed as a risk factor for RTIs. This study aims to examine the involvement of alcohol among emergency department patients presenting with RTIs in the Indian city of Hyderabad. As part of a prospective study, data were collected from 3366 patients (88.0% male) presenting with RTIs at an emergency department in Hyderabad, India, from September 2013 to February 2014. Logistic regression models were used to assess individual-level and road traffic crash characteristics associated with suspected or reported alcohol consumption six hours prior to the RTI. Alcohol was suspected or reported among 17.9% of the patients with RTIs. Adjusting for confounders, males experienced 9.8 times greater odds of alcohol-related RTIs than females. Compared to 15-24 year-olds, the odds of alcohol consumption was 1.4 times greater among 25-34 year-olds and 1.7 times greater among 35-44 year-olds, adjusting for confounding factors. Patients who were passengers in vehicles other than motorized two-wheelers had 90% reduced odds of an alcohol-related RTI than motorized two-wheeler drivers. Drivers of non-two-wheelers, passengers on two-wheelers, and pedestrians did not have significantly different odds of an alcohol-related RTI compared to two-wheeler drivers. Nighttime crashes were associated with nearly a threefold increase in the odds of alcohol consumption. Given that alcohol was suspected or reported in more than one in six injured ED patients with RTIs, it is clear that alcohol is a serious risk factor for RTIs; this evidence can guide prevention efforts. These findings suggest that evidence-based interventions to reduce drink-driving, such as random

  10. Pre-hospital trauma care resources for road traffic injuries in a middle-income country--a province based study on need and access in Iran.

    PubMed

    Haghparast Bidgoli, Hassan; Bogg, Lennart; Hasselberg, Marie

    2011-09-01

    Access to pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize many of traffic related mortality and morbidity in low- and middle-income countries with high rate of traffic deaths such as Iran. The aim of this study was to assess if the distribution of pre-hospital trauma care facilities reflect the burden of road traffic injury and mortality in different provinces in Iran. This national cross-sectional study is based on ecological data on road traffic mortality (RTM), road traffic injuries (RTIs) and pre-hospital trauma facilities for all 30 provinces in Iran in 2006. Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients were used to describe the distributions of RTM/RTIs and pre-hospital trauma care facilities across provinces. Spearman rank-order correlation was performed to assess the relationship between RTM/RTI and pre-hospital trauma care facilities. RTM and RTIs as well as pre-hospital trauma care facilities were distributed unequally between different provinces. There was no significant association between the rate of RTM and RTIs and the number of pre-hospital trauma care facilities across the country. The distribution of pre-hospital trauma care facilities does not reflect the needs in terms of RTM and RTIs for different provinces. These results suggest that traffic related mortality and morbidity could be reduced if the needs in terms of RTM and RTIs were taken into consideration when distributing pre-hospital trauma care facilities between the provinces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The World Health Organization's action plan on the road traffic injury pandemic: is there any action for orthopaedic trauma surgeons?

    PubMed

    Moroz, Paul J; Spiegel, David A

    2014-01-01

    Road traffic crash-related death, injury, and chronic disability continue to be a major worldwide burden to drivers, pedestrians, and users of mass transit, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Projections predict worsening of this burden, and while motorization of LMIC increases exponentially, a corresponding improvement in prehospital and acute in-hospital trauma care has not been seen. The WHO now has 2 programs that address different elements of this challenge, namely, the Violence and Injury Prevention department (prevention) and the Emergency and Essential Surgical Care project (treatment). Activities of Violence and Injury Prevention have included developing guidelines for prehospital and essential trauma care, whereas activities of the Emergency and Essential Surgical Care have included developing the Integrated Management of Emergency and Essential Surgical Care toolkit and a textbook, "Surgical Care at the District Hospital." Organized surgical institutions in high-income countries-trauma associations, university departments, surgical nongovernmental organizations, etc.-can benefit from the infrastructure and tools the WHO has developed to better address the deficits in surgical services to improve the equitable distribution of surgical care services and resources to LMIC.

  12. Determinants of Fatal Road Traffic Injuries in Côte d’Ivoire from 2002 to 2011

    PubMed

    Bénié Bi Vroh, Joseph; Tiembre, Issaka; Ekra, Daniel Kouadio; Ano Ama, Marie-Noëlle; Ka, Orlando Missiemoun; Ncho Dagnan, Simplice; Tagliante-Saracino, Janine

    2016-11-25

    Introduction : In most developing countries, with rapidly changing lifestyles, urbanization, and increasing numbers of vehicles, Road Traffic Injuries (RTI) are expected to have a growing impact on mortality and morbidity.The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with fatal RTI in Côte d’Ivoire.Methods : We conducted a cross-sectional study of data concerning RTI in Côte d’Ivoire over a ten-year period (2002 to 2011) from the Road Safety Office (RSO) database. All RTI reported by the police were included in the study. Fatal RTI was the dependent variable, while sociodemographic, behavioural and environmental risk factors were independent variables. Data were analysed using SPSS Version 16 software.Results : Out of a total of 56,966 reported RTI, 3008 were fatal, representing 0.6 deaths per 100,000. The majority (93.5%) of RTI occurred in urban areas. Pedestrian victims were identified in more than one half (59.3%) of cases. Subjects under the age of 18 and subjects between the ages of 43 and 47 years had 2.4-fold and 4.9-fold higher risks of fatal accidents, respectively. Excessive speed (OR = 5.3 ; p = 0.000) and dangerous overtaking (OR = 4.9 ; p = 0.000) were the leading causes of fatal accidents. Mechanical failure was also a risk factor (OR = 3.9 ; p < 0.005). The risk of a fatal accident was 6.8-fold higher in rural areas than in urban areas.Conclusion : Fatal RTI were related to human and environmental factors, hence the need for awareness campaigns to promote behaviour changes among road users.

  13. Examining Road Traffic Mortality Status in China: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwebel, David C.; Li, Li; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Data from the Chinese police service suggest substantial reductions in road traffic injuries since 2002, but critics have questioned the accuracy of those data, especially considering conflicting data reported by the health department. Methods To address the gap between police and health department data and to determine which may be more accurate, we conducted a simulation study based on the modified Smeed equation, which delineates a non-linear relation between road traffic mortality and the level of motorization in a country or region. Our goal was to simulate trends in road traffic mortality in China and compare performances in road traffic safety management between China and 13 other countries. Results Chinese police data indicate a peak in road traffic mortalities in 2002 and a significant and a gradual decrease in population-based road traffic mortality since 2002. Health department data show the road traffic mortality peaked in 2012. In addition, police data suggest China’s road traffic mortality peaked at a much lower motorization level (0.061 motor vehicles per person) in 2002, followed by a reduction in mortality to a level comparable to that of developed countries. Simulation results based on health department data suggest high road traffic mortality, with a mortality peak in 2012 at a moderate motorization level (0.174 motor vehicles per person). Comparisons to the other 13 countries suggest the health data from China may be more valid than the police data. Conclusion Our simulation data indicate China is still at a stage of high road traffic mortality, as suggested by health data, rather than a stage of low road traffic mortality, as suggested by police data. More efforts are needed to integrate safety into road design, improve road traffic management, improve data quality, and alter unsafe behaviors of pedestrians, drivers and passengers in China. PMID:27071008

  14. Examining Road Traffic Mortality Status in China: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helai; Yin, Qingyi; Schwebel, David C; Li, Li; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Data from the Chinese police service suggest substantial reductions in road traffic injuries since 2002, but critics have questioned the accuracy of those data, especially considering conflicting data reported by the health department. To address the gap between police and health department data and to determine which may be more accurate, we conducted a simulation study based on the modified Smeed equation, which delineates a non-linear relation between road traffic mortality and the level of motorization in a country or region. Our goal was to simulate trends in road traffic mortality in China and compare performances in road traffic safety management between China and 13 other countries. Chinese police data indicate a peak in road traffic mortalities in 2002 and a significant and a gradual decrease in population-based road traffic mortality since 2002. Health department data show the road traffic mortality peaked in 2012. In addition, police data suggest China's road traffic mortality peaked at a much lower motorization level (0.061 motor vehicles per person) in 2002, followed by a reduction in mortality to a level comparable to that of developed countries. Simulation results based on health department data suggest high road traffic mortality, with a mortality peak in 2012 at a moderate motorization level (0.174 motor vehicles per person). Comparisons to the other 13 countries suggest the health data from China may be more valid than the police data. Our simulation data indicate China is still at a stage of high road traffic mortality, as suggested by health data, rather than a stage of low road traffic mortality, as suggested by police data. More efforts are needed to integrate safety into road design, improve road traffic management, improve data quality, and alter unsafe behaviors of pedestrians, drivers and passengers in China.

  15. Vulnerable road users are at greater risk during Ramadan -- results from road traffic surveillance data.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Amber; Khan, Irum Qamar; Mir, Mohammad Umer; Moin, Anoosh; Jooma, Rashid

    2015-03-01

    To assess how the frequency, nature and outcome of road traffic crashes differ during the fasting month of Ramadan. The retrospective study was conducted in Karachi and comprised data from the Road Traffic Injury Surveillance Project which entailed information on all road traffic injury victims presenting to Emergency Departments in the city between September 2006 and September 2011. Data was analysed to find the frequency of road traffic crashes according to time of incident, road user group and survival. Ramadan and Non-Ramadan groups were compared with respect to time and frequency of incidents, road user group and mortality. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. There were 163,022 subjects from whom 13,640(8.36%) came during Ramadan and 149,382 (91.6%) during the non-Ramadan months. Frequency of road traffic crashes did not change significantly during Ramadan, but was clustered around the breaking of Fast and the Taravih prayers. The most commonly affected road user group was motorbike riders followed by pedestrians. Overall survival of the RTI victims was 96.1% with a mortality rate of 4.1% which was higher than the figure of 3.5% in the non-Ramadan period. Vulnerable road users were more frequently involved in road traffic injuries during Ramadan. Moreover, the frequency of crashes increased around evening which requires more careful planning of traffic controls, especially for the vulnerable road users.

  16. The effect of traffic tickets on road traffic crashes.

    PubMed

    Factor, Roni

    2014-03-01

    Road traffic crashes are globally a leading cause of death. The current study tests the effect of traffic tickets issued to drivers on subsequent crashes, using a unique dataset that overcomes some shortcomings of previous studies. The study takes advantage of a national longitudinal dataset at the individual level that merges Israeli census data with data on traffic tickets issued by the police and official data on involvement in road traffic crashes over seven years. The results show that the estimated probability of involvement in a subsequent fatal or severe crash was more than eleven times higher for drivers with six traffic tickets per year compared to those with one ticket per year, while controlling for various confounders. However, the majority of fatal and severe crashes involved the larger population of drivers who received up to one ticket on average per year. The current findings indicate that reducing traffic violations may contribute significantly to crash and injury reduction. In addition, mass random enforcement programs may be more effective in reducing fatal and severe crashes than targeting high-risk recidivist drivers.

  17. Social Justice Approach to Road Safety in Kenya: Addressing the Uneven Distribution of Road Traffic Injuries and Deaths across Population Groups

    PubMed Central

    Azetsop, Jacquineau

    2010-01-01

    Road traffic injury and deaths (RTID) are an important public health problem in Kenya, primarily affecting uneducated and disenfranchised people from lower socioeconomic groups. Studies conducted by Kenyan experts from police reports and surveys have shown that pedestrian and driver behaviors are the most important proximal causes of crashes, signifying that the occurrence of crashes results directly from human action. However, behaviors and risk factors do not fully explain the magnitude of RTID neither does it account for socioeconomic gradient in RTID. Instead, a social justice approach to RTID highlights the need for emphasizing distal causal factors. They allow us to understand how social inequities determine risk for RTID. Hence, designing policies that focus on behaviors will simply mask the underlying systemic causes of this growing phenomenon. To eradicate the RTID and address the gradient, a broader policy framework that includes the social dimension of injury, a strong political will to address the underlying causes of RTID and an effective partnership with stakeholders needs to be developed. PMID:20664752

  18. Exploring the provision of hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Johansson, Eva; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Hasselberg, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Identifying factors affecting the provision of trauma care is essential for improving the quality of care for road traffic injury (RTI) victims. The study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of trauma care among injured patients and health professionals to identify factors influencing an effective trauma care delivery at emergency departments (EDs) in Iran. The study was conducted with a grounded theory approach. The study participants consisted of 15 health professionals and 20 injured patients. The data were collected via semi-structured interviews and were analyzed using constant comparative analysis method. Lack of a systematic approach to providing trauma care at EDs emerged as the core category. The leading factors in the development of the core category were unclear national policies and poor organization of care at the ED. Other major factors were contextual factors in the environment of the hospitals such as inappropriate structure and unsupportive environment and also factors specific to the context of Iran such as a rapid increase in the number of traumas. Professionals reacted to the prevailing conditions in ways that contributed to an ineffective trauma care, even though strategies employed by Emergency Medicine Physicians (EMPs) improved the quality of trauma care locally. Building a national trauma system, using available professional resources especially EMPs, and implementing low cost and evidence-based improvements such as establishing trauma teams and trauma training for staff working at the EDs on a regular basis is necessary in order to improve delivery of trauma care at the hospitals.

  19. Reducing regional inequality in mortality from road traffic injuries through enforcement of the mandatory motorcycle helmet law in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Lai, Ching-Huei; Chiang, Tung-Liang

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to examine whether passage of the mandatory motorcycle helmet law in 1997 reduced the regional inequality in mortality from road traffic injuries (RTIs) across 22 cities/counties in Taiwan. We calculated the absolute (between-group variance, BGV) and relative (rate ratio between the city/county with the highest and lowest rate, RR) terms of inequality for the overall and motorcycle-related RTI mortality rates, the rate of helmet use and three other explanatory factors associated with RTI mortality at the city/county level from 1997 through 2008. The BGV of the overall and motorcycle-related RTI mortality rates across the 22 cities/counties showed persistently decreasing trends from 1997 to 2008; however, the RR of RTI mortality first increased and then levelled off from 2002. The decreasing trend in inequality was most prominent in males aged 0-24 years. The BGV and RR of the rate of motorcycle helmet use decreased after passage of the law but increased from 2002 onwards. In Taiwan, passage of the mandatory motorcycle helmet law reduced the regional inequality in RTI mortality; however, a resurgence in regional inequality in the helmet use rate years after passage of the helmet law was noted. It is therefore necessary to monitor the helmet use rate after passage of such a law to ensure the effect of a reduction in regional inequality in RTI mortality.

  20. [The relationship between secular trend of road traffic injuries and gross domestic product per capita in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang; Chi, Gui-Bo; Wang, Sheng-Yong; Dong, Xiao-Mei

    2011-04-01

    To explore the relationship between secular trend of road traffic injuries (RTI) and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita in China. Statistical description was used in the data about cases, injuries, deaths, mileage mortality and 10 million population mortality from 1970 to 2009. Cluster analysis was used to classify the 31 provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions in China. Ecological study was used to explore the relationship between RTI and GDP per capita. There were three stages of RTI in China. It grew rapidly in 1970 - 2002 (from 1.16 to 8.52 per 10 million population), kept steady in 2003 - 2004 (from 8.08 to 8.24 per 10 million population), and decreased obviously in 2005 - 2009 (from 7.55 to 5.08 per 10 million population). The ecological study showed that the population mortality of RTI rose along with the GDP per capita's growth. When the GDP per capita reached to 14 053 yuan (equivalent to 1716 US dollar, in 2005), the mortality began to decrease obviously, the average annual decreasing rate was 10.16%(8.14% - 10.52%)in the following five years. According to the GDP per capita during the period of 1999 - 2009, the 31 provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions in China were divided into three categories of region. The curves of population mortality of RTI and GDP per capita in different category possessed the same ecological trend. That was the population mortality early rose and then fell along with the GDP per capita's growth. All of they started to decrease obviously in 2005. The GDP per capita among three categories of region was different (45 281 yuan, 22 243 yuan and 10 475 yuan respectively) in the same period. In the early stage of economic development, the mortality of RTI increased along with the economic development. When the economic development reached a certain level, the mortality decreased along with the GDP per capita's growth.

  1. Rupture of the aorta following road traffic accidents in the United Kingdom 1992-1999. The results of the co-operative crash injury study.

    PubMed

    Richens, D; Kotidis, K; Neale, M; Oakley, C; Fails, A

    2003-02-01

    The true incidence and survivability of blunt traumatic aortic rupture following road traffic accidents in the UK is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of blunt traumatic aortic rupture in the UK after road traffic accidents and the conditions under which it occurs. Data for the study was obtained from the Co-operative Crash Injury Study database. Road traffic accidents that happened between 1992 and 1999 and included in the Co-operative Crash Injury Study database were retrospectively investigated. A total of 8285 vehicles carrying 14,435 occupants were involved in 7067 accidents. There were 132 cases of blunt traumatic aortic rupture, of which the scene survival was 9% and the overall mortality was 98%. Twenty-one percent of all fatalities had blunt traumatic aortic rupture (130/613). Twenty-nine percent were due to frontal impacts and 44% were due to side impacts. Twelve percent of the blunt traumatic aortic rupture cases in frontal vehicle impacts were wearing seat belts and had airbag protection and 19% had no restraint mechanism. The Equivalent Test Speed of the accident vehicles, (where equivalent test speed provides an estimate of the vehicle impact severity and not an estimate of the vehicle speed at the time of the accident), ranged from 30 to 110 km/h in frontal impacts and from 15 to 82 km/h in side impacts. Blunt traumatic aortic rupture carries a high mortality and occurred in 21% of car occupant deaths in this sample of road traffic accidents. Impact scenarios varied but were most common from the side. The use of an airbag or seat belt does not eliminate risk. The injury can occur at low severity impacts particularly in side impact. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Pattern of emergency room mortality among road traffic crash victims.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Oladimeji Ranti; Oluwadiya, Kehinde; Vrgoč, Goran; Akpati, Ugochukwu; Sindik, Joško; Čoklo, Miran; Marinović, Marin; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    Road traffic injuries are a major cause of death in the emergency room. The goal of this study was to highlight the demographic pattern of road traffic-related deaths in the accident and emergency room of a regional trauma centre. This was a 5-year retrospective study in which road traffic-related cases of emergency room mortality between June 2009 and June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 33 road traffic crash-related deaths occurred during this period with a male-to-female ratio of 2.3:1. Most of these patients were pedestrians with severe injuries involving two or more Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) coded regions. The mean time between injury and presentation in the first trauma facility was 112.1 (±55.4)min, and between presentation in the emergency room and death was 410 (±645)min. Mangled lower extremity, bilateral long bone lower limb fractures, pelvic injuries, blunt injuries to the chest and abdomen, and cranial fossae fractures were the common injury pattern. Median ISS and NISS in these patients were 22 (interquartile range [IQR]=11) and 25 (IQR=17), respectively. Severe injuries, delayed presentation, multiple referrals and delayed resuscitative measures contribute to road traffic crash-related mortality.

  3. Child road traffic crash injuries at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa in 1992, 2002 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kihurani N; Van Niekerk, Ashley; Van As, Arjan Bastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic crashes are a significant cause of the disease burden among children, with the highest mortality in low- and middle-income countries. This observational study explores such injuries in Cape Town, South Africa through an analysis of data for cases in 1992, 2002 and 2012 at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, a referral paediatric hospital for children younger than 13 years. Descriptive and time trend analysis of demographic data as well as of the causes, severity and place of injury was conducted. Logistic regression and generalised linear models described factors influencing hospital admission. In the years 1992, 2002 and 2012, a total of 4690 patients presented with injuries sustained as a result of a road traffic crash. Nearly 50% (n = 2201) of them were between five and nine years of age, with 1.7 males for every female. Three-quarters of those who got injured were pedestrians while the second most commonly injured ones were unrestrained passengers. The majority had minor injuries (58%), but with notably higher proportions with moderate to severe injuries in the years 2002 and 2012. Forty per cent were admitted for inpatient treatment, with the highest proportion (50%) in 2002. Admission was related to mechanism and severity. The epidemiological factors assessed remain largely unchanged over the assessment points calling into question the impact of local safety strategies.

  4. Profile of services provided by an accident and emergency care department in connection with road traffic injuries involving children, 2003-2005.

    PubMed

    Duma, Olga Odetta

    2007-12-01

    To study profile of services provided by an accident and emergency care department (AECD) in connection with road traffic injuries involving children in "St. Maria" University Paediatrics Hospital, Iaşi, Romania. The survey represents a descriptive analysis of 2003-2005 data regarding the 538 injured children aged 0-18 years and allowed to design the request pattern based on: a) comparison between observed case distribution by weekday, month and season and hypothetical equal distribution using chi2 test; b) most common features of cases. Injuries ranged from 4.3% in March to 12.3% in August, being significantly higher in summer. Children aged 5-14 years represented 65.6%. The male : female and urban : rural ratios were 1.3 : 1 and 1.5 : 1, respectively. Two in three cases were found to suffer head injury, and one in two children suffered abdomen/pelvis contusions. More road traffic injuries attended the AECD during summer. The common case was male gender aged 5-14 years, urban area, with head injury and abdomen/pelvis contusions.

  5. Isolated blunt lingual artery injury secondary to a road traffic accident: diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Mawaddah, Azman; Goh, Bee See; Kew, Thean Yean; Rozman, Zakaria

    2012-04-01

    Neurologic and airway compromise as a result of traumatic vascular injuries to the neck region often lead to more severe complications and thus require special consideration. Furthermore, these cases pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to healthcare providers. Here, we report a case of a 28-year-old motorcyclist presenting with progressively enlarged Zone 2 neck swelling on the left side following a high impact collision. There were no symptoms or signs suggesting neurologic or laryngeal injury. Computed tomography angiogram of the neck revealed signs of an active arterial bleed. The apparent vascular injury was managed by close observation for signs of airway compromise, urgent angiogram, and selective catheter embolisation of the left lingual artery. The patient subsequently recovered without further operative exploration of the neck. At 6 months post-trauma, the neck swelling fully subsided with no complications from angioembolisation. This case illustrates the individualised treatment and multidisciplinary approach in managing such cases. We review our rationale for this diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  6. Economic impact of fatal and non-fatal road traffic injuries in Guadalajara Metropolitan Area and Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Híjar-Medina, Martha; Pelcastre-Villafuerte, Blanca; Celis, Alfredo; Salinas-Rodríguez, Aarón

    2011-10-01

    To estimate the economic cost of fatal and non-fatal road traffic injuries (RTI) in Guadalajara metropolitan area (GMA) and Jalisco, Mexico during 2007. Using an incidence-based cost of illness analysis from a household perspective employing a bottom-up approach all direct medical and non-medical costs, and indirect costs were estimated for a sample of RTI people who sought care during 1 month in four different medical facilities. Individuals were surveyed just before discharge from emergency rooms (ER) and hospitalisation services. Hospitalised individuals were followed up at 8 weeks after discharge. Productivity loss was estimated with the human capital approach. Using estimated costs and administrative records of mortality and morbidity, the economic costs were dimensioned for GMA and for Jalisco. A multivariate and probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate variations resulting from assumptions used. 297 injured were included in the study, 20% were hospitalised and 237 only received care at ER. A total cost of US$21190 was estimated in all injured receiving care at ER and $83309 for those hospitalised. Direct cost represents more than 30% of reported income in 8% of the ER users and 80% of hospitalised. Total economic cost was US$329,061,813 for GMA (discount rate of 3%), nearly 51% of the state total (US$650,908,924 or 1.3% of State GNP). This estimation shows the high cost (both, direct and indirect) RTI impose in households affecting their economy and leading families to lose wealth assets, get in debt or impoverished.

  7. Feasibility of road traffic injury surveillance integrating police and health insurance data sets in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Puello, Adrian; Bhatti, Junaid; Salmi, Louis-Rachid

    2013-07-01

    To assess the feasibility of semiautomated linking of road traffic injury (RTI) cases in different data sets in low- and middle-income countries. The study population consisted of RTI cases in the Dominican Republic in 2010 and were identified in police and health insurance data sets. After duplicates were removed and fatality reporting was corrected by using forensic data, police and health insurance RTI records were linked if they had the same province, collision date, and gender of RTI cases and similar age within five years. A multinomial logistic regression model assessed the likelihood of being in only one of the data sets. One of five records was a duplicate, including 21.1% of 6 396 police and 16.2% of 6 178 insurance records. Health insurance data recorded 43 of 417 deaths as only injured. Capture - recapture estimated that both data sets recorded one of five RTI cases. Characteristics associated with increased likelihood (P < 0.05) of being only in the police data set were female gender [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.5], age ≥ 16 years (OR = 1.7), collision in the regions of Cibao Northeast (OR = 4.1) and Valdesia (OR = 6.4), day of occurrence from Tuesday to Saturday (ORs from 1.5 to 2.9), month of occurrence from October to December (ORs from 1.6 to 4.5), and occupant of four-wheeled vehicles (OR = 5.4) or trucks (OR = 5.3). Consistent semiautomated linking procedures were feasible to ascertain the RTI burden in the Dominican Republic and could be improved by standardized coding of police and health insurance RTI reporting.

  8. Health-related quality of life 24 months after sustaining a minor musculoskeletal injury in a road traffic crash: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Maher, Christopher G; Cameron, Ian D

    2017-04-03

    A better understanding of the long-term factors that independently predict poorer quality of life following mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries is needed. We aimed to establish the predictors of quality of life (including sociodemographic, health, psychosocial, and pre-injury factors) 24 months after a noncatastrophic road traffic injury. In a prospective cohort study of 252 participants with mild/moderate injury sustained in a road traffic crash, quality of life was measured 24 months following the baseline survey. A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on various potential explanatory variables. Health-related quality of life was measured using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-12 (SF-12). Multivariable linear regression analyses determined the associations between explanatory variables and quality of life measures. Mean SF-12 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores increased by 7.3 and 2.5 units, respectively, from baseline to 24-month follow-up. Each 10-year increase in baseline age was independently associated with 3.1-unit (P < .001) and 1.5-unit (P = .001) decrease in EQ Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and SF-12 PCS scores at follow-up, respectively. Poor/fair compared to excellent pre-injury health was associated with a 0.16-, 21.3-, and 11.5-unit decrease in EQ-5D summary (P = .03), VAS scores (P = .001), and SF-12 PCS scores (P < .001), respectively. Baseline pain severity ratings and pain catastrophizing scores were inversely associated with 24-month EQ VAS scores (both P < .001). Each unit increase in baseline pain score (P = .001) and pain catastrophizing score (P = .02) was associated with a 1.0- and 4.6-unit decrease in SF-12 MCS scores at 24 months, respectively. Other observed predictors of quality of life measures (EQ-5D summary and/or VAS scores and/ or SF-12 MCS) included marital status, smoking, hospital admission, pre-injury

  9. The role of motorcycle taxi drivers in the pre-hospital care of road traffic injury victims in rural Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Naira; Mello, Michael J; Clark, Melissa A

    2010-08-01

    This study explored the role of motorcycle taxi drivers in the pre-hospital care of road traffic injury victims in the province of Monte Plata, Dominican Republic. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of 58 motorcycle taxi drivers working at six different highway taxi posts. The majority of drivers surveyed (67.2%) indicated witnessing a motor vehicle crash. The most common type of help drivers reported providing was transportation of crash victims (41%). Only 15.8% of drivers had ever attended a first-aid course but 84.5% expressed interest in attending a course if given the opportunity.

  10. Road traffic accidents in Dubai, 2002-2008.

    PubMed

    Al Marzooqi, Ali Hassan; Badi, Mohamed; El Jack, Aizeldin

    2010-07-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are among the leading causes of mortality in Dubai, and the burden of the problem on the health system is vast. This study aims to explore trends in road traffic accidents and to identify the most common factors associated with RTIs. A cross-sectional study was conducted using secondary data for the period from 2002 to 2008. Dubai reported steadily increasing numbers of road traffic injuries, from 2203 in the year 2002 to 3043 in the year 2008, representing a 38% increase. The associated mortality showed the same trend with an overall increase of 54% during the same period. The age distribution of road traffic injuries per 100 000 in the population shows 2 peaks in the age groups 18 to 26 years and 63 to 71 years. The trend of road traffic fatalities is increasing among UAE nationals as well as expatriates. RTIs were found to be more frequent on roads with high speed limits and with the presence of trucks. Further research is needed to identify associated risk factors.

  11. [Road traffic injuries in Catalonia (Spain): an approach using the minimum data set for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources].

