Science.gov

Sample records for robotic assembly machine

  1. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  2. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-14

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  3. 3D vision assisted flexible robotic assembly of machine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogun, Philips S.; Usman, Zahid; Dharmaraj, Karthick; Jackson, Michael R.

    2015-12-01

    Robotic assembly systems either make use of expensive fixtures to hold components in predefined locations, or the poses of the components are determined using various machine vision techniques. Vision-guided assembly robots can handle subtle variations in geometries and poses of parts. Therefore, they provide greater flexibility than the use of fixtures. However, the currently established vision-guided assembly systems use 2D vision, which is limited to three degrees of freedom. The work reported in this paper is focused on flexible automated assembly of clearance fit machine components using 3D vision. The recognition and the estimation of the poses of the components are achieved by matching their CAD models with the acquired point cloud data of the scene. Experimental results obtained from a robot demonstrating the assembly of a set of rings on a shaft show that the developed system is not only reliable and accurate, but also fast enough for industrial deployment.

  4. Lessons from Two Years of Building Fusion Ignition Targets with the Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R C; Alger, E T; Atherton, L J; Bhandarkar, S D; Castro, C; Dzenitis, E G; Hamza, A V; Klingmann, J L; Nikroo, A; Parham, T G; Reynolds, J L; Seugling, R M; Swisher, M F; Taylor, J S; Witte, M C

    2010-02-19

    The Precision Robotic Assembly Machine was developed to manufacture the small and intricate laser-driven fusion ignition targets that are being used in the world's largest and most energetic laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) goal of using the NIF to produce a self-sustaining nuclear fusion burn with energy gain - for the first time ever in a laboratory setting - requires targets that are demanding in materials fabrication, machining, and assembly. We provide an overview of the design and function of the machine, with emphasis on the aspects that revolutionized how NIC targets are manufactured.

  5. Robotic Thumb Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Goza, S. Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An improved robotic thumb for a robotic hand assembly is provided. According to one aspect of the disclosure, improved tendon routing in the robotic thumb provides control of four degrees of freedom with only five tendons. According to another aspect of the disclosure, one of the five degrees of freedom of a human thumb is replaced in the robotic thumb with a permanent twist in the shape of a phalange. According to yet another aspect of the disclosure, a position sensor includes a magnet having two portions shaped as circle segments with different center points. The magnet provides a linearized output from a Hall effect sensor.

  6. Robotics: self-reproducing machines.

    PubMed

    Zykov, Victor; Mytilinaios, Efstathios; Adams, Bryant; Lipson, Hod

    2005-05-12

    Self-reproduction is central to biological life for long-term sustainability and evolutionary adaptation. Although these traits would also be desirable in many engineered systems, the principles of self-reproduction have not been exploited in machine design. Here we create simple machines that act as autonomous modular robots and are capable of physical self-reproduction using a set of cubes.

  7. Knowledge representation system for assembly using robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.; Donath, M.

    1987-01-01

    Assembly robots combine the benefits of speed and accuracy with the capability of adaptation to changes in the work environment. However, an impediment to the use of robots is the complexity of the man-machine interface. This interface can be improved by providing a means of using a priori-knowledge and reasoning capabilities for controlling and monitoring the tasks performed by robots. Robots ought to be able to perform complex assembly tasks with the help of only supervisory guidance from human operators. For such supervisory quidance, it is important to express the commands in terms of the effects desired, rather than in terms of the motion the robot must undertake in order to achieve these effects. A suitable knowledge representation can facilitate the conversion of task level descriptions into explicit instructions to the robot. Such a system would use symbolic relationships describing the a priori information about the robot, its environment, and the tasks specified by the operator to generate the commands for the robot.

  8. Machining operations using Yamaha YK 400 robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, A.; Pop, A.; Savu, D.; Dolga, V.

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the topic of industrial robots built for handling processes used in cutting machining applications. The study discourses the machining of a globe calotte made of komatex using a Yamaha YK 400 SCARA robot. Are presented aspects regarding the capabilities of Yamaha YK 400 robot, the development of the robot program, analyses of the proposed system and methods of improvement. A set of experimental analyses was conducted in order to identify correlations between the robot speed variation and distance between the points that describe the trajectory of the motion.

  9. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  10. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  11. Turning assistive machines into assistive robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argall, Brenna D.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the potential for automation in particular, in the form of smart wheelchairs to aid those with motor, or cognitive, impairments has been recognized. It is a paradox that often the more severe a person's motor impairment, the more challenging it is for them to operate the very assistive machines which might enhance their quality of life. A primary aim of my lab is to address this confound by incorporating robotics autonomy and intelligence into assistive machines turning the machine into a kind of robot, and offloading some of the control burden from the user. Robots already synthetically sense, act in and reason about the world, and these technologies can be leveraged to help bridge the gap left by sensory, motor or cognitive impairments in the users of assistive machines. This paper overviews some of the ongoing projects in my lab, which strives to advance human ability through robotics autonomy.

  12. Manifold learning in machine vision and robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Smart algorithms are used in Machine vision and Robotics to organize or extract high-level information from the available data. Nowadays, Machine learning is an essential and ubiquitous tool to automate extraction patterns or regularities from data (images in Machine vision; camera, laser, and sonar sensors data in Robotics) in order to solve various subject-oriented tasks such as understanding and classification of images content, navigation of mobile autonomous robot in uncertain environments, robot manipulation in medical robotics and computer-assisted surgery, and other. Usually such data have high dimensionality, however, due to various dependencies between their components and constraints caused by physical reasons, all "feasible and usable data" occupy only a very small part in high dimensional "observation space" with smaller intrinsic dimensionality. Generally accepted model of such data is manifold model in accordance with which the data lie on or near an unknown manifold (surface) of lower dimensionality embedded in an ambient high dimensional observation space; real-world high-dimensional data obtained from "natural" sources meet, as a rule, this model. The use of Manifold learning technique in Machine vision and Robotics, which discovers a low-dimensional structure of high dimensional data and results in effective algorithms for solving of a large number of various subject-oriented tasks, is the content of the conference plenary speech some topics of which are in the paper.

  13. Machine Learning for Flexible Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-31

    for Flexible Robotics N00014-86-K-0309 FINAL REPORT 2 5I October 1986 -31 December 1990 92-15300 SUMMARY OF TECHNICAL PROGRESS 1111111 11111 JilI 11...IIiIiIIiJ! Robotic planning, if it is to be successful in real-world situations, must find some way to side-step the now-well-documented obstacles to...untenable IN simplifying assumptions about the world. The source of complexity in real-world robotic domains I includes the problems of data uncertainty

  14. Rossum's universal robots: not the machines.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael E

    2007-12-01

    One assumes in the era of rapidly expanding technology that robot implies mechanical beings. This is not how the word was used initially and represents one of those metamorphoses to another conceptualization. This is an investigation into Capek's original play, Rossum's Universal Robots, for an understanding of his intended meaning. Karel Capek was Czechoslovakian. His play was written in 1920, first performed in 1921, and presented in New York in 1922. It has come to symbolize Western society's feelings about robots. Capek's writing and the original play might clarify the definition of robot for the record, in light of some controversy as to whether the da Vinci Surgical System is a robot or not. THE PLAY: Rossum was a great physiologist who chemically synthesized living protoplasm and was capable of constructing artificial life forms: first, a dog; then, a man. His son was an engineer who quickly was able to manufacture large numbers of humanoids at lower costs " ... producing a robot has been brought down within 15 years from $10,000 to $150." This is the first foreshadowing of Moore's Law. But critically, these are not machines, even though his robots outperform humans. The story turns sinister as the robots eventually revolt and kill their creators. Like many things in our vocabulary, the term robot was initially used for a biologic organism that was created for servitude. Defined by the Robotic Institute of America (1979), a robot is ... "a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or specialized devices through various programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks." This is far from the in tended use envisioned by Capek, but applies to the da Vinci Surgical System. As Alquist in R.U.R. concludes: "... if there are no more human beings left, at least let there be Robots!"

  15. Machine intelligence and robotics: Report of the NASA study group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Opportunities for the application of machine intelligence and robotics in NASA missions and systems were identified. The benefits of successful adoption of machine intelligence and robotics techniques were estimated and forecasts were prepared to show their growth potential. Program options for research, advanced development, and implementation of machine intelligence and robot technology for use in program planning are presented.

  16. Test build from Robotic Fiber Placement Machine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-01

    MAJID BABAI, LEFT, CHIEF OF THE NONMETALLIC MANUFACTURING BRANCH AT MARSHALL, AND STEPHEN RICHARDSON, LEAD FOR THE STRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM, TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT ONE OF THE FIRST TEST BUILDS MADE BY THE NEW ROBOTIC FIBER PLACEMENT MACHINE BEHIND THEM.

  17. Molecular machines: Molecules bearing robotic arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprahamian, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Mass production at the nanoscale requires molecular machines that can control, with high fidelity, the spatial orientation of other reactive species. The demonstration of a synthetic system in which a molecular robotic arm can be used to manipulate the position of a chemical cargo is a significant step towards achieving this goal.

  18. Acquisition of Human Expertise in Robotic Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Sawaragi, Tetsuo; Tian, Yajie; Horiguchi, Yukio

    Robots must be presently taught by human workers to execute given manufacturing tasks. The current problem is that the task of teaching robots is rather time-consuming, especially within the robotic assembly domain. This problem is caused by insufficient accumulation of human expertise that should be reused in this domain. Therefore, a knowledge-intensive method for acquiring human expertise is proposed in this paper. Our method is able to acquire human expertise in the robotic assembly domain by observing robot-teaching demonstrations of human experts. What distinguishes our method from others is that there are two modes of learning: 1. learning from an example directly given by human workers, and 2. learning expertise on error recovery by observing revisions made by human workers in handling execution errors that occur in reusing previously acquired knowledge. The acquired human expertise is required to be represented in a way that satisfies two requirements. The first one is operability so that the representation is easy to transform into robot programs (commands & parameters). The second one is understandability so that the representation is easy for human workers to understand the robot program. A specific robot assembly example is given to illustrate the proposed method.

  19. Human-Machine Interfaces in Industrial Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    General Motors Fanuc (GMF), International Business Machines (IBM), Schrader Bellows Division of Parker Hannifin, Toshiba, and Unimation/Westinghouse. The...servicing, and electronics in modules that swing out for easy servicing. 6. GMF (GENERAL MOTORS FANUC ) ROBOTICS CORPORATION TEACH PENDANT (see Figure 12...it found to be difficult to handle, but a complete revision seemed required. Fanuc (the Japanese partner in GMF with the General Motors Corporation

  20. Robotic System for Precision Assembly of NIF Ignition Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R C; Seugling, R M; Klingmann, J L; Dzenitis, E G; Alger, E T; Miller, G L; Kent, R A; Castro, C; Reynolds, J L; Carrillo, M A

    2008-08-27

    This paper provides an overview of the design and testing of a robotic system developed for assembling the inertial confinement fusion ignition targets (depicted in Figures 1 and 2) that will be fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [1]. The system, referred to as the Final Assembly Machine and shown in Figure 3, consists of six groups of stacked axes that allow manipulating millimeter-sized components with submicron precision, integrated with an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM) that provides in-situ metrology. Nineteen motorized axes and ten manual axes are used to control the position and orientation of five objects that are predominantly assembled together in a cubic centimeter work zone. An operator-in-the-loop provides top-level control of the system, making it more similar to a surgical robot than to a programmed computer-controlled machine tool. The operator is provided visual feedback by the vision system of the OCMM, and tactile feedback by force and torque sensors embedded in the tooling that holds the major components being assembled. The vision system is augmented with auxiliary mirrors providing multiple viewing directions, and is used to guide the approach and alignment of the components, and to measure the relative position and orientation of the components. The force and torque sensors are used to guide the final approach, alignment, and mating of the components that are designed to slip-fit together, and to monitor that mating while adhesively bonding those components and attaching the target base.

  1. Ongoing research using HERMIES: The Hostile Environment Robotic Machine Intelligence Experiment Series

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Spelt, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    In order to test and validate the hardware and software developed in the research activities of CESAR (Center of Engineering Systems Advanced Research) a series of mobile autonomous robotic vehicles are being assembled named HERMIES (Hostile Environment Robotic Machine Intelligence Experiment Series). The current experimental test bed HERMIES-IIB, is the third in the series. A description of the earlier HERMIES robots and research activities may be found in the literature. HERMIES-IIB has been operational for more than a year and is described in detail in this article and elsewhere. In addition to a description of the robot, this article details some of the experiments under way utilizing HERMIES-IIB. The fourth robot in the series, HERMIES-III, is currently being assembled and should be available for experiments during the fall of 1988. This robot and initial experiments planned for it are also briefly described in this paper. 26 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Insulation assembly for electric machine

    DOEpatents

    Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

    2013-10-15

    An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

  3. Improving Robotic Assembly of Planar High Energy Density Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudt, D.; Carlson, L.; Alexander, N.; Boehm, K.

    2016-10-01

    Increased quantities of planar assemblies for high energy density targets are needed with higher shot rates being implemented at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility and the Matter in Extreme Conditions station of the Linac Coherent Light Source. To meet this growing demand, robotics are used to reduce assembly time. This project studies how machine vision and force feedback systems can be used to improve the quantity and quality of planar target assemblies. Vision-guided robotics can identify and locate parts, reducing laborious manual loading of parts into precision pallets and associated teaching of locations. On-board automated inspection can measure part pickup offsets to correct part drop-off placement into target assemblies. Force feedback systems can detect pickup locations and apply consistent force to produce more uniform glue bond thickness, thus improving the performance of the targets. System designs and performance evaluations will be presented. Work supported in part by the US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI) and ICF Target Fabrication DE-NA0001808.

  4. Development of a machine vision system for automated structural assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydow, P. Daniel; Cooper, Eric G.

    1992-01-01

    Research is being conducted at the LaRC to develop a telerobotic assembly system designed to construct large space truss structures. This research program was initiated within the past several years, and a ground-based test-bed was developed to evaluate and expand the state of the art. Test-bed operations currently use predetermined ('taught') points for truss structural assembly. Total dependence on the use of taught points for joint receptacle capture and strut installation is neither robust nor reliable enough for space operations. Therefore, a machine vision sensor guidance system is being developed to locate and guide the robot to a passive target mounted on the truss joint receptacle. The vision system hardware includes a miniature video camera, passive targets mounted on the joint receptacles, target illumination hardware, and an image processing system. Discrimination of the target from background clutter is accomplished through standard digital processing techniques. Once the target is identified, a pose estimation algorithm is invoked to determine the location, in three-dimensional space, of the target relative to the robots end-effector. Preliminary test results of the vision system in the Automated Structural Assembly Laboratory with a range of lighting and background conditions indicate that it is fully capable of successfully identifying joint receptacle targets throughout the required operational range. Controlled optical bench test results indicate that the system can also provide the pose estimation accuracy to define the target position.

  5. Planning and scheduling for robotic assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Barry R.

    1987-01-01

    A system for reasoning about robotic assembly tasks is described. The first element of this system is a facility for itemizing the constraints which determine the admissible orderings over the activities to be sequenced. The second element is a facility which partitions the activities into independent subtasks and produces a set of admissible strategies for each. Finally, the system has facilities for constructing an admissible sequence of activities which is consistent with the given constraints. This can be done off-line, in advance of task execution, or it can be done incrementally, at execution time, according to conditions in the execution environment. The language of temporal constraints and the methods of inference presented in related papers are presented. It is shown how functional and spatial relationships between components impose temporal constraints on the order of assembly and how temporal constraints then imply admissible strategies and feasible sequences.

  6. Planning for Assembly with Robot Hands1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popplestone, Robin J.; Grupen, Roderic A.; Liu, Y.; Dakin, G. A.; Oskard, David N.; Nair, S.

    1990-02-01

    If an autonomous robot system is to make effective use of a dextrous hand for assembly, it must be able to (1) reason about how objects are intended to fit together and design mating trajectories, (2) derive uncertainty constraints which accommodate perturbations from the nominal trajectories, (3) and determine how objects should be grasped to exert the forces expected during execution. This paper discusses a planning system which exploits the knowledge of symmetry incorporated in a group theory based reasoner to arrive at a nominal assembly plan. The plan is then refined by establishing bounds on the permissible uncertainty and required forces. A final stage plans force mediated interaction by incorporating multiple agents which enforce the wrench closure requirements and uncertainty constraints over the space of possible grasps.

  7. Assembly For Moving a Robotic Device Along Selected Axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlin, Brentley Craig (Inventor); Koch, Lisa Danielle (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An assembly for moving a robotic device along selected axes includes a programmable logic controller (PLC) for controlling movement of the device along selected axes to effect movement of the device to a selected disposition. The PLC includes a plurality of single axis motion control modules, and a central processing unit (CPU) in communication with the motion control modules. A human-machine interface is provided for operator selection of configurations of device movements and is in communication with the CPU. A motor drive is in communication with each of the motion control modules and is operable to effect movement of the device along the selected axes to obtain movement of the device to the selected disposition.

  8. Assembly For Moving a Robotic Device Along Selected Axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlin, Brentley Craig (Inventor); Koch, Lisa Danielle (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An assembly for moving a robotic device along selected axes includes a programmable logic controller (PLC) for controlling movement of the device along selected axes to effect movement of the device to a selected disposition. The PLC includes a plurality of single axis motion control modules, and a central processing unit (CPU) in communication with the motion control modules. A human-machine interface is provided for operator selection of configurations of device movements and is in communication with the CPU. A motor drive is in communication with each of the motion control modules and is operable to effect movement of the device along the selected axes to obtain movement of the device to the selected disposition.

  9. Adaptive Multi-scale PHM for Robotic Assembly Processes

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Benjamin Y.; Beling, Peter A.; LaViers, Amy E.; Marvel, Jeremy A.; Weiss, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive multiscale prognostics and health management (AM-PHM) is a methodology designed to support PHM in smart manufacturing systems. As a rule, PHM information is not used in high-level decision-making in manufacturing systems. AM-PHM leverages and integrates component-level PHM information with hierarchical relationships across the component, machine, work cell, and production line levels in a manufacturing system. The AM-PHM methodology enables the creation of actionable prognostic and diagnostic intelligence up and down the manufacturing process hierarchy. Decisions are made with the knowledge of the current and projected health state of the system at decision points along the nodes of the hierarchical structure. A description of the AM-PHM methodology with a simulated canonical robotic assembly process is presented. PMID:28664161

  10. Optimization on robot arm machining by using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tung-Kuan; Chen, Chiu-Hung; Tsai, Shang-En

    2007-12-01

    In this study, an optimization problem on the robot arm machining is formulated and solved by using genetic algorithms (GAs). The proposed approach adopts direct kinematics model and utilizes GA's global search ability to find the optimum solution. The direct kinematics equations of the robot arm are formulated and can be used to compute the end-effector coordinates. Based on these, the objective of optimum machining along a set of points can be evolutionarily evaluated with the distance between machining points and end-effector positions. Besides, a 3D CAD application, CATIA, is used to build up the 3D models of the robot arm, work-pieces and their components. A simulated experiment in CATIA is used to verify the computation results first and a practical control on the robot arm through the RS232 port is also performed. From the results, this approach is proved to be robust and can be suitable for most machining needs when robot arms are adopted as the machining tools.

  11. Implementation of a robotic flexible assembly system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the Intelligent Task Automation program, a team developed enabling technologies for programmable, sensory controlled manipulation in unstructured environments. These technologies include 2-D/3-D vision sensing and understanding, force sensing and high speed force control, 2.5-D vision alignment and control, and multiple processor architectures. The subsequent design of a flexible, programmable, sensor controlled robotic assembly system for small electromechanical devices is described using these technologies and ongoing implementation and integration efforts. Using vision, the system picks parts dumped randomly in a tray. Using vision and force control, it performs high speed part mating, in-process monitoring/verification of expected results and autonomous recovery from some errors. It is programmed off line with semiautomatic action planning.

  12. Machine vision - Automated visual inspection and robot vision

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, D. )

    1991-01-01

    The subject of machine vision is treated with emphasis on fundamental tools for image acquisition, processing, and analysis. Topics discussed include an introduction to computer vision, illumination and sensors, image acquisition and representation, fundamentals of digital image processing, the segmentation problem, and image analysis. The book also covers techniques for shape description, robot programming and robot vision, and an introduction to image understanding. 250 refs.

  13. Cooperation between humans and robots in fine assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalba, C. K.; Konold, P.; Rapp, I.; Mann, C.; Muminovic, A.

    2017-01-01

    The development of ever smaller components in manufacturing processes require handling, assembling and testing of miniature similar components. The human eye meets its optical limits with ongoing miniaturization of parts, due to the fact that it is not able to detect particles with a size smaller than 0.11 mm or register distances below 0.07 mm - like separating gaps. After several hours of labour, workers cannot accurately differentiate colour nuances as well as constant quality of work cannot be guaranteed. Assembly is usually done with tools, such as microscopes, magnifiers or digital measuring devices. Due to the enormous mental concentration, quickly a fatigue process sets in. This requires breaks or change of task and reduces productivity. Dealing with handling devices such as grippers, guide units and actuators for component assembling, requires a time consuming training process. Often productivity increase is first achieved after years of daily training. Miniaturizations are ubiquitously needed, for instance in the surgery. Very small add-on instruments must be provided. In measurement, e.g. it is a technological must and a competitive advantage, to determine required data with a small-as-possible, highest-possible-resolution sensor. Solution: The realization of a flexible universal workstation, using standard robotic systems and image processing devices in cooperation with humans, where workers are largely freed up from highly strenuous physical and fine motoric work, so that they can do productive work monitoring and adjusting the machine assisted production process.

  14. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  15. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  16. Why Robots Should Be Social: Enhancing Machine Learning through Social Human-Robot Interaction.

    PubMed

    de Greeff, Joachim; Belpaeme, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Social learning is a powerful method for cultural propagation of knowledge and skills relying on a complex interplay of learning strategies, social ecology and the human propensity for both learning and tutoring. Social learning has the potential to be an equally potent learning strategy for artificial systems and robots in specific. However, given the complexity and unstructured nature of social learning, implementing social machine learning proves to be a challenging problem. We study one particular aspect of social machine learning: that of offering social cues during the learning interaction. Specifically, we study whether people are sensitive to social cues offered by a learning robot, in a similar way to children's social bids for tutoring. We use a child-like social robot and a task in which the robot has to learn the meaning of words. For this a simple turn-based interaction is used, based on language games. Two conditions are tested: one in which the robot uses social means to invite a human teacher to provide information based on what the robot requires to fill gaps in its knowledge (i.e. expression of a learning preference); the other in which the robot does not provide social cues to communicate a learning preference. We observe that conveying a learning preference through the use of social cues results in better and faster learning by the robot. People also seem to form a "mental model" of the robot, tailoring the tutoring to the robot's performance as opposed to using simply random teaching. In addition, the social learning shows a clear gender effect with female participants being responsive to the robot's bids, while male teachers appear to be less receptive. This work shows how additional social cues in social machine learning can result in people offering better quality learning input to artificial systems, resulting in improved learning performance.

  17. Free-floating dual-arm robots for space assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Sunil Kumar; Chen, M. Y.

    1994-01-01

    Freely moving systems in space conserve linear and angular momentum. As moving systems collide, the velocities get altered due to transfer of momentum. The development of strategies for assembly in a free-floating work environment requires a good understanding of primitives such as self motion of the robot, propulsion of the robot due to onboard thrusters, docking of the robot, retrieval of an object from a collection of objects, and release of an object in an object pool. The analytics of such assemblies involve not only kinematics and rigid body dynamics but also collision and impact dynamics of multibody systems. In an effort to understand such assemblies in zero gravity space environment, we are currently developing at Ohio University a free-floating assembly facility with a dual-arm planar robot equipped with thrusters, a free-floating material table, and a free-floating assembly table. The objective is to pick up workpieces from the material table and combine them into prespecified assemblies. This paper presents analytical models of assembly primitives and strategies for overall assembly. A computer simulation of an assembly is developed using the analytical models. The experiment facility will be used to verify the theoretical predictions.

  18. Why Robots Should Be Social: Enhancing Machine Learning through Social Human-Robot Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Greeff, Joachim; Belpaeme, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Social learning is a powerful method for cultural propagation of knowledge and skills relying on a complex interplay of learning strategies, social ecology and the human propensity for both learning and tutoring. Social learning has the potential to be an equally potent learning strategy for artificial systems and robots in specific. However, given the complexity and unstructured nature of social learning, implementing social machine learning proves to be a challenging problem. We study one particular aspect of social machine learning: that of offering social cues during the learning interaction. Specifically, we study whether people are sensitive to social cues offered by a learning robot, in a similar way to children’s social bids for tutoring. We use a child-like social robot and a task in which the robot has to learn the meaning of words. For this a simple turn-based interaction is used, based on language games. Two conditions are tested: one in which the robot uses social means to invite a human teacher to provide information based on what the robot requires to fill gaps in its knowledge (i.e. expression of a learning preference); the other in which the robot does not provide social cues to communicate a learning preference. We observe that conveying a learning preference through the use of social cues results in better and faster learning by the robot. People also seem to form a “mental model” of the robot, tailoring the tutoring to the robot’s performance as opposed to using simply random teaching. In addition, the social learning shows a clear gender effect with female participants being responsive to the robot’s bids, while male teachers appear to be less receptive. This work shows how additional social cues in social machine learning can result in people offering better quality learning input to artificial systems, resulting in improved learning performance. PMID:26422143

  19. Evolving self-assembly in autonomous homogeneous robots: experiments with two physical robots.

    PubMed

    Ampatzis, Christos; Tuci, Elio; Trianni, Vito; Christensen, Anders Lyhne; Dorigo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    This research work illustrates an approach to the design of controllers for self-assembling robots in which the self-assembly is initiated and regulated by perceptual cues that are brought forth by the physical robots through their dynamical interactions. More specifically, we present a homogeneous control system that can achieve assembly between two modules (two fully autonomous robots) of a mobile self-reconfigurable system without a priori introduced behavioral or morphological heterogeneities. The controllers are dynamic neural networks evolved in simulation that directly control all the actuators of the two robots. The neurocontrollers cause the dynamic specialization of the robots by allocating roles between them based solely on their interaction. We show that the best evolved controller proves to be successful when tested on a real hardware platform, the swarm-bot. The performance achieved is similar to the one achieved by existing modular or behavior-based approaches, also due to the effect of an emergent recovery mechanism that was neither explicitly rewarded by the fitness function, nor observed during the evolutionary simulation. Our results suggest that direct access to the orientations or intentions of the other agents is not a necessary condition for robot coordination: Our robots coordinate without direct or explicit communication, contrary to what is assumed by most research works in collective robotics. This work also contributes to strengthening the evidence that evolutionary robotics is a design methodology that can tackle real-world tasks demanding fine sensory-motor coordination.

  20. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called digital materials. We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  1. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called "digital materials." We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  2. Inventing Japan's 'robotics culture': the repeated assembly of science, technology, and culture in social robotics.

    PubMed

    Sabanović, Selma

    2014-06-01

    Using interviews, participant observation, and published documents, this article analyzes the co-construction of robotics and culture in Japan through the technical discourse and practices of robotics researchers. Three cases from current robotics research--the seal-like robot PARO, the Humanoid Robotics Project HRP-2 humanoid, and 'kansei robotics' - show the different ways in which scientists invoke culture to provide epistemological grounding and possibilities for social acceptance of their work. These examples show how the production and consumption of social robotic technologies are associated with traditional crafts and values, how roboticists negotiate among social, technical, and cultural constraints while designing robots, and how humans and robots are constructed as cultural subjects in social robotics discourse. The conceptual focus is on the repeated assembly of cultural models of social behavior, organization, cognition, and technology through roboticists' narratives about the development of advanced robotic technologies. This article provides a picture of robotics as the dynamic construction of technology and culture and concludes with a discussion of the limits and possibilities of this vision in promoting a culturally situated understanding of technology and a multicultural view of science.

  3. Automated solar-cell-array assembly machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Mueller, R. L.; Person, J. K.; Yasui, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Continuous-feeding machine automatically bonds solar cells to printed-circuit substrate. In completed machine, cells move to test station where electrical characteristics could be checked. If performance of cell is below specifications, that cell is marked and removed. All machine functions are synchronized by electronics located within unit. It may help to lower costs in future solar-cell production.

  4. Optical assembly of bio-hybrid micro-robots.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Álvaro; Landwerth, Shirin; Woerdemann, Mike; Alpmann, Christina; Buscher, Tim; Becker, Maike; Studer, Armido; Denz, Cornelia

    2015-04-01

    The combination of micro synthetic structures with bacterial flagella motors represents an actual trend for the construction of self-propelled micro-robots. The development of methods for fabrication of these bacteria-based robots is a first crucial step towards the realization of functional miniature and autonomous moving robots. We present a novel scheme based on optical trapping to fabricate living micro-robots. By using holographic optical tweezers that allow three-dimensional manipulation in real time, we are able to arrange the building blocks that constitute the micro-robot in a defined way. We demonstrate exemplarily that our method enables the controlled assembly of living micro-robots consisting of a rod-shaped prokaryotic bacterium and a single elongated zeolite L crystal, which are used as model of the biological and abiotic components, respectively. We present different proof-of-principle approaches for the site-selective attachment of the bacteria on the particle surface. The propulsion of the optically assembled micro-robot demonstrates the potential of the proposed method as a powerful strategy for the fabrication of bio-hybrid micro-robots.

  5. Assembly processor program converts symbolic programming language to machine language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelto, E. V.

    1967-01-01

    Assembly processor program converts symbolic programming language to machine language. This program translates symbolic codes into computer understandable instructions, assigns locations in storage for successive instructions, and computer locations from symbolic addresses.

  6. Fibre optic sensor on robot end effector for flexible assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, K.L.; Lau, W.S.; Choi, C.K.; Shan, Y.Y.

    1995-12-31

    A fibre optic sensor system was constructed for use on robot end effectors for flexible assembly. The sensor detected the deviations between robot end effector and the workpiece. The signal was fed back to robot controller to shift the end effector until the centre of end effector and the centre of workpiece were aligned at the correct orientation. Then workpiece can be grasped symmetrically. Sensor fusion concept was used to guard against sensor system failure. Fuzzy linguistic variable and control rule concept were introduced in the sensor integration. The experimental setup for the sensor integrated system was shown. The accuracy was also discussed.

  7. Efficacy of dry-ice blasting in preventive maintenance of auto robotic assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluch, Nazim; Mohtar, Shahimi; Abdullah, Che Sobry

    2016-08-01

    Welding robots are extensively applied in the automotive assemblies and `Spot Welding' is the most common welding application found in the auto stamping assembly manufacturing. Every manufacturing process is subject to variations - with resistance welding, these include; part fit up, part thickness variations, misaligned electrodes, variations in coating materials or thickness, sealers, weld force variations, shunting, machine tooling degradation; and slag and spatter damage. All welding gun tips undergo wear; an elemental part of the process. Though adaptive resistance welding control automatically compensates to keep production and quality up to the levels needed as gun tips undergo wear so that the welds remain reliable; the system cannot compensate for deterioration caused by the slag and spatter on the part holding fixtures, sensors, and gun tips. To cleanse welding robots of slag and spatter, dry-ice blasting has proven to be an effective remedy. This paper describes Spot welding process, analyses the slag and spatter formation during robotic welding of stamping assemblies, and concludes that the dry ice blasting process's utility in cleansing of welding robots in auto stamping plant operations is paramount and exigent.

  8. Path planning for robotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1993-01-01

    A new Potential Fields approach to the robotic path planning problem is proposed and implemented. Our approach, which is based on one originally proposed by Munger, computes an incremental joint vector based upon attraction to a goal and repulsion from obstacles. By repetitively adding and computing these 'steps', it is hoped (but not guaranteed) that the robot will reach its goal. An attractive force exerted by the goal is found by solving for the the minimum norm solution to the linear Jacobian equation. A repulsive force between obstacles and the robot's links is used to avoid collisions. Its magnitude is inversely proportional to the distance. Together, these forces make the goal the global minimum potential point, but local minima can stop the robot from ever reaching that point. Our approach improves on a basic, potential field paradigm developed by Munger by using an active, adaptive field - what we will call a 'flexible' potential field. Active fields are stronger when objects move towards one another and weaker when they move apart. An adaptive field's strength is individually tailored to be just strong enough to avoid any collision. In addition to the local planner, a global planning algorithm helps the planner to avoid local field minima by providing subgoals. These subgoals are based on the obstacles which caused the local planner to fail. A best-first search algorithm A* is used for graph search.

  9. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  10. Compensation for robot arm flexibility using machine intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabiri, Peyman; Sherkat, Nasser; Shih, Chi-Hsien V.

    1998-10-01

    This paper reports a new approach to error compensation for inaccuracies in position control for the end-effector of a Robot Arm. The goal is to overcome the problem of inaccuracy, due to the low precision in manufacturing of Robot Arms and the flexibility of their structure, by means of machine intelligence. Utilizing a mesh sensory system, a Real Time Monitoring System is designed. The position of the end-effector is monitored in real time and the positioning data for the end-effector is collected. A direction independent filtering system is designed to eliminate the noise from the collected data. After extracting the error map from the collected data, a novel Proportional Keen Approximation Method is implemented to generalize the error map. One of the main features of this method is the elimination of the training stage as in the Artificial Neural Networks. Using the knowledge obtained from the maps, the system compensates for the errors.

  11. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  12. Fusing human and machine skills for remote robotic operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, Paul S.; Kim, Won S.; Venema, Steven C.; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    The question of how computer assists can improve teleoperator trajectory tracking during both free and force-constrained motions is addressed. Computer graphics techniques which enable the human operator to both visualize and predict detailed 3D trajectories in real-time are reported. Man-machine interactive control procedures for better management of manipulator contact forces and positioning are also described. It is found that collectively, these novel advanced teleoperations techniques both enhance system performance and significantly reduce control problems long associated with teleoperations under time delay. Ongoing robotic simulations of the 1984 space shuttle Solar Maximum EVA Repair Mission are briefly described.

  13. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Sociable Machines: Expressive Social Exchange between Humans and Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    robot aesthetically appears, how its sensors are configured, its quality of movement, and its behavior. Inspired by infant social development...Robot 52 4.1 Design Issues and Robot Aesthetics ......................... 52 4.2 The Hardware Design ........ ........................... 54 4.3...Issues and Robot Aesthetics When designing robots that interact socially with people, the aesthetics of the robot should be carefully considered. The

  16. A fully omnidirectional wheeled assembly for robotic vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, S.M.; Pin, F.G. )

    1990-06-01

    A large number of wheeled or tracked platform mechanisms have been studied and developed to provide their mobility capability to teleoperated and autonomous robot vehicles. This paper presents an original wheeled platform based on an orthogonal wheel assembly that provides a full (three-degrees-of-freedom) omnidirectionality of the platform without wheel slippage and with the capability for simultaneous motions in rotation and translation (including sideways movements). A schematic of the basic wheel assembly is shown. The motion of the assembly is unconstrained (freewheeling) in the direction parallel to the main assembly shaft, while it is constrained in the direction perpendicular to the shaft, being driven in this direction by rotation of the shaft. A prototype platform was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of this new concept.

  17. Machine intelligence and robotics: Report of the NASA study group. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A brief overview of applications of machine intelligence and robotics in the space program is given. These space exploration robots, global service robots to collect data for public service use on soil conditions, sea states, global crop conditions, weather, geology, disasters, etc., from Earth orbit, space industrialization and processing technologies, and construction of large structures in space. Program options for research, advanced development, and implementation of machine intelligence and robot technology for use in program planning are discussed. A vigorous and long-range program to incorporate and keep pace with state of the art developments in computer technology, both in spaceborne and ground-based computer systems is recommended.

  18. Applications of artificial intelligence X: Machine vision and robotics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 22-24, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    Various papers on artificial intelligence in machine vision and robotics are presented. The general topics addressed include: design of a robot head, machine vision inspection techniques, segmentation of fused range and intensity imagery, parallel and VLSI architectures for machine vision, comparison of range image segmentation algorithms, state of the art in postcanny edge detection, simulation and visualization environments for autonomous robots, exploration of recognition by components representation and matching, reactive robotic control strategies, image processing techniques.

  19. Robotics. Programmable self-assembly in a thousand-robot swarm.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Michael; Cornejo, Alejandro; Nagpal, Radhika

    2014-08-15

    Self-assembly enables nature to build complex forms, from multicellular organisms to complex animal structures such as flocks of birds, through the interaction of vast numbers of limited and unreliable individuals. Creating this ability in engineered systems poses challenges in the design of both algorithms and physical systems that can operate at such scales. We report a system that demonstrates programmable self-assembly of complex two-dimensional shapes with a thousand-robot swarm. This was enabled by creating autonomous robots designed to operate in large groups and to cooperate through local interactions and by developing a collective algorithm for shape formation that is highly robust to the variability and error characteristic of large-scale decentralized systems. This work advances the aim of creating artificial swarms with the capabilities of natural ones.

  20. Atomistic Design and Simulations of Nanoscale Machines and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, William A., III; Cagin, Tahir; Walch, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Over the three years of this project, we made significant progress on critical theoretical and computational issues in nanoscale science and technology, particularly in:(1) Fullerenes and nanotubes, (2) Characterization of surfaces of diamond and silicon for NEMS applications, (3) Nanoscale machine and assemblies, (4) Organic nanostructures and dendrimers, (5) Nanoscale confinement and nanotribology, (6) Dynamic response of nanoscale structures nanowires (metals, tubes, fullerenes), (7) Thermal transport in nanostructures.

  1. Robotic U-shaped assembly line balancing using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund Nilakantan, J.; Ponnambalam, S. G.

    2016-02-01

    Automation in an assembly line can be achieved using robots. In robotic U-shaped assembly line balancing (RUALB), robots are assigned to workstations to perform the assembly tasks on a U-shaped assembly line. The robots are expected to perform multiple tasks, because of their capabilities. U-shaped assembly line problems are derived from traditional assembly line problems and are relatively new. Tasks are assigned to the workstations when either all of their predecessors or all of their successors have already been assigned to workstations. The objective function considered in this article is to maximize the cycle time of the assembly line, which in turn helps to maximize the production rate of the assembly line. RUALB aims at the optimal assignment of tasks to the workstations and selection of the best fit robot to the workstations in a manner such that the cycle time is minimized. To solve this problem, a particle swarm optimization algorithm embedded with a heuristic allocation (consecutive) procedure is proposed. The consecutive heuristic is used to allocate the tasks to the workstation and to assign a best fit robot to that workstation. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using a wide variety of data sets. The results indicate that robotic U-shaped assembly lines perform better than robotic straight assembly lines in terms of cycle time.

  2. Truss Assembly and Welding by Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR) prototype that enables the precise alignment and welding of titanium space telescope optical benches. The IPJR, equipped with micron accuracy sensors and actuators, worked in tandem with a lower precision remote controlled manipulator. The combined system assembled and welded a 2 m truss from stock titanium components. The calibration of the IPJR, and the difference between the predicted and the truss dimensions as-built, identified additional sources of error that should be addressed in the next generation of IPJRs in 2D and 3D.

  3. Reliability and availability analysis for robot subsystem in automotive assembly plant: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudzin, A. F.; Majid, M. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The automotive assembly plant in a manufacturing environment consists of conveying systems and robots. Robots with high reliability will ensure no interruption during production. This study is to analyze the individual robot reliability compared to reliability of robots subsystem in series configuration. Availability was computed based on individual robots breakdown data. Failures due to robots breakdown often occurred during the operations. Actual maintenance data for a period of seven years were used for the analysis. Incorporation of failures rate and mean time between failures yield the reliability computation with the assumption of constant failure rate. Result from the analysis based on 5000 operating hours indicated reliability of series configuration of robots in a subsystem decreased to 2.8% in comparison to 38% reliability of the individual robot with the lowest reliability. The calculated lowest availability of the robots is 99.41%. The robot with the lowest reliability and availability should be considered for replacement.

  4. Reconfiguration of EVA Modular Truss Assemblies using an Anthropomorphic Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diftler, Myron A.; Doggett, William R.; Mehling, Joshua S.; King, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    NASA relies heavily on astronauts to perform Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) as part of space construction and maintenance operations. Astronauts provide an unmatched capability and flexibility. In the future, this capability will be in even greater demand as space platforms become more modular making on-orbit servicing, repair and reconfiguration routine. To assist crew, NASA is developing Robonaut, an anthropomorphic robot with human sized arms and hands that can work with many of the same interfaces designed for the space suited astronaut. Recently Robonaut has been used to investigate techniques for automated assembly, disassembly, and repair of space platforms. The current work focuses on techniques to reconfigure a modular truss system representative of the tasks necessary to convert a space solar power tug to a lunar orbiting solar power station in support of lunar exploration missions. An overview of these activities is given, detailing the assembly sequence and the infrastructure used by Robonaut to perform the reconfiguration operations. Advances in Robonaut's capabilities are described and include: a grip surface augmentation to Robonaut's gloves that provides a close approximation to the latest astronaut gloves, ensuring a secure grasp during truss coupler manipulation, and a shared control strategy that divides the Cartesian control of Robonaut's hands between the teleoperator and the robot's on-board controller to minimize human workload during constrained tasks. To support truss reconfiguration experiments, infrastructure is required to stabilize and register the structure during reconfiguration. Details on the design and operation of the infrastructure, a small fixture, are given.

  5. Application of edge detection algorithm for vision guided robotics assembly system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabantaray, Bunil Kumar; Jha, Panchanand; Biswal, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision system has a major role in making robotic assembly system autonomous. Part detection and identification of the correct part are important tasks which need to be carefully done by a vision system to initiate the process. This process consists of many sub-processes wherein, the image capturing, digitizing and enhancing, etc. do account for reconstructive the part for subsequent operations. Edge detection of the grabbed image, therefore, plays an important role in the entire image processing activity. Thus one needs to choose the correct tool for the process with respect to the given environment. In this paper the comparative study of edge detection algorithm with grasping the object in robot assembly system is presented. The proposed work is performed on the Matlab R2010a Simulink. This paper proposes four algorithms i.e. Canny's, Robert, Prewitt and Sobel edge detection algorithm. An attempt has been made to find the best algorithm for the problem. It is found that Canny's edge detection algorithm gives better result and minimum error for the intended task.

  6. Apparatus for generating a robotic plan for automatically assembling a mechanical component

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, A.A.; Strip, D.R.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus operable in combination with a robot positioned in a workcell having a preselected specification is operable to generate a program for operating the robot to assemble a mechanical component. The apparatus includes a planner for receiving as inputs a CAD model of the mechanical component to be assembled, a set of robot primitives and a set of mechanical component assembly rules for determining the conditions under which the set of robot primitives apply. The planner generates from these inputs a general, workcell specification-independent plan for assembling the mechanical component. The general plan generated by the planner is provided as an input to a compiler along with details relating to the workcell specification, and the compiler generates from these inputs a workcell specification-dependent program which operates the robot to assemble the mechanical component.

