Science.gov

Sample records for robust atp subsystem

  1. Design and development of a robust ATP subsystem for the Altair UAV-to-Ground lasercomm 2.5 Gbps demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, G. G.; Lee, S.; Monacos, S.; Wright, M.; Biswas, A.

    2003-01-01

    A robust acquisition, tracking and pointing (ATP) subsystem is being developed for the 2.5 Gigabit per second (Gbps) Unmanned-Aerial-Vehicle (UAV) to ground free-space optical communications link project.

  2. Gauge subsystems, separability and robustness in autonomous quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Gopal; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2013-03-01

    Quantum error correction provides a fertile context for exploring the interplay of feedback control, microscopic physics and non-commutative probability. In this paper we deepen our understanding of this nexus through high-level analysis of a class of quantum memory models that we have previously proposed, which implement continuous-time versions of well-known stabilizer codes in autonomous nanophotonic circuits that require no external clocking or control. We demonstrate that the presence of the gauge subsystem in the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor code allows for a loss-tolerant layout of the corresponding nanophotonic circuit that substantially ameliorates the effects of optical propagation losses, argue that code separability allows for simplified restoration feedback protocols, and propose a modified fidelity metric for quantifying the performance of realistic quantum memories. Our treatment of these topics exploits the homogeneous modeling framework of autonomous nanophotonic circuits, but the key ideas translate to the traditional setting of discrete time, measurement-based quantum error correction.

  3. Robust stability analysis of uncertain switched linear systems with unstable subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiang; Wu, Baowei

    2015-05-01

    The problem of robust stability for switched linear systems with all the subsystems being unstable is investigated. Unlike the most existing results in which each switching mode in the system is asymptotically stable, the subsystems may be unstable in this paper. A necessary condition of stability for switched linear systems is first obtained with certain hypothesis. Then, under two assumptions, sufficient conditions of exponential stability for both deterministic and uncertain switched linear systems are presented by using the invariant subspace theory and average dwell time method. Moreover, we further develop multiple Lyapunov functions and propose a method for constructing multiple Lyapunov functions for the considered switched linear systems with certain switching law. Several examples are included to show the effectiveness of the theoretical findings.

  4. Robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.

    1993-01-01

    Robustness is a buzz word common to all newly proposed space systems design as well as many new commercial products. The image that one conjures up when the word appears is a 'Paul Bunyon' (lumberjack design), strong and hearty; healthy with margins in all aspects of the design. In actuality, robustness is much broader in scope than margins, including such factors as simplicity, redundancy, desensitization to parameter variations, control of parameter variations (environments flucation), and operational approaches. These must be traded with concepts, materials, and fabrication approaches against the criteria of performance, cost, and reliability. This includes manufacturing, assembly, processing, checkout, and operations. The design engineer or project chief is faced with finding ways and means to inculcate robustness into an operational design. First, however, be sure he understands the definition and goals of robustness. This paper will deal with these issues as well as the need for the requirement for robustness.

  5. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Sewy, D.; Pickering, C.; Sauers, R.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the phase 2 of the power subsystem automation study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using computer software to manage an aspect of the electrical power subsystem on a space station. The state of the art in expert systems software was investigated in this study. This effort resulted in the demonstration of prototype expert system software for managing one aspect of a simulated space station power subsystem.

  6. 2nd & 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraph presentation on the "2nd & 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems" project. The objective behind this project is to design, develop and test advanced avionics, power systems, power control and distribution components and subsystems for insertion into a highly reliable and low-cost system for a Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The project is divided into two sections: 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems and 2nd Generation Vehicle Subsystems. The following topics are discussed under the first section, 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems: supporting the NASA RLV program; high-performance guidance & control adaptation for future RLVs; Evolvable Hardware (EHW) for 3rd generation avionics description; Scaleable, Fault-tolerant Intelligent Network or X(trans)ducers (SFINIX); advance electric actuation devices and subsystem technology; hybrid power sources and regeneration technology for electric actuators; and intelligent internal thermal control. Topics discussed in the 2nd Generation Vehicle Subsystems program include: design, development and test of a robust, low-maintenance avionics with no active cooling requirements and autonomous rendezvous and docking systems; design and development of a low maintenance, high reliability, intelligent power systems (fuel cells and battery); and design of a low cost, low maintenance high horsepower actuation systems (actuators).

  7. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, Greg

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/output library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.

  8. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms.

  9. Preprototype SAWD subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    A regenerable, three man preprototype solid amine, water desorbed (SAWD) CO2 removal and concentation subsystem was designed, fabricated, and successfully acceptance tested by Hamilton Standard. The preprototype SAWD incorporates a single solid amine canister to perform the CO2 removal function, an accumulator to provide the CO2 storage and delivery function, and a microprocessor which automatically controls the subsystem sequential operation and performance. The SAWD subsystem was configured to have a CO2 removal and CO2 delivery capability at the rate of 0.12 kg/hr (0.264 lb/hr) over the relative humidity range of 35 to 70%. The controller was developed to provide fully automatic control over the relative humidity range via custom software that was generated specifically for the SAWD subsystem. The preprototype SAWD subsystem demonstrated a total of 281 hours (208) cycles of operation during ten acceptance tests that were conducted over the 3 to 70% relative humidity range. This operation was comprised of 178 hours (128 cycles) in the CO2 overboard mode and 103 hours (80 cycles) in the CO2 reduction mode. The average CO2 removal/delivery rate met or exceeded the design specification rate of 0.12 kg/hr (0.254 lb/hr) for all ten of the acceptance tests.

  10. HL-20 subsystem design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, H. W.; MacConochie, I. O.

    1993-10-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a lifting-body configuration called the HL-20 for potential application as a personnel launch system orbiter that will provide the crew changeout at the Space Station Freedom. The objectives have been to provide an alternate manned access to space with a more cost-effective, efficient, reliable, and safer system for the routine transportation of people to LEO. The detailed study of this concept includes the subsystem design, flight software sizing, and mass properties that are discussed in this paper. The goals were to develop a subsystem complement to maximize operational efficiency with minimum development costs while using current technology. Subsystem selection and trade studies showed that current technology components will provide the required performance and operational effectiveness. Many of the selected components have Shuttle flight histories or considerable development heritage from other programs that will help minimize development costs.

  11. HL-20 subsystem design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. W.; Macconochie, I. O.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a lifting-body configuration called the HL-20 for potential application as a personnel launch system orbiter that will provide the crew changeout at the Space Station Freedom. The objectives have been to provide an alternate manned access to space with a more cost-effective, efficient, reliable, and safer system for the routine transportation of people to LEO. The detailed study of this concept includes the subsystem design, flight software sizing, and mass properties that are discussed in this paper. The goals were to develop a subsystem complement to maximize operational efficiency with minimum development costs while using current technology. Subsystem selection and trade studies showed that current technology components will provide the required performance and operational effectiveness. Many of the selected components have Shuttle flight histories or considerable development heritage from other programs that will help minimize development costs.

  12. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Moser, R. L.; Veatch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Generic power-system elements and their potential faults are identified. Automation functions and their resulting benefits are defined and automation functions between power subsystem, central spacecraft computer, and ground flight-support personnel are partitioned. All automation activities were categorized as data handling, monitoring, routine control, fault handling, planning and operations, or anomaly handling. Incorporation of all these classes of tasks, except for anomaly handling, in power subsystem hardware and software was concluded to be mandatory to meet the design and operational requirements of the space station. The key drivers are long mission lifetime, modular growth, high-performance flexibility, a need to accommodate different electrical user-load equipment, onorbit assembly/maintenance/servicing, and potentially large number of power subsystem components. A significant effort in algorithm development and validation is essential in meeting the 1987 technology readiness date for the space station.

  13. Topological subsystem codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bombin, H.

    2010-03-15

    We introduce a family of two-dimensional (2D) topological subsystem quantum error-correcting codes. The gauge group is generated by two-local Pauli operators, so that two-local measurements are enough to recover the error syndrome. We study the computational power of code deformation in these codes and show that boundaries cannot be introduced in the usual way. In addition, we give a general mapping connecting suitable classical statistical mechanical models to optimal error correction in subsystem stabilizer codes that suffer from depolarizing noise.

  14. FLPP NGL Structural Subsystems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaredson, D.; Ramusat, G.; Appel, S.; Cardone, T.; Persson, J.; Baiocco, P.; Lavelle, F.; Bouilly, Th.

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP) is the basis for new paradigms, investigating the key elements, logic and roadmaps to prepare the development of the safe, reliable and low cost next European Launch Vehicle (LV) for access to space (dubbed NGL - Next Generation LV), with an initial operational capability mid-next decade. In addition to carry cargo to conventional GTO or SSO, the European NGL has to be flexible enough to cope with new pioneering institutional missions as well as the evolving commercial payloads market. This achievement is broached studying three main areas relevant to ELVs: System concepts, Propulsion and Core Technology During the preliminary design activity, a number of design alternatives concerning NGL main structural subsystems have been investigated. Technology is one of the ways to meet the NGL challenges to either improve the performances or to reduce the cost or both. The relevant requirements allow to steer a ‘top-down’ approach for their conception and to propose the most effective technologies. Furthermore, all these technology developments represent a significant ‘bottom-up’ approach investment and concern a large range of activities. The structural subsystems portfolio of the FLPP ‘Core Technology’ activity encompasses major cutting-edge challenges for maturation of the various subsystems leading to reduce overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic propellants, significantly reducing fabrication and operations cost, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of concurrent engineering methods will allow developments of performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost yielding to safe, low-risk technical approaches for a future development. Potential ability of these advanced structural LV technologies to satisfy the system requirements of the NGL and their current

  15. Quantum error-correcting subsystems are unitarily recoverable subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Kribs, David W.; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2006-10-15

    We show that every correctable subsystem for an arbitrary noise operation can be recovered by a unitary operation, where the notion of recovery is more relaxed than the notion of correction insofar as it does not protect the subsystem from subsequent iterations of the noise. We also demonstrate that in the case of unital noise operations one can identify a subset of all correctable subsystems--those that can be corrected by a single unitary operation--as the noiseless subsystems for the composition of the noise operation with its dual. Using the recently developed structure theory for noiseless subsystems, the identification of such unitarily correctable subsystems is reduced to an algebraic exercise.

  16. Pressure Garment Subsystem Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Constellation program pressure garment subsystem (PGS) team has created a technical roadmap that communicates major technical questions and how and when the questions are being answered in support of major project milestones. The roadmap is a living document that guides the team priorities. The roadmap also communicates technical reactions to changes in project priorities and funding. This paper presents the roadmap and discusses specific roadmap elements in detail as representative examples to provide insight into the meaning and use of the roadmap.

  17. NEP power subsystem modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, Richard B.

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system optimization code consists of a master module and various submodules. Each of the submodules represents a subsystem within the total NEP power system. The master module sends commands and input data to each of the submodules and receives output data back. Rocketdyne was responsible for preparing submodules for the power conversion (both K-Rankine and Brayton), heat rejection, and power management and distribution.

  18. The MAP Propulsion Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary T.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design, integration, test, performance, and lessons learned of NASA's Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) propulsion subsystem. MAP was launched on a Delta-II launch vehicle from NASA's Kennedy Space Center on June 30, 2001. Due to instrument thermal stability requirements, the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point was selected for the mission orbit. The L2 trajectory incorporated phasing loops and a lunar gravity assist. The propulsion subsystem's requirements are to manage momentum, perform maneuvers during the phasing loops to set up the lunar swingby, and perform stationkeeping at L2 for 2 years. MAP's propulsion subsystem uses 8 thrusters which are located and oriented to provide attitude control and momentum management about all axes, and delta-V in any direction without exposing the instrument to the sun. The propellant tank holds 72 kg of hydrazine, which is expelled by unregulated blowdown pressurization. Thermal management is complex because no heater cycling is allowed at L2. Several technical challenges presented themselves during I and T, such as in-situ weld repairs and in-situ bending of thruster tubes to accommodate late changes in the observatory CG. On-orbit performance has been nominal, and all phasing loop, mid-course correction, and stationkeeping maneuvers have been successfully performed to date.

  19. Conformal array antenna subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    An antenna subsystem to communicate between Ariane 4 and a data relay satellite was studied, concluding that the original ideas on ring antennas should be corrected due to the wide margin of coverage required in elevation for such antennas, which implies the need of splitting the coverage. Nevertheless, the study of cylindrical and conical conformal arrays was continued in view of their intrinsic interest. Needed coverages with specified gain can be obtained with a set of microstrip circular patch antennas. For the lower stage, a single patch is enough. For geostationary missions, one horizontal array is used, and for heliosynchronous missions two horizontal arrays and a vertical one. The numerical study carried out on omniazimuthal ring antennas shows that a tendency to omnidirectional pattern exists in spite of the directivity of the elementary radiators. A small pointing improvement of the meridian pattern can be obtained by means of conical arrays instead of the cylindrical ones.

  20. Fuel Subsystems Flight Test Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    aircraft fuel subsystems and the requirements to which they are designed . Details are provided of individual testes, test support requirements and eval...Flight Test Engineering, AFFTC. It is designed to introduce a newly assigned flight test engineer to the subject and provide a working reference for...Refueling Subsystem 17 Fuel Dump Subsystem 18 Heat Exchangers 18 REVIEW OF DESIGN AND TEST REQUIREMENTS 19 Classification of Requirements Other Than 20

  1. Waste collection subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Practical ways were explored of improving waste compaction and of providing rapid turnaround between flights at essentially no cost for the space shuttle waste collection subsystem commode. Because of the possible application of a fully developed shuttle commode to the space station, means of providing waste treatment without overboard venting were also considered. Three basic schemes for compaction and rapid turnaround, each fully capable of meeting the objectives, were explored in sufficient depth to bring out the characteristic advantages and disadvantages of each. Tradeoff comparisons were very close between leading contenders and efforts were made to refine the design concepts sufficiently to justify a selection. The concept selected makes use of a sealed canister containing wastes that have been forcibly compacted, which is removable in flight. No selection was made between three superior non-venting treatment methods owing to the need for experimental evaluations of the processes involved. A system requirements definition document has been prepared to define the task for a test embodiment of the selected concept.

  2. Spacecraft Design Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyake, Robert N.

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the functions of the thermal control subsystem engineers in the design of spacecraft. The goal of the thermal control subsystem that will be used in a spacecraft is to maintain the temperature of all spacecraft components, subsystems, and all the flight systems within specified limits for all flight modes from launch to the end of the mission. For most thermal control subsystems the mass, power and control and sensing systems must be kept below 10% of the total flight system resources. This means that the thermal control engineer is involved in all other flight systems designs. The two concepts of thermal control, passive and active are reviewed and the use of thermal modeling tools are explained. The testing of the thermal control is also reviewed.

  3. Subsystems component definitions summary program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, A. Don; Thomas, Carolyn C.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Hall, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program, the Subsystems Component Definitions Summary (SUBCOMDEF), was developed to provide a quick and efficient means of summarizing large quantities of subsystems component data in terms of weight, volume, resupply, and power. The program was validated using Space Station Freedom Program Definition Requirements Document data for the internal and external thermal control subsystem. Once all component descriptions, unit weights and volumes, resupply, and power data are input, the user may obtain a summary report of user-specified portions of the subsystem or of the entire subsystem as a whole. Any combination or all of the parameters of wet and dry weight, wet and dry volume, resupply weight and volume, and power may be displayed. The user may vary the resupply period according to individual mission requirements, as well as the number of hours per day power consuming components operate. Uses of this program are not limited only to subsystem component summaries. Any applications that require quick, efficient, and accurate weight, volume, resupply, or power summaries would be well suited to take advantage of SUBCOMDEF's capabilities.

  4. Space power subsystem automation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The technology issues involved in power subsystem automation and the reasonable objectives to be sought in such a program were discussed. The complexities, uncertainties, and alternatives of power subsystem automation, along with the advantages from both an economic and a technological perspective were considered. Whereas most spacecraft power subsystems now use certain automated functions, the idea of complete autonomy for long periods of time is almost inconceivable. Thus, it seems prudent that the technology program for power subsystem automation be based upon a growth scenario which should provide a structured framework of deliberate steps to enable the evolution of space power subsystems from the current practice of limited autonomy to a greater use of automation with each step being justified on a cost/benefit basis. Each accomplishment should move toward the objectives of decreased requirement for ground control, increased system reliability through onboard management, and ultimately lower energy cost through longer life systems that require fewer resources to operate and maintain. This approach seems well-suited to the evolution of more sophisticated algorithms and eventually perhaps even the use of some sort of artificial intelligence. Multi-hundred kilowatt systems of the future will probably require an advanced level of autonomy if they are to be affordable and manageable.

  5. The Atmosphere Explorer power subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenschain, A.; Bacher, J.; Callen, P.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes the design and in-flight performance of the power subsystem for the first three Atmosphere Explorer (AE) spacecraft. The subsystem provides all electrical power to the spacecraft loads and consists of a solar array, three batteries, and a power supply electronics unit. Power from the solar array is supplied to the spacecraft loads through an unregulated power bus, which varies between -26 and -38 V. Loads which are normally on only during data collection phases of an orbit are fed from a tightly regulated -24.5 V bus. Power subsystem performance during the first three months in orbit has been nominal, except for an anomally in the shunt limiter protection circuitry. A malfunctioning shunt control amplifier was reconnected via ground command.

  6. The Atmosphere Explorer power subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenschain, A.; Bacher, J.; Callen, P.

    1974-01-01

    The design and operation of the power subsystem for the Atmospheric Explorer spacecraft are discussed. The additional functional redundancy which was added in several component areas to improve the overall subsystem reliability is analyzed. The battery charging technique has been modified to include third electrode overcharge control. The automatic removal of all battery charge is provided to correct abnormally high battery voltages. An undervoltage detector has been added which removes all nonessential spacecraft loads when the battery voltage falls below a given level. All automatic functions can be over-ridden by ground command.

  7. Spacelab data management subsystem phase B study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Spacelab data management system is described. The data management subsystem (DMS) integrates the avionics equipment into an operational system by providing the computations, logic, signal flow, and interfaces needed to effectively command, control, monitor, and check out the experiment and subsystem hardware. Also, the DMS collects/retrieves experiment data and other information by recording and by command of the data relay link to ground. The major elements of the DMS are the computer subsystem, data acquisition and distribution subsystem, controls and display subsystem, onboard checkout subsystem, and software. The results of the DMS portion of the Spacelab Phase B Concept Definition Study are analyzed.

  8. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  9. Life support subsystem monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Kostell, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of the need for instrumentation in manned spacecraft life-support subsystems has increased significantly over the past several years. Of the required control and monitoring instrumentation, this paper will focus on the monitoring instrumentation as applied to life-support subsystems. The initial approach used independent sensors, independent sensor signal conditioning circuitry, and independent logic circuitry to provide shutdown protection only. This monitoring system was replaced with a coordinated series of printed circuit cards, each of which contains all the electronics to service one sensor and provide performance trend information, fault detection and isolation information, and shutdown protection. Finally, a review of sensor and instrumentation problems is presented, and the requirement for sensors with built-in signal conditioning and provisions for in situ calibration is discussed.

  10. NFIRAOS beamsplitters subsystems optomechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Nash, Reston; Boucher, Marc-André; Martin, Olivier; Buteau-Vaillancourt, Louis; Châteauneuf, François; Atwood, Jenny; Hill, Alexis; Byrnes, Peter W. G.; Herriot, Glen; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The early-light facility adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is the Narrow-Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS). The science beam splitter changer mechanism and the visible light beam splitter are subsystems of NFIRAOS. This paper presents the opto-mechanical design of the NFIRAOS beam splitters subsystems (NBS). In addition to the modal and the structural analyses, the beam splitters surface deformations are computed considering the environmental constraints during operation. Surface deformations are fit to Zernike polynomials using SigFit software. Rigid body motion as well as residual RMS and peak-to-valley surface deformations are calculated. Finally, deformed surfaces are exported to Zemax to evaluate the transmitted and reflected wave front error. The simulation results of this integrated opto-mechanical analysis have shown compliance with all optical requirements.

  11. The Human Subsystem - Definition and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonBengston, Kristian; Twyford, Evan

    2007-01-01

    This paper will discuss the use of the human subsystem in development phases of human space flight. Any space mission has clearly defined subsystems, managed by experts attached to these. Clearly defined subsystems and correct use provide easier and more efficient development for each independent subsystem and for the relation between these subsystems. Furthermore, this paper will argue that a defined subsystem related to humans in space has not always been clearly present, and that correct implementation is perhaps missing, based on experience and survey data. Finally, the authors will discuss why the human subsystem has not been fully integrated, why it must be a mandatory part of the programming, a re-definition of the human subsystem, and suggestions of methods to improve the integration of human factors in the development.

  12. Holonomic Quantum Computation in Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan

    2009-08-01

    We introduce a generalized method of holonomic quantum computation (HQC) based on encoding in subsystems. As an application, we propose a scheme for applying holonomic gates to unencoded qubits by the use of a noisy ancillary qubit. This scheme does not require initialization in a subspace since all dynamical effects factor out as a transformation on the ancilla. We use this approach to show how fault-tolerant HQC can be realized via 2-local Hamiltonians with perturbative gadgets.

  13. Customized ATP towpreg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  14. Technology advancement of an oxygen generation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. K.; Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An oxygen generation subsystem based on water electrolysis was developed and tested to further advance the concept and technology of the spacecraft air revitalization system. Emphasis was placed on demonstrating the subsystem integration concept and hardware maturity at a subsystem level. The integration concept of the air revitalization system was found to be feasible. Hardware and technology of the oxygen generation subsystem was demonstrated to be close to the preprototype level. Continued development of the oxygen generation technology is recommended to further reduce the total weight penalties of the oxygen generation subsystem through optimization.

  15. Epidemiology of satellite anomalies and failures: A subsystem-centric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Rachel A.; Saleh, Joseph H.

    2011-09-01

    Epidemiology is the basic science of public health and it investigates the distribution, frequency, rates, and drivers of health-related states and illnesses in specific populations. We adopt in this article some of Epidemiology's concepts and approaches, and instead of human population and diseases, we focus on a satellite population and its on-orbit anomalies and failures. We analyze an extensive database of geosynchronous satellite anomalies and failures (retrospective cohort study) and develop for each spacecraft subsystem a health scorecard synthesizing its track record of on-orbit failure events. We include results on the severity of the failure events in each subsystem's health scorecard (distribution and rates). We also provide for each subsystem its failure concentration ratio or the extent to which a single satellite in our population has experienced multiple failure events from the same subsystem. Next, having derived health scorecards for ten satellite subsystems identified in the database, we conduct a comparative analysis of the propensity and severity of failures between these subsystems. We identify for example several major subsystems driving on-orbit failure events, such as the Thruster/Fuel, the Solar Array, the Payload, and the Telemetry Tracking and Command (TTC) subsystems. In addition, we find that the Control Processor, the Mechanisms, and the Solar Array Deployment subsystems are sufficiently robust and contribute a minor share to the overall failure events on orbit. Furthermore, we find for example that while the attitude control subsystem and the batteries exhibit roughly similar average failure rates, they have very different behaviors in terms of the severity of anomalies they experience: the former primarily failing "soft" (minor anomaly), whereas the latter, the batteries most often fail "hard" with major non-repairable degradations that affect operation of a satellite on a permanent basis. The results here provided should prove

  16. iPAS Propulsion Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Integrated Power, Avionics and Software (iPAS) project is to develop a simulation facility that can be apply to various missions that use common avionics, hardware, and software architecture. The iPAS facility will model several subsystems, the EP4 contribution to the project is to design and build a low fidelity representation of the in-space propulsion system for the iPAS simulation. The system would use a pressurized bottle to provide the gas for the thrusters. Air will be used to perform the simulation to prevent a hazardous environment in the facility. Three cold gas thrusters previously used for the X-38 program will be used for the simulation because they are on hand and available for use. An incremental design-build-test approach will be taken where the X-38 thrusters may be replaced with actual flight thrusters as the flight design is matured. A pressurized system must be designed, built, and tested to reduce the 2,400psi bottle pressure to a reasonable pressure (0-800psig) to minimize the amount of noise created upon thruster activation. Once all the subsystems are completed they will be integrated together for testing.

  17. Preprototype independent air revitalization subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and maturity of a preprototype, three-person capacity, automatically controlled and monitored, self-contained independent air revitalization subsystem were evaluated. The subsystem maintains the cabin partial pressure of oxygen at 22 kPa (3.2 psia) and that of carbon dioxide at 400 Pa (3 mm Hg) over a wide range of cabin air relative humidity conditions. Consumption of water vapor by the water vapor electrolysis module also provides partial humidity control of the cabin environment. During operation, the average carbon dioxide removal efficiency at baseline conditions remained constant throughout the test at 84%. The average electrochemical depolarized concentrator cell voltage at the end of the parametric/endurance test was 0.41 V, representing a very slowly decreasing average cell voltage. The average water vapor electrolysis cell voltage increased only at a rate of 20 mu/h from the initial level of 1.67 V to the final level of 1.69 V at conclusion of the testing.

  18. Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alland, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes my work with the Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS) team during the summer of 2011. It gives some background on the motivation for this project and describes the expected benefit to the Cassini program. It then introduces the two tasks that I worked on - an automatic system auditing tool and a series of corrections to the Cassini Sequence Generator (SEQ_GEN) - and the specific objectives these tasks were to accomplish. Next, it details the approach I took to meet these objectives and the results of this approach, followed by a discussion of how the outcome of the project compares with my initial expectations. The paper concludes with a summary of my experience working on this project, lists what the next steps are, and acknowledges the help of my Cassini colleagues.

  19. Preprototype nitrogen supply subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nitrogen supply subsystem based on the dissociation of hydrazine into a mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is developed. The latter is separated to provide makeup nitrogen to control the composition of spacecraft atmospheres. Specific hardware developments resulted in the design and fabrication of a nominal 3.6 kg/d nitrogen generation module. The design integrates a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four hydrogen separation stages into a 33 kg, 14 cu dm module. A technique was devised to alternate the ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages to give high nitrogen purity in the end product stream. Tests show the product stream to contain less than 0.5 percent hydrogen and 10 parts per million ammonia. The design and development of a test stand for the nitrogen generation module and a series of tests which verified its operation and performance capability are described.

  20. Keck adaptive optics: control subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1996-03-08

    Adaptive optics on the Keck 10 meter telescope will provide an unprecedented level of capability in high resolution ground based astronomical imaging. The system is designed to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance with Strehl {gt} 0.3 n median Keck seeing of r0 = 25 cm, T =10 msec at 500 nm wavelength. The system will be equipped with a 20 watt sodium laser guide star to provide nearly full sky coverage. The wavefront control subsystem is responsible for wavefront sensing and the control of the tip-tilt and deformable mirrors which actively correct atmospheric turbulence. The spatial sampling interval for the wavefront sensor and deformable mirror is de=0.56 m which gives us 349 actuators and 244 subapertures. This paper summarizes the wavefront control system and discusses particular issues in designing a wavefront controller for the Keck telescope.

  1. Laser Crosslink Subsystem - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deadrick, R. B.; Deckelman, W. F.

    1992-06-01

    The Laser Crosslink Subsystem (LCS) is a full duplex laser communications terminal in production at McDonnell Douglas Electronics Systems Company. The LCS will provide a data crosslink for geosynchronous satellites. This paper provides an overview of the system design and major elements followed by a brief program history. One LCS is installed on each satellite. The system utilizes a solid state diode pumped Neodymium YAG laser and direct pulse detection to provide 1.28 Mbps data transmission in one direction on the link and 4 Kbps in the other. A single eight inch gimballed telescope provides both the transmit and receive antenna function. After autonomously acquiring, the 200 Hz bandwidth fine tracking system maintains pointing of the 10 microrad optical beam. The LCS began development in 1981. Since then, each of its assemblies has completed-flight qualification testing. The first integrated production unit successfully completed environmental and performance qualification testing in 1990.

  2. Optical components and subsystems: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Lee, P.; Zhu, T.; Lee, G.; Xu, K.; Wang, R.

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a brief review and discussion on the opportunities and challenges facing the optical components and sub-systems vendors. Specifically, this paper discusses some of the current components and sub-system development on the low loss CWDM filters, wavelength blockers, PLC switch arrays, wavelength selective switches, optical protection switching sub-systems, tunable filters and DCMs, and in addition, the fiber-coupled short-wavelength diode-lasers for medical applications.

  3. FUSE satellite electrical power subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Roufberg, L.; Noah, K.

    1998-07-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite will be placed into a low earth orbit to investigate astrophysical processes related to the formation and development of the early universe. The FUSE satellite is considered a pathfinder for NASA's Mid-Class Explorers (MIDEX). To reduce mission cost and development time while delivering quality science, NASA has enforced strict cost caps with a clear definition of high-level science objectives. As a result, a significant design driver for the electrical power subsystem (EPS) was to minimize cost. The FUSE EPS is a direct energy transfer, unregulated bus architecture, with batteries directly on the bus and solar array power limted by pulse-width-modulated shunt regulators. The power subsystem electronics (PSE) contains circuitry to control battery charging, provide power to the loads, and provide fault protection. The electronics is based on the PSE which Orbital (formerly, Fairchild Space) designed and built for NASA/GSFC's XTE spacecraft. However, the FUSE PSE design incorporates a number of unique features to meet the mission requirements. To minimize size of the solar panels due to stowed attachment constraints, GaAs/Ge solar cells were selected. This is the first time this type of large area, thinned solar cell with integral bypass diodes are being used for a NASA LEO mission. The solar panels support a satellite load power of 520W. Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) batteries are used which are identical to the RADARSAT-I design, except for different temperature sensors. This is the first mission for which Orbital is using SAFT NiCd batteries. The spacecraft bus, including the EPS, has successfully completed environmental testing and has been delivered for instrument integration. Tradeoffs involved in designing the EPS and selecting components based on the requirements are discussed. Analyses including solar array and battery sizing and energy balance are presented in addition to results from testing the flight

  4. Private quantum subsystems and quasiorthogonal operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Jeremy; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Kribs, David W.; Laflamme, Raymond; Pereira, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    We generalize a recently discovered example of a private quantum subsystem to find private subsystems for Abelian subgroups of the n-qubit Pauli group, which exist in the absence of private subspaces. In doing so, we also connect these quantum privacy investigations with the theory of quasiorthogonal operator algebras through the use of tools from group theory and operator theory.

  5. Mission payloads subsystem description, revision 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The Mission Payloads Subsystem (MPLS) which utilizes a simplified trajectory model to generate a list of missions for the Scheduling Algorithm for Mission Planning and Logistics Evaluation (SAMPLE) program is described. The MPLS is the mechanism that forms the basis of input for the other subsystems of SAMPLE and various post processors.

  6. Installation package for the Solaron solar subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Information that is intended to be a guide for installation, operation, and maintenance of the various solar subsystems is presented. The subsystems consist of the following: collectors, storage, transport (air handler) and controller for heat pump and peak storage. Two prototype residential systems were installed at Akron, Ohio, and Duffield, Virginia.

  7. ACCESS Sub-system Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Morris, Matthew J.; Aldoroty, Lauren Nicole; Godon, David; Pelton, Russell; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Kimble, Randy A.; Wright, Edward L.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Feldman, Paul D.; Moos, H. Warren; Riess, Adam G.; Bohlin, Ralph; Deustua, Susana E.; Dixon, William Van Dyke; Sahnow, David J.; Lampton, Michael; Perlmutter, Saul

    2016-01-01

    ACCESS: Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments designed to leverage significant technological advances in detectors, instruments, and the precision of the fundamental laboratory standards used to calibrate these instruments to enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of laboratory absolute detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass.A cross wavelength calibration of the astrophysical flux scale to this level of precision over this broad a bandpass is relevant for the data used to probe fundamental astrophysical problems such as the SNeIa photometry based measurements used to constrain dark energy theories.We will describe the strategy for achieving this level of precision, the payload and calibration configuration, present sub-system test data, and the status and preliminary performance of the integration and test of the spectrograph and telescope. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX14AH48G supports this work.

  8. The Calipso Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Ousley, Wes; Valentini, Marc; Thomas, Jason; Dejoie, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is a joint NASA-CNES mission to study the Earth s cloud and aerosol layers. The satellite is composed of a primary payload (built by Ball Aerospace) and a spacecraft platform bus (PROTEUS, built by Alcatel Alenia Space). The thermal control subsystem (TCS) for the CALIPSO satellite is a passive design utilizing radiators, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and both operational and survival surface heaters. The most temperature sensitive component within the satellite is the laser system. During thermal vacuum testing of the integrated satellite, the laser system s operational heaters were found to be inadequate in maintaining the lasers required set point. In response, a solution utilizing the laser system s survival heaters to augment the operational heaters was developed with collaboration between NASA, CNES, Ball Aerospace, and Alcatel-Alenia. The CALIPSO satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26th, 2006. Evaluation of both the platform and payload thermal control systems show they are performing as expected and maintaining the critical elements of the satellite within acceptable limits.

  9. Curtains for ATP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The administration's efforts to keep various technology-transfer programs afloat in the budget process appear to be stalled. House Science Committee chair Robert Walker (R-Pa.) advised in early April that the Republican agenda for the pending budget process entails zeroing out the Commerce Department's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), which was funded at 431 million in fiscal year 1995. The ATP would lose about 90 million from its FY 95 budget. Although Walker says that the Republican leadership has no intention to dictate to the subcommittees how cuts should be made, they will be held to the "fairly severe caps" established by the House Budget Committee. In other words, Walker says, if ATP stays, something else will have to go in its place. In addition, a bill to rescind about 223 million from the FY 1995 budget of the Technology Reinvestment Project and another 77 million from TRP's FY 1994 budget, which has not been spent, is heading for the president's signature. Yet Walker says while he supports the merits of technology transfer, "the question is do you have to create government programs to get the technology out?"

  10. Development of Testing Station for Prototype Rover Thermal Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, Kaitlin

    2010-01-01

    In order to successfully and efficiently explore the moon or other planets, a vehicle must be built to assist astronauts as they travel across the surface. One concept created to meet this need is NASA's Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). The SEV, a small pressurized cabin integrated onto a 12-wheeled chassis, can support two astronauts up to 14 days. Engineers are currently developing the second generation of the SEV, with the goal of being faster, more robust, and able to carry a heavier payload. In order to function properly, the rover must dissipate heat produced during operation and maintain an appropriate temperature profile inside the rover. If these activities do not occur, components of the rover will start to break down, eventually leading to the failure of the rover. On the rover, these requirements are the responsibility of the thermal subsystem. My project for the summer was to design and build a testing station to facilitate the design and testing of the new thermal subsystem. As the rover develops, initial low fidelity parts can be interchanged for the high fidelity parts used on the rover. Based on a schematic of the proposed thermal system, I sized and selected parts for each of the components in the thermal subsystem. For the components in the system that produced heat but had not yet been finalized or fabricated, I used power resistors to model their load patterns. I also selected all of the fittings to put the system together and a mounting platform to support the testing station. Finally, I implemented sensors at various points in the system to measure the temperature, pressure, and flow rate, and a data acquisition system to collect this information. In the future, the information from these sensors will be used to study the behavior of the subsystem under different conditions and select the best part for the rover.

  11. Intelligent subsystem interface for modular hardware system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krening, Douglas N. (Inventor); Lannan, Gregory B. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Robert A. (Inventor); Caffrey, Robert T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A single chip application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which provides a flexible, modular interface between a subsystem and a standard system bus. The ASIC includes a microcontroller/microprocessor, a serial interface for connection to the bus, and a variety of communications interface devices available for coupling to the subsystem. A three-bus architecture, utilizing arbitration, provides connectivity within the ASIC and between the ASIC and the subsystem. The communication interface devices include UART (serial), parallel, analog, and external device interface utilizing bus connections paired with device select signals. A low power (sleep) mode is provided as is a processor disable option.

  12. Data Transport Subsystem - The SFOC glue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    The design and operation of the Data Transport Subsystem (DTS) for the JPL Space Flight Operation Center (SFOC) are described. The SFOC is the ground data system under development to serve interplanetary space probes; in addition to the DTS, it comprises a ground interface facility, a telemetry-input subsystem, data monitor and display facilities, and a digital TV system. DTS links the other subsystems via an ISO OSI presentation layer and an LAN. Here, particular attention is given to the DTS services and service modes (virtual circuit, datagram, and broadcast), the DTS software architecture, the logical-name server, the role of the integrated AI library, and SFOC as a distributed system.

  13. More About Beam-Steering Subsystem For Laser Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Norman A.; Chen, Chien-Chu; Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about developmental beam-steering subsystem of laser-communication system. Aspects of this subsystem described previously in "Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19069) and "Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem" (NPO-19193). Reports reiterate basic principles of operation of beam-steering subsystem and of laser-communication system as whole. Also presents some of details of optical and mechanical design of prototype of subsystem, called Optical Communication Demonstrator.

  14. Evaluation of ATP bioluminescence assays for potential use in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Zoie A; Wilson, Michael; Pratten, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    ATP bioluminescence is being applied in hospitals to measure surface contamination. We compared commercial luminometers for detecting the number Staphylococcus aureus associated with surfaces. The data showed that the ATP bioluminescence methods tested were not robust enough to generate quantitative data on bacterial numbers, especially at low concentrations.

  15. Solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Solar Electric Propulsion System developed under this program was designed to demonstrate all the thrust subsystem functions needed on an unmanned planetary vehicle. The demonstration included operation of the basic elements, power matching input and output voltage regulation, three-axis thrust vector control, subsystem automatic control including failure detection and correction capability (using a PDP-11 computer), operation of critical elements in thermal-vacuum-, zero-gravity-type propellant storage, and data outputs from all subsystem elements. The subsystem elements, functions, unique features, and test setup are described. General features and capabilities of the test-support data system are also presented. The test program culminated in a 1500-h computer-controlled, system-functional demonstration. This included simultaneous operation of two thruster/power conditioner sets. The results of this testing phase satisfied all the program goals.

  16. Goddard trajectory determination subsystem: Mathematical specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. E. (Editor); Velez, C. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical specifications of the Goddard trajectory determination subsystem of the flight dynamics system are presented. These specifications include the mathematical description of the coordinate systems, dynamic and measurement model, numerical integration techniques, and statistical estimation concepts.

  17. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  18. Periodic subsystem density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele; Ceresoli, Davide

    2014-11-07

    By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

  19. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  20. Lightning testing at the subsystem level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luteran, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Testing at the subsystem or black box level for lightning hardness is required if system hardness is to be assured at the system level. The often applied philosophy of lighting testing only at the system level leads to extensive end of the line design changes which result in excessive costs and time delays. In order to perform testing at the subsystem level two important factors must be defined to make the testing simulation meaningful. The first factor is the definition of the test stimulus appropriate to the subsystem level. Application of system level stimulations to the subsystem level usually leads to significant overdesign of the subsystem which is not necessary and may impair normal subsystem performance. The second factor is the availability of test equipment needed to provide the subsystem level lightning stimulation. Equipment for testing at this level should be portable or at least movable to enable efficient testing in a design laboratory environment. Large fixed test installations for system level tests are not readily available for use by the design engineers at the subsystem level and usually require special operating skills. The two factors, stimulation level and test equipment availability, must be evaluated together in order to produce a practical, workable test standard. The neglect or subordination of either factor will guarantee failure in generating the standard. It is not unusual to hear that test standards or specifications are waived because a specified stimulation level cannot be accomplished by in-house or independent test facilities. Determination of subsystem lightning simulation level requires a knowledge and evaluation of field coupling modes, peak and median levels of voltages and currents, bandwidths, and repetition rates. Practical limitations on test systems may require tradeoffs in lightning stimulation parameters in order to build practical test equipment. Peak power levels that can be generated at specified bandwidths with

  1. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  2. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  3. Air and water quality monitor assessment of life support subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Ken; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Holder, D.; Humphries, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preprotype air revitalization and water reclamation subsystems (Mole Sieve, Sabatier, Static Feed Electrolyzer, Trace Contaminant Control, and Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporative Subsystem) were operated and tested independently and in an integrated arrangement. During each test, water and/or gas samples were taken from each subsystem so that overall subsystem performance could be determined. The overall test design and objectives for both subsystem and integrated subsystem tests were limited, and no effort was made to meet water or gas specifications. The results of chemical analyses for each of the participating subsystems are presented along with other selected samples which were analyzed for physical properties and microbiologicals.

  4. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  5. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  6. A comparative study of multivariable robustness analysis methods as applied to integrated flight and propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schierman, John D.; Lovell, T. A.; Schmidt, David K.

    1993-01-01

    Three multivariable robustness analysis methods are compared and contrasted. The focus of the analysis is on system stability and performance robustness to uncertainty in the coupling dynamics between two interacting subsystems. Of particular interest is interacting airframe and engine subsystems, and an example airframe/engine vehicle configuration is utilized in the demonstration of these approaches. The singular value (SV) and structured singular value (SSV) analysis methods are compared to a method especially well suited for analysis of robustness to uncertainties in subsystem interactions. This approach is referred to here as the interacting subsystem (IS) analysis method. This method has been used previously to analyze airframe/engine systems, emphasizing the study of stability robustness. However, performance robustness is also investigated here, and a new measure of allowable uncertainty for acceptable performance robustness is introduced. The IS methodology does not require plant uncertainty models to measure the robustness of the system, and is shown to yield valuable information regarding the effects of subsystem interactions. In contrast, the SV and SSV methods allow for the evaluation of the robustness of the system to particular models of uncertainty, and do not directly indicate how the airframe (engine) subsystem interacts with the engine (airframe) subsystem.

  7. Electrochemical energy storage subsystems study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. Q.; Richardson, P. W.; Graff, C. L.; Jordan, M. V.; Patterson, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs (LCC) of major design and performance technology parameters for multi kW LEO and GEO energy storage subsystems using NiCd and NiH2 batteries and fuel cell/electrolysis cell devices were examined. Design, performance and LCC dynamic models are developed based on mission and system/subsystem requirements and existing or derived physical and cost data relationships. The models define baseline designs and costs. The major design and performance parameters are each varied to determine their influence on LCC around the baseline values.

  8. Laboratory measurements of on-board subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuspl, P. P.; Dong, G.; Seran, H. C.

    1991-01-01

    Good progress was achieved on the test bed for on-board subsystems for future satellites. The test bed is for subsystems developed previously. Four test setups were configured in the INTELSAT technical labs: (1) TDMA on-board modem; (2) multicarrier demultiplexer demodulator; (3) IBS/IDR baseband processor; and (4) baseband switch matrix. The first three series of tests are completed and the tests on the BSM are in progress. Descriptions of test setups and major test results are included; the format of the presentation is outlined.

  9. Electrochemical Energy Storage Subsystems Study, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. Q.; Richardson, P. W.; Graff, C. L.; Jordan, M. V.; Patterson, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs (LCC) of major design and performance technology parameters for multi kW LEO and GEO energy storage subsystems using NiCd and NiH2 batteries and fuel cell/electrolysis cell devices were examined. Design, performance and LCC dynamic models are developed based on mission and system/subsystem requirements and existing or derived physical and cost data relationships. The models are exercised to define baseline designs and costs. Then the major design and performance parameters are each varied to determine their influence on LCC around the baseline values.