    PubMed

    Clèries, Montse; Bosch, Anna; Vela, Emili; Bustins, Montse

    2015-09-01

    To verify the usefulness of the minimum data set (MDS) for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources for the study of road traffic injuries and to describe the use of health resources in Catalonia (Spain). The study population consisted of patients treated in any kind of emergency service and patients admitted for acute hospitalization in Catalonia in 2013. A descriptive analysis was performed by age, gender, time and clinical variables. A total of 48,150 patients were treated in hospital emergency departments, 6,210 were attended in primary care, and 4,912 were admitted to hospital. There was a higher proportion of men (56.2%), mainly aged between 20 and 40 years. Men accounted for 54.9% of patients with minor injuries and 75.1% of those with severe injuries. Contusions are the most common injury (30.2%), followed by sprains (28.7%). Fractures mostly affected persons older than 64 years, internal injuries particularly affected men older than 64 years, and wounds mainly affected persons younger than 18 years and older than 64 years. In the adult population, the severity of the injuries increased with age, leading to longer length of stay and greater complexity. Hospital mortality was 0.2%. Fractures, internal injuries and wounds were more frequent in the group of very serious injuries, and sprains and contusions in the group of minor injuries. MDS records (acute hospitals and emergency resources) provide information that is complementary to other sources of information on traffic accidents, increasing the completeness of the data. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcomes of road traffic injuries before and after the implementation of a camera ticketing system: a retrospective study from a large trauma center in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghnam, Suliman; Alkelya, Muhamad; Alfraidy, Moath; Al-Bedah, Khalid; Albabtain, Ibrahim Tawfiq; Alshenqeety, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the third leading cause of death in Saudi Arabia. Because speed is a major risk factor for severe crash-related injuries, a camera ticketing system was implemented countrywide in mid-2010 by the traffic police in an effort to improve traffic safety. There are no published studies on the effects of the system in Saudi Arabia. To examine injury severity and associated mortality at a large trauma center before and after the implementation of the ticketing system. Retrospective, analytical. Trauma center of a tertiary care center in Riyadh. The study included all trauma registry patients seen in the emergency department for a crash-related injury (automobile occupants, pedestrians, or motorcyclists) between January 2005 and December 2014. Associations with outcome measures were assessed by univariate and multivariate methods. Injury severity score (ISS), Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and mortality. The study included all trauma registry patients seen in the emergency department for a crash-related injury. All health outcomes improved in the period following implementation of the ticketing system. Following implementation, ISS scores decreased (-3.1, 95% CI -4.6, -1.6) and GCS increased (0.47, 95% CI 0.08, 0.87) after adjusting for other covariates. The odds of death were 46% lower following implementation than before implementation. When the data were log-transformed to account for skewed data distributions, the results remained statistically significant. This study suggests positive health implications following the implementation of the camera ticketing system. Further investment in public health interventions is warranted to reduce preventable RTIs. The study findings represent a trauma center at a single hospital in Riyadh, which may not generalize to the Saudi population.

  13. Driving following Kava Use and Road Traffic Injuries: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Fiji (TRIP 14)

    PubMed Central

    Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Robinson, Elizabeth; Herman, Josephine; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between kava use and the risk of four-wheeled motor vehicle crashes in Fiji. Kava is a traditional beverage commonly consumed in many Pacific Island Countries. Herbal anxiolytics containing smaller doses of kava are more widely available. Methods Data for this population-based case-control study were collected from drivers of ‘case’ vehicles involved in serious injury-involved crashes (where at least one road user was killed or admitted to hospital for 12 hours or more) and ‘control’ vehicles representative of ‘driving time’ in the study base. Structured interviewer administered questionnaires collected self-reported participant data on demographic characteristics and a range of risk factors including kava use and potential confounders. Unconditional logistic regression models estimated odds ratios relating to the association between kava use and injury-involved crash risk. Findings Overall, 23% and 4% of drivers of case and control vehicles, respectively, reported consuming kava in the 12 hours prior to the crash or road survey. After controlling for assessed confounders, driving following kava use was associated with a four-fold increase in the odds of crash involvement (Odds ratio: 4.70; 95% CI: 1.90–11.63). The related population attributable risk was 18.37% (95% CI: 13.77–22.72). Acknowledging limited statistical power, we did not find a significant interaction in this association with concurrent alcohol use. Conclusion In this study conducted in a setting where recreational kava consumption is common, driving following the use of kava was associated with a significant excess of serious-injury involved road crashes. The precautionary principle would suggest road safety strategies should explicitly recommend avoiding driving following kava use, particularly in communities where recreational use is common. PMID:26930404

  14. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. Methods A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Conclusions Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process. PMID:21059243

  15. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach.

    PubMed

    Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Hasselberg, Marie; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Johansson, Eva

    2010-11-08

    Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process.

  16. Road accident rates: strategies and programmes for improving road traffic safety.

    PubMed

    Goniewicz, K; Goniewicz, M; Pawłowski, W; Fiedor, P

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the problem of road accident rates is one of the most important health and social policy issues concerning the countries in all continents. Each year, nearly 1.3 million people worldwide lose their life on roads, and 20-50 million sustain severe injuries, the majority of which require long-term treatment. The objective of the study was to identify the most frequent, constantly occurring causes of road accidents, as well as outline actions constituting a basis for the strategies and programmes aiming at improving traffic safety on local and global levels. Comparative analysis of literature concerning road safety was performed, confirming that although road accidents had a varied and frequently complex background, their causes have changed only to a small degree over the years. The causes include: lack of control and enforcement concerning implementation of traffic regulation (primarily driving at excessive speed, driving under the influence of alcohol, and not respecting the rights of other road users (mainly pedestrians and cyclists), lack of appropriate infrastructure and unroadworthy vehicles. The number of fatal accidents and severe injuries, resulting from road accidents, may be reduced through applying an integrated approach to safety on roads. The strategies and programmes for improving road traffic should include the following measures: reducing the risk of exposure to an accident, prevention of accidents, reduction in bodily injuries sustained in accidents, and reduction of the effects of injuries by improvement of post-accident medical care.

  17. Burden of road traffic injuries and related risk factors in low and middle-income Pacific Island countries and territories: a systematic review of the scientific literature (TRIP 5).

    PubMed

    Herman, Josephine; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Jackson, Rod

    2012-06-25

    In Pacific Island countries and territories, the burden of road traffic injuries and their attendant risks are considered significant but are poorly quantified. As with other low and middle-income countries, understanding the epidemiology of road traffic injuries in Pacific countries is critical to informing sustainable research and policy initiatives aimed at reducing this burden. We undertook a systematic review and critical appraisal of the relevant epidemiological literature between January 1980 and December 2010, using key search strings for incidence and aetiological studies focusing on RTIs in less resourced Pacific countries. Nineteen studies were identified. The majority were descriptive and were unable to provide population-based estimates of the burden of road crash injury, or reliable information on risk factors using well-designed aetiological research methods. All studies were published more than 10 years ago, and all but three reported on data from Papua New Guinea, thereby limiting the generalisability of findings to the current status in the region. Studies undertaken in Papua New Guinea suggested that RTIs were more frequent among young males, with head injuries the most common cause of death or hospital admission. Two thirds of fatalities occurred at the crash site or soon after admission. Most road crash victims were passengers or pedestrians. Factors postulated to influence the risk of RTIs were travel in open-back utility vehicles, utility vehicle overcrowding, and alcohol. This review suggests that, despite increasing awareness of the importance of addressing road safety among stakeholders in less resourced Pacific Island countries, road traffic injuries have not been a research priority with little relevant current evidence from the region to inform policy. Robust epidemiological research that can assess the magnitude and key determinants of road traffic injuries in these settings is essential to determine context-specific road safety

  18. An early intervention programme had no detectable influence on the health status of people with musculoskeletal injuries following road traffic crashes: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Littleton, S M; Hughes, D C; Poustie, S J; Robinson, B J; Neeman, T; Smith, P N; Cameron, I D

    2014-01-01

    To compare the health status of people with minor injuries from road traffic crashes that are exposed to an early, active intervention programme (intervention group) with those receiving usual care (control group) over a 12 month period. Prospective comparative study using sequential cohorts. People presenting to hospital emergency departments with mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries following road traffic crashes. Physical Component Score (PCS) and Mental Component Score (MCS) of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health status measure; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Functional Rating Index (FRI) recorded immediately post-crash, at 6 months and at 12 months after injury. There were 95 participants allocated to the control group and 98 allocated to the intervention group. Participants were enrolled at a mean of 9.3 days following the crash. There were no significant differences in baseline health measures between the groups. Apart from a small improvement in anxiety for the intervention group, there were no significant differences in health status between the groups. Twenty percent of participants in the intervention group received treatment from external healthcare providers that was inconsistent with the recommendations of the intervention programme. The intervention programme failed to result in a clinically significant improvement in health outcomes compared with usual care. There is some evidence to suggest that the intervention had some psychological benefits, as evidenced by the small improvement in anxiety levels. Limited adherence, frequent use of co-interventions, or other factors (such as intervention content or intensity) may have reduced its effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Public Health Perspective of Road Traffic Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Road traffic accidents (RTAs) have emerged as an important public health issue which needs to be tackled by a multi-disciplinary approach. The trend in RTA injuries and death is becoming alarming in countries like India. The number of fatal and disabling road accident happening is increasing day by day and is a real public health challenge for all the concerned agencies to prevent it. The approach to implement the rules and regulations available to prevent road accidents is often ineffective and half-hearted. Awareness creation, strict implementation of traffic rules, and scientific engineering measures are the need of the hour to prevent this public health catastrophe. This article is intended to create awareness among the health professionals about the various modalities available to prevent road accidents and also to inculcate a sense of responsibility toward spreading the message of road safety as a good citizen of our country. PMID:24479025

  20. Encapsulating Urban Traffic Rhythms into Road Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; Wei, Dong; He, Kun; Gong, Hang; Wang, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Using road GIS (geographical information systems) data and travel demand data for two U.S. urban areas, the dynamical driver sources of each road segment were located. A method to target road clusters closely related to urban traffic congestion was then developed to improve road network efficiency. The targeted road clusters show different spatial distributions at different times of a day, indicating that our method can encapsulate dynamical travel demand information into the road networks. As a proof of concept, when we lowered the speed limit or increased the capacity of road segments in the targeted road clusters, we found that both the number of congested roads and extra travel time were effectively reduced. In addition, the proposed modeling framework provided new insights on the optimization of transport efficiency in any infrastructure network with a specific supply and demand distribution. PMID:24553203

  1. FACTORS AFFECTING ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN BENGHAZI, LIBYA

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghaweel, Ibrahim; Mursi, Saleh A.; Jack, Joel P.; Joel, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the factors responsible for road traffic accidents in Benghazi. Material and Methods: Retrospective and descriptive studies were done in the years 2006-2007. The data was collected from Traffic and License Department, Benghazi. The data were analyzed, based on fatalities, the severely handicapped, hit and run victims and were correlated with age, sex, time, environmental factors, type of roads, etc. Results: One-Thousand-Two-Hundred-Sixty-Five accidents occurred between the years 2006-2007 within the Benghazi city limits; 11.14% of the injuries were fatal; 67.35% of the victims had severe injuries and 21.51% escaped with minor injuries. Table 1 shows that 73.04% lost their lives within the city limits, 13.47% on the fly-over, and 2.12% on minor roads connected to main roads within the city limits. The mean of the accidents and its standard deviation were 16.66± 25.67 with a variance of fatality of 1.54. Conclusion: It is concluded from the studies that major road traffic accidents occur because of environmental stress factors. In addition, fatalities and the seriousness of the accidents depend on a number of factors such as the age of the vehicle, safety measures, human error and time and place of accident. PMID:23012183

  2. a Combination of Geospatial and Clinical Analysis in Predicting Disability Outcome after Road Traffic Injury (rti) in a District in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik Hisamuddin, R.; Ruslan, R.; Syed Hatim, N.; Sharifah Mastura, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    This was a Prospective Cohort Study commencing from July 2011 until June 2013 involving all injuries related to motor vehicle crashes (MVC) attended Emergency Departments (ED) of two tertiary centers in a district in Malaysia. Selected attributes were geospatially analyzed by using ARCGIS (by ESRI) software version 10.1 licensed to the institution and Google Map free software and multiple logistic regression was performed by using SPSS version 22.0. A total of 439 cases were recruited. The mean age (SD) of the MVC victims was 26.04 years (s.d 15.26). Male comprised of 302 (71.7%) of the cases. Motorcyclists were the commonest type of victims involved [351(80.0%)]. Hotspot MVC locations occurred at certain intersections and on roads within borough of Kenali and Binjai. The number of severely injured and polytrauma are mostly on the road network within speed limit of 60 km/hour. A person with an increase in ISS of one score had a 37 % higher odd to have disability at hospital discharge (95% CI: 1.253, 1.499, p-value < 0.001). Pediatric age group (less than 19 years of age) had 52.1% lesser odds to have disability at discharge from hospital (95% CI: 0.258, 0.889, p-value < 0.001) and patients who underwent operation for definitive management had 4.14 times odds to have disability at discharge from hospital (95% CI: 1.681, 10.218, p-value = 0.002). Overall this study has proven that GIS with a combination of traditional statistical analysis is still a powerful tool in road traffic injury (RTI) related research.

  3. Outcome 3 years after a road traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Mayou, Richard; Bryant, Bridget

    2002-05-01

    Road traffic accidents are known to have significant consequences for mental state and quality of life in the ensuing year that are largely unrelated to the nature of the injuries. Little is known of longer-term outcome in a representative population. Questionnaires covering mental state and social adjustment were sent to 770 subjects who had previously participated in a prospective study of consecutive attenders at an emergency department following a road traffic accident and who had completed questionnaires at baseline, 3 months and 1 year. Outcomes were not predicted by measures related to injury type or severity but were predicted by baseline and later non-injury variables. Replies were received from 507 (66%) subjects. Although 76% of injuries were medically minor bruises and lacerations, 132 (26%) reported symptoms of psychiatric disorder and 104 (21 %) moderate or severe pain at 3 years. There was little evidence of improvement in prevalence between 1 and 3 years, with continuing physical symptoms, psychiatric disorder and reported consequences for everyday life. There was a significant reduction in the number of cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) despite there being 21 late onset cases. Psychiatric outcomes and pain were unrelated to the severity of injury and were largely predicted by post-accident variables. Road traffic accidents have much greater consequences than would be expected from the largely minor nature of the physical injuries. There is a need for changes in medical care and in socio-legal procedures.

  4. A queuing model for road traffic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrouahane, N.; Aissani, D.; Bouallouche-Medjkoune, L.; Farhi, N.

    2015-03-10

    We present in this article a stochastic queuing model for the raod traffic. The model is based on the M/G/c/c state dependent queuing model, and is inspired from the deterministic Godunov scheme for the road traffic simulation. We first propose a variant of M/G/c/c state dependent model that works with density-flow fundamental diagrams rather than density-speed relationships. We then extend this model in order to consider upstream traffic demand as well as downstream traffic supply. Finally, we show how to model a whole raod by concatenating raod sections as in the deterministic Godunov scheme.

  5. Road traffic casualties: understanding the night‐time death toll

    PubMed Central

    Plainis, S; Murray, I J; Pallikaris, I G

    2006-01-01

    A disproportionate number of fatal injuries occur after dark. The paper presents some statistics of road traffic injuries in a novel way which suggests that low luminance plays a major role in this effect. A sound physiological explanation for this is advanced based on the poor temporal characteristics of rod photoreceptors. It is argued that processing information based on low luminance, low contrast targets is much slower than that for high contrast bright targets. To test the idea, simple visual reaction times were measured under typical low visibility conditions encountered on non‐lit roads and were found to be substantially longer than under optimal conditions. It is shown that longer reaction times translate into significantly increased stopping distances. This important point has received insufficient attention in the road safety literature, by the Highways Agency, the police, injury prevention officials, and the UK Highway Code. PMID:16595429

  6. Road traffic collisions-case fatality rate, crash injury rate, and number of motor vehicles: time trends between a developed and developing country.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, Sanchia S; Baloch, Khalid; Porter, Keith; Sargeant, Ian; Punchihewa, Gamini

    2010-09-01

    Road traffic collisions (RTCs) are one of the most common preventable causes of death and disability worldwide. We investigated changes in numbers of motor vehicles, case fatality rate, and crash injury rate for the most present recorded year (2002) 5 and 10 years before that in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Sri Lanka (SL). We also investigated environmental and individual factors impacting patients at South Birmingham Trauma Unit, U.K. and Colombo General Hospital, SL. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study (both quantitative and qualitative). Over the 10-year period, numbers of motor vehicles have risen in both countries; the crash injury remained stable in both countries. Case fatality rate (far higher) in SL has decreased, as in the U.K.. Three hundred and twenty-five patients took part in the survey in SL, with 83 in the U.K. In the categories investigated, including patient demographics, RTC environment, visual impairment, pedestrian and driver factors, the majority of results were significantly different between the two countries. Target factors such as inadequate street lighting, visual impairment, speeding, and not wearing seatbelts at time of accident were identified, and recommendations developed as a result.

  7. Risk differences between children and adults in road traffic injuries: a descriptive study from a tertiary-care hospital in a low-income country.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Muazzam, Sana

    2012-06-01

    Our study attempted to describe the differences in circumstances, risk groups, and severity of road traffic injuries (RTIs) among injured children (1-15 years) and adults (≥16 years) coming to the tertiary-care hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Past medical records from June 2006 to May 2007 of injured patients coming to the Emergency Department of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi were reviewed. Data were recorded regarding the basic epidemiological features, hospital stay, body parts that are injured, and severity of injuries. Of 411 RTI patients, males outnumbered females by a ratio of 4 : 1 accounting for 81% (n = 333) of injured. Among pedestrians (82; 20%), females were injured more than males (38 vs. 16%; P < 0.01). When compared with adults, injured children were mostly pedestrians (18 vs. 36%; P = 0.01) and presented with severe Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (9 vs. 18%; P = 0.02). Among adults, most RTIs were caused by two wheelers crashing with four wheelers (16 vs. 19%; P = 0.01). Motor vehicle occupants (adjusted odds ratio: 3.04; 95% confidence interval: 1.382-6.668) were more likely to have severe GCS (GCS < 8) even after adjusting for injury severity. The study may assist local authorities in Karachi to prioritize interventions to address common injuries among those who are at a high risk for RTIs. Further quantitative and qualitative studies are needed to assess the factors leading to RTIs among pedestrians in Karachi.

  8. The association of compensation on longer term health status for people with musculoskeletal injuries following road traffic crashes: emergency department inception cohort study.

    PubMed

    Littleton, S M; Cameron, I D; Poustie, S J; Hughes, D C; Robinson, B J; Neeman, T; Smith, P N

    2011-09-01

    To compare the health status of people claiming compensation for injuries sustained in road traffic crashes (RTC), with people who do not claim compensation. Prospective cohort study. Australian Capital Territory, Australia and a fault based common law compensation scheme. People presenting to the emergency department with mild to moderate musculoskeletal injury following RTC. Physical Component Score (PCS) and Mental Component Score (MCS) of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health status measure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Functional Rating Index (FRI). These measures are recorded immediately post crash, at 6 and 12 months post crash. 95 people participated in the study and were enrolled a mean of 8.6 (median 8) days following the crash. 86% were followed up to 12 months after injury. Mean age was 37 years, 61% were female and 91% were employed at the time of their injury.33%ultimately claimed compensation, and 25% engaged a lawyer. There were no major differences in baseline personal characteristics or injury related factors between the groups. As expected, involvement as a passenger and in multiple vehicle crashes, were more frequent in the group claiming compensation. Over the duration of the study claiming compensation was associated with lower SF-36 PCS (5.5 (95%CI 8.6 to 2.4), p = 0.001), greater HADS-Anxiety (1.7 (95%CI 0.2–3.3), p = 0.048), and worse FRI (11.2 (95%CI 3.9–18.5), p = 0.003). There was a highly significant improvement in health status between baseline and 6 months after injury, but no further significant change between 6 and 12 months after injury. There was no difference in rate of improvement between the groups. Claiming compensation and psychological factors were independent predictors of worse health status at 12 months. In this study the group claiming compensation had overall worse health status following mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries over the course of the study. There was no difference in rate of

  9. Did Chile's traffic law reform push police enforcement? Understanding Chile's traffic fatalities and injuries reduction.

    PubMed

    Nazif-Munoz, José Ignacio; Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie; van den Berg, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the current study is to determine to what extent the reduction of Chile's traffic fatalities and injuries during 2000-2012 was related to the police traffic enforcement increment registered after the introduction of its 2005 traffic law reform. A unique dataset with assembled information from public institutions and analyses based on ordinary least square and robust random effects models was carried out. Dependent variables were traffic fatality and severe injury rates per population and vehicle fleet. Independent variables were: (1) presence of new national traffic law; (2) police officers per population; (3) number of traffic tickets per police officer; and (4) interaction effect of number of traffic tickets per police officer with traffic law reform. Oil prices, alcohol consumption, proportion of male population 15-24 years old, unemployment, road infrastructure investment, years' effects and regions' effects represented control variables. Empirical estimates from instrumental variables suggest that the enactment of the traffic law reform in interaction with number of traffic tickets per police officer is significantly associated with a decrease of 8% in traffic fatalities and 7% in severe injuries. Piecewise regression model results for the 2007-2012 period suggest that police traffic enforcement reduced traffic fatalities by 59% and severe injuries by 37%. Findings suggest that traffic law reforms in order to have an effect on both traffic fatality and injury rates reduction require changes in police enforcement practices. Last, this case also illustrates how the diffusion of successful road safety practices globally promoted by WHO and World Bank can be an important influence for enhancing national road safety practices. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. The Role of Marital Status in the Association between Benzodiazepines, Psychotropics and Injurious Road Traffic Crashes: A Register-Based Nationwide Study of Senior Drivers in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Johnell, Kristina; Laflamme, Lucie; Möller, Jette; Monárrez-Espino, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Background Among senior drivers, benzodiazepines (BZDs) have a documented effect on the risk of road traffic crashes (RTCs). It remains unclear however if BZDs play the same role when considering marital status. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of marital status in the association between BZD use and injurious RTCs among senior drivers. Methods Matched case-control study based on five national Swedish registers (n = 154 225). Cases comprised the first non-alcohol-related injurious RTC sustained by drivers aged 50–80 years from July 2005 to December 2009 and controls included registered residents with a valid license who did not crash during that period. Four controls were matched to each case by sex, age and place of residence. Conditional logistic regression analysis for injurious RTC was performed with adjustment for occupation and number of medications. The main exposure was dispensation of BZDs, alone or in combination with other psychotropic medications, 1–30 days prior to the crash date stratified by marital status. Results BZD use, alone or in combination with other psychotropic medications, increased the risk of being involved in an RTC (BZD only: adjusted OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.17–1.36; BZDs and other psychotropics: adjusted OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12–1.41). Compared to married drivers, those divorced (1.48, 1.43–1.53) and widowed (1.54; 1.45–1.63) had higher adjusted ORs. Marital status modified the association between BZDs and RTCs, particularly among younger male drivers. Conclusions Both BZDs and marital status independently affect the risk for senior drivers to be involved in an RTC. However, marital status plays a role in the association between BZD use and RTCs and this may have implications for targeting risk populations for RTCs among senior drivers. PMID:24489781

  11. Comparison of health outcomes between hospitalised and non-hospitalised persons with minor injuries sustained in a road traffic crash in Australia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Maher, Christopher G; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Cameron, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This prospective cohort study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in health outcomes among persons with mild or moderate injuries who were hospitalised compared with those not hospitalised following a road traffic crash. Setting Sydney Metropolitan, New South Wales, Australia. Participants Persons aged ≥18 years involved in a motor vehicle crash were surveyed at baseline (n=364), and at 12 (n=284) and 24 months (n=252). A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on a range of socioeconomic, and preinjury and postinjury psychological and heath characteristics of all participants. Primary outcome measure Participants who reported admission to hospital for 24 h or more (but less than 7 days) after the crash were classified as being hospitalised; those admitted for less than 24 h were classified as non-hospitalised. Results Around 1 in 5 participants (19.0%) were hospitalised for ≥24 h after the crash. After adjusting for age and sex, hospitalised participants compared with those not hospitalised had approximately 2.6 units (p=0.01) lower Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS) scores (poorer physical well-being) and approximately 4.9 units lower European Quality of Life visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) scores (p=0.05), 12 months later. After further adjusting for education level, whiplash, fracture and injury severity score, participants who were hospitalised had approximately 3.3 units lower SF-12 PCS (p=0.04), 12 months later. The association with EQ-VAS did not persist after multivariable adjustment. No significant differences were observed between the 2 groups in health outcomes at 24-month follow-up. Conclusions These findings indicate that long-term health status is unlikely to be influenced by hospitalisation status after sustaining a mild/moderate injury in a vehicle-related crash. PMID:26408286

  12. Road traffic noise, sleep and mental health.

    PubMed

    Sygna, Karin; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Aamodt, Geir; Oftedal, Bente; Krog, Norun Hjertager

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the relationship between road traffic noise, self-reported sleep quality and mental health. The study is cross-sectional and based on data from a survey conducted in Oslo, Norway, in 2000. Psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Checklist, HSCL-25) was measured along with self-reported somatic health, sleep quality, noise sensitivity and socioeconomic variables. Questionnaire data were combined with modeled estimates of noise exposure. The total study sample consisted of 2898 respondents. After adjustment for potential confounders and stratifying for sleep quality, we found a positive, but not statistically significant association between noise exposure and symptoms of psychological distress among participants with poor sleep quality (slope=0.06, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.13, per 10 dB increase in noise exposure). In the same sleep quality group, we found a borderline statistically significant association between noise exposure and a symptom level indicating a probable mental disorder (HSCL≥1.55) (odds ratio=1.47, 95% CI: 0.99-1.98, per 10 dB increase in noise exposure). We found no association between road traffic noise and mental health among subjects reporting good and medium sleep quality. The results suggest that road traffic noise may be associated with poorer mental health among subjects with poor sleep. Individuals with poor sleep quality may be more vulnerable to effects of road traffic noise on mental health than individuals with better sleep quality.

  13. Subjective Response to Road Traffic Noise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, I. D.; Langdon, F. J.

    A study consisting of acoustic measurements at fourteen sites in the London area and 1200 interviews dealing with the effects of the noise conditions prevailing at each of these sites has been carried out with the object of developing acceptability criteria for traffic noise from roads in residential areas. Dissatisfaction with the noise…

  14. Regulation of Traffic Lights at Road Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutolo, Alfredo; Manzo, Rosanna; Rarità, Luigi

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we aim to investigate the effects of traffic lights regulation at road junctions, modelled by a fluid dynamic approach. Numerical simulations prove that it is possible to plan some optimization strategies for green and red phases for networks consisting of more nodes.

  15. Road safety and road traffic accidents in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mansuri, Farah A.; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H.; Zalat, Marwa M.; Qabshawi, Reem I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the changing trends and crucial preventive approaches to road traffic accidents (RTAs) adopted in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) over the last 2.5 decades, and to analyze aspects previously overlooked. Methods: This systematic review was based on evidence of RTAs in KSA. All articles published during the last 25 years on road traffic accident in KSA were analyzed. This study was carried out from December 2013 to May 2014 in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, KSA. Results: Road traffic accidents accounted for 83.4% of all trauma admissions in 1984-1989, and no such overall trend was studied thereafter. The most frequently injured body regions as reported in the latest studies were head and neck, followed by upper and lower extremities, which was found to be opposite to that of the studies reported earlier. Hospital data showed an 8% non-significant increase in road accident mortalities in contrast to police records of a 27% significant reduction during the years 2005-2010. Excessive speeding was the most common cause reported in all recent and past studies. Conclusion: Disparity was common in the type of reporting of RTAs, outcome measures, and possible causes over a period of 2.5 decade. All research exclusively looked into the drivers’ faults. A sentinel surveillance of road crashes should be kept in place in the secondary and tertiary care hospitals for all regions of KSA. PMID:25828277

  16. Gypsies' response to road traffic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, I. D.; Raw, G. J.; Hill, C. A.; Storrar, J. M.

    1985-07-01

    A survey was carried out at 11 gypsy sites, in order to determine the extent to which gypsies are bothered by road traffic noise. Interviews were obtained with 149 gypsies, providing data on noise bother and satisfaction with other aspects of the sites. Noise measurements were carried out at each site, providing values of 18 hr L eq dB(A). The hypothesis, that gypsies would be less bothered by road traffic noise than the settled population, was based on consideration of the importance of the road in gypsies' lives, and on a small pilot study. This hypothesis was supported. In addition, there was no indication that noise bother was correlated with noise level. From a closer inspection of this result, a further hypothesis has been developed, that gypsies living in caravans may tend to migrate to sites at which the noise level is acceptable in the context of other site features.