  7. 30 CFR 18.80 - Approval of machines assembled with certified or explosion-proof components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of machines assembled with certified... MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment § 18.80 Approval of...

  8. 30 CFR 18.80 - Approval of machines assembled with certified or explosion-proof components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of machines assembled with certified... MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment § 18.80 Approval of...

  9. 30 CFR 18.80 - Approval of machines assembled with certified or explosion-proof components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of machines assembled with certified... MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment § 18.80 Approval of...

  10. 30 CFR 18.80 - Approval of machines assembled with certified or explosion-proof components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of machines assembled with certified... MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment § 18.80 Approval of...

  11. 30 CFR 18.80 - Approval of machines assembled with certified or explosion-proof components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of machines assembled with certified... MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment § 18.80 Approval of...

  12. Verification Test of Automated Robotic Assembly of Space Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary program has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to develop operational procedures for supervised autonomous assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The hardware and operations required to assemble a 102-member tetrahedral truss and attach 12 hexagonal panels were developed and evaluated. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. However, as the system matured and operations were proven, upgrades were incorporated and assessed against the baseline test results. These upgrades included the use of distributed microprocessors to control dedicated end-effector operations, machine vision guidance for strut installation, and the use of an expert system-based executive-control program. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, and a series of proposed enhancements. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly or truss structures have been encountered. The test system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  13. Developments in brain-machine interfaces from the perspective of robotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun K; Park, Shinsuk; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2009-04-01

    Many patients suffer from the loss of motor skills, resulting from traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, stroke, and many other disabling conditions. Thanks to technological advances in measuring and decoding the electrical activity of cortical neurons, brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have become a promising technology that can aid paralyzed individuals. In recent studies on BMI, robotic manipulators have demonstrated their potential as neuroprostheses. Restoring motor skills through robot manipulators controlled by brain signals may improve the quality of life of people with disability. This article reviews current robotic technologies that are relevant to BMI and suggests strategies that could improve the effectiveness of a brain-operated neuroprosthesis through robotics.

  14. Lightweight piston-rod assembly for a reciprocating machine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    In a reciprocating machine, there is provided a hollow piston including a dome portion on one end and a base portion on the opposite end. The base portion includes a central bore into which a rod is hermetically fixed in radial and angular alignment. The extending end of the rod has a reduced diameter portion adapted to fit into the central bore of a second member such as a cross-head assembly, and to be secured thereto in radial and axial alignment with the piston.

  15. The New Robotics-towards human-centered machines.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    Research in robotics has moved away from its primary focus on industrial applications. The New Robotics is a vision that has been developed in past years by our own university and many other national and international research institutions and addresses how increasingly more human-like robots can live among us and take over tasks where our current society has shortcomings. Elder care, physical therapy, child education, search and rescue, and general assistance in daily life situations are some of the examples that will benefit from the New Robotics in the near future. With these goals in mind, research for the New Robotics has to embrace a broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from traditional mathematical issues of robotics to novel issues in psychology, neuroscience, and ethics. This paper outlines some of the important research problems that will need to be resolved to make the New Robotics a reality.

  16. Robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Scheide, A.W.

    1983-11-01

    This article reviews some of the technical areas and history associated with robotics, provides information relative to the formation of a Robotics Industry Committee within the Industry Applications Society (IAS), and describes how all activities relating to robotics will be coordinated within the IEEE. Industrial robots are being used for material handling, processes such as coating and arc welding, and some mechanical and electronics assembly. An industrial robot is defined as a programmable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move material, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for a variety of tasks. The initial focus of the Robotics Industry Committee will be on the application of robotics systems to the various industries that are represented within the IAS.

  17. Model-adaptive hybrid dynamic control for robotic assembly tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, D.J.; McCarragher, B.J.

    1999-10-01

    A new task-level adaptive controller is presented for the hybrid dynamic control of robotic assembly tasks. Using a hybrid dynamic model of the assembly task, velocity constraints are derived from which satisfactory velocity commands are obtained. Due to modeling errors and parametric uncertainties, the velocity commands may be erroneous and may result in suboptimal performance. Task-level adaptive control schemes, based on the occurrence of discrete events, are used to change the model parameters from which the velocity commands are determined. Two adaptive schemes are presented: the first is based on intuitive reasoning about the vector spaces involved whereas the second uses a search region that is reduced with each iteration. For the first adaptation law, asymptotic convergence to the correct model parameters is proven except for one case. This weakness motivated the development of the second adaptation law, for which asymptotic convergence is proven in all cases. Automated control of a peg-in-hole assembly task is given as an example, and simulations and experiments for this task are presented. These results demonstrate the success of the method and also indicate properties for rapid convergence.

  18. Path planning algorithms for assembly sequence planning. [in robot kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S. S.; Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    Planning for manipulation in complex environments often requires reasoning about the geometric and mechanical constraints which are posed by the task. In planning assembly operations, the automatic generation of operations sequences depends on the geometric feasibility of paths which permit parts to be joined into subassemblies. Feasible locations and collision-free paths must be present for part motions, robot and grasping motions, and fixtures. This paper describes an approach to reasoning about the feasibility of straight-line paths among three-dimensional polyhedral parts using an algebra of polyhedral cones. A second method recasts the feasibility conditions as constraints in a nonlinear optimization framework. Both algorithms have been implemented and results are presented.

  19. [Rage against the machine -- necessity of robotic assisted prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, M; Steiner, T; Popken, G

    2013-03-01

    During the last decade urologists have faced a dramatic increase in robotic surgery. Despite the exceptional acceptance of this technique there is a complete lack of evidence for the equi-efficacy or superiority of this technique compared to open or laparoscopic prostatectomy. There is now an increasing body of evidence for the evaluation of robotic assisted prostatectomy. Robotic assisted prostatectomy is a safe procedure. The rate of technical failure is small. The rate of surgical complications is comparable with that of open or conventional laparoscopic prostatectomy. Similar to the conventional laparoscopic prostatectomy there is a trend for a minor blood loss and a smaller transfusion rate compared to the retropubic approach. In recent meta-analyses there is no advatage regarding the oncological or functional outcome for robotic prostatectomy. Neither the rate of positive surgical margins nor the rate of biochemical recurrence favours robotic prostatectomy. Regarding functional outcome some publications describe better results for urinary and sexual function for robotic surgery. Careful evaluation of these data reveals a low level of evidence due to a strong bias in favour of robotic surgery. In contrast, recent analysis of "Medicare" data reveal a considerable poorer urinary function after robotic prostatectomy compared to open retropubic prostatectomy. The Urological Board of the Helios Hospital Group does not recommend the use of a robotic device for radical prostatectomy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Modelling and calibration technique of laser triangulation sensors for integration in robot arms and articulated arm coordinate measuring machines.

    PubMed

    Santolaria, Jorge; Guillomía, David; Cajal, Carlos; Albajez, José A; Aguilar, Juan J

    2009-01-01

    A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS) integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic-laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry-and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been developed. This allows the integration of LTS and AACMM mathematical models without the need of additional optimization methods after the prior sensor calibration, usually done in a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) before the assembly of the sensor in the arm. The experimental tests results for accuracy and repeatability show the suitable performance of this technique, resulting in a reliable, quick and friendly calibration method for the AACMM final user. The presented method is also valid for sensor integration in robot arms and CMMs.

  1. Architecture for in-space robotic assembly of a modular space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nicolas; Backes, Paul; Burdick, Joel; Pellegrino, Sergio; Fuller, Christine; Hogstrom, Kristina; Kennedy, Brett; Kim, Junggon; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan; Seubert, Carl; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2016-10-01

    An architecture and conceptual design for a robotically assembled, modular space telescope (RAMST) that enables extremely large space telescopes to be conceived is presented. The distinguishing features of the RAMST architecture compared with prior concepts include the use of a modular deployable structure, a general-purpose robot, and advanced metrology, with the option of formation flying. To demonstrate the feasibility of the robotic assembly concept, we present a reference design using the RAMST architecture for a formation flying 100-m telescope that is assembled in Earth orbit and operated at the Sun-Earth Lagrange Point 2.

  2. Provision of Controlled Motion Accuracy of Industrial Robots and Multiaxis Machines by the Method of Integrated Deviations Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakhmalev, O. N.; Petreshin, D. I.; Fedonin, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    There is a developed method of correction of the integrated motion deviations of industrial robots and multiaxis machines, which are caused by the primary geometrical deviations of their segments. This method can be used to develop a control system providing the motion correction for industrial robots and multiaxis machines.

  3. Simulation modeling and tracing optimal trajectory of robotic mining machine effector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryanov, VN; Pavlova, LD

    2017-02-01

    Within the framework of the robotic coal mine design for deep-level coal beds with the high gas content in the seismically active areas in the southern Kuzbass, the motion path parameters for an effector of a robotic mining machine are evaluated. The simulation model is meant for selection of minimum energy-based optimum trajectory for the robot effector, calculation of stresses and strains in a coal bed in a variable perimeter shortwall in the course of coal extraction, determination of coordinates of a coal bed edge area with the maximum disintegration of coal, and for choice of direction of the robot effector to get in contact with the mentioned area and to break coal at the minimum energy input. It is suggested to use the model in the engineering of the robot intelligence.

  4. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    Computer science and electrical engineering have been the great success story of the twentieth century. The neat modularity and mapping of a language onto circuits has led to robots on Mars, desktop computers and smartphones. But these devices are not yet able to do some of the things that life takes for granted: repair a scratch, reproduce, regenerate, or grow exponentially fast--all while remaining functional. This thesis explores and develops algorithms, molecular implementations, and theoretical proofs in the context of "active self-assembly" of molecular systems. The long-term vision of active self-assembly is the theoretical and physical implementation of materials that are composed of reconfigurable units with the programmability and adaptability of biology's numerous molecular machines. En route to this goal, we must first find a way to overcome the memory limitations of molecular systems, and to discover the limits of complexity that can be achieved with individual molecules. One of the main thrusts in molecular programming is to use computer science as a tool for figuring out what can be achieved. While molecular systems that are Turing-complete have been demonstrated [Winfree, 1996], these systems still cannot achieve some of the feats biology has achieved. One might think that because a system is Turing-complete, capable of computing "anything," that it can do any arbitrary task. But while it can simulate any digital computational problem, there are many behaviors that are not "computations" in a classical sense, and cannot be directly implemented. Examples include exponential growth and molecular motion relative to a surface. Passive self-assembly systems cannot implement these behaviors because (a) molecular motion relative to a surface requires a source of fuel that is external to the system, and (b) passive systems are too slow to assemble exponentially-fast-growing structures. We call these behaviors "energetically incomplete" programmable

  5. A machine reading system for assembling synthetic paleontological databases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Shanan E; Zhang, Ce; Livny, Miron; Ré, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of macroevolutionary theory and our understanding of biotic responses to global environmental change derive from literature-based compilations of paleontological data. Existing manually assembled databases are, however, incomplete and difficult to assess and enhance with new data types. Here, we develop and validate the quality of a machine reading system, PaleoDeepDive, that automatically locates and extracts data from heterogeneous text, tables, and figures in publications. PaleoDeepDive performs comparably to humans in several complex data extraction and inference tasks and generates congruent synthetic results that describe the geological history of taxonomic diversity and genus-level rates of origination and extinction. Unlike traditional databases, PaleoDeepDive produces a probabilistic database that systematically improves as information is added. We show that the system can readily accommodate sophisticated data types, such as morphological data in biological illustrations and associated textual descriptions. Our machine reading approach to scientific data integration and synthesis brings within reach many questions that are currently underdetermined and does so in ways that may stimulate entirely new modes of inquiry.

  6. A Machine Reading System for Assembling Synthetic Paleontological Databases

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Shanan E.; Zhang, Ce; Livny, Miron; Ré, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of macroevolutionary theory and our understanding of biotic responses to global environmental change derive from literature-based compilations of paleontological data. Existing manually assembled databases are, however, incomplete and difficult to assess and enhance with new data types. Here, we develop and validate the quality of a machine reading system, PaleoDeepDive, that automatically locates and extracts data from heterogeneous text, tables, and figures in publications. PaleoDeepDive performs comparably to humans in several complex data extraction and inference tasks and generates congruent synthetic results that describe the geological history of taxonomic diversity and genus-level rates of origination and extinction. Unlike traditional databases, PaleoDeepDive produces a probabilistic database that systematically improves as information is added. We show that the system can readily accommodate sophisticated data types, such as morphological data in biological illustrations and associated textual descriptions. Our machine reading approach to scientific data integration and synthesis brings within reach many questions that are currently underdetermined and does so in ways that may stimulate entirely new modes of inquiry. PMID:25436610

  7. Supporting robotics technology requirements through research in intelligent machines

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    {open_quotes}Safer, better, cheaper{close_quotes} are recurring themes in many robot development efforts. Significant improvements are being accomplished with existing technology, but basic research sets the foundations for future improvements and breakthrough discoveries. Advanced robots represent systems that integrate the three basic functions of sensing, reasoning, and acting (locomotion and manipulation) into one functional unit. Depending on the application requirements, some of these functions are implemented at a more or less advanced level than others. For example, some navigation tasks can be accomplished with purely reactive control and do not require sophisticated reasoning and planning methodologies. Robotics work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) spans the spectrum from basic research to application-specific development and rapid prototyping of systems. This presentation summarizes recent highlights of the robotics research activities at ORNL.

  8. Problem-Solving at a Circuit-Board Assembly Machine: A Microanalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleifgen, Jo Anne; Frenz-Belken, Patricia

    A study described machine operators' problem-solving actions at a computerized circuit-board assembly machine in a small manufacturing plant located on the West Coast. Participants were a machine operator and his supervisor, both from Vietnam, who were building large prototype boards for a major computer corporation. Over a 6.5 minute interval,…

  9. Soft brain-machine interfaces for assistive robotics: A novel control approach.

    PubMed

    Schiatti, Lucia; Tessadori, Jacopo; Barresi, Giacinto; Mattos, Leonardo S; Ajoudani, Arash

    2017-07-01

    Robotic systems offer the possibility of improving the life quality of people with severe motor disabilities, enhancing the individual's degree of independence and interaction with the external environment. In this direction, the operator's residual functions must be exploited for the control of the robot movements and the underlying dynamic interaction through intuitive and effective human-robot interfaces. Towards this end, this work aims at exploring the potential of a novel Soft Brain-Machine Interface (BMI), suitable for dynamic execution of remote manipulation tasks for a wide range of patients. The interface is composed of an eye-tracking system, for an intuitive and reliable control of a robotic arm system's trajectories, and a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) unit, for the control of the robot Cartesian stiffness, which determines the interaction forces between the robot and environment. The latter control is achieved by estimating in real-time a unidimensional index from user's electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, which provides the probability of a neutral or active state. This estimated state is then translated into a stiffness value for the robotic arm, allowing a reliable modulation of the robot's impedance. A preliminary evaluation of this hybrid interface concept provided evidence on the effective execution of tasks with dynamic uncertainties, demonstrating the great potential of this control method in BMI applications for self-service and clinical care.

  10. Robotic assembly and maintenance of future space stations based on the ISS mission operations experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembala, Richard; Ower, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    MDA has provided 25 years of real-time engineering support to Shuttle (Canadarm) and ISS (Canadarm2) robotic operations beginning with the second shuttle flight STS-2 in 1981. In this capacity, our engineering support teams have become familiar with the evolution of mission planning and flight support practices for robotic assembly and support operations at mission control. This paper presents observations on existing practices and ideas to achieve reduced operational overhead to present programs. It also identifies areas where robotic assembly and maintenance of future space stations and space-based facilities could be accomplished more effectively and efficiently. Specifically, our experience shows that past and current space Shuttle and ISS assembly and maintenance operations have used the approach of extensive preflight mission planning and training to prepare the flight crews for the entire mission. This has been driven by the overall communication latency between the earth and remote location of the space station/vehicle as well as the lack of consistent robotic and interface standards. While the early Shuttle and ISS architectures included robotics, their eventual benefits on the overall assembly and maintenance operations could have been greater through incorporating them as a major design driver from the beginning of the system design. Lessons learned from the ISS highlight the potential benefits of real-time health monitoring systems, consistent standards for robotic interfaces and procedures and automated script-driven ground control in future space station assembly and logistics architectures. In addition, advances in computer vision systems and remote operation, supervised autonomous command and control systems offer the potential to adjust the balance between assembly and maintenance tasks performed using extra vehicular activity (EVA), extra vehicular robotics (EVR) and EVR controlled from the ground, offloading the EVA astronaut and even the robotic

  11. Machining, Assembly, and Characterization of a Meso-Scale Double Shell Target

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M J; Hibbard, R L

    2003-10-21

    Several issues related to the manufacture of precision meso-scale assemblies have been identified as part of an effort to fabricate an assembly consisting of machined polymer hemispherical shells and machined aerogel. The assembly, a double shell laser target, is composed of concentric spherical layers that were machined on a lathe and then assembled. This production effort revealed several meso-scale manufacturing techniques that worked well, such as the machining of aerogel with cutting tools to form low density structures, and the development of an assembly manipulator that allows control of the assembly forces to within a few milliNewtons. Limitations on the use of vacuum chucks for meso-scale components were also identified. Many of the lessons learned in this effort are not specific to double shell targets and may be relevant to the production of other meso-scale devices.

  12. Manufacturing process applications team (MATEAM). [technology transfer in the areas of machine tools and robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technology to the industrial sector is reported. Presentations to the machine tool and robot industries and direct technology transfers of the Adams Manipulator arm, a-c motor control, and the bolt tension monitor are discussed. A listing of proposed RTOP programs with strong potential is included. A detailed description of the rotor technology available to industry is given.

  13. System and method for controlling a vision guided robot assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Yhu-Tin; Daro, Timothy; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Turner, III, Raymond D.; Casoli, Daniel J.

    2017-03-07

    A method includes the following steps: actuating a robotic arm to perform an action at a start position; moving the robotic arm from the start position toward a first position; determining from a vision process method if a first part from the first position will be ready to be subjected to a first action by the robotic arm once the robotic arm reaches the first position; commencing the execution of the visual processing method for determining the position deviation of the second part from the second position and the readiness of the second part to be subjected to a second action by the robotic arm once the robotic arm reaches the second position; and performing a first action on the first part using the robotic arm with the position deviation of the first part from the first position predetermined by the vision process method.

  14. Vector-algebra approach to extract Denavit-Hartenberg parameters of assembled robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.

    1983-01-01

    The Denavit-Hartenberg parameters characterize the joint axis systems in a robot arm and, naturally, appear in the transformation matrices from one joint axis system to another. These parameters are needed in the control of robot arms and in the passage of sensor information along the arm. This paper presents a vector algebra method to determine these parameters for any assembled robot arm. The idea is to measure the location of the robot hand (or extension) for different joint angles and then use these measurements to calculate the parameters.

  15. Preliminary results in force-guided assembly for teams of heterogeneous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Juan; Peters, R. A., II

    2009-05-01

    The missions to the Moon and to Mars currently being planned by NASA require the advanced deployment of robots to prepare sites for human life support prior to the arrival of astronauts. Part of the robot's work will be the assembly of modular structures such as solar arrays, radiators, antennas, propellant tanks, and habitation modules. The construction will require teams of robots to work cooperatively and with a certain degree of independence. Such systems are complex and require of human intervention in the form of teleoperation attending unexpected contingencies. Latency in communications, however, will require that robots perform autonomous tasks during this time window. This paper proposes an approach to maximize the likelihood of success for teams of heterogeneous robots as they autonomously perform assembly tasks using force feedback to guide the process. An evaluation of the challenges related to the cooperation of two heterogeneous robots to join two parts into a stable, rigid configuration in a loosely structured environment is conducted. A control basis is such approach: it recasts a control problem by concurrently running a series of controllers to encode complex robot behavior. Each controller represents a control law that parses the underlying continuous control space and provides asymptotic stability, even under local perturbations. The control basis approach allows several controllers to be active concurrently through the null space control technique. Preliminary experimental results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the control basis to address the challenges of assembly tasks by teams of heterogeneous robots.

  16. An assembly system based on industrial robot with binocular stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Xiao, Nanfeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an electronic part and component assembly system based on an industrial robot with binocular stereo vision. Firstly, binocular stereo vision with a visual attention mechanism model is used to get quickly the image regions which contain the electronic parts and components. Secondly, a deep neural network is adopted to recognize the features of the electronic parts and components. Thirdly, in order to control the end-effector of the industrial robot to grasp the electronic parts and components, a genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed to compute the transition matrix and the inverse kinematics of the industrial robot (end-effector), which plays a key role in bridging the binocular stereo vision and the industrial robot. Finally, the proposed assembly system is tested in LED component assembly experiments, and the results denote that it has high efficiency and good applicability.

  17. ISS Robotic Assembly Analysis Using MAGIK (Manipulator Analysis - Graphic, Interactive, Kinematic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevill, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed kinematic analysis tool, the robotic tasks needed to assemble the large elements (truss segments and pressurized modules) of the International Space Station (ISS) can be carefully analyzed to ensure the tasks are kinematically feasible early in the hardware and assembly sequence development.

  18. Experimental Demonstration of Technologies for Autonomous On-Orbit Robotic Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMaster, Edward A.; Schaechter, David B.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2006-01-01

    The Modular Reconfigurable High Energy (MRHE) program aimed to develop technologies for the automated assembly and deployment of large-scale space structures and aggregate spacecraft. Part of the project involved creation of a terrestrial robotic testbed for validation and demonstration of these technologies and for the support of future development activities. This testbed was completed in 2005, and was thereafter used to demonstrate automated rendezvous, docking, and self-assembly tasks between a group of three modular robotic spacecraft emulators. This paper discusses the rationale for the MRHE project, describes the testbed capabilities, and presents the MRHE assembly demonstration sequence.

  19. A robot arm simulation with a shared memory multiprocessor machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sung-Soo; Chuang, Li-Ping

    1989-01-01

    A parallel processing scheme for a single chain robot arm is presented for high speed computation on a shared memory multiprocessor. A recursive formulation that is derived from a virtual work form of the d'Alembert equations of motion is utilized for robot arm dynamics. A joint drive system that consists of a motor rotor and gears is included in the arm dynamics model, in order to take into account gyroscopic effects due to the spinning of the rotor. The fine grain parallelism of mechanical and control subsystem models is exploited, based on independent computation associated with bodies, joint drive systems, and controllers. Efficiency and effectiveness of the parallel scheme are demonstrated through simulations of a telerobotic manipulator arm. Two different mechanical subsystem models, i.e., with and without gyroscopic effects, are compared, to show the trade-off between efficiency and accuracy.

  20. Intelligent machines: An introductory perspective of artificial intelligence and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an integrated view of the many diverse aspects of the fields of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics. It incorporates a summary of the basic concepts utilized in each of the many technical areas; a review of the state-of-the-art; research developments and needs, an indiction of the organizations involved; applications; and a 5-10 year forecast of emerging technology. AI and robotics terms are introduced and immediately defined. The book is designed in a modular format with each chapter essentially complete unto itself. It features extensive use of diagrams, charts, tables that illustrate the concepts and provide material in an easy-to-understand form. Simple illustrative examples clarify and make concrete ideas and material presented. It features an extensive glossary of AI terms and many sets of references and sources of further information.

  1. Human and robotic repair of a solar array wing during ISS assembly mission 10A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghenekevwe, Viano; Redmond, Scott; Hiltz, Michael; Rembala, Richard

    2009-12-01

    With the installation of a new module and the relocation of three other modules, including multiple hand-offs from the station arm (SSRMS) to the shuttle arm (SRMS), International Space Station (ISS) assembly mission 10A/STS-120 was anticipated to be one of the most complicated ISS assembly missions ever attempted. The assembly operations became even more complex when a solar array wing (SAW) on the relocated Port-6 (P6) truss segment ripped while being extended. Repairing the torn SAW became the single most important objective for the remainder of STS-120, with future ISS assembly missions threatened by reduced power generation capacity if the SAW could not be repaired. Precise coordination between the space shuttle and ISS robotics teams led to an operational concept that combined the capabilities of the SRMS and SSRMS robotic systems in ways far beyond their original design capacities. Benefits of consistent standards for ISS robotic interfaces have been previously identified, but the advantages of having two such versatile and compatible robotic systems have never been quite so spectacular. This paper describes the role of robotics in the emergency SAW repair and highlights how versatility within space robotics systems can allow operations far beyond the intended design scenarios.

  2. Structure Assembly by a Heterogeneous Team of Robots Using State Estimation, Generalized Joints, and Mobile Parallel Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik E.; Adhikari, Shaurav; Glassner, Samantha; Kishen, Ashwin; Quartaro, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous robotic assembly by mobile field robots has seen significant advances in recent decades, yet practicality remains elusive. Identified challenges include better use of state estimation to and reasoning with uncertainty, spreading out tasks to specialized robots, and implementing representative joining methods. This paper proposes replacing 1) self-correcting mechanical linkages with generalized joints for improved applicability, 2) assembly serial manipulators with parallel manipulators for higher precision and stability, and 3) all-in-one robots with a heterogeneous team of specialized robots for agent simplicity. This paper then describes a general assembly algorithm utilizing state estimation. Finally, these concepts are tested in the context of solar array assembly, requiring a team of robots to assemble, bond, and deploy a set of solar panel mockups to a backbone truss to an accuracy not built into the parts. This paper presents the results of these tests.

  3. Error modeling and sensitivity analysis of a parallel robot with SCARA(selective compliance assembly robot arm) motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuzhen; Xie, Fugui; Liu, Xinjun; Zhou, Yanhua

    2014-07-01

    Parallel robots with SCARA(selective compliance assembly robot arm) motions are utilized widely in the field of high speed pick-and-place manipulation. Error modeling for these robots generally simplifies the parallelogram structures included by the robots as a link. As the established error model fails to reflect the error feature of the parallelogram structures, the effect of accuracy design and kinematic calibration based on the error model come to be undermined. An error modeling methodology is proposed to establish an error model of parallel robots with parallelogram structures. The error model can embody the geometric errors of all joints, including the joints of parallelogram structures. Thus it can contain more exhaustively the factors that reduce the accuracy of the robot. Based on the error model and some sensitivity indices defined in the sense of statistics, sensitivity analysis is carried out. Accordingly, some atlases are depicted to express each geometric error's influence on the moving platform's pose errors. From these atlases, the geometric errors that have greater impact on the accuracy of the moving platform are identified, and some sensitive areas where the pose errors of the moving platform are extremely sensitive to the geometric errors are also figured out. By taking into account the error factors which are generally neglected in all existing modeling methods, the proposed modeling method can thoroughly disclose the process of error transmission and enhance the efficacy of accuracy design and calibration.

  4. Modular neuronal assemblies embodied in a closed-loop environment: toward future integration of brains and machines.

    PubMed

    Tessadori, Jacopo; Bisio, Marta; Martinoia, Sergio; Chiappalone, Michela

    2012-01-01

    Behaviors, from simple to most complex, require a two-way interaction with the environment and the contribution of different brain areas depending on the orchestrated activation of neuronal assemblies. In this work we present a new hybrid neuro-robotic architecture based on a neural controller bi-directionally connected to a virtual robot implementing a Braitenberg vehicle aimed at avoiding obstacles. The robot is characterized by proximity sensors and wheels, allowing it to navigate into a circular arena with obstacles of different sizes. As neural controller, we used hippocampal cultures dissociated from embryonic rats and kept alive over Micro Electrode Arrays (MEAs) for 3-8 weeks. The developed software architecture guarantees a bi-directional exchange of information between the natural and the artificial part by means of simple linear coding/decoding schemes. We used two different kinds of experimental preparation: "random" and "modular" populations. In the second case, the confinement was assured by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mask placed over the surface of the MEA device, thus defining two populations interconnected via specific microchannels. The main results of our study are: (i) neuronal cultures can be successfully interfaced to an artificial agent; (ii) modular networks show a different dynamics with respect to random culture, both in terms of spontaneous and evoked electrophysiological patterns; (iii) the robot performs better if a reinforcement learning paradigm (i.e., a tetanic stimulation delivered to the network following each collision) is activated, regardless of the modularity of the culture; (iv) the robot controlled by the modular network further enhances its capabilities in avoiding obstacles during the short-term plasticity trial. The developed paradigm offers a new framework for studying, in simplified model systems, neuro-artificial bi-directional interfaces for the development of new strategies for brain-machine interaction.

  5. Locomotion training of legged robots using hybrid machine learning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Doerschuk, Peggy I.; Zhang, Wen-Ran; Li, Andrew L.

    1995-01-01

    In this study artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic are used to control the jumping behavior of a three-link uniped robot. The biped locomotion control problem is an increment of the uniped locomotion control. Study of legged locomotion dynamics indicates that a hierarchical controller is required to control the behavior of a legged robot. A structured control strategy is suggested which includes navigator, motion planner, biped coordinator and uniped controllers. A three-link uniped robot simulation is developed to be used as the plant. Neurocontrollers were trained both online and offline. In the case of on-line training, a reinforcement learning technique was used to train the neurocontroller to make the robot jump to a specified height. After several hundred iterations of training, the plant output achieved an accuracy of 7.4%. However, when jump distance and body angular momentum were also included in the control objectives, training time became impractically long. In the case of off-line training, a three-layered backpropagation (BP) network was first used with three inputs, three outputs and 15 to 40 hidden nodes. Pre-generated data were presented to the network with a learning rate as low as 0.003 in order to reach convergence. The low learning rate required for convergence resulted in a very slow training process which took weeks to learn 460 examples. After training, performance of the neurocontroller was rather poor. Consequently, the BP network was replaced by a Cerebeller Model Articulation Controller (CMAC) network. Subsequent experiments described in this document show that the CMAC network is more suitable to the solution of uniped locomotion control problems in terms of both learning efficiency and performance. A new approach is introduced in this report, viz., a self-organizing multiagent cerebeller model for fuzzy-neural control of uniped locomotion is suggested to improve training efficiency. This is currently being evaluated for a possible

  6. Robot Guidance Using Machine Vision Techniques in Industrial Environments: A Comparative Review

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez, Íñigo; Rodríguez, Nuria; Usamentiaga, Rubén; García, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    In the factory of the future, most of the operations will be done by autonomous robots that need visual feedback to move around the working space avoiding obstacles, to work collaboratively with humans, to identify and locate the working parts, to complete the information provided by other sensors to improve their positioning accuracy, etc. Different vision techniques, such as photogrammetry, stereo vision, structured light, time of flight and laser triangulation, among others, are widely used for inspection and quality control processes in the industry and now for robot guidance. Choosing which type of vision system to use is highly dependent on the parts that need to be located or measured. Thus, in this paper a comparative review of different machine vision techniques for robot guidance is presented. This work analyzes accuracy, range and weight of the sensors, safety, processing time and environmental influences. Researchers and developers can take it as a background information for their future works. PMID:26959030

  7. Robot Guidance Using Machine Vision Techniques in Industrial Environments: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez, Íñigo; Rodríguez, Nuria; Usamentiaga, Rubén; García, Daniel F

    2016-03-05

    In the factory of the future, most of the operations will be done by autonomous robots that need visual feedback to move around the working space avoiding obstacles, to work collaboratively with humans, to identify and locate the working parts, to complete the information provided by other sensors to improve their positioning accuracy, etc. Different vision techniques, such as photogrammetry, stereo vision, structured light, time of flight and laser triangulation, among others, are widely used for inspection and quality control processes in the industry and now for robot guidance. Choosing which type of vision system to use is highly dependent on the parts that need to be located or measured. Thus, in this paper a comparative review of different machine vision techniques for robot guidance is presented. This work analyzes accuracy, range and weight of the sensors, safety, processing time and environmental influences. Researchers and developers can take it as a background information for their future works.

  8. Enhanced Flexibility and Reusability through State Machine-Based Architectures for Multisensor Intelligent Robotics

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Héctor; Outón, Jose Luis; Puerto, Mildred; Sallé, Damien; López de Ipiña, Karmele

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a state machine-based architecture, which enhances the flexibility and reusability of industrial robots, more concretely dual-arm multisensor robots. The proposed architecture, in addition to allowing absolute control of the execution, eases the programming of new applications by increasing the reusability of the developed modules. Through an easy-to-use graphical user interface, operators are able to create, modify, reuse and maintain industrial processes, increasing the flexibility of the cell. Moreover, the proposed approach is applied in a real use case in order to demonstrate its capabilities and feasibility in industrial environments. A comparative analysis is presented for evaluating the presented approach versus traditional robot programming techniques. PMID:28561750

  9. Enhanced Flexibility and Reusability through State Machine-Based Architectures for Multisensor Intelligent Robotics.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Héctor; Outón, Jose Luis; Puerto, Mildred; Sallé, Damien; López de Ipiña, Karmele

    2017-05-31

    This paper presents a state machine-based architecture, which enhances the flexibility and reusability of industrial robots, more concretely dual-arm multisensor robots. The proposed architecture, in addition to allowing absolute control of the execution, eases the programming of new applications by increasing the reusability of the developed modules. Through an easy-to-use graphical user interface, operators are able to create, modify, reuse and maintain industrial processes, increasing the flexibility of the cell. Moreover, the proposed approach is applied in a real use case in order to demonstrate its capabilities and feasibility in industrial environments. A comparative analysis is presented for evaluating the presented approach versus traditional robot programming techniques.

  10. Crimping machine for the assembly of MC3347 and MC3352 isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Gress, A.V. Jr.

    1980-01-10

    A special lathe-type machine was designed and built to crimp the brass grounding cap to the steel spacer during the assembly of MC3347 and MC3352 isolators. The machine uses three rollers controlled by pneumatic and electronic circuitry to provide a semiautomatic cycle. All of the pressures and times associated with the operating parameters are adjustable and controllable.

  11. Space applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 2: Space projects overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and their related ground support functions are studied so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The space project breakdowns, which are used to identify tasks ('functional elements'), are described. The study method concentrates on the production of a matrix relating space project tasks to pieces of ARAMIS.

  12. Space applications of automation, robotics and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS). Volume 2. Space projects overview

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Minsky, M.L.; Smith, D.B.S.

    1982-08-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and their related ground support functions are studied so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The space project breakdowns, which are used to identify tasks ('functional elements'), are described. The study method concentrates on the production of a matrix relating space project tasks to pieces of ARAMIS.

  13. Assistive Robotic Manipulation through Shared Autonomy and a Body-Machine Interface.

    PubMed

    Jain, Siddarth; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Broad, Alexander; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando; Argall, Brenna

    2015-08-01

    Assistive robotic manipulators have the potential to improve the lives of people with motor impairments. They can enable individuals to perform activities such as pick-and-place tasks, opening doors, pushing buttons, and can even provide assistance in personal hygiene and feeding. However, robotic arms often have more degrees of freedom (DoF) than the dimensionality of their control interface, making them challenging to use-especially for those with impaired motor abilities. Our research focuses on enabling the control of high-DoF manipulators to motor-impaired individuals for performing daily tasks. We make use of an individual's residual motion capabilities, captured through a Body-Machine Interface (BMI), to generate control signals for the robotic arm. These low-dimensional controls are then utilized in a shared-control framework that shares control between the human user and robot autonomy. We evaluated the system by conducting a user study in which 6 participants performed 144 trials of a manipulation task using the BMI interface and the proposed shared-control framework. The 100% success rate on task performance demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed system for individuals with motor impairments to control assistive robotic manipulators.

  14. Assistive Robotic Manipulation through Shared Autonomy and a Body-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Siddarth; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Broad, Alexander; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando; Argall, Brenna

    2016-01-01

    Assistive robotic manipulators have the potential to improve the lives of people with motor impairments. They can enable individuals to perform activities such as pick-and-place tasks, opening doors, pushing buttons, and can even provide assistance in personal hygiene and feeding. However, robotic arms often have more degrees of freedom (DoF) than the dimensionality of their control interface, making them challenging to use—especially for those with impaired motor abilities. Our research focuses on enabling the control of high-DoF manipulators to motor-impaired individuals for performing daily tasks. We make use of an individual’s residual motion capabilities, captured through a Body-Machine Interface (BMI), to generate control signals for the robotic arm. These low-dimensional controls are then utilized in a shared-control framework that shares control between the human user and robot autonomy. We evaluated the system by conducting a user study in which 6 participants performed 144 trials of a manipulation task using the BMI interface and the proposed shared-control framework. The 100% success rate on task performance demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed system for individuals with motor impairments to control assistive robotic manipulators. PMID:26855690

  15. Control of a 2 DoF robot using a brain-machine interface.

    PubMed

    Hortal, Enrique; Ubeda, Andrés; Iáñez, Eduardo; Azorín, José M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a non-invasive spontaneous Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) is used to control the movement of a planar robot. To that end, two mental tasks are used to manage the visual interface that controls the robot. The robot used is a PupArm, a force-controlled planar robot designed by the nBio research group at the Miguel Hernández University of Elche (Spain). Two control strategies are compared: hierarchical and directional control. The experimental test (performed by four users) consists of reaching four targets. The errors and time used during the performance of the tests are compared in both control strategies (hierarchical and directional control). The advantages and disadvantages of each method are shown after the analysis of the results. The hierarchical control allows an accurate approaching to the goals but it is slower than using the directional control which, on the contrary, is less precise. The results show both strategies are useful to control this planar robot. In the future, by adding an extra device like a gripper, this BMI could be used in assistive applications such as grasping daily objects in a realistic environment. In order to compare the behavior of the system taking into account the opinion of the users, a NASA Tasks Load Index (TLX) questionnaire is filled out after two sessions are completed.

  16. Calibration of CCD-Cameras for Machine Vision and Robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Horst A.

    1990-02-01

    The basic mathematical formulation of a general solution to the extraction of three-dimensional information from images and camera calibration is presented. Standard photogrammetric algorithms for the least squares estimation of relevant parameters are outlined together with terms and principal aspects of calibration and quality assessment. A second generation prototype system for "Real-Time Photogrammetry" developed as part of the "Digital Photogrammetric Station" of the Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry of ETH-Zurich is described. Two calibration tests with three-dimensional testfields and independently determined reference coordinates for quality assessment are presented. In a laboratory calibration with off the shelf equipment an accuracy of 1120th and 1150th of the pixel spacing in row and column direction respectively has been achieved. Problems of the hardware used in the test are outlined. The calibration of a vision system of a ping-pong playing high-speed robot led to an improvement of the accuracy of object coordinates by a factor of over 8. The vision system is tracking table-tennis balls with a 50 Hz rate.

  17. Space Applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Potential applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and to their related ground support functions are explored. The specific tasks which will be required by future space projects are identified. ARAMIS options which are candidates for those space project tasks and the relative merits of these options are defined and evaluated. Promising applications of ARAMIS and specific areas for further research are identified. The ARAMIS options defined and researched by the study group span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  18. Wireless brain-machine interface using EEG and EOG: brain wave classification and robot control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sechang; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) links a user's brain activity directly to an external device. It enables a person to control devices using only thought. Hence, it has gained significant interest in the design of assistive devices and systems for people with disabilities. In addition, BMI has also been proposed to replace humans with robots in the performance of dangerous tasks like explosives handling/diffusing, hazardous materials handling, fire fighting etc. There are mainly two types of BMI based on the measurement method of brain activity; invasive and non-invasive. Invasive BMI can provide pristine signals but it is expensive and surgery may lead to undesirable side effects. Recent advances in non-invasive BMI have opened the possibility of generating robust control signals from noisy brain activity signals like EEG and EOG. A practical implementation of a non-invasive BMI such as robot control requires: acquisition of brain signals with a robust wearable unit, noise filtering and signal processing, identification and extraction of relevant brain wave features and finally, an algorithm to determine control signals based on the wave features. In this work, we developed a wireless brain-machine interface with a small platform and established a BMI that can be used to control the movement of a robot by using the extracted features of the EEG and EOG signals. The system records and classifies EEG as alpha, beta, delta, and theta waves. The classified brain waves are then used to define the level of attention. The acceleration and deceleration or stopping of the robot is controlled based on the attention level of the wearer. In addition, the left and right movements of eye ball control the direction of the robot.

  19. Analysis of large space structures assembly: Man/machine assembly analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Procedures for analyzing large space structures assembly via three primary modes: manual, remote and automated are outlined. Data bases on each of the assembly modes and a general data base on the shuttle capabilities to support structures assembly are presented. Task element times and structure assembly component costs are given to provide a basis for determining the comparative economics of assembly alternatives. The lessons learned from simulations of space structures assembly are detailed.

  20. Development of a truss joint for robotic assembly of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed study of mechanical fasteners which were designed to facilitate robotic assembly of structures. Design requirements for robotic structural assembly were developed, taking into account structural properties and overall system design, and four candidate fasteners were designed to meet them. These fasteners were built and evaluated in the laboratory, and the Hammer-Head joint was chosen as superior overall. It had a high reliability of fastening under misalignments of 2.54 mm (0.1 in) and 3 deg, the highest end fixity (2.18), the simplest end effector, an integral capture guide, good visual verification, and the lightest weight (782 g, 1.72 lb). The study found that a good design should incorporate chamfers sliding on chamfers, cylinders sliding on chamfers, and hard surface finishes on sliding surfaces. The study also comments on robot flexibility, sag, hysteresis, thermal expansion, and friction which were observed during the testing.

  1. Theoretical method for calculating relative joint geometry of assembled robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Equations are developed to extract the relative joint parameters of an assembled robot arm. Specifically, the Denavit-Hartenberg parameters, which completely characterize the relative joint geometry, are calculated. These parameters are needed to control the hand of the robot arm by resolved rate. As an example, the parameter extraction equations are used with perfect simulated data (no measurement noise) obtained from a mathematical model of a six-degree-of-freedom robot arm. For an actual application, measurement data needed to estimate the relative joint parameters can be generated by moving a robot arm to different positions, measuring the location of the hand (or other extension) in base coordinates, and recording the corresponding joint angles.

  2. An Effective Division of Labor Between Human and Robotic Agents Performing a Cooperative Assembly Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik; Bluethmann, William; Rochlis, Jennifer; Huber, Eric; Ambrose, Robert

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by human astronauts. These so-called extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) are risky, expensive and complex. Work is underway to develop a robotic astronaut's assistant that can help reduce human EVA time and workload by delivering human-like dexterous manipulation capabilities to any EVA worksite. An experiment is conducted to evaluate human-robot teaming strategies in the context of a simplified EVA assembly task in which Robonaut, a collaborative effort with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an anthropomorphic robot works side-by-side with a human subject. Team performance is studied in an effort to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each teaming configuration and to recommend an appropriate division of labor. A shared control approach is developed to take advantage of the complementary strengths of the human teleoperator and robot, even in the presence of significant time delay.