  10. Timing subsystem development: Network synchronization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backe, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a program in which several experimental timing subsystem prototypes were designed, fabricated, and field tested using a small network of troposcatter and microwave digital communication links. This equipment was responsible for modem/radio interfacing, time interval measurement, clock adjustment and distribution, synchronization technique, and node to node information exchange. Presented are discussions of the design approach, measurement plan, and performance assessment methods. Recommendations are made based on the findings of the test program and an evaluation of the design of both the hardware and software elements of the timing subsystem prototypes.

  11. A Subsystem-Independent Generalization of Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Somma, Rolando; Viola, Lorenza

    2004-03-01

    We present a generalization of entanglement based on the idea that entanglement is relative to a distinguished subspace of observables rather than a distinguished subsystem decomposition. A pure quantum state is entangled relative to such a subspace if its expectations are a proper mixture of those of other states. Many information-theoretic aspects of entanglement can be extended to this observable-based setting, suggesting new ways of measuring and classifying multipartite entanglement. By going beyond the distinguishable-subsystem framework, generalized entanglement also provides novel tools for probing quantum correlations in interacting many-body systems.

  12. Small spacecraft power and thermal subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eakman, D.; Lambeck, R.; Mackowski, M.; Slifer, L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This white paper provides a general guide to the conceptual design of satellite power and thermal control subsystems with special emphasis on the unique design aspects associated with small satellites. The operating principles of these technologies are explained and performance characteristics of current and projected components are provided. A tutorial is presented on the design process for both power and thermal subsystems, with emphasis on unique issues relevant to small satellites. The ability of existing technology to meet future performance requirements is discussed. Conclusions and observations are presented that stress cost-effective, high-performance design solutions.

  13. MIUS integration and subsystems test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckham, W. S., Jr.; Shows, G. C.; Redding, T. E.; Wadle, R. C.; Keough, M. B.; Poradek, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The MIUS Integration and Subsystems Test (MIST) facility at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center was completed and ready in May 1974 for conducting specific tests in direct support of the Modular Integrated Utility System (MIUS). A series of subsystems and integrated tests was conducted since that time, culminating in a series of 24-hour dynamic tests to further demonstrate the capabilities of the MIUS Program concepts to meet typical utility load profiles for a residential area. Results of the MIST Program are presented which achieved demonstrated plant thermal efficiencies ranging from 57 to 65 percent.

  14. JOB BUILDER remote batch processing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, I. G.; Orlova, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The functions of the JOB BUILDER remote batch processing subsystem are described. Instructions are given for using it as a component of a display system developed by personnel of the System Programming Laboratory, Institute of Space Research, USSR Academy of Sciences.

  15. Space Interferometry Mission starlight and metrology subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Lawrence L.; Barrett, Stephanie D.; Calhoon, Stuart J.; Kvamme, Eric T.; Mason, James E.; Oseas, Jeffrey M.; Pryor, Mark; Schaechter, David B.; Stubbs, David M.

    2003-02-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), planned for launch in 2009, will measure the positions of celestial objects to an unprecedented accuracy of 4.0 microarcseconds. In order to achieve this accuracy, which represents an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude over previous astrometric measurements, a ten-meter baseline interferometer will be flown in space. NASA challenges JPL and its industrial partners, Lockheed Martin and TRW, to develop an affordable mission. This challenge will be met using a combination of existing designs and new technology. Performance and affordability must be balanced with a cost-conscious Systems Engineering approach to design and implementation trades. This paper focuses on the Lockheed Martin-led Starlight (STL) and Metrology (MET) subsystems within the main instrument of SIM. Starlight is collected by 35cm diameter telescopes to form fringes on detectors. To achieve the stated accuracy, the position of these white-light fringes must be measured to 10-9 of a wavelength of visible light. The STL Subsystem consists of siderostats, telescopes, fast steering mirrors, roof mirrors, optical delay lines and beam combiners. The MET Subsystem is used to measure very precisely the locations of the siderostats with respect to one another as well as to measure the distance traveled by starlight from the siderostat mirrors and reference corner cubes through the system to a point very close to the detectors inside the beam combiners. The MET subsystem consists of beam launchers, double and triple corner cubes, and a laser distribution system.

  16. SPECTROSCOPIC SUBSYSTEMS IN NEARBY WIDE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-12-15

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5 m telescope to study short-period systems. The data reduction is described, and mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, and for some of them the orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67 pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem, and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods matches the simple prescription proposed by the author. The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300 AU have an RV difference distribution between their components that is not compatible with the thermal eccentricity distribution f (e) = 2e but rather matches the uniform eccentricity distribution.

  17. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  18. Air-stimulated ATP release from keratinocytes occurs through connexin hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Barr, Travis P; Albrecht, Phillip J; Hou, Quanzhi; Mongin, Alexander A; Strichartz, Gary R; Rice, Frank L

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous ATP release plays an important role in both epidermal stratification and chronic pain, but little is known about ATP release mechanisms in keratinocytes that comprise the epidermis. In this study, we analyzed ATP release from cultured human neonatal keratinocytes briefly exposed to air, a process previously demonstrated to trigger ATP release from these cells. We show that exposing keratinocytes to air by removing media for 15 seconds causes a robust, long-lasting ATP release. This air-stimulated ATP release was increased in calcium differentiated cultures which showed a corresponding increase in connexin 43 mRNA, a major component of keratinocyte hemichannels. The known connexin hemichannel inhibitors 1-octanol and carbenoxolone both significantly reduced air-stimulated ATP release, as did two drugs traditionally used as ABC transporter inhibitors (glibenclamide and verapamil). These same 4 inhibitors also prevented an increase in the uptake of a connexin permeable dye induced by air exposure, confirming that connexin hemichannels are open during air-stimulated ATP release. In contrast, activity of the MDR1 ABC transporter was reduced by air exposure and the drugs that inhibited air-stimulated ATP release had differential effects on this transporter. These results indicate that air exposure elicits non-vesicular release of ATP from keratinocytes through connexin hemichannels and that drugs used to target connexin hemichannels and ABC transporters may cross-inhibit. Connexins represent a novel, peripheral target for the treatment of chronic pain and dermatological disease.

  19. The Digital Electronic Subsystem of Marsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltecca, L.; Pecora, M.; Scandelli, L.

    MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) is one of the Instrument of the ESA Mars Express mission, to be launched in June 2003 with a Soyuz/Fregate. Its primary objective is to map the distribution of water, both liquid and solid, in the upper portions of the crust of Mars. Secondary objectives are subsurface geologic probing, surface characterisation and ionosphere sounding. The MARSIS instrument is a low-frequency nadir-looking pulse limited radar sounder and altimeter with ground penetration capabilities, which uses synthetic aperture techniques and a secondary-receiving antenna to isolate subsurface reflections. Functionally and also from the responsibility point of view of each organisation involved in MARSIS, the instrument can be split into three subsystems: - Antenna: ANT - Radio Frequency Subsystem: RFS (TX+RX) - Digital Electronics Subsystem: DES MARSIS is an international co-operation between Italian Space Agency (ASI) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The experiment has an Italian Principal investigator (from Infocom Dept. of University of Rome "La Sapienza"), an U.S. Co-PI (from Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and Co-I~@~Ys from Italy, the U.S. and other countries. Italy is the lead for the experiment definition with the participation of the U.S.. In particular Alenia Spazio/Rome is the Prime Contractor of the industrial team and also supplier of part of the RF subsystem. Laben (a company of Finmeccanica) is the supplier of the Digital Electronic Subsystem (DES), including its basic and application SW, as subcontractor of ALS. The purpose of this paper is to describe the DES from HW and SW point of view, including the Test Equipment and the special simulator developed used for DES validation.

  20. Debris measure subsystem of the nanosatellite IRECIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, M.; di Ciolo, L.; Ortenzi, A.; Petrozzi, M.; del Re, V.

    2003-09-01

    The on board resources, needed to perform the mission tasks, are very limited in nano-satellites. This paper proposes an Electronic real-time system that acquires space debris measures. It uses a piezo-electric sensor. The described device is a subsystem on board of the IRECIN nanosatellite composed mainly by a r.i.s.c. microprocessor, an electronic part that interfaces to the debris sensor in order to provide a low noise electrical and suitable range to ADC 12 bit converter, and finally a memory in order to store the data. The microprocessor handles the Debris Measure System measuring the impacts number, their intensity and storing their waves form. This subsystem is able to communicate with the other IRECIN subsystems through I2C Bus and principally with the "Main Microprocessor" subsystem allowing the data download directly to the Ground Station. Moreover this subsystem lets free the "Main Microprocessor Board" from the management and charge of debris data. All electronic components are SMD technology in order to reduce weight and size. The realized Electronic board are completely developed, realized and tested at the Vitrociset S.P.A. under control of Research and Development Group. The proposed system is implemented on the IRECIN, a modular nanosatellite weighting less than 1.5 kg, constituted by sixteen external sides with surface-mounted solar cells and three internal Al plates, kept together by four steel bars. Lithium-ions batteries are added for eclipse operations. Attitude is determined by two three-axis magnetometers and the solar panels data. Control is provided by an active magnetic control system. The spacecraft will be spin-stabilized with the spin-axis normal to the orbit. debris and micrometeoroids mass and velocity.

  1. National Ingition Facility subsystem design requirements pockels cell subsystem SSDR 1.3.3

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.

    1996-10-31

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Pockels cell subsystem (WBS 1.3.3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Advances in ROADM technologies and subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay

    2005-09-01

    Until recently, reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM) systems did not exist, their components were unselected, and their market was unclear. Today, every major system vendor has a ROADM offering, and a large number of component vendors have announced ROADM products based on a variety of technologies, some more mature than others. We review the different optical component technologies that have been developed for use in ROADM subsystems, and describe their principles of operation, designs, advantages, and challenges. The technology platforms that we cover include MEMS, liquid crystals (liquid crystal devices (LCD) and liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) technologies), and monolithic and hybrid planar lightwave circuits (PLC) based on silica on silicon and polymer on silicon platforms. For each technology, we describe the corresponding ROADM subsystem architectures in terms of functionality, features, size, cost, and maturity.

  3. Analysis of the human operator subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lynette A.; Hunter, Ian W.

    1991-01-01

    Except in low-bandwidth systems, knowledge of the human operator transfer function is essential for high-performance telerobotic systems. This information has usually been derived from detailed analyses of tracking performance, in which the human operator is considered as a complete system rather than as a summation of a number of subsystems, each of which influences the operator's output. Studies of one of these subsystems, the limb mechanics system, demonstrate that large parameter variations can occur that can have a profound effect on the stability of force-reflecting telerobot systems. An objective of this research was to decompose the performance of the human operator system in order to establish how the dynamics of each of the elements influence the operator's responses.

  4. Toward a multiscale description of microvascular flow regulation: o(2)-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes and the distribution of ATP in capillary networks.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel; Fraser, Graham M; Ellis, Christopher G; Sprague, Randy S; Ellsworth, Mary L; Stephenson, Alan H

    2012-01-01

    Integration of the numerous mechanisms that have been suggested to contribute to optimization of O(2) supply to meet O(2) need in skeletal muscle requires a systems biology approach which permits quantification of these physiological processes over a wide range of length scales. Here we describe two individual computational models based on in vivo and in vitro studies which, when incorporated into a single robust multiscale model, will provide information on the role of erythrocyte-released ATP in perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Healthy human erythrocytes exposed to low O(2) tension release ATP via a well characterized signaling pathway requiring activation of the G-protein, Gi, and adenylyl cyclase leading to increases in cAMP. This cAMP then activates PKA and subsequently CFTR culminating in ATP release via pannexin 1. A critical control point in this pathway is the level of cAMP which is regulated by pathway-specific phosphodiesterases. Using time constants (~100 ms) that are consistent with measured erythrocyte ATP release, we have constructed a dynamic model of this pathway. The model predicts levels of ATP release consistent with measurements obtained over a wide range of hemoglobin O(2) saturations (sO(2)). The model further predicts how insulin, at concentrations found in pre-diabetes, enhances the activity of PDE3 and reduces intracellular cAMP levels leading to decreased low O(2)-induced ATP release from erythrocytes. The second model, which couples O(2) and ATP transport in capillary networks, shows how intravascular ATP and the resulting conducted vasodilation are affected by local sO(2), convection and ATP degradation. This model also predicts network-level effects of decreased ATP release resulting from elevated insulin levels. Taken together, these models lay the groundwork for investigating the systems biology of the regulation of microvascular perfusion distribution by

  5. Wideband embedded/conformal antenna subsystem concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalanskas, Joseph P.; Valentine, Gary W.; Wolfson, Ronald I.

    1991-10-01

    The concept for a wideband, embedded/conformal antenna subsystem is presented. A multilayer radome not only protects the antenna from hostile environments, but also is designed to sustain aircraft dynamic loading. The radiating element consists of a planar, dual- flared slot capable of high-performance, multioctave operation. Advanced materials are currently being developed to enhance the low profile and efficient, wideband performance of the radiating element.

  6. Apollo experience report: Electrical wiring subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general requirements of the electrical wiring subsystems and the problem areas and solutions that occurred during the major part of the Apollo Program are detailed in this report. The concepts and definitions of specific requirements for electrical wiring; wire-connecting devices; and wire-harness fabrication, checkout, and installation techniques are discussed. The design and development of electrical wiring and wire-connecting devices are described. Mission performance is discussed, and conclusions and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  7. Subsystem codes with spatially local generators

    SciTech Connect

    Bravyi, Sergey

    2011-01-15

    We study subsystem codes whose gauge group has local generators in two-dimensional (2D) geometry. It is shown that there exists a family of such codes defined on lattices of size LxL with the number of logical qubits k and the minimum distance d both proportional to L. The gauge group of these codes involves only two-qubit generators of type XX and ZZ coupling nearest-neighbor qubits (and some auxiliary one-qubit generators). Our proof is not constructive as it relies on a certain version of the Gilbert-Varshamov bound for classical codes. Along the way, we introduce and study properties of generalized Bacon-Shor codes that might be of independent interest. Secondly, we prove that any 2D subsystem [n,k,d] code with spatially local generators obeys upper bounds kd=O(n) and d{sup 2}=O(n). The analogous upper bound proved recently for 2D stabilizer codes is kd{sup 2}=O(n). Our results thus demonstrate that subsystem codes can be more powerful than stabilizer codes under the spatial locality constraint.

  8. Subsystem codes with spatially local generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We study subsystem codes whose gauge group has local generators in two-dimensional (2D) geometry. It is shown that there exists a family of such codes defined on lattices of size L×L with the number of logical qubits k and the minimum distance d both proportional to L. The gauge group of these codes involves only two-qubit generators of type XX and ZZ coupling nearest-neighbor qubits (and some auxiliary one-qubit generators). Our proof is not constructive as it relies on a certain version of the Gilbert-Varshamov bound for classical codes. Along the way, we introduce and study properties of generalized Bacon-Shor codes that might be of independent interest. Secondly, we prove that any 2D subsystem [n,k,d] code with spatially local generators obeys upper bounds kd=O(n) and d2=O(n). The analogous upper bound proved recently for 2D stabilizer codes is kd2=O(n). Our results thus demonstrate that subsystem codes can be more powerful than stabilizer codes under the spatial locality constraint.

  9. Automated searching for quantum subsystem codes

    SciTech Connect

    Crosswhite, Gregory M.; Bacon, Dave

    2011-02-15

    Quantum error correction allows for faulty quantum systems to behave in an effectively error-free manner. One important class of techniques for quantum error correction is the class of quantum subsystem codes, which are relevant both to active quantum error-correcting schemes as well as to the design of self-correcting quantum memories. Previous approaches for investigating these codes have focused on applying theoretical analysis to look for interesting codes and to investigate their properties. In this paper we present an alternative approach that uses computational analysis to accomplish the same goals. Specifically, we present an algorithm that computes the optimal quantum subsystem code that can be implemented given an arbitrary set of measurement operators that are tensor products of Pauli operators. We then demonstrate the utility of this algorithm by performing a systematic investigation of the quantum subsystem codes that exist in the setting where the interactions are limited to two-body interactions between neighbors on lattices derived from the convex uniform tilings of the plane.

  10. Advanced vehicle systems assessment. Volume 2: Subsystems assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, K.

    1985-01-01

    Volume 2 (Subsystems Assessment) is part of a five-volume report entitled Advanced Vehicle Systems Assessment. Volume 2 presents the projected performance capabilities and cost characteristics of applicable subsystems, considering an additional decade of development. Subsystems of interest include energy storage and conversion devices as well as the necessary powertrain components and vehicle subsystems. Volume 2 also includes updated battery information based on the assessment of an independent battery review board (with the aid of subcontractor reports on advanced battery characteristics).

  11. Analysis of Vital Subsystems of Technical System Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    fundamentals of logistic support for the technical system maintenance contained in and described by the basic maintance subsystems, have been presented in...this paper. The structure of the maintance system for major business was described throught the folloving subsystems: subsystem for the management of

  12. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem: Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Voisinet, Leeann

    1995-01-01

    A report presents additional information about laser-beam-steering apparatus described in "Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem" (NPO-19193) and "More About Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19381). Reiterates basic principles of operation of beam-steering subsystem, with emphasis on modes of operation, basic design concepts, and initial experiments on partial prototype of apparatus.

  13. Automated biowaste sampling system urine subsystem operating model, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Rosen, F.

    1973-01-01

    The urine subsystem automatically provides for the collection, volume sensing, and sampling of urine from six subjects during space flight. Verification of the subsystem design was a primary objective of the current effort which was accomplished thru the detail design, fabrication, and verification testing of an operating model of the subsystem.

  14. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-03-29

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

  15. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target area auxiliary subsystem SSDR 1.8.6

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, T.

    1996-10-20

    This Subsystem Design Requirement (SSDR) establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Target Area Auxiliary Subsystems (WBS 1.8.6), which is part of the NIF Target Experimental System (WBS 1.8). This document responds directly to the requirements detailed in NIF Target Experimental System SDR 003 document. Key elements of the Target Area Auxiliary Subsystems include: WBS 1.8.6.1 Local Utility Services; WBS 1.8.6.2 Cable Trays; WBS 1.8.6.3 Personnel, Safety, and Occupational Access; WBS 1.8.6.4 Assembly, Installation, and Maintenance Equipment; WBS 1.8.6.4.1 Target Chamber Service System; WBS 1.8.6.4.2 Target Bay Service Systems.

  16. The JPL telerobotic Manipulator Control and Mechanization (MCM) subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad; Lee, Thomas S.; Tso, Kam; Backes, Paul; Kan, Edwin; Lloyd, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Manipulator Control and Mechanization (MCM) subsystem of the telerobot system provides the real-time control of the robot manipulators in autonomous and teleoperated modes and real time input/output for a variety of sensors and actuators. Substantial hardware and software are included in this subsystem which interfaces in the hierarchy of the telerobot system with the other subsystems. The other subsystems are: run time control, task planning and reasoning, sensing and perception, and operator control subsystem. The architecture of the MCM subsystem, its capabilities, and details of various hardware and software elements are described. Important improvements in the MCM subsystem over the first version are: dual arm coordinated trajectory generation and control, addition of integrated teleoperation, shared control capability, replacement of the ultimate controllers with motor controllers, and substantial increase in real time processing capability.

  17. SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

  18. X-38 Bolt Retractor Subsystem Separation Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rugless, Fedoria (Editor); Johnston, A. S.; Ahmed, R.; Garrison, J. C.; Gaines, J. L.; Waggoner, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    The Flight Robotics Laboratory FRL successfully demonstrated the X-38 bolt retractor subsystem (BRS). The BRS design was proven safe by testing in the Pyrotechnic Shock Facility (PSI) before being demonstrated in the FRL. This Technical Memorandum describes the BRS, FRL, PSF, and interface hardware. Bolt retraction time, spacecraft simulator acceleration, and a force analysis are also presented. The purpose of the demonstration was to show the FRL capability for spacecraft separation testing using pyrotechnics. Although a formal test was not performed due to schedule and budget constraints, the data will show that the BRS is a successful design concept and the FRL is suitable for future separation tests.

  19. Waves in space plasma dipole antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Waves In Space Plasma (WISP) flight experiment requires a 50-meter-long deployable dipole antenna subsystem (DASS) to radiate radio frequencies from the STS Orbiter cargo bay. The transmissions are to excite outer ionospheric plasma between the dipole and a free-flying receiver (Spartan) for scientific purposes. This report describes the singular DASS design requirements and how the resulting design satisfies them. A jettison latch is described in some detail. The latch releases the antenna in case of any problems which might prevent the bay doors from closing for re-entry and landing of the Orbiter.

  20. High temperature superconducting digital circuits and subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, J.S.; Pance, A.; Whiteley, S.R.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.F.; Lee, L.; Hietala, V.M.; Wendt, J.R.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.

    1993-10-01

    The advances in the fabrication of high temperature superconducting devices have enabled the demonstration of high performance and useful digital circuits and subsystems. The yield and uniformity of the devices is sufficient for circuit fabrication at the medium scale integration (MSI) level with performance not seen before at 77 K. The circuits demonstrated to date include simple gates, counters, analog to digital converters, and shift registers. All of these are mid-sized building blocks for potential applications in commercial and military systems. The processes used for these circuits and blocks will be discussed along with observed performance data.

  1. Operation of the yield estimation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccrary, D. G.; Rogers, J. L.; Hill, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The organization and products of the yield estimation subsystem (YES) are described with particular emphasis on meteorological data acquisition, yield estimation, crop calendars, weekly weather summaries, and project reports. During the three phases of LACIE, YES demonstrated that it is possible to use the flow of global meteorological data and provide valuable information regarding global wheat production. It was able to establish a capability to collect, in a timely manner, detailed weather data from all regions of the world, and to evaluate and convert that data into information appropriate to the project's needs.

  2. Building the IOOS data management subsystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de La Beaujardière, J.; Mendelssohn, R.; Ortiz, C.; Signell, R.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss progress to date and plans for the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS??) Data Management and Communications (DMAC) subsystem. We begin by presenting a conceptual architecture of IOOS DMAC. We describe work done as part of a 3-year pilot project known as the Data Integration Framework and the subsequent assessment of lessons learned. We present work that has been accomplished as part of the initial version of the IOOS Data Catalog. Finally, we discuss near-term plans for augmenting IOOS DMAC capabilities.

  3. LARES Mission: Separation and Retention Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursi, Alessandro; Camilli, Pierluigi; Piredda, Claudio; Babini, Gianni; Mangraviti, Elio

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Lares (LAser RElativity Satellite) mission, an all-Italian scientific mission launched with the Vega maiden flight in February 2012, a mechanical separation and retention subsystem (SSEP) has been developed to retain the LARES satellite during launch and release it in the final orbit. The design flow was based on the identification of the driving requirements and critical areas to guide the trade-off, design, analysis and test activities. In particular, the SSEP had to face very high environmental loads and to minimize the contact areas with the satellite that had a spherical shape. The test activity overview is provided.

  4. Preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. D.; Ellis, G. S.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) has evolved as the most promising approach to reclaim potable water from wastewater for future long-term manned space missions. Life Systems, Inc. (LSI), working with NASA, has developed a preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem (VCDS) which processes wastewater at 1.4 kg/h. The preprototype unit weighs 143 kg, occupies a volume of 0.47 cu m, and will reclaim 96 percent of the available wastewater. This unit has been tested by LSI and is scheduled for further testing at NASA-JSC. This paper presents the preprototype VCDS design, configuration, performance data, test results and flight system projections.

  5. Vacuum control subsystem for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, J.R.; Chapman, L.J.

    1981-06-01

    The CAMAC 170 module and CIA crate provide a convenient, cost effective method of interfacing any system requiring a large number of simple devices to be multiplexed into the Accelerator Control System. The system is ideal for relatively slowly changing systems where ten bit analog to digital conversions are sufficiently accurate. Together with vacuum interface CIA cards and prom-based software resident in the 170, this system is used to provide intelligent local monitoring and control for the Tevatron vacuum subsystems. Although not implemented in the vacuum interface, digital to analog converters could be included on the plug in modules as well, providing a total digital and analog multiplexing scheme. 2 refs.

  6. UGV: security analysis of subsystem control network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott-McCune, Sam; Kobezak, Philip; Tront, Joseph; Marchany, Randy; Wicks, Al

    2013-05-01

    Unmanned Ground vehicles (UGVs) are becoming prolific in the heterogeneous superset of robotic platforms. The sensors which provide odometry, localization, perception, and vehicle diagnostics are fused to give the robotic platform a sense of the environment it is traversing. The automotive industry CAN bus has dominated the industry due to the fault tolerance and the message structure allowing high priority messages to reach the desired node in a real time environment. UGVs are being researched and produced at an accelerated rate to preform arduous, repetitive, and dangerous missions that are associated with a military action in a protracted conflict. The technology and applications of the research will inevitably be turned into dual-use platforms to aid civil agencies in the performance of their various operations. Our motivation is security of the holistic system; however as subsystems are outsourced in the design, the overall security of the system may be diminished. We will focus on the CAN bus topology and the vulnerabilities introduced in UGVs and recognizable security vulnerabilities that are inherent in the communications architecture. We will show how data can be extracted from an add-on CAN bus that can be customized to monitor subsystems. The information can be altered or spoofed to force the vehicle to exhibit unwanted actions or render the UGV unusable for the designed mission. The military relies heavily on technology to maintain information dominance, and the security of the information introduced onto the network by UGVs must be safeguarded from vulnerabilities that can be exploited.

  7. Fault-tolerant multichannel demultiplexer subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redinbo, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Fault tolerance in future processing and switching communication satellites is addressed by showing new methods for detecting hardware failures in the first major subsystem, the multichannel demultiplexer. An efficient method for demultiplexing frequency slotted channels uses multirate filter banks which contain fast Fourier transform processing. All numerical processing is performed at a lower rate commensurate with the small bandwidth of each bandbase channel. The integrity of the demultiplexing operations is protected by using real number convolutional codes to compute comparable parity values which detect errors at the data sample level. High rate, systematic convolutional codes produce parity values at a much reduced rate, and protection is achieved by generating parity values in two ways and comparing them. Parity values corresponding to each output channel are generated in parallel by a subsystem, operating even slower and in parallel with the demultiplexer that is virtually identical to the original structure. These parity calculations may be time shared with the same processing resources because they are so similar.

  8. Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Heppner, D. B.; Bunnell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The most promising concept for a regenerative CO2 removal system for long duration manned space flight is the Electrochemical CO2 Concentrator (EDC), which allows for the continuous, efficient removal of CO2 from the spacecraft cabin. This study addresses the advancement of the EDC system by generating subsystem and ancillary component reliability data through extensive endurance testing and developing related hardware components such as electrochemical module lightweight end plates, electrochemical module improved isolation valves, an improved air/liquid heat exchanger and a triple redundant relative humidity sensor. Efforts included fabrication and testing the EDC with a Sabatier CO2 Reduction Reactor and generation of data necessary for integration of the EDC into a space station air revitalization system. The results verified the high level of performance, reliability and durability of the EDC subsystem and ancillary hardware, verified the high efficiency of the Sabatier CO2 Reduction Reactor, and increased the overall EDC technology engineering data base. The study concluded that the EDC system is approaching the hardware maturity levels required for space station deployment.

  9. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  10. Local subsystems in gauge theory and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William; Freidel, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    We consider the problem of defining localized subsystems in gauge theory and gravity. Such systems are associated to spacelike hypersurfaces with boundaries and provide the natural setting for studying entanglement entropy of localized subsystems. We present a general formalism to associate a gauge-invariant classical phase space to a spatial slice with boundary by introducing new degrees of freedom on the boundary. In Yang-Mills theory the new degrees of freedom are a choice of gauge on the boundary, transformations of which are generated by the normal component of the nonabelian electric field. In general relativity the new degrees of freedom are the location of a codimension-2 surface and a choice of conformal normal frame. These degrees of freedom transform under a group of surface symmetries, consisting of diffeomorphisms of the codimension-2 boundary, and position-dependent linear deformations of its normal plane. We find the observables which generate these symmetries, consisting of the conformal normal metric and curvature of the normal connection. We discuss the implications for the problem of defining entanglement entropy in quantum gravity. Our work suggests that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy may arise from the different ways of gluing together two partial Cauchy surfaces at a cross-section of the horizon.

  11. Automating engineering verification in ALMA subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, José; Castillo, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array is an interferometer comprising 66 individual high precision antennas located over 5000 meters altitude in the north of Chile. Several complex electronic subsystems need to be meticulously tested at different stages of an antenna commissioning, both independently and when integrated together. First subsystem integration takes place at the Operations Support Facilities (OSF), at an altitude of 3000 meters. Second integration occurs at the high altitude Array Operations Site (AOS), where also combined performance with Central Local Oscillator (CLO) and Correlator is assessed. In addition, there are several other events requiring complete or partial verification of instrument specifications compliance, such as parts replacements, calibration, relocation within AOS, preventive maintenance and troubleshooting due to poor performance in scientific observations. Restricted engineering time allocation and the constant pressure of minimizing downtime in a 24/7 astronomical observatory, impose the need to complete (and report) the aforementioned verifications in the least possible time. Array-wide disturbances, such as global power interruptions and following recovery, generate the added challenge of executing this checkout on multiple antenna elements at once. This paper presents the outcome of the automation of engineering verification setup, execution, notification and reporting in ALMA and how these efforts have resulted in a dramatic reduction of both time and operator training required. Signal Path Connectivity (SPC) checkout is introduced as a notable case of such automation.

  12. Force protection demining system (FPDS) detection subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachery, Karen N.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2005-06-01

    This study describes the U.S. Army Force Protection Demining System (FPDS); a remotely-operated, multisensor platform developed for reliable detection and neutralization of both anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines. The ongoing development of the prototype multisensor detection subsystem is presented, which integrates an advanced electromagnetic pulsed-induction array and ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar array on a single standoff platform. The FPDS detection subsystem is mounted on a robotic rubber-tracked vehicle and incorporates an accurate and precise navigation/positioning module making it well suited for operation in varied and irregular terrains. Detection sensors are optimally configured to minimize interference without loss in sensitivity or performance. Mine lane test data acquired from the prototype sensors are processed to extract signal- and image-based features for automatic target recognition. Preliminary results using optimal feature and classifier selection indicate the potential of the system to achieve high probabilities of detection while minimizing false alarms. The FPDS detection software system also exploits modern multi-sensor data fusion algorithms to provide real-time detection and discrimination information to the user.

  13. Advanced transportation system studies. Alternate propulsion subsystem concepts: Propulsion database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Transportation System Studies alternate propulsion subsystem concepts propulsion database interim report is presented. The objective of the database development task is to produce a propulsion database which is easy to use and modify while also being comprehensive in the level of detail available. The database is to be available on the Macintosh computer system. The task is to extend across all three years of the contract. Consequently, a significant fraction of the effort in this first year of the task was devoted to the development of the database structure to ensure a robust base for the following years' efforts. Nonetheless, significant point design propulsion system descriptions and parametric models were also produced. Each of the two propulsion databases, parametric propulsion database and propulsion system database, are described. The descriptions include a user's guide to each code, write-ups for models used, and sample output. The parametric database has models for LOX/H2 and LOX/RP liquid engines, solid rocket boosters using three different propellants, a hybrid rocket booster, and a NERVA derived nuclear thermal rocket engine.

  14. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  15. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-03-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  16. NASA metrology information system: A NEMS subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    German, E. S., Jr.; Kern, F. A.; Yow, R. P.; Peterson, E.

    1984-01-01

    the NASA Metrology Information Systems (NMIS) is being developed as a standardized tool in managing the NASA field Center's instrument calibration programs. This system, as defined by the NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop, will function as a subsystem of the newly developed NASA Equipment Management System (NEMS). The Metrology Information System is designed to utilize and update applicable NEMS data fields for controlled property and to function as a stand alone system for noncontrolled property. The NMIS provides automatic instrument calibration recall control, instrument historical performance data storage and analysis, calibration and repair labor and parts cost data, and instrument user and location data. Nineteen standardized reports were developed to analyze calibration system operations.

  17. Commissioning subsystems of the 10 meter prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, Nathan; Fricke, Tobin; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Hanke, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    The best attempts at detecting the elusive gravitational waves are with L-shaped interferometers. Over the summer of 2014, I helped install subsystems of the 10 meter prototype, a gravitational wave interferometer designed to reach the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL), at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover, Germany through the University of Florida's International REU. While there, the frequency reference cavity was aligned and the mode matching the cavity began. We also worked on installing and testing the intensity stabilization servo, which consisted of an out-of-vacuum photodiode for each the in-loop and out-of-loop sensing that were being connected to the LIGO Control and Data System.

  18. HYBRID FUEL CELL-SOLAR CELL SPACE POWER SUBSYSTEM CAPABILITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report outlines the capabilities and limitations of a hybrid solar cell- fuel cell space power subsystem by comparing the proposed hybrid system...to conventional power subsystem devices. The comparisons are based on projected 1968 capability in the areas of primary and secondary battery, fuel ... cell , solar cell, and chemical dynamic power subsystems. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative merits of a hybrid power

  19. Plant development, auxin, and the subsystem incompleteness theorem.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Plant morphogenesis (the process whereby form develops) requires signal cross-talking among all levels of organization to coordinate the operation of metabolic and genomic subsystems operating in a larger network of subsystems. Each subsystem can be rendered as a logic circuit supervising the operation of one or more signal-activated system. This approach simplifies complex morphogenetic phenomena and allows for their aggregation into diagrams of progressively larger networks. This technique is illustrated here by rendering two logic circuits and signal-activated subsystems, one for auxin (IAA) polar/lateral intercellular transport and another for IAA-mediated cell wall loosening. For each of these phenomena, a circuit/subsystem diagram highlights missing components (either in the logic circuit or in the subsystem it supervises) that must be identified experimentally if each of these basic plant phenomena is to be fully understood. We also illustrate the "subsystem incompleteness theorem," which states that no subsystem is operationally self-sufficient. Indeed, a whole-organism perspective is required to understand even the most simple morphogenetic process, because, when isolated, every biological signal-activated subsystem is morphogenetically ineffective.

  20. F1F0-ATP synthases of alkaliphilic bacteria: lessons from their adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David B.; Liu, Jun; Fujisawa, Makoto; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the ATP synthases of alkaliphilic bacteria and, in particular, those that successfully overcome the bioenergetic challenges of achieving robust H+-coupled ATP synthesis at external pH values > 10. At such pH values the protonmotive force, which is posited to provide the energetic driving force for ATP synthesis, is too low to account for the ATP synthesis observed. The protonmotive force is lowered at very high pH by the need to maintain a cytoplasmic pH well below the pH outside, which results in an energetically adverse pH gradient. Several anticipated solutions to this bioenergetic conundrum have been ruled out. Although the transmembrane sodium motive force is high under alkaline conditions, respiratory alkaliphilic bacteria do not use Na+-instead of H+-coupled ATP synthases. Nor do they offset the adverse pH gradient with a compensatory increase in the transmembrane electrical potential component of the protonmotive force. Moreover, studies of ATP synthase rotors indicate that alkaliphiles cannot fully resolve the energetic problem by using an ATP synthase with a large number of c-subunits in the synthase rotor ring. Increased attention now focuses on delocalized gradients near the membrane surface and H+ transfers to ATP synthases via membrane-associated microcircuits between the H+ pumping complexes and synthases. Microcircuits likely depend upon proximity of pumps and synthases, specific membrane properties and specific adaptations of the participating enzyme complexes. ATP synthesis in alkaliphiles depends upon alkaliphile-specific adaptations of the ATP synthase and there is also evidence for alkaliphile-specific adaptations of respiratory chain components. PMID:20193659

  1. Giada improved calibration of measurement subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) is an in-situ instrument devoted to measure the dynamical properties of the dust grains emitted by the comet. An Extended Calibration activity using the GIADA Flight Spare Model has been carried out taking into account the knowledge gained through the analyses of IDPs and cometary samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2. GIADA consists of three measurement subsystems: Grain Detection System, an optical device measuring the optical cross-section for individual dust; Impact Sensor an aluminum plate connected to 5 piezo-sensors measuring the momentum of impacting single dust grains; Micro Balance System measuring the cumulative deposition in time of dust grains smaller than 10 μm. The results of the analyses on data acquired with the GIADA PFM and the comparison with calibration data acquired during the pre-launch campaign allowed us to improve GIADA performances and capabilities. We will report the results of the following main activities: a) definition of a correlation between the 2 GIADA Models (PFM housed in laboratory and In-Flight Model on-board ROSETTA); b) characterization of the sub-systems performances (signal elaboration, sensitivities, space environment effects); c) new calibration measurements and related curves by means of the PFM model using realistic cometary dust analogues. Acknowledgements: GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developed from a University of Kent, UK, PI proposal; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank

  2. Does Normal Processing Provide Evidence of Specialised Semantic Subsystems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Laura R.; Olson, Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Category-specific disorders are frequently explained by suggesting that living and non-living things are processed in separate subsystems (e.g. Caramazza & Shelton, 1998). If subsystems exist, there should be benefits for normal processing, beyond the influence of structural similarity. However, no previous study has separated the relative…

  3. Triple redundant computer system/display and keyboard subsystem interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulde, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Interfacing of the redundant display and keyboard subsystem with the triple redundant computer system is defined according to space shuttle design. The study is performed in three phases: (1) TRCS configuration and characteristics identification; (2) display and keyboard subsystem configuration and characteristics identification, and (3) interface approach definition.

  4. The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

  5. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional information about proposed apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). Discusses design of digital beam-steering control subsystem and, in particular, that part of design pertaining to digital compensation for frequency response of steering mirror.

  6. Subsystem radiation susceptibility analysis for deep-space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, W. S.; Poch, W.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Bilsky, H. W.; Carroll, D.

    1971-01-01

    Scientific, unmanned spacecraft on mission to Jupiter and beyond will be subjected to nuclear radiation from the natural environment and onboard nuclear power sources which may be harmful to subsystems. This report postulates these environments and discusses practical considerations to ensure confidence that the spacecraft's materials and subsystems will withstand the effects of anticipated radiation. Degradation mechanisms are discussed.

  7. OVEN & LAVA Subsystems in the RESOLVE Payload for Resource Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine E.

    2015-01-01

    A short briefing in Power Point of the status of the OVEN subsystem and the LAVA subsystems of the RESOLVE payload being developed under the Resource Prospector mission. The purpose of the mission is to sample and analyze volatile ices embedded in the lunar soil at the poles of the Moon and is expected to be conducted in the 2020 time frame.

  8. Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Dehner, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    This Master Test Plan outlines the test program to be performed by Hamilton Standard during the Urine Water Recovery Subsystem Program. Testing is divided into three phases: (1) design support testing; development component testing; and acceptance testing. The completion of this test program verifies the subsystem operation.

  9. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Definition Report

    SciTech Connect

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-03-16

    The system description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem establishes the system boundaries and describes the interface of the DST Monitor and Control Subsystem with new and existing systems that are required to accomplish the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission.

  10. Thermal energy storage subsystems. A collection of quarterly reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design, development, and progress toward the delivery of three subsystems is discussed. The subsystem used a salt hydrate mixture for thermal energy storage. The program schedules, technical data, and other program activities from October 1, 1976, through December 31, 1977 are presented.

  11. Assessing Quality across Health Care Subsystems in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Andrea; Pagán, José A.; Wong, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Recent healthcare reform efforts in Mexico have focused on the need to improve the efficiency and equity of a fragmented healthcare system. In light of these reform initiatives, there is a need to assess whether healthcare subsystems are effective at providing high-quality healthcare to all Mexicans. Nationally representative household survey data from the 2006 Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (National Health and Nutrition Survey) were used to assess perceived healthcare quality across different subsystems. Using a sample of 7234 survey respondents, we found evidence of substantial heterogeneity in healthcare quality assessments across healthcare subsystems favoring private providers over social security institutions. These differences across subsystems remained even after adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic, and health factors. Our analysis suggests that improvements in efficiency and equity can be achieved by assessing the factors that contribute to heterogeneity in quality across subsystems. PMID:19305224

  12. Apollo experience report: Lunar module environmental control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillen, R. J.; Brady, J. C.; Collier, F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional description of the environmental control subsystem is presented. Development, tests, checkout, and flight experiences of the subsystem are discussed; and the design fabrication, and operational difficulties associated with the various components and subassemblies are recorded. Detailed information is related concerning design changes made to, and problems encountered with, the various elements of the subsystem, such as the thermal control water sublimator, the carbon dioxide sensing and control units, and the water section. The problems associated with water sterilization, water/glycol formulation, and materials compatibility are discussed. The corrective actions taken are described with the expection that this information may be of value for future subsystems. Although the main experiences described are problem oriented, the subsystem has generally performed satisfactorily in flight.

  13. Multi-Mission Automated Task Invocation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Cecilia S.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Sayfi, Elias M.; Lee, Hyun H.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-Mission Automated Task Invocation Subsystem (MATIS) is software that establishes a distributed data-processing framework for automated generation of instrument data products from a spacecraft mission. Each mission may set up a set of MATIS servers for processing its data products. MATIS embodies lessons learned in experience with prior instrument- data-product-generation software. MATIS is an event-driven workflow manager that interprets project-specific, user-defined rules for managing processes. It executes programs in response to specific events under specific conditions according to the rules. Because requirements of different missions are too diverse to be satisfied by one program, MATIS accommodates plug-in programs. MATIS is flexible in that users can control such processing parameters as how many pipelines to run and on which computing machines to run them. MATIS has a fail-safe capability. At each step, MATIS captures and retains pertinent information needed to complete the step and start the next step. In the event of a restart, this information is retrieved so that processing can be resumed appropriately. At this writing, it is planned to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) for monitoring and controlling a product generation engine in MATIS. The GUI would enable users to schedule multiple processes and manage the data products produced in the processes. Although MATIS was initially designed for instrument data product generation,

  14. Revealing Open Quantum Systems with Subsystem DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    The traditional quantum chemical methods, wave function or density based, are designed to solve for a closed system, where the Hamiltonian contains all relevant interactions. The closed system is, however, not realistic, as in real life the system is embedded in an environment with which it interacts to some degree. Including the description of the environment at the full quantum mechanical level leads to the Open Quantum Systems (OQS) theory: the only theory which can describe non-Markovian dynamics between the system and the environment. By allowing the flow of information in both directions phenomena such as quantum entanglement, relevant for the design of quantum computers, become available. While most OQS theories rely on the density matrix to describe the system-bath interaction, time-dependent subsystem DFT allows to approach the problem using the electron density. Through Dyson-like equations connecting the density-density response kernels of the OQS and its environment, the extent to which non-Markovian dynamics is present can be revealed. We illustrate this for the process of excitation energy transfer in coupled chromophores embedded in explicit solvent.

  15. Synchronized target subsystem for automated docking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A synchronized target subsystem for use in an automated docking or station keeping system for docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle wherein the chase vehicle is provided with a video camera which provides adjacent frames each having a predetermined time duration. A light source mounted on the target vehicle flashes at a frequency which has a time duration which is a multiple of the duration time of the frames, the light being on for at least one frame duration and being off for the remainder of the cycle. An image processing unit is connected to the camera for receiving signals from the camera and subtracting one of the adjacent frames from the other to detect whether the light appears in one frame, both frames or neither frame. If the target light appears in both frames or neither frame, the image processing unit feeds a signal to a timing circuit to advance the video camera one frame. This process is continued until the target light appears in one frame and not in the other, at which time the process of advancing the video camera is stopped.