  17. [Definition of hospital discharge, serious injury and death from traffic injuries].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Katherine; Seguí-Gómez, María; Arrufat, Vita; Barberia, Eneko; Cabeza, Elena; Cirera, Eva; Gil, Mercedes; Martín, Carlos; Novoa, Ana M; Olabarría, Marta; Lardelli, Pablo; Suelves, Josep Maria; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Road traffic injury surveillance involves methodological difficulties due, among other reasons, to the lack of consensus criteria for case definition. Police records have usually been the main source of information for monitoring traffic injuries, while health system data has hardly been used. Police records usually include comprehensive information on the characteristics of the crash, but often underreport injury cases and do not collect reliable information on the severity of injuries. However, statistics on severe traffic injuries have been based almost exclusively on police data. The aim of this paper is to propose criteria based on medical records to define: a) "Hospital discharge for traffic injuries", b) "Person with severe traffic injury", and c) "Death from traffic injuries" in order to homogenize the use of these sources. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  18. Predictors of non-return to work 2 years post-injury in road traffic crash survivors: Results from the UQ SuPPORT study.

    PubMed

    Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Warren, Jacelle; Kenardy, Justin A

    2017-06-01

    Individuals who have sustained an injury from a road traffic crash (RTC) are at increased risk for long lasting health problems and non-return to work (NRTW). Determining the predictors of NRTW is necessary to develop screening tools to identify at-risk individuals and to provide early targeted intervention for successful return to work (RTW). The aim of this study was to identify factors that can predict which individuals will not RTW following minor or moderate injuries sustained from a RTC. Participants were 194 claimants (63.4% female) within a common-law "fault-based" system from the UQ SuPPORT cohort who were working prior to their RTC. Participants were assessed at 6 months on a variety of physical and mental health measures and RTW status was determined at 2 years post-RTC. RTW rate was 78.4%. Univariate predictors of NRTW included being the driver or passenger, having a prior psychiatric diagnosis, high disability level, low mental or physical quality of life, predicted non-recovery, high pain, low function, high expectations of pain persistency, low expectations about RTW, having a psychiatric diagnosis, elevated depression or anxiety. The final multivariable logistic regression model included only two variables: disability level and expectations about RTW. Seventy-five percent of individuals who will not RTW by 2 years can be identified accurately at an early stage, using only these two predictors. The results are promising, because they suggest that having information about two factors, which are easily obtainable, can predict with accuracy those who will require additional support to facilitate RTW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brazilian Road Traffic Fatalities: A Spatial and Environmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Luciano; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Rodrigues, Clarissa Garcia; Finato, Karen; Carvalho, Elias; Pietrobon, Ricardo; de Souza, Eniuce Menezes; Nihei, Oscar Kenji; Lynch, Catherine; de Barros Carvalho, Maria Dalva

    2014-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTI) are a major public health epidemic killing thousands of people daily. Low and middle-income countries, such as Brazil, have the highest annual rates of road traffic fatalities. In order to improve road safety, this study mapped road traffic fatalities on a Brazilian highway to determine the main environmental factors affecting road traffic fatalities. Methods and Findings Four techniques were utilized to identify and analyze RTI hotspots. We used spatial analysis by points by applying kernel density estimator, and wavelet analysis to identify the main hot regions. Additionally, built environment analysis, and principal component analysis were conducted to verify patterns contributing to crash occurrence in the hotspots. Between 2007 and 2009, 379 crashes were notified, with 466 fatalities on BR277. Higher incidence of crashes occurred on sections of highway with double lanes (ratio 2∶1). The hotspot analysis demonstrated that both the eastern and western regions had higher incidences of crashes when compared to the central region. Through the built environment analysis, we have identified five different patterns, demonstrating that specific environmental characteristics are associated with different types of fatal crashes. Patterns 2 and 4 are constituted mainly by predominantly urban characteristics and have frequent fatal pedestrian crashes. Patterns 1, 3 and 5 display mainly rural characteristics and have higher prevalence of vehicular collisions. In the built environment analysis, the variables length of road in urban area, limited lighting, double lanes roadways, and less auxiliary lanes were associated with a higher incidence of fatal crashes. Conclusions By combining different techniques of analyses, we have identified numerous hotspots and environmental characteristics, which governmental or regulatory agencies could make use to plan strategies to reduce RTI and support life-saving policies. PMID:24498051

  20. FWFA Optimization based Decision Support System for Road Traffic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, D. N.; Zaki, F. A.; Munjeri, I. J.; Putri, N. U.

    2017-01-01

    Several ways and efforts have been already conducted to formally solve the road traffic congestion. However, the objective strategy type of road traffic engineering could not be proven truly. Try and error is one inefficient way in road traffic engineering to degrade the level of congestion. The combination between fuzzy-logic and water flow algorithm methods (called FWFA) was used as a main method to construct the decision support system (DSS) for selecting the objective strategy in road traffic engineering. The proposed DSS can suggest the most optimal strategy decision in road traffic engineering. Here, a main traffic road of Juanda in area Ciputat, Tangerang Selatan, province Banten, Indonesia; was selected as a research object in this study. The constructed DSS for road traffic engineering was structurally delivered in this paper.

  1. Impact of road traffic accidents on the elderly.

    PubMed

    Etehad, H; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Sh; Davoudi-Kiakalaye, A; Moghadam Dehnadi, A; Hemati, H; Mohtasham-Amiri, Z

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are a vulnerable road user group with high mortality and morbidity in road crash. The aim of this study was to show pattern of road traffic injuries in this special aging group. In a cross sectional study, pre-hospital emergency system reports, hospital and police records of all motor vehicle collisions injured above 60 years old who were admitted to Pour-Sina hospital from April 2011 to March 2012 were studied. Demographic data, characteristic of road traffic incidents and in-hospital medical profiles were derived. Data were analyzed with SPSS ver. 18. Differences between demographic and injuries situation were calculated by chi square test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. One thousand three-hundred six old injured were admitted during study period that this amount accounted for 8.7% of total road accident injured. Mean age of them was 70.9 ± 6.7 years. Most of them were male (74.7%). 40.5% were pedestrians, 22.1% were car occupants and 19.1% were motorcyclists.76.7% had multiple trauma. Head and neck were the most prevalent regions of injured. Total in-hospital mortality rate was 10.1% that was higher in old elderly pedestrians and motorcyclists in comparison to young elderly (16.1% vs. 7.9%) and other type of victims (ρ<0.000). One thousand three-hundred six old injured were admitted during study period that this amount accounted for 8.7% of total road accident injured. Mean age of them was 70.9 ± 6.7 years. Most of them were male (74.7%). 40.5% were pedestrians, 22.1% were car occupants and 19.1% were motorcyclists.76.7% had multiple trauma. Head and neck were the most prevalent regions of injured. Total in-hospital mortality rate was 10.1% that was higher in old elderly pedestrians and motorcyclists in comparison to young elderly (16.1% vs. 7.9%) and other type of victims (ρ<0.000). High mortality rate of road traffic injuries in this group especially in pedestrians should be taken into consideration and strategies

  2. Road safety: serious injuries remain a major unsolved problem.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ben; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark C; Judson, Rodney T; Teague, Warwick; Lyons, Ronan A; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2017-09-18

    To investigate temporal trends in the incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and costs of health loss caused by serious road traffic injury. A retrospective review of data from the population-based Victorian State Trauma Registry and the National Coronial Information System on road traffic-related deaths (pre- and in-hospital) and major trauma (Injury Severity Score > 12) during 2007-2015.Main outcomes and measures: Temporal trends in the incidence of road traffic-related major trauma, mortality, DALYs, and costs of health loss, by road user type. There were 8066 hospitalised road traffic major trauma cases and 2588 road traffic fatalities in Victoria over the 9-year study period. There was no change in the incidence of hospitalised major trauma for motor vehicle occupants (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per year, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.99-1.01; P = 0.70), motorcyclists (IRR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01; P = 0.45) or pedestrians (IRR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.97-1.02; P = 0.73), but the incidence for pedal cyclists increased 8% per year (IRR, 1.08; 95% CI; 1.05-1.10; P < 0.001). While DALYs declined for motor vehicle occupants (by 13% between 2007 and 2015), motorcyclists (32%), and pedestrians (5%), there was a 56% increase in DALYs for pedal cyclists. The estimated costs of health loss associated with road traffic injuries exceeded $14 billion during 2007-2015, although the cost per patient declined for all road user groups. As serious injury rates have not declined, current road safety targets will be difficult to meet. Greater attention to preventing serious injury is needed, as is further investment in road safety, particularly for pedal cyclists.

  3. Metropolitan Road Traffic Simulation on FPGAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp J. L.; Mortveit, H. S.; Hansson, A. A.; Gokhale, M.

    2005-01-01

    This work demonstrates that road traffic simulation of entire metropolitan areas is possible with reconfigurable supercomputing that combines 64-bit microprocessors and FPGAs in a high bandwidth, low latency interconnect. Previously, traffic simulation on FPGAs was limited to very short road segments or required a very large number of FPGAs. Our data streaming approach overcomes scaling issues associated with direct implementations and still allows for high-level parallelism by dividing the data sets between hardware and software across the reconfigurable supercomputer. Using one FPGA on the Cray XD1 supercomputer, we are able to achieve a 34.4 x speed up over the AMD microprocessor. System integration issues must be optimized to exploit this speedup in the overall simulation.

  4. Basic Characteristics of Road Traffic Deaths in China

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Xujun; YAO, Hongyan; HU, Guoqing; CUI, Mengjing; GU, Yue; XIANG, Huiyun

    2013-01-01

    Background This study is to report characteristics of people killed in road traffic crashes and to describe major patterns of traffic crashes in China. Methods: Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted. Road traffic death national data, population denominator data and motor vehicles data of 2009 were obtained from the Bureau of Traffic Management at Ministry of Public Security and National Bureau of Statistics. The association between the fatalities from road traffic crashes and selected demographic factors, the time distribution, crash patterns, crash causes, and road user category were assessed in χ2 analyses. Results: Road traffic crashes in China disproportionably affected the following populations: males, persons 21–65 yr of age and adults aged more than 65 yr, persons living in rural areas, pedestrians, passengers, motorcyclists and bicyclists. Approximately 50% of fatalities of road traffic crash occurred in Eastern regions. The number of road traffic deaths was higher in daytime than in nighttime. Road traffic deaths in frontal crashes, side-to-side crash and crashes with an object or a person were more common than in rear-end crashes. In about 92% of road traffic deaths, auto drivers were believed to be responsible for the fatal crash. Major crash causing factors were speeding, careless driving, driving without a license, driving in the wrong lane, and driving after drinking alcohol. Conclusions: Road traffic deaths accounted for about 70,000 premature deaths in China which should be taken into account. PMID:23515114

  5. Global Progress in Road Injury Mortality since 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Peishan; Schwebel, David C.; Huang, Helai; Li, Li; Li, Jun; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine progress in global road injury mortality since the initiation of Global Plan for the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011–2020. We examined annual percent changes in age-adjusted road traffic mortality using data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Association between changes in road traffic mortality and legislative efforts in individual nations was explored using data from Global Status Reports on Road Safety 2013 and 2015. We found that global age-adjusted mortality, both overall and for user-specific road traffic injuries, decreased significantly between 2010 and 2013 (annual percent change in rates range from -1.43% to -0.99%). Developed countries witnessed a larger decrease than developing countries in both overall and user-specific road mortality (about 2.0–4.6 times). However, there were substantial disparities within developed countries and within developing countries, with some countries seeing large reductions in mortality rates and others seeing none. The annual percent change in road traffic mortality during 2010–2013 was significantly correlated with total national law enforcement score (Spearman rs = -0.38). We concluded that results highlight the need for continued effort to reduce the burden of road injury mortality, especially in LMIC countries. PMID:27727318

  6. The effect of pre-existing health conditions on the cost of recovery from road traffic injury: insights from data linkage of medicare and compensable injury claims in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Mahmooei, Behrooz; Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Hahn, Youjin; McClure, Roderick J

    2016-04-29

    Comorbidity is known to affect length of hospital stay and mortality after trauma but less is known about its impact on recovery beyond the immediate post-accident care period. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of pre-existing health conditions in the cost of recovery from road traffic injury using health service use records for 1 year before and after the injury. Individuals who claimed Transport Accident Commission (TAC) compensation for a non-catastrophic injury that occurred between 2010 and 2012 in Victoria, Australia and who provided consent for Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) linkage were included (n = 738) in the analysis. PBS and MBS records dating from 12 months prior to injury were provided by the Department of Human Services (Canberra, Australia). Pre-injury use of health service items and pharmaceuticals were considered to indicate pre-existing health condition. Bayesian Model Averaging techniques were used to identify the items that were most strongly correlated with recovery cost. Multivariate regression models were used to determine the impact of these items on the cost of injury recovery in terms of compensated ambulance, hospital, medical, and overall claim cost. Out of the 738 study participants, 688 used at least one medical item (total of 15,625 items) and 427 used at least one pharmaceutical item (total of 9846). The total health service cost of recovery was $10,115,714. The results show that while pre-existing conditions did not have any significant impact on the total cost of recovery, categorical costs were affected: e.g. on average, for every anaesthetic in the year before the accident, hospital cost of recovery increased by 24 % [95 % CI: 13, 36 %] and for each pathological test related to established diabetes, hospital cost increased by $10,407 [5466.78, 15346.28]. For medical costs, each anaesthetic led to $258 higher cost [174.16, 341.16] and every prescription of drugs

  7. Pattern of traffic injuries in Shanghai: implications for control.

    PubMed

    Yan-Hong, Li; Rahim, Yousif; Wei, Lu; Gui-Xiang, Song; Yan, Yu; De Ding, Zhou; Sheng-Nian, Zhang; Shun-Fu, Zhou; Shao-Ming, Chen; Bing-Jie, Yang

    2006-12-01

    In China, traffic-related injuries are often treated as transportation issues, called 'accidents'. The objectives of the research are to analyse traffic injury patterns, estimate costs of traffic injuries and provide evidence to develop effective prevention strategies. There were over 1 500 deaths due to traffic-related injuries annually in Shanghai from 1987 to 2003, and it is rising year by year with the rate of growth in motorization. The rates of annual increase are 3.59% in fatalities (from 7.78 to 14.18 per 100000 population) and 10.46% in non-fatalities (from 53.93 to 264.98 per 100000 population) respectively during the period. The analysis of the geographic information system showed that the geographic distribution of traffic injuries in the countryside regions of Shanghai had the highest rates. Labour force groups represented the majority of fatalities (70.97%) and serious traffic injuries (90.51%). The mortality rates were 18.40 per 100000 population and 10.02 per 100000 population in 45-65 year age group and 15-44 year age group respectively; the morbidity rates of serious traffic injuries were 121.60 per 100000 population and 70.46 per 100000 population in the same groups respectively. And females generally showed a lower incidence than males. In general, fatalities and injuries were higher for drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians. Among road traffic injury-related fatalities, 66.8% were attributed to head injuries. Of those with fatal head injuries, bicyclists accounted for 29.8% of the total; pedestrians accounted for 28.3%; motorcyclists accounted for 25.5%. Total traffic injury cost was estimated at least US $645989580 in Shanghai in 2003. Good injury intervention programmes need to be done as soon as possible to effectively reduce traffic injury burden in Shanghai, China.

  8. Comparison of health outcomes between hospitalised and non-hospitalised persons with minor injuries sustained in a road traffic crash in Australia: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Maher, Christopher G; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Cameron, Ian D

    2015-09-24

    This prospective cohort study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in health outcomes among persons with mild or moderate injuries who were hospitalised compared with those not hospitalised following a road traffic crash. Sydney Metropolitan, New South Wales, Australia. Persons aged ≥18 years involved in a motor vehicle crash were surveyed at baseline (n=364), and at 12 (n=284) and 24 months (n=252). A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on a range of socioeconomic, and preinjury and postinjury psychological and heath characteristics of all participants. Participants who reported admission to hospital for 24 h or more (but less than 7 days) after the crash were classified as being hospitalised; those admitted for less than 24 h were classified as non-hospitalised. Around 1 in 5 participants (19.0%) were hospitalised for ≥24 h after the crash. After adjusting for age and sex, hospitalised participants compared with those not hospitalised had approximately 2.6 units (p=0.01) lower Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS) scores (poorer physical well-being) and approximately 4.9 units lower European Quality of Life visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) scores (p=0.05), 12 months later. After further adjusting for education level, whiplash, fracture and injury severity score, participants who were hospitalised had approximately 3.3 units lower SF-12 PCS (p=0.04), 12 months later. The association with EQ-VAS did not persist after multivariable adjustment. No significant differences were observed between the 2 groups in health outcomes at 24-month follow-up. These findings indicate that long-term health status is unlikely to be influenced by hospitalisation status after sustaining a mild/moderate injury in a vehicle-related crash. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Road traffic accidents in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shanks, N J; Ansari, M; al-Kalai, D

    1994-01-01

    Road traffic accidents are a major health hazard in Saudi Arabia, particularly during Ramadan. The ensuing trauma has increased in direct proportion to the increase in the number of road vehicles. An audit of RTAs over a one-year period revealed that, out of 361 victims, 16% were under 10 years and 47% between 11 and 30 years. None of those involved in accidents was wearing a seat belt. Half of the children injured were pedestrians. There was a male to female ratio of 4:1 reflecting the driving laws in Saudi Arabia. Burst tyres due to intense heat were identified as a common cause (39%) of accidents. The introduction of seat belt legislation and stricter law enforcement should lead to a rapid reduction in morbidity and mortality on the roads in Saudi Arabia.

  10. On urban road traffic state evaluation index system and method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fei; Dong, Honghui; Jia, Limin; Sun, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    Traffic state evaluation is a basic and critical work in the research on road traffic congestion. It can provide basic data support for the improvement measures and information release in traffic management and service. The aim of this research is to obtain a comprehensive value to describe traffic state accurately based on the evaluation index system. In this paper, it is carried out using fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm and fuzzy entropy weight method. In the framework, traffic flow was classified into six different states to determine the fuzzy range of indices using the improved FCM clustering analysis. Besides, fuzzy entropy weight method is proposed to compute the evaluation result of traffic state for section, road and road network, respectively. The experiments based on the traffic information in a subset of Beijing’s road network prove that the findings of traffic evaluation are in accordance with the actual situation and people’s sense of traffic state.

  11. Under-reporting of road traffic crash data in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Salifu, Mohammed; Ackaah, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Having reliable estimates of the shortfalls in road traffic crash data is an important prerequisite for setting more realistic targets for crash/casualty reduction programmes and for a better appreciation of the socio-economic significance of road traffic crashes. This study was carried out to establish realistic estimates of the overall shortfall (under-reporting) in the official crash statistics in Ghana over an eight-year period (1997-2004). Surveys were conducted at hospitals and among drivers to generate relevant alternative data which were then matched against records in police crash data files and the official database. Overall shortfalls came from two sources, namely, 'non-reporting' and 'under-recording'. The results show that the level of non-reporting varied significantly with the severity of the crash from about 57% for property damage crashes through 8% for serious injury crashes to 0% for fatal crashes. Crashes involving cyclists and motorcyclists were also substantially non-reported. Under-recording on the other hand declined significantly over the period from an average of 37% in 1997-1998 to 27% in 2003-2004. Thus, the official statistics of road traffic crashes in Ghana are subject to significant shortfalls that need to be accounted for. Correction factors have therefore been suggested for adjusting the official data.

  12. Road traffic fatalities in selected governorates of Iraq from 2010 to 2013: prospective surveillance.

    PubMed

    Leidman, Eva; Maliniak, Maret; Sultan, Abdul-Salam Saleh; Hassan, Ahmed; Hussain, Syed Jaffar; Bilukha, Oleg O

    2016-01-01

    The insurgency tactics that characterize modern warfare, such as suicide car bombs and roadside bombs, have the potential to significantly impact road traffic injuries in conflict affected-countries. As road traffic incidents are one of the top ten causes of death in Iraq, changes in incidence have important implications for the health system. We aimed to describe patterns of road traffic fatalities for all demographic groups and types of road users in Iraq during a period characterized by a resurgence in insurgency activity. Iraqi Ministry of Health routine prospective injury surveillance collects information on all fatal injuries in eight governorates of Iraq: Baghdad, Al-Anbar, Basrah, Erbil, Kerbala, Maysan, Ninevah, and Al-Sulaimaniya. From all injury fatalities documented at the coroner office, we analyzed only those attributed to road traffic that occurred between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013. Coroners ascertain information from physical examinations, police reports and family members. Analysis included 7,976 road traffic fatalities. Overall, 6,238 (78.2 %) fatalities were male and 2,272 (28.5 %) were children under 18 years of age. The highest numbers of road traffic fatalities were among males 15 to 34 years of age and children of both sexes under 5 years of age. 49.2 % of fatalities occurred among pedestrians. Among children and females, the majority of road traffic fatalities were pedestrians, 69.0 % and 56.6 %, respectively. Fatalities among motorcyclists (3.7 %) and bicyclists (0.4 %) were least common. Rates of road traffic fatalities ranged from 8.6 to 10.7 per 100,000 population. The injury surveillance system provides the first data from a conflict-affected country on road traffic fatalities disaggregated by type of road user. The highest numbers of fatalities were among children and young men. Nearly half of fatalities were pedestrians, a proportion nearly double that of any neighboring country. As insurgency activity increased in

  13. Road Traffic Related Injury Research and Informatics. New Opportunities for Biomedical and Health Informatics as a Contribution to the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals?

    PubMed

    Al-Shorbaji, N; Haux, R; Krishnamurthy, R; Marschollek, M; Mattfeld, D C; Bartolomeos, K; Reynolds, T A

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations has recently adopted 17 sustainable development goals for 2030, including ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages, and making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Road injuries remain among the ten leading causes of death in the world, and are projected to increase with rapidly increasing motorisation globally. Lack of comprehensive data on road injuries has been identified as one of the barriers for effective implementation of proven road safety interventions. Building, linking and analysing electronic patient records in conjunction with establishing injury event and care registries can substantially contribute to healthy lives and safe transportation. Appropriate use of new technological approaches and health informatics best practices could provide significant added value to WHO's global road safety work and assist Member States in identifying prevention targets, monitoring progress and improving quality of care to reduce injury-related deaths. This paper encourages the initiation of new multidisciplinary research at a global level.

  14. The Pattern of Road Traffic Crashes in South East Iran.

    PubMed

    Rad, Mahdieh; Martiniuk, Alexandra Lc; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Rashedi, Fariborz; Ghasemi, Ardavan

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the epidemiologic aspects of road traffic crashes in South East of Iran are described. This cross-sectional study included the profile of 2398 motor vehicle crashes recorded in the police office in one Year in South East of Iran. Data collected included: demographics, the type of crash, type of involved vehicle, location of crash and factors contributing to the crash. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Collisions with other vehicles or objects contributed the highest proportion (62.4%) of motor vehicle crashes. Human factors including careless driving, violating traffic laws, speeding, and sleep deprivation/fatigue were the most important causal factors accounting for 90% of road crashes. Data shows that 41% of drivers were not using a seat belt at the time of crash. One- third of the crashes resulted in injury (25%) or death (5%). Reckless driving such as speeding and violation of traffic laws are major risk factors for crashes in the South East of Iran. This highlights the need for education along with traffic law enforcement to reduce motor vehicle crashes in future.

  15. The Pattern of Road Traffic Crashes in South East Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Mahdieh; Martiniuk, Alexandra LC.; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Rashedi, Fariborz; Ghasemi, Ardavan

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the present study, the epidemiologic aspects of road traffic crashes in South East of Iran are described. Methods: This cross-sectional study included the profile of 2398 motor vehicle crashes recorded in the police office in one Year in South East of Iran. Data collected included: demographics, the type of crash, type of involved vehicle, location of crash and factors contributing to the crash. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Collisions with other vehicles or objects contributed the highest proportion (62.4%) of motor vehicle crashes. Human factors including careless driving, violating traffic laws, speeding, and sleep deprivation/fatigue were the most important causal factors accounting for 90% of road crashes. Data shows that 41% of drivers were not using a seat belt at the time of crash. One- third of the crashes resulted in injury (25%) or death (5%). Conclusions: Reckless driving such as speeding and violation of traffic laws are major risk factors for crashes in the South East of Iran. This highlights the need for education along with traffic law enforcement to reduce motor vehicle crashes in future. PMID:27157159

  16. Green supply chain: Simulating road traffic congestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalal, Muhammad Zulqarnain Hakim Abd; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Laailatul Hanim Mat Desa, Wan; Khalid, Ruzelan; Khalid Abduljabbar, Waleed; Ramli, Razamin

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing awareness of the consumers about environmental issues, businesses, households and governments increasingly want use green products and services which lead to green supply chain. This paper discusses a simulation study of a selected road traffic system that will contribute to the air pollution if in the congestion state. Road traffic congestion (RTC) can be caused by a temporary obstruction, a permanent capacity bottleneck in the network itself, and stochastic fluctuation in demand within a particular sector of the network, leading to spillback and queue propagation. A discrete-event simulation model is developed to represent the real traffic light control (TLC) system condition during peak hours. Certain performance measures such as average waiting time and queue length were measured using the simulation model. Existing system uses pre-set cycle time to control the light changes which is fixed time cycle. In this research, we test several other combination of pre-set cycle time with the objective to find the best system. In addition, we plan to use a combination of the pre-set cycle time and a proximity sensor which have the authority to manipulate the cycle time of the lights. The sensors work in such situation when the street seems to have less occupied vehicles, obviously it may not need a normal cycle for green light, and automatically change the cycle to street where vehicle is present.

  17. Road risk-perception and pedestrian injuries among students at Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Jehan M; Day, Hannah; Hirshon, Jon Mark; El-Setouhy, Maged

    2012-07-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) constitute 45% of injury mortality in Egypt; 75% of these injuries are pedestrians related. Traditionally, research on road traffic safety has focused on the traffic environment and the vehicles. However, little attention has been given to road risky behaviors and perceptions of road safety by pedestrians as risk factors associated with high pedestrian injury rates. This study aimed to examine the relationship between road risk- perception, specific road behaviors, and self-reported pedestrian injuries among university students in Cairo, Egypt. A cross sectional survey was conducted among university students aged 18 to 24 years old at Ain Shams University in Cairo. Questions covered socio-demographic variables, injury episodes, road behaviors, road risk-perceptions, attitudes towards injury prevention, and road safety education. The survey was completed by 1,324 students. Two hundred ninety (21.9%) of the participants suffered from pedestrian injury during the past 6 months; of these, 28.9% were admitted to hospital or clinic as a result of the injury, 39.3% were unable to go to university or leave home because of the injury for a period ranging from one day up to one week. Participants were more likely to suffer from pedestrian injury when they did not always "look both ways to cross the road", whereas always "waiting for a green light" was protective. Students who "perceived it safe to cross the road from any point" or "did not perceive it to be safer to cross at a zebra crossing" were less likely to "look both ways" before crossing the road. Similarly, there was a positive association between road safety education and participants' road crossing behaviors. Inappropriate youths' road behaviors were significantly associated with pedestrian injury. There was also a positive association between road risk perception and road behaviors. This suggests that a behavioral approach together with modification of the traffic environment (such as

  18. Bicycle injuries: road trauma is not the only concern.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, G A; Blizzard, L; Dwyer, T

    1998-06-01

    Data on bicycle injury presentations at a public hospital emergency department for 1991-95 inclusive were analysed to determine the nature and extent of bicycle injuries in the community. There were 599 bicycle injury presentations during the study period, representing more than 2.0% of all injury-related presentations to the emergency department. The main outcome measures were severity and type of injury. Distribution by gender, age, helmet use (1991 and 1992 only), location and mechanism was examined. Rider-only injuries (falls or collisions with stationary objects) accounted for 79.3% of all presentations with only 5.2% due to collisions on a public road or footpath with other moving traffic. Of all injuries where a location was determined, 61.6% occurred in off-road locations. There was little difference in the overall proportions of hospital admissions from injuries on-road (12.4%) and off-road (9.0%). Cyclists injured in on-road collisions with traffic had a higher proportion of hospital admissions (40.0%) than those injured on-road by other mechanisms (7.6%). Children under 10 years of age who had been riding without a helmet suffered a much higher proportion of injuries to the head (53.2% of all injuries) than older cyclists riding without a helmet (19.4%). The majority (83.1%) of head injuries in children under 10 years of age occurred off-road and helmet use was lowest in this group (28.6%). Given previous evidence that helmet use can prevent head injuries, strategies to increase helmet use among cyclists, particularly young children, while riding both on and off-road, should be given a high priority. Rider-only injuries are also an important public health issue.