  3. Can Machines Think? Interaction and Perspective Taking with Robots Investigated via fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Krach, Sören; Hegel, Frank; Wrede, Britta; Sagerer, Gerhard; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Kircher, Tilo

    2008-01-01

    Background When our PC goes on strike again we tend to curse it as if it were a human being. Why and under which circumstances do we attribute human-like properties to machines? Although humans increasingly interact directly with machines it remains unclear whether humans implicitly attribute intentions to them and, if so, whether such interactions resemble human-human interactions on a neural level. In social cognitive neuroscience the ability to attribute intentions and desires to others is being referred to as having a Theory of Mind (ToM). With the present study we investigated whether an increase of human-likeness of interaction partners modulates the participants' ToM associated cortical activity. Methodology/Principal Findings By means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (subjects n = 20) we investigated cortical activity modulation during highly interactive human-robot game. Increasing degrees of human-likeness for the game partner were introduced by means of a computer partner, a functional robot, an anthropomorphic robot and a human partner. The classical iterated prisoner's dilemma game was applied as experimental task which allowed for an implicit detection of ToM associated cortical activity. During the experiment participants always played against a random sequence unknowingly to them. Irrespective of the surmised interaction partners' responses participants indicated having experienced more fun and competition in the interaction with increasing human-like features of their partners. Parametric modulation of the functional imaging data revealed a highly significant linear increase of cortical activity in the medial frontal cortex as well as in the right temporo-parietal junction in correspondence with the increase of human-likeness of the interaction partner (computerrobotrobot

  4. Can machines think? Interaction and perspective taking with robots investigated via fMRI.

    PubMed

    Krach, Sören; Hegel, Frank; Wrede, Britta; Sagerer, Gerhard; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Kircher, Tilo

    2008-07-09

    When our PC goes on strike again we tend to curse it as if it were a human being. Why and under which circumstances do we attribute human-like properties to machines? Although humans increasingly interact directly with machines it remains unclear whether humans implicitly attribute intentions to them and, if so, whether such interactions resemble human-human interactions on a neural level. In social cognitive neuroscience the ability to attribute intentions and desires to others is being referred to as having a Theory of Mind (ToM). With the present study we investigated whether an increase of human-likeness of interaction partners modulates the participants' ToM associated cortical activity. By means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (subjects n = 20) we investigated cortical activity modulation during highly interactive human-robot game. Increasing degrees of human-likeness for the game partner were introduced by means of a computer partner, a functional robot, an anthropomorphic robot and a human partner. The classical iterated prisoner's dilemma game was applied as experimental task which allowed for an implicit detection of ToM associated cortical activity. During the experiment participants always played against a random sequence unknowingly to them. Irrespective of the surmised interaction partners' responses participants indicated having experienced more fun and competition in the interaction with increasing human-like features of their partners. Parametric modulation of the functional imaging data revealed a highly significant linear increase of cortical activity in the medial frontal cortex as well as in the right temporo-parietal junction in correspondence with the increase of human-likeness of the interaction partner (computerrobotrobot

  5. A proposed hand-tool assembly for robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H.; Blaise, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    Terminator Kit Assembly (TKA) includes all features that mechanical manipulator needs to use hand tools for maintenance, repair, or assembly work. Tool box holds hand tools and, on command, releases them to hand interface which accepts and operates them. TKA is being studied as possible prosthetic device.

  6. Optimal use of human and machine resources for Space Station assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the issues involved in determining the best mix of human and machine resources for assembly of the Space Station. It presents the current Station assembly sequence, along with descriptions of the available assembly resources. A number of methodologies for optimizing the human/machine tradeoff problem have been developed, but the Space Station assembly offers some unique issues that have not yet been addressed. These include a strong constraint on available EVA time for early flights and a phased deployment of assembly resources over time. A methodology for incorporating the previously developed decision methods to the special case of the Space Station is presented. This methodology emphasizes an application of multiple qualitative and quantitative techniques, including simulation and decision analysis, for producing an objective, robust solution to the tradeoff problem.

  7. Optimal use of human and machine resources for Space Station assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the issues involved in determining the best mix of human and machine resources for assembly of the Space Station. It presents the current Station assembly sequence, along with descriptions of the available assembly resources. A number of methodologies for optimizing the human/machine tradeoff problem have been developed, but the Space Station assembly offers some unique issues that have not yet been addressed. These include a strong constraint on available EVA time for early flights and a phased deployment of assembly resources over time. A methodology for incorporating the previously developed decision methods to the special case of the Space Station is presented. This methodology emphasizes an application of multiple qualitative and quantitative techniques, including simulation and decision analysis, for producing an objective, robust solution to the tradeoff problem.

  8. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA- dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of posttranslational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates. PMID:19167202

  9. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines.

    PubMed

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-02-01

    Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA-dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of post-translational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates.

  10. Definition of large components assembled on-orbit and robot compatible mechanical joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamsen, J.; Thomas, F.; Finckenor, J.; Spiegel, B.

    1990-01-01

    One of four major areas of project Pathfinder is in-space assembly and construction. The task of in-space assembly and construction is to develop the requirements and the technology needed to build elements in space. A 120-ft diameter tetrahedral aerobrake truss is identified as the focus element. A heavily loaded mechanical joint is designed to robotically assemble the defined aerobrake element. Also, typical large components such as habitation modules, storage tanks, etc., are defined, and attachment concepts of these components to the tetrahedral truss are developed.

  11. Finite State Machine with Adaptive Electromyogram (EMG) Feature Extraction to Drive Meal Assistance Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu; Wang, Xingyu; Wang, Bei; Sugi, Takenao; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    Surface electromyogram (EMG) from elbow, wrist and hand has been widely used as an input of multifunction prostheses for many years. However, for patients with high-level limb deficiencies, muscle activities in upper-limbs are not strong enough to be used as control signals. In this paper, EMG from lower-limbs is acquired and applied to drive a meal assistance robot. An onset detection method with adaptive threshold based on EMG power is proposed to recognize different muscle contractions. Predefined control commands are output by finite state machine (FSM), and applied to operate the robot. The performance of EMG control is compared with joystick control by both objective and subjective indices. The results show that FSM provides the user with an easy-performing control strategy, which successfully operates robots with complicated control commands by limited muscle motions. The high accuracy and comfortableness of the EMG-control meal assistance robot make it feasible for users with upper limbs motor disabilities.

  12. Detecting and Classifying Human Touches in a Social Robot Through Acoustic Sensing and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Gamboa-Montero, Juan José; Castillo, José Carlos; Castro-González, Álvaro; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    An important aspect in Human–Robot Interaction is responding to different kinds of touch stimuli. To date, several technologies have been explored to determine how a touch is perceived by a social robot, usually placing a large number of sensors throughout the robot’s shell. In this work, we introduce a novel approach, where the audio acquired from contact microphones located in the robot’s shell is processed using machine learning techniques to distinguish between different types of touches. The system is able to determine when the robot is touched (touch detection), and to ascertain the kind of touch performed among a set of possibilities: stroke, tap, slap, and tickle (touch classification). This proposal is cost-effective since just a few microphones are able to cover the whole robot’s shell since a single microphone is enough to cover each solid part of the robot. Besides, it is easy to install and configure as it just requires a contact surface to attach the microphone to the robot’s shell and plug it into the robot’s computer. Results show the high accuracy scores in touch gesture recognition. The testing phase revealed that Logistic Model Trees achieved the best performance, with an F-score of 0.81. The dataset was built with information from 25 participants performing a total of 1981 touch gestures. PMID:28509865

  13. Development of the Triple Theta assembly station with machine vision feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Derek William

    2008-01-01

    Increased requirements for tighter tolerances on assembled target components in complex three-dimensional geometries with only days to assemble complete campaigns require the implementation of a computer-controlled high-precision assembly station. Over the last year, an 11-axis computer-controlled assembly station has been designed and built with custom software to handle the multiple coordinate systems and automatically calculate all relational positions. Preliminary development efforts have also been done to explore the benefit of a machine vision feedback module with a dual-camera viewing system to automate certain basic features like crosshair calibration, component leveling, and component centering.

  14. Performance characterization of precision micro robot using a machine vision system over the Internet for guaranteed positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yongjin; Chiou, Richard; Rauniar, Shreepud; Sosa, Horacio

    2005-11-01

    There is a missing link between a virtual development environment (e.g., a CAD/CAM driven offline robotic programming) and production requirements of the actual robotic workcell. Simulated robot path planning and generation of pick-and-place coordinate points will not exactly coincide with the robot performance due to lack of consideration in variations in individual robot repeatability and thermal expansion of robot linkages. This is especially important when robots are controlled and programmed remotely (e.g., through Internet or Ethernet) since remote users have no physical contact with robotic systems. Using the current technology in Internet-based manufacturing that is limited to a web camera for live image transfer has been a significant challenge for the robot task performance. Consequently, the calibration and accuracy quantification of robot critical to precision assembly have to be performed on-site and the verification of robot positioning accuracy cannot be ascertained remotely. In worst case, the remote users have to assume the robot performance envelope provided by the manufacturers, which may causes a potentially serious hazard for system crash and damage to the parts and robot arms. Currently, there is no reliable methodology for remotely calibrating the robot performance. The objective of this research is, therefore, to advance the current state-of-the-art in Internet-based control and monitoring technology, with a specific aim in the accuracy calibration of micro precision robotic system for the development of a novel methodology utilizing Ethernet-based smart image sensors and other advanced precision sensory control network.

  15. Knowledge-based process planning and line design in robotized assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delchambre, Alain

    1991-03-01

    This paper describes the research accomplished by the Industrial Automation Department of CRIF/WTCM in the area of assembly system design. The goal of this project is the integration of the assembly process since the design of the product until the programmation of the assembly cell. The paper presents the structure of the resulting off- line programming system and details two of the most important automatic processes: (1) the assembly planner, and (2) the line design or station allocation. The specific knowledge and the common sense expertise are specified for each module. Several results are presented and discussed on the basis of a concrete case study: a subassembly of a working machine.

  16. Intelligent Robots for Factory Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Oh, S. J.

    1985-04-01

    Industrial robots are now proven technology in a variety of applications including welding, materials handling, spray painting, machine loading and assembly. However, to fully realize the potential of these universal manipulators , "intelligence" needs to be added to the industrial robot. This involves adding sensory capability and machine intelligence to the controls. The "intelligence" may be added externally or as integral components of the robot. These new "intelligent robots" promise to greatly enhance the versatility of the robot for factory applications. The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the techniques and applications of intelligent robots for factory automation and to suggest possible designs for the intelligent robot of the future.

  17. Shared robotic system: automated pipette calibration and pipette tip filter assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, J.H. Jr.; Dyches, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    At the Savannah River Laboratory a Zymate Laboratory Automation System has been developed to perform two completely independent tasks within one work cell. One operation is the precise calibration of pipettes; the other is the assembly of a filter in a pipette tip. Since neither task requires full robot time, the shared system is an economical means of robotizing both processes. These are tedious, repetitive, time consuming tasks; and human operators fail to yield constant results. Automation insures a repeatable process which increases product quality.

  18. Development and verification testing of automation and robotics for assembly of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1993-01-01

    A program was initiated within the past several years to develop operational procedures for automated assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The assembly operations require the use of a robotic manipulator and are based on the principle of supervised autonomy to minimize crew resources. A hardware testbed was established to support development and evaluation testing. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop the baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. As the system matured and an operation was proven, upgrades were incorprated and assessed against the baseline test results. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, the current status, and a series of proposed developments for additional hardware and software control capability. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly of truss structures have been encountered. The current system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  19. Interset: A natural language interface for teleoperated robotic assembly of the EASE space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boorsma, Daniel K.

    1989-01-01

    A teleoperated robot was used to assemble the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extra-vehicular activity (EASE) space structure under neutral buoyancy conditions, simulating a telerobot performing structural assembly in the zero gravity of space. This previous work used a manually controlled teleoperator as a test bed for system performance evaluations. From these results several Artificial Intelligence options were proposed. One of these was further developed into a real time assembly planner. The interface for this system is effective in assembling EASE structures using windowed graphics and a set of networked menus. As the problem space becomes more complex and hence the set of control options increases, a natural language interface may prove to be beneficial to supplement the menu based control strategy. This strategy can be beneficial in situations such as: describing the local environment, maintaining a data base of task event histories, modifying a plan or a heuristic dynamically, summarizing a task in English, or operating in a novel situation.

  20. Development and verification testing of automation and robotics for assembly of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1993-01-01

    A program was initiated within the past several years to develop operational procedures for automated assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The assembly operations require the use of a robotic manipulator and are based on the principle of supervised autonomy to minimize crew resources. A hardware testbed was established to support development and evaluation testing. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop the baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. As the system matured and an operation was proven, upgrades were incorprated and assessed against the baseline test results. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, the current status, and a series of proposed developments for additional hardware and software control capability. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly of truss structures have been encountered. The current system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  1. MATERIAL PROCESSING FOR SELF-ASSEMBLING MACHINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    K. LACKNER; D. BUTT; C. WENDT

    1999-06-01

    We are developing an important aspect of a new technology based on self-reproducing machine systems. Such systems could overcome resource limitations and control the deleterious side effects of human activities on the environment. Machine systems capable of building themselves promise an increase in industrial productivity as dramatic as that of the industrial revolution. To operate successfully, such systems must procure necessary raw materials from their surroundings. Therefore, next to automation, most critical for this new technology is the ability to extract important chemicals from readily available soils. In contrast to conventional metallurgical practice, these extraction processes cannot make substantial use of rare elements. We have designed a thermodynamically viable process and experimentally demonstrated most steps that differ from common practice. To this end we had to develop a small, disposable vacuum furnace system. Our work points to a viable extraction process.

  2. Ghost-in-the-Machine reveals human social signals for human-robot interaction.

    PubMed

    Loth, Sebastian; Jettka, Katharina; Giuliani, Manuel; de Ruiter, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    We used a new method called "Ghost-in-the-Machine" (GiM) to investigate social interactions with a robotic bartender taking orders for drinks and serving them. Using the GiM paradigm allowed us to identify how human participants recognize the intentions of customers on the basis of the output of the robotic recognizers. Specifically, we measured which recognizer modalities (e.g., speech, the distance to the bar) were relevant at different stages of the interaction. This provided insights into human social behavior necessary for the development of socially competent robots. When initiating the drink-order interaction, the most important recognizers were those based on computer vision. When drink orders were being placed, however, the most important information source was the speech recognition. Interestingly, the participants used only a subset of the available information, focussing only on a few relevant recognizers while ignoring others. This reduced the risk of acting on erroneous sensor data and enabled them to complete service interactions more swiftly than a robot using all available sensor data. We also investigated socially appropriate response strategies. In their responses, the participants preferred to use the same modality as the customer's requests, e.g., they tended to respond verbally to verbal requests. Also, they added redundancy to their responses, for instance by using echo questions. We argue that incorporating the social strategies discovered with the GiM paradigm in multimodal grammars of human-robot interactions improves the robustness and the ease-of-use of these interactions, and therefore provides a smoother user experience.

  3. Viral capsid assembly as a model for protein aggregation diseases: Active processes catalyzed by cellular assembly machines comprising novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Bader, Verian; Selvarajah, Suganya; Dey, Debendranath; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Korth, Carsten

    2015-09-02

    Viruses can be conceptualized as self-replicating multiprotein assemblies, containing coding nucleic acids. Viruses have evolved to exploit host cellular components including enzymes to ensure their replicative life cycle. New findings indicate that also viral capsid proteins recruit host factors to accelerate their assembly. These assembly machines are RNA-containing multiprotein complexes whose composition is governed by allosteric sites. In the event of viral infection, the assembly machines are recruited to support the virus over the host and are modified to achieve that goal. Stress granules and processing bodies may represent collections of such assembly machines, readily visible by microscopy but biochemically labile and difficult to isolate by fractionation. We hypothesize that the assembly of protein multimers such as encountered in neurodegenerative or other protein conformational diseases, is also catalyzed by assembly machines. In the case of viral infection, the assembly machines have been modified by the virus to meet the virus' need for rapid capsid assembly rather than host homeostasis. In the case of the neurodegenerative diseases, it is the monomers and/or low n oligomers of the so-called aggregated proteins that are substrates of assembly machines. Examples for substrates are amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, prions in the prion diseases, Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) in subsets of chronic mental illnesses, and others. A likely continuum between virus capsid assembly and cell-to-cell transmissibility of aggregated proteins is remarkable. Protein aggregation diseases may represent dysfunction and dysregulation of these assembly machines analogous to the aberrations induced by viral infection in which cellular homeostasis is pathologically reprogrammed. In this view, as for viral infection, reset of assembly machines to normal homeostasis should be the goal of protein aggregation

  4. The art and science of self-assembling molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-López, Marcos; Preece, Jon A.; Fraser Stoddart, J.

    1996-09-01

    In this review, we show how noncovalent bonding interactions between 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich aromatic ring systems (e.g. hydroquinone) and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane, cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) can be used to self-assemble novel molecular architectures which are not only interesting to us, because of their fascinating topologies, but also because they have the potential to be developed into molecular structures with switchable properties on the nanometre scale. The high efficiency observed in the self-assembly of a [2]catenane, and its dynamic properties in solution, represent the first step in the design and self-assembly of other molecular assemblies better suited for the study of molecular switching processes. Therefore, a series of [2]rotaxanes, mechanically-interlocked molecular compounds, consisting of a linear 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich dumbbell-shaped component and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane as the cyclic component, have been self-assembled and evaluated. All of the so-called molecular shuttles show translational isomerism and one of them, comprising benzidine and biphenol recognition sites as the non-degenerate 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich sites, shows molecular switching properties when it is perturbed by external stimuli, such as electrons and protons. The versatility of our approach to nanoscale molecular switches is proven by the description of a series of molecular assemblies and supramolecular arrays, consisting of 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich and 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient components, which display molecular switching properties when they are influenced by external stimuli that are photochemical, electrochemical and/or chemical in nature. However, the molecular switching phenomena take place in the solution state. Therefore, finally we describe how simple molecular structures can be ordered on to a solid

  5. Adaptive measurement enhancing the performance of a five-axis laser robot machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Yu, Gang

    2000-02-01

    In order to enhance the performance of our 5-axis laser robot machine to the full extent, we installed an adaptive measuring system with protection on the ending arm of the machine. This brings at least three virtues: (1) Achieving measure functions by employing the same numerical-controlled mechanical structure without extra cost; (2) Increasing the capacity, efficiency, and accuracy of the raw measured data into machining format [computer aided design (CAD)/computer aided machining (CAM)/computer aided processing (CAP) process]; and (3) Realizing 3-dimensional (3-D) intelligent measurement for large size workpiece (up to 3 X 2 X 1 cubic meters) with given measurement accuracy (to 12 micrometer). Discrete 3-D signal point data are acquired and processed automatically by a personal computer, and the program employing network predicting concept has adaptive function with which the single- or multi-step measuring is determined by the surrounding points. By means of intelligent measurement a fast and effective measurement can be carried out for even a complex surface.

  6. Reliability of robotics: An overview with identification of specific aspects related to remote handling in fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Volta, G.; Maier, T.; Wilikens, M.

    1994-12-31

    Nowadays robots are indispensable in a major part of industry branches. Robots have the ability to perform precision demanding tasks at high speed and uninterruptedly over a long period of time, and to operate in environments which are inaccessible or hostile for human beings. In general, robots can even be considered as being more reliable than humans, and robots improve continuously thanks to ever more sophisticated technology. Therefore, to a certain extent, reliability and availability of robots can be taken for granted, and efforts of robot designers concentrate now more and more on safety, i.e. the risk robots may constitute for persons. Safety, as e.g. defined for robots working in production sites, differs slightly from safety related to remote handling devices in fusion machines, which operate in a contaminated environment where no person is supposed to be. The term safety should therefore not only consider the potentiality of human loss, but must be extended to severe damage of machinery and equipment. This paper describes a safety analysis methodology for robotized mechanical systems. This method has been applied on a case study, a 1/3 scale mock-up of a handling device for the blankets of the fusion reactor segments (ROBERTINO). In particular were analyzed two different mechanical concepts of gripping the blankets.

  7. Robotic Manufacturing of 5.5 Meter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket is the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles have been constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7-axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This presentation will focus on the friction stir welding of 5.5m diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome (LH2 MDA), the common bulkhead manufacturing development articles (CBMDA) and the thermal protection system demonstration dome (TPS Dome). The LH2 MDA was the first full-scale, flight-like Ares I hardware produced under the Constellation Program. It is a 5.5m diameter elliptical dome assembly consisting of eight gore panels, a y-ring stiffener and a manhole fitting. All components are made from aluminumlithium alloy 2195. Conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding was used on this article. An overview of the manufacturing processes will be discussed. The LH2 MDA is the first known fully friction stir welded dome ever produced. The completion of four Common Bulkhead Manufacturing Development Articles (CBMDA) and the TPS Dome will also be highlighted. Each CBMDA and the TPS Dome consists of a 5.5m diameter spun-formed dome friction stir welded to a y-ring stiffener. The domes and y-rings are made of aluminum 2014 and 2219 respectively. The TPS Dome has an additional aluminum alloy 2195 barrel section welded to the y-ring. Manufacturing solutions will be discussed including "fixtureless" welding with self reacting friction stir welding.

  8. Initial Validation of Robotic Operations for In-Space Assembly of a Large Solar Electric Propulsion Transport Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik E.; Dorsey, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Developing a capability for the assembly of large space structures has the potential to increase the capabilities and performance of future space missions and spacecraft while reducing their cost. One such application is a megawatt-class solar electric propulsion (SEP) tug, representing a critical transportation ability for the NASA lunar, Mars, and solar system exploration missions. A series of robotic assembly experiments were recently completed at Langley Research Center (LaRC) that demonstrate most of the assembly steps for the SEP tug concept. The assembly experiments used a core set of robotic capabilities: long-reach manipulation and dexterous manipulation. This paper describes cross-cutting capabilities and technologies for in-space assembly (ISA), applies the ISA approach to a SEP tug, describes the design and development of two assembly demonstration concepts, and summarizes results of two sets of assembly experiments that validate the SEP tug assembly steps.

  9. Robotic Assembly of Truss Structures for Space Systems and Future Research Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William

    2002-01-01

    Many initiatives under study by both the space science and earth science communities require large space systems, i.e. with apertures greater than 15 m or dimensions greater than 20 m. This paper reviews the effort in NASA Langley Research Center's Automated Structural Assembly Laboratory which laid the foundations for robotic construction of these systems. In the Automated Structural Assembly Laboratory reliable autonomous assembly and disassembly of an 8 meter planar structure composed of 102 truss elements covered by 12 panels was demonstrated. The paper reviews the hardware and software design philosophy which led to reliable operation during weeks of near continuous testing. Special attention is given to highlight the features enhancing assembly reliability.

  10. Synchronized assembly of gold nanoparticles driven by a dynamic DNA-fueled molecular machine.

    PubMed

    Song, Tingjie; Liang, Haojun

    2012-07-04

    A strategy for gold nanoparticle (AuNP) assembly driven by a dynamic DNA-fueled molecular machine is revealed here. In this machine, the aggregation of DNA-functionalized AuNPs is regulated by a series of toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions of DNA. The aggregation rate of the AuNPs can be regulated by controlling the amount of oligonucleotide catalyst. The versatility of the dynamic DNA-fueled molecular machine in the construction of two-component "OR" and "AND" logic gates has been demonstrated. This newly established strategy may find broad potential applications in terms of building up an "interface" that allows the combination of the strand displacement-based characteristic of DNA with the distinct assembly properties of inorganic nanoparticles, ultimately leading to the fabrication of a wide range of complex multicomponent devices and architectures.

  11. On the Applicability of Brain Reading for Predictive Human-Machine Interfaces in Robotics

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Kim, Su Kyoung; Straube, Sirko; Seeland, Anett; Wöhrle, Hendrik; Krell, Mario Michael; Tabie, Marc; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The ability of today's robots to autonomously support humans in their daily activities is still limited. To improve this, predictive human-machine interfaces (HMIs) can be applied to better support future interaction between human and machine. To infer upcoming context-based behavior relevant brain states of the human have to be detected. This is achieved by brain reading (BR), a passive approach for single trial EEG analysis that makes use of supervised machine learning (ML) methods. In this work we propose that BR is able to detect concrete states of the interacting human. To support this, we show that BR detects patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) that can be related to event-related activity in the EEG like the P300, which are indicators of concrete states or brain processes like target recognition processes. Further, we improve the robustness and applicability of BR in application-oriented scenarios by identifying and combining most relevant training data for single trial classification and by applying classifier transfer. We show that training and testing, i.e., application of the classifier, can be carried out on different classes, if the samples of both classes miss a relevant pattern. Classifier transfer is important for the usage of BR in application scenarios, where only small amounts of training examples are available. Finally, we demonstrate a dual BR application in an experimental setup that requires similar behavior as performed during the teleoperation of a robotic arm. Here, target recognition processes and movement preparation processes are detected simultaneously. In summary, our findings contribute to the development of robust and stable predictive HMIs that enable the simultaneous support of different interaction behaviors. PMID:24358125

  12. On the applicability of brain reading for predictive human-machine interfaces in robotics.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Kim, Su Kyoung; Straube, Sirko; Seeland, Anett; Wöhrle, Hendrik; Krell, Mario Michael; Tabie, Marc; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The ability of today's robots to autonomously support humans in their daily activities is still limited. To improve this, predictive human-machine interfaces (HMIs) can be applied to better support future interaction between human and machine. To infer upcoming context-based behavior relevant brain states of the human have to be detected. This is achieved by brain reading (BR), a passive approach for single trial EEG analysis that makes use of supervised machine learning (ML) methods. In this work we propose that BR is able to detect concrete states of the interacting human. To support this, we show that BR detects patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) that can be related to event-related activity in the EEG like the P300, which are indicators of concrete states or brain processes like target recognition processes. Further, we improve the robustness and applicability of BR in application-oriented scenarios by identifying and combining most relevant training data for single trial classification and by applying classifier transfer. We show that training and testing, i.e., application of the classifier, can be carried out on different classes, if the samples of both classes miss a relevant pattern. Classifier transfer is important for the usage of BR in application scenarios, where only small amounts of training examples are available. Finally, we demonstrate a dual BR application in an experimental setup that requires similar behavior as performed during the teleoperation of a robotic arm. Here, target recognition processes and movement preparation processes are detected simultaneously. In summary, our findings contribute to the development of robust and stable predictive HMIs that enable the simultaneous support of different interaction behaviors.

  13. Guidelines and rules for automated assembly by robots in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sadanand

    1992-01-01

    The development of an expert system for a 'Mechanical Design System' is discussed. Two different implementation approaches are described. One is coded in C, and the other is realized by a software package - 'Exsys.' The first method has the advantage of greater flexibility and quicker responses, while the latter one is easier to develop. This report discusses the feasible ways to establish a real mechanical intelligent design system applying artificial intelligence techniques so that the products designed by this system could best meet the requirements for space assembly.

  14. Remotely controlling of mobile robots using gesture captured by the Kinect and recognized by machine learning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Roy CHaoming; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Chuan; Lai, Chien-Hung; Liu, Cheng-Ting

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to use machine learning method and Kinect and its body sensation technology to design a simple, convenient, yet effective robot remote control system. In this study, a Kinect sensor is used to capture the human body skeleton with depth information, and a gesture training and identification method is designed using the back propagation neural network to remotely command a mobile robot for certain actions via the Bluetooth. The experimental results show that the designed mobile robots remote control system can achieve, on an average, more than 96% of accurate identification of 7 types of gestures and can effectively control a real e-puck robot for the designed commands.

  15. A Method for Estimating Costs and Benefits of Space Assembly and Servicing By Astronauts and Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R.; Benfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One aspect of designing future space missions is to determine whether Space Assembly and Servicing (SAS) is useful and, if so, what combination of robots and astronauts provides the most effective means of accomplishing it. Certain aspects of these choices, such as the societal value of developing the means for humans to live in space, do not lend themselves to quantification. However, other SAS costs and benefits can be quantified in a manner that can help select the most cost-effective SAS approach. Any space facility, whether it is assembled and serviced or not, entails an eventual replacement cost due to wear and obsolescence. Servicing can reduce this cost by limiting replacement to only failed or obsolete components. However, servicing systems, such as space robots, have their own logistics cost, and astronauts can have even greater logistics requirements. On the other hand, humans can be more capable than robots at performing dexterous and unstructured tasks, which can reduce logistics costs by allowing a reduction in mass of replacement components. Overall, the cost-effectiveness of astronaut SAS depends on its efficiency; and, if astronauts have to be wholly justified by their servicing usefulness, then the serviced space facility has to be large enough to fully occupy them.

  16. Increased robotic capabilities for lead preparation and component insertion on printed wiring assemblies: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    Printed Wiring Assembly (PWA) Robotics development work has increased the capabilities of the robotic component preparation (RCP) workcell to include a mechanism to trim and preform component leads, a part feeder system for radial-leaded components (capacitors and transistors), a fixture to orient axial-lead component marking, the use of dummy parts to separate the component types in the RCP carousel, and the use of the RCP controller to automatically keep track of the quantities of components loaded into the RCP carousel. These changes have reduced the amount of standard hours required to process the components for printed wiring assemblies (PWAs) with a resulting significant cost savings. An order for robotic component insertion system (RCIS) was released for purchase in May 1986 and is scheduled to be shipped to Bendix Kansas City Division (BKC) in the third quarter FY87. An interface system was designed to automate the storage and handling of components between the RCP and RCIS in order to reduce the amount of production operator intervention.

  17. Machine platform and software environment for rapid optics assembly process development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Sebastian; Müller, Tobias; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The assembly of optical components for laser systems is proprietary knowledge and typically done by well-trained personnel in clean room environment as it has major impact on the overall laser performance. Rising numbers of laser systems drives laser production to industrial-level automation solutions allowing for high volumes by simultaneously ensuring stable quality, lots of variants and low cost. Therefore, an easy programmable, expandable and reconfigurable machine with intuitive and flexible software environment for process configuration is required. With Fraunhofer IPT's expertise on optical assembly processes, the next step towards industrializing the production of optical systems is made.

  18. Modified hybrid control of robot manipulators for high precision assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Pooran, Farhad J.; Premack, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with applications of robot manipulators in high precision assembly tasks that can be successfully performed by employing a hybrid control scheme that independently controls force and position. A traditional hybrid control scheme is implemented in Cartesian space. In the modified hybrid control scheme introduced in this paper, the error driven control signals are expressed in joint space. This paper studies the implementation of the modified hybrid control scheme on a two-degree-of-freedom robot manipulator with a closed-kinematic chain mechanism. The performance of the traditional and modified hybrid control schemes is comparatively evaluated by computer simulation in terms of computation time and accuracy for several study cases.

  19. Efficient assembly of threaded molecular machines for sequence-specific synthesis.

    PubMed

    De Bo, Guillaume; Kuschel, Sonja; Leigh, David A; Lewandowski, Bartosz; Papmeyer, Marcus; Ward, John W

    2014-04-16

    We report on an improved strategy for the preparation of artificial molecular machines that can pick up and assemble reactive groups in sequence by traveling along a track. In the new approach a preformed rotaxane synthon is attached to the end of an otherwise fully formed strand of building blocks. This "rotaxane-capping" protocol is significantly more efficient than the "final-step-threading" method employed previously and enables the synthesis of threaded molecular machines that operate on extended oligomer, and potentially polymer, tracks. The methodology is exemplified through the preparation of a machine that adds four amino acid building blocks from a strand in sequence, featuring up to 20-membered ring native chemical ligation transition states.

  20. Applications of artificial intelligence 1993: Machine vision and robotics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 14-16, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, K.L.; Stark, L.

    1993-01-01

    Various levels of machine vision and robotics are addressed, including object recognition, image feature extraction, active vision, stereo and matching, range image acquisition and analysis, sensor models, motion and path planning, and software environments. Papers are presented on integration of geometric and nongeometric attributes for fast object recognition, a four-degree-of-freedom robot head for active computer vision, shape reconstruction from shading with perspective projection, fast extraction of planar surfaces from range images, and real-time reconstruction and rendering of three-dimensional occupancy maps.

  1. Application of machine vision based measurement in precise assembly of miniature parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cui; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiwen; Wang, Lin; Luo, Yi

    2010-08-01

    In manufacturing of precise miniature devices, automatic assembly is the trend to replace manual work for better quality and higher yield. Precise measurement is a critical issue during assembly process because the parts are often complicated and quite different in size, shapes, surface condition, etc. The position and orientation error must be determined precisely before assembly. In the developed automatic assembly system, microscopic machine vision and precise linear stages were integrated in the measurement system for higher detection resolution and larger measurement range in working space. As to the extract of contour of parts with different surface condition, dynamic illumination control and different combination of feature detection algorithms were applied. The errors brought by non-perpendicularity among precision linear stages were compensated and the movement errors were reduced with effective measurement strategy. The measuring accuracy was validated with a special fabricated precise template. Assembly tests were done with the developed system and results indicate that the required position and orientation accuracy can be met successfully and consequently the assembly task can be fulfilled.

  2. On the design of robotic hands for brain-machine interface.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yoky; Afshar, Pedram; Oh, Michael

    2006-05-15

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) is the latest solution to a lack of control for paralyzed or prosthetic limbs. In this paper the authors focus on the design of anatomical robotic hands that use BMI as a critical intervention in restorative neurosurgery and they justify the requirement for lower-level neuromusculoskeletal details (relating to biomechanics, muscles, peripheral nerves, and some aspects of the spinal cord) in both mechanical and control systems. A person uses his or her hands for intimate contact and dexterous interactions with objects that require the user to control not only the finger endpoint locations but also the forces and the stiffness of the fingers. To recreate all of these human properties in a robotic hand, the most direct and perhaps the optimal approach is to duplicate the anatomical musculoskeletal structure. When a prosthetic hand is anatomically correct, the input to the device can come from the same neural signals that used to arrive at the muscles in the original hand. The more similar the mechanical structure of a prosthetic hand is to a human hand, the less learning time is required for the user to recreate dexterous behavior. In addition, removing some of the nonlinearity from the relationship between the cortical signals and the finger movements into the peripheral controls and hardware vastly simplifies the needed BMI algorithms. (Nonlinearity refers to a system of equations in which effects are not proportional to their causes. Such a system could be difficult or impossible to model.) Finally, if a prosthetic hand can be built so that it is anatomically correct, subcomponents could be integrated back into remaining portions of the user's hand at any transitional locations. In the near future, anatomically correct prosthetic hands could be used in restorative neurosurgery to satisfy the user's needs for both aesthetics and ease of control while also providing the highest possible degree of dexterity.

  3. Brain-machine interface via real-time fMRI: preliminary study on thought-controlled robotic arm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Ryu, Jeongwon; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Cho, Zang-Hee; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2009-01-23

    Real-time functional MRI (rtfMRI) has been used as a basis for brain-computer interface (BCI) due to its ability to characterize region-specific brain activity in real-time. As an extension of BCI, we present an rtfMRI-based brain-machine interface (BMI) whereby 2-dimensional movement of a robotic arm was controlled by the regulation (and concurrent detection) of regional cortical activations in the primary motor areas. To do so, the subjects were engaged in the right- and/or left-hand motor imagery tasks. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal originating from the corresponding hand motor areas was then translated into horizontal or vertical robotic arm movement. The movement was broadcasted visually back to the subject as a feedback. We demonstrated that real-time control of the robotic arm only through the subjects' thought processes was possible using the rtfMRI-based BMI trials.

  4. Integrating robotic action with biologic perception: A brain-machine symbiosis theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Babak

    In patients with motor disability the natural cyclic flow of information between the brain and external environment is disrupted by their limb impairment. Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) aim to provide new communication channels between the brain and environment by direct translation of brain's internal states into actions. For enabling the user in a wide range of daily life activities, the challenge is designing neural decoders that autonomously adapt to different tasks, environments, and to changes in the pattern of neural activity. In this dissertation, a novel decoding framework for BMIs is developed in which a computational agent autonomously learns how to translate neural states into action based on maximization of a measure of shared goal between user and the agent. Since the agent and brain share the same goal, a symbiotic relationship between them will evolve therefore this decoding paradigm is called a Brain-Machine Symbiosis (BMS) framework. A decoding agent was implemented within the BMS framework based on the Actor-Critic method of Reinforcement Learning. The rule of the Actor as a neural decoder was to find mapping between the neural representation of motor states in the primary motor cortex (MI) and robot actions in order to solve reaching tasks. The Actor learned the optimal control policy using an evaluative feedback that was estimated by the Critic directly from the user's neural activity of the Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc). Through a series of computational neuroscience studies in a cohort of rats it was demonstrated that NAcc could provide a useful evaluative feedback by predicting the increase or decrease in the probability of earning reward based on the environmental conditions. Using a closed-loop BMI simulator it was demonstrated the Actor-Critic decoding architecture was able to adapt to different tasks as well as changes in the pattern of neural activity. The custom design of a dual micro-wire array enabled simultaneous implantation of MI and

  5. Parallel robot for micro assembly with integrated innovative optical 3D-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, Juergen; Ispas, Diana; Pokar, Gero; Soetebier, Sven; Tutsch, Rainer

    2002-10-01

    Recent advances in the fields of MEMS and MOEMS often require precise assembly of very small parts with an accuracy of a few microns. In order to meet this demand, a new approach using a robot based on parallel mechanisms in combination with a novel 3D-vision system has been chosen. The planar parallel robot structure with 2 DOF provides a high resolution in the XY-plane. It carries two additional serial axes for linear and rotational movement in/about z direction. In order to achieve high precision as well as good dynamic capabilities, the drive concept for the parallel (main) axes incorporates air bearings in combination with a linear electric servo motors. High accuracy position feedback is provided by optical encoders with a resolution of 0.1 μm. To allow for visualization and visual control of assembly processes, a camera module fits into the hollow tool head. It consists of a miniature CCD camera and a light source. In addition a modular gripper support is integrated into the tool head. To increase the accuracy a control loop based on an optoelectronic sensor will be implemented. As a result of an in-depth analysis of different approaches a photogrammetric system using one single camera and special beam-splitting optics was chosen. A pattern of elliptical marks is applied to the surfaces of workpiece and gripper. Using a model-based recognition algorithm the image processing software identifies the gripper and the workpiece and determines their relative position. A deviation vector is calculated and fed into the robot control to guide the gripper.

  6. CATIA-V 3D Modeling for Design Integration of the Ignitor Machine Load Assembly^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Gardella, F.; Coppi, B.

    2007-11-01

    In the framework of the ANSALDO industrial contribution to the Ignitor engineering design, the detailed design of all components of the machine core (Load Assembly) has been completed. The machine Central Post, Central Solenoid, and Poloidal Field Coil systems, the Plasma Chamber and First Wall system, the surrounding mechanical structures, the Vacuum Cryostat and the polyethylene boron sheets attached to it for neutron shielding, have all been analyzed to confirm that they can withstand both normal and off-normal operating loads, as well as the Plasma Chamber and First Wall baking operations, with proper safety margins, for the maximum plasma parameters scenario at 13 T/11 MA, for the reduced scenarios at 9 T/7 MA (limiter) and at 9 T/6 MA (double nul). Both 3D and 2D drawings of each individual component have been produced using the Dassault Systems CATIA-V software. After they have been all integrated into a single 3D CATIA model of the Load Assembly, the electro-fluidic and fluidic lines which supply electrical currents and helium cooling gas to the coils have been added and mechanically incorporated with the components listed above. A global seismic analysis of the Load Assembly with SSE/OBE response spectra has also been performed to verify that it is able to withstand such external events. ^*Work supported in part by ENEA of italy and by the US D.O.E.

  7. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, Melvin; Cottingham, James G.

    1996-03-12

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space, and the wedge is generally T-shaped.

  8. Epilogue to Special Issue on Developmental Robotics: Can Experiments with Machines Inform Theory in Infant Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Christopher G.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental robotics has forwarded a range of models of development and behaviours. With the variety of systems that have been created, and with some of these approximating prominent human behaviours (e.g. joint attention, word learning, imitation), one may argue that developmental robotics has started to go past robotic models of earwigs…

  9. Epilogue to Special Issue on Developmental Robotics: Can Experiments with Machines Inform Theory in Infant Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Christopher G.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental robotics has forwarded a range of models of development and behaviours. With the variety of systems that have been created, and with some of these approximating prominent human behaviours (e.g. joint attention, word learning, imitation), one may argue that developmental robotics has started to go past robotic models of earwigs…

  10. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  11. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  12. Load Assembly of the Ignitor Machine with 3D Interactive Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, S.; Pierattini, S.

    2003-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to assist the Ignitor team in every phase of the project using the new Virtual Reality Technology (VR). Through the VR it is possible to see, plan and test the machine assembly sequence and the total layout. We are also planning to simulate in VR the remote handling systems. The complexity of the system requires a large and powerful graphical device. The ENEA?s "Advanced Visualization Technology" team has implemented a repository file data structure integrated with the CATIA drawing cams from the designer of Ignitor. The 3D virtual mockup software is used to view and analyze all objects that compose the mockup and also to analyze the correct assembly sequences. The ENEA?s 3D immersive system and software are fully integrated in the ENEA?s supercomputing GRID infrastructure. At any time all members of the Ignitor Project can view the status of the mockup in 3D (draft and/or final objects) through the net. During the conference examples of the assembly sequence and load assembly structure will be presented.

  13. Space Applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 4: Supplement, Appendix 4.3: Candidate ARAMIS Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Potential applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and to their related ground support functions, in the years 1985-2000, so that NASA may make informed decisions on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The study first identifies the specific tasks which will be required by future space projects. It then defines ARAMIS options which are candidates for those space project tasks, and evaluates the relative merits of these options. Finally, the study identifies promising applications of ARAMIS, and recommends specific areas for further research. The ARAMIS options defined and researched by the study group span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  14. Classification of large-scale stellar spectra based on the non-linearly assembling learning machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongbao; Song, Lipeng; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-02-01

    An important problem to be solved of traditional classification methods is they cannot deal with large-scale classification because of very high time complexity. In order to solve above problem, inspired by the thinking of collaborative management, the non-linearly assembling learning machine (NALM) is proposed and used in the large-scale stellar spectral classification. In NALM, the large-scale dataset is firstly divided into several subsets, and then the traditional classifiers such as support vector machine (SVM) runs on the subset, finally, the classification results on each subset are assembled and the overall classification decision is obtained. In comparative experiments, we investigate the performance of NALM in the stellar spectral subclasses classification compared with SVM. We apply SVM and NALM respectively to classify the four subclasses of K-type spectra, three subclasses of F-type spectra and three subclasses of G-type spectra from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The comparative experiment results show that the performance of NALM is much better than SVM in view of the classification accuracy and the computation time.

  15. Human motion segmentation and recognition using machine vision for mechanical assembly operation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiannan; Liu, Mingzhou; Wang, Xiaoqiao; Ge, Maogen; Lin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The observation, decomposition and record of motion are usually accomplished through artificial means during the process of motion analysis. This method not only has a heavy workload, its efficiency is also very low. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel method to segment and recognize continuous human motion automatically based on machine vision for mechanical assembly operation. First, the content-based dynamic key frame extraction technology was utilized to extract key frames from video stream, and then automatic segmentation of action was implemented. Further, the SIFT feature points of the region of interest (ROIs) were extracted, on the basis of which the characteristic vector of the key frame was derived. The feature vector can be used not only to represent the characteristic of motion, but also to describe the connection between motion and environment. Finally, the classifier is constructed based on support vector machine (SVM) to classify feature vectors, and the type of therblig is identified according to the classification results. Our approach enables robust therblig recognition in challenging situations (such as changing of light intensity, dynamic backgrounds) and allows automatic segmentation of motion sequences. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach achieves recognition rates of 96.00 % on sample video which captured on the assembly line.