  16. The CALIPSO Integrated Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Ousley, Wes; Valentini, Marc; Thomas, Jason; Dejoie, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is a joint NASA-CNES mission to study the Earth's cloud and aerosol layers. The satellite is composed of a primary payload (built by Ball Aerospace) and a spacecraft platform bus (PROTEUS, built by Alcatel Alenia Space). The thermal control subsystem (TCS) for the CALIPSO satellite is a passive design utilizing radiators, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and both operational and survival surface heaters. The most temperature sensitive component within the satellite is the laser system. During thermal vacuum testing of the integrated satellite, the laser system's operational heaters were found to be inadequate in maintaining the lasers required set point. In response, a solution utilizing the laser system's survival heaters to augment the operational heaters was developed with collaboration between NASA, CNES, Ball Aerospace, and Alcatel-Alenia. The CALIPSO satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26th, 2006. Evaluation of both the platform and payload thermal control systems show they are performing as expected and maintaining the critical elements of the satellite within acceptable limits.

  17. The ATP permeability of pannexin 1 channels in a heterologous system and in mammalian taste cells is dispensable

    PubMed Central

    Romanov, Roman A.; Bystrova, Marina F.; Rogachevskaya, Olga A.; Sadovnikov, Vladimir B.; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Afferent output in type II taste cells is mediated by ATP liberated through ion channels. It is widely accepted that pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels are responsible for ATP release in diverse cell types, including taste cells. While biophysical evidence implicates slow deactivation of ion channels following ATP release in taste cells, recombinant Panx1 activates and deactivates rapidly. This inconsistency could indicate that the cellular context specifies Panx1 functioning. We cloned Panx1 from murine taste tissue, and heterologously expressed it in three different cell lines: HEK-293, CHO and neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. In all three cell lines, Panx1 transfection yielded outwardly rectifying anion channels that exhibited fast gating and negligible permeability to anions exceeding 250 Da. Despite expression of Panx1, the host cells did not liberate ATP upon stimulation, making it unclear whether Panx1 is involved in taste-related ATP secretion. This issue was addressed using mice with genetic ablation of the Panx1 gene. The ATP-biosensor assay revealed that, in taste cells devoid of Panx1, ATP secretion was robust and apparently unchanged compared with the control. Our data suggest that Panx1 alone forms a channel that has insufficient permeability to ATP. Perhaps, a distinct subunit and/or a regulatory circuit that is absent in taste cells is required to enable a high ATP-permeability mode of a native Panx1-based channel. PMID:22956545

  18. The ATP permeability of pannexin 1 channels in a heterologous system and in mammalian taste cells is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Bystrova, Marina F; Rogachevskaya, Olga A; Sadovnikov, Vladimir B; Shestopalov, Valery I; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2012-11-15

    Afferent output in type II taste cells is mediated by ATP liberated through ion channels. It is widely accepted that pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels are responsible for ATP release in diverse cell types, including taste cells. While biophysical evidence implicates slow deactivation of ion channels following ATP release in taste cells, recombinant Panx1 activates and deactivates rapidly. This inconsistency could indicate that the cellular context specifies Panx1 functioning. We cloned Panx1 from murine taste tissue, and heterologously expressed it in three different cell lines: HEK-293, CHO and neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. In all three cell lines, Panx1 transfection yielded outwardly rectifying anion channels that exhibited fast gating and negligible permeability to anions exceeding 250 Da. Despite expression of Panx1, the host cells did not liberate ATP upon stimulation, making it unclear whether Panx1 is involved in taste-related ATP secretion. This issue was addressed using mice with genetic ablation of the Panx1 gene. The ATP-biosensor assay revealed that, in taste cells devoid of Panx1, ATP secretion was robust and apparently unchanged compared with the control. Our data suggest that Panx1 alone forms a channel that has insufficient permeability to ATP. Perhaps, a distinct subunit and/or a regulatory circuit that is absent in taste cells is required to enable a high ATP-permeability mode of a native Panx1-based channel.

  19. MSG Power Subsystem Flight Return Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacometti, G.; Canard, JP.; Perron, O.

    2011-10-01

    The Meteosat programme has been running for more than twenty years under ESA leadership. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is a series of 4 geostationary satellites developed and procured by the European Space Agency (ESA) on behalf of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). Eumetsat is still operating two of the first generation satellites models named MOP3 and MTP1 which are pointed towards the Indian ocean. The European meteorological service is now enhanced by two spacecrafts of the Second Generation (MSG-1 and MSG-2). They have been launched by Ariane 5 in August 2002 and December 2005 respectively. Thales Alenia Space, Prime Contractor of the program, has developed the MSG spacecraft based on a spin-axis stabilized technology. The Electrical Power Subsystem was subcontracted to Astrium GmbH. The Solar Array is composed of 8 body mounted panels, based on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Panel substrate. The Solar network utilizes 7854 Silicon High Eta cells delivering a beginning of life power of 740W. The 28 volts mainbus is regulated using a series shunt regulating concept (S3R type). Two identical SAFT batteries, built from NiCd cells and offering a 29Ah nameplate capacity are connected to the mainbus through battery discharge and charge regulators. Both Solar Array and batteries have been designed to provide power and energy for a nominal 7 years lifetime. These equipments are continuously monitored and are still operating in excellent condition after more than eight and five years in orbit. This paper will present the major electrical design aspects of the power chain and will describe the main parameters performances, which are analysed during the in-orbit operations. Batteries ageing is detailed thanks to reconditioning processed telemetry while the solar array performances over lifetime use dedicated solar array telemetry.

  20. Pyrazinoic acid decreases the proton motive force, respiratory ATP synthesis activity, and cellular ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Haagsma, Anna C; Pham, Hoang; Maaskant, Janneke J; Mol, Selena; Lill, Holger; Bald, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  1. Neural network interpolation of the magnetic field for the LISA Pathfinder Diagnostics Subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguilo, Marc; Lobo, Alberto; García-Berro, Enrique

    2011-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, which aims to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. Its disturbances are monitored and dealt by the diagnostics subsystem. This subsystem consists of several modules, and one of these is the magnetic diagnostics system, which includes a set of four tri-axial fluxgate magnetometers, intended to measure with high precision the magnetic field at the positions of the test masses. However, since the magnetometers are located far from the positions of the test masses, the magnetic field at their positions must be interpolated. It has been recently shown that because there are not enough magnetic channels, classical interpolation methods fail to derive reliable measurements at the positions of the test masses, while neural network interpolation can provide the required measurements at the desired accuracy. In this paper we expand these studies and we assess the reliability and robustness of the neural network interpolation scheme for variations of the locations and possible offsets of the magnetometers, as well as for changes in environmental conditions. We find that neural networks are robust enough to derive accurate measurements of the magnetic field at the positions of the test masses in most circumstances.

  2. Shuttle Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem design and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Timothy A.; Metcalf, Jordan L.; Asuncion, Carmelo

    1991-01-01

    The paper examines the design of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem (ATCS) constructed for providing the vehicle and payload cooling during all phases of a mission and during ground turnaround operations. The operation of the Shuttle ATCS and some of the problems encountered during the first 39 flights of the Shuttle program are described, with special attention given to the major problems encountered with the degradation of the Freon flow rate on the Orbiter Columbia, the Flash Evaporator Subsystem mission anomalies which occurred on STS-26 and STS-34, and problems encountered with the Ammonia Boiler Subsystem. The causes and the resolutions of these problems are discussed.

  3. Development of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    The activities involved in the design, development, and test of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem are described. This subsystem, part of a larger regenerative life support evaluation system, is designed to recover usable water from urine, urinal rinse water, and concentrated shower and laundry brine collected from three space vehicle crewmen for a period of 180 days without resupply. Details of preliminary design and testing as well as component developments are included. Trade studies, considerations leading to concept selections, problems encountered, and test data are also presented. The rework of existing hardware, subsystem development including computer programs, assembly verification, and comprehensive baseline test results are discussed.

  4. Subsystem response review. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R. P.; Campbell, R. D.; Wesley, D. A.; Kamil, H.; Gantayat, A.; Vasudevan, R.

    1981-02-01

    A study was conducted to document the state of the art in seismic qualification of nuclear power plant components and subsystems by analysis and testing and to identify the sources and magnitude of the uncertainties associated with analysis and testing methods. The uncertainties are defined in probabilistic terms for use in probabilistic seismic risk studies. Recommendations are made for the most appropriate subsystem response analysis methods to minimize response uncertainties. Additional studies, to further quantify testing uncertainties, are identified. Although the general effect of non-linearities on subsystem response is discussed, recommendations and conclusions are based principally on linear elastic analysis and testing models.

  5. Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    A three-man wastewater recovery preprototype subsystem using a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump to provide efficient potable water recovery from wastewater on extended duration space flights was designed, fabricated, and tested at one-gravity. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem. The tubular hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts, and provide structural integrity, improving on previous flat sheet membrane designs. A thermoelectric heat pump provides latent energy recovery. Application and integration of these key elements solved problems inherent in all previous reclamation subsystem designs.

  6. Simulation verification techniques study. Subsystem simulation validation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques for validation of software modules which simulate spacecraft onboard systems are discussed. An overview of the simulation software hierarchy for a shuttle mission simulator is provided. A set of guidelines for the identification of subsystem/module performance parameters and critical performance parameters are presented. Various sources of reference data to serve as standards of performance for simulation validation are identified. Environment, crew station, vehicle configuration, and vehicle dynamics simulation software are briefly discussed from the point of view of their interfaces with subsystem simulation modules. A detailed presentation of results in the area of vehicle subsystems simulation modules is included. A list of references, conclusions and recommendations are also given.

  7. Space shuttle atmospheric revitalization subsystem/active thermal control subsystem computer program (users manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A shuttle (ARS) atmosphere revitalization subsystem active thermal control subsystem (ATCS) performance routine was developed. This computer program is adapted from the Shuttle EC/LSS Design Computer Program. The program was upgraded in three noteworthy areas: (1) The functional ARS/ATCS schematic has been revised to accurately synthesize the shuttle baseline system definition. (2) The program logic has been improved to provide a more accurate prediction of the integrated ARS/ATCS system performance. Additionally, the logic has been expanded to model all components and thermal loads in the ARS/ATCS system. (3) The program is designed to be used on the NASA JSC crew system division's programmable calculator system. As written the new computer routine has an average running time of five minutes. The use of desk top type calculation equipment, and the rapid response of the program provides the NASA with an analytical tool for trade studies to refine the system definition, and for test support of the RSECS or integrated Shuttle ARS/ATCS test programs.

  8. Apollo experience report: Command and service module controls and displays subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. B.; Swint, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the command and service module controls and displays subsystem is presented. The subsystem is described, and operational requirements, component history, problems and solutions, and conclusions and recommendations for the subsystem are included.

  9. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  10. ATP in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Braber, Saskia; Nazary, Maiwand; Givi, Masoumh Ezzati; Nijkamp, Frans P; Folkerts, Gert

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular ATP is a signaling molecule that often serves as a danger signal to alert the immune system of tissue damage. This molecule activates P2 nucleotide receptors, that include the ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. Recently, it has been reported that ATP accumulates in the airways of both asthmatic patients and sensitized mice after allergen challenge. The role and function of ATP in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are not well understood. In this study we investigated the effect of cigarette smoke on purinergic receptors and ATP release by neutrophils. Neutrophils and their mediators are key players in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema. Here we demonstrated that in an in vivo model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, the amount of ATP was increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, activation of neutrophils with cigarette smoke extract induced ATP release. Treatment of neutrophils with apyrase (catalyses the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP) and suramin (P2-receptor antagonist) abrogated the release of CXCL8 and elastase induced by cigarette smoke extract and exogenous ATP. These observations indicate that activation of purinergic signaling by cigarette smoke may take part in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

  11. ATP synthase: two motors, two fuels.

    PubMed

    Oster, G; Wang, H

    1999-04-15

    FoF1 ATPase is the universal protein responsible for ATP synthesis. The enzyme comprises two reversible rotary motors: Fo is either an ion 'turbine' or an ion pump, and F1 is either a hydrolysis motor or an ATP synthesizer. Recent biophysical and biochemical studies have helped to elucidate the operating principles for both motors.

  12. Application of bioluminescence ATP measurement for evaluation of fungal viability of foxing spots on old documents.

    PubMed

    Rakotonirainy, Malalanirina Sylvia; Dubar, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence-based protocol was tested to assess the viability of fungal species in old documents damaged by foxing. Foxing appears as scattered yellow brownish-red stains, damaging the aesthetics of documents and their long-term readability. In the field of cultural heritage conservation, the debate over the mechanism of foxing is ongoing. Previous studies found evidence of mold-like structures in some coloured areas; however, many species have not yet been identified and their role in the phenomenon is not understood. To better understand their involvement in this type of paper decay, we focused our attention first on their viability. We demonstrated the reliability and sensitivity of the ATP bioluminescence assay compared with conventional methods based on cultivation, which has rarely given rise to in vitro growth from foxed papers. From nine books dating back from the 19th and 20th centuries, the mean ATP amount of foxed spots ranged from 0.29 to 3.63 ng/cm(2), suggesting the presence of strains inside the brownish spots and providing evidence of their viability. Outside the spots, ATP content was considered negligible, with a mean ATP amount of 0 to 0.03 ng/cm(2). ATP assay appears to be a useful and robust method for the detection and quantification of viable elements in foxing spots.

  13. Distributed bounded-error state estimation based on practical robust positive invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riverso, Stefano; Rubini, Daria; Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    2015-11-01

    We propose a state estimator for linear discrete-time systems composed by coupled subsystems affected by bounded disturbances. The architecture is distributed in the sense that each subsystem is equipped with a local state estimator that exploits suitable pieces of information from parent subsystems. Furthermore, each local estimator reconstructs the state of the corresponding subsystem only. Different from methods based on moving horizon estimation, our approach does not require the online solution to optimisation problems. Our state estimation scheme, which is based on the notion of practical robust positive invariance, also guarantees satisfaction of constraints on local estimation errors and it can be updated with a limited computational effort when subsystems are added or removed.

  14. Robust finite-time chaos synchronization of uncertain permanent magnet synchronous motors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Ren, Xuemei; Na, Jing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a robust finite-time chaos synchronization scheme is proposed for two uncertain third-order permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs). The whole synchronization error system is divided into two cascaded subsystems: a first-order subsystem and a second-order subsystem. For the first subsystem, we design a finite-time controller based on the finite-time Lyapunov stability theory. Then, according to the backstepping idea and the adding a power integrator technique, a second finite-time controller is constructed recursively for the second subsystem. No exogenous forces are required in the controllers design but only the direct-axis (d-axis) and the quadrature-axis (q-axis) stator voltages are used as manipulated variables. Comparative simulations are provided to show the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed method.

  15. Development of Pattern Recognition Options for Combining Safeguards Subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Thomas L.; Hamada, Michael S.

    2012-08-24

    This talk reviews project progress in combining process monitoring data and nuclear material accounting data to improve the over nuclear safeguards system. Focus on 2 subsystems: (1) nuclear materials accounting (NMA); and (2) process monitoring (PM).

  16. Development status of a preprototype water electrolysis subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.; Erickson, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated for NASA's advanced regenerative life support program. A solid polymer is used for the cell electrolyte. The electrolysis module has 12 cells that can generate 5.5 kg/day of oxygen for the metabolic requirements of three crewmembers, for cabin leakage, and for the oxygen and hydrogen required for carbon dioxide collection and reduction processes. The subsystem can be operated at a pressure between 276 and 2760 kN/sq m and in a continuous constant-current, cyclic, or standby mode. A microprocessor is used to aid in operating the subsystem. Sensors and controls provide fault detection and automatic shutdown. The results of development, demonstration, and parametric testing are presented. Modifications to enhance operation in an integrated and manned test are described. Prospective improvements for the electrolysis subsystem are discussed.

  17. Implementation of the radio science subsystem in the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    The functional characteristics of a subsystem for support of radio science data acquisition requirements are described. The factors that were of major importance in the design and implementation approach are considered.

  18. Pilot climate data system: User's guide for charts subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of the Pilot Climate Data System's (PCDS) CHARTS Subsystem is described. This facility is an interactive software system for the graphical production and enhancement of text and viewgraph displays.

  19. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-11-03

    This specification revises the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  20. Double Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    2000-05-03

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  1. Ice pack heat sink subsystem - phase 1, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and test of a functional laboratory model ice pack heat sink subsystem are discussed. Operating instructions to include mechanical and electrical schematics, maintenance instructions, and equipment specifications are presented.

  2. Automated Subsystem Control for Life Support System (ASCLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Roger F.

    1987-01-01

    The Automated Subsystem Control for Life Support Systems (ASCLSS) program has successfully developed and demonstrated a generic approach to the automation and control of space station subsystems. The automation system features a hierarchical and distributed real-time control architecture which places maximum controls authority at the lowest or process control level which enhances system autonomy. The ASCLSS demonstration system pioneered many automation and control concepts currently being considered in the space station data management system (DMS). Heavy emphasis is placed on controls hardware and software commonality implemented in accepted standards. The approach demonstrates successfully the application of real-time process and accountability with the subsystem or process developer. The ASCLSS system completely automates a space station subsystem (air revitalization group of the ASCLSS) which moves the crew/operator into a role of supervisory control authority. The ASCLSS program developed over 50 lessons learned which will aide future space station developers in the area of automation and controls..

  3. MIUS Integration and Subsystem Test (MIST) data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pringle, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    A data system for use in testing integrated subsystems of a modular integrated utility system (MIUS) is presented. The MIUS integration and subsystem test (MIST) data system is reviewed from its conception through its checkout and operation as the controlling portion of the MIST facility. The MIST data system provides a real time monitoring and control function that allows for complete evaluation of the performance of the mechanical and electrical subsystems, as well as controls the operation of the various components of the system. In addition to the aforementioned capabilities, the MIST data system provides computerized control of test operations such that minimum manpower is necessary to set up, operate, and shut down subsystems during test periods.

  4. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2001-01-17

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  5. Double Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2001-01-18

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  6. Automated biowaste sampling system, solids subsystem operating model, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Stauffer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The detail design and fabrication of the Solids Subsystem were implemented. The system's capacity for the collection, storage or sampling of feces and vomitus from six subjects was tested and verified.

  7. Opto-mechanical subsystem with temperature compensation through isothemal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An opto-mechanical subsystem for supporting a laser structure which minimizes changes in the alignment of the laser optics in response to temperature variations is described. Both optical and mechanical structural components of the system are formed of the same material, preferably beryllium, which is selected for high mechanical strength and good thermal conducting qualities. All mechanical and optical components are mounted and assembled to provide thorough thermal coupling throughout the subsystem to prevent the development of temperature gradients.

  8. Multilevel control optimization using subsystem relative performance index sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.; Lehtinen, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for the design of optimal feedback controllers for large multivariable systems with subsystem sensitivity constraints. The weighted sum of subsystem and/or operational mode relative performance index sensitivities is defined as the overall performance index. The method is developed for linear systems with quadratic performance criteria and either full or partial state feedback. An example concerning the design of a stability augmentation system for a VTOL aircraft in the transition mode demonstrates the effectiveness of the design method.

  9. Prototype Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem for the RLSE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Wynveen, R. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements for the Bosch carbon dioxide reduction subsystem were established in a study of regenerative life support evaluation experiments. A detailed design is presented including a schematic, components list and characteristics, requirements summaries, and complete definition of life systems' advanced control/monitor instrumentation applied to the Bosch subsystem. Design information needed to proceed with the final design and fabrication of a preprototype system is presented.

  10. STS-2: SAIL non-avionics subsystems math model requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, W. P.; Herold, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Simulation of the STS-2 Shuttle nonavionics subsystems in the shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) is necessary for verification of the integrated shuttle avionics system. The math model (simulation) requirements for each of the nonavionics subsystems that interfaces with the Shuttle avionics system is documented and a single source document for controlling approved changes (by the SAIL change control panel) to the math models is provided.

  11. Power Subsystem for Extravehicular Activities for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has the responsibility to develop the next generation space suit power subsystem to support the Vision for Space Exploration. Various technology challenges exist in achieving extended duration missions as envisioned for future lunar and Mars mission scenarios. This paper presents an overview of ongoing development efforts undertaken at the Glenn Research Center in support of power subsystem development for future extravehicular activity systems.

  12. Technology for subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Corey, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    Technologies for different subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities are being developed at the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space. The technologies include concepts for water and nutrient delivery, for nutrient composition control, and for irradiation. Effort is being concentrated on these subsystems because available technologies cannot be effectively utilized for space applications.

  13. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  14. Operating executive for the DSIF tracking subsystem software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulson, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    The advanced engineering model of the DSIF tracking subsystem (DTS) is being developed by the Deep Space Instrumentation Facility. The DTS will provide effective and reliable tracking and data acquisition support for the complex planetary and interplanetary space flight missions planned for the 1970's. The nucleus of the subsystem is a Honeywell H832 digital computer. The design and capabilities of the real-time operating executive software are described.

  15. Double Shell Tank (DST) Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem Definition Report

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, E.A.

    2000-07-26

    The description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem presented in this document was developed to establish its boundaries. The DST Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem consists of new and existing equipment and facilities used to provide tank farm operators logistic support and problem resolution for the DST System during operations. This support will include evaluating equipment status, performing preventive and corrective maintenance, developing work packages, managing spares and consumables, supplying tooling, and training maintenance and operations personnel.

  16. Software For Real-Time Simulation Of Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favors, Dwight A.; Devoss, Dan; Cheatham, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Real-Time Software Simulation of Small Imbedded System (SSO) computer program developed for use in simulating number of systems and subsystems of space shuttle Columbia. These systems and subsystems include system control module (SCM), ground support equipment and test assembly (GSE/TA), and support system for orbiter experiments (OEX). Consists of SCM, orbiter experiments tape recorder, and orbiter experiments pulse-code-modulation (PCM) data system. Consists of four subprograms written in C language.

  17. An Algorithm for Integrated Subsystem Embodiment and System Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Kemper

    1997-01-01

    Consider the statement,'A system has two coupled subsystems, one of which dominates the design process. Each subsystem consists of discrete and continuous variables, and is solved using sequential analysis and solution.' To address this type of statement in the design of complex systems, three steps are required, namely, the embodiment of the statement in terms of entities on a computer, the mathematical formulation of subsystem models, and the resulting solution and system synthesis. In complex system decomposition, the subsystems are not isolated, self-supporting entities. Information such as constraints, goals, and design variables may be shared between entities. But many times in engineering problems, full communication and cooperation does not exist, information is incomplete, or one subsystem may dominate the design. Additionally, these engineering problems give rise to mathematical models involving nonlinear functions of both discrete and continuous design variables. In this dissertation an algorithm is developed to handle these types of scenarios for the domain-independent integration of subsystem embodiment, coordination, and system synthesis using constructs from Decision-Based Design, Game Theory, and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization. Implementation of the concept in this dissertation involves testing of the hypotheses using example problems and a motivating case study involving the design of a subsonic passenger aircraft.

  18. NFIRAOS in 2015: engineering for future integration of complex subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, Jenny; Andersen, David; Byrnes, Peter; Densmore, Adam; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff; Herriot, Glen; Hill, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    The Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) will be the first-light facility Adaptive Optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). NFIRAOS will be able to host three science instruments that can take advantage of this high performance system. NRC Herzberg is leading the design effort for this critical TMT subsystem. As part of the final design phase of NFIRAOS, we have identified multiple subsystems to be sub-contracted to Canadian industry. The scope of work for each subcontract is guided by the NFIRAOS Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and is divided into two phases: the completion of the final design and the fabrication, assembly and delivery of the final product. Integration of the subsystems at NRC will require a detailed understanding of the interfaces between the subsystems, and this work has begun by defining the interface physical characteristics, stability, local coordinate systems, and alignment features. In order to maintain our stringent performance requirements, the interface parameters for each subsystem are captured in multiple performance budgets, which allow a bottom-up error estimate. In this paper we discuss our approach for defining the interfaces in a consistent manner and present an example error budget that is influenced by multiple subsystems.

  19. Dynamics of ATP-induced Calcium Signaling in Single Mouse Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Paul E.; Ehring, George R.; Cahalan, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (ATPo) elicits a robust change in the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in fura-2–loaded mouse thymocytes. Most thymocytes (60%) exposed to ATPo exhibited a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i; [Ca2+]i rose slowly at first to a mean value of 260 nM after 163 s and then increased rapidly to a peak level of 735 nM. In many cells, a declining plateau, which lasted for more than 10 min, followed the crest in [Ca2+]i. Experiments performed in the absence of extracellular [Ca2+]o abolished the rise in thymocyte [Ca2+]i, indicating that Ca2+ influx, rather than the release of stored Ca2+, is stimulated by ATPo. ATPo- mediated Ca2+ influx was potentiated as the [Mg2+]o was reduced, confirming that ATP4− is the active agonist form. In the absence of Mg2+o, 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-ATP (BzATP) proved to be the most effective agonist of those tested. The rank order of potency for adenine nucleotides was BzATP4−>ATP4−>MgATP2−>ADP3−, suggesting purinoreceptors of the P2X7/P2Z class mediate the ATPo response. Phenotyping experiments illustrate that both immature (CD4−CD8−, CD4+CD8+) and mature (CD4+CD8−, CD4−CD8+) thymocyte populations respond to ATP. Further separation of the double-positive population by size revealed that the ATPo-mediated [Ca2+]i response was much more pronounced in large (actively dividing) than in small (terminally differentiated) CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. We conclude that thymocytes vary in sensitivity to ATPo depending upon the degree of maturation and suggest that ATPo may be involved in processes that control cellular differentiation within the thymus. PMID:9281578

  20. Mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel activity and hypoxic preconditioning are independent of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunit in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wojtovich, Andrew P; DiStefano, Peter; Sherman, Teresa; Brookes, Paul S; Nehrke, Keith

    2012-02-17

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HP) is an evolutionarily-conserved mechanism that protects an organism against stress. The mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (mK(ATP)) plays an essential role in the protective signaling, but remains molecularly undefined. Several lines of evidence suggest that mK(ATP) may arise from an inward rectifying K(+) channel (Kir). The genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits HP and displays mK(ATP) activity. Here, we investigate the tissue expression profile of the three C. elegans Kir genes and demonstrate that mutant strains where the irk genes have been deleted either individually or in combination can be protected by HP and exhibit robust mK(ATP) channel activity in purified mitochondria. These data suggest that the mK(ATP) in C. elegans does not arise from a Kir derived channel.

  1. Mechanisms of ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gangaraju, Vamsi K.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    The inter-relationship between DNA repair and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling has begun to become very apparent with recent discoveries. ATP dependent remodeling complexes mobilize nucleosomes along DNA, promote the exchange of histones, or completely displace nucleosomes from DNA. These remodeling complexes are often categorized based on the domain organization of their catalytic subunit. The biochemical properties and structural information of several of these remodeling complexes are reviewed. The different models for how these complexes are able to mobilize nucleosomes and alter nucleosome structure are presented incorporating several recent findings. Finally the role of histone tails and their respective modifications in ATP-dependent remodeling are discussed. PMID:17306844

  2. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G.; Møller, Lisbeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6–8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  3. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  4. Cleanup MAC and MBA code ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Material Balance (MBA) database system had some minor code cleanup performed to its code. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness.

  5. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  6. Customized ATP towpreg. [Automated Tow Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  7. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-04-27

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This subsystem specification establishes the interface and performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem. The DST Monitor and Control Subsystem consists of the new and existing equipment that will be used to provide tank farm operators with integrated local monitoring and control of the DST systems to support Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). New equipment will provide automatic control and safety interlocks where required and provide operators with visibility into the status of DST subsystem operations (e.g., DST mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers) and the ability to manually control specified DST functions as necessary. This specification is intended to be the basis for new project/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  8. Preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem. [recovering potable water from wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, G. S.; Wynveen, R. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-person capacity preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem for recovering potable water from wastewater aboard spacecraft was designed, assembled, and tested. The major components of the subsystem are: (1) a distillation unit which includes a compressor, centrifuge, central shaft, and outer shell; (2) a purge pump; (3) a liquids pump; (4) a post-treat cartridge; (5) a recycle/filter tank; (6) an evaporator high liquid level sensor; and (7) the product water conductivity monitor. A computer based control monitor instrumentation carries out operating mode change sequences, monitors and displays subsystem parameters, maintains intramode controls, and stores and displays fault detection information. The mechanical hardware occupies 0.467 m3, requires 171 W of electrical power, and has a dry weight of 143 kg. The subsystem recovers potable water at a rate of 1.59 kg/hr, which is equivalent to a duty cycle of approximately 30% for a crew of three. The product water has no foul taste or odor. Continued development of the subsystem is recommended for reclaiming water for human consumption as well as for flash evaporator heat rejection, urinal flushing, washing, and other on-board water requirements.

  9. Safe Operation of HIFI Local Oscillator Subsystem on Herschel Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, Malgorzata; Juchnikowski, Grzegorz; Klein, Thomas; Leinz, Christian; Nowosielski, Witold; Orleanski, Piotr; Ward, John

    The HIFI Local Oscillator Subsystem is part of the Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI) dedicated for astronomical observations,to be mounted on the ESA satellite HER- SCHEL. The Subsystem provides the local oscillator signal (480-1910 GHz) to each of the fourteen HIFI input mixers. Part of LO, the Local Oscillator Control Unit (LCU) provides the main interface between Local Oscillator Subsystem and HIFI/Herschel power and telemetry buses. The unit supplies Local Oscillator, decodes the HIFI macro-commands, programs and monitors the parameters of Ka-Band Synthesizer and THz multiplier chains and controls the operation of the whole Local Oscillator Subsystem. The unique microwave components used in HF multipliers are extremely sensitive to the proper biasing (polarity, voltage, current, presence of HF power).The ESA strategy of this mission requires full safe operation of the instrument. This requirements is covered by complex protection system implemented inside LCU. In this paper, we present the general overview of the protection system of microwave components. The different levels of protection (hardware realization and software procedures) are described as well as various reliability aspects. The functionality of LO subsystem controlled by LCU was tested in 2007. Now the flight model of HIFI instrument is integrated with the satellite and will be launched with Herschel mission in July 2008.

  10. Differential coding by two olfactory subsystems in the honeybee brain.

    PubMed

    Carcaud, Julie; Hill, Thomas; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2012-08-01

    Sensory systems use parallel processing to extract and process different features of environmental stimuli. Parallel processing has been studied in the auditory, visual, and somatosensory systems, but equivalent research in the olfactory modality is scarce. The honeybee Apis mellifera is an interesting model for such research as its relatively simple brain contains a dual olfactory system, with a clear neural dichotomy from the periphery to higher-order centers, based on two main neuronal tracts [medial (m) and lateral (l) antenno-protocerebral tract (APT)]. The function of this dual system is as yet unknown, and attributes like odor quality and odor quantity might be separately encoded in these subsystems. We have thus studied olfactory coding at the input of both subsystems, using in vivo calcium imaging. As one of the subsystems (m-APT) has never been imaged before, a novel imaging preparation was developed to this end, and responses to a panel of aliphatic odorants at different concentrations were compared in both subsystems. Our data show a global redundancy of olfactory coding at the input of both subsystems but unravel some specificities for encoding chemical group and carbon chain length of odor molecules.

  11. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-03

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  12. Validation of the AccuPoint Advanced ATP Hygiene Monitoring System for Sanitation Monitoring Through Detection of ATP from Stainless Steel Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Viator, Ryan; Gray, R Lucas; Sarver, Ron; Steiner, Brent; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    The AccuPoint Advanced ATP Hygeine Monitoring System was validated by an AOAC International Performance Tested MethodSM on the detection of ATP from stainless steel surfaces. Neogen Corp.'s system is a lightweight, hand-held diagnostic tool used to validate and verify a hygiene program's effectiveness by detecting organic residues remaining on surfaces and in liquids after cleaning. The system is composed of three primary components: an electronic luminometer, fully self-contained single-use samplers, and software. The system is designed to detect adenosine triphosphate (ATP) at set thresholds and to report the measurement in relative light units (RLU). These thresholds are established by a facility to reflect effective cleaning practices. The instrument compares the measured level of ATP with the established threshold and reports the results as pass, marginal, or fail. A linear dose-response in RLU was observed with pure analyte. In the matrix and microbial studies, detection levels varied depending on the matrix and microorganism tested. Independent laboratory trials confirmed pure analyte and matrix observations. Specificity testing of similar, yet different, compounds resulted in 0 RLU for all except 2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt, which showed markedly reduced reactivity when compared with ATP. Also, interference by these compounds was negligible. When disinfectant residues were evaluated for their effect on the test, cleaners increased RLU output to varying degrees. Stability testing showed consistent results between three independently manufactured lots and stable results through the 9 month shelf-life. Additionally, when three readers were compared using electronic light-emitting diodes as the light source, instrument variability was low (<3%). Robustness testing results provided evidence that temperature affects test performance more than shaking time, and sampler performance improves as the temperature increases to room temperature. These

  13. The complete Heyting algebra of subsystems and contextuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourdas, A.

    2013-08-01

    The finite set of subsystems of a finite quantum system with variables in {{Z}}(n), is studied as a Heyting algebra. The physical meaning of the logical connectives is discussed. It is shown that disjunction of subsystems is more general concept than superposition. Consequently, the quantum probabilities related to commuting projectors in the subsystems, are incompatible with associativity of the join in the Heyting algebra, unless if the variables belong to the same chain. This leads to contextuality, which in the present formalism has as contexts, the chains in the Heyting algebra. Logical Bell inequalities, which contain "Heyting factors," are discussed. The formalism is also applied to the infinite set of all finite quantum systems, which is appropriately enlarged in order to become a complete Heyting algebra.

  14. The definition of input parameters for modelling of energetic subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacek, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper is a short review and a basic description of mathematical models of renewable energy sources which present individual investigated subsystems of a system created in Matlab/Simulink. It solves the physical and mathematical relationships of photovoltaic and wind energy sources that are often connected to the distribution networks. The fuel cell technology is much less connected to the distribution networks but it could be promising in the near future. Therefore, the paper informs about a new dynamic model of the low-temperature fuel cell subsystem, and the main input parameters are defined as well. Finally, the main evaluated and achieved graphic results for the suggested parameters and for all the individual subsystems mentioned above are shown.

  15. Mathematical modeling of control subsystems for CELSS: Application to diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleh, Ahmad; Nguyen, Thoi K.; Kanevsky, Valery

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic control of a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) in a closed space habitat is of critical importance. The development of a practical method of control is also a necessary step for the selection and design of realistic subsystems and processors for a CELSS. Diet is one of the dynamic factors that strongly influences, and is influenced, by the operational states of all major CELSS subsystems. The problems of design and maintenance of a stable diet must be obtained from well characterized expert subsystems. The general description of a mathematical model that forms the basis of an expert control program for a CELSS is described. The formulation is expressed in terms of a complete set of time dependent canonical variables. System representation is dynamic and includes time dependent storage buffers. The details of the algorithm are described. The steady state results of the application of the method for representative diets made from wheat, potato, and soybean are presented.

  16. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-03-22

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of waste feed delivery. This subsystem transfers waste between transfer-associated structures (pits) and to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor Facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  17. The complete Heyting algebra of subsystems and contextuality

    SciTech Connect

    Vourdas, A.

    2013-08-15

    The finite set of subsystems of a finite quantum system with variables in Z(n), is studied as a Heyting algebra. The physical meaning of the logical connectives is discussed. It is shown that disjunction of subsystems is more general concept than superposition. Consequently, the quantum probabilities related to commuting projectors in the subsystems, are incompatible with associativity of the join in the Heyting algebra, unless if the variables belong to the same chain. This leads to contextuality, which in the present formalism has as contexts, the chains in the Heyting algebra. Logical Bell inequalities, which contain “Heyting factors,” are discussed. The formalism is also applied to the infinite set of all finite quantum systems, which is appropriately enlarged in order to become a complete Heyting algebra.

  18. Modular thrust subsystem approaches to solar electric propulsion module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. J.; Zevesky, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thrustor subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of interplanetary flights with the Space Shuttle/Interim Upper Stage as the launch vehicle. The emphasis is on the structural and thermal integration of the components into the modular thrust subsystems. Thermal control for the power processing units is either by direct radiation through louvers in combination with heat pipes of an all heat pipe system. The propellant storage and feed system and thrustor gimbal system concepts are presented. The three approaches are compared on the basis of mass, cost, testing, interfaces, simplicity, reliability, and maintainability.

  19. Ice pack heat sink subsystem - Phase 1, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and test at one-g of a functional laboratory model (non-flight) ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions are discussed. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick connect/disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  20. Controlling chaos in a satellite power supply subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, E. E. N.; Ramos Turci, L. F.; Yoneyama, T.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, we show that chaos control techniques can be used to increase the region that can be efficiently used to supply the power requests for an artificial satellite. The core of a satellite power subsystem relies on its DC/DC converter. This is a very nonlinear system that presents a multitude of phenomena ranging from bifurcations, quasi-periodicity, chaos, coexistence of attractors, among others. The traditional power subsystem design techniques try to avoid these nonlinear phenomena so that it is possible to use linear system theory in small regions about the equilibrium points. Here, we show that chaos control can be used to efficiently extend the applicability region of the satellite power subsystem when it operates in regions of high nonlinearity.

  1. Modular thrust subsystem approaches to solar electric propulsion module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. J.; Zavesky, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thruster subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of interplanetary flights with the space shuttle interim upper stage as the launch vehicle. The emphasis is on the structural and thermal integration of the components into the modular thrust subsystems. Thermal control for the power processing units is either by direct radiation through louvers in combination with heat pipes or an all heat pipe system. The propellant storage and feed system and thruster gimbal system concepts are presented. The three approaches are compared on the basis of mass, cost, testing, interfaces, simplicity, reliability, and maintainability.

  2. Efficacy and Limitations of an ATP-Based Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Danielle E; Daugherity, Erin K; Altier, Craig; Maurer, Kirk J

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of sanitation is an essential function of laboratory animal facilities. The purpose of the current study was to assess the ability of an ATP-based system to detect microbes and organic contaminants. Serial dilutions of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Toxocara canis eggs, Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, epithelial cells, and rodent blood, urine, and feces were analyzed according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The limit of E. coli detection was 104 organisms; sonication of E. coli significantly improved detection, indicating incomplete bacterial lysis in the detection system. Detection of S. aureus was significantly greater than that of E. coli with a limit of detection of 102; sonication did not alter results. In contrast, detection of T. canis, T. gondii, RBC, and epithelial cells was robust and ranged from 2 T. canis eggs to 10 epithelial cells. Urine was weakly detected, with a limit of detection at 1:10 dilution. Detection of all cell types except epithelia had a strong linear correlation to total cell number. In addition, our data demonstrate that the efficacy of the detection system can be affected adversely by residual disinfectants and that sample-bearing swabs are stable for more than 7 h after swabbing. These data demonstrate that this ATP based system sensitively detects pure cells and organic contaminants with a strong degree of linear predictability. A limitation of the system is its inability to detect gram-negative bacteria efficiently because of incomplete cell lysis. PMID:20353694

  3. United States Control Module Guidance, Navigation, and Control Subsystem Design Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, M. E.; Bartlow, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Should the Russian Space Agency (RSA) not participate in the International Space Station (ISS) program, then the United States (U.S.) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) may choose to execute the ISS mission. However, in order to do this, NASA must build two new space vehicles, which must perform the functions that the Russian vehicles and hardware were to perform. These functions include periodic ISS orbit reboost, initial ISS attitude control, and U.S. On-Orbit Segment (USOS) control Moment gyroscope (CMG) momentum desaturation. The two new NASA vehicles that must perform these functions are called the U.S. control module (USCM) and the U.S. resupply module. This paper presents a design concept for the USCM GN&C subsystem, which must play a major role in ISS orbit reboost and initial attitude control, plus USOS CMG momentum desaturation. The proposed concept is structured similar to the USOS GN&C subsystem, by design. It is very robust, in that it allows the USCM to assume a variety of vehicle attitudes and stay power-positive. It has a storage/safe mode that places the USCM in a gravity-gradient orientation and keeps it there for extended periods of time without consuming a great deal of propellant. Simulation results are presented and discussed that show the soundness of the design approach. An equipment list is included that gives detailed information on the baselined GN&C components.

  4. Galileo IOV Electrical Power Subsystem Relies On Li-Ion Batter Charge Management Controlled By Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douay, N.

    2011-10-01

    In the frame of GALILEO In-Orbit Validation program which is composed of 4 satellites, Thales Alenia Space France has designed, developed and tested the Electrical Power Subsystem. Besides some classical design choices like: -50V regulated main power bus provided by the PCDU manufactured by Terma (DK), -Solar array, manufactured by Dutch-Space (NL), using Ga-As triple junction technology from Azur Space Power Solar GmbH, -SAFT (FR) Lithium-ion Battery for which cell package balancing function is required, -Solar Array Drive Mechanism, provided by RUAG Space Switzerland, to transfer the power. This subsystem features a fully autonomous, failure tolerant, battery charge management able to operate even after a complete unavailability of the on-board software. The battery charge management is implemented such that priority is always given to satisfy the satellite main bus needs in order to maintain the main bus regulation under MEA control. This battery charge management principle provides very high reliability and operational robustness. So, the paper describes : -the battery charge management concept using a combination of PCDU hardware and relevant battery lines monitoring, -the functional aspect of the single point failure free S4R (Sequential Switching Shunt Switch Regulator) and associated performances, -the failure modes isolated and passivated by this architecture. The paper will address as well the autonomous balancing function characteristics and performances.

  5. Virtual Engineering and Science Team - Reusable Autonomy for Spacecraft Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Rilee, Michael L.; Truszkowski, Walt; Thompson, Bryan; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we address the design, development, and evaluation of the Virtual Engineering and Science Team (VEST) tool - a revolutionary way to achieve onboard subsystem/instrument autonomy. VEST directly addresses the technology needed for advanced autonomy enablers for spacecraft subsystems. It will significantly support the efficient and cost effective realization of on-board autonomy and contribute directly to realizing the concept of an intelligent autonomous spacecraft. VEST will support the evolution of a subsystem/instrument model that is probably correct and from that model the automatic generation of the code needed to support the autonomous operation of what was modeled. VEST will directly support the integration of the efforts of engineers, scientists, and software technologists. This integration of efforts will be a significant advancement over the way things are currently accomplished. The model, developed through the use of VEST, will be the basis for the physical construction of the subsystem/instrument and the generated code will support its autonomous operation once in space. The close coupling between the model and the code, in the same tool environment, will help ensure that correct and reliable operational control of the subsystem/instrument is achieved.VEST will provide a thoroughly modern interface that will allow users to easily and intuitively input subsystem/instrument requirements and visually get back the system's reaction to the correctness and compatibility of the inputs as the model evolves. User interface/interaction, logic, theorem proving, rule-based and model-based reasoning, and automatic code generation are some of the basic technologies that will be brought into play in realizing VEST.

  6. Interface Supports Lightweight Subsystem Routing for Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Block, Gary L.; Ahmad, Mohammad; Whitaker, William D.; Dillon, James W.