  19. The Global Burden of Road Injury: Its Relevance to the Emergency Physician

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Vanessa P.; Walker, David M.; Tomassoni, Anthony J.; Cone, David C.; Vaca, Federico E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Road traffic crash fatalities in the United States are at the lowest level since 1950. The reduction in crash injury burden is attributed to several factors: public education and prevention programs, traffic safety policies and enforcement, improvements in vehicle design, and prehospital services coupled with emergency and acute trauma care. Globally, the disease burden of road traffic injuries is rising. In 1990, road traffic injuries ranked ninth in the ten leading causes of the global burden of disease. By 2030, estimates show that road traffic injuries will be the fifth leading causes of death in the world. Historically, emergency medicine has played a pivotal role in contributing to the success of the local, regional, and national traffic safety activities focused on crash and injury prevention. Objective. We report on the projected trend of the global burden of road traffic injuries and fatalities and describe ongoing global initiatives to reduce road traffic morbidity and mortality. Discussion. We present key domains where emergency medicine can contribute through international collaboration to address global road traffic-related morbidity and mortality. Conclusion. International collaborative programs and research offer important opportunities for emergency medicine physicians to make a meaningful impact on the global burden of disease. PMID:24719768

  20. Determinant of Road Traffic Crash Fatalities in Iran: A Longitudinal Econometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Satar; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Karami Matin, Behzad; Bazyar, Mohammad; Hamzeh, Behrooz; Najafi, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Injuries and deaths from road traffic crashes are one of the main public health problems throughout the world. This study aimed to identify determinants of fatality traffic accident in Iran for the twenty-span year from 1991 to 2011. A time series analysis (1991-2011) was used to examine the effects of some of the key explanatory factors (GDP per capita, number of doctors per 10,000 populations, degree of urbanization, unemployment rate and motorization rate) on deaths from road traffic in Iran. In order to examine long- and short-run effects of variables, we employed autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach and error correction method (ECM). The data for the study was obtained from the Central Bank of Iran (CBI), Iranian Statistical Center (ISC) and Legal medical organizations (LMO). GDP per capita, doctor per 10,000 populations, degree of urbanization and motorization rate had a significant impact on fatality from road traffic in Iran. We did not observe any short- and long-term effects of the unemployment rate on fatality from road traffic. GDP per capita, doctor per 10,000 populations, degree of urbanization and motorization rate were identified as main determinant of fatality from road traffic accidents in Iran. We hope the results of the current study enable health policy-makers to understand better the factors affecting deaths from road traffic accidents in the country.

  1. Prescription of antiepileptics and the risk of road traffic crash.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Ludivine; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Delorme, Bernard; Tricotel, Aurore; Philip, Pierre; Moore, Nicholas; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Studies assessing the impact of epilepsy and its medication on the risk of road traffic crashes have shown inconsistent results. The aim in this study was to assess this risk using French databases. Data from three French national databases were extracted and matched: the national health care insurance database, police reports, and the national police database of injurious crashes. Only antiepileptics prescribed predominantly in epilepsy were studied (phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, valproic acid, vigabatrin, tiagabin, levitiracetam, zonisamide, and lacosamide). A case-control analysis comparing responsible and non-responsible drivers and a case-crossover analysis were performed. Drivers (72 685) involved in an injurious crash in France between July 2005 and May 2008, were included. Drivers exposed to prescribed antiepileptic medicines (n = 251) had an increased risk of being responsible for a crash (OR 1.74 [1.29-2.34]). The association was also significant for the most severe epileptic patients (n = 99; OR = 2.20 [1.31-3.69]). Case-crossover analysis found no association between crash risk and treatment prescription. Patients with prescription of antiepileptic drugs should be cautioned about their potential risk of road traffic crash. This risk is however more likely to be related to seizures than to the effect of antiepileptic medicines.

  2. Road traffic accidents in Kathmandu—an hour of education yields a glimmer of hope

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    After the Metropolitan Traffic Police, Kathmandu initiated a “No Drinking and Driving” policy in 2011 in which a major intervention for intoxicated drivers was mandatory 1-hour class to modify drunk driving behaviors, reports show that the number of road traffic accidents in the year 2012 decreased by 23 percent from the year 2011. The injury to fatality ratio decreased by 21 percent in this period. We remain encouraged by these statistics which confirm that increased enforcement of road traffic rules, combined with behavioral change programs, can have positive changes in LMICs which suffer considerably from the global burden of trauma. PMID:23517620

  3. Investigation of bias after data linkage of hospital admissions data to police road traffic crash reports

    PubMed Central

    Cryer, P; Westrup, S; Cook, A; Ashwell, V; Bridger, P; Clarke, C

    2001-01-01

    Research question—Does a database of hospital admission data linked to police road traffic accident (RTA) reports produce less biased information for the injury prevention policymaker, planner, and practitioner than police RTA reports alone? Design—Data linkage study. Study population—Non-fatal injury victims of road traffic crashes in southern England who were admitted to hospital. Data sources—Hospital admissions and police RTA reports. Main outcome measures—The estimated proportion of road traffic crashes admitted to hospital that were included on the linked database; distributions by age, sex, and road user groups: (A) for all RTA injury admissions and (B) for RTA serious injury admissions defined by length of stay or by nature of injury. Results—An estimated 50% of RTA injury admissions were included on the linked database. When assessing bias, admissions data were regarded as the "gold standard". The distributions of casualties by age, sex, and type of road user showed major differences between the admissions data and the police RTA injury data of comparable severity. The linked data showed smaller differences when compared with admissions data. For RTA serious injury admissions, the distributions by age and sex were approximately the same for the linked data compared with admissions data, and there were small but statistically significant differences between the distributions across road user group for the linked data compared with hospital admissions. Conclusion—These results suggest that investigators could be misinformed if they base their analysis solely on police RTA data, and that information derived from the linked database is less biased than that from police RTA data alone. A national linked dataset of road traffic crash data should be produced from hospital admissions and police RTA data for use by policymakers, planners and practitioners. PMID:11565992

  4. Association between perception of fault for the crash and function, return to work and health status 1 year after road traffic injury: a registry-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Simpson, Pamela M; Cameron, Peter A; Ekegren, Christina L; Edwards, Elton R; Page, Richard; Liew, Susan; Bucknill, Andrew; de Steiger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To establish the association between the patient's perception of fault for the crash and 12-month outcomes after non-fatal road traffic injury. Setting Two adult major trauma centres, one regional trauma centre and one metropolitan trauma centre in Victoria, Australia. Participants 2605 adult, orthopaedic trauma patients covered by the state's no-fault third party insurer for road traffic injury, injured between September 2010 and February 2014. Outcome measures EQ-5D-3L, return to work and functional recovery (Glasgow Outcome Scale—Extended score of upper good recovery) at 12 months postinjury. Results After adjusting for key confounders, the adjusted relative risk (ARR) of a functional recovery (0.57, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.69) and return to work (0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99) were lower for the not at fault compared to the at fault group. The ARR of reporting problems on EQ-5D items was 1.20–1.35 times higher in the not at fault group. Conclusions Patients who were not at fault, or denied being at fault despite a police report of fault, experienced poorer outcomes than the at fault group. Attributing fault to others was associated with poorer outcomes. Interventions to improve coping, or to resolve negative feelings from the crash, could facilitate better outcomes in the future. PMID:26610765

  5. The effect of stricter licensing on road traffic injury events involving 15 to 17-year-old moped drivers in Sweden: A time series intervention study.

    PubMed

    Bonander, Carl; Andersson, Ragnar; Nilson, Finn

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and quantify the effect of the introduction of the AM driving license on non-fatal moped-related injuries in Sweden. With the introduction of the new license category in October 2009, prospective moped drivers are now required to pass a mandatory theory test following a practical and theoretical course. In addition, obtaining a license to operate a moped is now considerably more costly. Time series intervention analysis on monthly aggregated injury data (1st Jan 2007-31st Dec 2013) was performed using generalized additive models for location, shape and scale (GAMLSS) to quantify the effect size on injury events involving teenage (15-17 years) moped drivers, while controlling for trend and seasonality. Exposure was adjusted for by using the number of registered mopeds in traffic as a proxy. The introduction of AM license was associated with a 41% reduction in the rate of injury events involving 15-year-old moped drivers (IRR 0.59 [95% CI: 0.48-0.72]), and a 39% and 36% decrease in those involving 16-year-old (IRR 0.61 [95% CI: 0.48-0.79]) and 17-year-old drivers (IRR 0.64 [95% CI: 0.46-0.90]), respectively. The effect in the 15-year-old stratum was decreased roughly by half after adjusting for exposure, but remained significant, and the corresponding estimates in the other age groups did not change noticeably. This study provides quasi-experimental evidence of an effect on non-fatal moped-related injuries as a result of stricter licensing rules. Only part of the effect could be explained by a reduction in the number of mopeds in traffic, indicating that other mechanisms must be studied to fully understand the cause of the reduction in injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Road traffic crashes managed by Rescue 1122 in Lahore, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Navid; Naseer, Rizwan; Khan, Samina Mohsin; Macassa, Gloria; Hashmi, Waseem; Durrani, Mohsin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to describe demographic characteristics, injury patterns and causes of road traffic crashes (RTCs) managed by Rescue 1122 in Lahore, Pakistan during the period 2005-2010. In total 123,268 RTCs were reported and responded by Rescue 1122 ambulance service during the study period. Of the 132,504 victims of RTCs, there were 67% male and 33% female subjects, and the maximum share (65%) was reported among people aged 16-35 years. Motorcyclists were involved in 45% of crashes, with over-speeding (40%) found to be the major reason of these collisions. Similarly, minor injuries (65%) and fractures (25%) were the most reported outcome of these crashes. It is concluded that data from ambulance services, if appropriately collected, can provide valuable epidemiological information to monitor RTCs in developing countries. However, in Pakistan, the collection of data as well as the registration process needs further improvement.

  7. Traffic mortality and the role of minor roads.

    PubMed

    van Langevelde, Frank; van Dooremalen, Coby; Jaarsma, Catharinus F

    2009-01-01

    Roads have large impacts on wildlife, as they form one of the principal causes of mortality, and disturbance and fragmentation of habitat. These impacts are mainly studied and mitigated on major roads. It is, however, a widespread misconception that most animals are killed on major roads. In this paper, we argue that minor roads have a larger impact on wildlife with respect to habitat destruction, noise load and traffic mortality. We use data on traffic related deaths in badgers (Meles meles) in The Netherlands to illustrate that traffic mortality is higher on minor roads. We ask for a more extensive investigation of the environmental impacts of minor roads. Moreover, we argue that the success of mitigation on roads drastically increases when both major and minor roads are integrated in the planning of traffic flows. Therefore, we propose a strategy based on the concept of a "traffic-calmed area". Traffic-calmed areas create opportunities for wildlife by decreasing limitations for animal movement. We ask for further studies to estimate what size traffic-calmed areas should be to maintain minimum viable animal populations.

  8. Psychological distress and physical disability in patients sustaining severe injuries in road traffic crashes: Results from a one-year cohort study from three European countries.

    PubMed

    Papadakaki, Maria; Ferraro, Ottavia Eleonora; Orsi, Chiara; Otte, Dietmar; Tzamalouka, Georgia; von-der-Geest, Marco; Lajunen, Timo; Özkan, Türker; Morandi, Anna; Sarris, Markos; Pierrakos, George; Chliaoutakis, Joannes

    2017-02-01

    The current study aimed to follow-up a group of road crash survivors for one year and assesses the impact of injury on their psychological and physical condition. All crash survivors that were admitted to the intensive or sub-intensive care units of selected hospitals in Greece, Germany and Italy over one year period (2013-2014), were invited to participate in the study and were interviewed at three different time-points as follows: (a) at one month (baseline data), (b) at six months, and (c) at twelve months. The study used widely recommended classifications for injury severity (AIS, MAIS) and standardized health outcome measures such as the Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS 2.0) to measure disability, "Impact of Event Scale" (IES-R) to measure Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D Scale) to measure depression. A total of 120 patients were enrolled in the study in all the partner countries and 93 completed all follow up questionnaires. The risk of physical disability was 4.57 times higher [CI 1.98-2.27] at the first follow up and 3.43 times higher [CI 1.43-9.42] at the second follow up as compared with the time before the injury. There was a 79% and an 88% lower risk of depression at the first and the second follow up respectively, as compared with the baseline time. There was also a 72% lower risk of Post-Traumatic Stress at the second follow up as compared with the baseline time. A number of factors relevant to the individuals, the road crash and the injury, were shown to distinguish those at higher risk of long-lasting disability and psychological distress including age, marital status, type of road user, severity and type of the injury, past emotional reaction to distress. The study highlights the importance of a comprehensive and holistic understanding of the impact of injury on an individual and further underlines the importance of screening and treating psychological comorbidities in injury

  9. Port Moresby road traffic accident survey.

    PubMed

    Lourie, J; Sinha, S

    1983-01-01

    Road Traffic Accidents (RTA's) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in Papua New Guinea today. A survey of casualties from RTA's attending Port Moresby General Hospital over a seven-month period from November 1982 to June 1983 showed that of 209 patients seen, one-third were in cars and one-quarter were in utilities. The most dangerous positions in vehicles were (1) in the open back of a utility or truck, and (2) in the front seat (driver or passenger) of a car or utility. Only 13% of injured front-seat occupants of cars or utilities were wearing a seat-belt; in one-third of vehicles no seat belts were fitted. A plea is made for the strengthening of legislation to ensure the safety of passengers travelling in the open back of trucks or utilities, and for the introduction of legislation for fitting and wearing of seat-belts by front-seat occupants.

  10. Incidence of road injuries in Mexico: country report.

    PubMed

    Bartels, D; Bhalla, K; Shahraz, S; Abraham, J; Lozano, R; Murray, C J L

    2010-09-01

    We used data from various sources to triangulate to a national snapshot of the incidence of fatal and non-fatal road traffic injuries in Mexico in 2005. Data sources used include national death registration data, national hospital discharge data and a nationally representative health survey. We estimate that in 2005, 19,389 people died due to injuries and nearly one million were injured in road traffic crashes. While deaths in high-income countries are declining, this is not the case in Mexico. Young adult males are the demographic at the highest risk in non-fatal crashes, but the elderly have the highest road death rates primarily due to pedestrian crashes. Pedestrians alone comprise nearly half (48%) of all deaths. Cars pose a substantial threat to occupants (38% of deaths and 39% of hospital admissions) and to other road users.

  11. Road Safety Barriers, the Need and Influence on Road Traffic Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butāns, Ž.; Gross, K. A.; Gridnevs, A.; Karzubova, E.

    2015-11-01

    Constantly increasing intensity of road traffic and the allowed speed limits seem to impose stronger requirements on road infrastructure and use of road safety systems. One of the ways to improve road safety is the use of road restraint systems. Road safety barriers allow not only reducing the number of road traffic accidents, but also lowering the severity of accidents. The paper provides information on the technical requirements of road safety barriers. Various types of road safety barriers and their selection criteria for different types of road sections are discussed. The article views an example of a road traffic accident, which is also modelled by PC-Crash computer program. The given example reflects a road accident mechanism in case of a car-to-barrier collision, and provides information about the typical damage to the car and the barrier. The paper describes an impact of the road safety barrier type and its presence on the road traffic accident mechanism. Implementation and maintenance costs of different barrier types are viewed. The article presents a discussion on the necessity to use road safety barriers, as well as their optimal choice.

  12. Consequences of road traffic accidents for different types of road user.

    PubMed

    Mayou, Richard; Bryant, Bridget

    2003-03-01

    The study aimed to describe the immediate and later physical, social and psychological consequences of a road traffic accident for vehicle occupants, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians amongst consecutive hospital attenders at an Accident and Emergency Department. Physical and accident details were collated from hospital records. Subjects completed questionnaires at hospital attendance, 3 months, 1 and 3 years. There were 1148 respondents from 1441 consecutive attenders over a 1-year period. The main outcome measures were self-report physical status, standard measures of post-traumatic stress disorder, mood, travel anxiety and health status at 3 months, 1 and 3 years. There were marked differences in injury pattern and immediate reaction between road user groups. Pedestrians and motorcyclists suffer the most severe injuries and report more continuing medical problems and greater resource use, especially in the first 3 months. There were few differences in psychological or social outcomes at any stage of follow-up. Despite differences between the road user groups in their injuries, immediate reactions and treatment, there were few longer-term differences. A third of all groups described chronic adverse consequences which were principally psychological, social and legal.

  13. Prospective study of post-traumatic stress disorder in children involved in road traffic accidents

    PubMed Central

    Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Richard; Baldwin, Sarah

    1998-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of severe psychological trauma—that is, post-traumatic stress disorder—in children involved in everyday road traffic accidents. Design 12 month prospective study. Setting Accident and emergency department, Royal United Hospital, Bath. Subjects 119 children aged 5-18 years involved in road traffic accidents and 66 children who sustained sports injuries. Main outcome measure Presence of appreciable psychological distress; fulfilment of diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Results Post-traumatic stress disorder was found in 41 (34.5%) children involved in road traffic accidents but only two (3.0%) who sustained sports injuries. The presence of post-traumatic stress disorder was not related to the type of accident, age of the child, or the nature of injuries but was significantly associated with sex, previous experience of trauma, and subjective appraisal of threat to life. None of the children had received any psychological help at the time of assessment. Conclusions One in three children involved in road traffic accidents was found to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder when they were assessed 6 weeks after their accident. The psychological needs of such children after such accidents remain largely unrecognised. Key messagesOne in three children involved in everyday road traffic accidents was found to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorderPost-traumatic stress disorder was experienced by children of all ages, although girls were most likely to be affectedNeither the type of accident nor the nature and severity of the physical injuries were related to the presence of post-traumatic stress disorderThe child’s personal appraisal of the accident was important, with those children perceiving the event as life threatening being more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorderThe psychological needs of children involved in road traffic accidents largely remain unrecognised PMID:9848900

  14. The journey from traffic offender to severe road trauma victim: destiny or preventive opportunity?

    PubMed

    Ho, Kwok M; Rao, Sudhakar; Burrell, Maxine; Weeramanthri, Tarun S

    2015-01-01

    Road trauma is a leading cause of death and injury in young people. Traffic offences are common, but their importance as a risk indicator for subsequent road trauma is unknown. This cohort study assessed whether severe road trauma could be predicted by a history of prior traffic offences. Clinical data of all adult road trauma patients admitted to the Western Australia (WA) State Trauma Centre between 1998 and 2013 were linked to traffic offences records at the WA Department of Transport. The primary outcomes were alcohol exposure prior to road trauma, severe trauma (defined by Injury Severity Score >15), and intensive care admission (ICU) or death, analyzed by logistic regression. Traffic offences directly leading to the road trauma admissions were excluded. Of the 10,330 patients included (median age 34 years-old, 78% male), 1955 (18.9%) had alcohol-exposure before road trauma, 2415 (23.4%) had severe trauma, 1360 (13.2%) required ICU admission, and 267 (2.6%) died. Prior traffic offences were recorded in 6269 (60.7%) patients. The number of prior traffic offences was significantly associated with alcohol-related road trauma (odds ratio [OR] per offence 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.05), severe trauma (OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.14-1.15), and ICU admission or death (OR 1.10, 95%CI 1.08-1.11). Drink-drinking, seat-belt, and use of handheld electronic device offences were specific offences strongly associated with road trauma leading to ICU admission or death--all in a 'dose-related' fashion. For those who recovered from road trauma after an ICU admission, there was a significant reduction in subsequent traffic offences (mean difference 1.8, 95%CI 1.5 to 2.0) and demerit points (mean difference 7.0, 95%CI 6.5 to 7.6) compared to before the trauma event. Previous traffic offences were a significant risk factor for alcohol-related road trauma and severe road trauma leading to ICU admission or death.

  15. The Journey from Traffic Offender to Severe Road Trauma Victim: Destiny or Preventive Opportunity?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kwok M.; Rao, Sudhakar; Burrell, Maxine; Weeramanthri, Tarun S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Road trauma is a leading cause of death and injury in young people. Traffic offences are common, but their importance as a risk indicator for subsequent road trauma is unknown. This cohort study assessed whether severe road trauma could be predicted by a history of prior traffic offences. Methodology and Principal Findings Clinical data of all adult road trauma patients admitted to the Western Australia (WA) State Trauma Centre between 1998 and 2013 were linked to traffic offences records at the WA Department of Transport. The primary outcomes were alcohol exposure prior to road trauma, severe trauma (defined by Injury Severity Score >15), and intensive care admission (ICU) or death, analyzed by logistic regression. Traffic offences directly leading to the road trauma admissions were excluded. Of the 10,330 patients included (median age 34 years-old, 78% male), 1955 (18.9%) had alcohol-exposure before road trauma, 2415 (23.4%) had severe trauma, 1360 (13.2%) required ICU admission, and 267 (2.6%) died. Prior traffic offences were recorded in 6269 (60.7%) patients. The number of prior traffic offences was significantly associated with alcohol-related road trauma (odds ratio [OR] per offence 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–1.05), severe trauma (OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.14–1.15), and ICU admission or death (OR 1.10, 95%CI 1.08–1.11). Drink-drinking, seat-belt, and use of handheld electronic device offences were specific offences strongly associated with road trauma leading to ICU admission or death—all in a ‘dose-related’ fashion. For those who recovered from road trauma after an ICU admission, there was a significant reduction in subsequent traffic offences (mean difference 1.8, 95%CI 1.5 to 2.0) and demerit points (mean difference 7.0, 95%CI 6.5 to 7.6) compared to before the trauma event. Significance Previous traffic offences were a significant risk factor for alcohol-related road trauma and severe road trauma leading to ICU admission or

  16. The University of Queensland study of physical and psychological outcomes for claimants with minor and moderate injuries following a road traffic crash (UQ SuPPORT): design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Kenardy, Justin; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Bellamy, Nicholas; Sterling, Michele; Connelly, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Background To date research investigating how mental health impacts physical recovery following a road traffic crash (RTC) has focused on cohorts with severe injuries. The UQ SuPPORT study aims to study the physical and psychological outcomes of claimants with minor injuries following an RTC under the Queensland common law compulsory insurance scheme. Objectives This paper outlines the protocols of this study as a platform for future publications. Methods The 2-year longitudinal cohort study collected interview and survey data from claimants at 6, 12, and 24 months post-RTC. Measures used in the telephone interview included the DSM-IV Composite International Diagnostic Interview for posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive episode, panic attacks, agoraphobia; and self-reported disability (WHO-DAS-II). Quality of life (SF-36v2), alcohol use (AUDIT), social support (MSPSS), quality-adjusted life years (EQ-5D), and return to work outcomes were assessed via postal questionnaires. Results A total of 382 claimants consented to participate at the beginning of the study, and these participants were approached at each wave. Retention was high (65%). The average age of participants at Wave 1 was 48.6 years, with 65% of the sample sustaining minor injuries (Injury Severity Score=1–3). Conclusions This study has collected a unique sample of data to investigate recovery patterns of claimants with minor injuries. Future publications will more fully assess the effects of the collected measures on recovery rates 2 years post-RTC. PMID:24799996

  17. The University of Queensland study of physical and psychological outcomes for claimants with minor and moderate injuries following a road traffic crash (UQ SuPPORT): design and methods.

    PubMed

    Kenardy, Justin; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Bellamy, Nicholas; Sterling, Michele; Connelly, Luke

    2014-01-01

    To date research investigating how mental health impacts physical recovery following a road traffic crash (RTC) has focused on cohorts with severe injuries. The UQ SuPPORT study aims to study the physical and psychological outcomes of claimants with minor injuries following an RTC under the Queensland common law compulsory insurance scheme. This paper outlines the protocols of this study as a platform for future publications. The 2-year longitudinal cohort study collected interview and survey data from claimants at 6, 12, and 24 months post-RTC. Measures used in the telephone interview included the DSM-IV Composite International Diagnostic Interview for posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive episode, panic attacks, agoraphobia; and self-reported disability (WHO-DAS-II). Quality of life (SF-36v2), alcohol use (AUDIT), social support (MSPSS), quality-adjusted life years (EQ-5D), and return to work outcomes were assessed via postal questionnaires. A total of 382 claimants consented to participate at the beginning of the study, and these participants were approached at each wave. Retention was high (65%). The average age of participants at Wave 1 was 48.6 years, with 65% of the sample sustaining minor injuries (Injury Severity Score=1-3). This study has collected a unique sample of data to investigate recovery patterns of claimants with minor injuries. Future publications will more fully assess the effects of the collected measures on recovery rates 2 years post-RTC.

  18. Predictability of Road Traffic and Congestion in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyuan; Mao, Yu; Li, Jing; Xiong, Zhang; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Mitigating traffic congestion on urban roads, with paramount importance in urban development and reduction of energy consumption and air pollution, depends on our ability to foresee road usage and traffic conditions pertaining to the collective behavior of drivers, raising a significant question: to what degree is road traffic predictable in urban areas? Here we rely on the precise records of daily vehicle mobility based on GPS positioning device installed in taxis to uncover the potential daily predictability of urban traffic patterns. Using the mapping from the degree of congestion on roads into a time series of symbols and measuring its entropy, we find a relatively high daily predictability of traffic conditions despite the absence of any priori knowledge of drivers' origins and destinations and quite different travel patterns between weekdays and weekends. Moreover, we find a counterintuitive dependence of the predictability on travel speed: the road segment associated with intermediate average travel speed is most difficult to be predicted. We also explore the possibility of recovering the traffic condition of an inaccessible segment from its adjacent segments with respect to limited observability. The highly predictable traffic patterns in spite of the heterogeneity of drivers' behaviors and the variability of their origins and destinations enables development of accurate predictive models for eventually devising practical strategies to mitigate urban road congestion. PMID:25849534

  19. Applicability of models to estimate traffic noise for urban roads.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ricardo A; Pimentel, Roberto L; Lacerda, Diego M; Silva, Wekisley M

    2015-01-01

    Traffic noise is a highly relevant environmental impact in cities. Models to estimate traffic noise, in turn, can be useful tools to guide mitigation measures. In this paper, the applicability of models to estimate noise levels produced by a continuous flow of vehicles on urban roads is investigated. The aim is to identify which models are more appropriate to estimate traffic noise in urban areas since several models available were conceived to estimate noise from highway traffic. First, measurements of traffic noise, vehicle count and speed were carried out in five arterial urban roads of a brazilian city. Together with geometric measurements of width of lanes and distance from noise meter to lanes, these data were input in several models to estimate traffic noise. The predicted noise levels were then compared to the respective measured counterparts for each road investigated. In addition, a chart showing mean differences in noise between estimations and measurements is presented, to evaluate the overall performance of the models. Measured Leq values varied from 69 to 79 dB(A) for traffic flows varying from 1618 to 5220 vehicles/h. Mean noise level differences between estimations and measurements for all urban roads investigated ranged from -3.5 to 5.5 dB(A). According to the results, deficiencies of some models are discussed while other models are identified as applicable to noise estimations on urban roads in a condition of continuous flow. Key issues to apply such models to urban roads are highlighted.

  20. Predictability of road traffic and congestion in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyuan; Mao, Yu; Li, Jing; Xiong, Zhang; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Mitigating traffic congestion on urban roads, with paramount importance in urban development and reduction of energy consumption and air pollution, depends on our ability to foresee road usage and traffic conditions pertaining to the collective behavior of drivers, raising a significant question: to what degree is road traffic predictable in urban areas? Here we rely on the precise records of daily vehicle mobility based on GPS positioning device installed in taxis to uncover the potential daily predictability of urban traffic patterns. Using the mapping from the degree of congestion on roads into a time series of symbols and measuring its entropy, we find a relatively high daily predictability of traffic conditions despite the absence of any priori knowledge of drivers' origins and destinations and quite different travel patterns between weekdays and weekends. Moreover, we find a counterintuitive dependence of the predictability on travel speed: the road segment associated with intermediate average travel speed is most difficult to be predicted. We also explore the possibility of recovering the traffic condition of an inaccessible segment from its adjacent segments with respect to limited observability. The highly predictable traffic patterns in spite of the heterogeneity of drivers' behaviors and the variability of their origins and destinations enables development of accurate predictive models for eventually devising practical strategies to mitigate urban road congestion.

  1. An epidemiological study of road traffic accident cases admitted in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Pathak, S M; Jindal, A K; Verma, A K; Mahen, A

    2014-01-01

    Road traffic accidents are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. In India, more than a million are injured annually and about a lakh are killed in road traffic accidents.(1) It causes the country to lose around 55,000 crores annually which is 2-3% of Gross Domestic Production (GDP).(2) This cross sectional study was conducted to elucidate the role of various factors involved in road traffic accidents. Road traffic accident cases admitted to a tertiary care hospital between 01 Oct 2009 and 28 Feb 2011 were included in the study. A total of 182 patients were studied. Information was collected through questionnaire, hospital records and on-site visit. OPD cases, comatose patients and deaths were excluded. Two-wheelers were the commonest vehicle involved in vehicular accidents. Most accidents happened at a speed of 40-60 km/h (37.9%). Most of the patients were aged between 20 and 30 years. Majority had a driving experience of less than 5 years. Monsoons witnessed 46.7% cases. Most cases occurred between 6 and 10 pm. Among severe injuries, the commonest was lower limb fractures (19.8%). There are multiple factors associated with road traffic accidents which due to the lack of road safety measures in the country are playing their role. It is the need of the hour to address this issue and formulate comprehensive, scientific and practical rules and regulations as well as evaluate its enforcement.