  16. Robotic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A complicated design project, successfully carried out by New York manufacturing consultant with help from NERAC, Inc., resulted in new type robotic system being marketed for industrial use. Consultant Robert Price, operating at E.S.I, Inc. in Albany, NY, sought help from NERAC to develop an automated tool for deburring the inside of 8 inch breech ring assemblies for howitzers produced by Watervliet Arsenal. NERAC conducted a search of the NASA data base and six others. From information supplied, Price designed a system consisting of a standard industrial robot arm, with a specially engineered six-axis deburring tool fitted to it. A microcomputer and computer program direct the tool on its path through the breech ring. E.S.I. markets the system to aerospace and metal cutting industries for deburring, drilling, routing and refining machined parts.

  17. A three-fingered, touch-sensitive, metrological micro-robotic assembly tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torralba, Marta; Hastings, D. J.; Thousand, Jeffery D.; Nowakowski, Bartosz K.; Smith, Stuart T.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes a metrological, robotic hand to manipulate and measure micrometer size objects. The presented work demonstrates not only assembly operations, but also positioning control and metrology capability. Sample motion is achieved by a commercial positioning stage, which provides XYZ-displacements for assembly of components. A designed and manufactured gripper tool that incorporates 21 degrees-of-freedom for independent alignment of actuators, sensors, and the three fingers of this hand is presented. These fingers can be opened and closed by piezoelectric actuators through levered flexures providing an 80 μm displacement range measured with calibrated opto-interrupter based, knife-edge sensors. The operational ends of the fingers comprise of a quartz tuning fork with a 7 μm diameter 3.2 mm long carbon fiber extending from the end of one tuning fork tine. Finger-tip force-sensing is achieved by the monitoring of individual finger resonances typically at around 32 kHz. Experimental results included are focused on probe performance analysis. Pick and place operation using the three fingers is demonstrated with all fingers being continuously oscillated, a capability not possible with the previous single or two finger tweezer type designs. By monitoring electrical feedback during pick and place operations, changes in the response of the three probes demonstrate the ability to identify both grab and release operations. Component metrology has been assessed by contacting different micro-spheres of diameters 50(±7.5) μm, 135(±20) μm, and 140(±20) μm. These were measured by the micro robot to have diameters of 67, 133, and 126 μm respectively with corresponding deviations of 4.2, 4.9, and 4.3 μm. This deviation in the measured results was primarily due to the manual, joystick-based, contacting of the fingers, difficulties associated with centering the components to the axis of the hand, and lower contact sensitivity for the smallest sphere

  18. Usage of the ACT3D Robot in a Brain Machine Interface for Hand Opening and Closing in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Sheaff, Clay; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2010-01-01

    At six months after brain injury, about 65% of stroke survivors have been shown to be unable to incorporate the affected hand into activities of daily living (ADL). Using a reliable Brain-Machine-Interface (BMI) together with Neural Electronic Stimulation (NES) is a possible solution for the restoration of hand function in severely impaired hemiparetic stroke survivors. However, discoordination, i.e. the abnormal coupling between adjacent joints, causes an expected reduction in the performance of BMI algorithms. In this study, we test whether the active support of an ACT3D robot can increase the performance of two brain-machine-interface (BMI) algorithms in separating the subject’s intention to open or close the impaired hand during reach. Improvement in recognition rate was obtained in 4 chronic hemiparetic stroke subjects when support from the robot was available. Further analysis on one subject suggests that such an improvement is related to quantitative changes in cortical activity. This result suggests that the ACT3D robot can be used to train severely impaired stroke subjects to use a BMI-controlled NES device. PMID:20454553

  19. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-01-01

    In the future, some spacecraft will be so large that they must be assembled on-orbit. These spacecraft will be used for such tasks as manned missions to Mars or used as orbiting platforms for monitoring the Earth or observing the universe. Some large spacecraft will probably consist of planar truss structures to which will be attached special purpose, self-contained modules. The modules will most likely be taken to orbit fully outfitted and ready for use in heavy-lift launch vehicles. The truss members will also similarly be taken to orbit, but most unassembled. The truss structures will need to be assembled robotically because of the high costs and risks of extra-vehicular activities. Some missions will involve very large loads. To date, very few structures of any kind have been constructed in space. Two relatively simple trusses were assembled in the Space Shuttle bay in late 1985. Here the development of a design of a welded joint for on-orbit, robotic truss assembly is described. Mechanical joints for this application have been considered previously. Welded joints have the advantage of allowing the truss members to carry fluids for active cooling or other purposes. In addition, welded joints can be made more efficient structurally than mechanical joints. Also, welded joints require little maintenance (will not shake loose), and have no slop which would cause the structure to shudder under load reversal. The disadvantages of welded joints are that a more sophisticated assembly robot is required, weld flaws may be difficult to detect on-orbit, the welding process is hazardous, and welding introduces contamination to the environment. In addition, welded joints provide less structural damping than do mechanical joints. Welding on-orbit was first investigated aboard a Soyuz-6 mission in 1969 and then during a Skylab electron beam welding experiment in 1973. A hand held electron beam welding apparatus is currently being prepared for use on the MIR space station

  20. Axiomatic Design and Fabrication of Composite Structures - Applications in Robots, Machine Tools, and Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dai Gil; Suh, Nam Pyo

    2005-11-01

    The idea that materials can be designed to satisfy specific performance requirements is relatively new. With high-performance composites, however, the entire process of designing and fabricating a part can be worked out before manufacturing. The purpose of this book is to present an integrated approach to the design and manufacturing of products from advanced composites. It shows how the basic behavior of composites and their constitutive relationships can be used during the design stage, which minimizes the complexity of manufacturing composite parts and reduces the repetitive "design-build-test" cycle. Designing it right the first time is going to determine the competitiveness of a company, the reliability of the part, the robustness of fabrication processes, and ultimately, the cost and development time of composite parts. Most of all, it should expand the use of advanced composite parts in fields that use composites only to a limited extent at this time. To achieve these goals, this book presents the design and fabrication of novel composite parts made for machine tools and other applications like robots and automobiles. This book is suitable as a textbook for graduate courses in the design and fabrication of composites. It will also be of interest to practicing engineers learning about composites and axiomatic design. A CD-ROM is included in every copy of the book, containing Axiomatic CLPT software. This program, developed by the authors, will assist readers in calculating material properties from the microstructure of the composite. This book is part of the Oxford Series on Advanced Manufacturing.

  1. Mergeable nervous systems for robots.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Nithin; Christensen, Anders Lyhne; O'Grady, Rehan; Mondada, Francesco; Dorigo, Marco

    2017-09-12

    Robots have the potential to display a higher degree of lifetime morphological adaptation than natural organisms. By adopting a modular approach, robots with different capabilities, shapes, and sizes could, in theory, construct and reconfigure themselves as required. However, current modular robots have only been able to display a limited range of hardwired behaviors because they rely solely on distributed control. Here, we present robots whose bodies and control systems can merge to form entirely new robots that retain full sensorimotor control. Our control paradigm enables robots to exhibit properties that go beyond those of any existing machine or of any biological organism: the robots we present can merge to form larger bodies with a single centralized controller, split into separate bodies with independent controllers, and self-heal by removing or replacing malfunctioning body parts. This work takes us closer to robots that can autonomously change their size, form and function.Robots that can self-assemble into different morphologies are desired to perform tasks that require different physical capabilities. Mathews et al. design robots whose bodies and control systems can merge and split to form new robots that retain full sensorimotor control and act as a single entity.

  2. An improved kernel based extreme learning machine for robot execution failures.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Rong, Xuewen; Li, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Robot execution failures prediction (classification) in the robot tasks is a difficult learning problem due to partially corrupted or incomplete measurements of data and unsuitable prediction techniques for this prediction problem with little learning samples. Therefore, how to predict the robot execution failures problem with little (incomplete) or erroneous data deserves more attention in the robot field. For improving the prediction accuracy of robot execution failures, this paper proposes a novel KELM learning algorithm using the particle swarm optimization approach to optimize the parameters of kernel functions of neural networks, which is called the AKELM learning algorithm. The simulation results with the robot execution failures datasets show that, by optimizing the kernel parameters, the proposed algorithm has good generalization performance and outperforms KELM and the other approaches in terms of classification accuracy. Other benchmark problems simulation results also show the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. An Improved Kernel Based Extreme Learning Machine for Robot Execution Failures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Rong, Xuewen; Li, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Robot execution failures prediction (classification) in the robot tasks is a difficult learning problem due to partially corrupted or incomplete measurements of data and unsuitable prediction techniques for this prediction problem with little learning samples. Therefore, how to predict the robot execution failures problem with little (incomplete) or erroneous data deserves more attention in the robot field. For improving the prediction accuracy of robot execution failures, this paper proposes a novel KELM learning algorithm using the particle swarm optimization approach to optimize the parameters of kernel functions of neural networks, which is called the AKELM learning algorithm. The simulation results with the robot execution failures datasets show that, by optimizing the kernel parameters, the proposed algorithm has good generalization performance and outperforms KELM and the other approaches in terms of classification accuracy. Other benchmark problems simulation results also show the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24977234

  4. The role of humans and robots in the assembly of large infrared observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Edward J.; Espero, Tracey

    2004-10-01

    Many authors have endorsed the concept of assembly of large optics in space and have pointed out the technology needs for astronauts, infrastructure, robots and the observatories themselves. In this paper, we consider the technical issues associated with the integration and test in space of large optics during the next 15 years or so, when human activity is largely confined to low Earth orbit (LEO). We identify technical areas that need development and define a first version of the processes that might be used to create successful telescope missions that are tested in space. We identify a pathway that supports scalable solutions for very large systems necessary for imaging planets in other solar systems and other magnificent science. The investment in space integration and testing technology will return important dividends to designers of large space optics of the future. This approach to space optics testing is attractive because it overcomes the limits of ground testing associated with large test chambers, star simulators and the effects of gravity. It also directly benefits from, and supports, the technology and infrastructure investments about to be made by the new NASA Exploration Systems Enterprise, allowing both observatories and exploration missions to be assembled.

  5. Tutorial on robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.G.; Gonzalez, R.C.; Fu, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Basic fundamentals in robotics are presented in this tutorial. Topics covered are as follows: robot arm kinematics; robot arm dynamics; planning or manipulator trajectories; servo control for manipulators; force sensing and control; robot vision systems; robot programming languages; and machine intelligence and robot planning.

  6. A Non-Newtonian Fluid Robot.

    PubMed

    Hachmon, Guy; Mamet, Noam; Sasson, Sapir; Barkai, Tal; Hadar, Nomi; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2016-01-01

    New types of robots inspired by biological principles of assembly, locomotion, and behavior have been recently described. In this work we explored the concept of robots that are based on more fundamental physical phenomena, such as fluid dynamics, and their potential capabilities. We report a robot made entirely of non-Newtonian fluid, driven by shear strains created by spatial patterns of audio waves. We demonstrate various robotic primitives such as locomotion and transport of metallic loads-up to 6-fold heavier than the robot itself-between points on a surface, splitting and merging, shapeshifting, percolation through gratings, and counting to 3. We also utilized interactions between multiple robots carrying chemical loads to drive a bulk chemical synthesis reaction. Free of constraints such as skin or obligatory structural integrity, fluid robots represent a radically different design that could adapt more easily to unfamiliar, hostile, or chaotic environments and carry out tasks that neither living organisms nor conventional machines are capable of.

  7. Robots: Fantasy and Reality

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Neil

    2007-04-27

    A irreverent non-technical review of the history of surprisingly animate machines, from ancient Egypt to current times. Areas include teleoperators for hazardous environments, assembly systems, medical applications, entertainment, and science fiction. The talk has over 100 slides, covering such varied topics as Memnon son of Dawn, Droz's automata, Vaucanson's duck, cathedral clocks, Von Kempelen's chess player, household robots, Asimov's laws, Disneyland, dinosaurs, and movie droids and cyborgs.

  8. End-effector for robotic assembly of welded truss structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, William V.

    1991-01-01

    In June 1987, work was initiated at LaRC on end-effectors and preloaded joints for robotic truss assembly. This is part of an on-going research effort centered on a test facility that assembles 1 inch x 2 m identical struts into an 8 m diameter x 1.5 m deep platform truss. A detailed description of the test facility was published. The end-effector being used for the LaRC assembly demonstration is quite suitable for the Precision Segmented Reflector or other precision applications. These require high stiffness provided by mechanical joint preloads. Stiffness obtained in this manner is only required and provided over a load range far less than the ultimate strength of the strut tubes. Beyond this useful range, truss behavior is somewhat unpredictable. Mechanically preloaded joints of this type are less suitable for applications such as the Aero Brake where predictable strength and stiffness are required over a greater fraction of the load bearing capacity of component parts. Preliminary studies of the Aerobrake support truss indicate that struts of at least 3 different diameters and various lengths would improve performance. The double-ended end-effector currently in service is designed for only one diameter and length. Anticipated single-ended versions can accommodate varying lengths but not multiple diameters. Tradeoff considerations for welded joints relative to their mechanically preloaded counterparts are presented. Conclusions from this research are as follows: (1) repair by cut and re-weld on the original weld site should be research; (2) welded joints, though repairable, should not be used where high repair frequencies are anticipated; and (3) welded joints should be considered for an Aero Brake truss.

  9. Blending of brain-machine interface and vision-guided autonomous robotics improves neuroprosthetic arm performance during grasping.

    PubMed

    Downey, John E; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Muelling, Katharina; Venkatraman, Arun; Valois, Jean-Sebastien; Hebert, Martial; Bagnell, J Andrew; Schwartz, Andrew B; Collinger, Jennifer L

    2016-03-18

    Recent studies have shown that brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) offer great potential for restoring upper limb function. However, grasping objects is a complicated task and the signals extracted from the brain may not always be capable of driving these movements reliably. Vision-guided robotic assistance is one possible way to improve BMI performance. We describe a method of shared control where the user controls a prosthetic arm using a BMI and receives assistance with positioning the hand when it approaches an object. Two human subjects with tetraplegia used a robotic arm to complete object transport tasks with and without shared control. The shared control system was designed to provide a balance between BMI-derived intention and computer assistance. An autonomous robotic grasping system identified and tracked objects and defined stable grasp positions for these objects. The system identified when the user intended to interact with an object based on the BMI-controlled movements of the robotic arm. Using shared control, BMI controlled movements and autonomous grasping commands were blended to ensure secure grasps. Both subjects were more successful on object transfer tasks when using shared control compared to BMI control alone. Movements made using shared control were more accurate, more efficient, and less difficult. One participant attempted a task with multiple objects and successfully lifted one of two closely spaced objects in 92 % of trials, demonstrating the potential for users to accurately execute their intention while using shared control. Integration of BMI control with vision-guided robotic assistance led to improved performance on object transfer tasks. Providing assistance while maintaining generalizability will make BMI systems more attractive to potential users. NCT01364480 and NCT01894802 .

  10. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  11. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, M.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1996-03-12

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines is disclosed having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space, and the wedge is generally T-shaped. 6 figs.

  12. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, M.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces, respectively between the housing and adjacent coils, the interpole spaces each extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends defining the slit to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. Preferably, the spring retainer and wedge are self-locking wherein wedge is fabricated from a material softer than a material the retainer spring is fabricated from, so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space and fabricated from berryllium-copper alloy, and the wedge is generally T-shaped and fabricated from aluminum. Alternatively, a wedge and spring assembly includes a wedge having divergent sloped surfaces in which each surface and the respective juxtaposed ends of the retainer spring are angled relative to one another so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit by friction existing between its sloped surfaces and the juxtaposed ends of the retaining spring.

  13. Characterization and mapping of very fine particles in an engine machining and assembly facility.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Peters, Thomas M; Slavin, Thomas J

    2007-05-01

    Very fine particle number and mass concentrations were mapped in an engine machining and assembly facility in the winter and summer. A condensation particle counter (CPC) was used to measure particle number concentrations in the 0.01 microm to 1 microm range, and an optical particle counter (OPC) was used to measure particle number concentrations in 15 channels between 0.3 microm and 20 microm. The OPC measurements were used to estimate the respirable mass concentration. Very fine particle number concentrations were estimated by subtracting the OPC particle number concentrations from 0.3 microm to 1 microm from the CPC number concentrations. At specific locations during the summer visit, an electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure particle size distribution from 0.07 microm to 10 microm in 12 channels. The geometric mean ratio of respirable mass concentration estimated from the OPC to the gravimetrically measured mass concentration was 0.66 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.5. Very fine particle number concentrations in winter were substantially greater where direct-fire natural gas heaters were operated (7.5 x 10(5) particles/cm(3)) than where steam was used for heat (3 x 10(5) particles/cm(3)). During summer when heaters were off, the very fine particle number concentrations were below 10(5) particles/cm(3), regardless of location. Elevated very fine particle number concentrations were associated with machining operations with poor enclosures. Whereas respirable mass concentrations did not vary noticeably with season, they were greater in areas with poorly fitting enclosures (0.12 mg/m(3)) than in areas where state-of-the-art enclosures were used (0.03 mg/m(3)). These differences were attributed to metalworking fluid mist that escaped from poorly fitting enclosures. Particles generated from direct-fire natural gas heater operation were very small, with a number size distribution modal diameter of less than 0.023 microm. Aerosols generated by

  14. A Study on Improvement of Machining Precision in a Medical Milling Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Naohiko; Osa, Takayuki; Nakajima, Yoshikazu; Mori, Masahiko; Saraie, Hidenori; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    Minimal invasiveness and increasing of precision have recently become important issues in orthopedic surgery. The femur and tibia must be cut precisely for successful knee arthroplasty. The recent trend towards Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) has increased surgical difficulty since the incision length and open access area are small. In this paper, the result of deformation analysis of the robot and an active compensation method of robot deformation, which is based on an error map, are proposed and evaluated.

  15. Self-assembly of robotic micro- and nanoswimmers using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanoscale robotic swimmers are very promising to significantly enhance the performance of particulate drug delivery by providing high accuracy at extremely small scales. Here, we introduce micro- and nanoswimmers fabricated using self-assembly of nanoparticles and control via magnetic fields. Nanoparticles self-align into parallel chains under magnetization. The swimmers exhibit flexibility under a rotating magnetic field resulting in chiral structures upon deformation, thereby having the prerequisite for non-reciprocal motion to move about at low Reynolds number. The swimmers are actuated wirelessly using an external rotating magnetic field supplied by approximate Helmholtz coils. By controlling the concentration of the suspended magnetic nanoparticles, the swimmers can be modulated into different sizes. Nanoscale swimmers are largely influenced by Brownian motion, as observed from their jerky trajectories. The microswimmers, which are roughly three times larger, are less vulnerable to the effects from Brownian motion. In this paper, we demonstrate responsive directional control of micro- and nanoswimmers and compare their respective diffusivities and trajectories to characterize the implications of Brownian disturbance on the motions of small and large swimmers. We then performed a simulation using a kinematic model for the magnetic swimmers including the stochastic nature of Brownian motion.

  16. Graph certificates, lookahead in dynamic graph problems, and assembly planning in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, S.; Motwani, R.; Wilson, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    Despite intensive efforts in the area of dynamic graph algorithms, no efficient algorithms are known for the dynamic versions of some basic graph problems such as strong connectivity and transitive closure. We provide some explanation for this lack of success by presenting quadratic lower bounds on the strong certificate complexity of such problems, thereby establishing the inapplicability of the only known general technique for designing dynamic graph algorithms, viz., sparsification. These results also provide evidence of the inherent intractability of such dynamic graph problems. Some of our results are based on a general technique for obtaining lower bounds on the strong certificate complexity for a class of graph properties by establishing a relationship with the witness complexity. In many real applications of dynamic graph problems, a certain amount of lookahead is available. Specifically, we consider the problems of assembly planning in robotics and the maintenance of relations in databases which, respectively, give rise to dynamic strong connectivity and transitive closure. We exploit the (naturally available) lookahead in these two applications to circumvent the inherent complexity of the dynamic graph problems. We propose a variant of sparsification, viz., lookahead based sparsification, and apply it to obtain the first efficient fully dynamic algorithms for strong connectivity and transitive closure.

  17. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  18. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  19. Peg-in-Hole Assembly Based on Two-phase Scheme and F/T Sensor for Dual-arm Robot

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianmin; Zheng, Yanglong; Ota, Jun; Huang, Yanjiang

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on peg-in-hole assembly based on a two-phase scheme and force/torque sensor (F/T sensor) for a compliant dual-arm robot, the Baxter robot. The coordinated operations of human beings in assembly applications are applied to the behaviors of the robot. A two-phase assembly scheme is proposed to overcome the inaccurate positioning of the compliant dual-arm robot. The position and orientation of assembly pieces are adjusted respectively in an active compliant manner according to the forces and torques derived by a six degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) F/T sensor. Experiments are conducted to verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed assembly scheme. The performances of the dual-arm robot are consistent with those of human beings in the peg-in-hole assembly process. The peg and hole with 0.5 mm clearance for round pieces and square pieces can be assembled successfully. PMID:28862691

  20. Peg-in-Hole Assembly Based on Two-phase Scheme and F/T Sensor for Dual-arm Robot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianmin; Zheng, Yanglong; Ota, Jun; Huang, Yanjiang

    2017-09-01

    This paper focuses on peg-in-hole assembly based on a two-phase scheme and force/torque sensor (F/T sensor) for a compliant dual-arm robot, the Baxter robot. The coordinated operations of human beings in assembly applications are applied to the behaviors of the robot. A two-phase assembly scheme is proposed to overcome the inaccurate positioning of the compliant dual-arm robot. The position and orientation of assembly pieces are adjusted respectively in an active compliant manner according to the forces and torques derived by a six degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) F/T sensor. Experiments are conducted to verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed assembly scheme. The performances of the dual-arm robot are consistent with those of human beings in the peg-in-hole assembly process. The peg and hole with 0.5 mm clearance for round pieces and square pieces can be assembled successfully.

  1. From Sci-Fi to Reality--Mobile Robots Get the Job Done

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2006-01-01

    Robots are simply computers that can interact with their environment. Some are fixed in place in industrial assembly plants for cars, appliances, micro electronic circuitry, and pharmaceuticals. Another important category of robots is the mobiles, machines that can be driven to the workplace, often designed for hazardous duty operation or…

  2. The Physics of Optical Position Sensors for Robotics and Numerical Control (N/C) Machine Tool Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    1996-03-01

    Mechanical position sensing is critical in many industrial applications, and is particularly important in automated machinery such as industrial robots and N/C machine tools. Automated machines usually require sensory feedback to control the position of end-of-arm tools and to sense changes in their environment, and mechanical position sensors based on optics often provide high spatial resolution together with large range. The design and development of optical position sensors, such as those based on interferometry, provides an excellent example of the application of physics knowledge and methodology to obtain elegant solutions to practical problems. These problems, and their solutions, can be delightfully subtle, especially when coupled with the need to control costs and allow for ease of mass production. Specific examples of problems in mechanical position sensing for automated machines will be presented, and various optical sensor solutions will be compared from an applied physics viewpoint, emphasizing especially the role of physics methodology in their design and development. The author gratefully acknowledges H. Akeel, A. Yee and M. McNeill of FANUC Berkeley Laboratory for their contributions and support

  3. Design of a Versatile, Teleoperable, Towable Lifting Machine with Robotic Capabilities for Use in Nasa's Lunar Base Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Elizabeth; Ogle, James; Schoppe, Dean

    1989-01-01

    The lifting machine will assist in lifting cargo off of landers sent to the Moon and in the construction of a lunar base. Three possible designs were considered for the overall configuration of the lifting machine: the variable angle crane, the tower crane, and the gantry crane. Alternate designs were developed for the major components of the lifting machine. A teleoperable, variable angle crane was chosen as its final design. The design consists of a telescoping boom mounted to a chassis that is supported by two conical wheels for towing and four outriggers for stability. Attached to the end of the boom is a seven degree of freedom robot arm for light, dexterous, lifting operations. A cable and hook suspends from the end of the boom for heavy, gross, lifting operations. Approximate structural sizes were determined for the lifter and its components. However, further analysis is needed to determine the optimum design dimensions. The design team also constructed a model of the design which demonstrates its features and operating principals.

  4. Tubulin-specific Chaperones: Components of a Molecular Machine that Assembles the α/β Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guoling; Cowan, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The tubulin heterodimer consists of one α- and one β-tubulin polypeptide. Neither protein can partition to the native state or assemble into polymerization competent heterodimers without the concerted action of a series of chaperone proteins including five tubulin-specific chaperones termed TBCA-TBCE. TBCA and TBCB bind to and stabilize newly synthesized quasi-native β- and α-tubulin polypeptides following their generation via multiple rounds of ATP-dependent interaction with the cytosolic chaperonin, CCT. There is free exchange β-tubulin between TBCA and TBCD, and of α-tubulin between TBCB and TBCE, resulting in the formation of TBCD/β and TBCE/α, respectively. The latter two complexes interact, forming a supercomplex (TBCD/α/TBCD/β). Discharge of the native α/β heterodimer occurs via interaction of the supercomplex with TBCC, which results in the triggering of TBC-bound β-tubulin-bound (E-site) GTP hydrolysis. This reaction acts as a switch for disassembly of the supercomplex and the release of GDP-bound heterodimer, which becomes polymerization competent following spontaneous E-site exchange with GTP. The tubulin-specific chaperones thus function together as a tubulin assembly machine, marrying the α- and β-tubulin subunits into a tightly associated heterodimer. The existence of this evolutionarily conserved pathway explains why it has never proved possible to isolate α- or β-tubulin as stable independent entities in the absence of their cognate partners, and implies that each exists and is maintained in the heterodimer in a non-minimal energy state. Here we describe methods for the purification of recombinant TBC’s as biologically active proteins following their expression in a variety of host/vector systems. PMID:23973072

  5. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  6. Space applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 4: Application of ARAMIS capabilities to space project functional elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities and their related ground support functions are studied, so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The specific tasks which will be required by future space project tasks are identified and the relative merits of these options are evaluated. The ARAMIS options defined and researched span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  7. Space applications of automation, robotics and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS). Volume 4. Application of ARAMIS capabilities to space project functional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Minsky, M.L.; Smith, D.B.S.

    1982-08-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities and their related ground support functions are studied, so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The specific tasks which will be required by future space project tasks are identified and the relative merits of these options are evaluated. The ARAMIS options defined and researched span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  8. A tunable support vector machine assembly classifier for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Durand, Dm

    2012-03-01

    Automating the detection of epileptic seizures could reduce the significant human resources necessary for the care of patients suffering from intractable epilepsy and offer improved solutions for closed-loop therapeutic devices such as implantable electrical stimulation systems. While numerous detection algorithms have been published, an effective detector in the clinical setting remains elusive. There are significant challenges facing seizure detection algorithms. The epilepsy EEG morphology can vary widely among the patient population. EEG recordings from the same patient can change over time. EEG recordings can be contaminated with artifacts that often resemble epileptic seizure activity. In order for an epileptic seizure detector to be successful, it must be able to adapt to these different challenges. In this study, a novel detector is proposed based on a support vector machine assembly classifier (SVMA). The SVMA consists of a group of SVMs each trained with a different set of weights between the seizure and non-seizure data and the user can selectively control the output of the SVMA classifier. The algorithm can improve the detection performance compared to traditional methods by providing an effective tuning strategy for specific patients. The proposed algorithm also demonstrates a clear advantage over threshold tuning. When compared with the detection performances reported by other studies using the publicly available epilepsy dataset hosted by the University of BONN, the proposed SVMA detector achieved the best total accuracy of 98.72%. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed SVMA detector and its potential in the clinical setting.

  9. A tunable support vector machine assembly classifier for epileptic seizure detection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Y; Durand, DM

    2011-01-01

    Automating the detection of epileptic seizures could reduce the significant human resources necessary for the care of patients suffering from intractable epilepsy and offer improved solutions for closed-loop therapeutic devices such as implantable electrical stimulation systems. While numerous detection algorithms have been published, an effective detector in the clinical setting remains elusive. There are significant challenges facing seizure detection algorithms. The epilepsy EEG morphology can vary widely among the patient population. EEG recordings from the same patient can change over time. EEG recordings can be contaminated with artifacts that often resemble epileptic seizure activity. In order for an epileptic seizure detector to be successful, it must be able to adapt to these different challenges. In this study, a novel detector is proposed based on a support vector machine assembly classifier (SVMA). The SVMA consists of a group of SVMs each trained with a different set of weights between the seizure and non-seizure data and the user can selectively control the output of the SVMA classifier. The algorithm can improve the detection performance compared to traditional methods by providing an effective tuning strategy for specific patients. The proposed algorithm also demonstrates a clear advantage over threshold tuning. When compared with the detection performances reported by other studies using the publicly available epilepsy dataset hosted by the University of BONN, the proposed SVMA detector achieved the best total accuracy of 98.72%. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed SVMA detector and its potential in the clinical setting. PMID:22563146

  10. Auto-adaptive robot-aided therapy using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Badesa, Francisco J; Morales, Ricardo; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolas; Sabater, J M; Casals, Alicia; Zollo, Loredana

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an application of a classification method to adaptively and dynamically modify the therapy and real-time displays of a virtual reality system in accordance with the specific state of each patient using his/her physiological reactions. First, a theoretical background about several machine learning techniques for classification is presented. Then, nine machine learning techniques are compared in order to select the best candidate in terms of accuracy. Finally, first experimental results are presented to show that the therapy can be modulated in function of the patient state using machine learning classification techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extending the Evolutionary Robotics approach to flying machines: an application to MAV teams.

    PubMed

    Ruini, Fabio; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    The work presented in this article focuses on the use of embodied neural networks--developed through Evolutionary Robotics and Multi-Agent Systems methodologies--as autonomous distributed controllers for Micro-unmanned Aerial Vehicle (MAV) teams. The main aim of the research is to extend the range of domains that could be successfully tackled by the Evolutionary Robotics approach. The flying robots realm is an area that has not been yet thoroughly investigated by this discipline. This is due to the lack of an affordable and reliable robotic platform to use for carrying out experiments, and to the difficulty and the high computational load involved in experiments based upon a realistic software simulator for aircraft. We believe that the most recent improvements to the state of the art now permit the investigation of this domain. For demonstrating this point, two different evolutionary computer simulation models are presented in this article. The first model, which uses a simplified 2D test environment, has resulted in controllers evolved with the following capabilities: (1) navigation through unknown environments, (2) obstacle-avoidance, (3) tracking of a movable target, and (4) execution of cooperative and coordinated behaviors based on implicit communication strategies. In order to improve the robustness of these results and their potential use in real MAV teams, a more sophisticated 3D model is presented herein. The results obtained so far using the two models demonstrate the feasibility of the chosen approach for further research on the design of autonomous controllers for MAVs.

  12. Ghost-in-the-Machine reveals human social signals for human–robot interaction

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Sebastian; Jettka, Katharina; Giuliani, Manuel; de Ruiter, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    We used a new method called “Ghost-in-the-Machine” (GiM) to investigate social interactions with a robotic bartender taking orders for drinks and serving them. Using the GiM paradigm allowed us to identify how human participants recognize the intentions of customers on the basis of the output of the robotic recognizers. Specifically, we measured which recognizer modalities (e.g., speech, the distance to the bar) were relevant at different stages of the interaction. This provided insights into human social behavior necessary for the development of socially competent robots. When initiating the drink-order interaction, the most important recognizers were those based on computer vision. When drink orders were being placed, however, the most important information source was the speech recognition. Interestingly, the participants used only a subset of the available information, focussing only on a few relevant recognizers while ignoring others. This reduced the risk of acting on erroneous sensor data and enabled them to complete service interactions more swiftly than a robot using all available sensor data. We also investigated socially appropriate response strategies. In their responses, the participants preferred to use the same modality as the customer’s requests, e.g., they tended to respond verbally to verbal requests. Also, they added redundancy to their responses, for instance by using echo questions. We argue that incorporating the social strategies discovered with the GiM paradigm in multimodal grammars of human–robot interactions improves the robustness and the ease-of-use of these interactions, and therefore provides a smoother user experience. PMID:26582998

  13. A novel EOG/EEG hybrid human-machine interface adopting eye movements and ERPs: application to robot control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiaxin; Zhang, Yu; Cichocki, Andrzej; Matsuno, Fumitoshi

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a novel human-machine interface (HMI) based on both electrooculography (EOG) and electroencephalography (EEG). This hybrid interface works in two modes: an EOG mode recognizes eye movements such as blinks, and an EEG mode detects event related potentials (ERPs) like P300. While both eye movements and ERPs have been separately used for implementing assistive interfaces, which help patients with motor disabilities in performing daily tasks, the proposed hybrid interface integrates them together. In this way, both the eye movements and ERPs complement each other. Therefore, it can provide a better efficiency and a wider scope of application. In this study, we design a threshold algorithm that can recognize four kinds of eye movements including blink, wink, gaze, and frown. In addition, an oddball paradigm with stimuli of inverted faces is used to evoke multiple ERP components including P300, N170, and VPP. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, two different online experiments are carried out. One is to control a multifunctional humanoid robot, and the other is to control four mobile robots. In both experiments, the subjects can complete tasks effectively by using the proposed interface, whereas the best completion time is relatively short and very close to the one operated by hand.

  14. Robotic Manufacturing of 18-ft (5.5m) Diameter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ronald E.; Carter, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket was the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles were constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7- axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This paper will focus on the friction stir welding of 18-ft (5.5m) diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome and two common bulkhead manufacturing development articles.

  15. ISS-based Development of Elements and Operations for Robotic Assembly of A Space Solar Power Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valinia, Azita; Moe, Rud; Seery, Bernard D.; Mankins, John C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a concept for an ISS-based optical system assembly demonstration designed to advance technologies related to future large in-space optical facilities deployment, including space solar power collectors and large-aperture astronomy telescopes. The large solar power collector problem is not unlike the large astronomical telescope problem, but at least conceptually it should be easier in principle, given the tolerances involved. We strive in this application to leverage heavily the work done on the NASA Optical Testbed Integration on ISS Experiment (OpTIIX) effort to erect a 1.5 m imaging telescope on the International Space Station (ISS). Specifically, we examine a robotic assembly sequence for constructing a large (meter diameter) slightly aspheric or spherical primary reflector, comprised of hexagonal mirror segments affixed to a lightweight rigidizing backplane structure. This approach, together with a structured robot assembler, will be shown to be scalable to the area and areal densities required for large-scale solar concentrator arrays.

  16. Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

    2010-04-06

    An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

  17. A demonstration of autonomous navigation and machine vision using the HERMIES-IIB robot

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Barnett, D.L.; Jones, J.P.; Killough, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, advances to our mobile robot series (currently HERMIES-IIB) to include 8 NCUBE processors on-board, (computationally equivalent to 8 Vax 11/780's) operating in parallel, and augmentation of the sensor suite with cameras to facilitate on-board vision analysis and goal finding are described. The essential capabilities of the expert system described in earlier papers have been ported to the on-board HERMIES-IIB computers thereby eliminating off-board computation. A successful experiment is described in which a robot is placed in an initial arbitrary location without prior specification of the room contents, successfully discovers and navigates around stationary and moving obstacles, picks up and moves small obstacles, searches for a control panel, and reads the meters found on the panel. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Robust human machine interface based on head movements applied to assistive robotics.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elisa; López, Natalia; Orosco, Eugenio; Soria, Carlos; Mut, Vicente; Freire-Bastos, Teodiano

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an interface that uses two different sensing techniques and combines both results through a fusion process to obtain the minimum-variance estimator of the orientation of the user's head. Sensing techniques of the interface are based on an inertial sensor and artificial vision. The orientation of the user's head is used to steer the navigation of a robotic wheelchair. Also, a control algorithm for assistive technology system is presented. The system is evaluated by four individuals with severe motors disability and a quantitative index was developed, in order to objectively evaluate the performance. The results obtained are promising since most users could perform the proposed tasks with the robotic wheelchair.

  19. Robust Human Machine Interface Based on Head Movements Applied to Assistive Robotics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elisa; López, Natalia; Orosco, Eugenio; Soria, Carlos; Mut, Vicente; Freire-Bastos, Teodiano

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an interface that uses two different sensing techniques and combines both results through a fusion process to obtain the minimum-variance estimator of the orientation of the user's head. Sensing techniques of the interface are based on an inertial sensor and artificial vision. The orientation of the user's head is used to steer the navigation of a robotic wheelchair. Also, a control algorithm for assistive technology system is presented. The system is evaluated by four individuals with severe motors disability and a quantitative index was developed, in order to objectively evaluate the performance. The results obtained are promising since most users could perform the proposed tasks with the robotic wheelchair. PMID:24453877

  20. Manned Mars Mission on-orbit operations metric development. [astronaut and robot performance in spacecraft orbital assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorin, Barney F.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the effort made to develop a scoring system, or metric, for comparing astronaut Extra Vehicular Activity with various robotic options for the on-orbit assembly of a very large spacecraft, such as would be needed for a Manned Mars Mission. All trade studies comparing competing approaches to a specific task involve the use of some consistent and unbiased method for assigning a score, or rating factor, to each concept under consideration. The relative scores generated by the selected rating system provide the tool for deciding which of the approaches is the most desirable.

  1. Surgical robotics beyond enhanced dexterity instrumentation: a survey of machine learning techniques and their role in intelligent and autonomous surgical actions.

    PubMed

    Kassahun, Yohannes; Yu, Bingbin; Tibebu, Abraham Temesgen; Stoyanov, Danail; Giannarou, Stamatia; Metzen, Jan Hendrik; Vander Poorten, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Advances in technology and computing play an increasingly important role in the evolution of modern surgical techniques and paradigms. This article reviews the current role of machine learning (ML) techniques in the context of surgery with a focus on surgical robotics (SR). Also, we provide a perspective on the future possibilities for enhancing the effectiveness of procedures by integrating ML in the operating room. The review is focused on ML techniques directly applied to surgery, surgical robotics, surgical training and assessment. The widespread use of ML methods in diagnosis and medical image computing is beyond the scope of the review. Searches were performed on PubMed and IEEE Explore using combinations of keywords: ML, surgery, robotics, surgical and medical robotics, skill learning, skill analysis and learning to perceive. Studies making use of ML methods in the context of surgery are increasingly being reported. In particular, there is an increasing interest in using ML for developing tools to understand and model surgical skill and competence or to extract surgical workflow. Many researchers begin to integrate this understanding into the control of recent surgical robots and devices. ML is an expanding field. It is popular as it allows efficient processing of vast amounts of data for interpreting and real-time decision making. Already widely used in imaging and diagnosis, it is believed that ML will also play an important role in surgery and interventional treatments. In particular, ML could become a game changer into the conception of cognitive surgical robots. Such robots endowed with cognitive skills would assist the surgical team also on a cognitive level, such as possibly lowering the mental load of the team. For example, ML could help extracting surgical skill, learned through demonstration by human experts, and could transfer this to robotic skills. Such intelligent surgical assistance would significantly surpass the state of the art in surgical

  2. Factors influencing design and selection of GTAW robotic welding machines for the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanigan, L.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed hardware and software for microprocessor-controlled power supplies and welding machines are described. The application of the automatic seven-axis welding machine, which is to be preprogrammed to allow minimum intervention by the welding operator during the actual process, to the welding of the Space Shuttle main engine is discussed. The production requirements for the gas tungsten arc welds for the Space Shuttle main engine are examined. Consideration is given to positioner design, welding variables, inert shielding gas management, filler metal wire control, the up loading and down loading of data from off-line computers, process improvements, tooling, the welding variable library, and adaptive sensor control.

  3. Factors influencing design and selection of GTAW robotic welding machines for the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanigan, L.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed hardware and software for microprocessor-controlled power supplies and welding machines are described. The application of the automatic seven-axis welding machine, which is to be preprogrammed to allow minimum intervention by the welding operator during the actual process, to the welding of the Space Shuttle main engine is discussed. The production requirements for the gas tungsten arc welds for the Space Shuttle main engine are examined. Consideration is given to positioner design, welding variables, inert shielding gas management, filler metal wire control, the up loading and down loading of data from off-line computers, process improvements, tooling, the welding variable library, and adaptive sensor control.

  4. End-effector: Joint conjugates for robotic assembly of large truss structures in space: Extended concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, W. V.; Rasis, E. P.; Shih, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    Results from NASA/HBCU Grant No. NAG-1-1125 are summarized. Designs developed for model fabrication, exploratory concepts drafted, interface of computer with robot and end-effector, and capability enhancement are discussed.

  5. An earthworm-like robot using origami-ball structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Zhang, Yetong; Wang, K. W.

    2017-04-01

    Earthworms possess extraordinary on-ground and underground mobility, which inspired researchers to mimic their morphology characteristics and locomotion mechanisms to develop crawling robots. One of the bottlenecks that constrain the development and wide-spread application of earthworm-like robots is the process of design, fabrication and assembly of the robot frameworks. Here we present a new earthworm-like robot design and prototype by exploring and utilizing origami ball structures. The origami ball is able to antagonistically output both axial and radial deformations, similar as an earthworm's body segment. The origami folding techniques also introduce many advantages to the robot development, including precise and low cost fabrication and high customizability. Starting from a flat polymer film, we adopt laser machining technique to engrave the crease pattern and manually fold the patterned flat film into an origami ball. Coupling the ball with a servomotor-driven linkage yields a robot segment. Connecting six segments in series, we obtain an earthworm-like origami robot prototype. The prototype is tested in a tube to evaluate its locomotion performance. It shows that the robot could crawl effectively in the tube, manifesting the feasibility of the origami-based design. In addition, test results indicate that the robot's locomotion could be tailored by employing different peristalsis-wave based gaits. The robot design and prototype reported in this paper could foster a new breed of crawling robots with simply design, fabrication, and assemble processes, and improved locomotion performance.

  6. Robot- and computer-assisted craniotomy (CRANIO): from active systems to synergistic man-machine interaction.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Cruz, V; Follmann, A; Popovic, A; Bast, P; Wu, T; Heger, S; Engelhardt, M; Schmieder, K; Radermacher, K

    2010-01-01

    Computer and robot assistance in craniotomy/craniectomy procedures is intended to increase precision and efficiency of the removal of calvarial tumours, enabling the preoperative design and manufacturing of the corresponding implant. In the framework of the CRANIO project, an active robotic system was developed to automate the milling processes based on a predefined resection planning. This approach allows for a very efficient milling process, but lacks feedback of the intra-operative process to the surgeon. To better integrate the surgeon into the process, a new teleoperated synergistic architecture was designed. This enables the surgeon to realize changes during the procedure and use their human cognitive capabilities. The preoperative planning information is used as guidance for the user interacting with the system through a master-slave architecture. In this article, the CRANIO system is presented together with this new synergistic approach. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the accuracy of the system in active and synergistic modes for the bone milling procedure. The laboratory studies showed the general feasibility of the new concept for the selected medical procedure and determined the accuracy of the system. Although the integration of the surgeon partially reduces the efficiency of the milling process compared with a purely active (automatic) milling, it provides more feedback and flexibility to the user during the intra-operative procedure.