    2010-01-01

    A wireless avionics interface exploits the constrained nature of data networks in flight systems to use a lightweight routing method. This simplified routing means that a processor is not required, and the logic can be implemented as an intellectual property (IP) core in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The FPGA can be shared with the flight subsystem application. In addition, the router is aware of redundant subsystems, and can be configured to provide hot standby support as part of the interface. This simplifies implementation of flight applications requiring hot stand - by support. When a valid inbound packet is received from the network, the destination node address is inspected to determine whether the packet is to be processed by this node. Each node has routing tables for the next neighbor node to guide the packet to the destination node. If it is to be processed, the final packet destination is inspected to determine whether the packet is to be forwarded to another node, or routed locally. If the packet is local, it is sent to an Applications Data Interface (ADI), which is attached to a local flight application. Under this scheme, an interface can support many applications in a subsystem supporting a high level of subsystem integration. If the packet is to be forwarded to another node, it is sent to the outbound packet router. The outbound packet router receives packets from an ADI or a packet to be forwarded. It then uses a lookup table to determine the next destination for the packet. Upon detecting a remote subsystem failure, the routing table can be updated to autonomously bypass the failed subsystem.

  7. Embedded Thermal Control for Subsystems for Next Generation Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. NASA, the Defense Department and commercial interests are actively engaged in developing miniaturized spacecraft systems and scientific instruments to leverage smaller cheaper spacecraft form factors such as CubeSats. This paper outlines research and development efforts among Goddard Space Flight Center personnel and its several partners to develop innovative embedded thermal control subsystems. Embedded thermal control subsystems is a cross cutting enabling technology integrating advanced manufacturing techniques to develop multifunctional intelligent structures to reduce Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) consumption of both the thermal control subsystem and overall spacecraft. Embedded thermal control subsystems permit heat acquisition and rejection at higher temperatures than state of the art systems by employing both advanced heat transfer equipment (integrated heat exchangers) and high heat transfer phenomena. The Goddard Space Flight Center Thermal Engineering Branch has active investigations seeking to characterize advanced thermal control systems for near term spacecraft missions. The embedded thermal control subsystem development effort consists of fundamental research as well as development of breadboard and prototype hardware and spaceflight validation efforts. This paper will outline relevant fundamental investigations of micro-scale heat transfer and electrically driven liquid film boiling. The hardware development efforts focus upon silicon based high heat flux applications (electronic chips, power electronics etc.) and multifunctional structures. Flight validation efforts include variable gravity campaigns and a proposed CubeSat based flight demonstration of a breadboard embedded thermal control system. The CubeSat investigation is technology demonstration will characterize in long-term low earth orbit a breadboard embedded thermal subsystem and its individual components to develop

  8. Decentralized adaptive control of robot manipulators with robust stabilization design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Bau-San; Book, Wayne J.

    1988-01-01

    Due to geometric nonlinearities and complex dynamics, a decentralized technique for adaptive control for multilink robot arms is attractive. Lyapunov-function theory for stability analysis provides an approach to robust stabilization. Each joint of the arm is treated as a component subsystem. The adaptive controller is made locally stable with servo signals including proportional and integral gains. This results in the bound on the dynamical interactions with other subsystems. A nonlinear controller which stabilizes the system with uniform boundedness is used to improve the robustness properties of the overall system. As a result, the robot tracks the reference trajectories with convergence. This strategy makes computation simple and therefore facilitates real-time implementation.

  9. Target-protecting dumbbell molecular probe against exonucleases digestion for sensitive detection of ATP and streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyang; Liu, Yucheng; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a versatile dumbbell molecular (DM) probe was designed and employed in the sensitively homogeneous bioassay. In the presence of target molecule, the DM probe was protected from the digestion of exonucleases. Subsequently, the protected DM probe specifically bound to the intercalation dye and resulted in obvious fluorescence signal which was used to determine the target molecule in return. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and no sophisticated fluorescence labeling. Integrating the idea of target-protecting DM probe with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) involved ligation reaction, the DM probe with 5'-end phosphorylation was successfully constructed for ATP detection, and the limitation of detection was found to be 4.8 pM. Thanks to its excellent selectivity and sensitivity, this sensing strategy was used to detect ATP spiked in human serum as well as cellular ATP. Moreover, the proposed strategy was also applied in the visual detection of ATP in droplet-based microfluidic platform with satisfactory results. Similarly, combining the principle of target-protecting DM probe with streptavidin (SA)-biotin interaction, the DM probe with 3'-end biotinylation was developed for selective and sensitive SA determination, which demonstrated the robustness and versatility of this design.

  10. Estimation of PMI depends on the changes in ATP and its degradation products.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shiwei; Fu, Gaowen; Seese, Ronald R; Wang, Zhen-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    Estimating the time since death, or postmortem interval (PMI), has been one of the biggest difficulties in modern forensic investigation. This study tests if the concentrations of breakdown products of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) correlate with PMI in multiple organs from rat. Brains, spleens, and kidneys of rats were harvested at different time points in carcasses maintained at 4°C or 20°C. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify concentrations of metabolites related to ATP degradation. A K value (Kv=100×(Hx+HxR)/(ATP+ADP+AMP+IMP+HxR+Hx)) was calculated and correlated with PMI for each organ and temperature. The results indicate that the K value is a robust index for the estimation of PMI based on highly significant linear correlations between PMI and concentrations of ATP breakdown products. Compared with other current research methods, the changing tendency of ATP and its degradation products may be potentially a better way for the estimation of PMI in medico-legal practice.

  11. Statistical error model for a solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem statistical error model was developed as a tool for investigating the effects of thrust subsystem parameter uncertainties on navigation accuracy. The model is currently being used to evaluate the impact of electric engine parameter uncertainties on navigation system performance for a baseline mission to Encke's Comet in the 1980s. The data given represent the next generation in statistical error modeling for low-thrust applications. Principal improvements include the representation of thrust uncertainties and random process modeling in terms of random parametric variations in the thrust vector process for a multi-engine configuration.

  12. Solar electric propulsion/instrument/subsystems interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Cole, R. K.; Kemp, R. F.; Hall, D. F.; Shelton, H.

    1973-01-01

    The interactive effects between a solar electric propulsion system and an electrically propelled scientific spacecraft were examined. The operation of the ion thrusters may impact upon the acquisition and interpretation of data by the science payload of the spacecraft. The effluents from the operation of the electric propulsion unit may also impact upon the operation of the various subsystems of the vehicle. Specific interactive effects were isolated where meaningful levels of interaction may occur. The level of impact upon elements of the science payload and other affected subsystems is examined, and avenues for the reduction or elimination of impact are defined.

  13. Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Six tasks are described reflecting subsystem hardware and software modifications and test evaluation of a TIMES wastewater recovery subsystem. The overall results are illustrated in a figure which shows the water production rate, the specific energy corrected to 26.5 VDC, and the product water conductivity at various points in the testing. Four tasks are described reflecting studies performed to develop a preliminary design concept for a next generation TIMES. The overall results of the study are the completion of major design analyses and preliminary configuration layout drawings.

  14. Challenges in the development of the orbiter atmosphere revitalization subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. N.; Swider, J.; Wojnarowski, J.; Decrisantis, A.; Ord, G. R.; Walleshauser, J. J.; Gibb, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter atmospheric revitalization subsystem provides thermal and contaminant control as well as total- and oxygen partial-pressure control of the environment within the orbiter crew cabin. Challenges that occurred during the development of this subsystem for the space shuttle orbiter are described. The design of the rotating hardware elements of the system (pumps, fans, etc.) required significant development to meet the requirements of long service life, maintainability, and high cycle-fatigue life. As a result, a stringent development program, particularly in the areas of bearing life and heat dissipation, was required. Another area requiring significant development was cabin humidity control and condensate collection.

  15. Optimizing subsystem test programs. [spacecraft equipment standardization for cost reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, W. H.; Pierman, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    The goal of reduction of space system costs is pursued in the areas of standardization of subsystem test requirements as well as overall subsystem test program resource requirements. A number of standard components are being developed by NASA. The rationale for the various environmental tests applicable to future missions and launch vehicles is discussed. The need for and approach to developing standard component specifications is presented. In addition, a method for reduction of test expenditures utilizing indexes of mission effect and hardware history as indicators of test requirements is proposed.

  16. Software Testbed for Developing and Evaluating Integrated Autonomous Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, James; Remolina, Emilio; Prompt, Axel; Robinson, Peter; Sweet, Adam; Nishikawa, David

    2015-01-01

    To implement fault tolerant autonomy in future space systems, it will be necessary to integrate planning, adaptive control, and state estimation subsystems. However, integrating these subsystems is difficult, time-consuming, and error-prone. This paper describes Intelliface/ADAPT, a software testbed that helps researchers develop and test alternative strategies for integrating planning, execution, and diagnosis subsystems more quickly and easily. The testbed's architecture, graphical data displays, and implementations of the integrated subsystems support easy plug and play of alternate components to support research and development in fault-tolerant control of autonomous vehicles and operations support systems. Intelliface/ADAPT controls NASA's Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), which comprises batteries, electrical loads (fans, pumps, and lights), relays, circuit breakers, invertors, and sensors. During plan execution, an experimentor can inject faults into the ADAPT testbed by tripping circuit breakers, changing fan speed settings, and closing valves to restrict fluid flow. The diagnostic subsystem, based on NASA's Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE), detects and isolates these faults to determine the new state of the plant, ADAPT. Intelliface/ADAPT then updates its model of the ADAPT system's resources and determines whether the current plan can be executed using the reduced resources. If not, the planning subsystem generates a new plan that reschedules tasks, reconfigures ADAPT, and reassigns the use of ADAPT resources as needed to work around the fault. The resource model, planning domain model, and planning goals are expressed using NASA's Action Notation Modeling Language (ANML). Parts of the ANML model are generated automatically, and other parts are constructed by hand using the Planning Model Integrated Development Environment, a visual Eclipse-based IDE that accelerates ANML model development. Because native ANML planners are currently

  17. Design evolution of the orbiter reaction control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeber, R. J.; Karakulko, W.; Belvins, D.; Hohmann, C.; Henderson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The challenges of space shuttle orbiter reaction control subsystem development began with selection of the propellant for the subsystem. Various concepts were evaluated before the current Earth storable, bipropellant combination was selected. Once that task was accomplished, additional challenges of designing the system to satisfy the wide range of requirements dictated by operating environments, reusability, and long life were met. Verification of system adequacy was achieved by means of a combination of analysis and test. The studies, the design efforts, and the test and analysis techniques employed in meeting the challenges are described.

  18. Apollo experience report: Crew provisions and equipment subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, F.

    1972-01-01

    A description of the construction and use of crew provisions and equipment subsystem items for the Apollo Program is presented. The subsystem is composed principally of survival equipment, bioinstrumentation devices, medical components and accessories, water- and waste-management equipment, personal-hygiene articles, docking aids, flight garments (excluding the pressure garment assembly), and various other crew-related accessories. Particular attention is given to items and assemblies that presented design, development, or performance problems: the crew optical alinement sight system, the metering water dispenser, and the waste-management system. Changes made in design and materials to improve the fire safety of the hardware are discussed.

  19. Apollo experience report: Lunar module landing gear subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    The development of the lunar module landing gear subsystem through the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission is presented. The landing gear design evolved from the design requirement, which had to satisfy the structural, mechanical, and landing performance constraints of the vehicle. Extensive analyses and tests were undertaken to verify the design adequacy. Techniques of the landing performance analysis served as a primary tool in developing the subsystem hardware and in determining the adequacy of the landing gear for toppling stability and energy absorption. The successful Apollo 11 lunar landing mission provided the first opportunity for a complete flight test of the landing gear under both natural and induced environments.

  20. Definition of an arcjet propulsion sub-system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Theodore W.

    1989-01-01

    An engineering flight demonstration of a 100 kW3 Space Reactor Power System is planned for the mid to late 1990s. An arcjet based propulsion subsystem will be included on the flight demonstraction as a secondary experiment. Two studies, sponsored by the Kay Technologies Directorate of the SDI Organization and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are currently under way to define that propulsion subsystem. The principal tasks of those contracts and the plans for two later phases, an experimental verification of the concept and a flight qualification/delivery of a flight unit, are described.

  1. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  2. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase 1. Project V. Structural sub-system response: subsystem response review. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelquist, J.; Kaul, M.K.; Koppe, R.; Tagart, S.W. Jr.; Thailer, H.; Uffer, R.

    1980-03-01

    This project is directed toward a portion of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program which includes one link in the seismic methodology chain. The link addressed here is the structural subsystem dynamic response which consists of those components and systems whose behavior is often determined decoupled from the major structural response. Typically the mathematical model utilized for the major structural response will include only the mass effects of the subsystem and the main model is used to produce the support motion inputs for subsystem seismic qualification. The main questions addressed in this report have to do with the seismic response uncertainty of safety-related components or equipment whose seismic qualification is performed by (a) analysis, (b) tests, or (c) combinations of analysis and tests, and where the seismic input is assumed to have no uncertainty.

  3. Synthetic peptides target ATP translocase of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ to block ATP uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As an obligate intracellular pathogen, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) may act as an “energy parasite” by importing ATP from its host’s cells. We previously demonstrated that the Las translocase NttA (gb|ACX71867.1) is functional in Escherichia coli and enables the direct import of ATP/ADP...

  4. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  5. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R.; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W.; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-01-01

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission. PMID:27342860

  6. Magnetic field affects enzymatic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A

    2008-10-01

    The rate of ATP synthesis by creatine kinase extracted from V. xanthia venom was shown to depend on the magnetic field. The yield of ATP produced by enzymes with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions in catalytic sites increases by 7-8% at 55 mT and then decreases at 80 mT. For enzyme with 25Mg2+ ion in a catalytic site, the ATP yield increases by 50% and 70% in the fields 55 and 80 mT, respectively. In the Earth field the rate of ATP synthesis by enzyme, in which Mg2+ ion has magnetic nucleus 25Mg, is 2.5 times higher than that by enzymes, in which Mg2+ ion has nonmagnetic, spinless nuclei 24Mg or 26Mg. Both magnetic field effect and magnetic isotope effect demonstrate that the ATP synthesis is an ion-radical process, affected by Zeeman interaction and hyperfine coupling in the intermediate ion-radical pair.

  7. Reception-Conversion Subsystem (RXCV) for microwave power transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    As part of a program to demonstrate the feasibility of power transmission from space, an approximately 25 sq m Reception-Conversion Subsystem was designed and tested. The device collects high power microwave energy, converts it into dc, and dissipates it in an instrumented demonstration load.

  8. Maximum-rank root subsystems of hyperbolic root systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tumarkin, P V

    2004-02-28

    A Kac-Moody algebra is said to be hyperbolic if it corresponds to a generalized Cartan matrix of hyperbolic type. Root subsystems of root systems of algebras of this kind are studied. The main result of the paper is the classification of the maximum-rank regular hyperbolic subalgebras of hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  9. Command module/service module reaction control subsystem assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weary, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed review of component failure histories, qualification adequacy, manufacturing flow, checkout requirements and flow, ground support equipment interfaces, subsystem interface verification, protective devices, and component design did not reveal major weaknesses in the command service module (CSM) reaction control system (RCS). No changes to the CSM RCS were recommended. The assessment reaffirmed the adequacy of the CSM RCS for future Apollo missions.

  10. Image Processing In Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R.; Ansari, Homayoon; Chen, Chien-Chung; Russell, Donald W.

    1996-01-01

    Conceptual design of image-processing circuitry developed for proposed tracking apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem For Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). In proposed system, desired frame rate achieved by "windowed" readout scheme in which only pixels containing and surrounding two spots read out and others skipped without being read. Image data processed rapidly and efficiently to achieve high frequency response.

  11. Apollo experience report: Lunar module display and control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar module display and control subsystem equipment is described with emphasis on major problems and their solutions. Included in the discussion of each item is a description of what the item does and how the item is constructed. The development, hardware history, and testing for each item are also presented.

  12. Emerging Network Storage Management Standards for Intelligent Data Storage Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando; Vollrath, William; Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben; Crouse, Don

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for intelligent storage devices and subsystems that can provide data integrity metadata, the content of the existing data integrity standard for optical disks and techniques and metadata to verify stored data on optical tapes developed by the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM) Optical Tape Committee.

  13. Cascade Distillation Subsystem Development: Progress Toward a Distillation Comparison Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, M. R.; Lubman, A.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential for the success of long-duration manned missions to the Moon and Mars. Honeywell International and a team from NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The wastewater processor, referred to as the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS), utilizes an innovative and efficient multistage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. The rotary centrifugal design of the system also provides gas/liquid phase separation and liquid transport under microgravity conditions. A five-stage subsystem unit has been designed, built, delivered and integrated into the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for performance testing. A major test objective of the project is to demonstrate the advancement of the CDS technology from the breadboard level to a subsystem level unit. An initial round of CDS performance testing was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2008. Based on FY08 testing, the system is now in development to support an Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project distillation comparison test expected to begin in early 2009. As part of the project objectives planned for FY09, the system will be reconfigured to support the ELS comparison test. The CDS will then be challenged with a series of human-gene-rated waste streams representative of those anticipated for a lunar outpost. This paper provides a description of the CDS technology, a status of the current project activities, and data on the system s performance to date.

  14. Mark 4A DSN receiver-exciter and transmitter subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The present configuration of the Mark 4A DSN Receiver-Exciter and Transmitter Subsystems is described. Functional requirements and key characteristics are given to show the differences in the capabilities required by the Networks Consolidation task for combined High Earth Orbiter and Deep Space Network tracking support.

  15. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J., Jr. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Major Solid Rocket Booster-Thrust Vector Control (SRB-TVC) subsystem components and subcomponents used in the Space Transportation System (STS) are identified. Simplified schematics, detailed schematics, figures, photographs, and data are included to acquaint the reader with the operation, performance, and physical layout as well as the materials and instrumentation used.

  16. Aircraft subsystems inspection: objective and easy... then, why skimp?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Yogesh

    2000-03-01

    Both NUVU and NUVU-IR instruments are now a proven demonstrated technology based on sound scientific concepts. They are designed to eliminate any crystal-ball approach to life prediction of aircraft wiring and cable subsystems. It is scientific, not magic.

  17. ANALYTICAL TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR AFTERTREATMENT SUB-SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, B; Fan, A; Goney, K; Pavlova-MacKinnon, Z; Sisken, K; Zhang, H

    2003-08-24

    The stringent emissions standards of 2007 and beyond require complex engine, aftertreatment and vehicle systems with a high degree of sub-system interaction and flexible control solutions. This necessitates a system-based approach to technology development, in addition to individual sub-system optimization. Analytical tools can provide an effective means to evaluate and develop such complex technology interactions as well as understand phenomena that is either too expensive or impossible to study with conventional experimental means. The analytical effort can also guide experimental development and thus lead to efficient utilization of available experimental resources.A suite of analytical models has been developed to represent PM and NOx aftertreatment sub-systems. These models range from computationally inexpensive zero-dimensional models for real-time control applications to CFD-based, multi-dimensional models with detailed temporal and spatial resolution. Such models in conjunction with well established engine modeling tools such as engine cycle simulation, engine controls modeling, CFD models of non-combusting and combusting flow, and vehicle models provide a comprehensive analytical toolbox for complete engine, aftertreatment and vehicle sub-systems development and system integration applications. However, the fidelity of aftertreatment models and application going forward is limited by the lack of fundamental kinetic data.

  18. Double Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-04-27

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem is intended to support Waste Feed Delivery. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem specification describes the relationship of this system with the DST System, describes the functions that must be performed by the system, and establishes the performance requirements to be applied to the design of the system. It also provides references for the requisite codes and standards. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem will treat the waste for a more favorable waste transfer. This will be accomplished by diluting the waste, dissolving the soluble portion of the waste, and flushing waste residuals from the transfer line. The Diluent and Flush Subsystem will consist of the following: The Diluent and Flush Station(s) where chemicals will be off-loaded, temporarily stored, mixed as necessary, heated, and metered to the delivery system; and A piping delivery system to deliver the chemicals to the appropriate valve or pump pit Associated support structures. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  19. Long Duration Space Missions: Human Subsystem Risks and Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Criag E.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the human health and performance risks associated with long duration space flight beyond low earth orbit. The contents include: 1) Human Research Program; 2) Human Subsystem Risks; 3) Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT) Architecture Elements; 4) Potentially Unacceptable Risks -1; 5) Potentially Unacceptable Risks-2; and 6) Major Mission Drivers of Risk.

  20. The OCLC Serials Sub-System: A First Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Neal L.; And Others

    This examination of the OCLC serials control sub-system points to positive and negative aspects of the OCLC system as they relate to serials, and evaluates the system's serials cataloging capabilities. While this report assumes a knowledge of the basic operations of OCLC, it describes the system in general, its function in cataloging, and its…

  1. Voltage dependence of ATP secretion in mammalian taste cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Khokhlov, Alexander A; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2008-12-01

    Mammalian type II taste cells release the afferent neurotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through ATP-permeable ion channels, most likely to be connexin (Cx) and/or pannexin hemichannels. Here, we show that ion channels responsible for voltage-gated (VG) outward currents in type II cells are ATP permeable and demonstrate a strong correlation between the magnitude of the VG current and the intensity of ATP release. These findings suggest that slowly deactivating ion channels transporting the VG outward currents can also mediate ATP secretion in type II cells. In line with this inference, we studied a dependence of ATP secretion on membrane voltage with a cellular ATP sensor using different pulse protocols. These were designed on the basis of predictions of a model of voltage-dependent transient ATP efflux. Consistently with curves that were simulated for ATP release mediated by ATP-permeable channels deactivating slowly, the bell-like and Langmuir isotherm-like potential dependencies were characteristic of ATP secretion obtained for prolonged and short electrical stimulations of taste cells, respectively. These observations strongly support the idea that ATP is primarily released via slowly deactivating channels. Depolarizing voltage pulses produced negligible Ca(2+) transients in the cytoplasm of cells releasing ATP, suggesting that ATP secretion is mainly governed by membrane voltage under our recording conditions. With the proviso that natural connexons and pannexons are kinetically similar to exogenously expressed hemichannels, our findings suggest that VG ATP release in type II cells is primarily mediated by Cx hemichannels.

  2. Subsystems in Nearby Solar-type Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Hartung, Markus; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2010-08-01

    We conducted a deep survey of resolved subsystems among wide binaries with solar-type components within 67 pc of the Sun. Images of 61 stars in the K and H bands were obtained with the Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager adaptive-optics instrument on the 8 m Gemini-South telescope. Our maximum detectable magnitude difference is about 5 mag and 7.8 mag at 0farcs15 and 0farcs9 separations, respectively. This enables a complete census of subsystems with stellar companions in the projected separation range from 5 to 100 AU. Out of seven such companions found in our sample, only one was previously known. We determine that the fraction of subsystems with projected separations above 5 AU is 0.12 ± 0.04 and that the distribution of their mass ratio is flat, with a power-law index of 0.2 ± 0.5. Comparing this with the properties of closer spectroscopic subsystems (separations below 1 AU), it appears that the mass-ratio distribution does not depend on the separation. The frequency of subsystems in the separation ranges below 1 AU and between 5 and 100 AU is similar, about 0.15. Unbiased statistics of multiplicity higher than 2, advanced by this work, provide constraints on star formation theory. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory (Program ID GS-2009B-Q-49), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  3. Dynamic regulation of extracellular ATP in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Corradi, Gerardo; Lauri, Natalia; Marginedas-Freixa, Irene; Leal Denis, María Florencia; Enrique, Nicolás; Mate, Sabina María; Milesi, Verónica; Ostuni, Mariano Anibal; Herlax, Vanesa; Schwarzbaum, Pablo Julio

    2017-04-04

    We studied the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in Escherichia coli and their outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) stimulated with amphipatic peptides melittin (MEL) and mastoparan 7 (MST7). Real-time luminometry was used to measure ATPe kinetics, ATP release, and ATPase activity. The latter was also determined by following [(32)P]Pi released from [γ-(32)P]ATP. E. coli was studied alone, co-incubated with Caco-2 cells, or in rat jejunum segments. In E. coli, the addition of [γ-(32)P]ATP led to the uptake and subsequent hydrolysis of ATPe. Exposure to peptides caused an acute 3-fold (MST7) and 7-fold (MEL) increase in [ATPe]. In OMVs, ATPase activity increased linearly with [ATPe] (0.1-1 µM). Exposure to MST7 and MEL enhanced ATP release by 3-7 fold, with similar kinetics to that of bacteria. In Caco-2 cells, the addition of ATP to the apical domain led to a steep [ATPe] increase to a maximum, with subsequent ATPase activity. The addition of bacterial suspensions led to a 6-7 fold increase in [ATPe], followed by an acute decrease. In perfused jejunum segments, exposure to E. coli increased luminal ATP 2 fold. ATPe regulation of E. coli depends on the balance between ATPase activity and ATP release. This balance can be altered by OMVs, which display their own capacity to regulate ATPe. E. coli can activate ATP release from Caco-2 cells and intestinal segments, a response which in vivo might lead to intestinal release of ATP from the gut lumen.

  4. Stable nuclear expression of ATP8 and ATP6 genes rescues a mtDNA Complex V null mutant

    PubMed Central

    Boominathan, Amutha; Vanhoozer, Shon; Basisty, Nathan; Powers, Kathleen; Crampton, Alexandra L.; Wang, Xiaobin; Friedricks, Natalie; Schilling, Birgit; Brand, Martin D.; O'Connor, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of re-engineering mitochondrial genes and expressing them from the nucleus as an approach to rescue defects arising from mitochondrial DNA mutations. We have used a patient cybrid cell line with a single point mutation in the overlap region of the ATP8 and ATP6 genes of the human mitochondrial genome. These cells are null for the ATP8 protein, have significantly lowered ATP6 protein levels and no Complex V function. Nuclear expression of only the ATP8 gene with the ATP5G1 mitochondrial targeting sequence appended restored viability on Krebs cycle substrates and ATP synthesis capabilities but, failed to restore ATP hydrolysis and was insensitive to various inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Co-expressing both ATP8 and ATP6 genes under similar conditions resulted in stable protein expression leading to successful integration into Complex V of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Tests for ATP hydrolysis / synthesis, oxygen consumption, glycolytic metabolism and viability all indicate a significant functional rescue of the mutant phenotype (including re-assembly of Complex V) following stable co-expression of ATP8 and ATP6. Thus, we report the stable allotopic expression, import and function of two mitochondria encoded genes, ATP8 and ATP6, resulting in simultaneous rescue of the loss of both mitochondrial proteins. PMID:27596602

  5. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H

    2015-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP pools showed great variability (diversity) among individuals (standard deviation of about 30-40% of mean at baseline). It was discovered that erythrocyte baseline ATP pool sizes are unique to each individual and that they fall within a narrow range in each individual. At the end of an 8 h continuous intravenous infusion of ATP, intracellular erythrocyte ATP pools were increased in the range of 40-60% and extracellular ATP declined from elevated levels achieved at the beginning and middle of the infusion, to baseline levels. The ability of erythrocytes to sequester exogenously administered ATP to this degree, after its initial conversion to adenosine in the blood plasma is unexpected, considering that some of the adenosine is likely to have been degraded by in vivo catabolic activities or taken up by organs. The data suggest that administration of ATP by short-term intravenous infusions, of up to 4 h, may be a favorable way for elevating extracellular ATP pools. A large fraction of the total exogenously administered ATP is sequestered into the intracellular compartments of the erythrocytes after an 8 h intravenous infusion. Erythrocytes loaded with ATP are known to release their ATP pools by the application of previously established agents or conditions applied locally or globally to circulating erythrocytes. Rapid degradation of intravenously administered ATP to adenosine and subsequent accumulation of ATP inside erythrocytes indicate the existence of very effective mechanisms

  6. Firefly bioluminescent assay of ATP in the presence of ATP extractant by using liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kamidate, Tamio; Yanashita, Kenji; Tani, Hirofumi; Ishida, Akihiko; Notani, Mizuyo

    2006-01-01

    Liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cholesterol (Chol) were applied to the enhancer for firefly bioluminescence (BL) assay for ATP in the presence of cationic surfactants using as an extractant for the release of ATP from living cells. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) was used as an ATP extractant. However, BAC seriously inhibited the activity of luciferase, thus resulting in the remarkable decrease in the sensitivity of the BL assay for ATP. On the other hand, we found that BAC was associated with liposomes to form cationic liposomes containing BAC. The association rate of BAC with liposomes was faster than that of BAC with luciferase. As a result, the inhibitory effect of BAC on luciferase was eliminated in the presence of liposomes. In addition, cationic liposomes thus formed enhanced BL emission. BL measurement conditions were optimized in terms of liposome charge type, liposome size, and total concentration of PC and Chol. ATP can be sensitively determined without dilution of analytical samples by using liposomes. The detection limit of ATP with and without liposomes was 100 amol and 25 fmol in aqueous ATP standard solutions containing 0.06% BAC, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of ATP in Escherichia coli extracts. The BL intensity was linear from 4 x 10(4) to 1 x 10(7) cells mL(-1) in the absence of liposomes. On the other hand, the BL intensity was linear from 4 x 10(3) to 4 x 10(6) cells mL(-1) in the presence of liposomes. The detection limit of ATP in E. coli extracts was improved by a factor of 10 via use of liposomes.

  7. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  8. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  9. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ole H; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-05

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50-100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca(2+) acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca(2+) gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca(2+) transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca(2+) signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca(2+) signalling relies on cell specific Ca(2+) signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca(2+) signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca(2+) signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'.

  10. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  11. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  12. Electrophysiological effects of ATP on brain neurones.

    PubMed

    Illes, P; Nieber, K; Nörenberg, W

    1996-12-01

    1. The electrophysiological effects of ATP on brain neurones are either due to the direct activation of P2 purinoceptors by the unmetabolized nucleotide or to the indirect activation of P1. purinoceptors by the degradation product adenosine. 2. Two subtypes of P2 purinoceptors are involved, a ligand-activated ion channel (P2X) and a G protein-coupled receptor (P2Y). Hence, the stimulation of P2X purinoceptors leads to a cationic conductance increase, while the stimulation of P2Y purinoceptors leads to a G protein-mediated opening or closure of potassium channels. 3. ATP may induce a calcium-dependent potassium current by increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This is due either to the entry of Ca2+ via P2X purinoceptors or to the activation of metabotropic P2Y purinoceptors followed by signaling via the G protein/phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) cascade. Eventually, IP3 releases Ca2+ from its intracellular pools. 4. There is no convincing evidence for the presence of P2U purinoceptors sensitive to both ATP and UTP, or pyrimidinoceptors sensitive to UTP only, in the central nervous system (CNS). 5. ATP-sensitive P2X and P2Y purinoceptors show a wide distribution in the CNS and appear to regulate important neuronal functions.

  13. P2X1 receptors localized in lipid rafts mediate ATP motor responses in the human vas deferens longitudinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Donoso, María Verónica; Norambuena, Andrés; Navarrete, Camilo; Poblete, Inés; Velasco, Alfredo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    To assess the role of the P2X1 receptors (P2X1R) in the longitudinal and circular layers of the human vas deferens, ex vivo-isolated strips or rings were prepared from tissue biopsies to record isometric contractions. To ascertain its membrane distribution, tissue extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting following sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP, or electrical field stimulation elicited robust contractions of the longitudinal layer but not of the circular layer which demonstrated inconsistent responses. Alpha,beta-methylene ATP generated stronger and more robust contractions than ATP. In parallel, prostatic segments of the rat vas deferens were examined. The motor responses in both species were not sustained but decayed within the first minute, showing desensitization to additional applications. Cross-desensitization was established between alpha,beta-methylene ATP or ATP-evoked contractions and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Full recovery of the desensitized motor responses required more than 30 min and showed a similar pattern in human and rat tissues. Immunoblot analysis of the human vas deferens extracts revealed a P2X1R oligomer of approximately 200 kDa under nonreducing conditions, whereas dithiothreitol-treated extracts showed a single band of approximately 70 kDa. The P2X1R was identified in ultracentrifugation fractions containing 15%-29% sucrose; the receptor localized in the same fractions as flotillin-1, indicating that it regionalized into smooth muscle lipid rafts. In conclusion, ATP plays a key role in human vas deferens contractile responses of the longitudinal smooth muscle layer, an effect mediated through P2X1Rs.

  14. Decentralized adaptive robust control based on sliding mode and nonlinear compensator for the control of ankle movement using functional electrical stimulation of agonist-antagonist muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobravi, Hamid-Reza; Erfanian, Abbas

    2009-08-01

    A decentralized control methodology is designed for the control of ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion in paraplegic subjects with electrical stimulation of tibialis anterior and calf muscles. Each muscle joint is considered as a subsystem and individual controllers are designed for each subsystem. Each controller operates solely on its associated subsystem, with no exchange of information between the subsystems. The interactions between the subsystems are taken as external disturbances for each isolated subsystem. In order to achieve robustness with respect to external disturbances, unmodeled dynamics, model uncertainty and time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, a robust control framework is proposed which is based on the synergistic combination of an adaptive nonlinear compensator with a sliding mode control and is referred to as an adaptive robust control. Extensive simulations and experiments on healthy and paraplegic subjects were performed to demonstrate the robustness against the time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, day-to-day variations, subject-to-subject variations, fast convergence, stability and tracking accuracy of the proposed method. The results indicate that the decentralized robust control provides excellent tracking control for different reference trajectories and can generate control signals to compensate the muscle fatigue and reject the external disturbance. Moreover, the controller is able to automatically regulate the interaction between agonist and antagonist muscles under different conditions of operating without any preprogrammed antagonist activities.

  15. A real-time recursive filter for the attitude determination of the Spacelab instrument pointing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time estimation filter which reduces sensitivity to system variations and reduces the amount of preflight computation is developed for the instrument pointing subsystem (IPS). The IPS is a three-axis stabilized platform developed to point various astronomical observation instruments aboard the shuttle. Currently, the IPS utilizes a linearized Kalman filter (LKF), with premission defined gains, to compensate for system drifts and accumulated attitude errors. Since the a priori gains are generated for an expected system, variations result in a suboptimal estimation process. This report compares the performance of three real-time estimation filters with the current LKF implementation. An extended Kalman filter and a second-order Kalman filter are developed to account for the system nonlinearities, while a linear Kalman filter implementation assumes that the nonlinearities are negligible. The performance of each of the four estimation filters are compared with respect to accuracy, stability, settling time, robustness, and computational requirements. It is shown, that for the current IPS pointing requirements, the linear Kalman filter provides improved robustness over the LKF with less computational requirements than the two real-time nonlinear estimation filters.

  16. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Lynn, Sean R.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). The analyses were performed using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off-design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component aero/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  17. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Lynn, Sean R.; Veres, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). Detailed analyses were performed using three- dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off- design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component acro/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  18. ERSYS-SPP access method subsystem design specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weise, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The STARAN special purpose processor (SPP) is a machine allowing the same operation to be performed on up to 512 different data elements simultaneously. In the ERSYS system, it is to be attached to a 4341 plug compatible machine (PCM) to do certain existing algorithms and, at a later date, to perform other to be specified algorithms. That part of the interface between the 4341 PCM and the SPP located in the 4341 PCM is known as the SPP access method (SPPAM). Access to the SPPAM will be obtained by use of the NQUEUE and DQUEUE commands. The subsystem design specification is to incorporate all applicable design considerations from the ERSYS system design specification and the Level B requirements documents relating to the SPPAM. It is intended as a basis for the preliminary design review and will expand into the subsystem detailed design specification.

  19. Subsystem software for TSTA (Tritium Systems Test Assembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, L.W.; Claborn, G.W.; Nielson, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Subsystem Control Software at the Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) must control sophisticated chemical processes through the physical operation of valves, motor controllers, gas sampling devices, thermocouples, pressure transducers, and similar devices. Such control software has to be capable of passing stringent quality assurance (QA) criteria to provide for the safe handling of significant amounts of tritium on a routine basis. Since many of the chemical processes and physical components are experimental, the control software has to be flexible enough to allow for trial/error learning curve, but still protect the environment and personnel from exposure to unsafe levels of radiation. The software at TSTA is implemented in several levels as described in a preceding paper in these proceedings. This paper depends on information given in the preceding paper for understanding. The top level is the Subsystem Control level.

  20. The skeletal subsystem as an integrative physiology paradigm.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aaron J; Iqbal, Jameel; Zaidi, Neeha; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2010-12-01

    Homeostatic bone remodeling depends on precise regulation of osteoblast-osteoclast coupling through intricate endocrine, immune, neuronal, and mechanical factors. The osteoblast-osteoclast model of bone physiology with layers of regulatory complexity can be investigated as a component of a local skeletal subsystem or as a part of a complete whole-body system. In this review, we flip the traditional investigative paradigm of scientific experimentation ("bottom-top research") to a "top-bottom" approach using systems biology. We first establish the intricacies of the two-cell model at the molecular signaling level. We then provide, on a systems level, an integrative physiologic approach involving many recognized organ-level subsystems having direct and/or indirect effects on bone remodeling. Lastly, a hypothetical model of bone remodeling based on frequency and amplitude regulatory mechanisms is presented. It is hoped that by providing a thorough model of skeletal homeostasis, future progress can be made in researching and treating skeletal morbidities.

  1. Development of a preprototype sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Birbara, P.

    1980-01-01

    A preoprototype Sabatier CO2 Reduction Subsystem was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The lightweight, quick starting reactor utilizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a single straight through plug flow design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with flows equivalent to a crew size of one person steadystate to 3 persons cyclical (equivalent to 5 persons steady state). The reactor requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation over the above range of molar ratios and crew loadings. The subsystem's operation and performance is controlled by a microprocessor and displayed on a nineteen inch multi-colored cathode ray tube.

  2. Development of a preprototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Birbara, P.

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, quick starting reactor utilizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a single straight through plug flow design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with flows equivalent to a crew size of one person steadystate to 3 persons cyclical. The reactor requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation over the above range of molar ratios and crew loadings. Subsystem performance was proven by parametric testing and endurance testing over a wide range of crew sizes and metabolic loadings. The subsystem's operation and performance is controlled by a microprocessor and displayed on a nineteen inch multi-colored cathode ray tube.

  3. Development of an advanced Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Cusick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The lightweight, quick starting (less than 5 minutes) reactor utlizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a simple, passively controlled reactor design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with process flows equivalent to a crew size of up to five persons. The subsystem requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation.

  4. [The innovative dynamic of the mechanics, electronics and materials subsystem].

    PubMed

    Maldonado, José; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira; Vargas, Marco

    2012-12-01

    The mechanics, electronics and materials subsystem, one of the subsystems of the health care productive complex, encompasses different activities, usually clustered in what is called the medical, hospital and dental equipment and materials industry. This is a strategic area for health care, since it represents a continuous source of changes in care practices, and influences the provision of health care services. It has, moreover, potential for promoting the progress of Brazil's system of innovation and for increasing the competitiveness of the industry as a whole, given that it articulates future technologies. Despite the significant growth of this industry in Brazil in recent years, such equipment and materials have been presenting a growing deficit in the balance of trade. This incompatibility between national health care needs and the productive and innovative basis of the industry points to structural fragilities in the system. Using the framework of political economy, the article aims to discuss the development of this industry in Brazil and its challenges.

  5. Entanglement, subsystem particle numbers and topology in free fermion systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Sheng, L; Shen, R; Wang, Rui; Xing, D Y

    2014-03-12

    We study the relationship between bipartite entanglement, subsystem particle number and topology in a half-filled free fermion system. It is proposed that the spin-projected particle numbers can distinguish the quantum spin Hall state from other states, and can be used to establish a new topological index for the system. Furthermore, we apply the new topological invariant to a disordered system and show that a topological phase transition occurs when the disorder strength is increased beyond a critical value. It is also shown that the subsystem particle number fluctuation displays behavior very similar to that of the entanglement entropy. This provides a lower-bound estimation for the entanglement entropy, which can be utilized to obtain an estimate of the entanglement entropy experimentally.

  6. Pyrotechnic Actuator for Retracting Tubes Between MSL Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallon, John C.; Webster, Richard G.; Patterson, Keith D.; Orzewalla, Matthew A.; Roberts, Eric T.; Tuszynski, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus, denoted the "retractuator" (a contraction of "retracting actuator"), was designed to help ensure clean separation between the cruise stage and the entry-vehicle subsystem of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The retractuator or an equivalent mechanism is needed because of tubes that (1) transport a heat-transfer fluid between the stages during flight and (2) are cut immediately prior to separation of the stages retractuator. The role of the retractuator is to retract the tubes, after they are cut and before separation of the subsystem, so that cut ends of the tubes do not damage thermal-protection coats on the entry vehicle and do not contribute to uncertainty of drag and consequent uncertainty in separation velocity.

  7. Automated monitor and control for deep space network subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, P.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of automating monitor and control loops for Deep Space Network (DSN) subsystems is considered and an overview of currently available automation techniques is given. The use of standard numerical models, knowledge-based systems, and neural networks is considered. It is argued that none of these techniques alone possess sufficient generality to deal with the demands imposed by the DSN environment. However, it is shown that schemes that integrate the better aspects of each approach and are referenced to a formal system model show considerable promise, although such an integrated technology is not yet available for implementation. Frequent reference is made to the receiver subsystem since this work was largely motivated by experience in developing an automated monitor and control loop for the advanced receiver.

  8. OAO-3 end of mission power subsystem evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasevoli, M.

    1982-01-01

    End of mission tests were performed on the OAO-3 power subsystem in three component areas: solar array, nickel-cadmium batteries and the On-Board Processor (OBP) power boost operation. Solar array evaluation consisted of analyzing array performance characteristics and comparing them to earlier flight data. Measured solar array degradation of 14.1 to 17.7% after 8 1/3 years is in good agreement with theortical radiation damage losses. Battery discharge characteristics were compared to results of laboratory life cycle tests performed on similar cells. Comparison of cell voltage profils reveals close correlation and confirms the validity of real time life cycle simulation. The successful operation of the system in the OBP/power boost regulation mode demonstrates the excellent life, reliability and greater system utilization of power subsystems using maximum power trackers.

  9. System integration of marketable subsystems. [for residential solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: systems integration of marketable subsystems; development, design, and building of site data acquisition subsystems; development and operation of the central data processing system; operation of the MSFC Solar Test Facility; and systems analysis.

  10. Thermal performance evaluation of the infrared telescope dewar subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal performance evaluations (TPE) were conducted with the superfluid helium dewar of the Infrared Telescope (IRT) experiment from November 1981 to August 1982. Test included measuring key operating parameters, simulating operations with an attached instrument cryostat and validating servicing, operating and safety procedures. Test activities and results are summarized. All objectives are satisfied except for those involving transfer of low pressure liquid helium (LHe) from a supply dewar into the dewar subsystem.

  11. GENERAL: Nonadiabatic Geometric Phase in Composite Systems and Its Subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin

    2008-11-01

    We point out that the time-dependent gauge transformation technique may be effective in investigating the nonadiabatic geometric phase of a subsystem in a composite system. As an example, we consider two uniaxially coupled spin —1/2 particles with one of particles driven by rotating magnetic Geld. The influences of coupling and precession frequency of the magnetic Geld on geometric phase are also discussed in detail.