  2. GBD-2010 overestimates deaths from road injuries in OECD countries: new methods perform poorly.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Kavi; Harrison, James E

    2015-10-01

    We assessed the quality of Global Burden of Disease-2010 (GBD-2010) estimates of road injury deaths by comparing with government statistics for Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries that report to the International Road Traffic Accident Database (IRTAD). We obtained tabulated data for 25 OECD countries that report to IRTAD and also report vital registration (VR) data to WHO. We collated VR deaths corresponding to the GBD-2010 road injury definition and estimated 'traffic', 'non-traffic' and 'unspecified whether traffic or non-traffic' components. We estimated national road injury deaths by redistributing partially specified causes of death, as was done by GBD until this was replaced by more complex methods in GBD-2010. GBD-2010 estimates of road injury deaths exceeded IRTAD by 45% overall. IRTAD values fell below the GBD-2010 95% uncertainty interval in all but three countries. Mismatch of conceptual scope accounted for about 8% of this discrepancy, 5% was because GBD-2010 included cases other than road traffic and 3% because GBD-2010 (unlike IRTAD) includes deaths >30 days after injury. Pro rata distribution of partially specified causes in VR data gave estimates that were 18% higher than IRTAD but closer than GBD-2010 estimates for all but two countries. Cases in VR data specified as road injury gave estimates closer to IRTAD. GBD-2010 road injury mortality estimates are substantially higher than the road death toll in OECD countries. The discrepancy is not explained by wider scope of the GBD road injury construct nor by undercounting by IRTAD. GBD-2010 likely attributed substantially more deaths with partially specified causes to road injuries than is appropriate. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  3. Health burden of serious road injuries in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Weijermars, W; Bos, N; Stipdonk, H

    2016-11-16

    The consequences of injuries in terms of disabilities and health burden are relevant for policy making. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge on this topic and discusses the health burden of serious road injuries in The Netherlands. The overview of current knowledge on disabilities following a road crash is based on a literature review. The health burden of serious road injuries is quantified in terms of years lived with disability (YLD), by combining incidence data from the Dutch hospital discharge register with information about temporary and lifelong disability. Literature shows that road traffic injuries can have a major impact on victims' physical and psychological well-being and functioning. Reported proportions of people with disability vary between 11 and 80% depending on the type of casualties, time elapsed since the crash, and the health impacts considered. Together, all casualties involving serious injuries in The Netherlands in 2009 account for about 38,000 YLD, compared to 25,000 years of life lost (YLL) of fatalities. Ninety percent of the burden of injury is due to lifelong consequences that are experienced by 20% of all those seriously injured in road accidents. Lower leg injuries and head injuries represent a high share in the total burden of injury as have cyclists that are injured in a crash without a motorized vehicle. Pedestrians and powered 2-wheeler users show the highest burden of injury per casualty. Given their major impacts and contribution to health burden, road policy making should also be aimed at reducing the number of serious road injuries and limiting the resulting health impacts.

  4. Visual impairment and road traffic accidents among drivers in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Biza, Mohamed; Mossie, Andualem; Woldemichael, Kifle; Gelaw, Yeshigeta

    2013-04-01

    Vision play a vital role in driving where good and efficient visual functioning of the driver is essential. Any significant loss of visual function will diminish a driver's ability to operate a motor vehicle safely and will thus contribute to road traffic injury. However, there is little evidence indicating that defects of vision alone cause road traffic accidents. To determine the impact of visual impairment and other factors on road traffic accident among vehicle drivers. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 249 sampled drivers in Southwest Ethiopia. A pretested interviewer led questionnaire was used for interview and vision tests were done using Snellen's acuity chart and Ishihara pseudo-isochromatic plates. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 16.0. The mean age of drivers was 33.6 years (SD +/- 10.3). The relative frequency of self reported road traffic accident was 15.3%. The prevalence of uncorrected binocular visual impairment was 1.6% and there was a significant association between visual impairment and road traffic accident (P < 0.05). Uncorrected refractive error was seen in 7.6% and 8.8% of drivers in the right and left eyes respectively, and 3.2% of them had vision less than what is required to obtain driving license (visual acuity of 6/12). None of the drivers with refractive errors were wearing appropriate corrections. Color vision impairment was seen in 1.6% of the drivers. A significant proportion (9.6%) of the drivers did not have eye exam for their driving license. Uncorrected binocular visual impairment was strongly associated with road traffic accident. There is need for consistent inspection and screening, strict rules and regulations of licensing and health education for drivers to minimize road traffic accident.

  5. Outcome in consecutive emergency department attenders following a road traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Mayou, R; Bryant, B

    2001-12-01

    Little is known about the consequences of road traffic accidents. To determine psychological and social outcome at 3 months and 1 year following a road traffic accident. A cohort study of a 1-year sample of consecutive attenders (n=1148) aged 17-69 years at the accident and emergency department of a teaching district general hospital (excluding major head injury). Data were extracted from medica notes and from self-report at baseline, 3 months and 1 year. Most (61%) injuries were physically minor. At 1 year 45% reported major physical problems and 32% reported psychiatric consequences. Non-injury variables were the principal predictors of outcome. Outcome across a range of variables is considerably worse than would be expected from the nature of the physical injuries. There is a need for changes in clinical care and socio-legal policy to prevent, identify and treat distressing and disabling chronic problems.

  6. The Influences of Drivers/Riders in Road Traffic Crashes in Ghana between 2001 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Amo, Thompson

    2014-01-01

    The road traffic accident (RTA) is a global misfortune and the leading cause of death among young drivers. In safeguarding and developing innovative safety strategies to curtail the situation, the factors causing this menace needs proper attention and investigation. The objective of this study is to identify the potential factors responsible for causing a traffic accident in Ghana. In studying these factors extensively, a descriptive study with quantitative technique was employed. Analyses used data between 2001 and 2011 obtained from the Building and Road Research Institute (BRRI) with specific focus on the age, drinking, vehicle defect, driver/rider error, injury, road surface type and weather. A total of 200,528 cases of drivers/riders were analysed and discovered that, people with younger age (21-40) contribute 62.97% of total crashes. Crashes reduce steadily as drivers/riders age increases. Also, the vehicle defect analysis shows that 87.46% of accidents cannot be linked to the fault of the vehicle before incidence, while the majority (75.38%) of drivers/riders had no injury during a traffic accident. Higher number of fatalities are recorded on tar good roads (81.57%) and clear weather (91.75%). The fight against this canker by the authorities must consider periodic refresher courses for younger drivers/riders on traffic law to bring to bear the adherence of good driving/riding principles and attitudes to ensure that safety is guaranteed for all road users in the country. PMID:24999145

  7. The influences of drivers/riders in road traffic crashes in Ghana between 2001 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Amo, Thompson

    2014-04-07

    The road traffic accident (RTA) is a global misfortune and the leading cause of death among young drivers. In safeguarding and developing innovative safety strategies to curtail the situation, the factors causing this menace needs proper attention and investigation. The objective of this study is to identify the potential factors responsible for causing a traffic accident in Ghana. In studying these factors extensively, a descriptive study with quantitative technique was employed. Analyses used data between 2001 and 2011 obtained from the Building and Road Research Institute (BRRI) with specific focus on the age, drinking, vehicle defect, driver/rider error, injury, road surface type and weather. A total of 200,528 cases of drivers/riders were analysed and discovered that, people with younger age (21-40) contribute 62.97% of total crashes. Crashes reduce steadily as drivers/riders age increases. Also, the vehicle defect analysis shows that 87.46% of accidents cannot be linked to the fault of the vehicle before incidence, while the majority (75.38%) of drivers/riders had no injury during a traffic accident. Higher number of fatalities are recorded on tar good roads (81.57%) and clear weather (91.75%). The fight against this canker by the authorities must consider periodic refresher courses for younger drivers/riders on traffic law to bring to bear the adherence of good driving/riding principles and attitudes to ensure that safety is guaranteed for all road users in the country.

  8. An Epidemiological Study of Road Traffic Accidents in Guilan Province, Northern Iran in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Dastgiri, Saeed; Davoudi-kiakalyeh, Ali; Imani, Ali; Mollarahimi, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the epidemiological characteristics of the road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Guilan province, northern Iran. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study which included all of RTIs admitted to medical centers of Guilan province (northern Iran) during 2012. ICD-10 was used as diagnostic criteria. Demographic variables also injury circumstance and in hospital variables such as length of stay, time of admission, type of surgery, ICU admission, final outcome and mechanism of injury, anatomical part of injury according to Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) classification were derives from records by trained research team. Descriptive data is reported. The predictors of mortality were also determined. Results: The prevalence of road traffic injuries in Guilan province was 31 in 10,000 populations. Of total 7671 accidents, 5976 (77.9%) were men and 1695 (22.1%) were women. Mean age of these victims was 33.3 ± 17.289 years (32.64±16.939 for men, 35.62±18.312 for women). Most of them (32.5%) were 20-29 years old. Motorcycle-car accidents had the highest frequency followed by car-car crashes and car accidents involving pedestrians. Most of the patients (85.9%) were hospitalized and 280 injured died (3.7%). Upper extremities were the most sites of injuries. Male sex, length of hospital stay, multiple injuries and increased age were associated with road traffic accident associated mortality. Conclusion: RTIs cause enormous death and disability in this area and more road traffic preventive programs should be enforcement in these areas to reduce incidences RTI. PMID:27878129

  9. Magnitude and outcomes of road traffic accidents at Hospitals in Wolaita Zone, SNNPR, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hailemichael, Feleke; Suleiman, Mohammed; Pauolos, Wondimagegn

    2015-04-09

    A Road traffic accident is an incident on a way or street open to public traffic, resulting in one or more persons being killed or injured, and involving at least one moving vehicle. The aim of this study is to assess magnitude and outcome of road traffic accidents among trauma victims at hospitals in Wolaita zone. A cross sectional hospital based study design using retrospective chart review was conducted from March 5th to March 25th, 2014. Simple random sampling technique was applied to identify sample population. The data was entered in to Epi info version 3.5.1 and transferred to SPSS version 16 for further analysis. A total of 384 trauma victims were incorporated in the study of which 240 (62.5%) were due to road traffic accidents. The majority of patients were male 298 (77.6%) and most commonly aged between 20-29 (35.42%). The principal outcome of injury was more commonly lower extremity (182 patients, 47.4%), compared to upper extremity (126 patients, 32.8%). Of all trauma patient presenting to hospitals (62.5%) are the result of road traffic accident. Hence, the provision of tailored messages to all members of the community regarding knowledge and practices of road safety measures like appropriate use of pavements by pedestrians and avoiding risky driving behaviors. Besides this make use of compulsory motorcycle helmets would appear to be a very important intervention.

  10. Active traffic management on road networks: a macroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Kurzhanskiy, Alex A; Varaiya, Pravin

    2010-10-13

    Active traffic management (ATM) is the ability to dynamically manage recurrent and non-recurrent congestion based on prevailing traffic conditions in order to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of road networks. It is a continuous process of (i) obtaining and analysing traffic measurement data, (ii) operations planning, i.e. simulating various scenarios and control strategies, (iii) implementing the most promising control strategies in the field, and (iv) maintaining a real-time decision support system that filters current traffic measurements to predict the traffic state in the near future, and to suggest the best available control strategy for the predicted situation. ATM relies on a fast and trusted traffic simulator for the rapid quantitative assessment of a large number of control strategies for the road network under various scenarios, in a matter of minutes. The open-source macrosimulation tool Aurora ROAD NETWORK MODELER is a good candidate for this purpose. The paper describes the underlying dynamical traffic model and what it takes to prepare the model for simulation; covers the traffic performance measures and evaluation of scenarios as part of operations planning; introduces the framework within which the control strategies are modelled and evaluated; and presents the algorithm for real-time traffic state estimation and short-term prediction.

  11. Road Traffic and Childhood Leukemia: The ESCALE Study (SFCE)

    PubMed Central

    Amigou, Alicia; Sermage-Faure, Claire; Orsi, Laurent; Leverger, Guy; Baruchel, André; Bertrand, Yves; Nelken, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Michel, Gérard; Margueritte, Geneviève; Perel, Yves; Mechinaud, Françoise; Bordigoni, Pierre; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Background Traffic is a source of environmental exposures, including benzene, which may be related to childhood leukemia. Objectives A national registry–based case–control study [ESCALE (Etude Sur les Cancers et les Leucémies de l’Enfant, Study on Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors of Childhood Cancers and Leukemia)] carried out in France was used to assess the effect of exposure to road traffic exhaust fumes on the risk of childhood leukemia. Methods Over the study period, 2003–2004, 763 cases and 1,681 controls < 15 years old were included, and the controls were frequency matched with the cases on age and sex. The ESCALE data were collected by a standardized telephone interview of the mothers. Various indicators of exposure to traffic and pollution were determined using the geocoded addresses at the time of diagnosis for the cases and of interview for the controls. Indicators of the distance from, and density of, main roads and traffic nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations derived from traffic emission data were used. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results Acute leukemia (AL) was significantly associated with estimates of traffic NO2 concentration at the place of residence > 27.7 μg/m3 compared with NO2 concentration < 21.9 μg/m3 [OR = 1.2; confidence interval (CI), 1.0–1.5] and with the presence of a heavy-traffic road within 500 m compared with the absence of a heavy-traffic road in the same area (OR = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0–3.6). There was a significant association between AL and a high density of heavy-traffic roads within 500 m compared with the reference category with no heavy-traffic road within 500 m (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.2), with a significant positive linear trend of the association of AL with the total length of heavy-traffic road within 500m. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that living close to heavy-traffic roads may increase the risk of

  12. Road traffic and childhood leukemia: the ESCALE study (SFCE).

    PubMed

    Amigou, Alicia; Sermage-Faure, Claire; Orsi, Laurent; Leverger, Guy; Baruchel, André; Bertrand, Yves; Nelken, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Michel, Gérard; Margueritte, Geneviève; Perel, Yves; Mechinaud, Françoise; Bordigoni, Pierre; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2011-04-01

    Traffic is a source of environmental exposures, including benzene, which may be related to childhood leukemia. A national registry-based case-control study [ESCALE (Etude Sur les Cancers et les Leucémies de l'Enfant, Study on Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors of Childhood Cancers and Leukemia)] carried out in France was used to assess the effect of exposure to road traffic exhaust fumes on the risk of childhood leukemia. Over the study period, 2003-2004, 763 cases and 1,681 controls < 15 years old were included, and the controls were frequency matched with the cases on age and sex. The ESCALE data were collected by a standardized telephone interview of the mothers. Various indicators of exposure to traffic and pollution were determined using the geocoded addresses at the time of diagnosis for the cases and of interview for the controls. Indicators of the distance from, and density of, main roads and traffic nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) concentrations derived from traffic emission data were used. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Acute leukemia (AL) was significantly associated with estimates of traffic NO(2) concentration at the place of residence > 27.7 µg/m(3) compared with NO(2) concentration < 21.9 µg/m(3) [OR=1.2; confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.5] and with the presence of a heavy-traffic road within 500 m compared with the absence of a heavy-traffic road in the same area (OR=2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-3.6). There was a significant association between AL and a high density of heavy-traffic roads within 500 m compared with the reference category with no heavy-traffic road within 500 m (OR=2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.2), with a significant positive linear trend of the association of AL with the total length of heavy-traffic road within 500 m. This study supports the hypothesis that living close to heavy-traffic roads may increase the risk of childhood leukemia.

  13. Non-vehicular homicides masquerading as road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Zine, K U; Mugadlimath, Anand B; Sane, Mandar Ramchandra; Bhuyyar, Chandrashekhar; Rathod, S N

    2016-03-01

    Interfering with or planting evidence to disguise the cause of a death is not uncommon in forensic practice. Homicides staged as road accidents are, however, rarely encountered by crime scene investigators. We report two homicides which were presented as road traffic accidents. Case 1: Dead body of a 35-year-old male was brought for autopsy with history of road traffic accident. Primary police inquiry suggested that the victim was knocked down by a speeding four-wheeler, while walking by the side of a high way with his friends. On postmortem examination the deceased's death was found due to homicidal smothering staged as a road traffic accident. Case 2: Dead body of 40-year-old male was brought for autopsy with history of road traffic accident. It was an unwitnessed crush by a speeding four-wheeler. However, on postmortem examination, the deceased was found to have died from homicidal multiple stab wounds with his death staged as a road traffic accident. Importance of meticulous autopsy to determine accurately the cause of death is emphasized. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Trends in Road Traffic Deaths in Yazd, Iran, 2004 - 2010

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohsen; Mirzadeh, Mahboobahsadat; Shogaei Far, Hossein; Mirzaei, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background Road traffic deaths are a considerable public health problem and a major source of lost financial and human resources. Most mortality occurs in low- and middle-income countries. Objectives This study aimed to measure road traffic fatality rates and years of lost life, and also to depict a view of trends in road traffic deaths from 2004 to 2010 in Yazd city, a province in central Iran. Materials and Methods This retrospective case study analyzed road traffic deaths that were classified under the V01 - V99 codes of the ICD-10 in Yazd province from March 2004 to March 2010, using data that were collected from the death registration system of the Yazd province health center. Cases were classified according to age, sex, time of year, and residence (urban vs. rural). Years of lost life and road fatality rate per 100,000 people were calculated. Data were analyzed using chi-square test and ANOVA with SPSS 16. Results During the seven-year period of this study, 3,028 people in Yazd province died due to road traffic accidents (9.1% of total deaths in the province). Most deaths occurred among people aged 20-24 (15%), men (82.7%), and urban residents (82.6%). Total years of lost life (YLL) were 73,875 (60,337 and 13,489 in men and women, respectively). The road traffic fatality rate per 100,000 was 47.6 in 2004 and 37.6 in 2010. In the study period, the rate of traffic fatalities decreased for men (from 77.9 to 68.5) but this is not the case for women (from 14.8 to 19.2). Road traffic deaths peaked every summer. Conclusions Despite the overall reduction trend, the road traffic fatality rate in Yazd province is still alarmingly high compared to national and global data. In addition, the female population shows increasing death rates. These findings can serve as a basis for health care professionals and policymakers to conduct preventive measures, especially during summer, and plan specifically for reducing fatalities in the female population. PMID:27679788

  15. Trends in Road Traffic Deaths in Yazd, Iran, 2004 - 2010.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohsen; Mirzadeh, Mahboobahsadat; Shogaei Far, Hossein; Mirzaei, Mojtaba

    2016-06-01

    Road traffic deaths are a considerable public health problem and a major source of lost financial and human resources. Most mortality occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This study aimed to measure road traffic fatality rates and years of lost life, and also to depict a view of trends in road traffic deaths from 2004 to 2010 in Yazd city, a province in central Iran. This retrospective case study analyzed road traffic deaths that were classified under the V01 - V99 codes of the ICD-10 in Yazd province from March 2004 to March 2010, using data that were collected from the death registration system of the Yazd province health center. Cases were classified according to age, sex, time of year, and residence (urban vs. rural). Years of lost life and road fatality rate per 100,000 people were calculated. Data were analyzed using chi-square test and ANOVA with SPSS 16. During the seven-year period of this study, 3,028 people in Yazd province died due to road traffic accidents (9.1% of total deaths in the province). Most deaths occurred among people aged 20-24 (15%), men (82.7%), and urban residents (82.6%). Total years of lost life (YLL) were 73,875 (60,337 and 13,489 in men and women, respectively). The road traffic fatality rate per 100,000 was 47.6 in 2004 and 37.6 in 2010. In the study period, the rate of traffic fatalities decreased for men (from 77.9 to 68.5) but this is not the case for women (from 14.8 to 19.2). Road traffic deaths peaked every summer. Despite the overall reduction trend, the road traffic fatality rate in Yazd province is still alarmingly high compared to national and global data. In addition, the female population shows increasing death rates. These findings can serve as a basis for health care professionals and policymakers to conduct preventive measures, especially during summer, and plan specifically for reducing fatalities in the female population.

  16. The contribution of the Israeli trauma system to the survival of road traffic casualties.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Sharon; Siman-Tov, Maya; Bahouth, H; Kessel, B; Klein, Y; Michaelson, M; Miklosh, B; Rivkind, A; Shaked, G; Simon, D; Soffer, D; Stein, M; Peleg, Kobi

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, over one million people die annually from traffic crashes, in which over half are pedestrians, bicycle riders and two-wheel motor vehicles. In Israel, during the last decade, mortality from traffic crashes has decreased from 636 in 1998 to 288 in 2011. Professionals attribute the decrease in mortality to enforcement, improved infrastructure and roads and behavioral changes among road users, while no credit is given to the trauma system. Trauma systems which care for severe and critical casualties improve the injury outcomes and reduce mortality among road casualties. 1) To evaluate the contribution of the Israeli Health System, especially the trauma system, on the reduction in mortality among traffic casualties. 2) To evaluate the chance of survival among hospitalized traffic casualties, according to age, gender, injury severity and type of road user. A retrospective study based on the National Trauma Registry, 1998-2011, including hospitalization data from eight hospitals. During the study period, the Trauma Registry included 262,947 hospitalized trauma patients, of which 25.3% were due to a road accident. During the study period, a 25% reduction in traffic related mortality was reported, from 3.6% in 1998 to 2.7% in 2011. Among severe and critical (ISS 16+) casualties the reduction in mortality rates was even more significant, 41%; from 18.6% in 1998 to 11.0% in 2011. Among severe and critical pedestrian injuries, a 44% decrease was reported (from 29.1% in 1998 to 16.2% in 2011) and a 65% reduction among bicycle injuries. During the study period, the risk of mortality decreased by over 50% from 1998 to 2011 (OR 0.44 95% 0.33-0.59. In addition, a simulation was conducted to determine the impact of the trauma system on mortality of hospitalized road casualties. Presuming that the mortality rate remained constant at 18.6% and without any improvement in the trauma system, in 2011 there would have been 182 in-hospital deaths

  17. Road rage and road traffic accidents among commercial vehicle drivers in Lahore, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M A; Shaikh, I A; Siddiqui, Z

    2012-04-01

    Road rage and road traffic accidents increase the burden of morbidity and mortality in a population. A cross-sectional survey with convenience sampling was conducted among commercial vehicle drivers in Lahore, Pakistan (n = 901) to record their behaviours/experiences regarding road rage and road traffic accidents. Respondents were asked about incidents of shouting/cursing/rude gestures or threats to physically hurt the person/vehicle, by others or themselves, in the previous 24 hours or 3 months, and their involvement in road traffic accidents in the previous 12 months. Auto-rickshaw drivers were significantly more likely to report various road rage experiences/behaviours and involvement in accidents compared with bus and wagon drivers. A total of 112 respondents (12.4%) reported being involved in a road traffic accident in the previous 12 months but traffic police did not record the accident in 52.7% of cases. The results of this study underline the need to improve road safety in Pakistan.

  18. Cervical spine lesions after road traffic accidents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Grunnet-Nilsson, Niels; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2002-09-01

    A systematic critical literature review. To determine whether occult pathoanatomical lesions in the cervical spine of road traffic fatalities exist and if they can be identified using optimal autopsy techniques. Previous investigations have examined pathoanatomical conditions of the cervical spine of road traffic fatalities. However, different methods of investigation have been used, and results of studies are conflicting. Hence, potential pathoanatomical conditions in fatalities and survivors remain a controversial issue. Articles were retrieved searching the MEDLINE, Mantis, and Cochrane libraries. Studies examining the cervical spine of road traffic fatalities at autopsy were included and evaluated according to a set of quality criteria. For in-depth review, only studies using surface cryoplaning microtomy autopsy technique and a control group were included. Twenty-seven articles of which three fulfilled the quality criteria were reviewed. In these studies, subtle pathoanatomical lesions were found in the cervical intervertebral discs, cartilaginous endplates, and the articular surfaces and capsules of the zygapophysial joints. The lesions were found exclusively in the traumatized patients and in none of the patients in the control group. Occult pathoanatomical lesions in the cervical intervertebral disc and zygapophysial joints after fatal road traffic trauma may exist. Present imaging methods, especially conventional radiography, do not visualize these subtle lesions; hence, underreporting of pathoanatomical lesions during standard autopsy is probably common. These findings may have clinical relevance in the management of road traffic trauma survivors with potentially similar pathoanatomy.

  19. Nonintrusive system for road traffic detection and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, M F; Briz, S; Durán, L

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the number, type, and velocity of the vehicles that drive along a road is extremely important to manage efficiently the traffic flow and also to estimate the environmental impact that the road may have in the surroundings. In this work the development and preliminary tests for a nonintrusive instrument and method for traffic characterization have been carried out. The system is part of a methodology to estimate the contaminants emitted to air due to urban and suburban road traffic. Based on a set of ultrasonic sensors, the system has shown reliability and accuracy in the determination of the number, type, and velocity of vehicles in a suburban road with several lanes and two ways. The success of this system lies on the method and data processing which overcomes the intrinsic noise problems of ultrasonic sensors. The developed system is easy to install and does not interfere with the road traffic. It is also of low cost, has no moving parts, and requires small power supply. The proposed system is an ideal tool to perform traffic studies where portability and low costs are required, for example, in environmental impact assessments studies.

  20. Economic Sanctions, Military Activity, and Road Traffic Crashes in Vojvodina, Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Ðurić, Predrag; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Political violence has not been examined as a risk factor for traumatic injuries from road traffic crashes. We identify trends in road traffic crashes related to war-related military activity and international economic sanctions in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia. Methods Overall road traffic crashes and crashes leading to hospitalization and fatality in Vojvodina, Serbia were examined from 1996 through 2001. Rates were calculated per 100,000 population and per 10,000 registered vehicles. Three time periods were examined: years with international sanctions and military activity; years with international sanctions but no military activity; and, years with neither sanctions nor military activity. Results Compared to the period with neither sanctions nor military activity, severe injury crashes were 1.23 times more frequent (95% CI = 1.19 – 1.27) during the period with sanctions and military activity and 1.21 times more frequent (95% CI= 1.16 – 1.27) during the period with sanctions but no military activity. Conclusions Our data suggest that vehicle travel became safer following the end of military action and economic sanctions. Road traffic safety needs to be a priority both during periods of political unrest and its recovery phase. PMID:19074242

  1. Road risk-perception and pedestrian injuries among students at Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Jehan M.; Day, Hannah; Hirshon, Jon Mark; El-Setouhy, Maged

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Road traffic injuries (RTIs) constitute 45% of injury mortality in Egypt; 75% of these injuries are pedestrians related. Traditionally, research on road traffic safety has focused on the traffic environment and the vehicles. However, little attention has been given to road risky behaviors and perceptions of road safety by pedestrians as risk factors associated with high pedestrian injury rates. This study aimed to examine the relationship between road risk- perception, specific road behaviors, and self-reported pedestrian injuries among university students in Cairo, Egypt. Methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted among university students aged 18 to 24 years old at Ain Shams University in Cairo. Questions covered socio-demographic variables, injury episodes, road behaviors, road risk-perceptions, attitudes towards injury prevention, and road safety education. Results: The survey was completed by 1,324 students. Two hundred ninety (21.9%) of the participants suffered from pedestrian injury during the past 6 months; of these, 28.9% were admitted to hospital or clinic as a result of the injury, 39.3% were unable to go to university or leave home because of the injury for a period ranging from one day up to one week. Participants were more likely to suffer from pedestrian injury when they did not always "look both ways to cross the road", whereas always "waiting for a green light" was protective. Students who "perceived it safe to cross the road from any point" or "did not perceive it to be safer to cross at a zebra crossing" were less likely to "look both ways" before crossing the road. Similarly, there was a positive association between road safety education and participants’ road crossing behaviors. Conclusion: Inappropriate youths' road behaviors were significantly associated with pedestrian injury. There was also a positive association between road risk perception and road behaviors. This suggests that a behavioral approach together

  2. A novel lattice traffic flow model on a curved road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jin-Liang; Shi, Zhon-Ke

    2015-03-01

    Due to the existence of curved roads in real traffic situation, a novel lattice traffic flow model on a curved road is proposed by taking the effect of friction coefficient and radius into account. The stability condition is obtained by using linear stability theory. The result shows that the traffic flow becomes stable with the decrease of friction coefficient and radius of the curved road. Using nonlinear analysis method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation are derived to describe soliton waves and the kink-antikink waves in the meta-stable region and unstable region, respectively. Numerical simulations are carried out and the results are consistent with the theoretical results.