  7. ATTRACT-EM: A New Method for the Computational Assembly of Large Molecular Machines Using Cryo-EM Maps

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Many of the most important functions in the cell are carried out by proteins organized in large molecular machines. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is increasingly being used to obtain low resolution density maps of these large assemblies. A new method, ATTRACT-EM, for the computational assembly of molecular assemblies from their components has been developed. Based on concepts from the protein-protein docking field, it utilizes cryo-EM density maps to assemble molecular subunits at near atomic detail, starting from millions of initial subunit configurations. The search efficiency was further enhanced by recombining partial solutions, the inclusion of symmetry information, and refinement using a molecular force field. The approach was tested on the GroES-GroEL system, using an experimental cryo-EM map at 23.5 Å resolution, and on several smaller complexes. Inclusion of experimental information on the symmetry of the systems and the application of a new gradient vector matching algorithm allowed the efficient identification of docked assemblies in close agreement with experiment. Application to the GroES-GroEL complex resulted in a top ranked model with a deviation of 4.6 Å (and a 2.8 Å model within the top 10) from the GroES-GroEL crystal structure, a significant improvement over existing methods. PMID:23251350

  8. Characterization of the β-barrel assembly machine accessory lipoproteins from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Joshua P; Kenedy, Melisha R; Iqbal, Henna; Akins, Darrin R

    2015-03-24

    Like all diderm bacteria studied to date, Borrelia burgdorferi possesses a β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex. The bacterial BAM complexes characterized thus far consist of an essential integral outer membrane protein designated BamA and one or more accessory proteins. The accessory proteins are typically lipid-modified proteins anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane through their lipid moieties. We previously identified and characterized the B. burgdorferi BamA protein in detail and more recently identified two lipoproteins encoded by open reading frames bb0324 and bb0028 that associate with the borrelial BamA protein. The role(s) of the BAM accessory lipoproteins in B. burgdorferi is currently unknown. Structural modeling of B. burgdorferi BB0028 revealed a distinct β-propeller fold similar to the known structure for the E. coli BAM accessory lipoprotein BamB. Additionally, the structural model for BB0324 was highly similar to the known structure of BamD, which is consistent with the prior finding that BB0324 contains tetratricopeptide repeat regions similar to other BamD orthologs. Consistent with BB0028 and BB0324 being BAM accessory lipoproteins, mutants lacking expression of each protein were found to exhibit altered membrane permeability and enhanced sensitivity to various antimicrobials. Additionally, BB0028 mutants also exhibited significantly impaired in vitro growth. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that BB0028 and BB0324 each interact specifically and independently with BamA to form the BAM complex in B. burgdorferi. Combined structural studies, functional assays, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that BB0028 and BB0324 are the respective BamB and BamD orthologs in B. burgdorferi, and are important in membrane integrity and/or outer membrane protein localization. The borrelial BamB and BamD proteins both interact specifically and independently with BamA to form a tripartite BAM complex in B

  9. Machine vision for real time orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinz, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision for automation and robotic operation of Space Station era systems has the potential for increasing the efficiency of orbital servicing, repair, assembly and docking tasks. A machine vision research project is described in which a TV camera is used for inputing visual data to a computer so that image processing may be achieved for real time control of these orbital operations. A technique has resulted from this research which reduces computer memory requirements and greatly increases typical computational speed such that it has the potential for development into a real time orbital machine vision system. This technique is called AI BOSS (Analysis of Images by Box Scan and Syntax).

  10. Machine vision for real time orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinz, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision for automation and robotic operation of Space Station era systems has the potential for increasing the efficiency of orbital servicing, repair, assembly and docking tasks. A machine vision research project is described in which a TV camera is used for inputing visual data to a computer so that image processing may be achieved for real time control of these orbital operations. A technique has resulted from this research which reduces computer memory requirements and greatly increases typical computational speed such that it has the potential for development into a real time orbital machine vision system. This technique is called AI BOSS (Analysis of Images by Box Scan and Syntax).

  11. Human-Robot Teaming in a Multi-Agent Space Assembly Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik; Currie, Nancy; Ambrose, Robert O.; Culbert, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by pairs of suited human astronauts. These Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) are severely restricted in both duration and scope by consumables and available manpower. An expanded multi-agent EVA team combining the information-gathering and problem-solving skills of humans with the survivability and physical capabilities of robots is proposed and illustrated by example. Such teams are useful for large-scale, complex missions requiring dispersed manipulation, locomotion and sensing capabilities. To study collaboration modalities within a multi-agent EVA team, a 1-g test is conducted with humans and robots working together in various supporting roles.

  12. Computer coordination of limb motion for locomotion of a multiple-armed robot for space assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, C. A.; Patterson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration is given to a possible robotic system for the construction of large space structures, which may be described as a multiple general purpose arm manipulator vehicle that can walk over the structure under construction to a given site for further work. A description is presented of the locomotion of such a vehicle, modeling its arms in terms of a currently available industrial manipulator. It is noted that for whatever maximum speed of operation is chosen, rapid changes in robot velocity create situations in which already-selected handholds are no longer practical. A step is added to the 'free gait' walking algorithm in order to solve this problem.

  13. Dynamic error compensation in robotic trusses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronkay, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A robotic truss is an active structure comprised of links which inherently can be loaded only in tension or compression. Unlike passive truss structures, a robotic truss can execute large motions by adjusting the lengths of its links through the use of actuators. The importance of the truss structure for robotics has been neither fully recognized nor fully exploited in prior work. This property and its consequences for design are the focus of this thesis. Robotic trusses are shown to have advantages in metrology, modularity, stiffness-to-weight ratio, natural frequencies, modeling, and simplicity. The robotic truss's qualities make dual coarse/fine actuation interesting for some applications, such as machining. In dual actuation, each leg of the robotic truss has two actuators, one for large, relatively slow motions and one for small, high speed motions. A dynamic model for a simple robotic truss with dual actuation and control strategies for it, including the possibility for distributed control, are developed. The model is used to show that a dual actuated robotic truss can achieve a dynamic stiffness of over 200 N/micron (1.14 x 10(exp 6) lb/in.) which is sufficient for precision machining. The modeling, design, construction, and performance of an experimental differential solenoid fine actuator are examined. While this work uses machining as a focus, the robotic truss may find innumerable other applications. It is especially appropriate for cases in which high precision is needed. Electronics assembly, in particular, could benefit from the robotic truss's combination of metrological advantages and high natural frequencies.

  14. Using machine learning to blend human and robot controls for assisted wheelchair navigation.

    PubMed

    Goil, Aditya; Derry, Matthew; Argall, Brenna D

    2013-06-01

    This work presents an algorithm for collaborative control of an assistive semi-autonomous wheelchair. Our approach is based on a statistical machine learning technique to learn task variability from demonstration examples. The algorithm has been developed in the context of shared-control powered wheelchairs that provide assistance to individuals with impairments that affect their control in challenging driving scenarios, like doorway navigation. We validate our algorithm within a simulation environment, and find that with relatively few demonstrations, our approach allows for safe traversal of the doorway while maintaining a high level of user control.

  15. Analytical method for coupled transmission error of helical gear system with machining errors, assembly errors and tooth modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tengjiao; He, Zeyin

    2017-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the transmission error of helical gear system with errors. First a finite element method is used for modeling gear transmission system with machining errors, assembly errors, modifications and the static transmission error is obtained. Then the bending-torsional-axial coupling dynamic model of the transmission system based on the lumped mass method is established and the dynamic transmission error of gear transmission system is calculated, which provides error excitation data for the analysis and control of vibration and noise of gear system.

  16. Modified differential evolution algorithm for simple assembly line balancing with a limit on the number of machine types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitakaso, Rapeepan; Sethanan, Kanchana

    2016-02-01

    This article proposes the differential evolution algorithm (DE) and the modified differential evolution algorithm (DE-C) to solve a simple assembly line balancing problem type 1 (SALBP-1) and SALBP-1 when the maximum number of machine types in a workstation is considered (SALBP-1M). The proposed algorithms are tested and compared with existing effective heuristics using various sets of test instances found in the literature. The computational results show that the proposed heuristics is one of the best methods, compared with the other approaches.

  17. Formation control of multi-robots for on-orbit assembly of large solar sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Quan; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Jingrui; Hu, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the formation control of four robots used for the on-orbit construction of a large solar sail. The solar sail under consideration is non-spinning and has a 1 km2 area. It includes a hub as the central body and four large booms supporting the lightweight films. Four formation operating space robots capable of walking on the boom structure are utilized to deploy the sail films. Because of the large size and mass of the sail, the robots should remain in formation during the sail deployment to avoid dramatic changes in the system properties. In this paper, the formation control issue of the four robots is solved by an adaptive sliding mode controller. A disturbance observer with finite-time convergence is embedded to improve the control performance. The proposed controller is capable of resisting the strong uncertainties in the operation and do not require the accurate parameters of the system. The stability is proven, and numerical simulations are provided to validate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  18. Assembly, Tuning, and Transfer of Action Systems in Infants and Robots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthouze, Luc; Goldfield, Eugene C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to foster a discussion on whether experiments with robots can inform theory in infant motor development and specifically (1) how the interactions among the parts of a system, including the nervous and musculoskeletal systems and the forces acting on the body, induce organizational changes in the whole, and (2) how exploratory…

  19. Assembly, Tuning, and Transfer of Action Systems in Infants and Robots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthouze, Luc; Goldfield, Eugene C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to foster a discussion on whether experiments with robots can inform theory in infant motor development and specifically (1) how the interactions among the parts of a system, including the nervous and musculoskeletal systems and the forces acting on the body, induce organizational changes in the whole, and (2) how exploratory…

  20. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's upper atmosphere is an extreme environment: dry, cold, and irradiated. It is unknown whether our aerobiosphere is limited to the transport of life, or there exist organisms that grow and reproduce while airborne (aerophiles); the microenvironments of suspended particles may harbor life at otherwise uninhabited altitudes[2]. The existence of aerophiles would significantly expand the range of planets considered candidates for life by, for example, including the cooler clouds of a hot Venus-like planet. The X project is an effort to engineer a robotic exploration and biosampling payload for a comprehensive survey of Earth's aerobiology. While many one-shot samples have been retrieved from above 15 km, their results are primarily qualitative; variations in method confound comparisons, leaving such major gaps in our knowledge of aerobiology as quantification of populations at different strata and relative species counts[1]. These challenges and X's preliminary solutions are explicated below. X's primary balloon payload is undergoing a series of calibrations before beginning flights in Spring 2012. A suborbital launch is currently planned for Summer 2012. A series of ground samples taken in Winter 2011 is being used to establish baseline counts and identify likely background contaminants.

  1. Space applications of Automation, Robotics And Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 3, phase 2: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Minsky, M. L.; Thiel, E. D.; Kurtzman, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The field of telepresence is defined, and overviews of those capabilities that are now available, and those that will be required to support a NASA telepresence effort are provided. Investigation of NASA's plans and goals with regard to telepresence, extensive literature search for materials relating to relevant technologies, a description of these technologies and their state of the art, and projections for advances in these technologies are included. Several space projects are examined in detail to determine what capabilities are required of a telepresence system in order to accomplish various tasks, such as servicing and assembly. The key operational and technological areas are identified, conclusions and recommendations are made for further research, and an example developmental program leading to an operational telepresence servicer is presented.

  2. The mRNA assembly line: transcription and processing machines in the same factory.

    PubMed

    Bentley, David

    2002-06-01

    Processing of RNA precursors to their mature form often occurs co-transcriptionally. Consequently, the ternary complex of DNA template, RNA polymerase and nascent RNA chain is the physiological substrate for factors that modify the nascent RNA by capping, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation. mRNA production is thought to occur within a "factory" that contains the RNA polymerase II transcription machine and the processing machines. Newly discovered protein-protein contacts between RNA polymerase and factors that process mRNA precursors are beginning to illuminate how the "mRNA factory" works.

  3. Intelligent robots and computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on artificial intelligence and robot vision. Topics considered at the conference included pattern recognition, image processing for intelligent robotics, three-dimensional vision (depth and motion), vision modeling and shape estimation, spatial reasoning, the symbolic processing visual information, robotic sensors and applications, intelligent control architectures for robot systems, robot languages and programming, human-machine interfaces, robotics applications, and architectures of robotics.

  4. A Study of Cooperative Control of Self-Assembling Robots in Space with Experimental Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    linear quadratic regulator ( LQR ) methods, is presented. This approach uses optimal control methods to coordinate the control of the modules after...Cooperative Control Algorithm Since the system is time-varying linear, a linear quadratic regulator ( LQR ) optimal controller is used to minimize errors...repaired and refueled. However, when individual modules assemble, many challenges and opportunities make the control of the assembled system complex

  5. Epithelial machines of morphogenesis and their potential application in organ assembly and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sagar D.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2013-01-01

    Sheets of embryonic epithelial cells coordinate their efforts to create diverse tissue structures such as pits, grooves, tubes, and capsules that lead to organ formation. Such cells can use a number of cell behaviors including contractility, proliferation, and directed movement to create these structures. By contrast, tissue engineers and researchers in regenerative medicine seeking to produce organs for repair or replacement therapy can combine cells with synthetic polymeric scaffolds. Tissue engineers try to achieve these goals by shaping scaffold geometry in such a way that cells embedded within these scaffold self-assemble to form a tissue, for instance aligning to synthetic fibers, and assembling native extracellular matrix to form the desired tissue-like structure. Although self-assembly is a dominant process that guides tissue assembly both within the embryo and within artificial tissue constructs we know little about these critical processes. Here, we compare and contrast strategies of tissue assembly used by embryos to those used by engineers during epithelial morphogenesis and highlight opportunities for future applications of developmental biology in the field of tissue engineering. PMID:22854913

  6. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  7. Studies in knowledge-based diagnosis of failures in robotic assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Raymond K.; Pollard, Nancy S.; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1990-01-01

    The telerobot diagnostic system (TDS) is a knowledge-based system that is being developed for identification and diagnosis of failures in the space robotic domain. The system is able to isolate the symptoms of the failure, generate failure hypotheses based on these symptoms, and test their validity at various levels by interpreting or simulating the effects of the hypotheses on results of plan execution. The implementation of the TDS is outlined. The classification of failures and the types of system models used by the TDS are discussed. A detailed example of the TDS approach to failure diagnosis is provided.

  8. Machine for removing in-core instrument assemblies from a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Klumb, R.H.; Margotta, K.V.; Shendy, D.S.

    1982-02-02

    A machine for smoothly and controllably winding or unwinding a stiff in-core-instrument tube onto and off of a reel during ythe refueling of a nuclear reactor. The machine includes a frame and a circular reel having a substantially continuous helical groove extending around the circumference of the reel. The groove is adapted to receive the tube. A plurality of cam rollers are carried by the frame and closely spaced around the circumference of the reel. The rollers keep the tube in the groove whereby the tube may be more easily wound onto or off of the reel. In the preferred embodiment, the reel carries a disposable cartridge in which the grooves are formed.

  9. NeuroRex: A Clinical Neural Interface Roadmap for EEG-based Brain Machine Interfaces to a Lower Body Robotic Exoskeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.; Grossman, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a translational clinical brain-machine interface (BMI) roadmap for an EEG-based BMI to a robotic exoskeleton (NeuroRex) is presented. This multi-faceted project addresses important engineering and clinical challenges: It addresses the validation of an intelligent, self-balancing, robotic lower-body and trunk exoskeleton (Rex) augmented with EEG-based BMI capabilities to interpret user intent to assist a mobility-impaired person to walk independently. The goal is to improve the quality of life and health status of wheelchair-bounded persons by enabling standing and sitting, walking and backing, turning, ascending and descending stairs/curbs, and navigating sloping surfaces in a variety of conditions without the need for additional support or crutches. PMID:24110003

  10. Combining a hybrid robotic system with a bain-machine interface for the rehabilitation of reaching movements: A case study with a stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Resquin, F; Ibañez, J; Gonzalez-Vargas, J; Brunetti, F; Dimbwadyo, I; Alves, S; Carrasco, L; Torres, L; Pons, Jose Luis

    2016-08-01

    Reaching and grasping are two of the most affected functions after stroke. Hybrid rehabilitation systems combining Functional Electrical Stimulation with Robotic devices have been proposed in the literature to improve rehabilitation outcomes. In this work, we present the combined use of a hybrid robotic system with an EEG-based Brain-Machine Interface to detect the user's movement intentions to trigger the assistance. The platform has been tested in a single session with a stroke patient. The results show how the patient could successfully interact with the BMI and command the assistance of the hybrid system with low latencies. Also, the Feedback Error Learning controller implemented in this system could adjust the required FES intensity to perform the task.

  11. The Impacts of Industrial Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    being installed in many medium batch size manufacturing plants, servicing two or three computer numerically controlled ( CNC ) machines . There will be a... Machine Tool Utilization in the Metalworking 22 Industries,19?7 Table 7: Motivations for Using Robots 26 Table 8: Prime Operative Tasks for Level I...ROBOTICS 1 What Are Industrial Robots? Industrial robots are machine tools. They are not human-like androids which can stroll around and converse

  12. Rapid assembly and use of robotic systems: Saving time and money in new applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.

    1995-10-01

    High costs and low productivity of manual operations in radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous environments have mandated the use of remote means to accomplish many tasks. However, traditional remote operations have proven to have very low productivity when compared with unencumbered humans. To improve the performance of these systems, computer models augmented by sensors, and modular computing environments are being utilized to automate many unstructured hazardous tasks. Establishment of a common structure for developments of modules such as the Generic Intelligent System Controller (GISC), have allowed many independent groups to develop specialized components that can be rapidly integrated into purpose-built robotic systems. The drawback in using this systems is that the equipment investments for such robotic systems can be substantial. In a resource-competitive environment, the ability to readily and reliably reconfigure and reuse assets operated by other industries, universities, research labs, government entities, etc., is proving to be a crucial advantage. Timely and efficient collaboration between entities has become increasingly important as monetary resources of government programs and entire industries expand or contract in response to rapid changes in production demand, dissolution of political barriers, and adoption of stringent environmental and commercial legislation. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the System Composer, Virtual Collaborative Environment (VCE) and A{sup primed} technologies described in this paper that demonstrate an environment for flexible and efficient integration, interaction, and information exchange between disparate entities.

  13. Application of artificial intelligence to robotic vision

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, P.S.; Frick, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    A brief introduction to artificial intelligence (AI) and the general vision process is provided. Two samples of AI researchers' work toward general computer vision are given. The first is a model-based vision system while the second is based on results of studies on human vision. The current state of machine vision in industrial robotics is demonstrated using a well known vision algorithm developed at SRI International. A part of a prototype robotic assembly project with vision is sketched to show the application of some AI tools to practical work. 8 references.

  14. DOE/NE robotics for advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bimonthly progress report for February through March, 1991, for the US Department of Energy Robotics for Advanced Reactors program contains information on research efforts in the following areas at the noted facilities: modeling of the Fuel Cycle Facility of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program (University of Florida), assembly of infrared range sensors (University of Michigan), demonstration of the autonomous surveillance of a waste storage container for radioactive surface contamination (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), development of a simulation and animation environment for sensor-based robots (University of Tennessee), and machining and installation of the actuator test stand and associated fixtures and adapters (University of Texas). (MHB)

  15. Viruses: sophisticated biological machines.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection involves coordination of a series of molecular machines, including entry machines, replication machines, assembly machines, and genome packaging machines, leading to the production of infectious virions. This chapter provides an introduction to various viral molecular machines described in this book.

  16. Brain state-dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Brauchle, Daniel; Vukelić, Mathias; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input. We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reaching movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery (MI)-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function. Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns—but different aptitudes—of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e., when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject’s arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task. Brain-robot interfaces (BRIs) may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants’ efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration, a proposal that

  17. Brain state-dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Brauchle, Daniel; Vukelić, Mathias; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input. We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reaching movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery (MI)-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function. Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns-but different aptitudes-of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e., when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject's arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task. Brain-robot interfaces (BRIs) may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants' efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration, a proposal that warrants

  18. A New Space Robot End-Effector for On-Orbit Reflector Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    Space antennas with hexagonal reflectors are planed for ETS-VIII and for VSOP -2. These antennas will be deployed in orbit, but could be a good prototype...Hirabayashi, P.G. Edwards and D.W.Murphy, Proceedings of the VSOP Symposium(2000) [3] S.Nishida, R.Okamura: "Onboard Assembling of Large Space Telescope by

  19. Applied machine vision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on robot vision. Topics considered at the conference included the link between fixed and flexible automation, general applications of machine vision, the development of a specification for a machine vision system, machine vision technology, machine vision non-contact gaging, and vision in electronics manufacturing.

  20. Non-equilibrium assembly of microtubules: from molecules to autonomous chemical robots.

    PubMed

    Hess, H; Ross, Jennifer L

    2017-03-22

    Biological systems have evolved to harness non-equilibrium processes from the molecular to the macro scale. It is currently a grand challenge of chemistry, materials science, and engineering to understand and mimic biological systems that have the ability to autonomously sense stimuli, process these inputs, and respond by performing mechanical work. New chemical systems are responding to the challenge and form the basis for future responsive, adaptive, and active materials. In this article, we describe a particular biochemical-biomechanical network based on the microtubule cytoskeletal filament - itself a non-equilibrium chemical system. We trace the non-equilibrium aspects of the system from molecules to networks and describe how the cell uses this system to perform active work in essential processes. Finally, we discuss how microtubule-based engineered systems can serve as testbeds for autonomous chemical robots composed of biological and synthetic components.

  1. A Robotic Pinch-Off System for the Sealing of Neutron Tube Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Ney, R.J.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    The process of manufacturing the MC4277 Neutron Tube requires the evacuation of the device through a 4.76 mm (.1875 in.) OD copper tube. Eight tubes are simultaneously evacuated and then baked out. When the process is completed, the tubes must be separated from the system without compromising the ultra-high vacuum in the tube and the system. Previously, a manual pinch-off tool was used. This procedure required up to 3 operators with a high probability of creating defective seals or destroyed tubes. Two new identical robotic systems were built to allow a single operator to consistently produce good tubes with perfect seals. These systems have the added capability of partially pinching off tubes at jaw displacements repeatable to *0.05 mm (kO.002 in.). Both systems have operated flawlessly since their installation in January and March, 1998. A detailed description of these systems is given in this report.

  2. Lower Robotic Arm Assembly Having a Plurality of Tendon Driven Digits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Raymond (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A lower robotic arm includes a base structure, a plurality of digits, and a plurality of tendons. The digits each include first, second, third, and fourth phalanges. Each digit is operatively attached to the base structure at the respective first phalange. A first joint operatively connects the first and second phalange to define a first axis, a second operatively connects the second and third phalange to define a second axis, and a third joint operatively connects the third and fourth phalange to define a third axis, such that the phalanges are selectively rotatable relative to the adjacent phalange, about the respective axis. The tendons are operatively connected to a respective one of the fourth phalanges. Each tendon selectively applies a first torque to the respective fourth phalange to urge the respective phalanges to rotate in a first direction about the respective axes.

  3. Rigid-cluster models of conformational transitions in macromolecular machines and assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon K; Jernigan, Robert L; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2005-07-01

    We present a rigid-body-based technique (called rigid-cluster elastic network interpolation) to generate feasible transition pathways between two distinct conformations of a macromolecular assembly. Many biological molecules and assemblies consist of domains which act more or less as rigid bodies during large conformational changes. These collective motions are thought to be strongly related with the functions of a system. This fact encourages us to simply model a macromolecule or assembly as a set of rigid bodies which are interconnected with distance constraints. In previous articles, we developed coarse-grained elastic network interpolation (ENI) in which, for example, only Calpha atoms are selected as representatives in each residue of a protein. We interpolate distance differences of two conformations in ENI by using a simple quadratic cost function, and the feasible conformations are generated without steric conflicts. Rigid-cluster interpolation is an extension of the ENI method with rigid-clusters replacing point masses. Now the intermediate conformations in an anharmonic pathway can be determined by the translational and rotational displacements of large clusters in such a way that distance constraints are observed. We present the derivation of the rigid-cluster model and apply it to a variety of macromolecular assemblies. Rigid-cluster ENI is then modified for a hybrid model represented by a mixture of rigid clusters and point masses. Simulation results show that both rigid-cluster and hybrid ENI methods generate sterically feasible pathways of large systems in a very short time. For example, the HK97 virus capsid is an icosahedral symmetric assembly composed of 60 identical asymmetric units. Its original Hessian matrix size for a Calpha coarse-grained model is >(300,000)(2). However, it reduces to (84)(2) when we apply the rigid-cluster model with icosahedral symmetry constraints. The computational cost of the interpolation no longer scales heavily with

  4. You Look Human, But Act Like a Machine: Agent Appearance and Behavior Modulate Different Aspects of Human-Robot Interaction.

    PubMed

    Abubshait, Abdulaziz; Wiese, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Gaze following occurs automatically in social interactions, but the degree to which gaze is followed depends on whether an agent is perceived to have a mind, making its behavior socially more relevant for the interaction. Mind perception also modulates the attitudes we have toward others, and determines the degree of empathy, prosociality, and morality invested in social interactions. Seeing mind in others is not exclusive to human agents, but mind can also be ascribed to non-human agents like robots, as long as their appearance and/or behavior allows them to be perceived as intentional beings. Previous studies have shown that human appearance and reliable behavior induce mind perception to robot agents, and positively affect attitudes and performance in human-robot interaction. What has not been investigated so far is whether different triggers of mind perception have an independent or interactive effect on attitudes and performance in human-robot interaction. We examine this question by manipulating agent appearance (human vs. robot) and behavior (reliable vs. random) within the same paradigm and examine how congruent (human/reliable vs. robot/random) versus incongruent (human/random vs. robot/reliable) combinations of these triggers affect performance (i.e., gaze following) and attitudes (i.e., agent ratings) in human-robot interaction. The results show that both appearance and behavior affect human-robot interaction but that the two triggers seem to operate in isolation, with appearance more strongly impacting attitudes, and behavior more strongly affecting performance. The implications of these findings for human-robot interaction are discussed.

  5. You Look Human, But Act Like a Machine: Agent Appearance and Behavior Modulate Different Aspects of Human–Robot Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Abubshait, Abdulaziz; Wiese, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Gaze following occurs automatically in social interactions, but the degree to which gaze is followed depends on whether an agent is perceived to have a mind, making its behavior socially more relevant for the interaction. Mind perception also modulates the attitudes we have toward others, and determines the degree of empathy, prosociality, and morality invested in social interactions. Seeing mind in others is not exclusive to human agents, but mind can also be ascribed to non-human agents like robots, as long as their appearance and/or behavior allows them to be perceived as intentional beings. Previous studies have shown that human appearance and reliable behavior induce mind perception to robot agents, and positively affect attitudes and performance in human–robot interaction. What has not been investigated so far is whether different triggers of mind perception have an independent or interactive effect on attitudes and performance in human–robot interaction. We examine this question by manipulating agent appearance (human vs. robot) and behavior (reliable vs. random) within the same paradigm and examine how congruent (human/reliable vs. robot/random) versus incongruent (human/random vs. robot/reliable) combinations of these triggers affect performance (i.e., gaze following) and attitudes (i.e., agent ratings) in human–robot interaction. The results show that both appearance and behavior affect human–robot interaction but that the two triggers seem to operate in isolation, with appearance more strongly impacting attitudes, and behavior more strongly affecting performance. The implications of these findings for human–robot interaction are discussed. PMID:28878703

  6. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  7. Verification of directed self-assembly (DSA) guide patterns through machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Seongbo; Cai, Sibo; Yang, Jaewon; Yang, Seunghune; Choi, Byungil; Shin, Youngsoo

    2015-03-01

    Verification of full-chip DSA guide patterns (GPs) through simulations is not practical due to long runtime. We develop a decision function (or functions), which receives n geometry parameters of a GP as inputs and predicts whether the GP faithfully produces desired contacts (good) or not (bad). We take a few sample GPs to construct the function; DSA simulations are performed for each GP to decide whether it is good or bad, and the decision is marked in n-dimensional space. The hyper-plane that separates good marks and bad marks in that space is determined through machine learning process, and corresponds to our decision function. We try a single global function that can be applied to any GP types, and a series of functions in which each function is customized for different GP type; they are then compared and assessed in 10nm technology.

  8. Robotics technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montemerlo, Melvin D.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on robotics technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: mechanisms; sensors; systems engineering processes for integrated robotics; man/machine cooperative control; 3D-real-time machine perception; multiple arm redundancy control; manipulator control from a movable base; multi-agent reasoning; and surfacing evolution technologies.

  9. Artificial intelligence approach to planning the robotic assembly of large tetrahedral truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homemdemello, Luiz S.

    1992-01-01

    An assembly planner for tetrahedral truss structures is presented. To overcome the difficulties due to the large number of parts, the planner exploits the simplicity and uniformity of the shapes of the parts and the regularity of their interconnection. The planning automation is based on the computational formalism known as production system. The global data base consists of a hexagonal grid representation of the truss structure. This representation captures the regularity of tetrahedral truss structures and their multiple hierarchies. It maps into quadratic grids and can be implemented in a computer by using a two-dimensional array data structure. By maintaining the multiple hierarchies explicitly in the model, the choice of a particular hierarchy is only made when needed, thus allowing a more informed decision. Furthermore, testing the preconditions of the production rules is simple because the patterned way in which the struts are interconnected is incorporated into the topology of the hexagonal grid. A directed graph representation of assembly sequences allows the use of both graph search and backtracking control strategies.

  10. Folding and assembly of the large molecular machine Hsp90 studied in single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Markus; Buchner, Johannes; Hugel, Thorsten; Rief, Matthias

    2016-02-02

    Folding of small proteins often occurs in a two-state manner and is well understood both experimentally and theoretically. However, many proteins are much larger and often populate misfolded states, complicating their folding process significantly. Here we study the complete folding and assembly process of the 1,418 amino acid, dimeric chaperone Hsp90 using single-molecule optical tweezers. Although the isolated C-terminal domain shows two-state folding, we find that the isolated N-terminal as well as the middle domain populate ensembles of fast-forming, misfolded states. These intradomain misfolds slow down folding by an order of magnitude. Modeling folding as a competition between productive and misfolding pathways allows us to fully describe the folding kinetics. Beyond intradomain misfolding, folding of the full-length protein is further slowed by the formation of interdomain misfolds, suggesting that with growing chain lengths, such misfolds will dominate folding kinetics. Interestingly, we find that small stretching forces applied to the chain can accelerate folding by preventing the formation of cross-domain misfolding intermediates by leading the protein along productive pathways to the native state. The same effect is achieved by cotranslational folding at the ribosome in vivo.

  11. Optimal Cross-Coupled Synchronizing Control of Dual-Drive Gantry System for a SMD Assembly Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Baeksuk; Kim, Sungsoo; Hong, Daehie; Park, Heung-Keun; Park, Jinmoo

    The present paper deals with the development of synchronizing controller for dual-drive servo system that is often used for SMD (Surface Mount Device) assembly machine. Instead of coordinating the commands to the individual feed drives and implementing closed position loop control for each axis, this work is achieved by the evaluation of an optimal cross-coupled compensator aimed specifically at improving synchronous accuracy in dual feed drives. The optimal control formulation explicitly includes the synchronous error in the performance index to be minimized. In this paper, surface chip mounter is used for experiment. It demands to synchronize the positions of its two primary driving axes. The system is modeled as the first order approximation and cross-coupled optimal synchronizing controller is designed. The synchronizing control is simulated and experimented with actual system for various velocity profiles. The results show that the proposed controller reduces the synchronous error considerably, compared to the conventional uncoupled control for the dual-drive system.

  12. The 1991-1992 walking robot design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarm, Shapour; Dayawansa, Wijesurija; Tsai, Lung-Wen; Peritt, Jon

    1992-01-01

    The University of Maryland Walking Machine team designed and constructed a robot. This robot was completed in two phases with supervision and suggestions from three professors and one graduate teaching assistant. Bob was designed during the Fall Semester 1991, then machined, assembled, and debugged in the Spring Semester 1992. The project required a total of 4,300 student hours and cost under $8,000. Mechanically, Bob was an exercise in optimization. The robot was designed to test several diverse aspects of robotic potential, including speed, agility, and stability, with simplicity and reliability holding equal importance. For speed and smooth walking motion, the footpath contained a long horizontal component; a vertical aspect was included to allow clearance of obstacles. These challenges were met with a leg design that utilized a unique multi-link mechanism which traveled a modified tear-drop footpath. The electrical requirements included motor, encoder, and voice control circuitry selection, manual controller manufacture, and creation of sensors for guidance. Further, there was also a need for selection of the computer, completion of a preliminary program, and testing of the robot.

  13. The 1991-1992 walking robot design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarm, Shapour; Dayawansa, Wijesurija; Tsai, Lung-Wen; Peritt, Jon

    The University of Maryland Walking Machine team designed and constructed a robot. This robot was completed in two phases with supervision and suggestions from three professors and one graduate teaching assistant. Bob was designed during the Fall Semester 1991, then machined, assembled, and debugged in the Spring Semester 1992. The project required a total of 4,300 student hours and cost under $8,000. Mechanically, Bob was an exercise in optimization. The robot was designed to test several diverse aspects of robotic potential, including speed, agility, and stability, with simplicity and reliability holding equal importance. For speed and smooth walking motion, the footpath contained a long horizontal component; a vertical aspect was included to allow clearance of obstacles. These challenges were met with a leg design that utilized a unique multi-link mechanism which traveled a modified tear-drop footpath. The electrical requirements included motor, encoder, and voice control circuitry selection, manual controller manufacture, and creation of sensors for guidance. Further, there was also a need for selection of the computer, completion of a preliminary program, and testing of the robot.

  14. The walking robot project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, P.; Sagraniching, E.; Bennett, M.; Singh, R.

    1991-01-01

    A walking robot was designed, analyzed, and tested as an intelligent, mobile, and a terrain adaptive system. The robot's design was an application of existing technologies. The design of the six legs modified and combines well understood mechanisms and was optimized for performance, flexibility, and simplicity. The body design incorporated two tripods for walking stability and ease of turning. The electrical hardware design used modularity and distributed processing to drive the motors. The software design used feedback to coordinate the system and simple keystrokes to give commands. The walking machine can be easily adapted to hostile environments such as high radiation zones and alien terrain. The primary goal of the leg design was to create a leg capable of supporting a robot's body and electrical hardware while walking or performing desired tasks, namely those required for planetary exploration. The leg designers intent was to study the maximum amount of flexibility and maneuverability achievable by the simplest and lightest leg design. The main constraints for the leg design were leg kinematics, ease of assembly, degrees of freedom, number of motors, overall size, and weight.

  15. Future uses of machine intelligence and robotics for the Space Station and implications for the U.S. economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A.; Erickson, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The exciting possibilities for advancing the technologies of artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation on the Space Station is summarized. How these possibilities will be realized and how their realization can benefit the U.S. economy are described. Plans, research programs and preliminary designs that will lead to the realization of many of these possibilities are being formulated.

  16. Future uses of machine intelligence and robotics for the Space Station and implications for the U.S. economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A.; Erickson, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The exciting possibilities for advancing the technologies of artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation on the Space Station is summarized. How these possibilities will be realized and how their realization can benefit the U.S. economy are described. Plans, research programs and preliminary designs that will lead to the realization of many of these possibilities are being formulated.

  17. A supplementary system for a brain-machine interface based on jaw artifacts for the bidimensional control of a robotic arm.

    PubMed

    Costa, Álvaro; Hortal, Enrique; Iáñez, Eduardo; Azorín, José M

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) are being used more and more these days to design systems focused on helping people with motor disabilities. Spontaneous BMIs translate user's brain signals into commands to control devices. On these systems, by and large, 2 different mental tasks can be detected with enough accuracy. However, a large training time is required and the system needs to be adjusted on each session. This paper presents a supplementary system that employs BMI sensors, allowing the use of 2 systems (the BMI system and the supplementary system) with the same data acquisition device. This supplementary system is designed to control a robotic arm in two dimensions using electromyographical (EMG) signals extracted from the electroencephalographical (EEG) recordings. These signals are voluntarily produced by users clenching their jaws. EEG signals (with EMG contributions) were registered and analyzed to obtain the electrodes and the range of frequencies which provide the best classification results for 5 different clenching tasks. A training stage, based on the 2-dimensional control of a cursor, was designed and used by the volunteers to get used to this control. Afterwards, the control was extrapolated to a robotic arm in a 2-dimensional workspace. Although the training performed by volunteers requires 70 minutes, the final results suggest that in a shorter period of time (45 min), users should be able to control the robotic arm in 2 dimensions with their jaws. The designed system is compared with a similar 2-dimensional system based on spontaneous BMIs, and our system shows faster and more accurate performance. This is due to the nature of the control signals. Brain potentials are much more difficult to control than the electromyographical signals produced by jaw clenches. Additionally, the presented system also shows an improvement in the results compared with an electrooculographic system in a similar environment.

  18. A Supplementary System for a Brain-Machine Interface Based on Jaw Artifacts for the Bidimensional Control of a Robotic Arm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Álvaro; Hortal, Enrique; Iáñez, Eduardo; Azorín, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) are being used more and more these days to design systems focused on helping people with motor disabilities. Spontaneous BMIs translate user's brain signals into commands to control devices. On these systems, by and large, 2 different mental tasks can be detected with enough accuracy. However, a large training time is required and the system needs to be adjusted on each session. This paper presents a supplementary system that employs BMI sensors, allowing the use of 2 systems (the BMI system and the supplementary system) with the same data acquisition device. This supplementary system is designed to control a robotic arm in two dimensions using electromyographical (EMG) signals extracted from the electroencephalographical (EEG) recordings. These signals are voluntarily produced by users clenching their jaws. EEG signals (with EMG contributions) were registered and analyzed to obtain the electrodes and the range of frequencies which provide the best classification results for 5 different clenching tasks. A training stage, based on the 2-dimensional control of a cursor, was designed and used by the volunteers to get used to this control. Afterwards, the control was extrapolated to a robotic arm in a 2-dimensional workspace. Although the training performed by volunteers requires 70 minutes, the final results suggest that in a shorter period of time (45 min), users should be able to control the robotic arm in 2 dimensions with their jaws. The designed system is compared with a similar 2-dimensional system based on spontaneous BMIs, and our system shows faster and more accurate performance. This is due to the nature of the control signals. Brain potentials are much more difficult to control than the electromyographical signals produced by jaw clenches. Additionally, the presented system also shows an improvement in the results compared with an electrooculographic system in a similar environment. PMID:25390372

  19. Demonstration of a Semi-Autonomous Hybrid Brain-Machine Interface using Human Intracranial EEG, Eye Tracking, and Computer Vision to Control a Robotic Upper Limb Prosthetic

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, David P.; Hotson, Guy; Katyal, Kapil D.; Wester, Brock A.; Fifer, Matthew S.; McGee, Timothy G.; Harris, Andrew; Johannes, Matthew S.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Ravitz, Alan D.; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2014-01-01

    To increase the ability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) to control advanced prostheses such as the modular prosthetic limb (MPL), we are developing a novel system: the Hybrid Augmented Reality Multimodal Operation Neural Integration Environment (HARMONIE). This system utilizes hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics to allow users to identify an object (via eye tracking and computer vision) and initiate (via brain-control) a semi-autonomous reach-grasp-and-drop of the object by the MPL. Sequential iterations of HARMONIE were tested in two pilot subjects implanted with electrocorticographic (ECoG) and depth electrodes within motor areas. The subjects performed the complex task in 71.4% (20/28) and 67.7% (21/31) of trials after minimal training. Balanced accuracy for detecting movements was 91.1% and 92.9%, significantly greater than chance accuracies (p < 0.05). After BMI-based initiation, the MPL completed the entire task 100% (one object) and 70% (three objects) of the time. The MPL took approximately 12.2 seconds for task completion after system improvements implemented for the second subject. Our hybrid-BMI design prevented all but one baseline false positive from initiating the system. The novel approach demonstrated in this proof-of-principle study, using hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics, addresses limitations of current BMIs. PMID:24760914

  20. Demonstration of a semi-autonomous hybrid brain-machine interface using human intracranial EEG, eye tracking, and computer vision to control a robotic upper limb prosthetic.

    PubMed

    McMullen, David P; Hotson, Guy; Katyal, Kapil D; Wester, Brock A; Fifer, Matthew S; McGee, Timothy G; Harris, Andrew; Johannes, Matthew S; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Ravitz, Alan D; Anderson, William S; Thakor, Nitish V; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-07-01

    To increase the ability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) to control advanced prostheses such as the modular prosthetic limb (MPL), we are developing a novel system: the Hybrid Augmented Reality Multimodal Operation Neural Integration Environment (HARMONIE). This system utilizes hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics to allow users to identify an object (via eye tracking and computer vision) and initiate (via brain-control) a semi-autonomous reach-grasp-and-drop of the object by the MPL. Sequential iterations of HARMONIE were tested in two pilot subjects implanted with electrocorticographic (ECoG) and depth electrodes within motor areas. The subjects performed the complex task in 71.4% (20/28) and 67.7% (21/31) of trials after minimal training. Balanced accuracy for detecting movements was 91.1% and 92.9%, significantly greater than chance accuracies (p < 0.05). After BMI-based initiation, the MPL completed the entire task 100% (one object) and 70% (three objects) of the time. The MPL took approximately 12.2 s for task completion after system improvements implemented for the second subject. Our hybrid-BMI design prevented all but one baseline false positive from initiating the system. The novel approach demonstrated in this proof-of-principle study, using hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics, addresses limitations of current BMIs.