  12. Simultaneous Time, Wavelength and Intensity Measurement of Optical Memory Subsystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    SIMULTANEOUS TIME, WAVELENGTH AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENT PE - 61102F OF OPTICAL MEMORY SUBSYSTEMS PR - 2300 6. AUTHOR( S ) TA - 06 WU -03 Joseph Osman and...Rebecca Bussjager 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER AFRL/SNDP25 letnic AFRL-SN-RS-TR- 1998...12025 Electronic Pky Rome, NY 13441-4515 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER

  13. Attitude Control Subsystem for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewston, Alan W.; Mitchell, Kent A.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-orbit operation of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The three ACTS control axes are defined, including the means for sensing attitude and determining the pointing errors. The desired pointing requirements for various modes of control as well as the disturbance torques that oppose the control are identified. Finally, the hardware actuators and control loops utilized to reduce the attitude error are described.

  14. Photovoltaic subsystem optimization and design tradeoff study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, W.J.

    1982-03-01

    Tradeoffs and subsystem choices are examined in photovoltaic array subfield design, power-conditioning sizing and selection, roof- and ground-mounted structure installation, energy loss, operating voltage, power conditioning cost, and subfield size. Line- and self-commutated power conditioning options are analyzed to determine the most cost-effective technology in the megawatt power range. Methods for reducing field installation of flat panels and roof mounting of intermediate load centers are discussed, including the cost of retrofit installations.

  15. Evolution of the 1-mlb mercury ion thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Banks, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The developmental history, performance, and major lifetests of each component of the present 1-mlb (4.5 mN) thruster system are traced over the past 10 years. The 1-mlb thruster subsystem consists of an 8 cm diameter ion thruster mounted on 2 axis gimbals, a mercury propellant tank, a power electronics unit, a controller/digital interface unit, and necessary electrical harnesses plus propellant tankage and feed lines.

  16. Design and Analysis of a Hyperspectral Microwave Receiver Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hancock, T.; Leslie, R.; Osaretin, I.; Shields, M.; Racette, P.; Hillard, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral microwave (HM) sounding has been proposed to achieve unprecedented performance. HM operation is achieved using multiple banks of RF spectrometers with large aggregate bandwidth. A principal challenge is Size/Weight/Power scaling. Objectives of this work: 1) Demonstrate ultra-compact (100 cm3) 52-channel IF processor (enabler); 2) Demonstrate a hyperspectral microwave receiver subsystem; and 3) Deliver a flight-ready system to validate HM sounding.

  17. TRIGA: Telecommunications Protocol Processing Subsystem Using Reconfigurable Interoperable Gate Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Jackson; Pingree, Paula J.; Torgerson, J. Leigh

    2006-01-01

    We present the Telecommunications protocol processing subsystem using Reconfigurable Interoperable Gate Arrays (TRIGA), a novel approach that unifies fault tolerance, error correction coding and interplanetary communication protocol off-loading to implement CCSDS File Delivery Protocol and Datalink layers. The new reconfigurable architecture offers more than one order of magnitude throughput increase while reducing footprint requirements in memory, command and data handling processor utilization, communication system interconnects and power consumption.

  18. Earth-to-orbit propulsion turbomachinery subsystem: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutzenhofer, L. A.; Garcia, R.

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The objectives are: (1) to develop the technology related to the turbomachinery systems of high performance rocket engines, which focuses on advanced design methodologies and concepts, develops high performance turbomachinery data bases, and validates turbomachinery design tools; and (2) specific turbomachinery subsystems and disciplines, which focus on turbine stages, pump stages, bearings, deals, structural dynamics, complex flow paths, materials, manufacturability, producibility, and inspectability, rotordynamics, and fatigue/fracture/life.

  19. Systems Approach to Terrorism: Countering the Terrorist Training Subsystem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    TERRORISM : COUNTERING THE TERRORIST TRAINING SUBSYSTEM by Erdogan Celebi December 2006 Thesis Advisor: Nancy Roberts Second Reader...REPORT DATE December 2006 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Systems Approach to Terrorism : Countering the...distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT This study on terrorism training follows the logic that terrorism is a

  20. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.A.

    1994-11-10

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  1. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. A.

    1994-11-01

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  2. Design of nanophotonic circuits for autonomous subsystem quantum error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerckhoff, J.; Pavlichin, D. S.; Chalabi, H.; Mabuchi, H.

    2011-05-01

    We reapply our approach to designing nanophotonic quantum memories in order to formulate an optical network that autonomously protects a single logical qubit against arbitrary single-qubit errors. Emulating the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor subsystem code, the network replaces the traditionally discrete syndrome measurement and correction steps by continuous, time-independent optical interactions and coherent feedback of unitarily processed optical fields.

  3. Static Feed Water Electrolysis Subsystem Testing and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Schubert, F. H.; Burke, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    A program was carried out to develop and test advanced electrochemical cells/modules and critical electromechanical components for a static feed (alkaline electrolyte) water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem. The accomplishments were refurbishment of a previously developed subsystem and successful demonstration for a total of 2980 hours of normal operation; achievement of sustained one-person level oxygen generation performance with state-of-the-art cell voltages averaging 1.61 V at 191 ASF for an operating temperature of 128F (equivalent to 1.51V when normalized to 180F); endurance testing and demonstration of reliable performance of the three-fluid pressure controller for 8650 hours; design and development of a fluid control assembly for this subsystem and demonstration of its performance; development and demonstration at the single cell and module levels of a unitized core composite cell that provides expanded differential pressure tolerance capability; fabrication and evaluation of a feed water electrolyte elimination five-cell module; and successful demonstration of an electrolysis module pressurization technique that can be used in place of nitrogen gas during the standby mode of operation to maintain system pressure and differential pressures.

  4. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  5. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    LESHIKAR, G.A.

    2000-03-27

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the DST Transfer Pump Subsystem that supports the first phase of (WFD). The DST Transfer Pump Subsystem consists of a pump for supernatant and or slurry transfer for the DSTs that will be retrieved during the Phase 1 WFD operations. This system is used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. It also will deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  6. Space Shuttle Orbiter audio subsystem. [to communication and tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    The selection of the audio multiplex control configuration for the Space Shuttle Orbiter audio subsystem is discussed and special attention is given to the evaluation criteria of cost, weight and complexity. The specifications and design of the subsystem are described and detail is given to configurations of the audio terminal and audio central control unit (ATU, ACCU). The audio input from the ACCU, at a signal level of -12.2 to 14.8 dBV, nominal range, at 1 kHz, was found to have balanced source impedance and a balanced local impedance of 6000 + or - 600 ohms at 1 kHz, dc isolated. The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) electroacoustic test laboratory, an audio engineering facility consisting of a collection of acoustic test chambers, analyzed problems of speaker and headset performance, multiplexed control data coupled with audio channels, and the Orbiter cabin acoustic effects on the operational performance of voice communications. This system allows technical management and project engineering to address key constraining issues, such as identifying design deficiencies of the headset interface unit and the assessment of the Orbiter cabin performance of voice communications, which affect the subsystem development.

  7. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  8. On DESTINY Science Instrument Electrical and Electronics Subsystem Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod R.

    2009-01-01

    Future space missions are going to require large focal planes with many sensing arrays and hundreds of millions of pixels all read out at high data rates'' . This will place unique demands on the electrical and electronics (EE) subsystem design and it will be critically important to have high technology readiness level (TRL) EE concepts ready to support such missions. One such omission is the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) charged with making precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe to reveal vital clues about the nature of dark energy - a hypothetical form of energy that permeates all of space and tends to increase the rate of the expansion. One of three JDEM concept studies - the Dark Energy Space Telescope (DESTINY) was conducted in 2008 at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland. This paper presents the EE subsystem framework, which evolved from the DESTINY science instrument study. It describes the main challenges and implementation concepts related to the design of an EE subsystem featuring multiple focal planes populated with dozens of large arrays and millions of pixels. The focal planes are passively cooled to cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K). The sensor mosaic is controlled by a large number of Readout Integrated Circuits and Application Specific Integrated Circuits - the ROICs/ASICs in near proximity to their sensor focal planes. The ASICs, in turn, are serviced by a set of "warm" EE subsystem boxes performing Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital signal processing (DSP) computations of complex algorithms, such as sampling-up-the-ramp algorithm (SUTR), over large volumes of fast data streams. The SUTR boxes are supported by the Instrument Control/Command and Data Handling box (ICDH Primary and Backup boxes) for lossless data compression, command and low volume telemetry handling, power conversion and for communications with the spacecraft. The paper outlines how the JDEM DESTINY concept

  9. Robust Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, K. S.; Annaswamy, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several concepts and results in robust adaptive control are are discussed and is organized in three parts. The first part surveys existing algorithms. Different formulations of the problem and theoretical solutions that have been suggested are reviewed here. The second part contains new results related to the role of persistent excitation in robust adaptive systems and the use of hybrid control to improve robustness. In the third part promising new areas for future research are suggested which combine different approaches currently known.

  10. Test Methods for Telemetry Systems and Subsystems. Volume 2: Test Methods for Telemetry Radio Frequency (RF) Subsystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    than 50°). Set the output of the signal generator to the minimum level and the attenuator to maximum attenuation. Verify that no extraneous radio ... Extraterrestrial Radio Sources in the Measurement of Antenna Parameters, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Transactions on Aerospace and...RCC DOCUMENT 118-12 VOLUME 2 TELEMETRY GROUP TEST METHODS FOR TELEMETRY SYSTEMS AND SUBSYSTEMS VOLUME 2 TEST METHODS FOR TELEMETRY RADIO

  11. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain.

  12. Dissipation, generalized free energy, and a self-consistent nonequilibrium thermodynamics of chemically driven open subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a system situated in a sustained environment with influx and efflux is usually treated as a subsystem in a larger, closed “universe.” A question remains with regard to what the minimally required description for the surrounding of such an open driven system is so that its nonequilibrium thermodynamics can be established solely based on the internal stochastic kinetics. We provide a solution to this problem using insights from studies of molecular motors in a chemical nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) with sustained external drive through a regenerating system or in a quasisteady state (QSS) with an excess amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and inorganic phosphate (Pi). We introduce the key notion of minimal work that is needed, Wmin, for the external regenerating system to sustain a NESS (e.g., maintaining constant concentrations of ATP, ADP and Pi for a molecular motor). Using a Markov (master-equation) description of a motor protein, we illustrate that the NESS and QSS have identical kinetics as well as the second law in terms of the same positive entropy production rate. The heat dissipation of a NESS without mechanical output is exactly the Wmin. This provides a justification for introducing an ideal external regenerating system and yields a free-energy balance equation between the net free-energy input Fin and total dissipation Fdis in an NESS: Fin consists of chemical input minus mechanical output; Fdis consists of dissipative heat, i.e. the amount of useful energy becoming heat, which also equals the NESS entropy production. Furthermore, we show that for nonstationary systems, the Fdis and Fin correspond to the entropy production rate and housekeeping heat in stochastic thermodynamics and identify a relative entropy H as a generalized free energy. We reach a new formulation of Markovian nonequilibrium thermodynamics based on only the internal kinetic equation without further reference to

  13. Dissipation, generalized free energy, and a self-consistent nonequilibrium thermodynamics of chemically driven open subsystems.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a system situated in a sustained environment with influx and efflux is usually treated as a subsystem in a larger, closed "universe." A question remains with regard to what the minimally required description for the surrounding of such an open driven system is so that its nonequilibrium thermodynamics can be established solely based on the internal stochastic kinetics. We provide a solution to this problem using insights from studies of molecular motors in a chemical nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) with sustained external drive through a regenerating system or in a quasisteady state (QSS) with an excess amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and inorganic phosphate (Pi). We introduce the key notion of minimal work that is needed, W(min), for the external regenerating system to sustain a NESS (e.g., maintaining constant concentrations of ATP, ADP and Pi for a molecular motor). Using a Markov (master-equation) description of a motor protein, we illustrate that the NESS and QSS have identical kinetics as well as the second law in terms of the same positive entropy production rate. The heat dissipation of a NESS without mechanical output is exactly the W(min). This provides a justification for introducing an ideal external regenerating system and yields a free-energy balance equation between the net free-energy input F(in) and total dissipation F(dis) in an NESS: F(in) consists of chemical input minus mechanical output; F(dis) consists of dissipative heat, i.e. the amount of useful energy becoming heat, which also equals the NESS entropy production. Furthermore, we show that for nonstationary systems, the F(dis) and F(in) correspond to the entropy production rate and housekeeping heat in stochastic thermodynamics and identify a relative entropy H as a generalized free energy. We reach a new formulation of Markovian nonequilibrium thermodynamics based on only the internal kinetic equation without further

  14. Space shuttle (ATP configuration) abort staging investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampy, J. M.; Blackwell, K. L.; Allen, E. C., Jr.; Fossler, I.

    1973-01-01

    A wind tunnel test conducted in a 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel to determine the force and moment characteristics of the ATP Orbiter and modified ATP External Tank/SRB combination during abort staging conditions is discussed. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded for the orbiter and ET/SRB combination. Pitch polars were obtained for an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees and orbiter incidence angles (orbiter relative to the ET/SRB combination) of 0 and 2 degrees. A limited amount of yaw data were obtained at 0 degree angle of attack and beta range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees. In addition, orbiter pitch control effectiveness was determined at several grid points. These force and moment data were obtained for Mach numbers of 0.9, 1.2 and 2.0.

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p.

    PubMed

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-03-15

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam's principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA.

  16. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems.

  17. Autonomous navigation - The ARMMS concept. [Autonomous Redundancy and Maintenance Management Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, L. J.; Jones, J. B.; Mease, K. D.; Kwok, J. H.; Goltz, G. L.; Kechichian, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual design is outlined for the navigation subsystem of the Autonomous Redundancy and Maintenance Management Subsystem (ARMMS). The principal function of this navigation subsystem is to maintain the spacecraft over a specified equatorial longitude to within + or - 3 deg. In addition, the navigation subsystem must detect and correct internal faults. It comprises elements for a navigation executive and for orbit determination, trajectory, maneuver planning, and maneuver command. Each of these elements is described. The navigation subsystem is to be used in the DSCS III spacecraft.

  18. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Systems and methods for an integrated electrical sub-system powered by wind energy

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Yan; Garces, Luis Jose

    2008-06-24

    Various embodiments relate to systems and methods related to an integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system including a wind power source, an electrically-powered sub-system coupled to and at least partially powered by the wind power source, the electrically-powered sub-system being coupled to the wind power source through power converters, and a supervisory controller coupled to the wind power source and the electrically-powered sub-system to monitor and manage the integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system.

  20. Robust nonlinear variable selective control for networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Behrooz

    2016-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the networked control of a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. In this way, Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy modelling is used to extend the previously proposed variable selective control (VSC) methodology to nonlinear systems. This extension is based upon the decomposition of the nonlinear system to a set of fuzzy-blended locally linearised subsystems and further application of the VSC methodology to each subsystem. To increase the applicability of the T-S approach for uncertain nonlinear networked control systems, this study considers the asynchronous premise variables in the plant and the controller, and then introduces a robust stability analysis and control synthesis. The resulting optimal switching-fuzzy controller provides a minimum guaranteed cost on an H2 performance index. Simulation studies on three nonlinear benchmark problems demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Design optimization for cost and quality: The robust design approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1990-01-01

    Designing reliable, low cost, and operable space systems has become the key to future space operations. Designing high quality space systems at low cost is an economic and technological challenge to the designer. A systematic and efficient way to meet this challenge is a new method of design optimization for performance, quality, and cost, called Robust Design. Robust Design is an approach for design optimization. It consists of: making system performance insensitive to material and subsystem variation, thus allowing the use of less costly materials and components; making designs less sensitive to the variations in the operating environment, thus improving reliability and reducing operating costs; and using a new structured development process so that engineering time is used most productively. The objective in Robust Design is to select the best combination of controllable design parameters so that the system is most robust to uncontrollable noise factors. The robust design methodology uses a mathematical tool called an orthogonal array, from design of experiments theory, to study a large number of decision variables with a significantly small number of experiments. Robust design also uses a statistical measure of performance, called a signal-to-noise ratio, from electrical control theory, to evaluate the level of performance and the effect of noise factors. The purpose is to investigate the Robust Design methodology for improving quality and cost, demonstrate its application by the use of an example, and suggest its use as an integral part of space system design process.

  2. Robust Critical Point Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Harsh

    2016-07-28

    Robust Critical Point Detection is a software to compute critical points in a 2D or 3D vector field robustly. The software was developed as a part of the author's work at the lab as a Phd student under Livermore Scholar Program (now called Livermore Graduate Scholar Program).

  3. Mechanisms for Robust Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Matthew M.; Gluck, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    To function well in an unpredictable environment using unreliable components, a system must have a high degree of robustness. Robustness is fundamental to biological systems and is an objective in the design of engineered systems such as airplane engines and buildings. Cognitive systems, like biological and engineered systems, exist within…

  4. Dynamic integrated cost and engineering (DICE) model and its applicability to ATP systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMont, Douglas V.; Benjamin, Brian J.

    1995-05-01

    As the system engineering process flows down constellation coverage specifications to the Spacecraft level in terms of agility requirements it's critical that the relationships between manueverability and cost are clearly understood. The probability of optimizing the cost of typical ATP system would be greatly enhanced if a realistic integrated cost/engineering model were available during the initial phase of a program (e.g. Conceptual Design Phase). Most Cost Engineering work performed to date has been done by Cost and/or Systems Engineers which has typically lead to models with a cost emphasis. This work tends to be parametric in nature and hence the models have has little 'buy-in' from the design engineering side of the house. A better approach is to take existing credible engineering models for the key Spacecraft subsystems (Attitude Control, Thermal, Power, etc.) and to append these models to include the appropriate hardware databases. This would allow the models to output cost, power and weight, besides analytical engineering parameters like torque, momentum, etc.. For sound engineering reasons some, but not all, subsystem models should be time-domain based (dynamic) simulations--a clear diverges from the typical Systems Engineering approach. A modular spacecraft model like the one created at Lockheed for the FEWS/ALARM programs provides an ideal basis for developing a Dynamic Integrated Cost & Engineering (DICE) Model. This paper provides a 'snapshot' of the initial development of Attitude Determination and Control portion of the DICE Model. These subsystems were modeled first since maneuverability has such a large cost impact on them. A multiple body dynamics package, High TEC1, provides the core of this DICE module. This package has been integrated into several simulation packages as described in previous works. Having access to this detailed 3-axis simulation model allows one to properly size spacecraft attitude systems (especially sensors and actuators

  5. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  6. Microglial migration mediated by ATP-induced ATP release from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ying; Wu, Hang-jun; Li, Hui-quan; Qin, Song; Wang, Yin-er; Li, Jing; Lou, Hui-fang; Chen, Zhong; Li, Xiao-ming; Luo, Qing-ming; Duan, Shumin

    2012-06-01

    Microglia are highly motile cells that act as the main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system. Attracted by factors released from damaged cells, microglia are recruited towards the damaged or infected site, where they are involved in degenerative and regenerative responses and phagocytotic clearance of cell debris. ATP release from damaged neural tissues has been suggested to mediate the rapid extension of microglial process towards the site of injury. However, the mechanisms of the long-range migration of microglia remain to be clarified. Here, we found that lysosomes in microglia contain abundant ATP and exhibit Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. By establishing an efficient in vitro chemotaxis assay, we demonstrated that endogenously-released ATP from microglia triggered by local microinjection of ATPγS is critical for the long-range chemotaxis of microglia, a response that was significantly inhibited in microglia treated with an agent inducing lysosome osmodialysis or in cells derived from mice deficient in Rab 27a (ashen mice), a small GTPase required for the trafficking and exocytosis of secretory lysosomes. These results suggest that microglia respond to extracellular ATP by releasing ATP themselves through lysosomal exocytosis, thereby providing a positive feedback mechanism to generate a long-range extracellular signal for attracting distant microglia to migrate towards and accumulate at the site of injury.

  7. An inverter/controller subsystem optimized for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, R. L.; Osullivan, G.; Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of solar array dc power to ac power stimulated the specification, design, and simulation testing of an inverter/controller subsystem tailored to the photovoltaic power source characteristics. Optimization of the inverter/controller design is discussed as part of an overall photovoltaic power system designed for maximum energy extraction from the solar array. The special design requirements for the inverter/ controller include: a power system controller (PSC) to control continuously the solar array operating point at the maximum power level based on variable solar insolation and cell temperatures; and an inverter designed for high efficiency at rated load and low losses at light loadings to conserve energy.

  8. A cost effective data management subsystem for the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, J. A.; Patterson, T. D.; Cole, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper outlines the approach used in developing DMS (Data Management Subsystem) alternatives for the LST (Large Space Telescope) and in selecting the concept considered to be the most cost effective means of implementing the LST DMS requirements. Two candidate DMS concepts are discussed: a functionally integrated and a functionally separated one. For the single vehicle LST program, separation of the DMS functions best provides high reliability, operations flexibility, minimal interface complexity, and the least complex software development and verification task. The use of available hardware and NASA standard components is stressed.

  9. Malaria as anthropo-ecosystem. Part VI: Demographic subsystem (DSS).

    PubMed

    Kondrashin, A V; Kalra, N I

    1991-06-01

    Demographic Subsystem (DSS) comprising structure, distribution, along with its dynamic process has been identified to influence Malaria as Anthropo-Ecosystem (MAES) broadly in two ways. Innate characters of some essential elements of DSS viz. growth, age and sex composition, infants, children, young and old adults, non-pregnant and pregnant and lactating mothers exert direct influence while other elements, viz. spatial distribution, density, configuration of settlements and migration are influenced by environmental factors and affect MAES indirectly. Attempt has been made to discuss each of these factors in the light of present knowledge and available data.

  10. Automation study for space station subsystems and mission ground support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An automation concept for the autonomous operation of space station subsystems, i.e., electric power, thermal control, and communications and tracking are discussed. To assure that functions essential for autonomous operations are not neglected, an operations function (systems monitoring and control) is included in the discussion. It is recommended that automated speech recognition and synthesis be considered a basic mode of man/machine interaction for space station command and control, and that the data management system (DMS) and other systems on the space station be designed to accommodate fully automated fault detection, isolation, and recovery within the system monitoring function of the DMS.

  11. Use of STS subsystems and components for MMSE, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Multiuse mission support equipment (MMSE) is flight/ground equipment for the shuttle era which is used in conjunction with more than one mission payload. Initial verification of STS subsystem's applicability to MMSE is provided along with the cost savings potential and programmatic data needed for further program planning decisions. Some 70 MMSE requirements were found to be potentially satisfied by STS equipment, and and 6 items of particular interest were chosen for special emphasis. All were found to be feasible and beneficial. Program cost savings through their use are estimated to be substantial. Further study is recommended to identify additional MMSE requirements and hardware.

  12. Addendum: Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the second generation operational improvements and the TIMES (Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem) 2 study are covered. Areas covered in the second generation operational improvements are improved temperature control, water quality improvements, subsytem operational improvements, solid handling improvements, wastewater pretreatment optimization, and membrane rejuvenation concepts. The task for the TIMES 2 study are thermoelectric regenerator improvement, recycle loop pH operational criteria, recycle loop component optimization, and hollow fiber membrane evaporator improvement. Results are presented and conclusions are drawn from both studies.

  13. A shuttle radar microwave subsystem for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Microwave subsystem considerations are discussed as a design example for a radar for earth resources applications to be used in conjunction with the shuttle spacelab. This system with a multiplicity of frequencies and polarizations - L-band (25-cm wavelength), S-band (10-cm wavelength), and X-band (3.2-cm wavelength) at two orthogonal linear polarizations - was tentatively selected. The space shuttle vehicle constrains the antenna to approximately 8 m in length and 3 m in width. The frequencies and antenna size comprise the major constraints on the system described, and determine the sensor altitude, coverage, and major hardware parameters.

  14. Recent developments for the Large Binocular Telescope Guiding Control Subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golota, T.; De La Peña, M. D.; Biddick, C.; Lesser, M.; Leibold, T.; Miller, D.; Meeks, R.; Hahn, T.; Storm, J.; Sargent, T.; Summers, D.; Hill, J.; Kraus, J.; Hooper, S.; Fisher, D.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has eight Acquisition, Guiding, and wavefront Sensing Units (AGw units). They provide guiding and wavefront sensing capability at eight different locations at both direct and bent Gregorian focal stations. Recent additions of focal stations for PEPSI and MODS instruments doubled the number of focal stations in use including respective motion, camera controller server computers, and software infrastructure communicating with Guiding Control Subsystem (GCS). This paper describes the improvements made to the LBT GCS and explains how these changes have led to better maintainability and contributed to increased reliability. This paper also discusses the current GCS status and reviews potential upgrades to further improve its performance.

  15. Attitude determination and control subsystem for the TOPEX satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, C. J.; Welch, R. V.; Kia, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Ocean Topography Experiment satellite will carry a modular Attitude Determination and Control Subsystem (ADCS) which contains all equipment required for attitude determination, stabilization, and control, as well as hydrazine thruster firing control, during all mission phases. Attention is presently given to the ADCS's architecture, constituent hardware components, performance requirements, and predicted on-orbit performance compliance, with emphasis on the design and analysis of the Normal Mission Mode control algorithm furnishing the primary scientific data-acquisition operational mode. This mode's attitude determination and control of on-orbit performance is predicted to better than 43 arcsec.

  16. Subsystem fault tolerance with the Bacon-Shor code.

    PubMed

    Aliferis, Panos; Cross, Andrew W

    2007-06-01

    We discuss how the presence of gauge subsystems in the Bacon-Shor code [D. Bacon, Phys. Rev. A 73, 012340 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevA.73.012340 (2006)] leads to remarkably simple and efficient methods for fault-tolerant error correction (FTEC). Most notably, FTEC does not require entangled ancillary states, and it can be implemented with nearest-neighbor two-qubit measurements. By using these methods, we prove a lower bound on the quantum accuracy threshold, 1.94 x 10(-4) for adversarial stochastic noise, that improves previous lower bounds by nearly an order of magnitude.

  17. Space Shuttle Orbiter - Reusable surface insulation subsystem thermal performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Battley, H. H.; Hughes, J. T.; Neuenschwander, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performance of the reusable surface insulation (RSI) subsystem consisting of silica tiles, silicone coated nylon felt insulation, and ceramic cloth gap fillers and thermal barriers is discussed. Thermal response predictions for the components are compared with measured flight data, which indicates that the RSI thermal performance can meet or exceed design requirements for the majority of the RSI. Visual inspections and the maximum temperature conditions observed in structural components after data acquisition suggest that the flight environment was not as severe as the worst case preflight prediction.

  18. Electric and hybrid vehicles environmental control subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An environmental control subsystem (ECS) in the passenger compartment of electric and hybrid vehicles is studied. Various methods of obtaining the desired temperature control for the battery pack is also studied. The functional requirements of ECS equipment is defined. Following categorization by methodology, technology availability and risk, all viable ECS concepts are evaluated. Each is assessed independently for benefits versus risk, as well as for its feasibility to short, intermediate and long term product development. Selection of the preferred concept is made against these requirements, as well as the study's major goal of providing safe, highly efficient and thermally confortable ECS equipment.

  19. Electric and hybrid vehicle environmental control subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitner, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    An environmental control subsystem (ECS) in electric and hybrid vehicles is studied. A combination of a combustion heater and gasoline engine (Otto cycle) driven vapor compression air conditioner is selected. The combustion heater, the small gasoline engine, and the vapor compression air conditioner are commercially available. These technologies have good cost and performance characteristics. The cost for this ECS is relatively close to the cost of current ECS's. Its effect on the vehicle's propulsion battery is minimal and the ECS size and weight do not have significant impact on the vehicle's range.

  20. Data Management Applications for the Service Preparation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Ivy P.; Chang, George W.; Bui, Tung; Allen, Christopher; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie C.; Bui, Bach X.; Gutheinz, Sandy C.; Kim, Rachel Y.; Zendejas, Silvino C.; Yu, Dan; Kim, Richard M.; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    These software applications provide intuitive User Interfaces (UIs) with a consistent look and feel for interaction with, and control of, the Service Preparation Subsystem (SPS). The elements of the UIs described here are the File Manager, Mission Manager, and Log Monitor applications. All UIs provide access to add/delete/update data entities in a complex database schema without requiring technical expertise on the part of the end users. These applications allow for safe, validated, catalogued input of data. Also, the software has been designed in multiple, coherent layers to promote ease of code maintenance and reuse in addition to reducing testing and accelerating maturity.

  1. The sensing and perception subsystem of the NASA research telerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, B.; Gennery, D. B.; Bon, B.; Litwin, T.

    1987-01-01

    A useful space telerobot for on-orbit assembly, maintenance, and repair tasks must have a sensing and perception subsystem which can provide the locations, orientations, and velocities of all relevant objects in the work environment. This function must be accomplished with sufficient speed and accuracy to permit effective grappling and manipulation. Appropriate symbolic names must be attached to each object for use by higher-level planning algorithms. Sensor data and inferences must be presented to the remote human operator in a way that is both comprehensible in ensuring safe autonomous operation and useful for direct teleoperation. Research at JPL toward these objectives is described.

  2. Characterization of Subsystems for a WB-003 Single Stage Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacConochie, Ian O.; Lepsch, Roger A., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Subsystems for an all oxygen-hydrogen-single-stage shuttle are characterized for a vehicle designated WB-003. Features of the vehicle include all-electric actuation, fiber optics for information circuitry, fuel cells for power generation, and extensive use of composites for structure. The vehicle is sized for the delivery of a 25,000 lb. payload to a space station orbit without crew. When crew are being delivered, they are carried in a module in the payload bay with escape and manual override capabilities. The underlying reason for undertaking this task is to provide a framework for the study of the operations costs of the newer shuttles.

  3. Revalidation of the Huygens Descent Control Sub-System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens probe, part of the Cassini mission to Saturn, is designed to investigate the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The passage of the probe through the atmosphere is controlled by the Descent Control Sub-System (DCSS), which consists of three parachutes and associated mechanisms. The Cassini / Huygens mission was launched in October 1997 and was designed during the early 1990's. During the time since the design and launch, analysis capabilities have improved significantly, knowledge of the Titan environment has improved and the baseline mission has been modified. Consequently, a study was performed to revalidate the DCSS design against the current predictions.

  4. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  5. Laser tracking test under satellite microvibrational disturbances by OICETS ATP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jono, Takashi; Toyoshima, Morio; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Yamawaki, Toshihiko; Nakagawa, Keizo; Yamamoto, Akio

    2002-07-01

    Free-space laser communication systems offer many advantages such as high data rate, small sized equipment, low consumption electric power and others. There are, however, many development factors to construct a realistic laser communication system in space. Precise Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing (ATP) functions are key issue to establish the laser communication system in space. OICETS (Optical Inter-orbit Communications Engineering Test Satellite) has been developed by National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) to verify an optical data link technology in space. ATP functions of the OICETS satellite for a laser inter-orbit link system must be controlled with an angular accuracy better than a few micro radian under vibrational disturbances of the host satellite. The microvibrational disturbances continually come from the satellite subsystem operations such as reaction wheels, solar paddle motors, scan sensors and so on. NASDA performed an on-ground microvibration test to evaluate vibration characteristics of the OICETS satellite and to verify laser tracking performances of the ATP system. The test was carried out by using a simulated OICETS satellite that consists of a mechanical structure model and an engineering model of the laser communication terminal. The mechanical structure model is equipped with some flight components and mass dummy components. The satellite is suspended from a lifting tackle by four straps and the free-free configuration was simulated using a suspension device. As a result, the incremental residual tracking error of 0.19 micro radians was measured due to the microvibration of the disturbing sources from the satellite platform.

  6. Real-time luminescence imaging of cellular ATP release.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Kishio; Sokabe, Masahiro; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2014-03-15

    Extracellular ATP and other purines are ubiquitous mediators of local intercellular signaling within the body. While the last two decades have witnessed enormous progress in uncovering and characterizing purinergic receptors and extracellular enzymes controlling purinergic signals, our understanding of the initiating step in this cascade, i.e., ATP release, is still obscure. Imaging of extracellular ATP by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence offers the advantage of studying ATP release and distribution dynamics in real time. However, low-light signal generated by bioluminescence reactions remains the major obstacle to imaging such rapid processes, imposing substantial constraints on its spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed an improved microscopy system for real-time ATP imaging, which detects ATP-dependent luciferin-luciferase luminescence at ∼10 frames/s, sufficient to follow rapid ATP release with sensitivity of ∼10 nM and dynamic range up to 100 μM. In addition, simultaneous differential interference contrast cell images are acquired with infra-red optics. Our imaging method: (1) identifies ATP-releasing cells or sites, (2) determines absolute ATP concentration and its spreading manner at release sites, and (3) permits analysis of ATP release kinetics from single cells. We provide instrumental details of our approach and give several examples of ATP-release imaging at cellular and tissue levels, to illustrate its potential utility.

  7. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  8. From ATP to PTP and Back: A Dual Function for the Mitochondrial ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Paolo; Di Lisa, Fabio; Fogolari, Federico; Lippe, Giovanna

    2015-05-22

    Mitochondria not only play a fundamental role in heart physiology but are also key effectors of dysfunction and death. This dual role assumes a new meaning after recent advances on the nature and regulation of the permeability transition pore, an inner membrane channel whose opening requires matrix Ca(2+) and is modulated by many effectors including reactive oxygen species, matrix cyclophilin D, Pi (inorganic phosphate), and matrix pH. The recent demonstration that the F-ATP synthase can reversibly undergo a Ca(2+)-dependent transition to form a channel that mediates the permeability transition opens new perspectives to the field. These findings demand a reassessment of the modifications of F-ATP synthase that take place in the heart under pathological conditions and of their potential role in determining the transition of F-ATP synthase from and energy-conserving into an energy-dissipating device.

  9. Robustness. [in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The concept of rubustness includes design simplicity, component and path redundancy, desensitization to the parameter and environment variations, control of parameter variations, and punctual operations. These characteristics must be traded with functional concepts, materials, and fabrication approach against the criteria of performance, cost, and reliability. The paper describes the robustness design process, which includes the following seven major coherent steps: translation of vision into requirements, definition of the robustness characteristics desired, criteria formulation of required robustness, concept selection, detail design, manufacturing and verification, operations.

  10. Orbits of Subsystems in Four Hierarchical Multiple Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    Seven spectroscopic orbits in nearby solar-type multiple stars are presented. The primary of the chromospherically active star HIP 9642 is a 4.8 day double-lined pair; the outer 420 year visual orbit is updated, but remains poorly constrained. HIP 12780 is a quadruple system consisting of the resolved 6.7 year pair FIN 379 Aa,Ab, for which the combined orbit, masses, and orbital parallax are determined here, and the single-lined binary Ba,Bb with a period of 27.8 days. HIP 28790 is a young quintuple system composed of two close binaries, Aa,Ab and Ba,Bb, with periods of 221 and 13 days, respectively, and a single distant component C. Its subsystem Ba,Bb is peculiar, having a spectroscopic mass ratio of 0.89 but a magnitude difference of ˜2.2 mag. HIP 64478 also contains five stars: the A-component is a 29 year visual pair with a previously known 4 day twin subsystem, while the B-component is a contact binary with a period of 5.8 hr, seen nearly pole-on.

  11. Optimisation study of a vehicle bumper subsystem with fuzzy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, L.; Moens, D.; Donders, S.; Vandepitte, D.

    2012-10-01

    This paper deals with the design and optimisation for crashworthiness of a vehicle bumper subsystem, which is a key scenario for vehicle component design. The automotive manufacturers and suppliers have to find optimal design solutions for such subsystems that comply with the conflicting requirements of the regulatory bodies regarding functional performance (safety and repairability) and regarding the environmental impact (mass). For the bumper design challenge, an integrated methodology for multi-attribute design engineering of mechanical structures is set up. The integrated process captures the various tasks that are usually performed manually, this way facilitating the automated design iterations for optimisation. Subsequently, an optimisation process is applied that takes the effect of parametric uncertainties into account, such that the system level of failure possibility is acceptable. This optimisation process is referred to as possibility-based design optimisation and integrates the fuzzy FE analysis applied for the uncertainty treatment in crash simulations. This process is the counterpart of the reliability-based design optimisation used in a probabilistic context with statistically defined parameters (variabilities).

  12. Near-infrared mapping spectrometer optical subsystem development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) is one of the four remote-sensing science instruments of the Galileo Orbiter scientific payload. The NIMS scientific objectives require operating the detector and optical subsystem at cryogenic temperatures. The necessity of assembling, aligning, and testing the optics at room temperature and meeting design specifications at the cryogenic operating temperature (130 K) presented a set of challenging technical problems. A systematic approach to the development of athermalized mounts and supporting structures for optical components is described. A technique utilizing the visible spectral range and supplementary ray-trace information for alignment of an infrared instrument is presented. The optical subsystem point-spread function and spatial and spectral resolution were determined at room temperature using selected spectral and spatial targets. Based on thermal-distortion analyses of the structure and mounts, compensators were selected, implemented, and verified at cryogenic temperatures. The selection of the compensator and the overall system performance were verified in a thermal vacuum chamber. Various external and internal calibration targets were used.

  13. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the instrumentation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Instrumentation Subsystem are documented. The Instrumentation Subsystem (SS) consists of transducers, signal conditioning equipment, pulse code modulation (PCM) encoding equipment, tape recorders, frequency division multiplexers, and timing equipment. For this analysis, the SS is broken into two major groupings: Operational Instrumentation (OI) equipment and Modular Auxiliary Data System (MADS) equipment. The OI equipment is required to acquire, condition, scale, digitize, interleave/multiplex, format, and distribute operational Orbiter and payload data and voice for display, recording, telemetry, and checkout. It also must provide accurate timing for time critical functions for crew and payload specialist use. The MADS provides additional instrumentation to measure and record selected pressure, temperature, strain, vibration, and event data for post-flight playback and analysis. MADS data is used to assess vehicle responses to the flight environment and to permit correlation of such data from flight to flight. The IOA analysis utilized available SS hardware drawings and schematics for identifying hardware assemblies and components and their interfaces. Criticality for each item was assigned on the basis of the worst-case effect of the failure modes identified.

  14. Rotating field collector subsystem phase 1 study and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Eibling, J. A.

    1982-10-01

    The rotating field collector system is an alternative concept in which all heliostats are mounted on a single large platform which rotates around a tower to track the azumuthal angle of the Sun. Each heliostat is mounted to the platform with appropriate pivots, linkage, and controls to provide the additional positioning required to properly direct the solar radiation onto the receiver. The results are presented of the first phase of a study to investigate the technical and economic merits of a particular type of rotating field collector subsystem. The large pie-shaped platform would revolve over an array of support pedestals by means of a roller at the top of each pedestal. Several heliostats were built to demonstrate their construction features, and the operation of both flat and amphitheater rotating fields was studied. Work included an analysis of the concepts, development of modifications and additions to make the system comply with design criteria, and cost estimates to be used for comparison with other heliostat subsystems. Because of considerably high cost estimates, the focus of a large part of the study was directed toward developing lower cost designs of major components.

  15. ARES I Upper Stage Subsystems Design and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Senick, Paul F.; Tolbert, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    From 2005 through early 2011, NASA conducted concept definition, design, and development of the Ares I launch vehicle. The Ares I was conceived to serve as a crew launch vehicle for beyond-low-Earth-orbit human space exploration missions as part of the Constellation Program Architecture. The vehicle was configured with a single shuttle-derived solid rocket booster first stage and a new liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen upper stage, propelled by a single, newly developed J-2X engine. The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle was to be mated to the forward end of the Ares I upper stage through an interface with fairings and a payload adapter. The vehicle design passed a Preliminary Design Review in August 2008, and was nearing the Critical Design Review when efforts were concluded as a result of the Constellation Program s cancellation. At NASA Glenn Research Center, four subsystems were developed for the Ares I upper stage. These were thrust vector control (TVC) for the J-2X, electrical power system (EPS), purge and hazardous gas (P&HG), and development flight instrumentation (DFI). The teams working each of these subsystems achieved 80 percent or greater design completion and extensive development testing. These efforts were extremely successful representing state-of-the-art technology and hardware advances necessary to achieve Ares I reliability, safety, availability, and performance requirements. This paper documents the designs, development test activity, and results.

  16. Satellite Power System (SPS) microwave subsystem impacts and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The impacts and benefits to society of the microwave subsystem resulting from the developing, construction and operating of a space solar power to earth, electric power delivery system are presented and discussed. The primary benefit (usable energy) is conveyed mainly in the fundamental frequency portion of the RF radiation beam that is intercepted and converted to electric power output. The small fraction of the microwave and other electromagnetic energy that does not end up in the electric utility grid, yields most of the subsystem impacts. The impacts range from harmonics and noise radiated by the transmitting antenna, through potential interference with ionospheric communications and navigation caused by the power beam heating the ionosphere, to the potential large land area requirements for the rectennas and low level microwave radiation around the rectennas. Additional benefits range from a very low level of waste heat liberated and lack of atmospheric emissions including noise while operating to having no residual ionizing radiation from the rectenna when it is deactivated.

  17. Effects of ATP7A overexpression in mice on copper transport and metabolism in lactation and gestation

    PubMed Central

    Wadwa, Jarrod; Chu, Yu‐Hsiang; Nguyen, Nhu; Henson, Thomas; Figueroa, Alyssa; Llanos, Roxana; Ackland, Margaret Leigh; Michalczyk, Agnes; Fullriede, Hendrik; Brennan, Grant; Mercer, Julian F. B.; Linder, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Placentae and mammary epithelial cells are unusual in robustly expressing two copper “pumps”, ATP7A and B, raising the question of their individual roles in these tissues in pregnancy and lactation. Confocal microscopic evidence locates ATP7A to the fetal side of syncytiotrophoblasts, suggesting a role in pumping Cu towards the fetus; and to the basolateral (blood) side of lactating mammary epithelial cells, suggesting a role in recycling Cu to the blood. We tested these concepts in wild‐type C57BL6 mice and their transgenic counterparts that expressed hATP7A at levels 10–20× those of endogenous mAtp7a. In lactation, overexpression of ATP7A reduced the Cu concentrations of the mammary gland and milk ~50%. Rates of transfer of tracer 64Cu to the suckling pups were similarly reduced over 30–48 h, as was the total Cu in 10‐day ‐old pups. During the early and middle periods of gestation, the transgenic litters had higher Cu concentrations than the wild‐type, placental Cu showing the reverse trend; but this difference was lost by the first postnatal day. The transgenic mice expressed ATP7A in some hepatocytes, so we investigated the possibility that metalation of ceruloplasmin (Cp) might be enhanced. Rates of 64Cu incorporation into Cp, oxidase activity, and ratios of holo to apoceruloplasmin were unchanged. We conclude that in the lactating mammary gland, the role of ATP7A is to return Cu to the blood, while in the placenta it mediates Cu delivery to the fetus and is the rate‐limiting step for fetal Cu nutrition during most of gestation in mice. PMID:24744874

  18. On the subsystem formulation of linear-response time-dependent DFT.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele

    2013-05-28

    A new and thorough derivation of linear-response subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is presented and analyzed in detail. Two equivalent derivations are presented and naturally yield self-consistent subsystem TD-DFT equations. One reduces to the subsystem TD-DFT formalism of Neugebauer [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134116 (2007)]. The other yields Dyson type equations involving three types of subsystem response functions: coupled, uncoupled, and Kohn-Sham. The Dyson type equations for subsystem TD-DFT are derived here for the first time. The response function formalism reveals previously hidden qualities and complications of subsystem TD-DFT compared with the regular TD-DFT of the supersystem. For example, analysis of the pole structure of the subsystem response functions shows that each function contains information about the electronic spectrum of the entire supersystem. In addition, comparison of the subsystem and supersystem response functions shows that, while the correlated response is subsystem additive, the Kohn-Sham response is not. Comparison with the non-subjective partition DFT theory shows that this non-additivity is largely an artifact introduced by the subjective nature of the density partitioning in subsystem DFT.