  3. Benzodiazepine-like hypnotics and the associated risk of road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Orriols, L; Philip, P; Moore, N; Castot, A; Gadegbeku, B; Delorme, B; Mallaret, M; Lagarde, E

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the use of benzodiazepine or benzodiazepine-like hypnotics and the risk of road traffic accidents. Data from three French national databases were matched: the health-care insurance database, police reports, and the police database of injury-related traffic accidents. A total of 72,685 drivers involved in injury-related road traffic accidents in France, from 2005 to 2008, were included in the study. The risk of being responsible for a traffic accident was higher in users of benzodiazepine hypnotics (odds ratio (OR) = 1.39 (1.08-1.79)) and in the 155 drivers to whom a dosage of more than one pill of zolpidem a day had been dispensed during the 5 months before the collision (OR = 2.46 (1.70-3.56)). No association was found between the use of zopiclone and risk of traffic accidents. Although this study did not find any association between the use of zolpidem as recommended and causation of traffic accidents, the potential risk related to possible abuse of the drug and risky driving behaviors should be further investigated. The results related to benzodiazepine hypnotics are consistent with those of previous studies.

  4. Monitoring and assessing global impacts of roads and off-road vehicle traffic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid increases in the number of vehicles, urban sprawl, exurban development and infrastructure development for energy and water have led to dramatic increases in both the size and extent of the global road network. Anecdotal evidence suggests that off-road vehicle traffic has also increased in many...

  5. Comparison of road traffic emission models in Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge, Rafael; de Miguel, Isabel; de la Paz, David; Lumbreras, Julio; Pérez, Javier; Rodríguez, Encarnación

    2012-12-01

    Many cities in Europe have difficulties to meet the air quality standards set by the European legislation, most particularly the annual mean Limit Value for NO2. Road transport is often the main source of air pollution in urban areas and therefore, there is an increasing need to estimate current and future traffic emissions as accurately as possible. As a consequence, a number of specific emission models and emission factors databases have been developed recently. They present important methodological differences and may result in largely diverging emission figures and thus may lead to alternative policy recommendations. This study compares two approaches to estimate road traffic emissions in Madrid (Spain): the COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport (COPERT4 v.8.1) and the Handbook Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA v.3.1), representative of the 'average-speed' and 'traffic situation' model types respectively. The input information (e.g. fleet composition, vehicle kilometres travelled, traffic intensity, road type, etc.) was provided by the traffic model developed by the Madrid City Council along with observations from field campaigns. Hourly emissions were computed for nearly 15 000 road segments distributed in 9 management areas covering the Madrid city and surroundings. Total annual NOX emissions predicted by HBEFA were a 21% higher than those of COPERT. The discrepancies for NO2 were lower (13%) since resulting average NO2/NOX ratios are lower for HBEFA. The larger differences are related to diesel vehicle emissions under "stop & go" traffic conditions, very common in distributor/secondary roads of the Madrid metropolitan area.In order to understand the representativeness of these results, the resulting emissions were integrated in an urban scale inventory used to drive mesoscale air quality simulations with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modelling system (1 km2 resolution). Modelled NO2 concentrations were compared

  6. Alcohol-related road traffic accidents before and after the passing of the Road Traffic Safety Act in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Missoni, Eduard; Bozić, Boris; Missoni, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    were caused by drivers with more than 0.5 per thousand and up to 1.5 per thousand in 2005 (in 2006 - 2,582), along with 53 fatalities (1 fewer than in 2006). Drivers with more than 1.5 per thousand participated in 2,809 accidents (2006 - 2,844), with the number of killed drivers amounting to 57, three fewer than in 2006. In light of these facts, alcohol use still remains a significant factor in road traffic accidents and is an important area for injury prevention efforts.

  7. The influence of road traffic noise on sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, J. L.

    1988-12-01

    The influence of road traffic noise on the sleep of adults and 6-11 year old children was studied by using electrophysiological methods. Young adults, unaccustomed to traffic noise, were disturbed by continuous and intermittent traffic noise at 45 dB(A). No sleep disturbances were found for continuous traffic noise at 36 dB(A). Car passages with a peak noise level of 55 dB(A) caused awakenings. The equivalent sound pressure level ( Leq) did not correlate with sleep disturbance effects. A better noise dose description was found in the number of vehicles per night that made most noise. Children wer about 10 dB(A) less sensitive than adults to awakening reactions, and even less sensitive with respect to disturbances of REM sleep and deep sleep. Total habituation to road traffic noise did not occur, even after at least one year of exposure. Sound reduction in the bedroom induced increased amounts of deep sleep for adults and reduced falling-asleep time for children. Road traffic noise during the first hours of a night's sleep tended to disturb sleep more than when it ocurred later in the night, the main effects being a reduction of the total amount of REM sleep during the night and an increased duration of intermittent wakefulness during the hours of exposure.

  8. Prescription medicines and the risk of road traffic crashes: a French registry-based study.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Ludivine; Delorme, Bernard; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Tricotel, Aurore; Contrand, Benjamin; Laumon, Bernard; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2010-11-16

    In recent decades, increased attention has been focused on the impact of disabilities and medicinal drug use on road safety. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between prescription medicines and the risk of road traffic crashes, and estimate the attributable fraction. We extracted and matched data from three French nationwide databases: the national health care insurance database, police reports, and the national police database of injurious crashes. Drivers identified by their national health care number involved in an injurious crash in France, between July 2005 and May 2008, were included in the study. Medicines were grouped according to the four risk levels of the French classification system (from 0 [no risk] to 3 [high risk]). We included 72,685 drivers involved in injurious crashes. Users of level 2 (odds ratio [OR]  = 1.31 [1.24-1.40]) and level 3 (OR  = 1.25 [1.12-1.40]) prescription medicines were at higher risk of being responsible for a crash. The association remained after adjustment for the presence of a long-term chronic disease. The fraction of road traffic crashes attributable to levels 2 and 3 medications was 3.3% [2.7%-3.9%]. A within-person case-crossover analysis showed that drivers were more likely to be exposed to level 3 medications on the crash day than on a control day, 30 days earlier (OR  = 1.15 [1.05-1.27]). The use of prescription medicines is associated with a substantial number of road traffic crashes in France. In light of the results, warning messages appear to be relevant for level 2 and 3 medications and questionable for level 1 medications. A follow-up study is needed to evaluate the impact of the warning labeling system on road traffic crash prevention.

  9. Querying and Extracting Timeline Information from Road Traffic Sensor Data

    PubMed Central

    Imawan, Ardi; Indikawati, Fitri Indra; Kwon, Joonho; Rao, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    The escalation of traffic congestion in urban cities has urged many countries to use intelligent transportation system (ITS) centers to collect historical traffic sensor data from multiple heterogeneous sources. By analyzing historical traffic data, we can obtain valuable insights into traffic behavior. Many existing applications have been proposed with limited analysis results because of the inability to cope with several types of analytical queries. In this paper, we propose the QET (querying and extracting timeline information) system—a novel analytical query processing method based on a timeline model for road traffic sensor data. To address query performance, we build a TQ-index (timeline query-index) that exploits spatio-temporal features of timeline modeling. We also propose an intuitive timeline visualization method to display congestion events obtained from specified query parameters. In addition, we demonstrate the benefit of our system through a performance evaluation using a Busan ITS dataset and a Seattle freeway dataset. PMID:27563900

  10. Querying and Extracting Timeline Information from Road Traffic Sensor Data.

    PubMed

    Imawan, Ardi; Indikawati, Fitri Indra; Kwon, Joonho; Rao, Praveen

    2016-08-23

    The escalation of traffic congestion in urban cities has urged many countries to use intelligent transportation system (ITS) centers to collect historical traffic sensor data from multiple heterogeneous sources. By analyzing historical traffic data, we can obtain valuable insights into traffic behavior. Many existing applications have been proposed with limited analysis results because of the inability to cope with several types of analytical queries. In this paper, we propose the QET (querying and extracting timeline information) system-a novel analytical query processing method based on a timeline model for road traffic sensor data. To address query performance, we build a TQ-index (timeline query-index) that exploits spatio-temporal features of timeline modeling. We also propose an intuitive timeline visualization method to display congestion events obtained from specified query parameters. In addition, we demonstrate the benefit of our system through a performance evaluation using a Busan ITS dataset and a Seattle freeway dataset.

  11. Prediction of road traffic death rate using neural networks optimised by genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jahandideh, Sepideh; Jahandideh, Mina; Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are realised as a main cause of public health problems at global, regional and national levels. Therefore, prediction of road traffic death rate will be helpful in its management. Based on this fact, we used an artificial neural network model optimised through Genetic algorithm to predict mortality. In this study, a five-fold cross-validation procedure on a data set containing total of 178 countries was used to verify the performance of models. The best-fit model was selected according to the root mean square errors (RMSE). Genetic algorithm, as a powerful model which has not been introduced in prediction of mortality to this extent in previous studies, showed high performance. The lowest RMSE obtained was 0.0808. Such satisfactory results could be attributed to the use of Genetic algorithm as a powerful optimiser which selects the best input feature set to be fed into the neural networks. Seven factors have been known as the most effective factors on the road traffic mortality rate by high accuracy. The gained results displayed that our model is very promising and may play a useful role in developing a better method for assessing the influence of road traffic mortality risk factors.

  12. Predicting Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Children after Road Traffic Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, Markus A.; Vollrath, Margarete; Timm, Karin; Gnehm, Hanspeter E.; Sennhauser, Felix H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the prevalence, course, and predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs) in children after road traffic accidents (RTAs). Method: Sixty-eight children (6.5-14.5 years old) were interviewed 4-6 weeks and 12 months after an RTA with the Child PTSD Reaction Index (response rate 58.6%). Their mothers (n = 60)…

  13. The amount of consolation compensation in road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Jou, Rong-Chang

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the amount of consolation compensation that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay victims. It used 2010 statistics for general road accidents from Taiwan's National Police Agency (NPA) for further sampling and to mail questionnaires. In investigating consolation compensation, the framework of the contingent valuation method was used, and the data were collected through the design of different scenarios. In this study, five injury levels were designed to further analyse the consolation compensation price the perpetrators were willing to pay: minor injury, moderate injury, serious injury, disability, and death. The results revealed the price that many perpetrators were willing to pay was zero; however, we overcame this issue by using the Spike model. The estimated results showed that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay more consolation compensation with increased injury severity.

  14. Road traffic collisions in Bursa, Turkey, during 2003, 2004 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Durak, Dilek; Fedakar, Recep; Türkmen, Nursel; Akgöz, Semra; Baduroğlu, Erol

    2008-05-01

    To highlight the demographic pattern of road traffic injuries in Bursa and to improve emergency care and health facility-based treatment. Records of all registered road traffic collisions maintained by the Uludağ University Emergency Department in Bursa for the period 2003 to 2005 and trauma files of 1307 road traffic collision victims were examined in this study. A form was designed to document patients' age, gender, type of trauma, time of trauma (hour, day, month and year), type and time to hospital of transport, presence of safety devices, presence of alcohol and blood alcohol concentration, localisations of wounds, trauma scores and outcomes. Of the 1307 cases, 418 (32%) were female and 889 (68%) were male. Ages ranged from 3 months to 87 years; mean age (+/-S.D.) was 34.8 (+/-17.3) years. The mean (+/-S.D.) ages of women and men were 35+/-17.6 and 34.7+/-17.2 years, respectively. Trauma was most commonly sustained within the motor vehicle (72.2%), followed by pedestrian injuries (21.7%), motorcycle injuries (5.5%) and bicycle injuries (0.6%). Collisions were most frequent in summer (34.7%) and on Fridays and weekends (48.5%). Seat belts were used in only 1.8% of incidents. In 90 cases (6.9%) alcohol was found in the blood; mean blood alcohol concentration was 139.2+/-88.3mg/dl. The identification of RTC characteristics may contribute to the development of injury prevention measures. Road travel requires extra attentiveness at peak accident times. Seat-belt use should increase, as well as use of other safety equipment such as collision helmets. Shorter transportation time of casualties to hospital would improve outcome.

  15. Underreporting of traffic injuries involving children in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, S; Wakai, S

    2001-01-01

    Background—Significant underreporting of road traffic injuries by the police has been documented, even in developed countries. The objective of this study was to clarify the magnitude of underreporting of police data in Japan. Methods—Police reports were compared with those of the fire department and the Marine and Fire Insurance Association of Japan. Results—The results reveal significant underreporting by police of child vehicle occupant injuries. The true incidence of these injuries in preschoolers was twice as high as that provided by official police reports. Conclusion—Police reports would underestimate the magnitude of vehicle occupant injuries in children and distort any evaluations of preventive initiatives. Improving the police report system, and establishing a more comprehensive trauma registry, that would include data from hospitals and insurance companies should be implemented. PMID:11565993

  16. The Effect of Road Traffic Noise on Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Zokaei, Mojtaba; Sandrock, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traffic noise is one of the main important sources in urban noise pollution, which causes various physiological and psychological effects that can cause disturbs in performance, sleep disturbances, hearing loss and impact on job performance. This study was conducted to verify the impact of road traffic noise on reaction time in terms of extraversion and sex. Methods: Traffic noise was measured and recorded in 10 arterial streets in Tehran, and then the recorded noise was emitted towards participants in an acoustic room. The participants were 80 (40 cases and 40 controls) students. Personality type was determined by Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) questioner. Reaction time before and after exposure to traffic noise was measured. Results: Reaction time before exposure to traffic noise did not differ (P=0.437) significantly between introverts and extraverts. However, it was increased significantly in both groups after exposure to traffic noise (P<0.01). Introvert’s reaction time was more increased than that of extraverts. Conclusion: Traffic noise augmented reaction time of both males and females. This study also revealed that exposure to traffic noise leads to increase in reaction time. PMID:26634199

  17. The Effect of Road Traffic Noise on Reaction Time.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Zokaei, Mojtaba; Sandrock, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Traffic noise is one of the main important sources in urban noise pollution, which causes various physiological and psychological effects that can cause disturbs in performance, sleep disturbances, hearing loss and impact on job performance. This study was conducted to verify the impact of road traffic noise on reaction time in terms of extraversion and sex. Traffic noise was measured and recorded in 10 arterial streets in Tehran, and then the recorded noise was emitted towards participants in an acoustic room. The participants were 80 (40 cases and 40 controls) students. Personality type was determined by Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) questioner. Reaction time before and after exposure to traffic noise was measured. Reaction time before exposure to traffic noise did not differ (P=0.437) significantly between introverts and extraverts. However, it was increased significantly in both groups after exposure to traffic noise (P<0.01). Introvert's reaction time was more increased than that of extraverts. Traffic noise augmented reaction time of both males and females. This study also revealed that exposure to traffic noise leads to increase in reaction time.

  18. Serious road injuries in The Netherlands dissected.

    PubMed

    Weijermars, Wendy; Bos, Niels; Stipdonk, Henk L

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the characteristics and injury patterns of serious road injuries (Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale [MAIS] 2+ inpatients) in The Netherlands. In The Netherlands, the actual number of serious injuries is estimated by linking police data to hospital data. The distribution of serious road injuries over (1) travel mode and gender and (2) crash type and age are compared for the years 2000 and 2011. Moreover, the distribution of the injuries over the body regions is illustrated using colored injury body profiles. The number of serious injuries is higher for men than for women and increased from 16,500 in 2000 to 19,700 in 2011. In 2011, about half (51%) of the serious road injuries were due to a bicycle crash not involving a motor vehicle. The share of casualties aged 60 years and older is relatively high (43% in 2011) in these crashes. The injury body profiles show that head injuries (31%) and injuries to the lower extremities (37%) are most prevalent. Compared to other travel modes, pedestrians and riders of powered 2-wheelers relatively often sustain lower-leg injuries compared to other travel modes. Head injuries are most prevalent in cyclists who are injured in a crash with a motorized vehicle. Cyclists who are injured in a crash not involving a motor vehicle and casualties of 60 years and older relatively often include hip or upper-leg injuries. The characteristics of serious road injuries differ from those of fatalities and the distribution of injuries over the body differs by travel mode, gender, and age.

  19. Road traffic mortality in the Slovak Republic in 1996-2014.

    PubMed

    Brazinova, Alexandra; Majdan, Marek

    2016-10-02

    mortality rate was observed in all individual road user groups. The implementation of the new traffic regulations may have contributed significantly to the observed decrease in mortality rates of road users in the Slovak Republic. A significant decrease in mortality was observed in all population groups and in all groups of road users. The introduction of a new comprehensive road traffic law may have expedited the decrease of road fatalities, especially in the age group 25-64 years old. This type of evidence-based epidemiology data can be used for improved targeting of future public health measures for road traffic injury prevention.

  20. Phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L

    2009-11-01

    Based on empirical and numerical analyses of vehicular traffic, the physics of spatiotemporal phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads is revealed. The complex dynamics of moving jams observed in single vehicle data measured by video cameras on American highways is explained by the nucleation-interruption effect in synchronized flow, i.e., the spontaneous nucleation of a narrow moving jam with the subsequent jam dissolution. We find that (i) lane changing, vehicle merging from on-ramps, and vehicle leaving to off-ramps result in different traffic phases-free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jams-occurring and coexisting in different road lanes as well as in diverse phase transitions between the traffic phases; (ii) in synchronized flow, the phase transitions are responsible for a non-regular moving jam dynamics that explains measured single vehicle data: moving jams emerge and dissolve randomly at various road locations in different lanes; (iii) the phase transitions result also in diverse expanded general congested patterns occurring at closely located bottlenecks.

  1. Phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.

    2009-11-01

    Based on empirical and numerical analyses of vehicular traffic, the physics of spatiotemporal phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads is revealed. The complex dynamics of moving jams observed in single vehicle data measured by video cameras on American highways is explained by the nucleation-interruption effect in synchronized flow, i.e., the spontaneous nucleation of a narrow moving jam with the subsequent jam dissolution. We find that (i) lane changing, vehicle merging from on-ramps, and vehicle leaving to off-ramps result in different traffic phases—free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jams—occurring and coexisting in different road lanes as well as in diverse phase transitions between the traffic phases; (ii) in synchronized flow, the phase transitions are responsible for a non-regular moving jam dynamics that explains measured single vehicle data: moving jams emerge and dissolve randomly at various road locations in different lanes; (iii) the phase transitions result also in diverse expanded general congested patterns occurring at closely located bottlenecks.

  2. A cluster analysis on road traffic accidents using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharan, Sabariah; Baragona, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The analysis of traffic road accidents is increasingly important because of the accidents cost and public road safety. The availability or large data sets makes the study of factors that affect the frequency and severity accidents are viable. However, the data are often highly unbalanced and overlapped. We deal with the data set of the road traffic accidents recorded in Christchurch, New Zealand, from 2000-2009 with a total of 26440 accidents. The data is in a binary set and there are 50 factors road traffic accidents with four level of severity. We used genetic algorithm for the analysis because we are in the presence of a large unbalanced data set and standard clustering like k-means algorithm may not be suitable for the task. The genetic algorithm based on clustering for unknown K, (GCUK) has been used to identify the factors associated with accidents of different levels of severity. The results provided us with an interesting insight into the relationship between factors and accidents severity level and suggest that the two main factors that contributes to fatal accidents are "Speed greater than 60 km h" and "Did not see other people until it was too late". A comparison with the k-means algorithm and the independent component analysis is performed to validate the results.

  3. Quality assurance in road traffic analyses in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Briellmann, Thomas A; Sigrist, Thomas; Augsburger, Marc; Favrat, Bernard; Oestreich, Andrea; Deom, André

    2010-05-20

    Swiss laboratories performing toxicological road traffic analyses have been authorized for many years by the Swiss Federal Roads Office (FEDRO). In 2003 FEDRO signed a contract with the Swiss Society of Legal Medicine (SSLM) to organize the complete quality management concerning road traffic analyses. For this purpose a multidisciplinary working group was established under the name of "road traffic commission (RTC)". RTC has to organize external quality control, to interpret the results of these controls, to perform audits in the laboratories and to report all results to FEDRO. Furthermore the working group can be mandated for special tasks by FEDRO. As an independent organization the Swiss Center for Quality Control (CSCQ) in Geneva manages the external quality controls in the laboratory over the past years. All tested drugs and psychoactive substances are listed in a federal instruction. The so-called 'zero tolerance substances' (THC, morphine, cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA and MDEA) and their metabolites have to be tested once a year, all other substances (benzodiazepines, zolpidem, phenobarbital, etc.) periodically. Results over the last years show that all laboratories are generally within the confidence interval of +/-30% of the mean value. In cases of non-conformities measures have to be taken immediately and reported to the working group. External audits are performed triennially but accredited laboratories can combine this audit with the approval of the Swiss Accreditation Service (SAS). During the audits a special checklist filled in by the laboratory director is assessed. Non-conformities have to be corrected. During the process of establishing a new legislation, RTC had an opportunity of advising FEDRO. In collaboration with FEDRO, RTC and hence SSLM can work actively on improving of quality assurance in road traffic toxicological analyses, and has an opportunity to bring its professional requests to the federal authorities.

  4. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) on the road: a serious traffic safety and public health concern.

    PubMed

    Denning, Gerene; Jennissen, Charles; Harland, Karisa; Ellis, David; Buresh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    collision with another vehicle, suggesting that ATVs on the road represent a potential traffic safety concern. Of note, helmets were associated with reduced risk for the number and severity of brain injuries, providing further support for the importance of helmet use. Finally, even controlling for helmet use, on-road crash victims suffered more major trauma and severe brain injuries than those off-road. Overall, our data reinforce the importance of laws restricting ATV road use and the need for effective enforcement, as well as the need to increase user education about ATV road-use laws and the dangers of riding on the roads.

  5. A study on posttraumatic experience of road traffic accident afflicted maxillofacial trauma patient at tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shrestha, Suraksha

    2017-01-01

    Patients are usually left in a vulnerable state after an accident. Because of this, they long for a good encounter when they are brought to the hospital. Physical impairment and psychological morbidities are some of the complications that can occur to them. Traditionally, surgeons tend to pay little attention to a patient's emotional and psychological perspective. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of oral and maxillofacial trauma patients due to road traffic accident right from immediate after the accident till the end of definitive treatment. Phenomenological approach of qualitative study was used to explore these patients' experience. Twenty subjects involved in road traffic accidents without any cognitive impairment aged 18 and above were recruited. Purposive sampling was used to include maximal variation sample regarding age, gender, types of injury, and types of treatment received. Semi-structured and open-ended interview approach was used to obtain in-depth information. Seven themes were identified to describe the patients' response to and experience after meeting with a road traffic accident; they are unreal experiences, emotional responses, need to inform and need for information, need for assistance, their perception toward the maxillofacial injury, their experience on treatment and staff-patient interaction. This qualitative study has provided an in-depth understanding of patients experience during maxillofacial trauma and treatment, which otherwise cannot be obtained by the use of surveys and test questions.

  6. [The medical social aspects of ambulatory medical care to victims of road traffic accidents].

    PubMed

    Gorbunkov, V Ia; Bugaev, D A; Derevianko, D V

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the issues of the organization of medical care to victims of road traffic accidents. The analysis of primary appealability of patients to the first-aid center of Stavropol and Novorossiysk during 2008-2010 is presented. The sampling consisted of 904 cases of this kind of trauma. It is established that among victims of road traffic accident appealed to first-aid centers the pedestrians consist the major part. The traumas of limbs are among the most frequently occurred cases. The victims with cranio-cerebral injuries are among those who appealed most frequently for medical aid. Besides that in most cases (63.4%) the victims with cranio-cerebral injuries were transported not to the neurologic surgery clinic but to the first-aid center This action increased the number of transport stages and duration of time gap before specialized medical care was applied. The conclusion is made concerning the need of further development of out-patient urgent medical care to victims of road traffic accidents.

  7. A study on posttraumatic experience of road traffic accident afflicted maxillofacial trauma patient at tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shrestha, Suraksha

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Patients are usually left in a vulnerable state after an accident. Because of this, they long for a good encounter when they are brought to the hospital. Physical impairment and psychological morbidities are some of the complications that can occur to them. Traditionally, surgeons tend to pay little attention to a patient's emotional and psychological perspective. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of oral and maxillofacial trauma patients due to road traffic accident right from immediate after the accident till the end of definitive treatment. Materials and Methods: Phenomenological approach of qualitative study was used to explore these patients’ experience. Twenty subjects involved in road traffic accidents without any cognitive impairment aged 18 and above were recruited. Purposive sampling was used to include maximal variation sample regarding age, gender, types of injury, and types of treatment received. Semi-structured and open-ended interview approach was used to obtain in-depth information. Results: Seven themes were identified to describe the patients’ response to and experience after meeting with a road traffic accident; they are unreal experiences, emotional responses, need to inform and need for information, need for assistance, their perception toward the maxillofacial injury, their experience on treatment and staff-patient interaction. Conclusion: This qualitative study has provided an in-depth understanding of patients experience during maxillofacial trauma and treatment, which otherwise cannot be obtained by the use of surveys and test questions. PMID:28250673

  8. Epidemiologic Pattern of Fatal Traffic Injuries among Iranian Drivers; 2004–2010

    PubMed Central

    BAKHTIYARI, Mahmood; MEHMANDAR, Mohammad Reza; RIAHI, Seyed Mohammad; MANSOURNIA, Mohammad Ali; SARTIPI, Majid; BAHADORIMONFARED, Ayad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to their specific nature, such as high incidence, high intensity and direct involvement of all members of society, traffic injuries are of particular importance. Through a mega data, this study investigated the epidemiological aspects and depict current situation of road traffic injuries in Iran. Methods: Using legal medicine and traffic police data, deaths from road traffic injuries in men were predicted through determining the most appropriate model for death using time series statistical models; and then most important human factors associated with it in a period of 6 yr in Iran was analyzed using multi-nominal regression model. Results: The frequency of deaths from traffic injuries in the last seven years was 172,834 cases and the number of deaths at the accident scene was 42798 cases, of which 24.24% (41,971 cases) were recorded by the Traffic Police experts. Death rate from traffic injuries has been declined from 38 cases per 100,000 people in 2004 to 31 cases per 100,000 people between 2009 and 2010. Fatigue and sleepiness (AOR=10.36, 95% CI: 8.41–13.3) was the most significant human risk factors for death outcome in the urban and suburban traffic injuries. According to the predictions, the death rate is about 16488 (CI 95%, 8531–24364) for the year 2012. Conclusion: Despite all measures to prevent such injuries, even fatal injuries have still a high incidence. Intervention in the human risk factors field would be more effective due to their important roles in traffic injuries in Iran. PMID:27252920

  9. Epidemiologic Pattern of Fatal Traffic Injuries among Iranian Drivers; 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiyari, Mahmood; Mehmandar, Mohammad Reza; Riahi, Seyed Mohammad; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Sartipi, Majid; Bahadorimonfared, Ayad

    2016-04-01

    Due to their specific nature, such as high incidence, high intensity and direct involvement of all members of society, traffic injuries are of particular importance. Through a mega data, this study investigated the epidemiological aspects and depict current situation of road traffic injuries in Iran. Using legal medicine and traffic police data, deaths from road traffic injuries in men were predicted through determining the most appropriate model for death using time series statistical models; and then most important human factors associated with it in a period of 6 yr in Iran was analyzed using multi-nominal regression model. The frequency of deaths from traffic injuries in the last seven years was 172,834 cases and the number of deaths at the accident scene was 42798 cases, of which 24.24% (41,971 cases) were recorded by the Traffic Police experts. Death rate from traffic injuries has been declined from 38 cases per 100,000 people in 2004 to 31 cases per 100,000 people between 2009 and 2010. Fatigue and sleepiness (AOR=10.36, 95% CI: 8.41-13.3) was the most significant human risk factors for death outcome in the urban and suburban traffic injuries. According to the predictions, the death rate is about 16488 (CI 95%, 8531-24364) for the year 2012. Despite all measures to prevent such injuries, even fatal injuries have still a high incidence. Intervention in the human risk factors field would be more effective due to their important roles in traffic injuries in Iran.

  10. [The forensic-medical characteristic of the injuries inflicted to a pedestrian in a road traffic accident by the vehicle in the side and front impact position].

    PubMed

    Leonov, S V; Pinchuk, P V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to distinguish between the separate phases of the car-to-pedestrian collision with the vehicle being in the side and front impact position. The secondary objective was to determine characteristics of injuries specific for the collisions of this type. The methods employed in the study included the analysis of archival materials and video sequence images. We propose to consider a special type of injury resulting from the car-to-pedestrian collision with the vehicle being in the side and front impact position and to distinguish its two varieties. One of them is caused by the vehicle hitting the pedestrian front laterally, the other arises from the oblique-transverse collision. Each type of collision produces injuries with highly specific characteristics.