  1. An Assessment of Potential Robotic Applications to Naval Aviation Operations and Support. ASTR (Advanced Support Technologies/Robotics)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-17

    II-1 b. Industrial Robotics in the 1980’s ........ 11-2 c. Machine Intelligence and Robotics ........ 11-2 d. Social Impact of Robotics...34• •.•B. Volune Two 1. Machine Intelligence and Robotics i• 2. Social Impact of Robotics ŗ. "Factory of the Future" conference proceedings II. Zxtension...analysis 10. social impacts III.Abstracted Data A. Robots-1964-Janaury 1981 Citations from the NTIS Data Base B. Industrial Robots and Teleoperators

  2. An Intelligent Man-Machine Interface-Multi-Robot Control Adapted for Task Engagement Based on Single-Trial Detectability of P300.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Elsa A; Kim, Su K; Tabie, Marc; Wöhrle, Hendrik; Maurus, Michael; Kirchner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Advanced man-machine interfaces (MMIs) are being developed for teleoperating robots at remote and hardly accessible places. Such MMIs make use of a virtual environment and can therefore make the operator immerse him-/herself into the environment of the robot. In this paper, we present our developed MMI for multi-robot control. Our MMI can adapt to changes in task load and task engagement online. Applying our approach of embedded Brain Reading we improve user support and efficiency of interaction. The level of task engagement was inferred from the single-trial detectability of P300-related brain activity that was naturally evoked during interaction. With our approach no secondary task is needed to measure task load. It is based on research results on the single-stimulus paradigm, distribution of brain resources and its effect on the P300 event-related component. It further considers effects of the modulation caused by a delayed reaction time on the P300 component evoked by complex responses to task-relevant messages. We prove our concept using single-trial based machine learning analysis, analysis of averaged event-related potentials and behavioral analysis. As main results we show (1) a significant improvement of runtime needed to perform the interaction tasks compared to a setting in which all subjects could easily perform the tasks. We show that (2) the single-trial detectability of the event-related potential P300 can be used to measure the changes in task load and task engagement during complex interaction while also being sensitive to the level of experience of the operator and (3) can be used to adapt the MMI individually to the different needs of users without increasing total workload. Our online adaptation of the proposed MMI is based on a continuous supervision of the operator's cognitive resources by means of embedded Brain Reading. Operators with different qualifications or capabilities receive only as many tasks as they can perform to avoid mental

  3. An Intelligent Man-Machine Interface—Multi-Robot Control Adapted for Task Engagement Based on Single-Trial Detectability of P300

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Elsa A.; Kim, Su K.; Tabie, Marc; Wöhrle, Hendrik; Maurus, Michael; Kirchner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Advanced man-machine interfaces (MMIs) are being developed for teleoperating robots at remote and hardly accessible places. Such MMIs make use of a virtual environment and can therefore make the operator immerse him-/herself into the environment of the robot. In this paper, we present our developed MMI for multi-robot control. Our MMI can adapt to changes in task load and task engagement online. Applying our approach of embedded Brain Reading we improve user support and efficiency of interaction. The level of task engagement was inferred from the single-trial detectability of P300-related brain activity that was naturally evoked during interaction. With our approach no secondary task is needed to measure task load. It is based on research results on the single-stimulus paradigm, distribution of brain resources and its effect on the P300 event-related component. It further considers effects of the modulation caused by a delayed reaction time on the P300 component evoked by complex responses to task-relevant messages. We prove our concept using single-trial based machine learning analysis, analysis of averaged event-related potentials and behavioral analysis. As main results we show (1) a significant improvement of runtime needed to perform the interaction tasks compared to a setting in which all subjects could easily perform the tasks. We show that (2) the single-trial detectability of the event-related potential P300 can be used to measure the changes in task load and task engagement during complex interaction while also being sensitive to the level of experience of the operator and (3) can be used to adapt the MMI individually to the different needs of users without increasing total workload. Our online adaptation of the proposed MMI is based on a continuous supervision of the operator's cognitive resources by means of embedded Brain Reading. Operators with different qualifications or capabilities receive only as many tasks as they can perform to avoid mental

  4. Transient State Machine Enabled from the Colliding and Coalescence of a Swarm of Autonomously Running Liquid Metal Motors.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lei; He, Zhizhu; Yao, Youyou; Liu, Jing

    2015-10-21

    Internally triggered motion of an object owns important potential in diverse application areas ranging from micromachines, actuator or sensor, to self-assembly of superstructures. A new conceptual liquid metal machine style has been presented here: the transient state machine that can work as either a large size robot, partial running elements, or just divide spontaneously running swarm of tiny motors. According to need, the discrete droplet machines as quickly generated through injecting the stream of a large liquid metal machine can combine back again to the original one. Over the process, each tiny machine just keeps its running, colliding, bouncing, or adhesion states until finally assembling into a single machine. Unlike the commonly encountered rigid machines, such transient state system can be reversible in working shapes. Depending on their surface tension, the autonomously traveling droplet motors can experience bouncing and colliding before undergoing total coalescence, arrested coalescence, or total bounce. This finding would help mold unconventional robot in the sense of transient state machine that could automatically transform among different geometries such as a single or swarm, small or large size, assembling and interaction, etc. It refreshes people's basic understandings on machines, liquid metal materials, fluid mechanics, and micromotors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Feasibility of Robotics and Machine Vision in Military Combat Ration Inspection (Short Term Project STP No. 11)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    January 1989. [11] Burdea G and Zhuang J. Dextrous telerobotics with force feedback - an overview - part 2: Control and implementation. Robotica , UK, 9...291-298, 1991. [12] Burdea G. and Zhuang J. Dextrous telerobotics with force feedback - an overview, part 1: Human I factors. Robotica , UK, 9:171-178...trans- planting workcell. In American Society of Agricultural Engineering, St. Joseph, MI, 1991. I [26] Frost A.R. Robotic milking: a review. Robotica

  6. Robot Forearm and Dexterous Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    An electromechanical hand-and-forearm assembly has been developed for incorporation into an anthropomorphic robot that would be used in outer space. The assembly is designed to offer manual dexterity comparable to that of a hand inside an astronaut s suit; thus, the assembly may also be useful as a prosthesis or as an end effector on an industrial robot.

  7. BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE MAKES BOTH MOLD HALVES INDIVIDUALLY WHICH ARE LATER ROTATED, ASSEMBLED, AND LOWERED TO POURING CONVEYORS BY ASSISTING MACHINES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  8. BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE MAKES BOTH MOLD HALVES INDIVIDUALLY WHICH ARE LATER ROTATED, ASSEMBLED, AND LOWERED TO POURING CONVEYORS BY ASSISTING MACHINES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Autonomous Mechanical Assembly on the Space Shuttle: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raibert, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    The space shuttle will be equipped with a pair of 50 ft. manipulators used to handle payloads and to perform mechanical assembly operations. Although current plans call for these manipulators to be operated by a human teleoperator. The possibility of using results from robotics and machine intelligence to automate this shuttle assembly system was investigated. The major components of an autonomous mechanical assembly system are examined, along with the technology base upon which they depend. The state of the art in advanced automation is also assessed.

  10. USSR Report Machine Tools and Metalworking Equipment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    automation of welding (automated submerged arc welding ; welding in a carbon dioxide medium; plasma cutting of large thickness sheets, etc.); use of quick...Robots Service NC Machine Tools 65 New Unitized Design Manipulator 65 Robots Weld Truck Cabs 66 Robot Adjustors Schooled 66 Robots Manufactured at...Divnogorsk 66 New Welding Robot Designed 66 Tashkent Robotics Department Opened 66 - D - JPRS-UMM-86-007 21 March 1986 INDUSTRY PLANNING AND

  11. Operator roles in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.; Madni, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The authors suggest that operator roles in robotics can be classified under the categories of monitor, manager, and maintainer. With increasingly sophisticated applications of machine intelligence, however, these roles will require explicit and continuing reassessment. 5 references.

  12. Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report gives brief descriptions of the projects associated with the Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program (RISP). Projects included in the report are (1) Remote Operations Demonstration Facility; (2) M-2 Servomanipulator; (3) The Advanced Servomanipulator; (4) Hostile Environment Robotic Machine Intelligence Experiment Series robots); and (5) Telerobotic Concepts. These devices have application in nuclear industry and space environments. (JDH)

  13. Next generation space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Tsutomu; Oda, Mitsushige; Imai, Ryoichi

    1989-01-01

    The recent research effort on the next generation space robots is presented. The goals of this research are to develop the fundamental technologies and to acquire the design parameters of the next generation space robot. Visual sensing and perception, dexterous manipulation, man machine interface and artificial intelligence techniques such as task planning are identified as the key technologies.

  14. Robotics: Generation soft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2016-08-01

    Meet the octobot, the first robot to be made entirely from soft materials. Powered by a chemical reaction and controlled by a fluidic logic circuit, it heralds a generation of soft robots that might surpass conventional machines. See Letter p.451

  15. Walking robot: A design project for undergraduate students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The design and construction of the University of Maryland walking machine was completed during the 1989 to 1990 academic year. It was required that the machine be capable of completing a number of tasks including walking a straight line, turning to change direction, and manuevering over an obstacle such as a set of stairs. The machine consists of two sets of four telescoping legs that alternately support the entire structure. A gear box and crank arm assembly is connected to the leg sets to provide the power required for the translational motion of the machine. By retracting all eight legs, the robot comes to rest on a central Bigfoot support. Turning is accomplished by rotating this machine about this support. The machine can be controlled by using either a user-operated remote tether or the onboard computer for the execution of control commands. Absolute encoders are attached to all motors to provide the control computer with information regarding the status of the motors. Long and short range infrared sensors provide the computer with feedback information regarding the machine's position relative to a series of stripes and reflectors. These infrared sensors simulate how the robot might sense and gain information about the environment of Mars.

  16. A Survey of Space Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, L.; Kortenkamp, D.; Wettergreen, D.; Nourbakhsh, I.; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we summarize a survey conducted by NASA to determine the state-of-the-art in space robotics and to predict future robotic capabilities under either nominal and intensive development effort. The space robotics assessment study examined both in-space operations including assembly, inspection, and maintenance and planetary surface operations like mobility and exploration. Applications of robotic autonomy and human-robot cooperation were considered. The study group devised a decomposition of robotic capabilities and then suggested metrics to specify the technical challenges associated with each. The conclusion of this paper identifies possible areas in which investment in space robotics could lead to significant advances of important technologies.

  17. Production of Candida antaractica Lipase B Gene Open Reading Frame using Automated PCR Gene Assembly Protocol on Robotic Workcell & Expression in Ethanologenic Yeast for use as Resin-Bound Biocatalyst in Biodiesel Production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A synthetic Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) gene open reading frame (ORF) for expression in yeast was produced using an automated PCR assembly and DNA purification protocol on an integrated robotic workcell. The lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1) C3 variant gene ORF was added in-frame with the CALB ORF to pote...

  18. DOE/NE robotics for advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    ORNL is continuing to transfer technology under the NE Robotics for Advanced Reactors Program to other programs and institutions. The HELIX computer architecture developed under the NE robotics program are currently being transferred to the University of Florida for control of their Articulated Transporter Manipulator (ATMS or snake) robot prototype. The Modular Integrated Control architecture (MICA), also developed under the NE Robotics Program is currently being utilized by the DOE ER WM Robotics Program to control a long-reach manipulator for use in cleanup of underground storage tanks at Hanford. HELIX and MICA were developed at ORNL in response to the need to integrate software and hardware developed on different computer systems by the university participants. The University of Texas is constructing and assembling the actuator module. Several parts have been re-machined. The Tennessee group has performed a series of experiments to verify the performance of their system for object localization, identification, and manipulation using 3D Geometric models (SOLIDGEM). The Michigan group has completed experiments on the radiation resistance of ultrasonic range sensors (URSs). The Florida team continues to model key features of the ALMR. Drawings have been received from GE providing much greater detail on many structures. These details are being incorporated into the IGRIP model of the ALMR. A conceptual design for the Articulated Transporter/Manipulator System (ATMS) has been finalized.

  19. Medical robotics.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  20. Industrial robots: Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Iu. G.

    Topics covered include terms, definitions, and classification; operator-directed manipulators; autooperators as used in automated pressure casting; construction and application of industrial robots; and the operating bases of automated systems. Attention is given to adaptive and interactive robots; gripping mechanisms; applications to foundary production, press-forging plants, heat treatment, welding, and assembly operations. A review of design recommendations includes a determination of fundamental structural and technological indicators for industrial robots and a consideration of drive mechanisms.

  1. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  2. The 50-Minute Robot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Miram R.

    1985-01-01

    Sixth graders built working "robots" (or grasping bars) for remote control use during a unit on simple mechanics. Steps for making a robot are presented, including: cutting the wood, drilling and nailing, assembling the jaws, and making them work. The "jaws," used to pick up objects, illustrate principles of levers. (DH)

  3. The robotics review 1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatib, O.; Craig, J.J.; Lozano-Perez, T.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical and implementation issues in robotics are discussed in reviews of recent investigations. Sections are devoted to programming, planning, and learning; sensing and perception; kinematics, dynamics, and design; and motion and force control. Particular attention is given to a robust layered control system for a mobile robot, camera calibration for three-dimensional machine vision, walking vehicles, design and control of direct-drive vehicles, an efficient parallel algorithm for robot inverse dynamics, stability problems in contact tasks, and kinematics and reaction-moment compensation for satellite-mounted robot manipulators.

  4. Space Applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS), phase 2. Volume 1: Telepresence technology base development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Minsky, M. L.; Thiel, E. D.; Kurtzman, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The field of telepresence is defined, and overviews of those capabilities that are now available, and those that will be required to support a NASA telepresence effort are provided. Investigation of NASA's plans and goals with regard to telepresence, extensive literature search for materials relating to relevant technologies, a description of these technologies and their state of the art, and projections for advances in these technologies over the next decade are included. Several space projects are examined in detail to determine what capabilities are required of a telepresence system in order to accomplish various tasks, such as servicing and assembly. The key operational and technological areas are identified, conclusions and recommendations are made for further research, and an example developmental program is presented, leading to an operational telepresence servicer.

  5. The TamB ortholog of Borrelia burgdorferi interacts with the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex protein BamA

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Henna; Kenedy, Melisha R.; Lybecker, Meghan; Akins, Darrin R.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Two outer membrane protein (OMP) transport systems in diderm bacteria assist in assembly and export of OMPs. These two systems are the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex and the translocation and assembly module (TAM). The BAM complex consists of the OMP component BamA along with several outer membrane associated proteins. The TAM also consists of an OMP, designated TamA, and a single inner membrane (IM) protein, TamB. Together TamA and TamB aid in the secretion of virulence-associated OMPs. In this study we characterized the hypothetical protein BB0794 in Borrelia burgdorferi. BB0794 contains a conserved DUF490 domain, which is a motif found in all TamB proteins. All spirochetes lack a TamA ortholog, but computational and physicochemical characterization of BB0794 revealed it is a TamB ortholog. Interestingly, BB0794 was observed to interact with BamA and a BB0794 regulatable mutant displayed altered cellular morphology and antibiotic sensitivity. The observation that B. burgdorferi contains a TamB ortholog that interacts with BamA and is required for proper outer membrane biogenesis not only identifies a novel role for TamB-like proteins, but also may explain why most diderms harbor a TamB-like protein while only a select group encodes TamA. PMID:27588694

  6. Robotic System For Greenhouse Or Nursery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul; Montgomery, Jim; Silver, John; Heffelfinger, Neil; Simonton, Ward; Pease, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Report presents additional information about robotic system described in "Robotic Gripper With Force Control And Optical Sensors" (MFS-28537). "Flexible Agricultural Robotics Manipulator System" (FARMS) serves as prototype of robotic systems intended to enhance productivities of agricultural assembly-line-type facilities in large commercial greenhouses and nurseries.

  7. [Robots and intellectual property].

    PubMed

    Larrieu, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    This topic is part of the global issue concerning the necessity to adapt intellectual property law to constant changes in technology. The relationship between robots and IP is dual. On one hand, the robots may be regarded as objects of intellectual property. A robot, like any new machine, could qualify for a protection by a patent. A copyright may protect its appearance if it is original. Its memory, like a database, could be covered by a sui generis right. On the other hand, the question of the protection of the outputs of the robot must be raised. The robots, as the physical embodiment of artificial intelligence, are becoming more and more autonomous. Robot-generated works include less and less human inputs. Are these objects created or invented by a robot copyrightable or patentable? To whom the ownership of these IP rights will be allocated? To the person who manufactured the machine ? To the user of the robot? To the robot itself? All these questions are worth discussing.

  8. Robot Independent Programming Environment and Language

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, Charleene

    1995-04-05

    RIPE is an object-oriented approach to robot system architectures; it is a software environment which facilitates rapid design and implementation of complex robot systems for diverse applications. The robot work cell is modeled using software objects and supports model-based automated programming of robotic and machining devices, real-time sensor-based control, error handling, robust communications and graphical interfaces for robot system control. The objects include robots, sensors, end effectors, workpieces, NC machines and various other devices. A set of generic classes is defined to represent these objects, and the interfaces to them become RIPL.

  9. Exploratorium: Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  10. Exploratorium: Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  11. Development of a Robotic Assembly for Analyzing the Instantaneous Axis of Rotation of the Foot Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    Salb, Kelly N.; Wido, Daniel M.; Stewart, Thomas E.; DiAngelo, Denis J.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle instantaneous axis of rotation (IAR) measurements represent a more complete parameter for characterizing joint motion. However, few studies have implemented this measurement to study normal, injured, or pathological foot ankle biomechanics. A novel testing protocol was developed to simulate aspects of in vivo foot ankle mechanics during mid-stance gait in a human cadaveric specimen. A lower leg was mounted in a robotic testing platform with the tibia upright and foot flat on the baseplate. Axial tibia loads (ATLs) were controlled as a function of a vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) set at half body weight (356 N) and a 50% vGRF (178 N) Achilles tendon load. Two specimens were repetitively loaded over 10 degrees of dorsiflexion and 20 degrees of plantar flexion. Platform axes were controlled within 2 microns and 0.008 degrees resulting in ATL measurements within ±2 N of target conditions. Mean ATLs and IAR values were not significantly different between cycles of motion, but IAR values were significantly different between dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. A linear regression analysis showed no significant differences between slopes of plantar flexion paths. The customized robotic platform and advanced testing protocol produced repeatable and accurate measurements of the IAR, useful for assessing foot ankle biomechanics under different loading scenarios and foot conditions. PMID:27099456

  12. 1999 IEEE international conference on robotics and automation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    Topics covered in this conference include: biped robots; underwater vehicles; robot planning and programming for assembly; discrete event control of mobile robot maneuvering; navigation in unknown environment; biped robots; underwater vehicles; robot planning and programming for assembly; discrete event control of manufacturing systems; motion planning; robot control; actuator; teleoperation; force and position control; contact and grasping control; visual servo control; tactile sensing; mobile robots and applications; sensor-based navigation; underwater robotics; sensing, navigation and control; flexible manipulators; task scheduling; actuators and joint actuation; teleoperation; sensor-based teleoperation; contact geometry; sonar-based sensing; mobile robot-environment interaction; mobile robot motion planning; biology-inspired methods; service and underwater robots; manufacturing planning and scheduling; constraint and nonholonomic system; fault-tolerant robots; parallel manipulators; dexterous manipulation; computer vision in manufacturing; contact sensing; mobile robot field applications; flexible robots; fuzzy control; and more.

  13. On the development of a reactive sensor-based robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hexmoor, Henry H.; Underwood, William E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Flexible robotic systems for space applications need to use local information to guide their action in uncertain environments where the state of the environment and even the goals may change. They have to be tolerant of unexpected events and robust enough to carry their task to completion. Tactical goals should be modified while maintaining strategic goals. Furthermore, reactive robotic systems need to have a broader view of their environments than sensory-based systems. An architecture and a theory of representation extending the basic cycles of action and perception are described. This scheme allows for dynamic description of the environment and determining purposive and timely action. Applications of this scheme for assembly and repair tasks using a Universal Machine Intelligence RTX robot are being explored, but the ideas are extendable to other domains. The nature of reactivity for sensor-based robotic systems and implementation issues encountered in developing a prototype are discussed.

  14. Kinematics of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The theory and methodology of design of general-purpose machines that may be controlled by a computer to perform all the tasks of a set of special-purpose machines is the focus of modern machine design research. These seventeen contributions chronicle recent activity in the analysis and design of robot manipulators that are the prototype of these general-purpose machines. They focus particularly on kinematics, the geometry of rigid-body motion, which is an integral part of machine design theory. The challenges to kinematics researchers presented by general-purpose machines such as the manipulator are leading to new perspectives in the design and control of simpler machines with two, three, and more degrees of freedom. Researchers are rethinking the uses of gear trains, planar mechanisms, adjustable mechanisms, and computer controlled actuators in the design of modern machines.

  15. University of Maryland walking robot: A design project for undergraduate students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Bob; Bielec, Jim; Hartsig, Dave; Oliva, Mani; Grotheer, Phil; Hekmat, Morad; Russell, David; Tavakoli, Hossein; Young, Gary; Nave, Tom

    1990-01-01

    The design and construction required that the walking robot machine be capable of completing a number of tasks including walking in a straight line, turning to change direction, and maneuvering over an obstable such as a set of stairs. The machine consists of two sets of four telescoping legs that alternately support the entire structure. A gear-box and crank-arm assembly is connected to the leg sets to provide the power required for the translational motion of the machine. By retracting all eight legs, the robot comes to rest on a central Bigfoot support. Turning is accomplished by rotating the machine about this support. The machine can be controlled by using either a user operated remote tether or the on-board computer for the execution of control commands. Absolute encoders are attached to all motors (leg, main drive, and Bigfoot) to provide the control computer with information regarding the status of the motors (up-down motion, forward or reverse rotation). Long and short range infrared sensors provide the computer with feedback information regarding the machine's relative position to a series of stripes and reflectors. These infrared sensors simulate how the robot might sense and gain information about the environment of Mars.

  16. Prototyping a robotic dental testing simulator.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, K; Hyde, R A; Gao, J

    2007-05-01

    A parallel robot based on the Stewart platform is being developed to simulate jaw motion and investigate its effect on jaw function to test the wearing away of dental components such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, full set of dentures, and implant-supported overdentures by controlling chewing motion. The current paper only describes the comparison between an alternative configuration proposed by Xu and the Stewart platform configuration. The Stewart platform was chosen as an ideal structure for simulating human mastication as it is easily assembled, has high rigidity, high load-carrying capacity, and accurate positioning capability. The kinematics and singularities of the Stewart platform have been analysed and software developed to (a) test the control algorithms/strategy of muscle movement for the six degree of freedom of mastication cycle and (b) simulate and observe various design options to be able to make the best judgement in product development. The human replica skull has been analysed and reverse engineered with further simplification before integration with the Stewart platform computer-aided design (CAD) to develop the robotic dental testing simulator. Assembly modelling of the reproduced skull was critically analysed for good occlusion in CAD environment. A pulse-width modulation (PWM) circuit plus interface was built to control position and speed of the chosen actuators. A computer numerical control (CNC) machine and wire-electro-discharge machining (wire EDM) were used to manufacture the critical parts such as lower mandible, upper maxilla, and universal joints.

  17. Machine learning in motion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng; Kermiche, Noureddine

    1989-01-01

    The existing methodologies for robot programming originate primarily from robotic applications to manufacturing, where uncertainties of the robots and their task environment may be minimized by repeated off-line modeling and identification. In space application of robots, however, a higher degree of automation is required for robot programming because of the desire of minimizing the human intervention. We discuss a new paradigm of robotic programming which is based on the concept of machine learning. The goal is to let robots practice tasks by themselves and the operational data are used to automatically improve their motion performance. The underlying mathematical problem is to solve the problem of dynamical inverse by iterative methods. One of the key questions is how to ensure the convergence of the iterative process. There have been a few small steps taken into this important approach to robot programming. We give a representative result on the convergence problem.

  18. Machine learning in motion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng; Kermiche, Noureddine

    1989-01-01

    The existing methodologies for robot programming originate primarily from robotic applications to manufacturing, where uncertainties of the robots and their task environment may be minimized by repeated off-line modeling and identification. In space application of robots, however, a higher degree of automation is required for robot programming because of the desire of minimizing the human intervention. We discuss a new paradigm of robotic programming which is based on the concept of machine learning. The goal is to let robots practice tasks by themselves and the operational data are used to automatically improve their motion performance. The underlying mathematical problem is to solve the problem of dynamical inverse by iterative methods. One of the key questions is how to ensure the convergence of the iterative process. There have been a few small steps taken into this important approach to robot programming. We give a representative result on the convergence problem.

  19. BRASS FOUNDRY MACHINE ROOM USED TO MACHINE CAST BRONZE PIECES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRASS FOUNDRY MACHINE ROOM USED TO MACHINE CAST BRONZE PIECES FOR VALVES AND PREPARE BRONZE VALVE BODIES FOR ASSEMBLY. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Brass Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Roboter in der Raumfahrt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirzinger, G.

    (Robots in space)—The paper emphasizes the enormous automation impact in industry caused by microelectronics, a "byproduct" of space-technology. The evolutionary stages of robotic are outlined and it is shown that there are a lot of reasons for more automation, artificial intelligence and robotic in space, too. The telemanipulator concept is compared with the industrial robot concept, both showing up an increasing degree of similarity. The state of the art in sensory systems is discussed. By hand of the typical operations needed in space as rendezvous, assembly and docking the required robot skill is indicated. As a conclusion it is stated that the basic technologies available with industrial robots today could solve a lot of space problems. What remains to do—apart of course from ongoing research—is better integration and adaption of industrial techniques to the need of space technology.

  1. A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces oris*

    PubMed Central

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces oris contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. oris yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. oris MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. oris possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria. PMID:26170452

  2. Computing Relative Joint Positions of Robot Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.

    1986-01-01

    Vector-algebra method developed for extracting Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for any assembled robot arm. Method for extracting relative joint geometry of robot arms useful to researchers who need data for existing robot arms for either validation of mathematical models or for studies involving actual control of these devices. Method, does not require robot arm to be disassembled, also useful in recalibration of misalined or bent robot arm and becomes useful industrial procedure. Merit of method is errors not propagated.

  3. Induction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, W.H.

    1980-10-14

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizes, a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  4. Induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Whitney H.

    1980-01-01

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  5. Evolution of robotic arms.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond the human arm. da Vinci designed the first sophisticated robotic arm in 1495 with four degrees-of-freedom and an analog on-board controller supplying power and programmability. von Kemplen's chess-playing automaton left arm was quite sophisticated. Unimate introduced the first industrial robotic arm in 1961, it has subsequently evolved into the PUMA arm. In 1963 the Rancho arm was designed; Minsky's Tentacle arm appeared in 1968, Scheinman's Stanford arm in 1969, and MIT's Silver arm in 1974. Aird became the first cyborg human with a robotic arm in 1993. In 2000 Miguel Nicolalis redefined possible man-machine capacity in his work on cerebral implantation in owl-monkeys directly interfacing with robotic arms both locally and at a distance. The robotic arm is the end-effector of robotic systems and currently is the hallmark feature of the da Vinci Surgical System making its entrance into surgical application. But, despite the potential advantages of this computer-controlled master-slave system, robotic arms have definite limitations. Ongoing work in robotics has many potential solutions to the drawbacks of current robotic surgical systems.

  6. Biosleeve Human-Machine Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assad, Christopher (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for sensing human muscle action and gestures in order to control machines or robotic devices are disclosed. One exemplary system employs a tight fitting sleeve worn on a user arm and including a plurality of electromyography (EMG) sensors and at least one inertial measurement unit (IMU). Power, signal processing, and communications electronics may be built into the sleeve and control data may be transmitted wirelessly to the controlled machine or robotic device.

  7. 61 FR 25920 - Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems; Notice Of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-05-23

    ... Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems; Notice Of Meeting In accordance... announces the following meeting. Name: Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent... NSF for financial support. Agenda: To review and evaluate Robotics and Machine Intelligence...

  8. SPHERE-IRDIS assembly, integration and testing: from bits and metal to a planet-hunting machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madec, Fabrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Blanchard, Patrick; Carle, Michael; Origné, Alain; Jaquet, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Barette, Rudy; Moreaux, Gabriel; Arthaud, Gilles; Ferrand, Didier; Blanc, Jean-Claude; Vors, Patrick; Ducret, Franck; Gluck, Laurence; Saisse, Michel; Fabron, Christophe; Laurent, Philippe; Benedetti, Jean-Antoine; Bon, William; Llored, Marc; Moutou, Claire; Gry, Cécile; Meunier, Jean-Charles; Vigan, Arthur; Hill, Lucien; Langlois, Maud P.; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Naranjo, Vianak; Brast, Roland; Feldt, Markus; Popovic, Dan

    2012-09-01

    SPHERE, a second-generation instrument for the VLT, is currently under performance validation before shipping to Chile. The IRDIS sub-system, an Infra-Red Dual-Imager and Spectrograph, was integrated on the SPHERE bench last December, and this paper tells the story of the 12 months preceding this milestone: the Assembly, integration and Tests (AIT) performed at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM). Key points of the AIT strategy are then presented, and the successes and failures---human, technical, and managerial---of this adventure are discussed. We also report on the excellent optical quality achieved, paramount to guarantee ultimate performance of the SPHERE instrument, thanks to high-quality optical manufacture and a successfully applied alignment strategy.

  9. Mothers of Invention: Hubble Engineers Push Robotic 'Evolution' to Save Telescope, Enable New Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Robotic technology being developed out of necessity to keep the Hubble Space Telescope operating could also lead to new levels of man-machine team-work in deep-space exploration down the road-if it survives the near-term scramble for funding. Engineers here who have devoted their NASA careers to the concept of humans servicing the telescope in orbit are planning modifications to International Space Station (ISS) robots that would leave the humans on the ground. The work. forced by post-Columbia flight rules that killed a planned shuttle-servicing mission to Hubble, marks another step in the evolution of robot-partners for human space explorers. "Hubble has always been a pathfider for this agency," says Mike Weiss. Hubble deputy program manager technical. "When the space station was flown and assembled, Hubble was the pathfinder. not just for modularity, but for operations, for assembly techniques. Exploration is the next step. Things we're going to do on Hubble are going to be applied to exploration. It's not just putting a robot in space. It's operating a robot in space. It's adapting that robot to what needs to be done the next time you're up there."

  10. Modularity in robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Butler, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Most robotic systems today are designed one at a time, at a high cost of time and money. This wasteful approach has been necessary because the industry has not established a foundation for the continued evolution of intelligent machines. The next generation of robots will have to be generic, versatile machines capable of absorbing new technology rapidly and economically. This approach is demonstrated in the success of the personal computer, which can be upgraded or expanded with new software and hardware at virtually every level. Modularity is perceived as a major opportunity to reduce the 6 to 7 year design cycle time now required for new robotic manipulators, greatly increasing the breadth and speed of diffusion of robotic systems in manufacturing. Modularity and its crucial role in the next generation of intelligent machines are the focus of interest. The main advantages that modularity provides are examined; types of modules needed to create a generic robot are discussed. Structural modules designed by the robotics group at the University of Texas at Austin are examined to demonstrate the advantages of modular design.

  11. Humanlike Robots - The Upcoming Revolution in Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-01-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  12. Humanlike Robots - The Upcoming Revolution in Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-01-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  13. Humanlike robots: the upcoming revolution in robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-08-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  14. A Practical Solution Using A New Approach To Robot Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, David L.

    1984-01-01

    all of his own software to test, analyze and process the vision application. The second and most common approach was to contract with the vision equipment vendor for the development and installation of a turnkey inspection or manufacturing system. The robot user and his company paid a premium for their vision system in an effort to assure the success of the system. Since 1981, emphasis on robotics has skyrocketed. New groups have been formed in many manufacturing companies with the charter to learn about, test and initially apply new robot and automation technologies. Machine vision is one of new technologies being tested and applied. This focused interest has created a need for a robot vision system that makes it easy for manufacturing engineers to learn about, test, and implement a robot vision application. A newly developed vision system addresses those needs. Vision Development System (VDS) is a complete hardware and software product for the development and testing of robot vision applications. A complimentary, low cost Target Application System (TASK) runs the application program developed with the VDS. An actual robot vision application that demonstrates inspection and pre-assembly for keyboard manufacturing is used to illustrate the VDS/TASK approach.

  15. Automatic Robot Safety Shutdown System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lirette, M.

    1985-01-01

    Robot turned off if acceleration exceeds preset value. Signals from accelerometer on robot arm pass through filter and amplifier, eliminating high-frequency noise and hydraulic-pump pulsations. Data digitized and processed in computer. Unit controls other machines that perform repetitive movements, including rotary tables, tracked vehicles, conveyor lines, and elevators.

  16. Dictionary of robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, H.

    1985-01-01

    The idea of using robots to perform repetitious tasks quickly, cheaply and efficiently has intrigued humans since the Industrial Revolution. Growth has occurred geometrically from the introduction of the first industrial robot in 1955, and continues, unabated, as industry sales are expected to increase 20-fold with applications in both high technology and industry. The Dictionary defines not only those terms standard to robotics but also those used in areas that are just beginning to be involved. The book offers concise, readable descriptions of robot systems, actions, hardware (including applications), communications, computer control, dynamics, cost justification, feedback, kinematics, man-machine interface, sensors and software. There are references to all major robots and manufacturers in the US, Europe and Japan.

  17. Robotics: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Cloy, D.; Harris, D.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an account encompassing the entire range of disciplines involved in robotics: mechanical, electrical, electronic, and software design, as well as the related technologies of pick-and-place devices, walking machines, teleoperators, and prosthetics. The book explores the evolution of robotics and major trends in the field, and covers an array of robot configurations and mechanisms. It also looks at fundamentals such as actuation, control, measurement, computers, sensing and interaction with the environment, and pattern recognition. Important economic and financial aspects as well as safety and social implications are detailed.

  18. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  19. Flexible machining systems described

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butters, H. J.

    1985-03-01

    The rationalization and gradual automation of short rotationally symmetric parts in the Saalfeld VEB Machine Tool Factory was carried out in three stages: (1) part-specific manufacturing; (2) automated production line for manufacturing toothed gears; and (3) automated manufacturing section for short rotationally symmetric parts. The development of numerically controlled machine tools and of industrial robot technology made possible automated manufacturing. The design of current facilities is explored, manufacturing control is examined, experience is reported.

  20. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L. L.

    1985-07-09

    A tunnel boring machine for controlled boring of a curvilinear tunnel including a rotating cutter wheel mounted on the forward end of a thrust cylinder assembly having a central longitudinal axis aligned with the cutter wheel axis of rotation; the thrust cylinder assembly comprising a cylinder barrel and an extendable and retractable thrust arm received therein. An anchoring assembly is pivotally attached to the rear end of the cylinder barrel for anchoring the machine during a cutting stroke and providing a rear end pivot axis during curved cutting strokes. A pair of laterally extending, extendable and retractable arms are fixedly mounted at a forward portion of the cylinder barrel for providing lateral displacement in a laterally curved cutting mode and for anchoring the machine between cutting strokes and during straight line boring. Forward and rear transverse displacement and support assemblies are provided to facilitate cutting in a transversely curved cutting mode and to facilitate machine movement between cutting strokes.

  1. The Structure of a BamA-BamD Fusion Illuminates the Architecture of the β-Barrel Assembly Machine Core.

    PubMed

    Bergal, Hans Thor; Hopkins, Alex Hunt; Metzner, Sandra Ines; Sousa, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-02-02

    The β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) mediates folding and insertion of integral β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in Gram-negative bacteria. Of the five BAM subunits, only BamA and BamD are essential for cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of a fusion between BamA POTRA4-5 and BamD from Rhodothermus marinus. The POTRA5 domain binds BamD between its tetratricopeptide repeats 3 and 4. The interface structural elements are conserved in the Escherichia coli proteins, which allowed structure validation by mutagenesis and disulfide crosslinking in E. coli. Furthermore, the interface is consistent with previously reported mutations that impair BamA-BamD binding. The structure serves as a linchpin to generate a BAM model where POTRA domains and BamD form an elongated periplasmic ring adjacent to the membrane with a central cavity approximately 30 × 60 Å wide. We propose that nascent OMPs bind this periplasmic ring prior to insertion and folding by BAM.

  2. TH-C-17A-06: A Hardware Implementation and Evaluation of Robotic SPECT: Toward Molecular Imaging Onboard Radiation Therapy Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S; Touch, M; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Cheng, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch. The system has potential for on-board functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was developed utilizing a Digirad 2020tc detector and a KUKA KR150-L110 robot. An imaging study was performed with the PET CT Phantom, which includes 5 spheres: 10, 13, 17, 22 and 28 mm in diameter. Sphere-tobackground concentration ratio was 6:1 of Tc99m. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired with a parallel-hole collimator and a single pinhole collimator. The robotic system navigated the detector tracing the flat-top table to maintain the closest possible proximity to the phantom. For image reconstruction, detector trajectories were described by six parameters: radius-of-rotation, x and z detector shifts, and detector rotation θ, tilt ϕ and twist γ. These six parameters were obtained from the robotic system by calibrating the robot base and tool coordinates. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector-to-COR (center-ofrotation) distance. In acquisitions with background at 1/6th sphere activity concentration, photopeak contamination was heavy, yet the 17, 22, and 28 mm diameter spheres were readily observed with the parallel hole imaging, and the single, targeted sphere (28 mm diameter) was readily observed in the pinhole region-of-interest (ROI) imaging. Conclusion: Onboard SPECT could be achieved by a robot maneuvering a SPECT detector about patients in position for radiation therapy on a flat-top couch. The robot inherent coordinate frame could be an effective means to estimate detector pose for use in SPECT image reconstruction. PHS/NIH/NCI grant R21-CA156390-01A1.

  3. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  4. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  5. Space Robotics: AWIMR an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Rick

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the usages of Autonomous Walking Inspection and Maintenance Robots (AWIMR) in space. Some of the uses that these robots in support of space exploration can have are: inspection of a space craft, cleaning, astronaut assistance, assembly of a structure, repair of structures, and replenishment of supplies.

  6. Sensory Interactive Teleoperator Robotic Grasping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alark, Keli; Lumia, Ron

    1997-01-01

    As the technological world strives for efficiency, the need for economical equipment that increases operator proficiency in minimal time is fundamental. This system links a CCD camera, a controller and a robotic arm to a computer vision system to provide an alternative method of image analysis. The machine vision system which was employed possesses software tools for acquiring and analyzing images which are received through a CCD camera. After feature extraction on the object in the image was performed, information about the object's location, orientation and distance from the robotic gripper is sent to the robot controller so that the robot can manipulate the object.

  7. Primitive robotic procedures: automotions for medical liquids in 12th century Asia minor.

    PubMed

    Penbegul, Necmettin; Atar, Murat; Kendirci, Muammer; Bozkurt, Yasar; Hatipoglu, Namık Kemal; Verit, Ayhan; Kadıoglu, Ates

    2014-12-30

    In recent years, day by day, robotic surgery applications have increase their role in our medical life. In this article, we reported the discovery of the first primitive robotic applications as automatic machines for the sensitive calculation of liquids such as blood in the literature. Al-Jazari who wrote the book "Elcâmi 'Beyne'l - 'ilm ve'l - 'amel en-nâfi 'fi es-sınaâ 'ti'l - hiyel", lived in Anatolian territory between 1136 and 1206. In this book that was written in the twelfth century, Al-Jazari described nearly fifty graphics of robotic machines and six of them that were designed for medical purposes. We found that some of the robots mentioned in this book are related to medical applications. This book reviews approximately 50 devices, including water clocks, candle clocks, ewers, various automata used for amusement in drink assemblies, automata used for ablution, blood collection tanks, fountains, music devices, devices for water lifting, locks, a protractor, a boat-shaped water clock, and the gate of Diyarbakir City in south-east of Turkey, actually in northern Mesopotamia. We found that automata used for ablution and blood collection tanks were related with medical applications; therefore, we will describe these robots.

  8. Robot and robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E. (Inventor); Marzwell, Neville I. (Inventor); Wall, Jonathan N. (Inventor); Poole, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A robot and robot system that are capable of functioning in a zero-gravity environment are provided. The robot can include a body having a longitudinal axis and having a control unit and a power source. The robot can include a first leg pair including a first leg and a second leg. Each leg of the first leg pair can be pivotally attached to the body and constrained to pivot in a first leg pair plane that is substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body.

  9. Morphological Evolution of Physical Robots through Model-Free Phenotype Development

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Luzius; Hauser, Simon; Iida, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Artificial evolution of physical systems is a stochastic optimization method in which physical machines are iteratively adapted to a target function. The key for a meaningful design optimization is the capability to build variations of physical machines through the course of the evolutionary process. The optimization in turn no longer relies on complex physics models that are prone to the reality gap, a mismatch between simulated and real-world behavior. We report model-free development and evaluation of phenotypes in the artificial evolution of physical systems, in which a mother robot autonomously designs and assembles locomotion agents. The locomotion agents are automatically placed in the testing environment and their locomotion behavior is analyzed in the real world. This feedback is used for the design of the next iteration. Through experiments with a total of 500 autonomously built locomotion agents, this article shows diversification of morphology and behavior of physical robots for the improvement of functionality with limited resources. PMID:26091255

  10. PIR-1 and PIRPL. A Project in Robotics Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Charles P.

    This paper presents the results of a project in robotics education that included: (1) designing a mobile robot--the Personal Instructional Robot-1 (PIR-1); (2) providing a guide to the purchase and assembly of necessary parts; (3) providing a way to interface the robot with common classroom microcomputers; and (4) providing a language by which the…

  11. Types of verbal interaction with instructable robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crangle, C.; Suppes, P.; Michalowski, S.

    1987-01-01

    An instructable robot is one that accepts instruction in some natural language such as English and uses that instruction to extend its basic repertoire of actions. Such robots are quite different in conception from autonomously intelligent robots, which provide the impetus for much of the research on inference and planning in artificial intelligence. Examined here are the significant problem areas in the design of robots that learn from vebal instruction. Examples are drawn primarily from our earlier work on instructable robots and recent work on the Robotic Aid for the physically disabled. Natural-language understanding by machines is discussed as well as in the possibilities and limits of verbal instruction. The core problem of verbal instruction, namely, how to achieve specific concrete action in the robot in response to commands that express general intentions, is considered, as are two major challenges to instructability: achieving appropriate real-time behavior in the robot, and extending the robot's language capabilities.

  12. RIPE/RIPL. Robot Independent Programming Environment and Language

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D; Lennox, R C; Fahrenholtz, J; Shinn, R; Rhea, R; Rogers, M

    1990-01-01

    RIPE is an object-oriented approach to robot system architectures; it is a software environment which facilitates rapid design and implementation of complex robot systems for diverse applications. The robot work cell is modeled using software objects and supports model-based automated programming of robotic and machining devices, real-time sensor-based control, error handling, robust communications and graphical interfaces for robot system control. The objects include robots, sensors, end effectors, workpieces, NC machines and various other devices. A set of generic classes is defined to represent these objects, and the interfaces to them become RIPL.

  13. Robotics and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Schaal, Stefan

    2014-09-22

    In the attempt to build adaptive and intelligent machines, roboticists have looked at neuroscience for more than half a century as a source of inspiration for perception and control. More recently, neuroscientists have resorted to robots for testing hypotheses and validating models of biological nervous systems. Here, we give an overview of the work at the intersection of robotics and neuroscience and highlight the most promising approaches and areas where interactions between the two fields have generated significant new insights. We articulate the work in three sections, invertebrate, vertebrate and primate neuroscience. We argue that robots generate valuable insight into the function of nervous systems, which is intimately linked to behaviour and embodiment, and that brain-inspired algorithms and devices give robots life-like capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  15. Mining machine

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.R.