  19. The development of the intrinsic functional connectivity of default network subsystems from age 3 to 5.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yaqiong; Zhai, Hongchang; Friederici, Angela D; Jia, Fucang

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, research on human functional brain imaging using resting-state fMRI techniques has been increasingly prevalent. The term "default mode" was proposed to describe a baseline or default state of the brain during rest. Recent studies suggested that the default mode network (DMN) is comprised of two functionally distinct subsystems: a dorsal-medial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) subsystem involved in self-oriented cognition (i.e., theory of mind) and a medial temporal lobe (MTL) subsystem engaged in memory and scene construction; both subsystems interact with the anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC) and posterior cingulate (PCC) as the core regions of DMN. The present study explored the development of DMN core regions and these two subsystems in both hemispheres from 3- to 5-year-old children. The analysis of the intrinsic activity showed strong developmental changes in both subsystems, and significant changes were specifically found in MTL subsystem, but not in DMPFC subsystem, implying distinct developmental trajectories for DMN subsystems. We found stronger interactions between the DMPFC and MTL subsystems in 5-year-olds, particularly in the left subsystems that support the development of environmental adaptation and relatively complex mental activities. These results also indicate that there is stronger right hemispheric lateralization at age 3, which then changes as bilateral development gradually increases through to age 5, suggesting in turn the hemispheric dominance in DMN subsystems changing with age. The present results provide primary evidence for the development of DMN subsystems in early life, which might be closely related to the development of social cognition in childhood.

  20. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenhagen, Jason Alan

    2003-01-01

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca2+ imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca2+ signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K+ and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol

  1. A taste for ATP: neurotransmission in taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Not only is ATP a ubiquitous source of energy but it is also used widely as an intercellular signal. For example, keratinocytes release ATP in response to numerous external stimuli including pressure, heat, and chemical insult. The released ATP activates purinergic receptors on nerve fibers to generate nociceptive signals. The importance of an ATP signal in epithelial-to-neuronal signaling is nowhere more evident than in the taste system. The receptor cells of taste buds release ATP in response to appropriate stimulation by tastants and the released ATP then activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on the taste nerves. Genetic ablation of the relevant P2X receptors leaves an animal without the ability to taste any primary taste quality. Of interest is that release of ATP by taste receptor cells occurs in a non-vesicular fashion, apparently via gated membrane channels. Further, in keeping with the crucial role of ATP as a neurotransmitter in this system, a subset of taste cells expresses a specific ectoATPase, NTPDase2, necessary to clear extracellular ATP which otherwise will desensitize the P2X receptors on the taste nerves. The unique utilization of ATP as a key neurotransmitter in the taste system may reflect the epithelial rather than neuronal origins of the receptor cells. PMID:24385952

  2. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO4 (2-)), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO4 (2-)-activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5(')-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S(2-)) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes.

  3. Release of extracellular ATP by bacteria during growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is used as an intracellular energy source by all living organisms. It plays a central role in the respiration and metabolism, and is the most important energy supplier in many enzymatic reactions. Its critical role as the energy storage molecule makes it extremely valuable to all cells. Results We report here the detection of extracellular ATP in the cultures of a variety of bacterial species. The levels of the extracellular ATP in bacterial cultures peaked around the end of the log phase and decreased in the stationary phase of growth. Extracellular ATP levels were dependent on the cellular respiration as bacterial mutants lacking cytochrome bo oxidase displayed lower extracellular ATP levels. We have also shown that Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella actively depleted extracellular ATP and an ATP supplement in culture media enhanced the stationary survival of E. coli and Salmonella. In addition to E. coli and Salmonella the presence of the extracellular ATP was observed in a variety of bacterial species that contain human pathogens such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus. Conclusion Our results indicate that extracellular ATP is produced by many bacterial species during growth and extracellular ATP may serve a role in the bacterial physiology. PMID:24364860

  4. Role of ATP-bound divalent metal ion in the conformation and function of actin. Comparison of Mg-ATP, Ca-ATP, and metal ion-free ATP-actin.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Ranc, C; Carlier, M F

    1991-04-25

    The fluorescence of N-acetyl-N'-(sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (AEDANS) covalently bound to Cys-374 of actin is used as a probe for different conformational states of G-actin according to whether Ca-ATP, Mg-ATP, or unchelated ATP is bound to the nucleotide site. Upon addition of large amounts (greater than 10(2)-fold molar excess) of EDTA to G-actin, metal ion-free ATP-G-actin is obtained with EDTA bound. Metal ion free ATP-G-actin is characterized by a higher AEDANS fluorescence than Mg-ATP-G-actin, which itself has a higher fluorescence than Ca-ATP-G-actin. Evidence for EDTA binding to G-actin is shown using difference spectrophotometry. Upon binding of EDTA, the rate of dissociation of the divalent metal ion from G-actin is increased (2-fold for Ca2+, 10-fold for Mg2+) in a range of pH from 7.0 to 8.0. A model is proposed that quantitatively accounts for the kinetic data. The affinity of ATP is weakened 10(6)-fold upon removal of the metal ion. Metal ion-free ATP-G-actin is in a partially open conformation, as indicated by the greater accessibility of -SH residues, yet it retains functional properties of polymerization and ATP hydrolysis that appear almost identical to those of Ca-ATP-actin, therefore different from those of Mg-ATP-actin. These results are discussed in terms of the role of the ATP-bound metal ion in actin structure and function.

  5. Flexible Foam Protection Materials for Constellation Space Suit Element Portable Life Support Subsystem Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Thomas, Gretchen A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the effort in evaluating and selecting a light weight impact protection material for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) conceptual packaging study. A light weight material capable of holding and protecting the components inside the PLSS is required to demonstrate the viability of the flexible PLSS packaging concept. The material needs to distribute, dissipate, and absorb the impact energy of the PLSS falling on the lunar surface. It must also be very robust and function in the extreme lunar thermal vacuum environment for up to one hundred Extravehicular Activity (EVA) missions. This paper documents the performance requirements for selecting a foam protection material, and the methodologies for evaluating commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) foam protection materials. It also presents the materials properties test results and impact drop test results of the various foam materials evaluated in the study. The findings from this study suggest that a foam based flexible protection system is a viable solution for PLSS packaging. However, additional works are needed to optimize COTS foam properties or to develop a composite foam system that will meet all the performance requirements for the CSSE PLSS flexible packaging.

  6. Developments in Nano-Satellite Structural Subsystem Design at NASA-GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter; Panetta, Peter V.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA-GSFC Nano-satellite Technology Development Program will enable flying constellations of tens to hundreds of nano-satellites for future NASA Space and Earth Science missions. Advanced technology components must be developed to make these future spacecraft compact, lightweight, low-power, low-cost, and survivable to a radiation environment over a two-year mission lifetime. This paper describes the efforts underway to develop lightweight, low cost, and multi-functional structures, serviceable designs, and robust mechanisms. As designs shrink, the integration of various subsystems becomes a vital necessity. This paper also addresses structurally integrated electrical power, attitude control, and thermal systems. These innovations bring associated fabrication, integration, and test challenges. Candidate structural materials and processes are examined and the merits of each are discussed. Design and fabrication processes include flat stock composite construction, cast aluminum-beryllium alloy, and an injection molded fiber-reinforced plastic. A viable constellation deployment scenario is described as well as a Phase-A Nano-satellite Pathfinder study.

  7. Robust operative diagnosis as problem solving in a hypothesis space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an approach that formulates diagnosis of physical systems in operation as problem solving in a hypothesis space. Such a formulation increases robustness by: (1) incremental hypotheses construction via dynamic inputs, (2) reasoning at a higher level of abstraction to construct hypotheses, and (3) partitioning the space by grouping fault hypotheses according to the type of physical system representation and problem solving techniques used in their construction. It was implemented for a turbofan engine and hydraulic subsystem. Evaluation of the implementation on eight actual aircraft accident cases involving engine faults provided very promising results.

  8. Subsystem Quantum Mechanics and its Applications to Crystalline Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Pengfei

    This thesis reports results of the author's investigations along the theme that both dynamic and static properties of molecules and solids can be expressed in terms of their parts from theoretical and applied aspects. Specifically, the following four main results are obtained: (1) A topological analysis of the charge density in crystals has been developed. This is an extension of the theory of molecular structure to crystalline systems. Relationships between the bulk properties of a crystal and its topological structure have been established. A comparison of the topological properties of molecules and crystals have been made. (2) The theory of atoms in molecules has been extended to a crystal and yields a variational definition of a Wigner-Seitz cell. This definition maximizes the relation of the cell to the physical form exhibited by the charge density and the derived structure factors that account, in a natural way, for the observed intensities of scattered electrons and X-rays. It has been demonstrated that the theory of atoms in molecules and crystals can provide a way to model the behaviour of solids. This is done through the use of the fact that atomic properties are often transferable from one system to another. (3) The subsystem variational principle has been reformulated in terms of quantum field theoretical language and the subsystem Feynman path integrals of electrons have been obtained using the coherent representation. This part contributes to the foundation of the theory of atoms in molecules and crystals. (4) Both dynamic and static quantum mechanical subspace techniques have been extensively investigated. A new variational method has been derived for embedding one system in another using the R-matrix formalism within the density functional approach. A formal subspace perturbation scheme has been proposed. These methods aim to obtain the charge distribution of a subsystem starting from known reference systems. Before I came here I was confused about

  9. Paradox applications integration ATP`s for MAC and mass balance programs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.; Mullaney, J.E.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Material Balance (MBA) database system were set up to run under one common applications program. This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness. The scope of the tests is minimal, since both MAC and MBA have already been tested in detail as stand-alone programs.

  10. Fluorescent ATP analog mant-ATP reports dynein activity in the isolated Chlamydomonas axoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilova, Maria; Howard, Jonathon

    Eukaryotic flagella are long rod-like extensions of cells, which play a fundamental role in single cell movement, as well as in fluid transport. Flagella contain a highly evolutionary conserved mechanical structure called the axoneme. The motion of the flagellum is generated by dynein motor proteins located all along the length of the axoneme. How the force production of motors is controlled spatially and temporally is still an open question. Therefore, monitoring dynein activity in the axonemal structure is expected to provide novel insights in regulation of the beat. We use high sensitivity fluorescence microscopy to monitor the binding and hydrolysis kinetics of the fluorescently labeled ATP analogue mant-ATP (2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate), which is known to support dynein activity. By studying the kinetics of mant-ATP fluorescence, we identified distinct mant-ATP binding sites in the axoneme. The application of this method to axonemes with reduced amounts of dynein, showed evidence that one of the sites is associated with binding to dynein. In the future, we would like to use this method to find the spatial distribution of dynein activity in the axoneme.

  11. ATP alone triggers the outward facing conformation of the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Duong, Franck

    2013-02-01

    The maltose transporter MalFGK(2) is a study prototype for ABC importers. During catalysis, the MalFG membrane domain alternates between inward and outward facing conformations when the MalK dimer closes and hydrolyzes ATP. Because a rapid ATP hydrolysis depends on MalE and maltose, it has been proposed that closed liganded MalE facilitates the transition to the outward facing conformation. Here we find that, in contrast to the expected, ATP is sufficient for the closure of MalK and for the conversion of MalFG to the outward facing state. The outward facing transporter binds MalE with nanomolar affinity, yet neither MalE nor maltose is necessary or facilitates the transition. Thus, the rapid hydrolysis of ATP observed in the presence of MalE and maltose is not because closed liganded MalE accelerates the formation of the outward facing conformation. These findings have fundamental implications for the description of the transport reaction.

  12. ATP-sensitive K+ channels in rat pancreatic beta-cells: modulation by ATP and Mg2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, F M; Kakei, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp method was used to study the effects of MgATP, free ATP and Mg2+ on single ATP-sensitive K+ channel currents in rat pancreatic beta-cells. 2. Magnesium ions caused a marked reduction of channel activity: 5 mM-free Mg2+ produced a 50% reduction in the activity of inward currents recorded at -60 mV in symmetrical K+ concentrations. 3. Inhibition of channel activity by MgATP does not involve phosphorylation as both free ATP (i.e. ATP in the absence of divalent cations) and non-hydrolysable ATP analogues were effective inhibitors. 4. Magnesium ions produced a striking reduction in the ability of ATP (total) to inhibit channel activity. When channel activity was plotted as a function of the total ATP concentration, the Ki for channel inhibition was 4 microM in Mg2(+)-free solution, compared to a Ki of 26 microM in the presence of 2 mM-Mg2+. The shape of the relationship between channel activity and the total ATP concentration was not changed by Mg2+. When channel activity was plotted as a function of the free ATP concentration, however, Mg2+ had little effect on Ki. This suggests that free ATP is the more potent inhibitor of channel activity and that MgATP has little inhibitory effect. 5. ATP analogues that dissociate only as far as the tribasic form were also able to inhibit channel activity. This suggests that both ATP4- and ATPH3- can block the channel. 6. Like ATP, ADP was more effective at inhibiting channel activity in the absence of Mg2+, that is as the free base. The non-hydrolysable ATP analogues AMP-PNP and AMP-PCP, however, were more effective in the presence of Mg2+. 7. It is suggested that (1) the potency of inhibition is related to the amount of negative charge carried by the ion and (2) the intracellular concentration of free ATP will be an important modulator of channel activity in the intact beta-cell. PMID:2691645

  13. Understanding the requirements imposed by programming model middleware on a common communication subsystem.

    SciTech Connect

    Buntinas, D.; Gropp, W.

    2005-12-13

    In high-performance parallel computing, most programming-model middleware libraries and runtime systems use a communication subsystem to abstract the lower-level network layer. The functionality required of a communication subsystem depends largely on the programming model implemented by the middleware. In order to maximize performance, middleware libraries and runtime systems typically implement their own communication subsystems that are specially tuned for the middleware, rather than use an existing communication subsystem. This situation leads to duplicated effort and prevents different middleware libraries from being used by the same application in hybrid programming models. In this paper we describe features required by various middleware libraries as well as some desirable features that would make it easier to port a middleware library to the communication subsystem and allow the middleware to make use of high-performance features provided by some networking layers. We show that none of the communication subsystems that we evaluate support all of the features.

  14. A development and integration analysis of commercial and in-house control subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.M.; Dalesio, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    The acquisition and integration of commercial automation and control subsystems in physics research is becoming more common. It is presumed these systems present lower risk and less cost. This paper studies four subsystems used in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) resonance-control cooling subsystem (RCCS), the high-power RF subsystem and the RFQ vacuum subsystem were outsourced; the low-level RF (LLRF) subsystem was developed in-house. Based on the authors experience a careful evaluation of the costs and risks in acquisition, implementation, integration, and maintenance associated with these approaches is given.

  15. ATP system target for performance scoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerler, Timothy; Dowling, James A.; Dillow, Michael A.; Sebesta, Henry R.

    1997-06-01

    The US Air Force Phillips Laboratory is developing the High Altitude Balloon Experiment (HABE) to investigate acquisition, tracking, and pointing concepts to be employed in engagements against boosting missiles in near-space environments. In its most stressing test, HABE employs the Inertial Pseudo Star Reference Unit to provide inertially stabilized line-of-sights (LOSs) for an illuminator laser, active fine track camera, and the marker scoring. The latter serves to measure and score the payload's laser pointing performance. HABE's LOS stabilization subsystem and marker laser pointing are required to demonstrate jitter and drift which is below 1 (mu) rad RMS, a requirement which stresses testing capabilities. At present, a system does not exist to characterize and score the lasers used on this and other experiments at the target plane. This paper will address a concept to provide accurate characterization of laser systems in the far-field target plane.

  16. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  17. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  18. SNAP-27/ALSEP power subsystem used in the Apollo program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remini, W. C.; Grayson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) measures lunar physical and environmental characteristics and transmits the data to receiving stations on earth. The data are used to derive information on the composition and structure of the moon. The electrical power subsystem generates and conditions all the electrical power for operations of the ALSEP system. The power source for the ALSEP is the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). The generator produces electricity by thermoelectric conversion. The radioactive isotope plutonium 238 is used as the energy source for the SNAP-27. By April 1, 1970, the SNAP-27 RTG had produced more than 230 kWh of continuous and stable power for the ALSEP.-

  19. Propellant Feed Subsystem for the X-34 Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, J. P.; Minor, R. B.; Knight, K. C.; Champion, R. H., Jr.; Russell, F. J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The Orbital Sciences Corporation X-34 vehicle demonstrates technologies and operations key to future reusable launch vehicles. The general flight performance goal of this unmanned rocket plane is Mach 8 flight at an altitude of 250,000 feet. The Main Propulsion System supplies liquid propellants to the main engine, which provides the primary thrust for attaining mission goals. Major NMS design and operational goals are aircraft-like ground operations, quick turnaround between missions, and low initial/operational costs. This paper reviews major design and analysis aspects of the X-34 propellant feed subsystem of the X-34 Main Propulsion System. Topics include system requirements, system design, the integration of flight and feed system performance, propellant acquisition at engine start, and propellant tank terminal drain.

  20. Lacie phase 1 Classification and Mensuration Subsystem (CAMS) rework experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.; Hsu, E. M.; Liszcz, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment was designed to test the ability of the Classification and Mensuration Subsystem rework operations to improve wheat proportion estimates for segments that had been processed previously. Sites selected for the experiment included three in Kansas and three in Texas, with the remaining five distributed in Montana and North and South Dakota. The acquisition dates were selected to be representative of imagery available in actual operations. No more than one acquisition per biophase were used, and biophases were determined by actual crop calendars. All sites were worked by each of four Analyst-Interpreter/Data Processing Analyst Teams who reviewed the initial processing of each segment and accepted or reworked it for an estimate of the proportion of small grains in the segment. Classification results, acquisitions and classification errors and performance results between CAMS regular and ITS rework are tabulated.

  1. An advanced carbon reactor subsystem for carbon dioxide reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Gary P.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the development status of an advanced carbon-reactor subsystem (ACRS) for the production of water and dense, solid carbon from CO2 and hydrogen, as required in physiochemical air revitalization systems for long-duration manned space missions. The ACRS consists of a Sabatier Methanation Reactor (SMR) that reduces CO2 with hydrogen to form methane and water, a gas-liquid separator to remove product water from the methane, and a Carbon Formation Reactor (CFR) to pyrolize methane to carbon and hydrogen; the carbon is recycled to the SMR, while the produce carbon is periodically removed from the CFR. A preprototype ACRS under development for the NASA Space Station is described.

  2. The Earth Observing System AM Spacecraft - Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, D.; Fredley, J.; Scott, C.

    1993-01-01

    Mission requirements for the EOS-AM Spacecraft intended to monitor global changes of the entire earth system are considered. The spacecraft is based on an instrument set containing the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT). Emphasis is placed on the design, analysis, development, and verification plans for the unique EOS-AM Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) aimed at providing the required environments for all the onboard equipment in a densely packed layout. The TCS design maximizes the use of proven thermal design techniques and materials, in conjunction with a capillary pumped two-phase heat transport system for instrument thermal control.

  3. Progress report for the scintillator plate calorimeter subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report covers the work completed in FY90 by ANL staff and those of Westinghouse STC and BICRON Corporation under subcontract to ANL towards the design of a compensating calorimeter based on the use of scintillator plate as the sensitive medium. It is presented as five task sections dealing with respectively mechanical design; simulation studies; optical system design; electronics development; development of rad hard plastic scintillator and wavelength shifter and a summary. The work carried out by the University of Tennessee under a subcontract from ANL is reported separately. Finally, as principal institution with responsibility for the overall management of this subsystem effort, the summary here reports the conclusions resulting from the work of the collaboration and their impact on our proposed direction of effort in FY91. This proposal, for obvious reasons is given separately.

  4. Performance characterization of a Bosch CO sub 2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of Bosch hardware at the subsystem level (up to five-person capacity) in terms of five operating parameters was investigated. The five parameters were: (1) reactor temperature, (2) recycle loop mass flow rate, (3) recycle loop gas composition (percent hydrogen), (4) recycle loop dew point and (5) catalyst density. Experiments were designed and conducted in which the five operating parameters were varied and Bosch performance recorded. A total of 12 carbon collection cartridges provided over approximately 250 hours of operating time. Generally, one cartridge was used for each parameter that was varied. The Bosch hardware was found to perform reliably and reproducibly. No startup, reaction initiation or carbon containment problems were observed. Optimum performance points/ranges were identified for the five parameters investigated. The performance curves agreed with theoretical projections.

  5. SSC detector muon sub-system beam tests

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.; Errede, S.; Gauthier, A.; Haney, M.; Karliner, I.; Liss, T.; O`Halloran, T.; Sheldon, P.; Simiatis, V.; Thaler, J.; Wiss, J.; Green, D.; Martin, P.; Morfin, J.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Okusawa, T.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Asano, Y.; Mann, T.; Davisson, R.; Liang, G.; Lubatti, H.; Wilkes, R.; Zhao, T.; Carlsmith, D.

    1993-08-01

    We propose to start a test-beam experiment at Fermilab studying the problems associated with tracking extremely high energy muons through absorbers. We anticipate that in this energy range the observation of the muons will be complicated by associated electromagnetic radiation Monte Carlo simulations of this background need to be tuned by direct observations. These beam tests are essential to determine important design parameters of a SSC muon detector, such as the choice of the tracking, geometry, hardware triggering schemes, the number of measuring stations, the amount of iron between measuring stations, etc. We intend to begin the first phase of this program in November of 1990 utilizing the Tevatron muon beam. We plan to measure the multiplicity, direction, and separation of secondary particles associated with the primary muon track as it emerges from an absorber. The second phase of beam test in 1992 or later will be a full scale test for the final design chosen in our muon subsystem proposal.

  6. Designing RF control subsystems using the VXIbus standard

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, J.D.; Vong, F.C.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-08-01

    Various components are being designed to control the RF system of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS). The associated control electronics (phase shifters, amplitude modulators, phase detectors, automatic tuning control, and local feedback control) are designed as modular cards with multiple channels for ease of replacement as well as for compact design. Various specifications of the VXIbus are listed and the method used to simplify the design of the control subsystem is shown. A commercial VXI interface board was used to speed the design cycle. Required manpower and actual task times are included. A discussion of the computer architecture and software development of the device drivers which allowed computer control from a VME processor located in a remote crate operating under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls Software (EPICS) program is also presented.

  7. Portable Life Support Subsystem Thermal Hydraulic Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce; Pinckney, John; Conger, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the current state of the thermal hydraulic modeling efforts being conducted for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The goal of these efforts is to provide realistic simulations of the PLSS under various modes of operation. The PLSS thermal hydraulic model simulates the thermal, pressure, flow characteristics, and human thermal comfort related to the PLSS performance. This paper presents modeling approaches and assumptions as well as component model descriptions. Results from the models are presented that show PLSS operations at steady-state and transient conditions. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are offered that summarize results, identify PLSS design weaknesses uncovered during review of the analysis results, and propose areas for improvement to increase model fidelity and accuracy.

  8. Principal Components Analysis of a JWST NIRSpec Detector Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Fixsen, D. J.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Lander, Matthew; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Mott, D. Brent; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna V.; Xenophontos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    We present principal component analysis (PCA) of a flight-representative James Webb Space Telescope NearInfrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) Detector Subsystem. Although our results are specific to NIRSpec and its T - 40 K SIDECAR ASICs and 5 m cutoff H2RG detector arrays, the underlying technical approach is more general. We describe how we measured the systems response to small environmental perturbations by modulating a set of bias voltages and temperature. We used this information to compute the systems principal noise components. Together with information from the astronomical scene, we show how the zeroth principal component can be used to calibrate out the effects of small thermal and electrical instabilities to produce cosmetically cleaner images with significantly less correlated noise. Alternatively, if one were designing a new instrument, one could use a similar PCA approach to inform a set of environmental requirements (temperature stability, electrical stability, etc.) that enabled the planned instrument to meet performance requirements

  9. Subsystem-based theoretical spectroscopy of biomolecules and biomolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Johannes

    2009-12-21

    The absorption properties of chromophores in biomolecular systems are subject to several fine-tuning mechanisms. Specific interactions with the surrounding protein environment often lead to significant changes in the excitation energies, but bulk dielectric effects can also play an important role. Moreover, strong excitonic interactions can occur in systems with several chromophores at close distances. For interpretation purposes, it is often desirable to distinguish different types of environmental effects, such as geometrical, electrostatic, polarization, and response (or differential polarization) effects. Methods that can be applied for theoretical analyses of such effects are reviewed herein, ranging from continuum and point-charge models to explicit quantum chemical subsystem methods for environmental effects. Connections to physical model theories are also outlined. Prototypical applications to optical spectra and excited states of fluorescent proteins, biomolecular photoreceptors, and photosynthetic protein complexes are discussed.

  10. An inverter/controller subsystem optimized for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, R. L.; Merrill, W. C.; Osullivan, G.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of solar array dc power to ac power stimulated the specification, design, and simulation testing of an inverter/controller subsystem tailored to the photovoltaic power source characteristics. This paper discusses the optimization of the inverter/controller design as part of an overall Photovoltaic Power System (PPS) designed for maximum energy extraction from the solar array. The special design requirements for the inverter/controller include: (1) a power system controller (PSC) to control continuously the solar array operating point at the maximum power level based on variable solar insolation and cell temperatures; and (2) an inverter designed for high efficiency at rated load and low losses at light loadings to conserve energy. It must be capable of operating connected to the utility line at a level set by an external controller (PSC).

  11. Beamed microwave power transmitting and receiving subsystems radiation characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measured characteristics of the spectrum of typical converters and the distribution of radiated Radio Frequency (RF) energy from the terminals (transmitting antenna and rectenna) of a beamed microwave power subsystem are presented for small transmitting and receiving S-band (2.45 GHz) subarrays. Noise and harmonic levels of tube and solid-state RF power amplifiers are shown. The RF patterns and envelope of a 64 element slotted waveguide antenna are given for the fundamental frequency and harmonics through the fifth. Reflected fundamental and harmonic patterns through the fourth for a 42 element rectenna subarray are presented for various dc load and illumination conditions. Bandwidth measurements for the waveguide antenna and rectenna are shown.

  12. Exterior spacecraft subsystem protective shielding analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1990-01-01

    All spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris. An effective mechanism is developed to protect external spacecraft subsystems against damage by ricochet particles formed during such impacts. Equations and design procedures for protective shield panels are developed based on observed ricochet phenomena and calculated ricochet particle sizes and speeds. It is found that the diameter of the most damaging ricochet debris particle can be as large as 40 percent of the original project tile diameter, and can travel at speeds between 24 and 36 percent of the original projectile impact velocity. Panel dimensions are shown to be strongly dependent on their inclination to the impact velocity vector and on their distribution around a spacecraft module. It is concluded that obliquity effects of high-speed impacts must be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  13. Principal components analysis of a JWST NIRSpec detector subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixsen, D. J.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Lander, Matthew; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Mott, D. Brent; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna V.; Xenophontos, Christos

    2013-09-01

    We present principal component analysis (PCA) of a flight-representative James Webb Space Telescope Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) Detector Subsystem. Although our results are specific to NIRSpec and its T ~ 40 K SIDECAR ASICs and 5 μm cutoff H2RG detector arrays, the underlying technical approach is more general. We describe how we measured the system's response to small environmental perturbations by modulating a set of bias voltages and temperature. We used this information to compute the system's principal noise components. Together with information from the astronomical scene, we show how the zeroth principal component can be used to calibrate out the effects of small thermal and electrical instabilities to produce cosmetically cleaner images with significantly less correlated noise. Alternatively, if one were designing a new instrument, one could use PCA to determine a set of environmental requirements (temperature stability, electrical stability, etc.) that enabled the planned instrument to meet performance requirements.

  14. Status of the Space Station water reclamation and management subsystem design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, R. M.; Mortazavi, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    A development status report is presented for the NASA Space Station's water reclamation and management (WRM) system, for which the candidate phase change-employing processing technologies are an air evaporation subsystem, a thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem, and the vapor compression distillation subsystem. These WRM candidates employ evaporation to effect water removal from contaminants, but differ in their control of the vapor/liquid interface in zero-gravity and in the recovery of the latent heat of vaporization.

  15. The human operator transfer function: Identification of the limb mechanics subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lynette A.; Hunter, Ian W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research is to decompose the performance of the human operator in terms of the subsystems that determine the operator's responses in order to establish how the dynamics of these component subsystems influence the operator's performance. In the present experiment, the dynamic stiffness of the human elbow joint was measured at rest and under different levels of biceps muscle activation; this work forms part of the analysis of the limb mechanics subsystem.

  16. A model for the emergence of adaptive subsystems.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, H; Gordon, M B; Perazzo, R; Risau-Gusman, S

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of learning and evolution in a changing environment. A stable learning capability is regarded as an emergent adaptive system evolved by natural selection of genetic variants. We consider the evolution of an asexual population. Each genotype can have 'fixed' and 'flexible' alleles. The former express themselves as synaptic connections that remain unchanged during ontogeny and the latter as synapses that can be adjusted through a learning algorithm. Evolution is modelled using genetic algorithms and the changing environment is represented by two optimal synaptic patterns that alternate a fixed number of times during the 'life' of the individuals. The amplitude of the change is related to the Hamming distance between the two optimal patterns and the rate of change to the frequency with which both exchange roles. This model is an extension of that of Hinton and Nowlan in which the fitness is given by a probabilistic measure of the Hamming distance to the optimum. We find that two types of evolutionary pathways are possible depending upon how difficult (costly) it is to cope with the changes of the environment. In one case the population loses the learning ability, and the individuals inherit fixed synapses that are optimal in only one of the environmental states. In the other case a flexible subsystem emerges that allows the individuals to adapt to the changes of the environment. The model helps us to understand how an adaptive subsystem can emerge as the result of the tradeoff between the exploitation of a congenital structure and the exploration of the adaptive capabilities practised by learning.

  17. Olfactory subsystems in the honeybee: sensory supply and sex specificity.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Jan; Kelber, Christina; Bieringer, Kathrin; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    The antennae of honeybee (Apis mellifera) workers and drones differ in various aspects. One striking difference is the presence of Sensilla basiconica in (female) workers and their absence in (male) drones. We investigate the axonal projection patterns of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) housed in S. basiconica in honeybee workers by using selective anterograde labeling with fluorescent tracers and confocal-microscopy analysis of axonal projections in antennal lobe glomeruli. Axons of S. basiconica-associated ORNs preferentially projected into a specific glomerular cluster in the antennal lobe, namely the sensory input-tract three (T3) cluster. T3-associated glomeruli had previously been shown to be innervated by uniglomerular projection (output) neurons of the medial antennal lobe tract (mALT). As the number of T3 glomeruli is reduced in drones, we wished to determine whether this was associated with the reduction of glomeruli innervated by medial-tract projection neurons. We retrogradely traced mALT projection neurons in drones and counted the innervated glomeruli. The number of mALT-associated glomeruli was strongly reduced in drones compared with workers. The preferential projections of S. basiconica-associated ORNs in T3 glomeruli together with the reduction of mALT-associated glomeruli support the presence of a female (worker)-specific olfactory subsystem that is partly innervated by ORNs from S. basiconica and is associated with the T3 cluster of glomeruli and mALT projection neurons. We propose that this olfactory subsystem supports parallel olfactory processing related to worker-specific olfactory tasks such as the coding of colony odors, colony pheromones and/or odorants associated with foraging on floral resources.

  18. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  19. ATP6AP1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    ATP6AP1 is an integral membrane protein composed of at least 10 subunits. It is responsible for acidifying various eukaryotic intracellular organelles. ATP6AP1, also known as vacuolar ATPase or V-ATPase, has a cytosolic V1 domain and a transmembrane V0 domain. The acidification performed by ATP6AP1 is necessary for intracellular processes such as protein sorting, zymogen activation, and receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  20. Phosphorylation Hypothesis: A Fourth Sink of ATP for Cellular Information Processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule is used in living cells as a universal ``energy currency.'' The Gibbs free energy liberated from hydrolysis reaction of ATP to ADP + Pi is used for (a) biosynthesis, (b) ionic and neutral molecular pumping, and (c) mechanical movement. They are known collectively as the three major energy sinks at the cellular level. Using biochemical activities of various enzymes, a cell carries out information processing, known as signal transduction. Essentially all signal transduction reactions also require ATP (or GTP) hydrolysis. In the past, such energy dissipative reactions are considered as ``futile.'' However, it is clear that the free energy derived from a futile cycle is used to correct errors in biomolecular recognition, improve robustness in cell development, overcome Boltzmann's equilibrium law of probability, and drive Maxwell's demons (one notes that Gibbs' chemical potential is a thermodynamic force without mechanical interpretation). The free energy involved in processing information will be explained in terms of stochastic entropy production -- the central concept in irreversible and nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS) thermodynamics.

  1. Engineering robust intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Ali, S. M. Alhaj; Ghaffari, M.; Liao, X.; Cao, M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenge of engineering robust intelligent robots. Robust intelligent robots may be considered as ones that not only work in one environment but rather in all types of situations and conditions. Our past work has described sensors for intelligent robots that permit adaptation to changes in the environment. We have also described the combination of these sensors with a "creative controller" that permits adaptive critic, neural network learning, and a dynamic database that permits task selection and criteria adjustment. However, the emphasis of this paper is on engineering solutions which are designed for robust operations and worst case situations such as day night cameras or rain and snow solutions. This ideal model may be compared to various approaches that have been implemented on "production vehicles and equipment" using Ethernet, CAN Bus and JAUS architectures and to modern, embedded, mobile computing architectures. Many prototype intelligent robots have been developed and demonstrated in terms of scientific feasibility but few have reached the stage of a robust engineering solution. Continual innovation and improvement are still required. The significance of this comparison is that it provides some insights that may be useful in designing future robots for various manufacturing, medical, and defense applications where robust and reliable performance is essential.

  2. Preliminary design package for noncorrosive fluid subsystem, solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The preliminary evaluation includes drawings for subsystem definition, rationale for special handling, installation and maintenance tools, and an outline for hazard analysis, along with development and testing plans.

  3. Orbital maneuvering subsystem functional path analysis for performance monitoring fault detection and annunciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesler, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The functional paths of the Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) is defined. The operational flight instrumentation required for performance monitoring, fault detection, and annunciation is described. The OMS is a pressure fed rocket engine propulsion subsystem. One complete OMS shares each of the two auxiliary propulsion subsystem pods with a reaction control subsystem. Each OMS is composed of a pressurization system, a propellant tanking system, and a gimbaled rocket engine. The design, development, and operation of the system are explained. Diagrams of the system are provided.

  4. Functional Performance of an Enabling Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem Architecture for Deep Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Frederick, Kenneth R.; Greenwood, Zachary W.; Kayatin, Matthew J.; Newton, Robert L.; Parrish, Keith J.; Roman, Monsi C.; Takada, Kevin C.; Miller, Lee A.; Scott, Joseph P.; Stanley, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    A subsystem architecture derived from the International Space Station's (ISS) Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) has been functionally demonstrated. This ISS-derived architecture features re-arranged unit operations for trace contaminant control and carbon dioxide removal functions, a methane purification component as a precursor to enhance resource recovery over ISS capability, operational modifications to a water electrolysis-based oxygen generation assembly, and an alternative major atmospheric constituent monitoring concept. Results from this functional demonstration are summarized and compared to the performance observed during ground-based testing conducted on an ISS-like subsystem architecture. Considerations for further subsystem architecture and process technology development are discussed.

  5. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. )

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  6. Intracellular Assessment of ATP Levels in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Palikaras, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells heavily depend on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generated by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) within mitochondria. ATP is the major energy currency molecule, which fuels cell to carry out numerous processes, including growth, differentiation, transportation and cell death among others (Khakh and Burnstock, 2009). Therefore, ATP levels can serve as a metabolic gauge for cellular homeostasis and survival (Artal-Sanz and Tavernarakis, 2009; Gomes et al., 2011; Palikaras et al., 2015). In this protocol, we describe a method for the determination of intracellular ATP levels using a bioluminescence approach in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:28194429

  7. ATP11B Mediates Platinum Resistance in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    A2780-CP20 cells (Supplemental Figure 7). To exam- ine the subcellular localization of ATP11B by immunofluorescence staining, we used specific cell...presence of 2 μM cisplatin, ATP11B was found in the nuclei of a limited number of cells. To further analyze the subcellular local - ization of ATP11B in the...TGN (27, 28). Our pharmacological studies demonstrated that both of these Figure 5 Subcellular localization of ATP11B in cisplatin-sensitive and

  8. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  9. A hierarchy of ATP-consuming processes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Buttgereit, F; Brand, M D

    1995-01-01

    The rates of different ATP-consuming reactions were measured in concanavalin A-stimulated thymocytes, a model system in which more than 80% of the ATP consumption can be accounted for. There was a clear hierarchy of the responses of different energy-consuming reactions to changes in energy supply: pathways of macromolecule biosynthesis (protein synthesis and RNA/DNA synthesis) were most sensitive to energy supply, followed by sodium cycling and then calcium cycling across the plasma membrane. Mitochondrial proton leak was the least sensitive to energy supply. Control analysis was used to quantify the relative control over ATP production exerted by the individual groups of ATP-consuming reactions. Control was widely shared; no block of reactions had more than one-third of the control. A fuller control analysis showed that there appeared to be a hierarchy of control over the flux through ATP: protein synthesis > RNA/DNA synthesis and substrate oxidation > Na+ cycling and Ca2+ cycling > other ATP consumers and mitochondrial proton leak. Control analysis also indicated that there was significant control over the rates of individual ATP consumers by energy supply. Each ATP consumer had strong control over its own rate but very little control over the rates of the other ATP consumers. Images Figure 3 PMID:7492307

  10. Imaging changes in the cytosolic ATP-to-ADP ratio

    PubMed Central

    Tantama, Mathew; Yellen, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a central metabolite that plays fundamental roles as an energy transfer molecule, a phosphate donor, and a signaling molecule inside cells. The phosphoryl group transfer potential of ATP provides a thermodynamic driving force for many metabolic reactions, and phosphorylation of both small metabolites and large proteins can serve as a regulatory modification. In the process of phosphoryl transfer from ATP, the diphosphate ADP is produced, and as a result, the ATP-to-ADP ratio is an important physiological control parameter. The ATP-to-ADP ratio is directly proportional to cellular energy charge and phosphorylation potential. Furthermore, several ATP-dependent enzymes and signaling proteins are regulated by ADP, and their activation profiles are a function of the ATP-to-ADP ratio. Finally, regeneration of ATP from ADP can serve as an important readout of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. We therefore developed a genetically-encoded fluorescent biosensor tuned to sense ATP-to-ADP ratios in the physiological range of healthy mammalian cells. Here we present a protocol for using this biosensor to visualize energy status using live-cell fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25416365

  11. Uncertainty analysis and robust trajectory linearization control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zhiqiang; Tan, Xiangmin; Fan, Guoliang; Yi, Jianqiang

    2014-08-01

    Flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicles feature significant uncertainties which pose huge challenges to robust controller designs. In this paper, four major categories of uncertainties are analyzed, that is, uncertainties associated with flexible effects, aerodynamic parameter variations, external environmental disturbances, and control-oriented modeling errors. A uniform nonlinear uncertainty model is explored for the first three uncertainties which lumps all uncertainties together and consequently is beneficial for controller synthesis. The fourth uncertainty is additionally considered in stability analysis. Based on these analyses, the starting point of the control design is to decompose the vehicle dynamics into five functional subsystems. Then a robust trajectory linearization control (TLC) scheme consisting of five robust subsystem controllers is proposed. In each subsystem controller, TLC is combined with the extended state observer (ESO) technique for uncertainty compensation. The stability of the overall closed-loop system with the four aforementioned uncertainties and additional singular perturbations is analyzed. Particularly, the stability of nonlinear ESO is also discussed from a Liénard system perspective. At last, simulations demonstrate the great control performance and the uncertainty rejection ability of the robust scheme.

  12. Investigation of whether in-room CT-based adaptive intracavitary brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer is robust against interfractional location variations of organs and/or applicators

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Yoshifumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nguyen, Tran Thi Thao; Hiraki, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hirata, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates whether in-room computed tomography (CT)-based adaptive treatment planning (ATP) is robust against interfractional location variations, namely, interfractional organ motions and/or applicator displacements, in 3D intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. In ATP, the radiation treatment plans, which have been designed based on planning CT images (and/or MR images) acquired just before the treatments, are adaptively applied for each fraction, taking into account the interfractional location variations. 2D and 3D plans with ATP for 14 patients were simulated for 56 fractions at a prescribed dose of 600 cGy per fraction. The standard deviations (SDs) of location displacements (interfractional location variations) of the target and organs at risk (OARs) with 3D ATP were significantly smaller than those with 2D ATP (P < 0.05). The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI) and tumor control probability (TCP) in 3D ATP were significantly higher for high-risk clinical target volumes than those in 2D ATP. The SDs of the HI, CI, TCP, bladder and rectum D2cc, and the bladder and rectum normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in 3D ATP were significantly smaller than those in 2D ATP. The results of this study suggest that the interfractional location variations give smaller impacts on the planning evaluation indices in 3D ATP than in 2D ATP. Therefore, the 3D plans with ATP are expected to be robust against interfractional location variations in each treatment fraction. PMID:27296250

  13. ATP25, a New Nuclear Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Required for Expression and Assembly of the Atp9p Subunit of Mitochondrial ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiaomei; Barros, Mario H.; Shulman, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    We report a new nuclear gene, designated ATP25 (reading frame YMR098C on chromosome XIII), required for expression of Atp9p (subunit 9) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial proton translocating ATPase. Mutations in ATP25 elicit a deficit of ATP9 mRNA and of its translation product, thereby preventing assembly of functional F0. Unlike Atp9p, the other mitochondrial gene products, including ATPase subunits Atp6p and Atp8p, are synthesized normally in atp25 mutants. Northern analysis of mitochondrial RNAs in an atp25 temperature-sensitive mutant confirmed that Atp25p is required for stability of the ATP9 mRNA. Atp25p is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein with a predicted mass of 70 kDa. The primary translation product of ATP25 is cleaved in vivo after residue 292 to yield a 35-kDa C-terminal polypeptide. The C-terminal half of Atp25p is sufficient to stabilize the ATP9 mRNA and restore synthesis of Atp9p. Growth on respiratory substrates, however, depends on both halves of Atp25p, indicating that the N-terminal half has another function, which we propose to be oligomerization of Atp9p into a proper size ring structure. PMID:18216280

  14. Evidence for the Synthesis of ATP by an F0F1 ATP Synthase in Membrane Vesicles from Halorubrum Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faguy, David; Lawson, Darion; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vesicles prepared in a buffer containing ADP, Mg(2+) and Pi synthesized ATP at an initial rate of 2 nmols/min/mg protein after acidification of the bulk medium (pH 8 (right arrow) 4). The intravesicular ATP concentration reached a steady state after about 30 seconds and slowly declined thereafter. ATP synthesis was inhibited by low concentrations of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and m-chlorophenylhydrazone indicating that synthesis took place in response to the proton gradient. NEM and PCMS, which inhibit vacuolar ATPases and the vacuolar-like ATPases of extreme halophiles, did not affect ATP synthesis, and, in fact, produced higher steady state levels of ATP. This suggested that two ATPase activities were present, one which catalyzed ATP synthesis and one that caused its hydrolysis. Azide, a specific inhibitor of F0F1 ATP Synthases, inhibited halobacterial ATP synthesis. The distribution of acridine orange as imposed by a delta pH demonstrated that azide inhibition was not due to the collapse of the proton gradient due to azide acting as a protonophore. Such an effect was observed, but only at azide concentrations higher than those that inhibited ATP synthesis. These results confirm the earler observations with cells of H. saccharovorum and other extreme halophiles that ATP synthesis is inconsistent with the operation of a vacuolar-like ATPase. Therefore, the observation that a vacuolar-like enzyme is responsible for ATP synthesis (and which serves as the basis for imputing ATP synthesis to the vacuolar-like ATPases of the extreme halophiles, and the Archaea in general) should be taken with some degree of caution.