  11. Disability related to road traffic crashes among adults in Spain.

    PubMed

    Palmera-Suárez, Rocío; López-Cuadrado, Teresa; Almazán-Isla, Javier; Fernández-Cuenca, Rafael; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Galán, Iñaki

    2015-09-01

    Road traffic accidents cause substantial morbidity and disease burden; few studies have examined their impact on disability. To estimate the magnitude and distribution of disability due to road traffic accidents according to socio-demographic variables, and its main socioeconomic and health determinants. A cross-sectional study was conducted in community-dwelling participants in the "2008 Spanish National Disability Survey", a representative sample of 91,846 households with 20,425 disabled persons older than 15 years; 443 had disability due to road traffic accidents. The prevalence was 2.1 per 1000 inhabitants (95% CI:1.8-2.3), with no differences by sex. Risk was highest among persons aged 31 to 64 years, and onset of disability showed a sharp inflection point at age 16 years in both sexes. Odds ratios (ORs) were higher (OR=1.3; 95% CI:1.1- 1.7) for participants with secondary education than for those with the lowest educational levels and were lower (OR: 0.5; 95% CI:0.3-0.8) for participants with the highest household income levels than for those with lowest. Only 24% of disabled participants were gainfully employed. As compared to other sources of disability, traffic crashes caused greater disability in terms of mobility (OR=3.1;p<0.001), a greater need for health/social services (OR=1.5;p=0.003), and more problems with private transportation (OR=1.6;p<0.001), moving around outside the home (OR=1.6;p<0.001) and changes in economic activity (OR=2.4;p<0.001). The prevalence of disability due to road traffic accidents in Spain is lower than in other developed countries, with middle-aged and socio-economically underprivileged persons being the most affected. Disability due to road traffic accidents is related to a greater demand for social/health care support, problems of accessibility/commuting, and major changes in economic activity. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Road traffic accidents in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Liam, C K; How, L G; Tan, C T

    1996-03-01

    Three patients involved in road traffic accidents were suspected to have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Two of them fell asleep while riding motorcycles and one patient fell asleep behind the wheel of a truck causing it to overturn. The diagnosis of OSA in each case was suspected based on a history of loud snoring, restless sleep, and excessive daytime somnolence and was confirmed by sleep studies.

  13. Study of the road traffic noise in Erzurum-Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Road traffic noise affects a large number of people, especially in urban areas and is generally a major source of complaints. This paper refers to a study of the problem of traffic noise on roads which have been transformed into streets in the city of Erzurum. Noise levels are measured and the impacts suffered by the community are documented. Manual noise measurements were made along 12 streets exploring sources of maximum noise levels. Noise from different types of vehicles driven in a realistic way in inner city traffic was measured. The results from the measurements showed that, of 750 measured events, approximately 5% of the vehicles exceeded 70 dB(A) and less than 2% exceeded 80 dB(A) maximum noise level. In summary, the result showed that the most important vehicle component as regards the maximum noise level in inner city traffic was a medium-weight vehicle. Among the higher noise levels measured (>80 dB(A)) this type of vehicle was dominant. PMID:23369534

  14. A comparative study of road traffic accidents in West Malaysia.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of road traffic accidents in developing countries is now becoming a cause for concern. This is more so as preventive measures have not kept pace with economic progress and development. This paper reviews the present situation in West Malaysia, one of the better developed countries of the East, during the period 1970 to 1975. A comparative study has been made between the United States and Malaysia. To enable the urgency of the problem in developing countries to be appreciated the increases in the country's population and in the number of vehicles in use and their relation to the lesser increase in road mileage over the period of study have been discussed. The study has considered every aspect of the causative factors leading to traffic accidents, such as the effects of weather, seasonal variation, and road and lighting conditions. The common human errors leading to accidents have been discussed. Other factors, such as the ethnic distribution in Malaysia, and their relation to road accidents have shown the effect of the social structure on the problems. The data evaluated in this study make it clear that preventive measures are very necessary in underdeveloped as well as in developed countries. PMID:718073

  15. A comparative study of road traffic accidents in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Silva, J F

    1978-11-01

    The problem of road traffic accidents in developing countries is now becoming a cause for concern. This is more so as preventive measures have not kept pace with economic progress and development. This paper reviews the present situation in West Malaysia, one of the better developed countries of the East, during the period 1970 to 1975. A comparative study has been made between the United States and Malaysia. To enable the urgency of the problem in developing countries to be appreciated the increases in the country's population and in the number of vehicles in use and their relation to the lesser increase in road mileage over the period of study have been discussed. The study has considered every aspect of the causative factors leading to traffic accidents, such as the effects of weather, seasonal variation, and road and lighting conditions. The common human errors leading to accidents have been discussed. Other factors, such as the ethnic distribution in Malaysia, and their relation to road accidents have shown the effect of the social structure on the problems. The data evaluated in this study make it clear that preventive measures are very necessary in underdeveloped as well as in developed countries.

  16. Effects of Road Traffic Noise on Inhabitants of Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Osada, Y.; Kawaguchi, T.; Hoshiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    1997-08-01

    A questionnaire-based study was performed in an area of about 16 ha near a main road in Tokyo to elucidate any relations between road traffic noise and the effects of this noise among women living on both sides of the road. Questions concerned annoyance, sleep disturbance, interference with daily activities, health-related symptoms and disease histories. 366 inhabitants were analyzed. Dose-response relationships were found in high reported responses to noisiness, annoyance, dissatisfaction with the nearby environment and interference with listening to TV, conversation and reading. It was also found that the number of high responses to questions increases clearly at noise levels above 70 dB(A),Leq(24h), with regard to interference with thinking and sleep disturbance (waking during the night), fatigue, headache, gastroenteric disorders, loss of appetite, depression and irritation. Furthermore, there was an increase in reports of disease histories with noise above 70 dB(A) for climacteric disturbances, and at noise above 65 dB(A) for deafness, heart disease and hypercholestrolemia. These all suggest that noise may be related to the health status of inhabitants living in areas with heavy road traffic. A noise level of 65 dB(A) or 70 dB(A) inLeq(24h)was the critical point above which respondents indicated increased effects on health and reports of disease increased.

  17. Oil industry and road traffic fatalities in contemporary Colombia.

    PubMed

    Tasciotti, Luca; Alejo, Didier; Romero, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the effects that oil extraction activities in Colombia have on the number of dead/injured people as a consequence of road-related accidents. Starting in 2004, the increasing exploitation of oil wells in some Colombian departments has worsened the traffic conditions due to the increased presence of trucks transporting crude oil from the wells to the refineries; this phenomenon has not been accompanied by an improvement in the road system with dramatic consequences in terms of road viability. The descriptive and empirical analysis presented here focuses on the period 2004-2011; results from descriptive statistics indicate a positive relationship between the presence of oil extraction activities and the number of either dead/injured people. Panel regressions for the period 2004-2011 confirm that, among other factors, the presence of oil-extraction activities did play a positive and statistical significant role in increasing the number of dead/injured people.

  18. Road safety and road traffic accidents in Saudi Arabia. A systematic review of existing evidence.

    PubMed

    Mansuri, Farah A; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H; Zalat, Marwa M; Qabshawi, Reem I

    2015-04-01

    To identify the changing trends and crucial preventive approaches to road traffic accidents (RTAs) adopted in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) over the last 2.5 decades, and to analyze aspects previously overlooked. This systematic review was based on evidence of RTAs in KSA. All articles published during the last 25 years on road traffic accident in KSA were analyzed. This study was carried out from December 2013 to May 2014 in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, KSA. Road traffic accidents accounted for 83.4% of all trauma admissions in 1984-1989, and no such overall trend was studied thereafter. The most frequently injured body regions as reported in the latest studies were head and neck, followed by upper and lower extremities, which was found to be opposite to that of the studies reported earlier. Hospital data showed an 8% non-significant increase in road accident mortalities in contrast to police records of a 27% significant reduction during the years 2005-2010. Excessive speeding was the most common cause reported in all recent and past studies. Disparity was common in the type of reporting of RTAs, outcome measures, and possible causes over a period of 2.5 decade. All research exclusively looked into the drivers' faults. A sentinel surveillance of road crashes should be kept in place in the secondary and tertiary care hospitals for all regions of KSA.

  19. Effects of traffic and ditch maintenance on forest road sediment production

    Treesearch

    Charles H. Luce; Thomas A. Black

    2001-01-01

    Observations of sediment yield from road segments in the Oregon Coast Range show that either heavy traffic during rainfall or blading the road ditch will increase erosion from forest roads. For the fine soils and high quality aggregate surfacing on the study plots, ditch blading increased sediment yield more than traffic equivalent to 12 log trucks per day. The...

  20. Do unpaved, low-traffic roads affect bird communities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammides, Christos; Kounnamas, Constantinos; Goodale, Eben; Kadis, Costas

    2016-02-01

    Unpaved, low traffic roads are often assumed to have minimal effects on biodiversity. To explore this assertion, we sampled the bird communities in fifteen randomly selected sites in Pafos Forest, Cyprus and used multiple regression to quantify the effects of such roads on the total species richness. Moreover, we classified birds according to their migratory status and their global population trends, and tested each category separately. Besides the total length of unpaved roads, we also tested: a. the site's habitat diversity, b. the coefficient of variation in habitat (patch) size, c. the distance to the nearest agricultural field, and d. the human population size of the nearest village. We measured our variables at six different distances from the bird point-count locations. We found a strong negative relationship between the total bird richness and the total length of unpaved roads. The human population size of the nearest village also had a negative effect. Habitat diversity was positively related to species richness. When the categories were tested, we found that the passage migrants were influenced more by the road network while resident breeders were influenced by habitat diversity. Species with increasing and stable populations were only marginally affected by the variables tested, but the effect of road networks on species with decreasing populations was large. We conclude that unpaved and sporadically used roads can have detrimental effects on the bird communities, especially on vulnerable species. We propose that actions are taken to limit the extent of road networks within protected areas, especially in sites designated for their rich avifauna, such as Pafos Forest, where several of the affected species are species of European and global importance.

  1. Epidemiological Study of Road Traffic Accident Cases from Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Badrinarayan; Sinha (Mishra), Nidhi D; Sukhla, SK; Sinha, AK

    2010-01-01

    Background: Road Traffic Accident (RTA) is one among the top five causes of morbidity and mortality in South-East Asian countries.(1) Its socioeconomic repercussions are a matter of great concern. Efficient addressing of the issue requires quality information on different causative factors. Research Question: What are different epidemiological determinants of RTA in western Nepal? Objective: To examine the factors associated with RTA. Study Design: Prospective observational. Setting: Study was performed in a tertiary healthcare delivery institute in western Nepal. Participants: 360 victims of RTA who reported to Manipal Teaching hospital in one year. Study Variables: Demographic, human, vehicular, environmental and time factors. Statistical analysis: Percentages, linear and logarithmic trend and Chi-square. Results: Most of the victims i.e. 147 (40.83%) were young (15 to 30 years); from low i.e. 114 (31.66%) and mid i.e. 198 (55%) income families and were passengers i.e. 153 (42.50%) and pedestrians i.e. 105 (29.16%). Sever accidents leading to fatal outcome were associated with personal problems (P<0.01, χ2 - 8.03), recent or on-day conflicts (P<0.001, χ2 - 18.88) and some evidence of alcohol consumptions (P<0.001, χ2 - 30.25). Increased prevalence of RTA was also noticed at beginning i.e. 198 (55%) and end i.e. 69 (19.16%) of journey; in rainy and cloudy conditions (269 i.e. 74.72%) and in evening hours (3 to 7 p.m. 159 i.e. 44.16%). Out of 246 vehicles involved; 162 (65.85%) were old and ill maintained. The contributions of old vehicle to fatal injuries were 33 (50%). Head injury was found in 156 (43.33 %) cases and its associated case fatality rate was 90.90%. In spite of a good percentage receiving first aid i.e. 213 (59.16%) after RTA; there was a notable delay (174 i.e. 48.33% admitted after 6 h) in shifting the cases to the hospitals. The estimated total days lost due to hospital stay was 4620 with an average of 12.83 days per each case. Conclusion: Most

  2. Road traffic nuisance in residential and commercial areas.

    PubMed

    Williams, I D; McCrae, I S

    1995-07-08

    Air pollution from traffic is one of the main factors considered in the environmental appraisal of road schemes. Currently this appraisal concentrates on the emission and roadside concentration of those regulated pollutants which are potentially harmful to the health or well-being of human, animal or plant life, or to ecological systems. However, vehicle emissions, especially those from diesel vehicles, may also cause a number of aesthetic and nuisance problems, such a visibility reduction, urban soiling and physical irritation. A methodology to investigated the subjective nuisance effects of air pollution from road traffic on the public has been developed and tested. The data indicates that vehicle-derived air pollution was an issue of high relative importance to the public when compared to other major social issues. On a local level, the physical presence of road traffic and its associated pollution appeared to be the largest contributors to outdoor public environmental nuisance. Indoors, the public appeared to experience only minor disturbances from vehicle-derived pollution, with the average respondent being not very bothered by vehicle-derived smoke, fumes and odour, dust and dirt and general air pollution. Noise appeared to cause the greatest indoor traffic-related nuisance, although many respondents complained about soiling from dust/dirt. The surveys suggest that outdoor disturbance from vehicle-derived air pollution was fairly high, with smoke, fumes and odour causing the greatest annoyance. The main reason given for disturbance from outdoor smoke, fumes and odour and dust/dirt was concern that they would harm the public's health. Other important specific reasons included soiling and the smell of the fumes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Road traffic and adverse effects on respiratory health in children.

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, M; Reitmeir, P; Dold, S; Wulff, A; Nicolai, T; von Loeffelholz-Colberg, E F; von Mutius, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine whether road traffic in a big city has a direct effect on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in children. DESIGN--Cross sectional study. SETTING--Of all 7445 fourth grade children (aged 9-11 years) in Munich, 6537 were examined. Of the children with German nationality and the same residence during the past five years and known exposure data, 4678 questionnaires and 4320 pulmonary function tests could be analysed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Variables of pulmonary function by forced expiration and respiratory symptoms reported in a questionnaire; census data on car traffic collected in the school district. RESULTS--Density of car traffic ranged from 7000 to 125,000 cars per 24 hours. Multiple regression analysis of peak expiratory flow showed a significant decrease of 0.71% (95% confidence interval 1.08% to 0.33%) per increase of 25,000 cars daily passing through the school district on the main road. Maximum expiratory flow when 25% vital capacity had been expired was decreased by 0.68% (1.11% to 0.25%). In contrast, response to cold air challenge was not increased. The adjusted odds ratio for the cumulative prevalence of recurrent wheezing with the same exposure was 1.08 (1.01 to 1.16). Cumulative prevalence of recurrent dyspnoea was increased, with an odds ratio of 1.10 (1.00 to 1.20). Lifetime prevalence of asthma (odds ratio 1.04; 0.89 to 1.21) and recurrent bronchitis (1.05; 0.98 to 1.12) were not significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS--High rates of road traffic diminish forced expiratory flow and increase respiratory symptoms in children. Images FIG 1 PMID:7691304

  4. Pre-hospital trauma care in road traffic accidents in kashan, iran.

    PubMed

    Paravar, Mohammad; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Salehi, Shayesteh; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Shojaee, Abolfazl; Akbari, Hossein; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat

    2013-01-01

    Iran has one of the highest rates of road traffic accidents (RTAs) worldwide. Pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize many instances of traffic-related mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of pre-hospital care in patients who were injured in RTAs, admitted to hospital. The focus was mainly directed at evaluating pre-hospital trauma care provided in city streets and roads out of the city. This retrospective study was carried out on all trauma patients, transported by the emergency medical service (EMS) system, who were admitted to Kashan Shahid-Beheshti hospital during the period from March 2011 to March 2012. The patients' demographic data, location of accident, damaged organs, mechanism of injury, injury severity, pre-hospital times (response, scene, transport), pre-hospital interventions and outcomes, were extracted from the data registry and analyzed through descriptive statistics using SPSS 18 software. Findings of this study showed that, 75% of RTAs occurred on city streets (n = 1 251). Motor-car accidents were the most frequent mechanism of RTA on city streets (n = 525) (42%), while car rollover was the most frequent mechanism of RTA on roads out of the city (n = 155) (44.4%). The mean pre-hospital time intervals (min); response, scene, and transport for all patients were 6.6 ± 3.1, 10.7 ± 5 and 13 ± 9.8, respectively. The mean pre-hospital time intervals (response, scene, transport) in roads out of the city were higher than those in city streets. There was a significant difference (P = 0.04) in the mortality rates due to RTAs between city streets (n = 46) and roads out of the city (n = 32). In comparison with road traffic accidents on city streets, trauma patients in RTAs on roads out of the city have longer pre-hospital time intervals and more severe injuries; therefore, this group needs more pre-hospital resuscitation interventions.

  5. Impact of daylight saving time on road traffic collision risk: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carey, Rachel N; Sarma, Kiran M

    2017-07-02

    Bills have been put forward in the UK and Republic of Ireland proposing a move to Central European Time (CET). Proponents argue that such a change will have benefits for road safety, with daylight being shifted from the morning, when collision risk is lower, to the evening, when risk is higher. Studies examining the impact of daylight saving time (DST) on road traffic collision risk can help inform the debate on the potential road safety benefits of a move to CET. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the impact of DST on collision risk. Major electronic databases were searched, with no restrictions as to date of publication (the last search was performed in January 2017). Access to unpublished reports was requested through an international expert group. Studies that provided a quantitative analysis of the effect of DST on road safety-related outcomes were included. The primary outcomes of interest were road traffic collisions, injuries and fatalities. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen examined the short-term impact of transitions around DST and 12 examined long-term effects. Findings from the short-term studies were inconsistent. The long-term findings suggested a positive effect of DST. However, this cannot be attributed solely to DST, as a range of road collision risk factors vary over time. The evidence from this review cannot support or refute the assertion that a permanent shift in light from morning to evening will have a road safety benefit. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. New, Occasional, and Frequent Use of Zolpidem or Zopiclone (Alone and in Combination) and the Risk of Injurious Road Traffic Crashes in Older Adult Drivers: A Population-Based Case-Control and Case-Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Nevriana, Alicia; Möller, Jette; Laflamme, Lucie; Monárrez-Espino, Joel

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies on the effect of zolpidem or zopiclone use on the risk of road traffic crashes (RTCs) have shown mixed results. Our objective was to determine the association between zolpidem or zopiclone use (as separate drugs or combined) and the occurrence of injurious RTCs among older adult drivers. This was a population-based matched case-control and case-crossover study based on secondary data linked together from Swedish national registers. Cases were drivers aged 50-80 years involved in a vehicle crash resulting in injuries between January 2006 and December 2009 for the case-control study (n = 27,096) and from February 2006 to December 2009 for the case-crossover study (n = 26,586). For the first design, four controls were matched to each case by sex, age, and residential area, and exposure was categorized into new, occasional, and frequent use of zolpidem only, zopiclone only, and combined zolpidem and zopiclone. For the case-crossover study, newly dispensed zolpidem or zopiclone users were assessed during the 28 days prior to the crash and compared with an equally long control period using a 12-week washout period. Matched adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed using conditional logistic regression. Increased ORs for all users were observed. In the case-control study, the highest odds were seen among newly initiated zolpidem-only users involved in single-vehicle crashes (adjusted OR 2.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-4.24), followed by frequent combined zolpidem and zopiclone users [adjusted OR 2.20; CI 1.21-4.00]. In the case-crossover, newly initiated treatment with zolpidem or zopiclone showed an increased risk that was highest in the 2 weeks after the start of the treatment (OR 2.66; 95% CI 1.04-6.81). These results provide more compelling evidence for the role of zolpidem or zopiclone in the occurrence of RTCs among older adults, not only in frequent users, but also at the beginning of treatment.

  7. Road traffic impact on urban water quality: a step towards integrated traffic, air and stormwater modelling.

    PubMed

    Fallah Shorshani, Masoud; Bonhomme, Céline; Petrucci, Guido; André, Michel; Seigneur, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Methods for simulating air pollution due to road traffic and the associated effects on stormwater runoff quality in an urban environment are examined with particular emphasis on the integration of the various simulation models into a consistent modelling chain. To that end, the models for traffic, pollutant emissions, atmospheric dispersion and deposition, and stormwater contamination are reviewed. The present study focuses on the implementation of a modelling chain for an actual urban case study, which is the contamination of water runoff by cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the Grigny urban catchment near Paris, France. First, traffic emissions are calculated with traffic inputs using the COPERT4 methodology. Next, the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants is simulated with the Polyphemus line source model and pollutant deposition fluxes in different subcatchment areas are calculated. Finally, the SWMM water quantity and quality model is used to estimate the concentrations of pollutants in stormwater runoff. The simulation results are compared to mass flow rates and concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn measured at the catchment outlet. The contribution of local traffic to stormwater contamination is estimated to be significant for Pb and, to a lesser extent, for Zn and Cd; however, Pb is most likely overestimated due to outdated emissions factors. The results demonstrate the importance of treating distributed traffic emissions from major roadways explicitly since the impact of these sources on concentrations in the catchment outlet is underestimated when those traffic emissions are spatially averaged over the catchment area.

  8. Road Traffic Control Based on Genetic Algorithm for Reducing Traffic Congestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigehiro, Yuji; Miyakawa, Takuya; Masuda, Tatsuya

    In this paper, we propose a road traffic control method for reducing traffic congestion with genetic algorithm. In the not too distant future, the system which controls the routes of all vehicles in a certain area must be realized. The system should optimize the routes of all vehicles, however the solution space of this problem is enormous. Therefore we apply the genetic algorithm to this problem, by encoding the route of all vehicles to a fixed length chromosome. To improve the search performance, a new genetic operator called “path shortening” is also designed. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by the experiment.

  9. Road traffic noise, air pollution components and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; van Lenthe, Frank J; Visschedijk, Antoon J H; Zandveld, Peter Y J; Miedema, Henk M E; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2013-01-01

    Traffic noise and air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular health effects. Until date, only a limited amount of prospective epidemiological studies is available on long-term effects of road traffic noise and combustion related air pollution. This study investigates the relationship between road traffic noise and air pollution and hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease (IHD: International Classification of Diseases (ICD9) 410-414) or cerebrovascular disease (cerebrovascular event [CVE]: ICD9 430-438). We linked baseline questionnaire data to 13 years of follow-up on hospital admissions and road traffic noise and air pollution exposure, for a large random sample (N = 18,213) of inhabitants of the Eindhoven region, Netherlands. Subjects with cardiovascular event during follow-up on average had higher road traffic noise day, evening, night level (L den) and air pollution exposure at the home. After adjustment for confounders (age, sex, body mass index, smoking, education, exercise, marital status, alcohol use, work situation, financial difficulties), increased exposure did not exert a significant increased risk of hospital admission for IHD or cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RRs) for a 5 (th) to 95 (th) percentile interval increase were 1.03 (0.88-1.20) for L den; 1.04 (0.90-1.21) for particulate matter (PM 10 ); 1.05 (0.91-1.20) for elemental carbon (EC); and 1.12 (096-1.32) for nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in the full model. While the risk estimate seemed highest for NO 2 , for a 5 (th) to 95 (th) percentile interval increase, expressed as RRs per 1 μg/m 3 increases, hazard ratios seemed highest for EC (RR 1.04 [0.92-1.18]). In the subgroup of study participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, RR estimates seemed highest for noise exposure (1.19 [0.87-1.64] for L den); in the subgroup of elderly RR seemed highest for air pollution exposure (RR 1.24 [0.93-1.66] for NO 2 ).

  10. A Study on Urban Road Traffic Safety Based on Matter Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qizhou; Zhou, Zhuping; Sun, Xu

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a new evaluation of urban road traffic safety based on a matter element analysis, avoiding the difficulties found in other traffic safety evaluations. The issue of urban road traffic safety has been investigated through the matter element analysis theory. The chief aim of the present work is to investigate the features of urban road traffic safety. Emphasis was placed on the construction of a criterion function by which traffic safety achieved a hierarchical system of objectives to be evaluated. The matter element analysis theory was used to create the comprehensive appraisal model of urban road traffic safety. The technique was used to employ a newly developed and versatile matter element analysis algorithm. The matter element matrix solves the uncertainty and incompatibility of the evaluated factors used to assess urban road traffic safety. The application results showed the superiority of the evaluation model and a didactic example was included to illustrate the computational procedure. PMID:25587267

  11. The effects of road traffic noise on mental performance.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Soltani, Raziyeh; Sandrock, Stephan; Azkhosh, Manouchehr; Gohari, Mahmood Reza

    2013-02-09

    Noise is one of the more widespread pollutions of road transportation system, which can cause deterioration in performance. This experimental study was designed to assess the effect of road traffic noise on performance with regard to extra/introversion and sex of participants. The personality trait of extra/introversion has been remarked as relevant factor to mental performance. Thirty six (26 males and 10 females) medical sciences students of Tehran University participated in the study. The students were placed in an unechoing room and performed the Cognitrone test from Vienna Test System in quiet condition and under road traffic noise (71 dBA). The results of this study pointed out that noise increased the percentage of sum of correct answers but had no effect on the speed of performance. Furthermore this study showed that performance was enhanced in extroverts (P=0.001) but no significant difference was found in introverts (P ≤0.05). The regression analysis revealed that extra/introversion was more important than sex to predict the performance parameters.

  12. The effects of road traffic noise on mental performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Noise is one of the more widespread pollutions of road transportation system, which can cause deterioration in performance. This experimental study was designed to assess the effect of road traffic noise on performance with regard to extra/introversion and sex of participants. The personality trait of extra/introversion has been remarked as relevant factor to mental performance. Results Thirty six (26 males and 10 females) medical sciences students of Tehran University participated in the study. The students were placed in an unechoing room and performed the Cognitrone test from Vienna Test System in quiet condition and under road traffic noise (71 dBA). The results of this study pointed out that noise increased the percentage of sum of correct answers but had no effect on the speed of performance. Furthermore this study showed that performance was enhanced in extroverts (P=0.001) but no significant difference was found in introverts (P ≤0.05). Conclusions The regression analysis revealed that extra/introversion was more important than sex to predict the performance parameters. PMID:23394722

  13. Prehospital transportation decisions for patients sustaining major trauma in road traffic crashes in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Candefjord, Stefan; Buendia, Ruben; Caragounis, Eva-Corina; Sjöqvist, Bengt Arne; Fagerlind, Helen

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion and characteristics of patients sustaining major trauma in road traffic crashes (RTCs) who could benefit from direct transportation to a trauma center (TC). Currently, there is no national classification of TC in Sweden. In this study, 7 university hospitals (UHs) in Sweden were selected to represent a TC level I or level II. These UHs have similar capabilities as the definition for level I and level II TC in the United States. Major trauma was defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. A total of 117,730 patients who were transported by road or air ambulance were selected from the Swedish TRaffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA) database between 2007 to 2014. An analysis of the patient characteristics sustaining major trauma in comparison with patients sustaining minor trauma (ISS < 15) was conducted. Major trauma patients transported to a TC versus non-TC were further analysed with respect to injured body region and road user type. Approximately 3% (n = 3, 411) of patients sustained major trauma. Thirty-eight percent of major trauma patients were transported to a TC, and 62% were transported to a non-TC. This results in large proportions of patients with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 3+ injuries being transported to a non-TC.  The number of AIS 3+ head injuries for major trauma patients transported to a TC versus non-TC were similar, whereas a larger number of AIS 3+ thorax injuries were present in the non-TC group. The non-TC major trauma patients had a higher probability of traveling in a car, truck, or bus and to be involved in a crash in a rural location. Our results show that the majority of RTC major trauma patients are transported to a non-TC. This may cause unnecessary morbidity and mortality. These findings can guide the development of improved prehospital treatment guidelines, protocols and decision support systems.

  14. Genotoxicity Biomarkers Associated with Exposure to Traffic And Near-Road Atmospheres: A Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genotoxicity Biomarkers Associated with Exposure to Traffic And Near-Road Atmospheres: A Review Diesel and gasoline emissions, which are the primary components of traffic exhaust, are known or possible human carcinogens, re...

  15. Genotoxicity Biomarkers Associated with Exposure to Traffic And Near-Road Atmospheres: A Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genotoxicity Biomarkers Associated with Exposure to Traffic And Near-Road Atmospheres: A Review Diesel and gasoline emissions, which are the primary components of traffic exhaust, are known or possible human carcinogens, re...

  16. Chronic ocular lesions in tawny owls (Strix aluco) injured by road traffic.

    PubMed

    Williams, D L; Gonzalez Villavincencio, C M; Wilson, S

    2006-07-29

    The chronic ocular lesions suffered by 50 tawny owls (Strix aluco) injured by road traffic were investigated. They included non-healing corneal erosions, cataracts and retinal scarring, and periretinal membrane formation. The intraocular pressure was significantly lower in the eyes with intraocular inflammatory pathology and higher in the eyes with irido- or cyclodialysis than in ophthalmically normal eyes. Cicatritial retinal lesions were not associated with high titres of antibodies to Toxoplasma species. The findings correlate with those observed in human beings with eye injuries due to high-speed blunt trauma.