    1984-12-04

    A mining machine is disclosed comprising a mobile base and a cutting head assembly at a forward end of the mobile base having a cutter drum rotatable about an output shaft disposed along the longitudinal axis of the cutter drum. A drive system for the cutting head assembly comprises at least one motor for driving at least one toothed motor pinion and a generally cylindrical combination gear having generally circular end surfaces. A bevel or face gear is formed in at least one of the end surfaces, having teeth adapted to mate with and be driven by the toothed motor pinion. The combination gear has a worm gear formed in the outside cylindrical surface, which is disposed in driving engagement with the teeth of an output gear integrally and coaxially connected to the output shaft of the cutter drum.

  16. Robot Would Reconfigure Modular Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R.

    1993-01-01

    Special-purpose sets of equipment, packaged in identical modules with identical interconnecting mechanisms, attached to or detached from each other by specially designed robot, according to proposal. Two-arm walking robot connects and disconnects modules, operating either autonomously or under remote supervision. Robot walks along row of connected modules by grasping successive attachment subassemblies in hand-over-hand motion. Intended application for facility or station in outer space; robot reconfiguration scheme makes it unnecessary for astronauts to venture outside spacecraft or space station. Concept proves useful on Earth in assembly, disassembly, or reconfiguration of equipment in such hostile environments as underwater, near active volcanoes, or in industrial process streams.

  17. Robot vision system programmed in Prolog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Bruce G.; Hack, Ralf

    1995-10-01

    This is the latest in a series of publications which develop the theme of programming a machine vision system using the artificial intelligence language Prolog. The article states the long-term objective of the research program of which this work forms part. Many but not yet all of the goals laid out in this plan have already been achieved in an integrated system, which uses a multi-layer control hierarchy. The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate that a system based upon a Prolog controller is capable of making complex decisions and operating a standard robot. The authors chose, as a vehicle for this exercise, the task of playing dominoes against a human opponent. This game was selected for this demonstration since it models a range of industrial assembly tasks, where parts are to be mated together. (For example, a 'daisy chain' of electronic equipment and the interconnecting cables/adapters may be likened to a chain of dominoes.)

  18. Robot Serviced Space Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A robot serviced space facility includes multiple modules which are identical in physical structure, but selectively differing in function. and purpose. Each module includes multiple like attachment points which are identically placed on each module so as to permit interconnection with immediately adjacent modules. Connection is made through like outwardly extending flange assemblies having identical male and female configurations for interconnecting to and locking to a complementary side of another flange. Multiple rows of interconnected modules permit force, fluid, data and power transfer to be accomplished by redundant circuit paths. Redundant modules of critical subsystems are included. Redundancy of modules and of interconnections results in a space complex with any module being removable upon demand, either for module replacement or facility reconfiguration. without eliminating any vital functions of the complex. Module replacement and facility assembly or reconfiguration are accomplished by a computer controlled articulated walker type robotic manipulator arm assembly having two identical end-effectors in the form of male configurations which are identical to those on module flanges and which interconnect to female configurations on other flanges. The robotic arm assembly moves along a connected set or modules by successively disconnecting, moving and reconnecting alternate ends of itself to a succession of flanges in a walking type maneuver. To transport a module, the robot keeps the transported module attached to one of its end-effectors and uses another flange male configuration of the attached module as a substitute end-effector during walking.

  19. Softworms: the design and control of non-pneumatic, 3D-printed, deformable robots.

    PubMed

    Umedachi, T; Vikas, V; Trimmer, B A

    2016-03-10

    Robots that can easily interact with humans and move through natural environments are becoming increasingly essential as assistive devices in the home, office and hospital. These machines need to be safe, effective, and easy to control. One strategy towards accomplishing these goals is to build the robots using soft and flexible materials to make them much more approachable and less likely to damage their environment. A major challenge is that comparatively little is known about how best to design, fabricate and control deformable machines. Here we describe the design, fabrication and control of a novel soft robotic platform (Softworms) as a modular device for research, education and public outreach. These robots are inspired by recent neuromechanical studies of crawling and climbing by larval moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera, caterpillars). Unlike most soft robots currently under development, the Softworms do not rely on pneumatic or fluidic actuators but are electrically powered and actuated using either shape-memory alloy microcoils or motor tendons, and they can be modified to accept other muscle-like actuators such as electroactive polymers. The technology is extremely versatile, and different designs can be quickly and cheaply fabricated by casting elastomeric polymers or by direct 3D printing. Softworms can crawl, inch or roll, and they are steerable and even climb steep inclines. Softworms can be made in any shape but here we describe modular and monolithic designs requiring little assembly. These modules can be combined to make multi-limbed devices. We also describe two approaches for controlling such highly deformable structures using either model-free state transition-reward matrices or distributed, mechanically coupled oscillators. In addition to their value as a research platform, these robots can be developed for use in environmental, medical and space applications where cheap, lightweight and shape-changing deformable robots will provide new

  20. Prototyping artificial jaws for the robotic dental testing simulator.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, K; Raabe, D

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a robot periphery prototyped for the six-degrees-of-freedom robotic dental testing simulator, simulating the wear of materials on dental components, such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, or a full set of teeth. The robot periphery consists of the artificial jaws and compliance module. The jaws have been reverse engineered and represent a human-like mandible and maxilla with artificial teeth. Each clinically fabricated tooth consists of a crown and glass ceramic roots which are connected using resin cement. Normal clinical occlusion of the artificial jaws assembly was emulated by a dental articulator based on 'Andrew's six keys to occlusion'. The radii of the von Spee curve, the Monson curve, and the Wilson curve were also measured as important jaw characteristic indicators to aid normal occlusion. A compliance module had to be built between the lower jaw and the robot platform to sustain the fluctuating forces that occur during normal chewing in the occlusal contact areas, where these high bite forces are major causes of dental component failure. A strain gauge force transducer has been integrated into the machined lower jaw, underneath the second molars, to measure axial biting forces applied to the posterior teeth. The experiments conducted have shown that the sensor is able to sense small changes in the compression force satisfactorily, when applied perpendicular to the occlusal surfaces of the teeth.

  1. Designing, Fabrication and Controlling Of Multipurpose3-DOF Robotic Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabeel, Hafiz Muhammad; Azher, Anum; Usman Ali, Syed M.; Wahab Mughal, Abdul

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, we have successfully designed and developed a 3-DOF articulated Robotic Arm capable of performing typical industrial tasks such as painting or spraying, assembling and handling automobiles parts and etc., in resemblance to a human arm. The mechanical assembly is designed on SOLIDWORKS and aluminum grade 6061 -T6 is used for its fabrication in order to reduce the structure weight. We have applied inverse kinematics to determine the joint angles, equations are fed into an efficient microcontroller ATMEGA16 which performs all the calculations to determine the joint angles on the basis of given coordinates to actuate the joints through motorized control. Good accuracy was obtained with quadrature optical encoders installed in each joint to achieve the desired position and a LabVIEW based GUI is designed to provide human machine interface.

  2. Setup Aid for Electrical-Discharge Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lines, G.; Duca, J.

    1985-01-01

    Interlock assures that workpiece is correctly assembled in machining fixture. A Plunger in a Hollow Shaft actuates a switch, allowing a power supply to produce current for electrical-discharge machining. Plunger operates only when necessary parts are position.

  3. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  4. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  5. A shotcrete system using a robot

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.; Kahng, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    This paper describes the problems and solutions raised in an experimental approach for a shotcrete underground system design. The system consists of a retrofit dry-wet process dual purpose shotcrete machine and an industrial robot.

  6. A brain-machine interface to navigate a mobile robot in a planar workspace: enabling humans to fly simulated aircraft with EEG.

    PubMed

    Akce, Abdullah; Johnson, Miles; Dantsker, Or; Bretl, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an interface for navigating a mobile robot that moves at a fixed speed in a planar workspace, with noisy binary inputs that are obtained asynchronously at low bit-rates from a human user through an electroencephalograph (EEG). The approach is to construct an ordered symbolic language for smooth planar curves and to use these curves as desired paths for a mobile robot. The underlying problem is then to design a communication protocol by which the user can, with vanishing error probability, specify a string in this language using a sequence of inputs. Such a protocol, provided by tools from information theory, relies on a human user's ability to compare smooth curves, just like they can compare strings of text. We demonstrate our interface by performing experiments in which twenty subjects fly a simulated aircraft at a fixed speed and altitude with input only from EEG. Experimental results show that the majority of subjects are able to specify desired paths despite a wide range of errors made in decoding EEG signals.

  7. Modular robot

    DOEpatents

    Ferrante, Todd A.

    1997-01-01

    A modular robot may comprise a main body having a structure defined by a plurality of stackable modules. The stackable modules may comprise a manifold, a valve module, and a control module. The manifold may comprise a top surface and a bottom surface having a plurality of fluid passages contained therein, at least one of the plurality of fluid passages terminating in a valve port located on the bottom surface of the manifold. The valve module is removably connected to the manifold and selectively fluidically connects the plurality of fluid passages contained in the manifold to a supply of pressurized fluid and to a vent. The control module is removably connected to the valve module and actuates the valve module to selectively control a flow of pressurized fluid through different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. The manifold, valve module, and control module are mounted together in a sandwich-like manner and comprise a main body. A plurality of leg assemblies are removably connected to the main body and are removably fluidically connected to the fluid passages in the manifold so that each of the leg assemblies can be selectively actuated by the flow of pressurized fluid in different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold.

  8. Modular robot

    DOEpatents

    Ferrante, T.A.

    1997-11-11

    A modular robot may comprise a main body having a structure defined by a plurality of stackable modules. The stackable modules may comprise a manifold, a valve module, and a control module. The manifold may comprise a top surface and a bottom surface having a plurality of fluid passages contained therein, at least one of the plurality of fluid passages terminating in a valve port located on the bottom surface of the manifold. The valve module is removably connected to the manifold and selectively fluidically connects the plurality of fluid passages contained in the manifold to a supply of pressurized fluid and to a vent. The control module is removably connected to the valve module and actuates the valve module to selectively control a flow of pressurized fluid through different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. The manifold, valve module, and control module are mounted together in a sandwich-like manner and comprise a main body. A plurality of leg assemblies are removably connected to the main body and are removably fluidically connected to the fluid passages in the manifold so that each of the leg assemblies can be selectively actuated by the flow of pressurized fluid in different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. 12 figs.

  9. Robots Are Taking Over--Who Does What.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, H. Don

    Robots are machines designed to replace human labor. A fear of vast unemployment due to robots seems unfounded, however, since industrialization creates many more jobs and automation requires technologists to build, program, maintain, and operate sophisticated equipment. Robots possess an intelligence unit, a manipulator, and an end effector.…

  10. Robots Are Taking Over--Who Does What.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, H. Don

    Robots are machines designed to replace human labor. A fear of vast unemployment due to robots seems unfounded, however, since industrialization creates many more jobs and automation requires technologists to build, program, maintain, and operate sophisticated equipment. Robots possess an intelligence unit, a manipulator, and an end effector.…

  11. Building Bridges, Robots, and High Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennie, Fiona; Corbett, Charlotte; Palo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an after-school program at the Horace Mann School for the Deaf (HMS), the oldest public day school for deaf students in the United States, where almost half of the student body imagined and created bridge and robotic machines. The Deaf Robotics Engineering and Math Team, or the DREAM Team club, included HMS students in…

  12. The Archimedes 2 mechanical assembly planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, S.G.; Wilson, R.H.; Jones, R.E.; Calton, T.L.; Ames, A.L.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of Archimedes 2, an integrated mechanical assembly planning system. Archimedes 2 includes two planners, two assembly sequence animation facilities, and an associated robotic workcell. Both planners use full 3 dimensional data. A rudimentary translator from high level assembly plans to control code for the robotic workcell has also been implemented. We can translate data from a commercial CAD system into input data for the system, which has allowed us to plan assembly sequences for many industrial assemblies. Archimedes 2 has been used to plan sequences for assemblies consisting of 5 to 109 parts. We have also successfully taken a CAD model of an assembly, produced an optimized assembly sequence for it, and translated the plan into robot code, which successfully assembles the device specified in the model.

  13. The universal robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moravec, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Our artifacts are getting smarter, and a loose parallel with the evolution of animal intelligence suggests one future course for them. Computerless industrial machinery exhibits the behavioral flexibility of single-celled organisms. Today's best computer-controlled robots are like the simpler invertebrates. A thousand-fold increase in computer power in the next decade should make possible machines with reptile-like sensory and motor competence. Properly configured, such robots could do in the physical world what personal computers now do in the world of data - act on our behalf as literal-minded slaves. Growing computer power over the next half-century will allow this reptile stage to be surpassed, in stages producing robots that learn like mammals, model their world like primates, and eventually reason like humans. Depending on your point of view, humanity will then have produced a worthy successor, or transcended some of its inherited limitations and so transformed itself into something quite new.

  14. The universal robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Hans

    1993-12-01

    Our artifacts are getting smarter, and a loose parallel with the evolution of animal intelligence suggests one future course for them. Computerless industrial machinery exhibits the behavioral flexibility of single-celled organisms. Today's best computer-controlled robots are like the simpler invertebrates. A thousand-fold increase in computer power in the next decade should make possible machines with reptile-like sensory and motor competence. Properly configured, such robots could do in the physical world what personal computers now do in the world of data - act on our behalf as literal-minded slaves. Growing computer power over the next half-century will allow this reptile stage to be surpassed, in stages producing robots that learn like mammals, model their world like primates, and eventually reason like humans. Depending on your point of view, humanity will then have produced a worthy successor, or transcended some of its inherited limitations and so transformed itself into something quite new.

  15. Intelligent robot trends for 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest L.

    1998-10-01

    An intelligent robot is a remarkably useful combination of a manipulator, sensors and controls. The use of these machines in factory automation can improve productivity, increase product quality and improve competitiveness. This paper presents a discussion of recent technical and economic trends. Technically, the machines are faster, cheaper, more repeatable, more reliable and safer. The knowledge base of inverse kinematic and dynamic solutions and intelligent controls is increasing. More attention is being given by industry to robots, vision and motion controls. New areas of usage are emerging for service robots, remote manipulators and automated guided vehicles. Economically, the robotics industry now has a 1.1 billion-dollar market in the U.S. and is growing. Feasibility studies results are presented which also show decreasing costs for robots and unaudited healthy rates of return for a variety of robotic applications. However, the road from inspiration to successful application can be long and difficult, often taking decades to achieve a new product. A greater emphasis on mechatronics is needed in our universities. Certainly, more cooperation between government, industry and universities is needed to speed the development of intelligent robots that will benefit industry and society.

  16. In vivo roles of BamA, BamB and BamD in the biogenesis of BamA, a core protein of the β-barrel assembly machine of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Rajeev; Stikeleather, Ryan; Gabriele, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of the β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is an essential cellular process in Gram negative bacteria and in the mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes—two organelles of bacterial origin. Central to this process is the conserved β-barrel OMP that belongs to the Omp85 superfamily. In Escherichia coli, BamA is the core β-barrel OMP, and together with four outer membrane lipoproteins, BamBCDE, constitute the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM). In this paper, we investigated the roles of BamD, an essential lipoprotein, and BamB in BamA biogenesis. Depletion of BamD caused impairment in BamA biogenesis and cessation of cell growth. These defects of BamD depletion were partly reversed by single amino acid substitutions mapping within the β-barrel domain of BamA. However, in the absence of BamB, the positive effects of the β-barrel substitutions on BamA biogenesis under BamD depletion conditions were nullified. By employing a BamA protein bearing one such substitution, F494L, it was demonstrated that the mutant BamA protein could not only assemble without BamD, but it could also facilitate the assembly of wild-type BamA expressed in trans. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the Bam lipoproteins, which are localized to the outer membrane by the BAM-independent Lol pathway, aid in the creation of new BAM complexes by serving as outer membrane receptors and folding factors for nascent BamA molecules. The newly assembled BAM holocomplex then catalyzes the assembly of substrate OMPs and BamA. These in vivo findings are corroborated by recently published in vitro data. PMID:24792419

  17. Modular Track System For Positioning Mobile Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Conceptual system for positioning mobile robotic manipulators on large main structure includes modular tracks and ancillary structures assembled easily along with main structure. System, called "tracked robotic location system" (TROLS), originally intended for application to platforms in outer space, but TROLS concept might also prove useful on Earth; for example, to position robots in factories and warehouses. T-cross-section rail keeps mobile robot on track. Bar codes mark locations along track. Each robot equipped with bar-code-recognizing circuitry so it quickly finds way to assigned location.

  18. Small Dog-Like Quadruped Robot Powered With McKibben Air Muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary surface robotic exploration is typically done by wheeled robots, which are limited to traveling on relatively flat terrain. The goal of this project was to design a bio-inspired robot to mimic the movements and agility of animals to navigate in various types of natural terrain, such as found on Mars. My objective for the summer was to design and construct a quadruped robot with a locomotion gait similar to a small dog. The design includes four legs and an actuated flexible spine for added mobility and performance; each leg has three joints - hip, knee, and ankle. I created 3D CAD models and machined the pieces for the assemblies of each part. One of the key areas of concern is weight vs. power issues for the driving force of locomotion. To maximize the power-to-weight ratio, I used McKibben air muscles to drive the motion of the quadruped. The prototype went through several iterations to analyze performance, with adjustments made to each assembly. We expect the final working prototype will be capable of standing unassisted and pronking into the air without active control. It will serve as a research platform for future bio-inspired control algorithms.

  19. Small Dog-Like Quadruped Robot Powered With McKibben Air Muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary surface robotic exploration is typically done by wheeled robots, which are limited to traveling on relatively flat terrain. The goal of this project was to design a bio-inspired robot to mimic the movements and agility of animals to navigate in various types of natural terrain, such as found on Mars. My objective for the summer was to design and construct a quadruped robot with a locomotion gait similar to a small dog. The design includes four legs and an actuated flexible spine for added mobility and performance; each leg has three joints - hip, knee, and ankle. I created 3D CAD models and machined the pieces for the assemblies of each part. One of the key areas of concern is weight vs. power issues for the driving force of locomotion. To maximize the power-to-weight ratio, I used McKibben air muscles to drive the motion of the quadruped. The prototype went through several iterations to analyze performance, with adjustments made to each assembly. We expect the final working prototype will be capable of standing unassisted and pronking into the air without active control. It will serve as a research platform for future bio-inspired control algorithms.

  20. Robot Lies in Health Care: When Is Deception Morally Permissible?

    PubMed

    Matthias, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Autonomous robots are increasingly interacting with users who have limited knowledge of robotics and are likely to have an erroneous mental model of the robot's workings, capabilities, and internal structure. The robot's real capabilities may diverge from this mental model to the extent that one might accuse the robot's manufacturer of deceiving the user, especially in cases where the user naturally tends to ascribe exaggerated capabilities to the machine (e.g. conversational systems in elder-care contexts, or toy robots in child care). This poses the question, whether misleading or even actively deceiving the user of an autonomous artifact about the capabilities of the machine is morally bad and why. By analyzing trust, autonomy, and the erosion of trust in communicative acts as consequences of deceptive robot behavior, we formulate four criteria that must be fulfilled in order for robot deception to be morally permissible, and in some cases even morally indicated.

  1. Business Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pactor, Paul

    1970-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Labor has projected a 106 percent increase in the demand for office machine operators over the next 10 years. Machines with a high frequency of use include printing calculators, 10-key adding machines, and key punch machines. The 12th grade is the logical time for teaching business machines. (CH)

  2. CASSY Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Anna; Wright, Ann; Rice, Aaron; Shyaka, Claude

    2014-03-01

    The CASSY Robot project involved two square robots coded in RobotC. The goal was to code a robot to do a certain set of tasks autonomously. To begin with, our task was to code the robot so that it would roam a certain area, marked off by black tape. When the robot hit the black tape, it knew to back up and turn around. It was able to do this thanks to the light sensor that was attached to the bottom of the robot. Also, whenever the robot hit an obstacle, it knew to stop, back up, and turn around. This was primarily to prevent the robot from hurting itself if it hit an obstacle. This was accomplished by using touch sensors set up as bumpers. Once that was accomplished, we attached sonar sensors and created code so that one robot was able to find and track the other robot in a sort of intruder/police scenario. The overall goal of this project was to code the robot so that we can test it against a robot coded exactly the same, but using Layered Mode Selection Logic. Professor.

  3. Clean-room robot implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Comeau, J.L.

    1982-07-14

    A robot has been incorporated in a clean room operation in which vacuum tube parts are cleaned just prior to final assembly with a 60 lb/in/sup 2/ blast of argon gas. The robot is programmed to pick up the parts, manipulate/rotate them as necessary in the jet pattern and deposit them in a tray precleaned by the robot. A carefully studied implementation plan was followed in the procurement, installation, modification and programming of the robot facility. An unusual configuration of one tube part required a unique gripper design. A study indicated that the tube parts processed by the robot are 12% cleaner than those manually cleaned by an experienced operator.

  4. Archimedes : An experiment in automating mechanical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Strip, D. ); Maciejewski, A.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Archimedes is a prototype mechanical assembly system which generates and executes robot assembly programs from a CAD model input. The system addresses the unrealized potential for flexibility in robotic mechanical assembly applications by automating the programming task. Input is a solid model of the finished assembly. Using this model. Archimedes deduces geometric assembly constraints and then produces an assembly plan that satisfies the geometric constraints, as well as other constraints such as stability and accessibility. A retargetable plan compiler converts the generic plan into robot and cell specific code, including recognition routines for a vision system. In the prototype system the code is executed in a workcell containing an Adept Two robot, a vision system, and other parts handling equipment. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Adaptive Accommodation Control Method for Complex Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Munsang; Park, Shinsuk

    Robotic systems have been used to automate assembly tasks in manufacturing and in teleoperation. Conventional robotic systems, however, have been ineffective in controlling contact force in multiple contact states of complex assemblythat involves interactions between complex-shaped parts. Unlike robots, humans excel at complex assembly tasks by utilizing their intrinsic impedance, forces and torque sensation, and tactile contact clues. By examining the human behavior in assembling complex parts, this study proposes a novel geometry-independent control method for robotic assembly using adaptive accommodation (or damping) algorithm. Two important conditions for complex assembly, target approachability and bounded contact force, can be met by the proposed control scheme. It generates target approachable motion that leads the object to move closer to a desired target position, while contact force is kept under a predetermined value. Experimental results from complex assembly tests have confirmed the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  6. RNA folding and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2008-12-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a tightly regulated process that is crucial for cell survival. Chemical footprinting, mass spectrometry, and cryo-electron microscopy are revealing how these complex cellular machines are assembled. Rapid folding of the rRNA provides a platform for protein-induced assembly of the bacterial 30S ribosome. Multiple assembly pathways increase the flexibility of the assembly process, while accessory factors and modification enzymes chaperone the late stages of assembly and control the quality of the mature subunits.

  7. Generic robotic kinematic generator for virtual environment interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Piguet, Laurent; Baur, Charles

    1996-12-01

    The expansion of robotic systems' performance, as well as the need for such machines to work in complex environments (hazardous, small, distant, etc.), involves the need for user interfaces which permit efficient teleoperation. Virtual Reality based interfaces provide the user with a new method for robot task planning and control: he or she can define tasks in a very intuitive way by interacting with a 3D computer generated representation of the world, which is continuously updated thanks to multiple sensors fusion and analysis. The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has successfully tested different kinds of teleoperations. In the early 90s, a transatlantic teleoperation of a conventional robot manipulator with a vision feedback system to update the virtual world was achieved. This approach was then extended to perform teleoperation of several mobile robots (Khepera, Koala) as well as to control microrobots used for microsystems' assembly in the micrometer range. One of the problems encountered with such an approach is the necessity to program a specific kinematic algorithm for each kind of manipulator. To provide a more general solution, we started a project aiming at the design of a 'kinematic generator' (CINEGEN) for the simulation of generic serial and parallel mechanical chains. With CINEGEN, each manipulator is defined with an ascii file description and its attached graphics files; inserting a new manipulator simply requires a new description file, and none of the existing tools require modification. To have a real time behavior, we have chosen a numerical method based on the pseudo-Jacobian method to generate the inverse kinematics of the robot. The results obtained with an object-oriented implementation on a graphic workstation are presented in this paper.

  8. TPX assembly plan

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, D.

    1993-11-01

    The TPX machine will be assembled in the TFTR Test Cell at the Plasma Physics Laboratory, utilizing the existing TFTR machine foundation. Preparation of the area for assembly will begin after completion of the decontamination and decommissioning phase on TFTR and certification that the radiation levels remaining, if any, are consistent with the types of operations planned. Assembly operations begin with the arrival of the first components, and conclude, approximately 24 months later, with the successful completion of the integrated systems tests and the achievement of a first plasma.

  9. Army Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  10. Space Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENTS CATALOG NUIA3.R CMU-RI-TR-82-10 I4 1 (. 4. ;,;-LL (and Sublitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD CovEREO SPACE ROBOTICS Interim... Robotics Institute Pittsburgh, PA. 15213 It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Office of Naval Research -August 1982 Arlington, VA 22217...SXnet.eE . Space Robotics Richard E. Korf Department of Computer Science and The Robotics Institute Carnegie-Mellon University Pittsburgh, Oetusylvania

  11. TARDEC Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-12

    unclassified TARDEC Robotics Dr. James L. Overholt Director, Joint Center for Robotics US Army TARDEC Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TARDEC Robotics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) James L. Overholt... Robotics , Network and Control Components with a Focus on Customer Driven Requirements to Provide Full System Solutions to the War Fighter Technology

  12. Robotics in near-earth space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    The areas of space exploration in which robotic devices will play a part are identified, and progress to date in the space agency plans to acquire this capability is briefly reviewed. Roles and functions on orbit for robotic devices include well known activities, such as inspection and maintenance, assembly, docking, berthing, deployment, retrieval, materials handling, orbital replacement unit exchange, and repairs. Missions that could benefit from a robotic capability are discussed.

  13. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  14. Basic Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  15. (Robotic hands)

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1988-09-23

    The traveler attended the International Workshop on Robot Hands at the Palace Hotel in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia. The traveler presented a lecture on An integrated sensor system for the ORNL mobile robot.'' The traveler obtained important information on current R D efforts in multi-fingered robot hands and object recognition using touch sensing.

  16. Basic Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  17. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  18. Perception and estimation challenges for humanoid robotics: DARPA Robotics Challenge and NASA Valkyrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Maurice

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes ongoing work at the University of Edinburgh's Humanoid Robotics Project. University of Edinburgh have formed a collaboration with the United States' National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) around their R5 humanoid robot commonly known as Valkyrie. Also involved are MIT, Northeastern University and the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) as part of NASA's Space Robotics Challenge. We will outline the development of state estimation and localization algorithms being developed for Valkyrie.

  19. Serpentine Robot Arm Contains Electromagnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moya, Israel A.; Studer, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    Identical modules assembled into flexible robot arm configured in serpentlike fashion to manipulate objects while avoiding obstacles. Each module includes integral electromagnetic actuators energized selectively to produce variety of motions, stationary configurations, and combinations thereof.

  20. The human/robot interface.

    PubMed

    Wiker, S F

    1993-10-01

    The use of telerobotic technology in space exploration is examined. Early aspirations for anthropomorphic designs and advances in the field are reviewed. The application of human factors engineering to robotics design and the human-machine interface are examined. New strategies in design and automation are presented.

  1. Vision Guided Intelligent Robot Design And Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutzky, G. D.; Hall, E. L.

    1988-02-01

    The concept of an intelligent robot is an important topic combining sensors, manipulators, and artificial intelligence to design a useful machine. Vision systems, tactile sensors, proximity switches and other sensors provide the elements necessary for simple game playing as well as industrial applications. These sensors permit adaption to a changing environment. The AI techniques permit advanced forms of decision making, adaptive responses, and learning while the manipulator provides the ability to perform various tasks. Computer languages such as LISP and OPS5, have been utilized to achieve expert systems approaches in solving real world problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe several examples of visually guided intelligent robots including both stationary and mobile robots. Demonstrations will be presented of a system for constructing and solving a popular peg game, a robot lawn mower, and a box stacking robot. The experience gained from these and other systems provide insight into what may be realistically expected from the next generation of intelligent machines.

  2. A strategy planner for NASA robotics applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodd, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic strategy or task planning is an important element of robotics systems. A strategy planner under development at Goddard Space Flight Center automatically produces robot plans for assembly, disassembly, or repair of NASA spacecraft from computer aided design descriptions of the individual parts of the spacecraft.

  3. Building Teen Futures with Underwater Robotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Michael L.; Freitas, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Preparing young Americans with science and technology skills has been on the forefront of educational reform for several years, and Extension has responded. Robotics projects have become a natural fit for 4-H clubs, with members' experiences ranging from using Lego® Mindstorms® and other "purchase and assemble" robotics kits to building…

  4. Building Teen Futures with Underwater Robotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Michael L.; Freitas, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Preparing young Americans with science and technology skills has been on the forefront of educational reform for several years, and Extension has responded. Robotics projects have become a natural fit for 4-H clubs, with members' experiences ranging from using Lego® Mindstorms® and other "purchase and assemble" robotics kits to building…

  5. Autonomous mobile robots: Vehicles with cognitive control

    SciTech Connect

    Meystel, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book explores a new rapidly developing area of robotics. It describes the state-of-the-art intelligence control, applied machine intelligence, and research and initial stages of manufacturing of autonomous mobile robots. A complete account of the theoretical and experimental results obtained during the last two decades together with some generalizations on Autonomous Mobile Systems are included in this book. Contents: Introduction; Requirements and Specifications; State-of-the-art in Autonomous Mobile Robots Area; Structure of Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System; Planner, Navigator; Pilot; Cartographer; Actuation Control; Computer Simulation of Autonomous Operation; Testing the Autonomous Mobile Robot; Conclusions; Bibliography.

  6. Tinning/Trimming Robot System

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    In a new surface mount assembly area at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), a tinning/trimming robot system tins and trims the gold-plated leads of surface mount technology (SMT) transistors. The KCD-designed system uses a Unimation PUMA 260 robot, a General Production Devices SP-2000 solder pot; water-soluble Blackstone No. 2508 flux; and a Virtual Industries high-temperature, ESD-conductive, miniature suction cup. After the manual cleaning operation, the processed SMT transistors go to the QUADSTAR Automated Component Placement System for a Radar Logic Assembly. The benefits are reductions in the cost of nonconformance, worker fatigue, and standard hours.

  7. Dexterous Humanoid Robotic Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a torso, a pair of arms, a neck, a head, a wrist joint assembly, and a control system. The arms and the neck movably extend from the torso. Each of the arms includes a lower arm and a hand that is rotatable relative to the lower arm. The wrist joint assembly is operatively defined between the lower arm and the hand. The wrist joint assembly includes a yaw axis and a pitch axis. The pitch axis is disposed in a spaced relationship to the yaw axis such that the axes are generally perpendicular. The pitch axis extends between the yaw axis and the lower arm. The hand is rotatable relative to the lower arm about each of the yaw axis and the pitch axis. The control system is configured for determining a yaw angle and a pitch angle of the wrist joint assembly.

  8. Automatic tool changer for laser machining centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgstrom, Robert

    1993-08-01

    In order to improve flexibility when changing between different laser processing workheads we have developed an automatic tool changer for laser machining centers. This tool system was designed for large multi axis machines such as gantries suitable for three-dimensional processing, but can also be used for other types of laser operations like robots for example. The system also offers the possibility to combine laser processing with deburring and milling on the same machine.

  9. Workshop on automation and robotics: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This workshop provided a forum in which Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Laboratory) scientists and engineers exchanged ideas and information on the latest internal developments in the field of robotic and automation technologies. The material in this report constitutes most of the presentations given during the workshop. Presentations were given on the following session topics: Robotics and automation in hazardous environments; laboratory and machine tool automation; neural networks, machine vision, and sensors; applied real-time control; future technologies and applications; intelligent man-machine interaction issues. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (SM)

  10. A Boltzmann machine for the organization of intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moed, Michael C.; Saridis, George N.

    1989-01-01

    In the present technological society, there is a major need to build machines that would execute intelligent tasks operating in uncertain environments with minimum interaction with a human operator. Although some designers have built smart robots, utilizing heuristic ideas, there is no systematic approach to design such machines in an engineering manner. Recently, cross-disciplinary research from the fields of computers, systems AI and information theory has served to set the foundations of the emerging area of the design of intelligent machines. Since 1977 Saridis has been developing an approach, defined as Hierarchical Intelligent Control, designed to organize, coordinate and execute anthropomorphic tasks by a machine with minimum interaction with a human operator. This approach utilizes analytical (probabilistic) models to describe and control the various functions of the intelligent machine structured by the intuitively defined principle of Increasing Precision with Decreasing Intelligence (IPDI) (Saridis 1979). This principle, even though resembles the managerial structure of organizational systems (Levis 1988), has been derived on an analytic basis by Saridis (1988). The purpose is to derive analytically a Boltzmann machine suitable for optimal connection of nodes in a neural net (Fahlman, Hinton, Sejnowski, 1985). Then this machine will serve to search for the optimal design of the organization level of an intelligent machine. In order to accomplish this, some mathematical theory of the intelligent machines will be first outlined. Then some definitions of the variables associated with the principle, like machine intelligence, machine knowledge, and precision will be made (Saridis, Valavanis 1988). Then a procedure to establish the Boltzmann machine on an analytic basis will be presented and illustrated by an example in designing the organization level of an Intelligent Machine. A new search technique, the Modified Genetic Algorithm, is presented and proved

  11. Machine Shop Grinding Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, James

    This curriculum manual is one in a series of machine shop curriculum manuals intended for use in full-time secondary and postsecondary classes, as well as part-time adult classes. The curriculum can also be adapted to open-entry, open-exit programs. Its purpose is to equip students with basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to enter the…

  12. Rehabilitation robotics.

    PubMed

    Munih, Marko; Bajd, Tadej

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the background, main achievements and components of rehabilitation robotics in a simple way, using non-technical terms. The introductory part looks at the development of robotic approaches in the rehabilitation of neurological patients and outlines the principles of robotic device interactions with patients. There follows a section on virtual reality in rehabilitation. Hapticity and interaction between robot and human are presented in order to understand the added value of robotics that cannot be exploited in other devices. The importance of passive exercise and active tasks is then discussed using the results of various clinical trials, followed by the place of upper and lower extremity robotic devices in rehabilitation practice. The closing section refers to the general importance of measurements in this area and stresses quantitative measurements as one of the advantages in using robotic devices.

  13. Intelligent Control of Modular Robotic Welding Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Smartt, Herschel Bernard; Kenney, Kevin Louis; Tolle, Charles Robert

    2002-04-01

    Although robotic machines are routinely used for welding, such machines do not normally incorporate intelligent capabilities. We are studying the general problem of formulating usable levels of intelligence into welding machines. From our perspective, an intelligent machine should: incorporate knowledge of the welding process, know if the process is operating correctly, know if the weld it is making is good or bad, have the ability to learn from its experience to perform welds, and be able to optimize its own performance. To this end, we are researching machine architecture, methods of knowledge representation, decision making and conflict resolution algorithms, methods of learning and optimization, human/machine interfaces, and various sensors. This paper presents work on the machine architecture and the human/machine interface specifically for a robotic, gas metal arc welding cell. Although the machine control problem is normally approached from the perspective of having a central body of control in the machine, we present a design using distributed agents. A prime goal of this work is to develop an architecture for an intelligent machine that will support a modular, plug and play standard. A secondary goal of this work is to formulate a human/machine interface that treats the human as an active agent in the modular structure.

  14. Intelligent robots and computer vision; Proceedings of the Fifth Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Oct. 28-31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Major topics and new areas of work in intelligent robots and computer vision research are examined. The general topics addressed include: pattern recognition for computer vision, image processing for intelligent robotics, depth and motion in three-dimensional vision, modeling and shape estimation in three-dimensional vision, symbolic processing of visual information, robotic sensors and applications, intelligent control architectures for robot systems, robot languages and programing, human-machine interfaces, systems and architectures for robotics.

  15. Robotic Surveying

    SciTech Connect

    Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

    2007-03-01

    ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine

  16. Eclectic theory of intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Ghaffari, M.; Liao, X.; Ali, S. M. Alhaj; Sarkar, Saurabh; Reynolds, Scott; Mathur, Kovid

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a concept of eclecticism for the design, development, simulation and implementation of a real time controller for an intelligent, vision guided robots. The use of an eclectic perceptual, creative controller that can select its own tasks and perform autonomous operations is illustrated. This eclectic controller is a new paradigm for robot controllers and is an attempt to simplify the application of intelligent machines in general and robots in particular. The idea is to uses a task control center and dynamic programming approach. However, the information required for an optimal solution may only partially reside in a dynamic database so that some tasks are impossible to accomplish. So a decision must be made about the feasibility of a solution to a task before the task is attempted. Even when tasks are feasible, an iterative learning approach may be required. The learning could go on forever. The dynamic database stores both global environmental information and local information including the kinematic and dynamic models of the intelligent robot. The kinematic model is very useful for position control and simulations. However, models of the dynamics of the manipulators are needed for tracking control of the robot's motions. Such models are also necessary for sizing the actuators, tuning the controller, and achieving superior performance. Simulations of various control designs are shown. Much of the model has also been used for the actual prototype Bearcat Cub mobile robot. This vision guided robot was designed for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Contest. A novel feature of the proposed approach lies in the fact that it is applicable to both robot arm manipulators and mobile robots such as wheeled mobile robots. This generality should encourage the development of more mobile robots with manipulator capability since both models can be easily stored in the dynamic database. The multi task controller also permits wide

  17. Supraspliceosomes at defined functional states portray the pre-assembled nature of the pre-mRNA processing machine in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kotzer-Nevo, Hani; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sperling, Joseph; Sperling, Ruth

    2014-06-30

    When isolated from mammalian cell nuclei, all nuclear pre-mRNAs are packaged in multi-subunit large ribonucleoprotein complexes-supraspliceosomes-composed of four native spliceosomes interconnected by the pre-mRNA. Supraspliceosomes contain all five spliceosomal U snRNPs, together with other splicing factors, and are functional in splicing. Supraspliceosomes studied thus far represent the steady-state population of nuclear pre-mRNAs that were isolated at different stages of the splicing reaction. To analyze specific splicing complexes, here, we affinity purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage 7 (PP7)-tagged splicing complexes assembled in vivo on Adenovirus Major Late (AdML) transcripts at specific functional stages, and characterized them using molecular techniques including mass spectrometry. First, we show that these affinity purified splicing complexes assembled on PP7-tagged AdML mRNA or on PP7-tagged AdML pre-mRNA are assembled in supraspliceosomes. Second, similar to the general population of supraspliceosomes, these defined supraspliceosomes populations are assembled with all five U snRNPs at all splicing stages. This study shows that dynamic changes in base-pairing interactions of U snRNA:U snRNA and U snRNA:pre-mRNA that occur in vivo during the splicing reaction do not require changes in U snRNP composition of the supraspliceosome. Furthermore, there is no need to reassemble a native spliceosome for the splicing of each intron, and rearrangements of the interactions will suffice.

  18. Robotics in neuro-rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pignolo, Loris

    2009-11-01

    The aims of this study were to review robot-assisted motor and functional rehabilitation of the upper limb in patients with stroke and to outline possible clinical applications of robotics in neuro-rehabilitation. Available active systems, with actuators driving the paretic arm, were sub-classified by scientific rationale and mechatronic structure as exoskeletons or operational-type machines (manipulators). Applicative studies were compared for indication of efficacy. Clinical and biomechanical evidence available to date suggests substantial efficacy of robot--assisted neuro-rehabilitation in the recovery of the paretic arm after stroke, enabling longer dedicated training sessions with no additional work for the therapist. Further investigation of large samples of patients is required to define the relationship between disability and residual function, to provide shared criteria of evaluation of disability/outcome and protocols of rehabilitation, and to identify the expected future role and application of robotics in neuro-rehabilitation.

  19. The flight telerobotic servicer (FTS): A focus for automation and robotics on the space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkal, S. W.; Andary, J. F.; Watzin, J. G.; Provost, D. E.

    NASA has committed to the design and implementation of a robotic device to assist the astronauts in assembly, maintenance, servicing and inspection tasks in the unpressurized environment of the Space Station, substantially reducing the time required for crew extra vehicular activity (EVA). This system introduces into the Space Station program a "telerobot" adaptable to a variety of tasks and worksites. The term "telerobot" is used to indicate the combined attributes of an autonomous robot and a teleoperated manipulator. Design requirements for the telerobot are driven by a detailed analysis of the tasks which are required on the Space Station and its associated free-flying platforms. The Space Station will have several kilometers of truss structure to which are attached numerous scientific payloads, as well as functional elements and utilities of the Space Station itself. Scientific payloads require servicing of different levels of complexity. Free-flying spacecraft will be brought into the hangar-like servicing facility for repair. There will be maintenance and inspection tasks of the Space Station elements, as well as initial Space Station assembly tasks. A step-by-step analysis of candidate tasks has led to a design envelope for the telerobot. Since the telerobot is an extension or telepresence of the astronaut at the remote worksite, design of the workstation in the pressurized module has to give careful consideration to the man/machine interface, as well as the constrained volume in the pressurized modules. The flight telerobotic servicer (FTS) is designed for future growth toward more autonomy. By a careful selection of the functional architecture, and a modular approach to the hardware and software design, the FTS can accept developments in artificial intelligence and newer, more advanced sensors, such as machine vision and collision avoidance. The FTS is a focus for automation and robotics on the Space Station, as well as a baseline from which visionary

  20. 49 CFR 173.174 - Refrigerating machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Refrigerating machines. 173.174 Section 173.174 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Refrigerating machines. A refrigerating machine assembled for shipment and containing 7 kg (15 pounds) or...

  1. 49 CFR 173.174 - Refrigerating machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Refrigerating machines. 173.174 Section 173.174 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Refrigerating machines. A refrigerating machine assembled for shipment and containing 7 kg (15 pounds) or...

  2. 49 CFR 173.174 - Refrigerating machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Refrigerating machines. 173.174 Section 173.174 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Refrigerating machines. A refrigerating machine assembled for shipment and containing 7 kg (15 pounds) or...

  3. 49 CFR 173.174 - Refrigerating machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Refrigerating machines. 173.174 Section 173.174 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Refrigerating machines. A refrigerating machine assembled for shipment and containing 7 kg (15 pounds) or...

  4. 49 CFR 173.174 - Refrigerating machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Refrigerating machines. 173.174 Section 173.174 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Refrigerating machines. A refrigerating machine assembled for shipment and containing 7 kg (15 pounds) or...

  5. Talking to Robots: On the Linguistic Construction of Personal Human-Robot Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    How should we make sense of 'personal' human-robot relations, given that many people view robots as 'mere machines'? This paper proposes that we understand human-robot relations from a phenomenological view as social relations in which robots are constructed as quasi-others. It is argued that language mediates in this construction. Responding to research by Turkle and others, it is shown that our talking to robots (as opposed to talking about robots) reveals a shift from an impersonal third-person to a personal second-person perspective, which constitutes a different kind of human-robot relation. The paper makes suggestions for empirical research to further study this social-phenomenological process.

  6. Generalized recognition of single-ended contact formations for use in automated assembly operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ravuri, R.; Everett, L.J.