  15. ATP dependent charge movement in ATP7B Cu+-ATPase is demonstrated by pre-steady state electrical measurements.

    PubMed

    Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Bartolommei, Gianluca; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Pilankatta, Rajendra; Lewis, David; Inesi, Giuseppe

    2010-11-19

    ATP7B is a copper dependent P-type ATPase, required for copper homeostasis. Taking advantage of high yield heterologous expression of recombinant protein, we investigated charge transfer in ATP7B. We detected charge displacement within a single catalytic cycle upon ATP addition and formation of phosphoenzyme intermediate. We attribute this charge displacement to movement of bound copper within ATP7B. Based on specific mutations, we demonstrate that enzyme activation by copper requires occupancy of a site in the N-terminus extension which is not present in other transport ATPases, as well as of a transmembrane site corresponding to the cation binding site of other ATPases.

  16. ATP7A trafficking and mechanisms underlying the distal motor neuropathy induced by mutations in ATP7A

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Diverse mutations in the gene encoding the copper transporter ATP7A lead to X-linked recessive Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome. Recently, two unique ATP7A mutations, T994I and P1386S, were shown to cause isolated adult-onset distal motor neuropathy. These mutations induce subtle defects in ATP7A intracellular trafficking resulting in preferential accumulation at the plasma membrane compared to wild-type ATP7A. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed abnormal interaction between ATP7AT994I and p97/VCP, a protein mutated in two autosomal dominant forms of motor neuron disease. Small-interfering RNA knockdown of p97/VCP corrected ATP7AT994I mislocalization. For ATP7AP1386S, flow cytometry documented that non-permeabilized fibroblasts bound a C-terminal ATP7A antibody, suggesting unstable insertion of the 8th transmembrane segment due to a helix-breaker effect of the amino acid substitution. This could sabotage interaction of ATP7AP1386S with adaptor protein complexes. These molecular events appear to selectively disturb normal motor neuron function and lead to neurologic illness that takes years and sometimes decades to develop. PMID:24754450

  17. ATP synthesis in Halobacterium saccharovorum: evidence that synthesis may be catalysed by an F0F1-ATP synthase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.

    1992-01-01

    Halobacterium saccharovorum synthesized ATP in response to a pH shift from 8 to 6.2. Synthesis was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chloro-phenylhydrazone, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and azide. Nitrate, an inhibitor of the membrane-bound ATPase previously isolated from this organism, did not inhibit ATP synthesis. N-Ethymaleimide, which also inhibited this ATPase, stimulated the production of ATP. These observations suggested that H. saccharovorum synthesized and hydrolysed ATP using different enzymes and that the vacuolar-like ATPase activity previously described in H. saccharovorum was an ATPase whose function is yet to be identified.

  18. Bcl-2 delays cell cycle through mitochondrial ATP and ROS.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Fu, Xufeng; Yao, Kun; Lan, Zhenwei; Xu, Hui; Cui, Qinghua; Yang, Elizabeth

    2017-02-22

    Bcl-2 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying G0/G1 to S phase entry. We tested the hypothesis that Bcl-2 regulates S phase entry through mitochondrial pathways. Existing evidence indicates mitochondrial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signals in cell survival and cell death, however, the molecular details of how these 2 processes are linked remain unknown. In this study, 2 cell lines stably expressing Bcl-2, 3T3Bcl-2 and C3HBcl-2, and vector-alone PB controls were arrested in G0/G1 phase by serum starvation and contact inhibition, and ATP and ROS were measured during re-stimulation of cell cycle entry. Both ATP and ROS levels were decreased in G0/G1 arrested cells compared with normal growing cells. In addition, ROS levels were significant lower in synchronized Bcl-2 cells than those in PB controls. After re-stimulation, ATP levels increased with time, reaching peak value 1-3 hours ahead of S phase entry for both Bcl-2 cells and PB controls. Consistent with 2 hours of S phase delay, Bcl-2 cells reached ATP peaks 2 hours later than PB control, which suggests a rise in ATP levels is required for S phase entry. To examine the role of ATP and ROS in cell cycle regulation, ATP and ROS level were changed. We observed that elevation of ATP accelerated cell cycle progression in both PB and Bcl-2 cells, and decrease of ATP and ROS to the level equivalent to Bcl-2 cells delayed S phase entry in PB cells. Our results support the hypothesis that Bcl-2 protein regulates mitochondrial metabolism to produce less ATP and ROS, which contributes to S phase entry delay in Bcl-2 cells. These findings reveal a novel mechanistic basis for understanding the link between mitochondrial metabolism and tumor-suppressive function of Bcl-2.

  19. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems.

  20. Robustness of spatial micronetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Thomas C.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Bagrow, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  1. Robust Control Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    106 A. 13 XSU ......................................... 108 A.14 DDTCON...................................... 108 A.15 DKFTR...operation is preserved. Although some papers (Refs 6 and 13 ) deal with robustness only in regard to parameter variations within the basic controlled...since these can ofter be neglected in actual implementation, a constant-gain time 13 ........................................ invariant solution with

  2. Robustness of spatial micronetworks.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Thomas C; Danforth, Christopher M; Bagrow, James P

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  3. Antagonistic regulation of native Ca2+- and ATP-sensitive cation channels in brain capillaries by nucleotides and decavanadate.

    PubMed

    Csanády, László; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2004-06-01

    Regulation by cytosolic nucleotides of Ca2+- and ATP-sensitive nonselective cation channels (CA-NSCs) in rat brain capillary endothelial cells was studied in excised inside-out patches. Open probability (Po) was suppressed by cytosolic nucleotides with apparent KI values of 17, 9, and 2 microM for ATP, ADP, and AMP, as a consequence of high-affinity inhibition of channel opening rate and low-affinity stimulation of closing rate. Cytosolic [Ca2+] and voltage affected inhibition of Po, but not of opening rate, by ATP, suggesting that the conformation of the nucleotide binding site is influenced only by the state of the channel gate, not by that of the Ca2+ and voltage sensors. ATP inhibition was unaltered by channel rundown. Nucleotide structure affected inhibitory potency that was little sensitive to base substitutions, but was greatly diminished by 3'-5' cyclization, removal of all phosphates, or complete omission of the base. In contrast, decavanadate potently (K1/2 = 90 nM) and robustly stimulated Po, and functionally competed with inhibitory nucleotides. From kinetic analyses we conclude that (a) ATP, ADP, and AMP bind to a common site; (b) inhibition by nucleotides occurs through simple reversible binding, as a consequence of tighter binding to the closed-channel relative to the open-channel conformation; (c) the conformation of the nucleotide binding site is not directly modulated by Ca2+ and voltage; (d) the differences in inhibitory potency of ATP, ADP, and AMP reflect their different affinities for the closed channel; and (e) though decavanadate is the only example found to date of a compound that stimulates Po with high affinity even in the presence of millimolar nucleotides, apparently by competing for the nucleotide binding site, a comparable mechanism might allow CA-NSC channels to open in living cells despite physiological levels of nucleotides. Decavanadate now provides a valuable tool for studying native CA-NSC channels and for screening cloned

  4. Mechanically driven ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Akira; Adachi, Kengo; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ryohei; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    ATP, the main biological energy currency, is synthesized from ADP and inorganic phosphate by ATP synthase in an energy-requiring reaction. The F1 portion of ATP synthase, also known as F1-ATPase, functions as a rotary molecular motor: in vitro its γ-subunit rotates against the surrounding α3β3 subunits, hydrolysing ATP in three separate catalytic sites on the β-subunits. It is widely believed that reverse rotation of the γ-subunit, driven by proton flow through the associated Fo portion of ATP synthase, leads to ATP synthesis in biological systems. Here we present direct evidence for the chemical synthesis of ATP driven by mechanical energy. We attached a magnetic bead to the γ-subunit of isolated F1 on a glass surface, and rotated the bead using electrical magnets. Rotation in the appropriate direction resulted in the appearance of ATP in the medium as detected by the luciferase-luciferin reaction. This shows that a vectorial force (torque) working at one particular point on a protein machine can influence a chemical reaction occurring in physically remote catalytic sites, driving the reaction far from equilibrium.

  5. The dark side of extracellular ATP in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Solini, Anna; Usuelli, Vera; Fiorina, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Intracellular ATP is the most vital source of cellular energy for biologic systems, whereas extracellular ATP is a multifaceted mediator of several cell functions via its interaction, in an autocrine or paracrine manner, with P2 purinergic receptors expressed on the cell surface. These ionotropic and metabotropic P2 purinergic receptors modulate a variety of physiologic events upon the maintenance of a highly sensitive "set point," the derangement of which may lead to the development of key pathogenic mechanisms during acute and chronic diseases. Growing evidence suggests that extracellular ATP signaling via P2 purinergic receptors may be involved in different renal pathologic conditions. For these reasons, investigators and pharmaceutical companies are actively exploring novel strategies to antagonize or block these receptors with the goal of reducing extracellular ATP production or accelerating extracellular ATP clearance. Targeting extracellular ATP signaling, particularly through the P2X7 receptor, has considerable translational potential, given that novel P2X7-receptor inhibitors are already available for clinical use (e.g., CE224,535, AZD9056, and GSK1482160). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the involvement of extracellular ATP and its P2 purinergic receptor-mediated signaling in physiologic and pathologic processes in the kidney; potential therapeutic options targeting extracellular ATP purinergic receptors are analyzed as well.

  6. Investigation of the association between ATP2B4 and ATP5B genes with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Geyik, Esra; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Pala, Elif; Suner, Ali; Borazan, Ersin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Bayraktar, Emine; Bayraktar, Recep; Ergun, Sercan; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Gokalp, Avni; Arslan, Ahmet

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops as a multi-step process which results from gradual accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor, and DNA repair genes. Mortality rate of CRC is very high. Therefore, development of alternative diagnostic methods which can be used in the early diagnosis is crucial. ATP2B4 gene encodes one of the four isoforms of p-type ATPase PMCA enzyme and bears critical importance in maintaining the balance of intracellular calcium homeostasis by providing the export of calcium ions out of the cell. ATP5B encodes a subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase which is an f-type ATPase. In this study, the relationship between ATP2B4 and ATP5B genes and CRC regarding gene expression was investigated. Study groups were constructed from a number of 50 patients (25 males, 25 females) with the mean age of 55.68 ± 9.4 and the gene expression levels in the healthy and cancerous tissues of the patients were compared by using semi-quantitative PCR and Real-Time PCR methods. As a result, in patients with rectum tumors, there was a significant relationship between ATP2B4 gene expression and the tumor location and in patients younger than 45 years, ATP5B gene expressions were detected significantly higher in tumor tissues by using RT-PCR. However, no significant relationship was detected in terms of expression differences of ATP2B4 and ATP5B genes between cancerous and healthy tissues of the CRC patients. ATP2B4 and ATP5B genes might have indirect associations in CRC pathogenesis and the investigation of their interactions with DNA repair and other related genes may help in understanding of CRC formation.

  7. Owens-Illinois subsystem design package for the SEC-601 air-cooled solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The subsystem design of the SEC-601 solar collector was evaluated. The collector is of modular design and is approximately 12 feet three inches wide and eight feet seven inches tall. It contains 72 collector tube elements and weighs approximately 300 pounds. Included in this report are the subsystem performance specifications and the assembly and installation drawings of the solar collectors and manifold.

  8. The Organization of the Distance Teaching Sub-System in an Open University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacon, Fabio J.

    The problem of finding an adequate organization for the distance teaching subsystem in the Open University of Venezuela (Universidad Nacional Abierta) is analyzed. Problems facing this subsystem concern: communications with the headquarters and within the learning centers network, interaction with the environment in order to create a favorable…

  9. Apollo experience report: Command and service module sequential events control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo command and service module sequential events control subsystem is described, with particular emphasis on the major systems and component problems and solutions. The subsystem requirements, design, and development and the test and flight history of the hardware are discussed. Recommendations to avoid similar problems on future programs are outlined.

  10. Selected Lessons Learned in Space Shuttle Orbiter Propulsion and Power Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Francisco J.; Martinez, Hugo; Ryan, Abigail; Westover, Shayne; Davies, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Over its 30 years of space flight history, plus the nearly 10 years of design, development test and evaluation, the Space Shuttle Orbiter is full of lessons learned in all of its numerous and complex subsystems. In the current paper, only selected lessons learned in the areas of the Orbiter propulsion and power subsystems will be described. The particular Orbiter subsystems include: Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), Hydraulics and Water Spray Boiler (WSB), Mechanical Flight Controls, Main Propulsion System (MPS), Fuel Cells and Power Reactant and Storage Devices (PRSD), Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), Reaction Control System (RCS), Electrical Power Distribution (EPDC), electrical wiring and pyrotechnics. Given the complexity and extensive history of each of these subsystems, and the limited scope of this paper, it is impossible to include most of the lessons learned; instead the attempt will be to present a selected few or key lessons, in the judgment of the authors. Each subsystem is presented separate, beginning with an overview of the hardware and their function, a short description of a few historical problems and their lessons, followed by a more comprehensive table listing of the major subsystem problems and lessons. These tables serve as a quick reference for lessons learned in each subsystem. In addition, this paper will establish common lessons across subsystems as well as concentrate on those lessons which are deemed to have the highest applicability to future space flight programs.

  11. Internet Use and Child Development: Validation of the Ecological Techno-Subsystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2010-01-01

    Johnson and Puplampu recently proposed the "ecological techno-subsystem", a refinement to Bronfenbrenner's theoretical organization of environmental influences on child development. The ecological techno-subsystem includes child interaction with both living (e.g., peers) and nonliving (e.g., hardware) elements of communication,…

  12. Development and testing of the data automation subsystem for the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The data automation subsystem designed and built as part of the Mariner Mars 1971 program, sequences and controls the science instruments and formats all science data. A description of the subsystem with emphasis on major changes relative to Mariner Mars 1969 is presented. In addition, the complete test phase is described.

  13. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems: Command and service module entry monitor subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reina, B., Jr.; Patterson, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual aspects of the command and service module entry monitor subsystem, together with an interpretation of the displays and their associated relationship to entry trajectory control, are presented. The entry monitor subsystem is described, and the problems encountered during the developmental phase and the first five manned Apollo flights are discussed in conjunction with the design improvements implemented.

  14. Does a Causal Relation Exist between the Functional Hemispheric Asymmetries of Visual Processing Subsystems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, David R.; Marsolek, Chad J.

    2005-01-01

    Past research indicates that specific shape recognition and spatial-relations encoding rely on subsystems that exhibit right-hemisphere advantages, whereas abstract shape recognition and spatial-relations encoding rely on subsystems that exhibit left-hemisphere advantages. Given these apparent regularities, we tested whether asymmetries in shape…

  15. Report of an international collaborative study to establish the suitability of using modified ATP assay for viable count of BCG vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei M; Markey, Kevin; Rigsby, Peter; Jensen, Sten E; Gairola, Sunil; Seki, Masaaki; Castello-Branco, Luiz R; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Corbel, Michael J

    2008-08-26

    As part of the World Health Organisation (WHO) initiative to update the current requirements for BCG vaccine a collaborative study was carried out to establish the robustness, reproducibility and the suitability of the modified ATP assay. This assay was developed by Statens Serum Institut, Denmark, as a potential replacement of the method for detection of viable counts of BCG vaccine which is routinely used as a quality control test for lot release. Two BCG preparations, of same strain but different production methods, were tested. For each preparation, two different storage conditions of -20 or 37 degrees C were used in order to establish the suitability of this assay for testing heat-treated BCG vaccine as in the temperature stability test. The lyophilised BCG samples were tested using the ATP reagents from the same source and same principle of testing but some procedural modifications were allowed to accommodate different equipment and resource availability in different laboratories. Data from four laboratories showed that the heat-treated BCG samples contained significantly lower ATP content per sample than the untreated control stored at -20 degrees C. Three laboratories gave consistent mean ATP contents, especially for control samples, even with variations in testing protocol. The present study showed that this modified ATP assay is very robust and can be reproducible. Once the correlation of cultural viable count and ATP content of a BCG vaccine product has been established, this rapid alternative assay may be used to monitor BCG viable count. Due to the fact that this study was small, further investigation is planned. A collaborative study will be carried out using this modified ATP assay in parallel with the cultural viable count method in the establishment of the replacement of the WHO International Reference Preparation of BCG vaccine.

  16. Robust algebraic image enhancement for intelligent control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Bao-Ting; Morrelli, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Robust vision capability for intelligent control systems has been an elusive goal in image processing. The computationally intensive techniques a necessary for conventional image processing make real-time applications, such as object tracking and collision avoidance difficult. In order to endow an intelligent control system with the needed vision robustness, an adequate image enhancement subsystem capable of compensating for the wide variety of real-world degradations, must exist between the image capturing and the object recognition subsystems. This enhancement stage must be adaptive and must operate with consistency in the presence of both statistical and shape-based noise. To deal with this problem, we have developed an innovative algebraic approach which provides a sound mathematical framework for image representation and manipulation. Our image model provides a natural platform from which to pursue dynamic scene analysis, and its incorporation into a vision system would serve as the front-end to an intelligent control system. We have developed a unique polynomial representation of gray level imagery and applied this representation to develop polynomial operators on complex gray level scenes. This approach is highly advantageous since polynomials can be manipulated very easily, and are readily understood, thus providing a very convenient environment for image processing. Our model presents a highly structured and compact algebraic representation of grey-level images which can be viewed as fuzzy sets.

  17. Radioprotective effects of ATP in human blood ex vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Swennen, Els L.R. Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Van den Beucken, Twan; Bast, Aalt

    2008-03-07

    Damage to healthy tissue is a major limitation of radiotherapy treatment of cancer patients, leading to several side effects and complications. Radiation-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines is thought to be partially responsible for the radiation-associated complications. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of extracellular ATP on markers of oxidative stress, radiation-induced inflammation and DNA damage in irradiated blood ex vivo. ATP inhibited radiation-induced TNF-{alpha} release and increased IL-10 release. The inhibitory effect of ATP on TNF- {alpha} release was completely reversed by adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate, indicating a P2Y{sub 11} mediated effect. Furthermore, ATP attenuated radiation-induced DNA damage immediate, 3 and 6 h after irradiation. Our study indicates that ATP administration alleviates radiation-toxicity to blood cells, mainly by inhibiting radiation-induced inflammation and DNA damage.

  18. System design of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 8: Command/data handling subsystems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesely, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    Study tasks for the command and data handling subsystems have been directed to: (1) determining ground data systems, (GDS) interfaces and deep space network (DSN) changes, if required, (2) defining subsystem requirements, (3) surveying existing hardware that could be used or modified to meet subsystem requirements, and (4) establishing a baseline design. Study of the existing GDS led to the conclusion that the Viking configuration GDS can be used with only minor changes required for the Pioneer Venus baseline. Those changes required are associated with providing a predetection recording capability used during probe entry and descent. Subsystem requirements were first formulated with sufficient latitude so that surveys of existing hardware could lead to low cost hardware which, in turn, could modify more narrowly defined subsystem requirements.

  19. Intracellular ATP can regulate afferent arteriolar tone via ATP-sensitive K+ channels in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, J N; Schnermann, J; Brosius, F C; Briggs, J P; Furspan, P B

    1992-01-01

    Studies were performed to assess whether ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels on rabbit preglomerular vessels can influence afferent arteriolar (AA) tone. K+ channels with a slope conductance of 258 +/- 13 (n = 7) pS and pronounced voltage dependence were demonstrated in excised patches from vascular smooth muscle cells of microdissected preglomerular segments. Channel activity was markedly reduced by 1 mM ATP and in a dose-dependent fashion by glibenclamide (10(-9) M to 10(-6) M), a specific antagonist of KATP channels. 10(-5) M diazoxide, a K+ channel opener, activated these channels in the presence of ATP, and this effect was also blocked by glibenclamide. To determine the role of these KATP channels in the control of vascular tone, diazoxide was tested on isolated perfused AA. After preconstriction from a control diameter of 13.1 +/- 1.1 to 3.5 +/- 2.1 microns with phenylephrine (PE), addition of 10(-5) M diazoxide dilated vessels to 11.2 +/- 0.7 microns, which was not different from control. Further addition of 10(-5) M glibenclamide reconstricted the vessels to 5.8 +/- 1.5 microns (n = 5; P less than 0.03). In support of its specificity for KATP channels, glibenclamide did not reverse verapamil induced dilation in a separate series of experiments. To determine whether intracellular ATP levels can effect AA tone, studies were conducted to test the effect of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose. After preconstriction from 13.4 +/- 3.2 to 7.7 +/- 1.3 microns with PE, bath glucose was replaced with 6 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Within 10 min, the arteriole dilated to a mean value of 11.8 +/- 1.4 microns (n = 6; NS compared to control). Subsequent addition of 10(-5) M glibenclamide significantly reconstricted the vessels to a diameter of 8.6 +/- 0.5 micron (P less than 0.04). These data demonstrate that KATP channels are present on the preglomerular vasculature and that changes in intracellular ATP can directly influence afferent arteriolar tone via these channels

  20. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naser A.; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO42-), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO42--activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S2-) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  1. Regulation of ClC-2 gating by intracellular ATP.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Gabriel; Teodorescu, Georgeta; Begemann, Birgit; Schubert, Julian; Nabbout, Rima; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Sander, Thomas; Nürnberg, Peter; Lerche, Holger; Fahlke, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    ClC-2 is a voltage-dependent chloride channel that activates slowly at voltages negative to the chloride reversal potential. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other nucleotides have been shown to bind to carboxy-terminal cystathionine-ß-synthase (CBS) domains of ClC-2, but the functional consequences of binding are not sufficiently understood. We here studied the effect of nucleotides on channel gating using single-channel and whole-cell patch clamp recordings on transfected mammalian cells. ATP slowed down macroscopic activation and deactivation time courses in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of the complete carboxy-terminus abolishes the effect of ATP, suggesting that CBS domains are necessary for ATP regulation of ClC-2 gating. Single-channel recordings identified long-lasting closed states of ATP-bound channels as basis of this gating deceleration. ClC-2 channel dimers exhibit two largely independent protopores that are opened and closed individually as well as by a common gating process. A seven-state model of common gating with altered voltage dependencies of opening and closing transitions for ATP-bound states correctly describes the effects of ATP on macroscopic and microscopic ClC-2 currents. To test for a potential pathophysiological impact of ClC-2 regulation by ATP, we studied ClC-2 channels carrying naturally occurring sequence variants found in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, G715E, R577Q, and R653T. All naturally occurring sequence variants accelerate common gating in the presence but not in the absence of ATP. We propose that ClC-2 uses ATP as a co-factor to slow down common gating for sufficient electrical stability of neurons under physiological conditions.

  2. Electric and hybrid vehicle environmental control subsystem study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heitner, K. L.

    1980-12-04

    The purpose of this study is to select the best technologies for the environmental control subsystem (ECS) for interior heating and cooling in electric and hybrid vehicles. The best technology must be selected from technologies that are available in the near term. The selected technology will serve as a basis on which development of a prototype ECS could start immediately. The technology selected as best ECS for the electric vehicle is the combination of a combustion heater and gasoline engine (Otto cycle) driven vapor compression air conditioner. All of the major ECS components, i.e., the combustion heater, the small gasoline engine, and the vapor compression air conditioner are commercially available. These technologies have good cost and performance characteristics. The cost for this best ECS is relatively close to the cost of current ECS's. At the same time, its effect on the vehicle's propulsion battery is minimal and the ECS size and weight do not have significant impact on the vehicle's range. The required technology also minimizes risk for the vehicle manufacturer because little new capital investment will be needed to produce the ECS. Since electric vehicles are likely to be in limited production for several years, the technology is appropriate for the market size.

  3. Designing Scalable PGAS Communication Subsystems on Cray Gemini Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnu, Abhinav; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2012-12-26

    The Cray Gemini Interconnect has been recently introduced as a next generation network architecture for building multi-petaflop supercomputers. Cray XE6 systems including LANL Cielo, NERSC Hopper, ORNL Titan and proposed NCSA BlueWaters leverage the Gemini Interconnect as their primary Interconnection network. At the same time, programming models such as the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) models such as Unified Parallel C (UPC) and Co-Array Fortran (CAF) have become available on these systems. Global Arrays is a popular PGAS model used in a variety of application domains including hydrodynamics, chemistry and visualization. Global Arrays uses Aggregate Re- mote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) as the communication runtime system for Remote Memory Access communication. This paper presents a design, implementation and performance evaluation of scalable and high performance communication subsystems on Cray Gemini Interconnect using ARMCI. The design space is explored and time-space complexities of commu- nication protocols for one-sided communication primitives such as contiguous and uniformly non-contiguous datatypes, atomic memory operations (AMOs) and memory synchronization is presented. An implementation of the proposed design (referred as ARMCI-Gemini) demonstrates the efficacy on communication primitives, application kernels such as LU decomposition and full applications such as Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) application.

  4. Custom electronic subsystems for the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Glassell, R.L.; Butler, P.L.; Rowe, J.C. ); Zimmermann, S.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Station Program presents new opportunities for the application of telerobotic and robotic systems. The Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) is a highly advanced 7 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) telerobotic/robotic manipulator. It was developed and built for the Automation Technology Branch at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) for work in research and to demonstrate ground-based telerobotic manipulator system hardware and software systems for future NASA applications in the hazardous environment of space. The LTM manipulator uses an embedded wiring design with all electronics, motor power, and control and communication cables passing through the pitch-yaw differential joints. This design requires the number of cables passing through the pitch/yaw joint to be kept to a minimum. To eliminate the cables needed to carry each pitch-yaw joint's sensor data to the VME control computers, a custom-embedded electronics package for each manipulator joint was developed. The electronics package collects and sends the joint's sensor data to the VME control computers over a fiber optic cable. The electronics package consist of five individual subsystems: the VME Link Processor, the Joint Processor and the Joint Processor power supply in the joint module, the fiber optics communications system, and the electronics and motor power cabling. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Advanced Space Suit Portable Life Support Subsystem Packaging Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Robert; Diep, Chuong; Barnett, Bob; Thomas, Gretchen; Rouen, Michael; Kobus, Jack

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) packaging design work done by the NASA and Hamilton Sundstrand in support of the 3 future space missions; Lunar, Mars and zero-g. The goal is to seek ways to reduce the weight of PLSS packaging, and at the same time, develop a packaging scheme that would make PLSS technology changes less costly than the current packaging methods. This study builds on the results of NASA s in-house 1998 study, which resulted in the "Flex PLSS" concept. For this study the present EMU schematic (low earth orbit) was used so that the work team could concentrate on the packaging. The Flex PLSS packaging is required to: protect, connect, and hold the PLSS and its components together internally and externally while providing access to PLSS components internally for maintenance and for technology change without extensive redesign impact. The goal of this study was two fold: 1. Bring the advanced space suit integrated Flex PLSS concept from its current state of development to a preliminary design level and build a proof of concept mockup of the proposed design, and; 2. "Design" a Design Process, which accommodates both the initial Flex PLSS design and the package modifications, required to accommodate new technology.

  6. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Arthur W; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line.

  7. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  8. Building Scalable PGAS Communication Subsystem on Blue Gene/Q

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnu, Abhinav; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Barker, Kevin J.; van Dam, Hubertus

    2013-05-20

    This paper presents a design of scalable Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) communication subsystems on recently proposed Blue Gene/Q architecture. The proposed design provides an in-depth modeling of communication infrastructure using Parallel Active Messaging Interface (PAMI). The communication infrastructure is used to design time-space efficient communication protocols for frequently used data-types (contiguous, uniformly non-contiguous) using Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) get/put primitives. The proposed design accelerates load balance counters by using asynchronous threads, which are required due to the missing network hardware support for Atomic Memory Operations (AMOs). Under the proposed design, the synchronization traffic is reduced by tracking conflicting memory accesses in distributed space with slightly increment in space complexity. An evaluation with simple communication benchmarks show a adjacent node get latency of 2.89$\\mu$s and peak bandwidth of 1775 MB/s resulting in $\\approx$ 99\\% communication efficiency.The evaluation shows a reduction in the execution time by up to 30\\% for NWChem self consistent field calculation on 4096 processes using the proposed asynchronous thread based design.

  9. Plug-and-Play Environmental Monitoring Spacecraft Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Brinza, David E.; Tran, Tuan A.; Blaes, Brent R.

    2011-01-01

    A Space Environment Monitor (SEM) subsystem architecture has been developed and demonstrated that can benefit future spacecraft by providing (1) real-time knowledge of the spacecraft state in terms of exposure to the environment; (2) critical, instantaneous information for anomaly resolution; and (3) invaluable environmental data for designing future missions. The SEM architecture consists of a network of plug-and- play (PnP) Sensor Interface Units (SIUs), each servicing one or more environmental sensors. The SEM architecture is influenced by the IEEE Smart Transducer Interface Bus standard (IEEE Std 1451) for its PnP functionality. A network of PnP Spacecraft SIUs is enabling technology for gathering continuous real-time information critical to validating spacecraft health in harsh space environments. The demonstrated system that provided a proof-of-concept of the SEM architecture consisted of three SIUs for measurement of total ionizing dose (TID) and single event upset (SEU) radiation effects, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and deep dielectric charging through use of a prototype Internal Electro-Static Discharge Monitor (IESDM). Each SIU consists of two stacked 2X2 in. (approximately 5X5 cm) circuit boards: a Bus Interface Unit (BIU) board that provides data conversion, processing and connection to the SEM power-and-data bus, and a Sensor Interface Electronics (SIE) board that provides sensor interface needs and data path connection to the BIU.

  10. Transport properties of copper with excited electron subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu V.; Migdal, K. P.; Knyazev, D. V.; Inogamov, N. A.; Levashov, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated transport properties of an electron subsystem of copper heated by a femtosecond laser pulse. These properties change greatly in comparison with the room temperature solid metal. The electron temperature and pressure profiles significantly depend on these properties in bulk laser targets according to the two-temperature (2T) model. These profiles at the 2T stage are responsible for shock and rarefaction waves' formation. We have developed the analytical model of electroconductivity and heat conductivity of copper which takes into account changes of density, electron and ion temperatures. The model is based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation for consideration of electron collisions. Also we have carried out the first-principles calculations using the Kubo-Greenwood theory, methods of pseudopotential and linear augmented plane waves which are necessary to evaluate electron wavefunctions. We have provided the check of convergence of all parameters of our first-principles calculations. The results of our analytical model for electro- and heat conductivities are in good agreement with the data obtained using the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method.

  11. Design development and test: Two-gas atmosphere control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    An atmosphere control subsystem (ACS) was developed for NASA-IBJSC which is designed to measure the major atmospheric constituents in the manned cabin of the space shuttle orbiter and control the addition of oxygen and nitrogen to maintain the partial pressures of these gases within very close limits. The ACS includes a mass spectrometer sensor (MSS) which analyzes the atmosphere of a shuttle vehicle pressurized cabin, and an electronic control assembly (ECA). The MSS was built and tested to meet the requirements for flight equipment for the M-171 Metabolic Analyzer experiment for the Skylab flight program. The instrument analyzes an atmospheric gas sample and produces continuous 0-5 vdc analog signals proportional to the partial pressures of H2, O2, N2, H2O, CO2 and total hydrocarbons having a m/e ratio between 50 and 120. It accepts signals from the MSS proportional to the partial pressures of N2 and O2 and controls the supply of these gases to the closed cabin.

  12. Custom electronic subsystems for the laboratory telerobotic manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassell, R. L.; Butler, P. L.; Rowe, J. C.; Zimmermann, S. D.

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Station Program presents new opportunities for the application of telerobotic and robotic systems. The Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) is a highly advanced 7 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) telerobotic/robotic manipulator. It was developed and built for the Automation Technology Branch at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) for work in research and to demonstrate ground-based telerobotic manipulator system hardware and software systems for future NASA applications in the hazardous environment of space. The LTM manipulator uses an embedded wiring design with all electronics, motor power, and control and communication cables passing through the pitch-yaw differential joints. This design requires the number of cables passing through the pitch/yaw joint to be kept to a minimum. To eliminate the cables needed to carry each pitch-yaw joint's sensor data to the VME control computers, a custom-embedded electronics package for each manipulator joint was developed. The electronics package collects and sends the joint's sensor data to the VME control computers over a fiber optic cable. The electronics package consist of five individual subsystems: the VME Link Processor, the Joint Processor and the Joint Processor power supply in the joint module, the fiber optics communications system, and the electronics and motor power cabling.

  13. Failure detection and recovery in the assembly/contingency subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1993-01-01

    The Assembly/Contingency Subsystem (ACS) is the primary communications link on board the Space Station. Any failure in a component of this system or in the external devices through which it communicates with ground-based systems will isolate the Station. The ACS software design includes a failure management capability (ACFM) that provides protocols for failure detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR). The the ACFM design requirements as outlined in the current ACS software requirements specification document are reviewed. The activities carried out in this review include: (1) an informal, but thorough, end-to-end failure mode and effects analysis of the proposed software architecture for the ACFM; and (2) a prototype of the ACFM software, implemented as a C program under the UNIX operating system. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the FDIR protocols specified in the ACS design and the specifications themselves in light of their use in implementing the ACFM. The basis of failure detection in the ACFM is the loss of signal between the ground and the Station, which (under the appropriate circumstances) will initiate recovery to restore communications. This recovery involves the reconfiguration of the ACS to either a backup set of components or to a degraded communications mode. The initiation of recovery depends largely on the criticality of the failure mode, which is defined by tables in the ACFM and can be modified to provide a measure of flexibility in recovery procedures.

  14. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the body flap subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Riccio, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Body Flap (BF) subsystem hardware are documented. The BF is a large aerosurface located at the trailing edge of the lower aft fuselage of the Orbiter. The proper function of the BF is essential during the dynamic flight phases of ascent and entry. During the ascent phase of flight, the BF trails in a fixed position. For entry, the BF provides elevon load relief, trim control, and acts as a heat shield for the main engines. Specifically, the BF hardware comprises the following components: Power Drive Unit (PDU), rotary actuators, and torque tubes. The IOA analysis process utilized available BF hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 35 failure modes analyzed, 19 were determined to be PCIs.

  15. Experimental Results for Titan Aerobot Thermo-Mechanical Subsystem Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffrey L.; Jones, J. A.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Lachenmeier, T.; Mahr, P.; Pauken, M.; Plett, G. A.; Smith, L.; VanLuvender, M. L.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes experimental results from a development program focused in maturing Titan aerobot technology in the areas of mechanical and thermal subsystems. Results from four key activities are described: first, a cryogenic balloon materials development program involving coupon and cylinder tests and culminating in the fabrication and testing of an inflated 4.6 m long prototype blimp at 93 K; second, a combined lab experiment and numerical simulation effort to assess potential problems resulting from radioisotope thermal generator waste heat generation near an inflated blimp; third, an aerial deployment and inflation development program consisting of laboratory and helicopter drop tests on a near full scale (11 m long) prototype blimp; and fourth, a proof of concept experiment demonstrating the viability of using a mechanically steerable high gain antenna on a floating blimp to perform direct to Earth telecommunications from Titan. The paper provides details on all of these successful activities and discusses their impact on the overall effort to produce mature systems technology for future Titan aerobot missions.

  16. Overview of the Mars Science Laboratory Parachute Decelerator Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Steltzner, Adam; Witkowski, Al; Rowan, Jerry; Cruz, Juan

    2007-01-01

    In 2010 the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will deliver NASA's largest and most capable rover to the surface of Mars. MSL will explore previously unattainable landing sites due to the implementation of a high precision Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) system. The parachute decelerator subsystem (PDS) is an integral prat of the EDL system, providing a mass and volume efficient some of aerodynamic drag to decelerate the entry vehicle from Mach 2 to subsonic speeds prior to final propulsive descent to the sutface. The PDS for MSL is a mortar deployed 19.7m Viking type Disk-Gap-Band (DGB) parachute; chosen to meet the EDL timeline requirements and to utilize the heritage parachute systems from Viking, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rover, and Phoenix NASA Mars Lander Programs. The preliminary design of the parachute soft goods including materials selection, stress analysis, fabrication approach, and development testing will be discussed. The preliminary design of mortar deployment system including mortar system sizing and performance predictions, gas generator design, and development mortar testing will also be presented.

  17. A Subsystem Test Bed for Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, An; Yan, Yihua; Wang, Wei

    2014-11-01

    The Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph is a solar dedicated radio interferometric array that will produce high spatial resolution, high temporal resolution, and high spectral resolution images of the Sun simultaneously in decimetre and centimetre wave range. Digital processing of intermediate frequency signal is an important part in a radio telescope. This paper describes a flexible and high-speed digital down conversion system for the CSRH by applying complex mixing, parallel filtering, and extracting algorithms to process IF signal at the time of being designed and incorporates canonic-signed digit coding and bit-plane method to improve program efficiency. The DDC system is intended to be a subsystem test bed for simulation and testing for CSRH. Software algorithms for simulation and hardware language algorithms based on FPGA are written which use less hardware resources and at the same time achieve high performances such as processing high-speed data flow (1 GHz) with 10 MHz spectral resolution. An experiment with the test bed is illustrated by using geostationary satellite data observed on March 20, 2014. Due to the easy alterability of the algorithms on FPGA, the data can be recomputed with different digital signal processing algorithms for selecting optimum algorithm.

  18. Solid Propulsion Systems, Subsystems, and Components Service Life Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundley, Nedra H.; Jones, Connor

    2011-01-01

    The service life extension of solid propulsion systems, subsystems, and components will be discussed based on the service life extension of the Space Transportation System Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) and Booster Separation Motors (BSM). The RSRM is certified for an age life of five years. In the aftermath of the Columbia accident there were a number of motors that were approaching the end of their five year service life certification. The RSRM Project initiated an assessment to determine if the service life of these motors could be extended. With the advent of the Constellation Program, a flight test was proposed that would utilize one of the RSRMs which had been returned from the launch site due to the expiration of its five year service life certification and twelve surplus Chemical Systems Division BSMs which had exceeded their eight year service life. The RSRM age life tracking philosophy which establishes when the clock starts for age life tracking will be described. The role of the following activities in service life extension will be discussed: subscale testing, accelerated aging, dissecting full scale aged hardware, static testing full scale aged motors, data mining industry data, and using the fleet leader approach. The service life certification and extension of the BSMs will also be presented.

  19. Possible Involvement of F1F0-ATP synthase and Intracellular ATP in Keratinocyte Differentiation in normal skin and skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiaoyun, Xie; Chaofei, Han; Weiqi, Zeng; Chen, Chen; Lixia, Lu; Queping, Liu; Cong, Peng; Shuang, Zhao; Juan, Su; Xiang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The F1F0-ATP synthase, an enzyme complex, is mainly located on the mitochondrial inner membrane or sometimes cytomembrane to generate or hydrolyze ATP, play a role in cell proliferation. This study focused on the role of F1F0-ATP synthase in keratinocyte differentiation, and its relationship with intracellular and extracellular ATP (InATP and ExATP). The F1F0-ATP synthase β subunit (ATP5B) expression in various skin tissues and confluence-dependent HaCaT differentiation models was detected. ATP5B expression increased with keratinocyte and HaCaT cell differentiation in normal skin, some epidermis hyper-proliferative diseases, squamous cell carcinoma, and the HaCaT cell differentiation model. The impact of InATP and ExATP content on HaCaT differentiation was reflected by the expression of the differentiation marker involucrin. Inhibition of F1F0-ATP synthase blocked HaCaT cell differentiation, which was associated with a decrease of InATP content, but not with changes of ExATP. Our results revealed that F1F0-ATP synthase expression is associated with the process of keratinocyte differentiation which may possibly be related to InATP synthesis. PMID:28209970

  20. Comparing dependent robust correlations.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Rand R

    2016-11-01

    Let r1 and r2 be two dependent estimates of Pearson's correlation. There is a substantial literature on testing H0  : ρ1  = ρ2 , the hypothesis that the population correlation coefficients are equal. However, it is well known that Pearson's correlation is not robust. Even a single outlier can have a substantial impact on Pearson's correlation, resulting in a misleading understanding about the strength of the association among the bulk of the points. A way of mitigating this concern is to use a correlation coefficient that guards against outliers, many of which have been proposed. But apparently there are no results on how to compare dependent robust correlation coefficients when there is heteroscedasicity. Extant results suggest that a basic percentile bootstrap will perform reasonably well. This paper reports simulation results indicating the extent to which this is true when using Spearman's rho, a Winsorized correlation or a skipped correlation.

  1. Robust verification analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, William; Witkowski, Walt; Kamm, James R.; Wildey, Tim

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a new methodology for inferring the accuracy of computational simulations through the practice of solution verification. We demonstrate this methodology on examples from computational heat transfer, fluid dynamics and radiation transport. Our methodology is suited to both well- and ill-behaved sequences of simulations. Our approach to the analysis of these sequences of simulations incorporates expert judgment into the process directly via a flexible optimization framework, and the application of robust statistics. The expert judgment is systematically applied as constraints to the analysis, and together with the robust statistics guards against over-emphasis on anomalous analysis results. We have named our methodology Robust Verification. Our methodology is based on utilizing multiple constrained optimization problems to solve the verification model in a manner that varies the analysis' underlying assumptions. Constraints applied in the analysis can include expert judgment regarding convergence rates (bounds and expectations) as well as bounding values for physical quantities (e.g., positivity of energy or density). This approach then produces a number of error models, which are then analyzed through robust statistical techniques (median instead of mean statistics). This provides self-contained, data and expert informed error estimation including uncertainties for both the solution itself and order of convergence. Our method produces high quality results for the well-behaved cases relatively consistent with existing practice. The methodology can also produce reliable results for ill-behaved circumstances predicated on appropriate expert judgment. We demonstrate the method and compare the results with standard approaches used for both code and solution verification on well-behaved and ill-behaved simulations.