  17. Electric-bicycle-related injury: a rising traffic injury burden in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiying; Raghuwanshi, Rakesh P; Xu, Zigang; Huang, Dayong; Zhang, Chong; Jin, Tao

    2010-12-01

    To examine the rising casualty rate related to electric bicycle usage. Analysis of the Hangzhou Police Bureau's data on electric-bicycle-related injuries and deaths. Hangzhou, China, 2004-2008. PATIENTS OR SUBJECTS: Electric-bicycle riders. Electric-bicycle-related casualty rates in Hangzhou from 2004 to 2008. There was a significant average annual increase in electric-bicycle-related casualty rates of 2.7 per 100,000 population (95% CI 1.5 to 3.9, p=0.005). At the same time, overall road traffic and manual-bicycle-related deaths and injuries decreased. As it is difficult to ban the use of electric bicycles in China, laws, rules and regulations need to be reinforced and strengthened. New regulations should be created for the safety of electric bicycle riders and others on the road, and mandatory helmet use should be considered.

  18. Noise sensitivity and road traffic annoyance in a population sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Y.; Rylander, R.

    1991-12-01

    Noise sensitivity was studied in a random sample of the population of Gothenburg, Sweden. The selected population of 805 persons received a mailed questionnaire comprising questions on self-reported noise sensitivity, attitudes to noise, annoyance due to environmental noises and the effect of noise on daily activities. The response rate was 56%. Noise sensitivity was most common in older age groups. Noise-sensitive individuals were more annoyed by road traffic noise, and also reported interference with daily activities to a higher extent than non-sensitive persons. Listening to music while working or reading was also less common in the noise-sensitive group.

  19. Car-following model of multispecies systems of road traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Anthony D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1997-03-01

    A speed-adjustment car-following model is extended to systems of traffic where there is a variety of vehicle response times and speed-headway relationships. This is proposed as a model of the interactions between cars and trucks on single-lane roads where there is no overtaking, and some of its properties are derived. First, we make a distinction between temporal stability on a circular road and spatial stability on a straight road and go on to derive criteria for linear stability in each case. The propagation and dispersion of a linear disturbance wave is studied, and we also compare the nonlinear evolution of both single- and multiple-species systems on circuitous and straight roads. When the speed-headway relationship of all vehicles is given by the nonlinear law proposed by Bando et al. [Phys. Rev. E 51, 2 (1995)], we find that for models of car-truck systems, as for systems consisting of one type of vehicle only, there is a range of equilibrium headways for which the system is linearly unstable. The size of this range increases with the proportion of the more unreactive vehicle type, trucks, in the population of vehicles. Computer simulations verify the analytical results and show the nonlinear development of disturbances when the system is linearly unstable. It is demonstrated that slow vehicles in a platoon moving at close to their top speed can damp nonlinear congestion waves.

  20. The rising burden of serious thoracic trauma sustained by motorcyclists in road traffic crashes.

    PubMed

    Bambach, M R; Mitchell, R J

    2014-01-01

    In many countries increased on-road motorcycling participation has contributed to increased motorcyclist morbidity and mortality over recent decades. Improved helmet technologies and increased helmet wearing rates have contributed to reductions in serious head injuries, to the point where in many regions thoracic injury is now the most frequently occurring serious injury. However, few advances have been made in reducing the severity of motorcyclist thoracic injury. The aim of the present study is to provide needed information regarding serious motorcyclist thoracic trauma, to assist motorcycling groups, road safety advocates and road authorities develop and prioritise counter-measures and ultimately reduce the rising trauma burden. For this purpose, a data collection of linked police-reported and hospital data was established, and considerable attention was given to establishing a weighting procedure to estimate hospital cases not reported to police and fatal cases not admitted to hospital. The resulting data collection of an estimated 19,979 hospitalised motorcyclists is used to provide detailed information on the nature, incidence and risk factors for thoracic trauma. Over the last decade the incidence of motorcyclist serious thoracic injury has more than doubled in the population considered, and by 2011 while motorcycles comprised 3.2% of the registered vehicle fleet, one quarter of road traffic-related serious thoracic trauma cases treated in hospitals were motorcyclists. Motor-vehicle collisions, fixed object collisions and non-collision crashes were fairly evenly represented amongst these cases, while older motorcyclists were over-represented. Several prevention strategies are identified and discussed.

  1. The Characteristics of Road Traffic Fatalities in Kazakhstan’s Semey Region, 2006-2010: A Descriptive Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    MYSSAYEV, Ayan; MEIRMANOV, Serik; RAKHYPBEKOV, Tolebay; BULEGENOV, Tolkyn; SEMENOVA, Yuliya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Kazakhstan, a developing middle-income country, has the highest road traffic collision (RTC) mortality in the European Region. The aims of this study were to determine main characteristics of road traffic fatalities in Semey region, Kazakhstan and to compare findings with National data and middle-income European countries. Methods This descriptive surveillance study assesses RTC mortality rates and epidemiology in the Semey Region of East Kazakhstan Oblast. Data of all 318 road traffic fatalities form the Semey Regional Center for Forensic Medicine were analyzed for the 5-year period of January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2010. Results Over the study period, the average road traffic mortality in the Semey Region was 12.1 per 100,000 population with downward trend by 35.1% (p=0.002). The victims mean age was 37.1 (SD=17) years. Males predominated at 74.5%. Vehicle fatality was the most common mode of fatality at 61.3%. The majority of collisions, 53.1%, occurred on highways. Most victims, 67.3%, have died at the scene of collision; in 67.3% of fatalities, autopsies identified multiple injuries as cause of death. The high number of fatal collisions took place in “no snow” season (P<0.001), with an overall 5-years downward dynamic. Conclusion High proportion of males, pedestrians and car occupants among road traffic fatalities; high proportion of death on scene in case of highway collisions are specifics for Semey region, Kazakhstan. These findings can be used to formulate preventive strategies to reduce fatalities and to improve the medical care system for road traffic fatalities. PMID:26110146

  2. Prevalence of traffic rule infractions in Cali, Colombia, at sites where injury crashes occurred.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Salazar, G S; Bonilla-Escobar, F J; Morales-Quintero, F J; Fandiño-Losada, A; Santaella, J; Gonzalez, G; Gutierrez, M I

    2017-06-01

    This study aim to determine the proportion of traffic rule infractions in Cali, Colombia, in places where a road traffic injury (RTI) occurred. Description of videotaping of sites where a person was injured in an RTI in 2009. Counts of road users and infractions were established for each road user group and were compared using a Z-test. They were found 13,491 users, distributed as follow: 8.9% were pedestrians, 4.6% cyclists, 24.6% motorcyclists, and 61.8% were automobile drivers. The most frequent traffic violation among motorcyclists was transiting on lines designated for other vehicles (55.2%). Among cyclists, the most frequent violations were transiting without a helmet (99.2%) and not wearing the designated vest (100%). Among pedestrians, crossing streets at prohibited places (77.3%), even at sites where a pedestrian bridge was present (72.7%), represented two common violations. Vulnerable road users committed more traffic infractions than automobile drivers (p < 0.001). High rates of traffic rule infractions among vulnerable road users were observed. Studies to better understand the occurrence of these behaviours and the promotion of effective interventions are warranted.

  3. Risk factors for severe injury in cyclists involved in traffic crashes in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Boufous, Soufiane; de Rome, Liz; Senserrick, Teresa; Ivers, Rebecca

    2012-11-01

    This study examines the impact of cyclist, road and crash characteristics on the injury severity of cyclists involved in traffic crashes reported to the police in Victoria, Australia between 2004 and 2008. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify predictors of severe injury (serious injury and fatality) in cyclist crashes reported to the police. There were 6432 cyclist crashes reported to the police in Victoria between 2004 and 2008 with 2181 (33.9%) resulting in severe injury of the cyclist involved. The multivariate analysis found that factors that increase the risk of severe injury in cyclists involved in traffic crashes were age (50 years and older), not wearing a helmet, riding in the dark on unlit roads, riding on roads zoned 70 km/h or above, on curved sections of the road, in rural locations and being involved in head-on collisions as well as off path crashes, which include losing control of vehicle, and on path crashes which include striking the door of a parked vehicle. While this study did not test effectiveness of preventative measures, policy makers should consider implementation of programs that address these risk factors including helmet programs and environmental modifications such as speed reduction on roads that are frequented by cyclists.

  4. Daylight Saving Time Transitions and Road Traffic Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Tuuli; Nysten, Esa; Haukka, Jari; Sulander, Pekka; Partonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disruptions may have harmful impacts on health. Circadian rhythm disruptions caused by jet lag compromise the quality and amount of sleep and may lead to a variety of symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and loss of attention and alertness. Even a minor change in time schedule may cause considerable stress for the body. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time alter the social and environmental timing twice a year. According to earlier studies, this change in time-schedule leads to sleep disruption and fragmentation of the circadian rhythm. Since sleep deprivation decreases motivation, attention, and alertness, transitions into and out of daylight saving time may increase the amount of accidents during the following days after the transition. We studied the amount of road traffic accidents one week before and one week after transitions into and out of daylight saving time during years from 1981 to 2006. Our results demonstrated that transitions into and out of daylight saving time did not increase the number of traffic road accidents. PMID:20652036

  5. Daylight saving time transitions and road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Tuuli; Nysten, Esa; Haukka, Jari; Sulander, Pekka; Partonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disruptions may have harmful impacts on health. Circadian rhythm disruptions caused by jet lag compromise the quality and amount of sleep and may lead to a variety of symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and loss of attention and alertness. Even a minor change in time schedule may cause considerable stress for the body. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time alter the social and environmental timing twice a year. According to earlier studies, this change in time-schedule leads to sleep disruption and fragmentation of the circadian rhythm. Since sleep deprivation decreases motivation, attention, and alertness, transitions into and out of daylight saving time may increase the amount of accidents during the following days after the transition. We studied the amount of road traffic accidents one week before and one week after transitions into and out of daylight saving time during years from 1981 to 2006. Our results demonstrated that transitions into and out of daylight saving time did not increase the number of traffic road accidents.

  6. Road Traffic Noise Exposure and Hearing Impairment Among Traffic Policemen in Surat, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandel, B. N.; Macwan, J. E. M.

    2017-06-01

    Among all of the sources responsible for noise pollution, traffic related sources are of great environmental concern and increasing level of discomfort in urban areas with increasing traffic concentration. It will be a larger and serious problem in the future, if effective precautions are not taken addressed and attended to. Hence, a study was undertaken to measure the levels of road traffic noise at major intersections of Surat city, located in Western India and assess the hearing impairment among the exposed group of population i.e. the traffic policemen. Manual noise measurements and vehicle counts were performed at three of the busiest traffic intersections in the city for a period of 12 h. Audiometric screening was done on 46 policemen working at these intersections to determine the occurrence of hearing impairment. At all the three intersections, Leq measured was well above the permissible levels of 65 dBA for daytime. The Lmax recorded for three intersections were 84.6 dBA (07:36 pm), 87.3 dBA (06:32 pm) and 85.6 dBA (11:41 am). Audiometric screening showed that only 10 policemen (22%) had normal hearing. Slight, moderate and severe hearing impairment was recorded among 13 (28%), 18 (39%) and 5 (11%) policemen respectively. Of the total 46 policemen, none had profound impairment (deafness, hearing loss >81 dB). Of the 36 policemen having hearing impairment, 27 had bilateral impairment.

  7. Factors Impacting Mortality in the Pre-Hospital Period After Road Traffic Accidents in Urban India.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Ananthnarayan; Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Sandhya; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    India currently has the dubious distinction of experiencing the highest number of road traffic accidents in the world. We believe that this study on road traffic accidents may help to identify factors in the pre-hospital setting that may influence mortality rates. A prospective observational study was carried out in a metro area in India over a period of one year. The study included consecutive patients admitted to the trauma service after road traffic accidents. Demographic information, time and place of accident, and details regarding the vehicle and the events leading up to the hospital admission were recorded. Injury severity, management in the hospital, and final outcomes in terms of mortality were noted. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. A total of 773 patients were enrolled. Of these, there were 197 deaths and 576 survivors. The majority of patients were aged 15 - 40 years (67%) and were male (87.84%). More accidents occurred at night (58.2%) than during the day (41.8%). Mortality was not significantly associated with age, sex, or time of accident. City roads (38.9%) saw more accidents than highways (26.13%), but highway accidents were more likely to be fatal. Two-wheeler riders (37.65%) and pedestrians (35.75%) formed the majority of our study population. Mortality was significantly associated with crossing the road on foot (P = 0.004). Pillion riders on two-wheeler vehicles were more likely to experience poor outcomes (relative risk [RR] = 1.9, P = 0.001). Front-seat occupants in four-wheeler vehicles were at an increased risk of not surviving the accident (61.98%; RR=2.56, P = 0.01). Lack of safety gear, such as helmets, seat belts, and airbags, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.05). Delays in transfers of patients to the hospital and a lack of pre-hospital emergency services was significantly associated with increased mortality (P = 0.000). A lack of respect for the law, weak legislation and law enforcement, disregard for

  8. Factors Impacting Mortality in the Pre-Hospital Period After Road Traffic Accidents in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Ananthnarayan; Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Sandhya; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Background India currently has the dubious distinction of experiencing the highest number of road traffic accidents in the world. Objectives We believe that this study on road traffic accidents may help to identify factors in the pre-hospital setting that may influence mortality rates. Patients and Methods A prospective observational study was carried out in a metro area in India over a period of one year. The study included consecutive patients admitted to the trauma service after road traffic accidents. Demographic information, time and place of accident, and details regarding the vehicle and the events leading up to the hospital admission were recorded. Injury severity, management in the hospital, and final outcomes in terms of mortality were noted. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results A total of 773 patients were enrolled. Of these, there were 197 deaths and 576 survivors. The majority of patients were aged 15 - 40 years (67%) and were male (87.84%). More accidents occurred at night (58.2%) than during the day (41.8%). Mortality was not significantly associated with age, sex, or time of accident. City roads (38.9%) saw more accidents than highways (26.13%), but highway accidents were more likely to be fatal. Two-wheeler riders (37.65%) and pedestrians (35.75%) formed the majority of our study population. Mortality was significantly associated with crossing the road on foot (P = 0.004). Pillion riders on two-wheeler vehicles were more likely to experience poor outcomes (relative risk [RR] = 1.9, P = 0.001). Front-seat occupants in four-wheeler vehicles were at an increased risk of not surviving the accident (61.98%; RR=2.56, P = 0.01). Lack of safety gear, such as helmets, seat belts, and airbags, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.05). Delays in transfers of patients to the hospital and a lack of pre-hospital emergency services was significantly associated with increased mortality (P = 0.000). Conclusions A lack of respect for the

  9. An epidemiologic survey of road traffic accidents in Iran: analysis of driver-related factors.

    PubMed

    Moafian, Ghasem; Aghabeigi, Mohammad-Reza; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Hoseinzadeh, Amin; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Sarikhani, Yaser

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic accident (RTA) and its related injuries contribute to a significant portion of the burden of diseases in Iran. This paper explores the association between driver-related factors and RTA in the country. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Iran and all data regarding RTAs from March 20, 2010 to June 10, 2010 were obtained from the Traffic Police Department. We included 538 588 RTA records, which were classified to control for the main confounders: accident type, final cause of accident, time of accident and driver-related factors. Driver-related factors included sex, educational level, license type, type of injury, duration between accident and getting the driving license and driver's error type. A total of 538 588 drivers (91.83% male, sex ratio of almost 13:1) were involved in the RTAs. Among them 423 932 (78.71%) were uninjured; 224 818 (41.74%) had a diploma degree. Grade 2 driving license represented the highest proportion of all driving licenses (290 811, 54.00%). The greatest number of accidents took place at 12:00-13:59 (75 024, 13.93%). The proportion of drivers involved in RTAs decreased from 15.90% in the first year of getting a driving license to 3.13% after 10 years'of driving experience. Neglect of regulations was the commonest cause of traffic crashes (345 589, 64.17%). Non-observance of priority and inattention to the front were the most frequent final causes of death (138 175, 25.66% and 129 352, 24.02%, respectively). We found significant association between type of accident and sex, education, license type, time of accident, final cause of accident, driver's error as well as duration between accident and getting the driving license (all P less than 0.001). Our results will improve the traffic law enforcement measures, which will change inappropriate behavior of drivers and protect the least experienced road users.

  10. Informing road traffic intervention choices in South Africa: the role of economic evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Wesson, Hadley K.H.; Boikhutso, Nkuli; Hyder, Adnan A.; Bertram, Melanie; Hofman, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Given the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in South Africa, economic evaluations of prevention interventions are necessary for informing and prioritising public health planning and policy with regard to road safety. Methods In view of the dearth of RTI cost analysis, and in order to understand the extent to which RTI-related costs in South Africa compare with those in other low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), we reviewed published economic evaluations of RTI-related prevention in LMICs. Results Thirteen articles were identified, including cost-of-illness and cost-effectiveness studies. Although RTI-related risk factors in South Africa are well described, costing studies are limited. There is minimal information, most of which is not recent, with nothing at all on societal costs. Cost-effective interventions for RTIs in LMICs include bicycle and motorcycle helmet enforcement, traffic enforcement, and the construction of speed bumps. Discussion Policy recommendations from studies conducted in LMICs suggest a number of cost-effective interventions for consideration in South Africa. They include speed bumps for pedestrian safety, strategically positioned speed cameras, traffic enforcement such as the monitoring of seatbelt use, and breathalyzer interventions. However, interventions introduced in South Africa will need to be based either on South African cost-effectiveness data or on findings adapted from similar middle-income country settings. PMID:27396485

  11. Informing road traffic intervention choices in South Africa: the role of economic evaluations.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Hadley K H; Boikhutso, Nkuli; Hyder, Adnan A; Bertram, Melanie; Hofman, Karen J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Given the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in South Africa, economic evaluations of prevention interventions are necessary for informing and prioritising public health planning and policy with regard to road safety. Methods In view of the dearth of RTI cost analysis, and in order to understand the extent to which RTI-related costs in South Africa compare with those in other low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), we reviewed published economic evaluations of RTI-related prevention in LMICs. Results Thirteen articles were identified, including cost-of-illness and cost-effectiveness studies. Although RTI-related risk factors in South Africa are well described, costing studies are limited. There is minimal information, most of which is not recent, with nothing at all on societal costs. Cost-effective interventions for RTIs in LMICs include bicycle and motorcycle helmet enforcement, traffic enforcement, and the construction of speed bumps. Discussion Policy recommendations from studies conducted in LMICs suggest a number of cost-effective interventions for consideration in South Africa. They include speed bumps for pedestrian safety, strategically positioned speed cameras, traffic enforcement such as the monitoring of seatbelt use, and breathalyzer interventions. However, interventions introduced in South Africa will need to be based either on South African cost-effectiveness data or on findings adapted from similar middle-income country settings.

  12. Safety and accessibility effects of code modifications and traffic calming of an arterial road.

    PubMed

    Leden, Lars; Wikström, Per-Erik; Gårder, Per; Rosander, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The European Road E12 through the community center of Storuman, Sweden was reconstructed in 1999 and 2000. Pedestrian walkways, traffic islands, chicanes of a type referred to as "Danish buns", a roundabout and a two-directional cycle track along the E12 were installed. The purpose of the reconstruction was to improve safety for pedestrians and bicyclists, primarily for children, the elderly and the disabled, and to reduce the barrier effect of the E12 thoroughfare. In May 2000, the code governing the conduct of drivers at marked crosswalks in Sweden became stricter to improve safety and mobility for pedestrians. The combined effect of reconstructions and change of code was analyzed. Traffic behavior was studied at the intersection where the roundabout was constructed. Yield behavior towards pedestrians changed significantly. The difference was even greater with respect to yielding to child bicyclists - from 6% before to 84% after - even though the code change only related to pedestrians. Crash data analysis suggests a minor increase in fall injuries after reconstructions and change of code. Measures of speed, behavioral studies, questionnaires, face-to-face interviews and crash data analysis suggest that safety has increased not only along the E12 but also along adjacent roads. The final conclusion is that a bypass is not needed in a case like Storuman. Traffic calming of the main arterial through the town seems sufficient.

  13. Prevalence and factors associated with road traffic crash among bus drivers in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    La, Quang Ngoc; Lee, Andy H; Meuleners, Lynn B; Van Duong, Dat

    2013-01-01

    Bus provides a main mode of public transport in Vietnam, but the risk of road traffic crash for bus drivers is unknown. This retrospective study estimated the crash prevalence among bus drivers in Hanoi, Vietnam, and identified driver characteristics affecting their crashes. Information on bus crashes for the period 2006-2009 was collected by interviewing drivers from five bus companies in Hanoi using a structured questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine pertinent risk factors affecting the crash prevalence for bus drivers. Of the total 365 participants recruited, 73 drivers reported 76 crashes, giving an overall crash prevalence of 20%. Among the crashed group, three drivers (4%) were involved in two crashes during the past 3 years. Crashes mainly occurred on streets or local roads (81%). Migrant worker (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 4.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.20-8.25) and insufficient income perceived (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.37-4.93) were identified to be significantly associated with the crash risk. Further prospective and qualitative studies are needed to provide detailed crash characteristics as well as behaviour and perception of bus drivers, so that an effective intervention can be developed to improve road safety and to prevent traffic injury of these drivers.

  14. Effect of odour on multisensory environmental evaluations of road traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Like Masullo, Massimiliano Maffei, Luigi

    2016-09-15

    This study investigated the effect of odour on multisensory environmental evaluations of road traffic. The study aimed to answer: (1) Does odour have any effect on evaluations on noise, landscape and the overall environment? (2) How different are participants' responses to odour stimuli and are these differences influential on the evaluations? Experimental scenarios varied in three Traffic levels, three Tree screening conditions and two Odour presence conditions were designed, and presented to participants in virtual reality. Perceived Loudness, Noise Annoyance, Landscape Quality and Overall Pleasantness of each scenario were evaluated and the results were analysed. It shows that Odour presence did not have significant main effect on any of the evaluations, but has significant interactions with Traffic level on Noise Annoyance and with Tree screening on Landscape Quality, indicating the potential of odour to modulate noise and visual landscape perceptions in specific environmental content. Concerning participants' responses to odour stimuli, large differences were found in this study. However, the differences did not seem to be influential on environmental evaluations in this study. Larger samples of participants may benefit this study for more significant results of odour effect.

  15. Epidemiology of traffic injuries and motor vehicles utilization in the Capital of Iran: A population based study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries are a serious public health problem worldwide. The incidence rate of fatal road traffic injuries is 26.4 per 100000 in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Road traffic injuries are a major public health problem in Iran. Different routine sources are available for road traffic injuries in Iran, but they present several limitations. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of road traffic injuries in greater Tehran, using a population-based approach which is less prone to under-estimation compared to service-based data. Methods In the year 2008, 2488 households were randomly selected for a face to face interview. Trained interviewers referred to the selected households to collect the subjects' demographic information, as well as their motor vehicle utilization and traffic injuries during the year prior to data collection. All interviews were recorded using a digital voice recorder and reviewed by a quality control team the day after the interview. The Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to analyze continuous variables. Chi-square test -including a test for trend for ordinal data- was used to analyze categorical variables. Ninety-five percent confidence interval was calculated for point estimates of incidences using Poisson or binomial distribution assumptions accordingly. Results There were 119 traffic injury cases including 3 deaths (33 per 100 000) in the survey sample (n = 9100). The annual incidence of all traffic injuries for 1000 population was 13.1 (95% CI: 10.8 - 15.6), and that of fatal traffic injuries was 33.0 per 100 000 population (95% CI: 6.80 - 96.32). The annual incidence of collision traffic injury for 1000 motorcycles was 95. Conclusion This population-based study demonstrates that the morbidity rate of RTIs is about ten times higher than the national figures reported by other available sources; and this can serve as an important warning to countries like Iran to prioritize this issue in their public health

  16. Work-related road traffic collisions in the UK.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David D; Ward, Patrick; Bartle, Craig; Truman, Wendy

    2009-03-01

    Road traffic collisions while at work are the single largest cause of occupational fatality in the United Kingdom. Work-related road collisions do not comprise a homogenous group, but take many forms, encompassing the use of varying types of vehicle used for diverse purposes. A sample of over 2000 collision cases was considered, over 1000 in detail, from UK police forces, involving drivers/workers of all ages, and covering the years 1996-2004 inclusive. There were three key findings. (1) There were six main classes of collision-involved vehicles. These were company cars, vans/pickups, large goods vehicles (LGVs), buses (PCVs or 'passenger carrying vehicles'), taxis/minicabs, and emergency vehicles (police, fire/rescue and ambulance). (2) The drivers of company cars, vans/pickups, and large goods vehicles (LGVs) all appeared to have a high 'blameworthiness ratio' in their collision involvement. Company car drivers showed excess speed as a causal factor, whereas van drivers showed more observational failures, and LGV drivers showed more fatigue and vehicle defects as factors. (3) The drivers of buses (PCVs), taxis/minicabs, and emergency vehicles showed a low 'blameworthiness ratio' in their collision involvement. Their problems seemed to be primarily with the other drivers/parties with whom they share the road. While they made a variety of mistakes or errors, they were more likely to become the victim of another party's mistake or error.

  17. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Injured in Road Traffic Crashes and Transported by Emergency Medical Services.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ying; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Chuang, Jung-Fang; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-02-19

    To investigate the injury characteristics and mortality of patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS) and hospitalized for trauma following a road traffic crash, data obtained from the Trauma Registry System were retrospectively reviewed for trauma admissions between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013 in a Level I trauma center. Of 16,548 registered patients, 3978 and 1440 patients injured in road traffic crashes were transported to the emergency department by EMS and non-EMS, respectively. Patients transported by EMS had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores and worse hemodynamic measures. Compared to patients transported by non-EMS, more patients transported by EMS required procedures (intubation, chest tube insertion, and blood transfusion) at the emergency department. They also sustained a higher injury severity, as measured by the injury severity score (ISS) and the new injury severity score (NISS). Lastly, in-hospital mortality was higher among the EMS than the non-EMS group (1.8% vs. 0.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). However, we found no statistically significant difference in the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for mortality among patients transported by EMS after adjustment for ISS (AOR 4.9, 95% CI 0.33-2.26), indicating that the higher incidence of mortality was likely attributed to the patients' higher injury severity. In addition, after propensity score matching, logistic regression of 58 well-matched pairs did not show a significant influence of transportation by EMS on mortality (OR: 0.578, 95% CI: 0.132-2.541 p = 0.468).

  18. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Injured in Road Traffic Crashes and Transported by Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ying; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Chuang, Jung-Fang; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the injury characteristics and mortality of patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS) and hospitalized for trauma following a road traffic crash, data obtained from the Trauma Registry System were retrospectively reviewed for trauma admissions between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013 in a Level I trauma center. Of 16,548 registered patients, 3978 and 1440 patients injured in road traffic crashes were transported to the emergency department by EMS and non-EMS, respectively. Patients transported by EMS had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores and worse hemodynamic measures. Compared to patients transported by non-EMS, more patients transported by EMS required procedures (intubation, chest tube insertion, and blood transfusion) at the emergency department. They also sustained a higher injury severity, as measured by the injury severity score (ISS) and the new injury severity score (NISS). Lastly, in-hospital mortality was higher among the EMS than the non-EMS group (1.8% vs. 0.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). However, we found no statistically significant difference in the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for mortality among patients transported by EMS after adjustment for ISS (AOR 4.9, 95% CI 0.33–2.26), indicating that the higher incidence of mortality was likely attributed to the patients’ higher injury severity. In addition, after propensity score matching, logistic regression of 58 well-matched pairs did not show a significant influence of transportation by EMS on mortality (OR: 0.578, 95% CI: 0.132–2.541 p = 0.468). PMID:26907318

  19. Predictors of children's sleep onset and maintenance problems after road traffic accidents

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Lutz; Zehnder, Daniel; Jenni, Oskar G.; Landolt, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep onset and maintenance problems are a frequent complaint after traumatic events in children. However, the association of traumatic experiences and disturbed sleep remains to be explained. Objective To examine the incidence of sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after road traffic accidents and identify potential predictors of sleep onset and maintenance problems, including putative psychopathological mechanisms as well as stressors affecting the family system. Method In 33 children treated for injuries after road traffic accidents, sleep and measures of psychopathology were assessed 10 days, 2 months, and 6 months after hospital admission. The predictive value of four clusters of predictor variables for children's sleep onset and maintenance problems was prospectively tested by multiple regression analyses. These clusters included socio-demographic, injury- and accident-related