    1999-03-01

    Robots are preferred over any other form of automated machines for assembly tasks due to their capability of being programmed to perform a variety of tasks. However, in the present day industries, the turn around time for new designs have dramatically reduced. Therefore, the need for robots which can adapt its teaching and programming to new situations is strongly felt. This is especially true in the tasks such as assembly operations, which involve the robot making frequent contacts with its environment. This research addresses the problems that arise due to small changes in the work settings after the system has been programmed or trained. In an industry setting it is very likely that changes such as orientation and translation of the grasped object with respect to the robot axes can occur due to many unforeseen causes. The research here is focused on generalizing a Hybrid Control System, in which an assembly skill is described as a sequence of qualitative states and the desired transition between the states. In this case, the qualitative state takes the form of a single-ended contact formation, which describes how a grasped object touches its environment. Skill acquisition involves learning the sequence of qualitative states, the transition between those states, and the mapping from the sensor signals to the qualitative states. The authors discuss impact of changes in the orientation and the position of the grasped object with respect to the robot axes on the recognition of these qualitative states. They also propose a method of decreasing the performance degradation caused by this orientation change in recognition of these qualitative states, by adapting to the new situation with as minimum retraining as possible. Experimental results are presented which illustrate and validate the approach.

  7. Robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Diana, M; Marescaux, J

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in minimally invasive surgery requires intensive and continuous training, as it is technically challenging for unnatural visual and haptic perceptions. Robotic and computer sciences are producing innovations to augment the surgeon's skills to achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery. This article reviews the current use of robotically assisted surgery, focusing on technology as well as main applications in digestive surgery, and future perspectives. The PubMed database was interrogated to retrieve evidence-based data on surgical applications. Internal and external consulting with key opinion leaders, renowned robotics laboratories and robotic platform manufacturers was used to produce state-of-the art business intelligence around robotically assisted surgery. Selected digestive procedures (oesophagectomy, gastric bypass, pancreatic and liver resections, rectal resection for cancer) might benefit from robotic assistance, although the current level of evidence is insufficient to support widespread adoption. The surgical robotic market is growing, and a variety of projects have recently been launched at both academic and corporate levels to develop lightweight, miniaturized surgical robotic prototypes. The magnified view, and improved ergonomics and dexterity offered by robotic platforms, might facilitate the uptake of minimally invasive procedures. Image guidance to complement robotically assisted procedures, through the concepts of augmented reality, could well represent a major revolution to increase safety and deal with difficulties associated with the new minimally invasive approaches. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Intelligent robots: Do we need them and can they be built

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    For avid watchers of science fiction movies, the mention of robotics and artificial intelligence conjures up images of humanlike machines. Often, news reports of scientific advances that enable machines to behave in a flexible manner for a limited set of tests draw parallels to science fiction robots. The effect of this unfortunate kind of publicity is that the scientific disciplines of robotics and artificial intelligence are sometimes regarded as a playground for slightly crazed scientists trying to create artificial humans. In reality, the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence can best be described by answering a few commonly asked questions: What is an intelligent robot, anyway Why would we need things like that Could we build them and make them reliable for certain uses An example of an intelligent machine, or robot is presented and the question of whether intelligent robots are needed is addressed. The impact of ORNL research on uses for intelligent machines is described.

  9. Supraspliceosomes at Defined Functional States Portray the Pre-Assembled Nature of the Pre-mRNA Processing Machine in the Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kotzer-Nevo, Hani; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sperling, Joseph; Sperling, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    When isolated from mammalian cell nuclei, all nuclear pre-mRNAs are packaged in multi-subunit large ribonucleoprotein complexes—supraspliceosomes—composed of four native spliceosomes interconnected by the pre-mRNA. Supraspliceosomes contain all five spliceosomal U snRNPs, together with other splicing factors, and are functional in splicing. Supraspliceosomes studied thus far represent the steady-state population of nuclear pre-mRNAs that were isolated at different stages of the splicing reaction. To analyze specific splicing complexes, here, we affinity purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage 7 (PP7)-tagged splicing complexes assembled in vivo on Adenovirus Major Late (AdML) transcripts at specific functional stages, and characterized them using molecular techniques including mass spectrometry. First, we show that these affinity purified splicing complexes assembled on PP7-tagged AdML mRNA or on PP7-tagged AdML pre-mRNA are assembled in supraspliceosomes. Second, similar to the general population of supraspliceosomes, these defined supraspliceosomes populations are assembled with all five U snRNPs at all splicing stages. This study shows that dynamic changes in base-pairing interactions of U snRNA:U snRNA and U snRNA:pre-mRNA that occur in vivo during the splicing reaction do not require changes in U snRNP composition of the supraspliceosome. Furthermore, there is no need to reassemble a native spliceosome for the splicing of each intron, and rearrangements of the interactions will suffice. PMID:24983480

  10. Brain controlled robots

    PubMed Central

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey’s motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis’s lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the “Computational Brain Project.” CB-i’s locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey’s voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot. PMID:19404467

  11. Industrial robot's vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iureva, Radda A.; Raskin, Evgeni O.; Komarov, Igor I.; Maltseva, Nadezhda K.; Fedosovsky, Michael E.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the improved economic situation in the high technology sectors, work on the creation of industrial robots and special mobile robotic systems are resumed. Despite this, the robotic control systems mostly remained unchanged. Hence one can see all advantages and disadvantages of these systems. This is due to lack of funds, which could greatly facilitate the work of the operator, and in some cases, completely replace it. The paper is concerned with the complex machine vision of robotic system for monitoring of underground pipelines, which collects and analyzes up to 90% of the necessary information. Vision Systems are used to identify obstacles to the process of movement on a trajectory to determine their origin, dimensions and character. The object is illuminated in a structured light, TV camera records projected structure. Distortions of the structure uniquely determine the shape of the object in view of the camera. The reference illumination is synchronized with the camera. The main parameters of the system are the basic distance between the generator and the lights and the camera parallax angle (the angle between the optical axes of the projection unit and camera).

  12. Brain controlled robots.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-06-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey's motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis's lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the "Computational Brain Project." CB-i's locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey's voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot.

  13. Analysis and design of asymmetrical reluctance machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harianto, Cahya A.

    Over the past few decades the induction machine has been chosen for many applications due to its structural simplicity and low manufacturing cost. However, modest torque density and control challenges have motivated researchers to find alternative machines. The permanent magnet synchronous machine has been viewed as one of the alternatives because it features higher torque density for a given loss than the induction machine. However, the assembly and permanent magnet material cost, along with safety under fault conditions, have been concerns for this class of machine. An alternative machine type, namely the asymmetrical reluctance machine, is proposed in this work. Since the proposed machine is of the reluctance machine type, it possesses desirable feature, such as near absence of rotor losses, low assembly cost, low no-load rotational losses, modest torque ripple, and rather benign fault conditions. Through theoretical analysis performed herein, it is shown that this machine has a higher torque density for a given loss than typical reluctance machines, although not as high as the permanent magnet machines. Thus, the asymmetrical reluctance machine is a viable and advantageous machine alternative where the use of permanent magnet machines are undesirable.

  14. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  15. BALI development environment for small mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Willie Y.

    1995-12-01

    The design and prototyping of a development environment, called BALI, for a small robot, viz., the MIT 6.270 robot, is presented in this paper. BALI is being developed and used for research work using a 6.270-based robot. Building on the experience with IC (interactive-C) for programming the 6.270 robot and new technologies like Java, a more powerful and low cost robot development environment is possible. The goal of BALI is to provide a flexible, customizable, and extensible development environment so that robot researchers can quickly tailor BALI to their robots. Given that the 6.270 robot is really a building kit made up of LEGO blocks (or similar kinds of physical building blocks), the 68HC11-based motherboard, and a variety of sensors, BALI cannot be specially built for one 'instance' of the 6.270 robot. Rather the guiding principles for building BALI should be to provide the GUI (graphical user interface) 'primitives' from which one can assemble and build his or her development environment. Thus GUI primitives for displaying status information, sensor readings, robot orientation, and environment maps must be provided. Much of these primitives are already provided in Java. It is the robot-specific ones that have to be developed for BALI. The Java- like language that forms the core of BALI is the main focus of this paper.

  16. TARDEC Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    TARDEC Robotics Dr. Greg Hudas Greg.hudas@us.army.mil UNCLASSIFIED: Dist A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TARDEC Robotics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Greg Hudas...ANSI Std Z39-18 Excellence in Robotics Outreach & University Shaping Requirements Building Modeling & Simulation Component Development International

  17. ROBOT WRITING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Technical writers who are hypnotized by the mechanical metaphor inevitably produce robot writing - a separate language, distantly related to the...prose of Darwin, Huxley, Jeans, and Einstein. Where they were clear, fresh, and graceful, the robot writer is hard, dull, and clumsy. Where they were...merely human, the robot writer is infallible, prefabricated, impersonal, and irresponsible. These four characteristics are interlinked. An example of one usually illustrates the other three.

  18. Robot Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    34natural" behavior . They are each suitable to some applications more than others. Robot systems should support a wide repertoire of such motion regimes... behavior at a kinematic singularity. Some applications, such as arc-welding or spray-painting, can require very fine control of the robot’s speed...for specifying the behavior of systems more complex than a single robot. Another example of the need of this kind of coordination is in the

  19. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New control techniques for self contained, autonomous free flying space robots were developed and tested experimentally. Free flying robots are envisioned as a key element of any successful long term presence in space. These robots must be capable of performing the assembly, maintenance, and inspection, and repair tasks that currently require human extravehicular activity (EVA). A set of research projects were developed and carried out using lab models of satellite robots and a flexible manipulator. The second generation space robot models use air cushion vehicle (ACV) technology to simulate in 2-D the drag free, zero g conditions of space. The current work is divided into 5 major projects: Global Navigation and Control of a Free Floating Robot, Cooperative Manipulation from a Free Flying Robot, Multiple Robot Cooperation, Thrusterless Robotic Locomotion, and Dynamic Payload Manipulation. These projects are examined in detail.

  20. Creative learning for intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaoqun; Hall, Ernest L.

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a methodology for creative learning that applies to man and machines. Creative learning is a general approach used to solve optimal control problems. The creative controller for intelligent machines integrates a dynamic database and a task control center into the adaptive critic learning model. The task control center can function as a command center to decompose tasks into sub-tasks with different dynamic models and criteria functions, while the dynamic database can act as an information system. To illustrate the theory of creative control, several experimental simulations for robot arm manipulators and mobile wheeled vehicles were included. The simulation results showed that the best performance was obtained by using adaptive critic controller among all other controllers. By changing the paths of the robot arm manipulator in the simulation, it was demonstrated that the learning component of the creative controller was adapted to a new set of criteria. The Bearcat Cub robot was another experimental example used for testing the creative control learning. The significance of this research is to generalize the adaptive control theory in a direction toward highest level of human learning - imagination. In doing this it is hoped to better understand the adaptive learning theory and move forward to develop more human-intelligence-like components and capabilities into the intelligent robot. It is also hoped that a greater understanding of machine learning will motivate similar studies to improve human learning.

  1. Hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a hopping robot that includes a misfire tolerant linear actuator suitable for long trips, low energy steering and control, reliable low energy righting, miniature low energy fuel control. The present invention provides a robot with hopping mobility, capable of traversing obstacles significant in size relative to the robot and capable of operation on unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides a hopping robot with misfire-tolerant combustion actuation, and with combustion actuation suitable for use in oxygen-poor environments.

  2. Robotics research

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.; Paul, R.

    1984-01-01

    Organized around a view of robotics as ''the intelligent connection of perception to action,'' the fifty-three contributions collected in this book present leading current research in one of the fastest moving fields of artificial intelligence. Readings Include: Hand-Eye Coordination in Rope Handling; 3-D Balance Using 2-D algorithms. A Model Driven Visual Inspection Module: Stereo Vision: Complexity and Constraints; Interpretation of Contact Geometers from Force Measurement; The Utah MIT Dextrous Hand: Work in Progress; Hierarchical Nonlinear Control for Robots; VAL-11; A Robot Programming Language and Control System; Technological Barriers in Robotics: A Perspective from Industry.

  3. Dual-Head Robotic Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Gary S.

    1990-01-01

    Robotic welder uses two welding heads simultaneously. Developed for assembly of "hot dog" shell on main injector for Space Shuttle main engine, concept applicable to other, similarly rounded or contoured workpieces. Opposed heads reduce distortion and stress in opposed weld joints and speed up welding operations.

  4. Dual-Head Robotic Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Gary S.

    1990-01-01

    Robotic welder uses two welding heads simultaneously. Developed for assembly of "hot dog" shell on main injector for Space Shuttle main engine, concept applicable to other, similarly rounded or contoured workpieces. Opposed heads reduce distortion and stress in opposed weld joints and speed up welding operations.

  5. The use of interactive computer vision and robot hand controllers for enhancing manufacturing safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Jacobus, Charles J.; Peurach, Thomas M.; Mitchell, Brian T.

    1994-01-01

    Current available robotic systems provide limited support for CAD-based model-driven visualization, sensing algorithm development and integration, and automated graphical planning systems. This paper describes ongoing work which provides the functionality necessary to apply advanced robotics to automated manufacturing and assembly operations. An interface has been built which incorporates 6-DOF tactile manipulation, displays for three dimensional graphical models, and automated tracking functions which depend on automated machine vision. A set of tools for single and multiple focal plane sensor image processing and understanding has been demonstrated which utilizes object recognition models. The resulting tool will enable sensing and planning from computationally simple graphical objects. A synergistic interplay between human and operator vision is created from programmable feedback received from the controller. This approach can be used as the basis for implementing enhanced safety in automated robotics manufacturing, assembly, repair and inspection tasks in both ground and space applications. Thus, an interactive capability has been developed to match the modeled environment to the real task environment for safe and predictable task execution.

  6. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part M. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #60--Food Assembler; #61--Injection Molder--Machine Operator; #62--Data Entry Typist; #63--Institutional Cook; Office Core Job Description; #64--Clerk Typist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This tenth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Food Assembler, Injection Molder-Machine Operator, Data Entry Typist, Institutional Cook, and Clerk Typist. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE…

  7. Will machines ever think

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence research has come under fire for failing to fulfill its promises. A growing number of AI researchers are reexamining the bases of AI research and are challenging the assumption that intelligent behavior can be fully explained as manipulation of symbols by algorithms. Three recent books -- Mind over Machine (H. Dreyfus and S. Dreyfus), Understanding Computers and Cognition (T. Winograd and F. Flores), and Brains, Behavior, and Robots (J. Albus) -- explore alternatives and open the door to new architectures that may be able to learn skills.

  8. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  9. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopy in Gynecological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Naghmeh S.; Shahmohamady, Babac; Nezhat, Farr

    2006-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic surgery has revolutionized the concept of minimally invasive surgery for the last 3 decades. Robotic-assisted surgery is one of the latest innovations in the field of minimally invasive surgery. Already, many procedures have been performed in urology, cardiac surgery, and general surgery. In this article, we attempt to report our preliminary experience with robotic-assisted laparoscopy in a variety of gynecological surgeries. We sought to evaluate the role of robotic-assisted laparoscopy in gynecological surgeries. Methods: The study was a case series of 15 patients who underwent various gynecologic surgeries for combined laparoscopic and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery. The da Vinci robot was used in each case at a tertiary referral center for laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. An umbilicus, suprapubic, and 2 lateral ports were inserted. These surgeries were performed both using laparoscopic and robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques. The assembly and disassembly time to switch from laparoscopy to robotic-assisted surgery was measured. Subjective advantages and disadvantages of using robotic-assisted laparoscopy in gynecological surgeries were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent a variety of gynecologic surgeries, such as myomectomies, treatment of endometriosis, total and supracervical hysterectomy, ovarian cystectomy, sacral colpopexy, and Moskowitz procedure. The assembly time to switch from laparoscopy to robotic-assisted surgery was 18.9 minutes (range, 14 to 27), and the disassembly time was 2.1 minutes (range, 1 to 3). Robotic-assisted laparoscopy acts as a bridge between laparoscopy and laparotomy but has the disadvantage of being costly and bulky. Conclusion: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgeries have advantages in providing a 3-dimensional visualization of the operative field, decreasing fatigue and tension tremor of the surgeon, and added wrist motion for improved dexterity and greater surgical precision. The

  10. Concentric agonist-antagonist robots for minimally invasive surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Butler, Kaitlin; Epps, Zane H.; Rucker, Daniel Caleb

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel continuum robot design concept, Concentric Agonist-Antagonist Robots (CAAR), that uses push-pull, agonist-antagonist action of a pair of concentric tubes. The CAAR tubes are designed to have noncentral, offset neutral axes, and they are fixed together at their distal ends. Axial base translations then induce bending in the device. A CAAR segment can be created by selectively cutting asymmetric notches into the profile of two stock tubes, which relocates the neutral bending plane away from the center of the inner lumen. Like conventional concentric-tube robots (CTRs) based on counter-rotating precurved tubes, a CAAR can be made at very small scales and contain a large, open lumen. In contrast with CTRs, the CAAR concept has no elastic stability issues, offers a larger range of motion, and has lower overall stiffness. Furthermore, by varying the position of the neutral axes along the length of each tube, arbitrary, variable curvature actuation modes can be achieved. Precurving the tubes can additionally increase the workspace of a single segment. A single two-tube assembly can be used to create 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot segments, and multiple segments can be deployed concentrically. Both additive manufacturing and traditional machining of stock tubes can create and customize the geometry and performance of the CAAR. In this paper, we explore the CAAR concept, provide kinematic and static models, and experimentally evaluate the model with a both a straight and a precurved CAAR. We conclude with a discussion of the significance and our plans for future work.

  11. Control of autonomous robot using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Adam; Volna, Eva

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the article is to design a method of control of an autonomous robot using artificial neural networks. The introductory part describes control issues from the perspective of autonomous robot navigation and the current mobile robots controlled by neural networks. The core of the article is the design of the controlling neural network, and generation and filtration of the training set using ART1 (Adaptive Resonance Theory). The outcome of the practical part is an assembled Lego Mindstorms EV3 robot solving the problem of avoiding obstacles in space. To verify models of an autonomous robot behavior, a set of experiments was created as well as evaluation criteria. The speed of each motor was adjusted by the controlling neural network with respect to the situation in which the robot was found.

  12. Kernel for modular robot applications: Automatic modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.M.; Yeo, S.H.; Chen, G.; Yang, G.

    1999-02-01

    A modular robotic system consists of standardized joint and link units that an be assembled into various kinematic configurations for different types of tasks. For the control and simulation of such a system, manual derivation of the kinematic and dynamic models, as well as the error model for kinematic calibration, require tremendous effort, because the models constantly change as the robot geometry is altered after module reconfiguration. This paper presents a frame-work to facilitate the model-generation procedure for the control and simulation of the modular robot system. A graph technique, termed kinematic graphs and realized through assembly incidence matrices (AIM), is introduced to represent the module-assembly sequence and robot geometry. The kinematics and dynamics are formulated based on a local representation of the theory of lie groups and Lie algebras. The automatic model-generation procedure starts with a given assembly graph of the modular robot. Kinematic, dynamic, and error models of the robot are then established, based on the local representations and iterative graph-traversing algorithms. This approach can be applied to a modular robot with both serial and branch-type geometries, and arbitrary degrees of freedom. Furthermore, the AIM of the robot naturally leads to solving the task-oriented optimal configuration problem in modular robots. There is no need to maintain a huge library of robot models, and the footprint of the overall software system can be reduced.

  13. Database machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiefel, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The functions and performance characteristics of data base machines (DBM), including machines currently being studied in research laboratories and those currently offered on a commerical basis are discussed. The cost/benefit considerations that must be recognized in selecting a DBM are discussed, as well as the future outlook for such machines.

  14. Production of Candida antarctica lipase B gene open reading frame using automated PCR gene assembly protocol on robotic workcell and expression in an ethanologenic yeast for use as resin-bound biocatalyst in biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Harmsen, Amanda J; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Saha, Badal C; Liu, Siqing; Jackson, John S; Robinson, Samantha; Cotta, Michael C; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    A synthetic Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) gene open reading frame (ORF) for expression in yeast was constructed, and the lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1) C3 variant gene ORF, potentially to improve the availability of the active enzyme at the surface of the yeast cell, was added in frame with the CALB ORF using an automated PCR assembly and DNA purification protocol on an integrated robotic workcell. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing CALB protein or CALB Lyt-1 fusion protein were first grown on 2% (w/v) glucose, producing 9.3 g/L ethanol during fermentation. The carbon source was switched to galactose for GAL1-driven expression, and the CALB and CALB Lyt-1 enzymes expressed were tested for fatty acid ethyl ester (biodiesel) production. The synthetic enzymes catalyzed the formation of fatty acid ethyl esters from ethanol and either corn or soybean oil. It was further demonstrated that a one-step-charging resin, specifically selected for binding to lipase, was capable of covalent attachment of the CALB Lyt-1 enzyme, and that the resin-bound enzyme catalyzed the production of biodiesel. High-level expression of lipase in an ethanologenic yeast strain has the potential to increase the profitability of an integrated biorefinery by combining bioethanol production with coproduction of a low-cost biocatalyst that converts corn oil to biodiesel. Copyright © 2011 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Robotics 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Robots are used in all kinds of industrial settings. They are used to rivet bolts to cars, to move items from one conveyor belt to another, to gather information from other planets, and even to perform some very delicate types of surgery. Anyone who has watched a robot perform its tasks cannot help but be impressed by how it works. This article…

  16. Robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A robot having a plurality of interconnected sections is disclosed. Each of the sections includes components which are moveable relative to components of an adjacent section. A plurality of electric motors are operably connected to at least two of said relatively moveable components to effect relative movement. A fitted, removable protective covering surrounds the sections to protect the robot.

  17. Robotics 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Robots are used in all kinds of industrial settings. They are used to rivet bolts to cars, to move items from one conveyor belt to another, to gather information from other planets, and even to perform some very delicate types of surgery. Anyone who has watched a robot perform its tasks cannot help but be impressed by how it works. This article…

  18. Study of robotics systems applications to the space station program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of robotics systems to potential uses of the Space Station as an assembly facility, and secondarily as a servicing facility, are considered. A typical robotics system mission is described along with the pertinent application guidelines and Space Station environmental assumptions utilized in developing the robotic task scenarios. A functional description of a supervised dual-robot space structure construction system is given, and four key areas of robotic technology are defined, described, and assessed. Alternate technologies for implementing the more routine space technology support subsystems that will be required to support the Space Station robotic systems in assembly and servicing tasks are briefly discussed. The environmental conditions impacting on the robotic configuration design and operation are reviewed.

  19. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will be...

  20. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  1. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  2. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  3. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  4. Robot Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Martin Marietta Aero and Naval Systems has advanced the CAD art to a very high level at its Robotics Laboratory. One of the company's major projects is construction of a huge Field Material Handling Robot for the Army's Human Engineering Lab. Design of FMR, intended to move heavy and dangerous material such as ammunition, was a triumph in CAD Engineering. Separate computer problems modeled the robot's kinematics and dynamics, yielding such parameters as the strength of materials required for each component, the length of the arms, their degree of freedom and power of hydraulic system needed. The Robotics Lab went a step further and added data enabling computer simulation and animation of the robot's total operational capability under various loading and unloading conditions. NASA computer program (IAC), integrated Analysis Capability Engineering Database was used. Program contains a series of modules that can stand alone or be integrated with data from sensors or software tools.

  5. Task allocation among multiple intelligent robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, L.; Bekey, G.

    1987-01-01

    Researchers describe the design of a decentralized mechanism for allocating assembly tasks in a multiple robot assembly workstation. Currently, the approach focuses on distributed allocation to explore its feasibility and its potential for adaptability to changing circumstances, rather than for optimizing throughput. Individual greedy robots make their own local allocation decisions using both dynamic allocation policies which propagate through a network of allocation goals, and local static and dynamic constraints describing which robots are elibible for which assembly tasks. Global coherence is achieved by proper weighting of allocation pressures propagating through the assembly plan. Deadlock avoidance and synchronization is achieved using periodic reassessments of local allocation decisions, ageing of allocation goals, and short-term allocation locks on goals.

  6. Robot vision and sensory controls, V

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book covers the expanding and important subjects of robot vision and sensory controls. These advanced industrial techniques are now solving real application problems and improving productivity, quality, reliability and product cost. RoViSeC embraces the whole spectrum of sensing and measurement, including the technologies of machine vision, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, tactile and other sensing, speech recognition, voice synthesis, sensor based robots, hardware and software. All aspects of the latest research are included while retaining an essentially practical outlook.

  7. Design and implementation of a compliant robot with force feedback and strategy planning software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.; Strempek, F. M.; Solis, L. A.; Brodd, S. S.; Cutler, E. P.; Purves, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    Force-feedback robotics techniques are being developed for automated precision assembly and servicing of NASA space flight equipment. Design and implementation of a prototype robot which provides compliance and monitors forces is in progress. Computer software to specify assembly steps and makes force feedback adjustments during assembly are coded and tested for three generically different precision mating problems. A model program demonstrates that a suitably autonomous robot can plan its own strategy.

  8. A Human Machine Interface for EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.

    EVA astronauts work in a challenging environment that includes high rate of muscle fatigue, haptic and proprioception impairment, lack of dexterity and interaction with robotic equipment. Currently they are heavily dependent on support from on-board crew and ground station staff for information and robotics operation. They are limited to the operation of simple controls on the suit exterior and external robot controls that are difficult to operate because of the heavy gloves that are part of the EVA suit. A wearable human machine interface (HMI) inside the suit provides a powerful alternative for robot teleoperation, procedure checklist access, generic equipment operation via virtual control panels and general information retrieval and presentation. The HMI proposed here includes speech input and output, a simple 6 degree of freedom (dof) pointing device and a heads up display (HUD). The essential characteristic of this interface is that it offers an alternative to the standard keyboard and mouse interface of a desktop computer. The astronaut's speech is used as input to command mode changes, execute arbitrary computer commands and generate text. The HMI can respond with speech also in order to confirm selections, provide status and feedback and present text output. A candidate 6 dof pointing device is Measurand's Shapetape, a flexible "tape" substrate to which is attached an optic fiber with embedded sensors. Measurement of the modulation of the light passing through the fiber can be used to compute the shape of the tape and, in particular, the position and orientation of the end of the Shapetape. It can be used to provide any kind of 3d geometric information including robot teleoperation control. The HUD can overlay graphical information onto the astronaut's visual field including robot joint torques, end effector configuration, procedure checklists and virtual control panels. With suitable tracking information about the position and orientation of the EVA suit

  9. Quantum Virtual Machine (QVM)

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alexander J.

    2016-11-18

    There is a lack of state-of-the-art HPC simulation tools for simulating general quantum computing. Furthermore, there are no real software tools that integrate current quantum computers into existing classical HPC workflows. This product, the Quantum Virtual Machine (QVM), solves this problem by providing an extensible framework for pluggable virtual, or physical, quantum processing units (QPUs). It enables the execution of low level quantum assembly codes and returns the results of such executions.

  10. Machine Vision Tests for Spent Fuel Scrap Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    BERGER, W.W.

    2000-04-27

    The purpose of this work is to perform a feasibility test of a Machine Vision system for potential use at the Hanford K basins during spent nuclear fuel (SNF) operations. This report documents the testing performed to establish functionality of the system including quantitative assessment of results. Fauske and Associates, Inc., which has been intimately involved in development of the SNF safety basis, has teamed with Agris-Schoen Vision Systems, experts in robotics, tele-robotics, and Machine Vision, for this work.

  11. 62 FR 2693 - Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent System; Notice Of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-01-17

    ... Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent System; Notice Of Meeting In accordance... announces the following meeting. Name: Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent (1200... submitted to NSF for financial support. Agenda: To review and evaluate Robotics and Machine and...

  12. 62 FR 999 - Sepcial Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-01-07

    ... Sepcial Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems; Notice of Meeting In accordance... announces the following meeting. Name: Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent (1200... NSF for financial support. Agenda: To review and evaluate Robotics and Machine and...

  13. 62 FR 27074 - Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-05-16

    ... Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems; Notice of Meetings This notice is...: Special Emphasis Panel in Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems (1200). 1. Date: June 2-3, 1997...: Robotics and Machine Intelligence Program Computer Vision. 2. Date: June 9-10, 1997. Contact: Dr....

  14. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-06-30

    described as Human Machine Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR). The HMCTR combines the telerobot with robotic control techniques to improve the system efficiency and reliability in teleoperation mode. In this topical report, the control strategy, configuration and experimental results of Human Machines Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR), which modifies and limits the commands of human operator to follow the predefined constraints in the teleoperation mode, is described. The current implementation is a laboratory-scale system that will be incorporated into an engineering-scale system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the future.

  15. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  16. The case for planetary surface mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giralt, G.; Boissier, L.; Lamboley, M.; Moura, D.

    1992-08-01

    Concepts for an automated planetary vehicle (APV) are examined in the context of mission characteristics, resources and system constraints, and operational robot concepts. Both lunar and Martian missions are discussed in terms of exploratory missions and work-site development that require distance and time goals of 1000 km and several years, respectively. Resource and system constraints emphasized in the areas of: rover material technologies, terrain characteristics, and communications. Operational robot concepts are described and compared in light of the constraints and mission requirements, and four candidate classes of robots are given: master-slave teleoperation, advanced teleprogramming, autonomous reactive machines, and autonomous task-level programmable robots. It is shown that these robotic concepts can provide the foundation for implementing lunar and martian exploratory missions.

  17. Potential of industrial robotics in physical rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Industrial robots have evolved from simple devices used for heavy jobs requiring little accuracy and sensing, to sophisticated, computer-controlled machines capable of using sensory feedback and complex decision strategies to complete their tasks. Large amounts of effort are now being expended on sensor development, sensor controlled actions, task planning, actuator improvement, and structural design. Smaller efforts are focusing on dexterous hands, mobility, two arm coordination and obstacle avoidance. The long term goal of these efforts is to allow the robot to work in an unstructured environment. It is likely that the technology to develop a simple household robot will exist within ten years. This technology will be capable of providing manipulation to a disabled individual. It is likely that the most difficult problem will not be the basic robot abilities, but rather devising an effective means of communication between the robot and the person.

  18. Subsumption Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Subsumption Robotics Christopher K. DeBolt Naval EOD Technology Division 2008 Stump Neck Road Indian Head, MD 20640-5070 phone: (301) 744-6850, Ext...eodmgate.navsea.navy.mil; nguyent.eodtc@eodmgate.navsea.navy.mil Helen Greiner and Polly K. Pook I.S. Robotics phone: (617) 629-0055 e-mail: helen@isr.com , pook...408) 656-3462 e-mail: healey@me.nps.navy.mil LONG-TERM GOALS Through the use of subsumption architectures, low cost, simple robots can be developed

  19. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures.

  20. Robotic thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, F Christopher; Chung, Woong Youn

    2014-06-01

    Robotic thyroidectomy is ideal for patients with indeterminate, likely benign lesions less than 3 cm, and a body mass index less than 35 kg/mg(2). Proper arm position and padding are important to facilitate exposure and development of the working space from axilla to thyroid bed. The working space is developed using headlight and retractors without robotic assistance, establishing exposure of the thyroid bed from a 5-cm incision in the axilla. Three robotic instruments and a stereoscopic endoscope provide excellent visualization of the associated thyroid neurovasculature anatomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced machine tools, loading systems viewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkov, V. I.

    1986-03-01

    The machine-tooling complex built from a revolving lathe and a two-armed robot designed to machine short revolving bodies including parts with curvilinear and threaded surfaces from piece blanks in either small-series or series multiitem production is described. The complex consists of: (1) a model 1V340F30 revolving lathe with a vertical axis of rotation, 8-position revolving head on a cross carriage and an Elektronika NTs-31 on-line control system; (2) a gantry-style two-armed M20-Ts robot with a 20-kilogram (20 x 2) load capacity; and (3) an 8-position indexable blank table, one of whose positions is for initial unloading of finished parts. Subsequently, machined parts are set onto the position into which all of the blanks are unloaded. Complex enclosure allows adjustment and process correction during maintenance and convenient observation of the machining process.

  2. Motion vision for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrb, Matthieu

    The problem of using computer vision in mobile robots is dealt with. The datacube specialized cards and a parallel machine using a transputer network are studied. The tracking and localization of a three dimensional object in a sequence of images is examined, using first order prediction of the motion in the image plane and verification by a maximal clique search in the graph of mutually compatible matchings. A dynamic environment modeling module, using numerical fusion between trinocular stereovision and tracking of stereo matched primitives is presented. The integration of this perception system in the control architecture of a mobile robot is examined to achieve various functions, such as vision servo motion and environment modeling. The functional units implementing vision tasks and the data exchanged with other units are outlined. Experiments realized with the mobile robot Hilare 1.5 allowed the proposed algorithms and concepts to be validated.

  3. Automated Assembly Center (AAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate advanced assembly and assembly support technology under a comprehensive architecture; to implement automated assembly technologies in the production of high-visibility DOD weapon systems; and to document the improved cost, quality, and lead time. This will enhance the production of DOD weapon systems by utilizing the latest commercially available technologies combined into a flexible system that will be able to readily incorporate new technologies as they emerge. Automated assembly encompasses the following areas: product data, process planning, information management policies and framework, three schema architecture, open systems communications, intelligent robots, flexible multi-ability end effectors, knowledge-based/expert systems, intelligent workstations, intelligent sensor systems, and PDES/PDDI data standards.

  4. Embedded mobile farm robot for identification of diseased plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadistap, S. S.; Botre, B. A.; Pandit, Harshavardhan; Chandrasekhar; Rao, Adesh

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a mobile robot used in farms for identification of diseased plants. It puts forth two of the major aspects of robotics namely automated navigation and image processing. The robot navigates on the basis of the GPS (Global Positioning System) location and data obtained from IR (Infrared) sensors to avoid any obstacles in its path. It uses an image processing algorithm to differentiate between diseased and non-diseased plants. A robotic platform consisting of an ARM9 processor, motor drivers, robot mechanical assembly, camera and infrared sensors has been used. Mini2440 microcontroller has been used wherein Embedded linux OS (Operating System) is implemented.

  5. ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Hamel; Steven Everett

    2000-08-01

    Environmental restoration and waste management (ER and WM) challenges in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and around the world, involve radiation or other hazards which will necessitate the use of remote operations to protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote operations carry the implication of greater costs since remote work systems are inherently less productive than contact human work due to the inefficiencies/complexities of teleoperation. To reduce costs and improve quality, much attention has been focused on methods to improve the productivity of combined human operator/remote equipment systems; the achievements to date are modest at best. The most promising avenue in the near term is to supplement conventional remote work systems with robotic planning and control techniques borrowed from manufacturing and other domains where robotic automation has been used. Practical combinations of teleoperation and robotic control will yield telerobotic work systems that outperform currently available remote equipment. It is believed that practical telerobotic systems may increase remote work efficiencies significantly. Increases of 30% to 50% have been conservatively estimated for typical remote operations. It is important to recognize that the basic hardware and software features of most modern remote manipulation systems can readily accommodate the functionality required for telerobotics. Further, several of the additional system ingredients necessary to implement telerobotic control--machine vision, 3D object and workspace modeling, automatic tool path generation and collision-free trajectory planning--are existent.

  6. On-line dimensional measurement of small components on the eyeglasses assembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, G.; Boschetti, G.; Biondi, A.; Rossi, A.

    2009-03-01

    Dimensional measurement of the subassemblies at the beginning of the assembly line is a very crucial process for the eyeglasses industry, since even small manufacturing errors of the components can lead to very visible defects on the final product. For this reason, all subcomponents of the eyeglass are verified before beginning the assembly process either with a 100% inspection or on a statistical basis. Inspection is usually performed by human operators, with high costs and a degree of repeatability which is not always satisfactory. This paper presents a novel on-line measuring system for dimensional verification of small metallic subassemblies for the eyeglasses industry. The machine vision system proposed, which was designed to be used at the beginning of the assembly line, could also be employed in the Statistical Process Control (SPC) by the manufacturer of the subassemblies. The automated system proposed is based on artificial vision, and exploits two CCD cameras and an anthropomorphic robot to inspect and manipulate the subcomponents of the eyeglass. Each component is recognized by the first camera in a quite large workspace, picked up by the robot and placed in the small vision field of the second camera which performs the measurement process. Finally, the part is palletized by the robot. The system can be easily taught by the operator by simply placing the template object in the vision field of the measurement camera (for dimensional data acquisition) and hence by instructing the robot via the Teaching Control Pendant within the vision field of the first camera (for pick-up transformation acquisition). The major problem we dealt with is that the shape and dimensions of the subassemblies can vary in a quite wide range, but different positioning of the same component can look very similar one to another. For this reason, a specific shape recognition procedure was developed. In the paper, the whole system is presented together with first experimental lab

  7. [History of robotics: from archytas of tarentum until Da Vinci robot. (Part II)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, F M; Jiménez Schlegl, P; Millán Rodríguez, F; Salvador-Bayarri, J; Monllau Font, V; Palou Redorta, J; Villavicencio Mavrich, H

    2007-03-01

    Robotic surgery is a reality. In order to to understand how new robots work is interesting to know the history of ancient (see part i) and modern robotics. The desire to design automatic machines imitating humans continued for more than 4000 years. Archytas of Tarentum (at around 400 a.C.), Heron of Alexandria, Hsieh-Fec, Al-Jazari, Bacon, Turriano, Leonardo da Vinci, Vaucanson o von Kempelen were robot inventors. At 1942 Asimov published the three robotics laws. Mechanics, electronics and informatics advances at XXth century developed robots to be able to do very complex self governing works. At 1985 the robot PUMA 560 was employed to introduce a needle inside the brain. Later on, they were designed surgical robots like World First, Robodoc, Gaspar o Acrobot, Zeus, AESOP, Probot o PAKI-RCP. At 2000 the FDA approved the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), a very sophisticated robot to assist surgeons. Currently urological procedures like prostatectomy, cystectomy and nephrectomy are performed with the da Vinci, so urology has become a very suitable speciality to robotic surgery.

  8. Segmented stator assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Alexander, James Pellegrino; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Quirion, Owen Scott

    2013-04-02

    An electric machine and stator assembly are provided that include a continuous stator portion having stator teeth, and a tooth tip portion including tooth tips corresponding to the stator teeth of the continuous stator portion, respectively. The tooth tip portion is mounted onto the continuous stator portion.

  9. Planning in the anthropomorphical machine intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Meystel, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Anthropomorphical systems of machine intelligence (ASMI) are defined which are applied in a number of areas particularly in robotics, autonomous mobile devices, large space structures, multiactuator manufacturing systems, and information-intensive machines augmenting human capabilities in management, engineering and military decision making. A theory of planning is outlined for ASMI, based in the mathematical description of a special (verbless) multiple production procedure. Possible applications of the theory and continuations of the research are considered. 19 references.

  10. Surrogate Robot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-21

    The Surrogate robot Surge, built at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA., is being developed in order to extend humanity reach into hazardous environments to perform tasks such as using environmental test equipment.

  11. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  13. Robotic arm

    DOEpatents

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  14. Robotic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W. Donald

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  15. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  16. Automated solar panel assembly line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somberg, H.

    1981-01-01

    The initial stage of the automated solar panel assembly line program was devoted to concept development and proof of approach through simple experimental verification. In this phase, laboratory bench models were built to demonstrate and verify concepts. Following this phase was machine design and integration of the various machine elements. The third phase was machine assembly and debugging. In this phase, the various elements were operated as a unit and modifications were made as required. The final stage of development was the demonstration of the equipment in a pilot production operation.

  17. Rolling Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed rolling robot routinely traverses rough terrain, clearing rocks as high as 1 m. Climbs steps 1 m high and spans ditches 2.3 m wide. Simple but rugged semiautonomous rover has large wheels and articulated body. With combined yaw, roll, and four-wheel drive, robot crawls slowly to pass over soft or sandy terrain. Senses terrain along corridor, chooses path to avoid insurmountable obstacles, and monitors state of vehicle for unexpected hazards.

  18. Robot Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Tests with robots and the high-fidelity Hubble Space Telescope mockup astronauts use to train for servicing missions have convinced NASA managers it may be possible to maintain and upgrade the orbiting observatory without sending a space shuttle to do the job. In a formal request last week, the agency gave bidders until July 16 to sub-mit proposals for a robotic mission to the space telescope before the end of 2007. At a minimum, the mission would attach a rocket motor to deorbit the telescope safely when its service life ends. In the best case, it would use state-of-the- art robotics to prolong its life on orbit and install new instruments. With the space shuttle off-limits for the job under strict post-Columbia safety policies set by Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA has designed a "straw- man" robotic mission that would use an Atlas V or Delta N to launch a 20,ooO-lb. "Hubble Robotic Vehicle" to service the telescope. There, a robotic arm would grapple it, much as the shuttle does.

  19. Learning for intelligent mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest L.; Liao, Xiaoqun; Alhaj Ali, Souma M.

    2003-10-01

    Unlike intelligent industrial robots which often work in a structured factory setting, intelligent mobile robots must often operate in an unstructured environment cluttered with obstacles and with many possible action paths. However, such machines have many potential applications in medicine, defense, industry and even the home that make their study important. Sensors such as vision are needed. However, in many applications some form of learning is also required. The purpose of this paper is to present a discussion of recent technical advances in learning for intelligent mobile robots. During the past 20 years, the use of intelligent industrial robots that are equipped not only with motion control systems but also with sensors such as cameras, laser scanners, or tactile sensors that permit adaptation to a changing environment has increased dramatically. However, relatively little has been done concerning learning. Adaptive and robust control permits one to achieve point to point and controlled path operation in a changing environment. This problem can be solved with a learning control. In the unstructured environment, the terrain and consequently the load on the robot"s motors are constantly changing. Learning the parameters of a proportional, integral and derivative controller (PID) and artificial neural network provides an adaptive and robust control. Learning may also be used for path following. Simulations that include learning may be conducted to see if a robot can learn its way through a cluttered array of obstacles. If a situation is performed repetitively, then learning can also be used in the actual application. To reach an even higher degree of autonomous operation, a new level of learning is required. Recently learning theories such as the adaptive critic have been proposed. In this type of learning a critic provides a grade to the controller of an action module such as a robot. The creative control process is used that is "beyond the adaptive critic." A

  20. Dual arm robotic system with sensory input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguner, U.

    1987-01-01

    The need for dual arm robots in space station assembly and satellite maintainance is of increasing significance. Such robots will be in greater demand in the future when numerous tasks will be assigned to them to relieve the direct intervention of humans in space. Technological demands from these robots will be high. They will be expected to perform high speed tasks with a certain degree of autonomy. Various levels of sensing will have to be used in a sophisticated control scheme. Ongoing research in control, sensing and real-time software to produce a two-arm robotic system than can accomplish generic assembly tasks is discussed. The control hierarchy and the specific control approach are discussed. A decentralized implementation of model-reference adaptive control using Variable Structure controllers and the incorporation of tactile feedback is considered.