  2. Robust verification analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Witkowski, Walt; Kamm, James R.; Wildey, Tim

    2016-02-15

    We introduce a new methodology for inferring the accuracy of computational simulations through the practice of solution verification. We demonstrate this methodology on examples from computational heat transfer, fluid dynamics and radiation transport. Our methodology is suited to both well- and ill-behaved sequences of simulations. Our approach to the analysis of these sequences of simulations incorporates expert judgment into the process directly via a flexible optimization framework, and the application of robust statistics. The expert judgment is systematically applied as constraints to the analysis, and together with the robust statistics guards against over-emphasis on anomalous analysis results. We have named our methodology Robust Verification. Our methodology is based on utilizing multiple constrained optimization problems to solve the verification model in a manner that varies the analysis' underlying assumptions. Constraints applied in the analysis can include expert judgment regarding convergence rates (bounds and expectations) as well as bounding values for physical quantities (e.g., positivity of energy or density). This approach then produces a number of error models, which are then analyzed through robust statistical techniques (median instead of mean statistics). This provides self-contained, data and expert informed error estimation including uncertainties for both the solution itself and order of convergence. Our method produces high quality results for the well-behaved cases relatively consistent with existing practice. The methodology can also produce reliable results for ill-behaved circumstances predicated on appropriate expert judgment. We demonstrate the method and compare the results with standard approaches used for both code and solution verification on well-behaved and ill-behaved simulations.

  3. Distance of myofilament sliding per ATP molecule in skeletal muscle fibers studied using laser flash photolysis of caged ATP.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Abe, O; Kobayashi, T; Sugi, H

    1993-01-01

    We studied the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by recording shortening of single glycerinated muscle fibers induced by laser flash photolysis of caged ATP, diffusion of photochemically released ATP out of the fiber being prevented by surrounding the fiber with silicone oil. With 75 microM ATP released (one half of the total myosin head concentration within the fiber), the fiber showed the minimum shortening (10 +/- 2 nm/half sarcomere, n = 10) taking place uniformly in each sarcomere in the fiber. Comparison of the initial flash-induced shortening velocity with the force-velocity relation of maximally Ca(2+)-activated fibers indicated that the above minimum fiber shortening took place under an internal load nearly equal to Po. These results may be taken to indicate that, under a nearly isometric condition, the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule is of the order of 10 nm.

  4. Robustness in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, U.; Surette, M. G.; Barkai, N.; Leibler, S.

    1999-01-01

    Networks of interacting proteins orchestrate the responses of living cells to a variety of external stimuli, but how sensitive is the functioning of these protein networks to variations in theirbiochemical parameters? One possibility is that to achieve appropriate function, the reaction rate constants and enzyme concentrations need to be adjusted in a precise manner, and any deviation from these `fine-tuned' values ruins the network's performance. An alternative possibility is that key properties of biochemical networks are robust; that is, they are insensitive to the precise values of the biochemical parameters. Here we address this issue in experiments using chemotaxis of Escherichia coli, one of the best-characterized sensory systems,. We focus on how response and adaptation to attractant signals vary with systematic changes in the intracellular concentration of the components of the chemotaxis network. We find that some properties, such as steady-state behaviour and adaptation time, show strong variations in response to varying protein concentrations. In contrast, the precision of adaptation is robust and does not vary with the protein concentrations. This is consistent with a recently proposed molecular mechanism for exact adaptation, where robustness is a direct consequence of the network's architecture.

  5. Robustness of metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the robustness of cellular metabolism by simulating the system-level computational models, and also performed the corresponding experiments to validate our predictions. We address the cellular robustness from the ``metabolite''-framework by using the novel concept of ``flux-sum,'' which is the sum of all incoming or outgoing fluxes (they are the same under the pseudo-steady state assumption). By estimating the changes of the flux-sum under various genetic and environmental perturbations, we were able to clearly decipher the metabolic robustness; the flux-sum around an essential metabolite does not change much under various perturbations. We also identified the list of the metabolites essential to cell survival, and then ``acclimator'' metabolites that can control the cell growth were discovered. Furthermore, this concept of ``metabolite essentiality'' should be useful in developing new metabolic engineering strategies for improved production of various bioproducts and designing new drugs that can fight against multi-antibiotic resistant superbacteria by knocking-down the enzyme activities around an essential metabolite. Finally, we combined a regulatory network with the metabolic network to investigate its effect on dynamic properties of cellular metabolism.

  6. Robustness of Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-03-01

    In interdependent networks, when nodes in one network fail, they cause dependent nodes in other networks to also fail. This may happen recursively and can lead to a cascade of failures. In fact, a failure of a very small fraction of nodes in one network may lead to the complete fragmentation of a system of many interdependent networks. We will present a framework for understanding the robustness of interacting networks subject to such cascading failures and provide a basic analytic approach that may be useful in future studies. We present exact analytical solutions for the critical fraction of nodes that upon removal will lead to a failure cascade and to a complete fragmentation of two interdependent networks in a first order transition. Surprisingly, analyzing complex systems as a set of interdependent networks may alter a basic assumption that network theory has relied on: while for a single network a broader degree distribution of the network nodes results in the network being more robust to random failures, for interdependent networks, the broader the distribution is, the more vulnerable the networks become to random failure. We also show that reducing the coupling between the networks leads to a change from a first order percolation phase transition to a second order percolation transition at a critical point. These findings pose a significant challenge to the future design of robust networks that need to consider the unique properties of interdependent networks.

  7. Improved Dynamic Modeling of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem and Integration with Models of Other Water Recovery Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) is a rotary multistage distiller being developed to serve as the primary processor for wastewater recovery during long-duration space missions. The CDS could be integrated with a system similar to the International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor Assembly (WPA) to form a complete Water Recovery System (WRS) for future missions. Independent chemical process simulations with varying levels of detail have previously been developed using Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) to aid in the analysis of the CDS and several WPA components. The existing CDS simulation could not model behavior during thermal startup and lacked detailed analysis of several key internal processes, including heat transfer between stages. The first part of this paper describes modifications to the ACM model of the CDS that improve its capabilities and the accuracy of its predictions. Notably, the modified version of the model can accurately predict behavior during thermal startup for both NaCl solution and pretreated urine feeds. The model is used to predict how changing operating parameters and design features of the CDS affects its performance, and conclusions from these predictions are discussed. The second part of this paper describes the integration of the modified CDS model and the existing WPA component models into a single WRS model. The integrated model is used to demonstrate the effects that changes to one component can have on the dynamic behavior of the system as a whole.

  8. Authentic role of ATP signaling in micturition reflex

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Kentaro; Kondo, Makoto; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Norichika; Soda, Tetsuji; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Matsumoto-Miyai, Kazumasa; Ishida, Yusuke; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Ogawa, Osamu; Nonomura, Norio; Shimada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a signaling molecule that regulates cellular processes. Based on previous studies of bladder function over the past decade, bladder ATP signaling was thought to have an essential role in the normal micturition reflex. In this study, we performed detailed analyses of bladder function in purinergic receptor-deficient mice using the automated voided stain on paper method and video-urodynamics. Unexpectedly, a lack of P2X2 or P2X3 receptors did not affect bladder function under normal physiological conditions, indicating that bladder ATP signaling is not essential for normal micturition reflex. In contrast, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced markedly high levels of ATP release from the urothelium. In addition, LPS-induced rapid bladder hyperactivity was attenuated in P2X2−/− and P2X3−/− mice. Contrary to the previous interpretation, our present findings indicate that bladder ATP signaling has a fundamental role in the micturition reflex, especially in bladder dysfunction, under pathological conditions. Therefore, the bladder ATP signaling pathway might be a highly promising therapeutic target for functional bladder disorders. This study newly defines an authentic role for bladder ATP signaling in the micturition reflex. PMID:26795755

  9. ATP and potassium ions: a deadly combination for astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David G.; Wang, Junjie; Keane, Robert W.; Scemes, Eliana; Dahl, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    The ATP release channel Pannexin1 (Panx1) is self-regulated, i.e. the permeant ATP inhibits the channel from the extracellular space. The affinity of the ATP binding site is lower than that of the purinergic P2X7 receptor allowing a transient activation of Panx1 by ATP through P2X7R. Here we show that the inhibition of Panx1 by ATP is abrogated by increased extracellular potassium ion concentration ([K+]o) in a dose-dependent manner. Since increased [K+]o is also a stimulus for Panx1 channels, it can be expected that a combination of ATP and increased [K+]o would be deadly for cells. Indeed, astrocytes did not survive exposure to these combined stimuli. The death mechanism, although involving P2X7R, does not appear to strictly follow a pyroptotic pathway. Instead, caspase-3 was activated, a process inhibited by Panx1 inhibitors. These data suggest that Panx1 plays an early role in the cell death signaling pathway involving ATP and K+ ions. Additionally, Panx1 may play a second role once cells are committed to apoptosis, since Panx1 is also a substrate of caspase-3.

  10. Unidirectional Transport Mechanism in an ATP Dependent Exporter

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters use the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to move a large variety of compounds across biological membranes. P-glycoprotein, involved in multidrug resistance, is the most investigated eukaryotic family member. Although a large number of biochemical and structural approaches have provided important information, the conformational dynamics underlying the coupling between ATP binding/hydrolysis and allocrite transport remains elusive. To tackle this issue, we performed molecular dynamic simulations for different nucleotide occupancy states of Sav1866, a prokaryotic P-glycoprotein homologue. The simulations reveal an outward-closed conformation of the transmembrane domain that is stabilized by the binding of two ATP molecules. The hydrolysis of a single ATP leads the X-loop, a key motif of the ATP binding cassette, to interfere with the transmembrane domain and favor its outward-open conformation. Our findings provide a structural basis for the unidirectionality of transport in ABC exporters and suggest a ratio of one ATP hydrolyzed per transport cycle. PMID:28386603

  11. Authentic role of ATP signaling in micturition reflex.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Kentaro; Kondo, Makoto; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Norichika; Soda, Tetsuji; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Matsumoto-Miyai, Kazumasa; Ishida, Yusuke; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Ogawa, Osamu; Nonomura, Norio; Shimada, Shoichi

    2016-01-22

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a signaling molecule that regulates cellular processes. Based on previous studies of bladder function over the past decade, bladder ATP signaling was thought to have an essential role in the normal micturition reflex. In this study, we performed detailed analyses of bladder function in purinergic receptor-deficient mice using the automated voided stain on paper method and video-urodynamics. Unexpectedly, a lack of P2X2 or P2X3 receptors did not affect bladder function under normal physiological conditions, indicating that bladder ATP signaling is not essential for normal micturition reflex. In contrast, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced markedly high levels of ATP release from the urothelium. In addition, LPS-induced rapid bladder hyperactivity was attenuated in P2X2(-/-) and P2X3(-/-) mice. Contrary to the previous interpretation, our present findings indicate that bladder ATP signaling has a fundamental role in the micturition reflex, especially in bladder dysfunction, under pathological conditions. Therefore, the bladder ATP signaling pathway might be a highly promising therapeutic target for functional bladder disorders. This study newly defines an authentic role for bladder ATP signaling in the micturition reflex.

  12. Intrarenal localization of the plasma membrane ATP channel pannexin1.

    PubMed

    Hanner, Fiona; Lam, Lisa; Nguyen, Mien T X; Yu, Alan; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2012-11-15

    In the renal tubules, ATP released from epithelial cells stimulates purinergic receptors, regulating salt and water reabsorption. However, the mechanisms by which ATP is released into the tubular lumen are multifaceted. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a newly identified. ubiquitously expressed protein that forms connexin-like channels in the plasma membrane, which have been demonstrated to function as a mechanosensitive ATP conduit. Here, we report on the localization of Panx1 in the mouse kidney. Using immunofluorescence, strong Panx1 expression was observed in renal tubules, including proximal tubules, thin descending limbs, and collecting ducts, along their apical cell membranes. In the renal vasculature, Panx1 expression was localized to vascular smooth muscle cells in renal arteries, including the afferent and efferent arterioles. Additionally, we tested whether Panx1 channels expressed in renal epithelial cells facilitate luminal ATP release by measuring the ATP content of urine samples freshly collected from wild-type and Panx1(-/-) mice. Urinary ATP levels were reduced by 30% in Panx1(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that Panx1 channels in the kidney may regulate ATP release and via purinergic signaling may participate in the control of renal epithelial fluid and electrolyte transport and vascular functions.

  13. Intrarenal localization of the plasma membrane ATP channel pannexin1

    PubMed Central

    Hanner, Fiona; Lam, Lisa; Nguyen, Mien T. X.; Yu, Alan

    2012-01-01

    In the renal tubules, ATP released from epithelial cells stimulates purinergic receptors, regulating salt and water reabsorption. However, the mechanisms by which ATP is released into the tubular lumen are multifaceted. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a newly identified. ubiquitously expressed protein that forms connexin-like channels in the plasma membrane, which have been demonstrated to function as a mechanosensitive ATP conduit. Here, we report on the localization of Panx1 in the mouse kidney. Using immunofluorescence, strong Panx1 expression was observed in renal tubules, including proximal tubules, thin descending limbs, and collecting ducts, along their apical cell membranes. In the renal vasculature, Panx1 expression was localized to vascular smooth muscle cells in renal arteries, including the afferent and efferent arterioles. Additionally, we tested whether Panx1 channels expressed in renal epithelial cells facilitate luminal ATP release by measuring the ATP content of urine samples freshly collected from wild-type and Panx1−/− mice. Urinary ATP levels were reduced by 30% in Panx1−/− compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that Panx1 channels in the kidney may regulate ATP release and via purinergic signaling may participate in the control of renal epithelial fluid and electrolyte transport and vascular functions. PMID:22952282

  14. Modeling K,ATP-Dependent Excitability in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jonathan R.; Cooper, Paige; Nichols, Colin G.

    2014-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, K,ATP channels respond to changes in glucose to regulate cell excitability and insulin release. Confirming a high sensitivity of electrical activity to K,ATP activity, mutations that cause gain of K,ATP function cause neonatal diabetes. Our aim was to quantitatively assess the contribution of K,ATP current to the regulation of glucose-dependent bursting by reproducing experimentally observed changes in excitability when K,ATP conductance is altered by genetic manipulation. A recent detailed computational model of single cell pancreatic β-cell excitability reproduces the β-cell response to varying glucose concentrations. However, initial simulations showed that the model underrepresents the significance of K,ATP activity and was unable to reproduce K,ATP conductance-dependent changes in excitability. By altering the ATP and glucose dependence of the L-type Ca2+ channel and the Na-K ATPase to better fit experiment, appropriate dependence of excitability on K,ATP conductance was reproduced. Because experiments were conducted in islets, which contain cell-to-cell variability, we extended the model from a single cell to a three-dimensional model (10×10×10 cell) islet with 1000 cells. For each cell, the conductance of the major currents was allowed to vary as was the gap junction conductance between cells. This showed that single cell glucose-dependent behavior was then highly variable, but was uniform in coupled islets. The study highlights the importance of parameterization of detailed models of β-cell excitability and suggests future experiments that will lead to improved characterization of β-cell excitability and the control of insulin secretion. PMID:25418087

  15. System, Subsystem, Hive: Boundary Problems in Computational Theories of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Tomer; van Leeuwen, Cees; Edelman, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    A computational theory of consciousness should include a quantitative measure of consciousness, or MoC, that (i) would reveal to what extent a given system is conscious, (ii) would make it possible to compare not only different systems, but also the same system at different times, and (iii) would be graded, because so is consciousness. However, unless its design is properly constrained, such an MoC gives rise to what we call the boundary problem: an MoC that labels a system as conscious will do so for some—perhaps most—of its subsystems, as well as for irrelevantly extended systems (e.g., the original system augmented with physical appendages that contribute nothing to the properties supposedly supporting consciousness), and for aggregates of individually conscious systems (e.g., groups of people). This problem suggests that the properties that are being measured are epiphenomenal to consciousness, or else it implies a bizarre proliferation of minds. We propose that a solution to the boundary problem can be found by identifying properties that are intrinsic or systemic: properties that clearly differentiate between systems whose existence is a matter of fact, as opposed to those whose existence is a matter of interpretation (in the eye of the beholder). We argue that if a putative MoC can be shown to be systemic, this ipso facto resolves any associated boundary issues. As test cases, we analyze two recent theories of consciousness in light of our definitions: the Integrated Information Theory and the Geometric Theory of consciousness. PMID:27512377

  16. MAIUS-1- Vehicle, Subsystems Design and Mission Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamminger, A.; Ettl, J.; Grosse, J.; Horschgen-Eggers, M.; Jung, W.; Kallenbach, A.; Raith, G.; Saedtler, W.; Seidel, S. T.; Turner, J.; Wittkamp, M.

    2015-09-01

    In November 2015, the DLR Mobile Rocket Base will launch the MAIUS-1 rocket vehicle at Esrange, Northern Sweden. The MAIUS-A experiment is a pathfinder atom optics experiment. The scientific objective of the mission is the first creation of a BoseEinstein Condensate in space and performing atom interferometry on a sounding rocket [3]. MAIUS-1 comprises a two-stage unguided solid propellant VSB-30 rocket motor system. The vehicle consists of a Brazilian 53 1 motor as 1 st stage, a 530 motor as 2nd stage, a conical motor adapter, a despin module, a payload adapter, the MAIUS-A experiment consisting of five experiment modules, an attitude control system module, a newly developed conical service system, and a two-staged recovery system including a nosecone. In contrast to usual payloads on VSB-30 rockets, the payload has a diameter of 500 mm due to constraints of the scientific experiment. Because of this change in design, a blunted nosecone is necessary to guarantee the required static stability during the ascent phase of the flight. This paper will give an overview on the subsystems which have been built at DLR MORABA, especially the newly developed service system. Further, it will contain a description of the MAIUS-1 vehicle, the mission and the unique requirements on operations and attitude control, which is additionally required to achieve a required attitude with respect to the nadir vector. Additionally to a usual microgravity environment, the MAIUS-l payload requires attitude control to achieve a required attitude with respect to the nadir vector.

  17. Understanding and Improving High-Performance I/O Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek A.; Frieder, Gideon; Clark, A. James

    1996-01-01

    This research program has been conducted in the framework of the NASA Earth and Space Science (ESS) evaluations led by Dr. Thomas Sterling. In addition to the many important research findings for NASA and the prestigious publications, the program has helped orienting the doctoral research program of two students towards parallel input/output in high-performance computing. Further, the experimental results in the case of the MasPar were very useful and helpful to MasPar with which the P.I. has had many interactions with the technical management. The contributions of this program are drawn from three experimental studies conducted on different high-performance computing testbeds/platforms, and therefore presented in 3 different segments as follows: 1. Evaluating the parallel input/output subsystem of a NASA high-performance computing testbeds, namely the MasPar MP- 1 and MP-2; 2. Characterizing the physical input/output request patterns for NASA ESS applications, which used the Beowulf platform; and 3. Dynamic scheduling techniques for hiding I/O latency in parallel applications such as sparse matrix computations. This study also has been conducted on the Intel Paragon and has also provided an experimental evaluation for the Parallel File System (PFS) and parallel input/output on the Paragon. This report is organized as follows. The summary of findings discusses the results of each of the aforementioned 3 studies. Three appendices, each containing a key scholarly research paper that details the work in one of the studies are included.

  18. Subsystem approach to the electrodynamics in dielectric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Brandon A.

    2012-10-01

    A century has now passed since the origins of the Abraham-Minkowski controversy pertaining to the correct form of optical momentum in media. Since, the debate has come to reference the general debate over optical momentum, including a number of competing formulations. The pervasive modern view is that the Abraham momentum represents the optical momentum contained within the fields and the Minkowski momentum includes a material component which is coupled with the fields. A recently proposed resolution to the debate identified Abraham's kinetic momentum as responsible for the overall center-of-mass translations of a medium and Minkowski's canonical momentum as responsible for local translations of a medium within or with respect to another medium. Still, current literature reveals significant confusion as to how systems of light and matter should be modeled as to deduce the equations of motion when multiple material types are present. For example, the state-of-the-art model for optical dynamics of submerged particles assumes over damped systems such that the mass of the particles is ignored in the equations of motion. In this paper, we apply the subsystem approach to deduce the electrodynamics of such systems. We show that regardless of which electromagnetic momentum continuity law is applied, the equations of motion can be correctly deduced as long as the continuity law is consistent with Maxwells equations and the overall system is closed such that momentum is conserved. Because the closed system includes the material response, the model can be very complex. However, we demonstrate with simple, well-known examples.

  19. Immunity-Based Accommodation of Aircraft Subsystem Failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togayev, Adil

    This thesis presents the design, development, and flight-simulation testing of an artificial immune system (AIS) based approach for accommodation of different aircraft subsystem failures. Failure accommodation is considered as part of a complex integrated AIS scheme that contains four major components: failure detection, identification, evaluation, and accommodation. The accommodation part consists of providing compensatory commands to the aircraft under specific abnormal conditions based on previous experience. In this research effort, the possibility of building an AIS allowing the extraction of pilot commands is investigated. The proposed approach is based on structuring the self (nominal conditions) and the non-self (abnormal conditions) within the AIS paradigm, as sets of artificial memory cells (mimicking behavior of T-cells, B-cells, and antibodies) consisting of measurement strings, over pre-defined time windows. Each string is a set of features values at each sample time of the flight including pilot inputs, system states, and other variables. The accommodation algorithm relies on identifying the memory cell that is the most similar to the in-coming measurements. Once the best match is found, control commands corresponding to this match will be extracted from the memory and used for control purposes. The proposed methodology is illustrated through simulation of simple maneuvers at nominal flight conditions, different actuators, and sensor failure conditions. Data for development and demonstration have been collected from West Virginia University 6-degrees-of-freedom motion-based flight simulator. The aircraft model used for this research represents a supersonic fighter which includes model following adaptive control laws based on non-linear dynamic inversion and artificial neural network augmentation. The simulation results demonstrate the possibility of extracting pilot compensatory commands from the self/non-self structure and the capability of the AIS

  20. Superconducting Super Collider silicon tracking subsystem research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Thompson, T.C.; Ziock, H.J. ); Gamble, M.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    The Alamos National Laboratory Mechanical Engineering and Electronics Division has been investigating silicon-based elementary particle tracking device technology as part of the Superconducting Super Collider-sponsored silicon subsystem collaboration. Structural, materials, and thermal issues have been addressed. This paper explores detector structural integrity and stability, including detailed finite element models of the silicon wafer support and predictive methods used in designing with advanced composite materials. The current design comprises a magnesium metal matrix composite (MMC) truss space frame to provide a sparse support structure for the complex array of silicon detectors. This design satisfies the 25-{mu}m structural stability requirement in a 10-Mrad radiation environment. This stability is achieved without exceeding the stringent particle interaction constraints set at 2.5% of a radiation length. Materials studies have considered thermal expansion, elastic modulus, resistance to radiation and chemicals, and manufacturability of numerous candidate materials. Based on optimization of these parameters, the MMC space frame will possess a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near zero to avoid thermally induced distortions, whereas the cooling rings, which support the silicon detectors and heat pipe network, will probably be constructed of a graphite/epoxy composite whose CTE is engineered to match that of silicon. Results from radiation, chemical, and static loading tests are compared with analytical predictions and discussed. Electronic thermal loading and its efficient dissipation using heat pipe cooling technology are discussed. Calculations and preliminary designs for a sprayed-on graphite wick structure are presented. A hydrocarbon such as butane appears to be a superior choice of heat pipe working fluid based on cooling, handling, and safety criteria.

  1. Observables, gravitational dressing, and obstructions to locality and subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William; Giddings, Steven B.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum field theory—our basic framework for describing all nongravitational physics—conflicts with general relativity: the latter precludes the standard definition of the former's essential principle of locality, in terms of commuting local observables. We examine this conflict more carefully, by investigating implications of gauge (diffeomorphism) invariance for observables in gravity. We prove a dressing theorem, showing that any operator with nonzero Poincaré charges, and in particular any compactly supported operator, in flat-spacetime quantum field theory must be gravitationally dressed once coupled to gravity, i.e., it must depend on the metric at arbitrarily long distances, and we put lower bounds on this nonlocal dependence. This departure from standard locality occurs in the most severe way possible: in perturbation theory about flat spacetime, at leading order in Newton's constant. The physical observables in a gravitational theory therefore do not organize themselves into local commuting subalgebras: the principle of locality must apparently be reformulated or abandoned, and in fact we lack a clear definition of the coarser and more basic notion of a quantum subsystem of the Universe. We discuss relational approaches to locality based on diffeomorphism-invariant nonlocal operators, and reinforce arguments that any such locality is state-dependent and approximate. We also find limitations to the utility of bilocal diffeomorphism-invariant operators that are considered in cosmological contexts. An appendix provides a concise review of the canonical covariant formalism for gravity, instrumental in the discussion of Poincaré charges and their associated long-range fields.

  2. Robust stabilisation and L2 -gain analysis for switched systems with actuator saturation under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Robust stabilisation and L2-gain analysis for a class of switched systems with actuator saturation are studied in this paper. The switching signal of the controllers lags behind that of the system modes, which leads to the asynchronous switching between the candidate controllers and the subsystems. By combining the piecewise Lyapunov function method with the convex hull technique, sufficient conditions in terms of LMIs for the solvability of the robust stabilisation and weighted L2-gain problems are presented respectively under the dwell time scheme. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  3. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of power supply and communication subsystem's Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Zabihian, Ahmadreza

    In this paper, based on the fact that in designing the energy providing and communication subsystems for satellites, most approaches and relations are empirical and statistical, and also, considering the aerospace sciences and its relation with other engineering fields such as electrical engineering to be young, these are no analytic or one hundred percent proven empirical relations in many fields. Therefore, we consider the statistical design of this subsystem. The presented approach in this paper is entirely innovative and all parts of the energy providing and communication subsystems for the satellite are specified. In codifying this approach, the data of 602 satellites and some software programs such as SPSS have been used. In this approach, after proposing the design procedure, the total needed power for the satellite, the mass of the energy providing and communication subsystems , communication subsystem needed power, working band, type of antenna, number of transponders the material of solar array and finally the placement of these arrays on the satellite are designed. All these parts are designed based on the mission of the satellite and its weight class. This procedure increases the performance rate, avoids wasting energy, and reduces the costs. Keywords: database, Statistical model, the design procedure, power supply subsystem, communication subsystem

  4. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with A Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystem approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and speech intelligibility, were measured in 22 children with CP. These children included 13 with a clinical diagnosis of dysarthria (SMI), and nine judged to be free of dysarthria (NSMI). Data from children with CP were compared to data from age-matched typically developing children (TD). Results Multiple acoustic variables reflecting the articulatory subsystem were different in the SMI group, compared to the NSMI and TD groups. A significant speech intelligibility prediction model was obtained with all variables entered into the model (Adjusted R-squared = .801). The articulatory subsystem showed the most substantial independent contribution (58%) to speech intelligibility. Incremental R-squared analyses revealed that any single variable explained less than 9% of speech intelligibility variability. Conclusions Children in the SMI group have articulatory subsystem problems as indexed by acoustic measures. As in the adult literature, the articulatory subsystem makes the primary contribution to speech intelligibility variance in dysarthria, with minimal or no contribution from other systems. PMID:24824584

  5. Robust Photon Locking

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a strong-field coherent control mechanism that combines the advantages of photon locking (PL) and rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Unlike earlier implementations of PL and RAP by pulse sequences or chirped pulses, we use shaped pulses generated by phase modulation of the spectrum of a femtosecond laser pulse with a generalized phase discontinuity. The novel control scenario is characterized by a high degree of robustness achieved via adiabatic preparation of a state of maximum coherence. Subsequent phase control allows for efficient switching among different target states. We investigate both properties by photoelectron spectroscopy on potassium atoms interacting with the intense shaped light field.

  6. Robust Kriged Kalman Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Baingana, Brian; Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Mateos, Gonzalo; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2015-11-11

    Although the kriged Kalman filter (KKF) has well-documented merits for prediction of spatial-temporal processes, its performance degrades in the presence of outliers due to anomalous events, or measurement equipment failures. This paper proposes a robust KKF model that explicitly accounts for presence of measurement outliers. Exploiting outlier sparsity, a novel l1-regularized estimator that jointly predicts the spatial-temporal process at unmonitored locations, while identifying measurement outliers is put forth. Numerical tests are conducted on a synthetic Internet protocol (IP) network, and real transformer load data. Test results corroborate the effectiveness of the novel estimator in joint spatial prediction and outlier identification.

  7. Complexity and robustness

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J. M.; Doyle, John

    2002-01-01

    Highly optimized tolerance (HOT) was recently introduced as a conceptual framework to study fundamental aspects of complexity. HOT is motivated primarily by systems from biology and engineering and emphasizes, (i) highly structured, nongeneric, self-dissimilar internal configurations, and (ii) robust yet fragile external behavior. HOT claims these are the most important features of complexity and not accidents of evolution or artifices of engineering design but are inevitably intertwined and mutually reinforcing. In the spirit of this collection, our paper contrasts HOT with alternative perspectives on complexity, drawing on real-world examples and also model systems, particularly those from self-organized criticality. PMID:11875207

  8. Robustness of Cantor diffractals.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rupesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Varsha; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2013-04-08

    Diffractals are electromagnetic waves diffracted by a fractal aperture. In an earlier paper, we reported an important property of Cantor diffractals, that of redundancy [R. Verma et. al., Opt. Express 20, 8250 (2012)]. In this paper, we report another important property, that of robustness. The question we address is: How much disorder in the Cantor grating can be accommodated by diffractals to continue to yield faithfully its fractal dimension and generator? This answer is of consequence in a number of physical problems involving fractal architecture.

  9. Differences in G-actin containing bound ATP or ADP: the Mg2+-induced conformational change requires ATP.

    PubMed

    Frieden, C; Patane, K

    1985-07-16

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the Mg2+-induced conformational change of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin has been investigated by comparing actin containing bound ADP with actin containing bound ATP. As previously described [Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886], N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled G-actin containing ATP undergoes a time-dependent Mg2+-induced fluorescence change that reflects a conformational change in the actin. Addition of Mg2+ to labeled G-actin containing ADP gives no fluorescence change, suggesting that the conformational change does not occur. The fluorescence change can be restored on the addition of ATP. Examination of the time courses of these experiments suggests that ATP must replace ADP prior to the Mg2+-induced change. The Mg2+-induced polymerization of actin containing ADP is extraordinarily slow compared to that of actin containing ATP. The lack of the Mg2+-induced conformational change, which is an essential step in the Mg2+-induced polymerization, is probably the cause for the very slow polymerization of actin containing ADP. On the other hand, at 20 degrees C, at pH 8, and in 2 mM Mg2+, the elongation rate from the slow growing end of an actin filament, measured by using the protein brevin to block growth at the fast growing end, is only 4 times slower for actin containing ADP than for actin containing ATP.

  10. Dual recognition unit strategy improves the specificity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer biosensor for cerebral ATP assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; He, Xiulan; Zhang, Li; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-01-20

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer has been widely used as a recognition unit for biosensor development; however, its relatively poor specificity toward ATP against adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) essentially limits the application of the biosensors in real systems, especially in the complex cerebral system. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrate a dual recognition unit strategy (DRUS) to construct a highly selective and sensitive ATP biosensor by combining the recognition ability of aptamer toward A nucleobase and of polyimidazolium toward phosphate. The biosensors are constructed by first confining the polyimidazolium onto a gold surface by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and then the aptamer onto electrode surface by electrostatic self-assembly to form dual-recognition-unit-functionalized electrodes. The constructed biosensor based on DRUS not only shows an ultrahigh sensitivity toward ATP with a detection limit down to the subattomole level but also an ultrahigh selectivity toward ATP without interference from ADP and AMP. The constructed biosensor is used for selective and sensitive sensing of the extracellular ATP in the cerebral system by combining in vivo microdialysis and can be used as a promising neurotechnology to probing cerebral ATP concentration.

  11. Method of predictive studies of the effectiveness of spacecraft modifications with integrated subsystem replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Yu. A.; Lamzin, V. A.; Lamzin, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The article reviews application features of the method of bilevel coordinated optimization of spacecraft modification parameters during integrated replacement of subsystems. The algorithm for problem solution is presented in the article. It is shown that in the case of implementation of a balanced bilevel schematic of optimization search, the agreement of project solutions for spacecraft modification is provided by integrated replacement of subsystems. Project models are shown for the problem solution of optimization parameters for spacecraft modification with the integrated replacement of subsystems of the payload equipment module and a unified space platform.

  12. Cost analysis of life sciences experiments and subsystems. [to be carried in the Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Cost estimates for experiments and subsystems flown in the Spacelab were established. Ten experiments were cost analyzed. Estimated cost varied from $650,000 for the hardware development of the SPE water electrolysis experiment to $78,500,000 for the development and operation of a representative life sciences laboratory program. The cost of subsystems for thermal, atmospheric and trace contaminants control of the Spacelab internal atmosphere was also estimated. Subsystem cost estimates were based on the utilization of existing components developed in previous space programs whenever necessary.

  13. System Simulation by Recursive Feedback: Coupling a Set of Stand-Alone Subsystem Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Douglas D.; Ryan, Stephen G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recursive feedback is defined and discussed as a framework for development of specific algorithms and procedures that propagate the time-domain solution for a dynamical system simulation consisting of multiple numerically coupled, self-contained, stand-alone subsystem simulations. A satellite motion example containing three subsystems (orbit dynamics, attitude dynamics, and aerodynamics) has been defined and constructed using this approach. Conventional solution methods are used in the subsystem simulations. Centralized and distributed versions of coupling structure have been addressed. Numerical results are evaluated by direct comparison with a standard total-system, simultaneous-solution approach.

  14. System Simulation by Recursive Feedback: Coupling A Set of Stand-Alone Subsystem Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Douglas D.; Hanson, John M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recursive feedback is defined and discussed as a framework for development of specific algorithms and procedures that propagate the time-domain solution for a dynamical system simulation consisting of multiple numerically coupled self-contained stand-alone subsystem simulations. A satellite motion example containing three subsystems (other dynamics, attitude dynamics, and aerodynamics) has been defined and constructed using this approach. Conventional solution methods are used in the subsystem simulations. Centralized and distributed versions of coupling structure have been addressed. Numerical results are evaluated by direct comparison with a standard total-system simultaneous-solution approach.

  15. Organizational vs. Subsystem vs. Psychological Climate: What’s in a Name?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    AD-AI14 092 NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA F/G 5/10 ORGANIZATIONAL VS. SUBSYSTEM VS. PSYCHOLOGICAL CLIMATE! WATITS --ETC(U) JUL7 A P JOES...DEVELOPMNT COMMAND 1 BETHESDA, MARYLAND 82 05 .04 0430 Organizational vs. Subsystem vs. Psychological Climate: What’s in a Name? * Allan P. Jones (Ph.D...Subsystem vs. Psychological Climate: What’s in a Name? Abstract Many recent climate articles have continued in the tradition of theo- retical and

  16. International Space Station Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Verification for Node 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem design. The paper will also provide a discussion of the detailed Element Verification methodologies for nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem operations utilized during the Qualification phase.

  17. Work Plan for Updating Double Shell Tank (DST) SubSystem Specifications (TBR 120.020)

    SciTech Connect

    GRENARD, C.E.

    1999-11-19

    The DST System stores waste from the processing of nuclear material at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The program to dispose of this waste has been divided into several phases with Phase 1 being the demonstration of the waste disposal technology by a private contractor. Subsystem specifications are being prepared providing requirements for the subsystems that are necessary for the continued safe storage of waste in the DST System and the removal of selected waste for processing by the privatized facility during Phase 1. This document provides the detailed plans for updating subsystem specifications developed during EY99.

  18. Extracellular ATP a New Player in Cancer Metabolism: NSCLC Cells Internalize ATP In Vitro and In Vivo Using Multiple Endocytic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yanrong; Wang, Xuan; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Yanyang; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2016-11-01

    Intratumoral extracellular ATP concentrations are 1000 times higher than those in normal tissues of the same cell origin. However, whether or not cancer cells use the abundant extracellular ATP was unknown until we recently reported that cancer cells internalize ATP. The internalized ATP was found to substantially increase intracellular ATP concentration and promote cell proliferation and drug resistance in cancer cells. Here, using a nonhydrolyzable fluorescent ATP (NHF-ATP), radioactive and regular ATP, coupled with high and low molecular weight dextrans as endocytosis tracers and fluorescence microscopy and ATP assays, cultured human NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells as well as A549 tumor xenografts were found to internalize extracellular ATP at concentrations within the reported intratumoral extracellular ATP concentration range. In addition to macropinocytosis, both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis significantly contribute to the ATP internalization, which led to an approximately 30% (within 45 minutes) or more than 50% (within 4 hours) increase in intracellular ATP levels after ATP incubation. This increase could not be accounted for by either purinergic receptor signaling or increased intracellular ATP synthesis rates in the ATP-treated cancer cells. These new findings significantly deepen our understanding of the Warburg effect by shedding light on how cancer cells in tumors, which are heterogeneous for oxygen and nutrition supplies, take up extracellular ATP and use the internalized ATP to perform multiple previously unrecognized functions of biological importance. They strongly suggest the existence of ATP sharing among cancer and stromal cells in tumors and simultaneously identify multiple new anticancer targets.

  19. Robust omniphobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Anish; Choi, Wonjae; Mabry, Joseph M.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces display water contact angles greater than 150° in conjunction with low contact angle hysteresis. Microscopic pockets of air trapped beneath the water droplets placed on these surfaces lead to a composite solid-liquid-air interface in thermodynamic equilibrium. Previous experimental and theoretical studies suggest that it may not be possible to form similar fully-equilibrated, composite interfaces with drops of liquids, such as alkanes or alcohols, that possess significantly lower surface tension than water (γlv = 72.1 mN/m). In this work we develop surfaces possessing re-entrant texture that can support strongly metastable composite solid-liquid-air interfaces, even with very low surface tension liquids such as pentane (γlv = 15.7 mN/m). Furthermore, we propose four design parameters that predict the measured contact angles for a liquid droplet on a textured surface, as well as the robustness of the composite interface, based on the properties of the solid surface and the contacting liquid. These design parameters allow us to produce two different families of re-entrant surfaces— randomly-deposited electrospun fiber mats and precisely fabricated microhoodoo surfaces—that can each support a robust composite interface with essentially any liquid. These omniphobic surfaces display contact angles greater than 150° and low contact angle hysteresis with both polar and nonpolar liquids possessing a wide range of surface tensions. PMID:19001270

  20. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  1. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  2. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  3. Evolution, structure and function of hydrologic subsystems in hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Brooks, P.; Chorover, J.; Huxman, T.; McDonnell, J. J.; Rasmussen, C.; Sivapalan, M.

    2007-12-01

    Hillslopes offer a useful elementary scale to construct catchment hydrologic models, and to understand the role of water in the landscape. However, hillslopes exhibit enormous complexity and heterogeneity, much of which is not easily observable. The complexity is driven by the interactions between water, biogeochemistry, ecology and soils, within the constraints set by the climate and the geologic history of the system. These interactions create complex, non-random patterns and structures in space-time. Current models have difficulty accounting for these interactions and unobserved structural complexity. A new approach may ask: why do the complex structures exist at all? Taking the view that the hydrology of a landscape has evolved along with its soils, ecology and geomorphology, we may ask if the hydrologic subsystem of a hillslope has a functional role in the maintenance of the overall system. This functional role may be expressed as an organizing principle - a constraint on possible ways that the hydrologic flowpaths may be organized such that the functional role is met. If a relationship can be established between an organizing principle and the structure of hydrologic flow-paths and storages, it can form the basis for developing closure relations at the hillslope scale that have meaningful relationships to the underlying dynamics. In this way, heterogeneity and complexity of hillslopes are no longer problems to be overcome, but rather are keys to making meaningful predictions. Formulating and testing organizing principles will necessarily require the synthesis of knowledge from many disciplines. One approach is to construct artificial hillslopes in a controlled environment, and use them to ask, given a set of observable constraints (climate, soil, ecologic and biogeochemical parameters) which structures and responses are "behavioral" - in the sense that they fulfill the function set by the organizing principle. Such artificial hillslopes will be constructed at

  4. Quantitative ATP synthesis in human liver measured by localized 31P spectroscopy using the magnetization transfer experiment.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A I; Chmelík, M; Szendroedi, J; Krssák, M; Brehm, A; Moser, E; Roden, M

    2008-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in intermediate metabolism. Accumulation of liver fat (steatosis) predisposes to various liver diseases. Steatosis and abnormal muscle energy metabolism are found in insulin-resistant and type-2 diabetic states. To examine hepatic energy metabolism, we measured hepatocellular lipid content, using proton MRS, and rates of hepatic ATP synthesis in vivo, using the 31P magnetization transfer experiment. A suitable localization scheme was developed and applied to the measurements of longitudinal relaxation times (T1) in six healthy volunteers and the ATP-synthesis experiment in nine healthy volunteers. Liver 31P spectra were modelled and quantified successfully using a time domain fit and the AMARES (advanced method for accurate, robust and efficient spectral fitting of MRS data with use of prior knowledge) algorithm describing the essential components of the dataset. The measured T1 relaxation times are comparable to values reported previously at lower field strengths. All nine subjects in whom saturation transfer was measured had low hepatocellular lipid content (1.5 +/- 0.2% MR signal; mean +/- SEM). The exchange rate constant (k) obtained was 0.30 +/- 0.02 s(-1), and the rate of ATP synthesis was 29.5 +/- 1.8 mM/min. The measured rate of ATP synthesis is about three times higher than in human skeletal muscle and human visual cortex, but only about half of that measured in perfused rat liver. In conclusion, 31P MRS at 3 T provides sufficient sensitivity to detect magnetization transfer effects and can therefore be used to assess ATP synthesis in human liver.

  5. Follow the ATP: tumor energy production: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Oronsky, Neil; Fanger, Gary R; Parker, Christopher W; Caroen, Scott Z; Lybeck, Michelle; Scicinski, Jan J

    2014-01-01

    As early as the 1920s, the eminent physician and chemist, Otto Warburg, nominated for a second Nobel Prize for his work on fermentation, observed that the core metabolic signature of cancer cells is a high glycolytic flux. Warburg averred that the prime mover of cancer is defective mitochondrial respiration, which drives a switch to an alternative energy source, aerobic glycolysis in lieu of Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS), in an attempt to maintain cellular viability and support critical macromolecular needs. The cell, deprived of mitochondrial ATP production, must reprogram its metabolism as a secondary survival mechanism to maintain sufficient ATP and NADH levels for macromolecule production, membrane integrity and DNA synthesis as well as maintenance of membrane ionic gradients. A time-tested method to identify and disrupt criminal activity is to "follow the money" since the illicit proceeds from crime are required to underwrite it. By analogy, strategies to target cancer involve following and disrupting the flow of ATP and NADH, the energetic and redox "currencies" of the cell, respectively, since the tumor requires high levels of ATP and NADH, not only for metastasis and proliferation, but also, on a more basic level, for survival. Accordingly, four broad ATP reduction strategies to impact and potentially derail cancer energy production are highlighted herein: 1) small molecule energy-restriction mimetic agents (ERMAs) that target various aspects of energy metabolism, 2) reduction of energy 'subsidization' with autophagy inhibitors, 3) acceleration of ATP turnover to increase energy inefficiency, and 4) dietary energy restriction to limit the energy supply.

  6. ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Leshinsky, E; Ganoth, D; Heller, H

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-requiring conjugation of ubiquitin with proteins plays a role in the energy-dependent degradation of intracellular proteins. To examine whether such conjugates are indeed intermediates in protein breakdown, conjugates of 125I-labeled lysozyme with ubiquitin were isolated and incubated with a fraction of reticulocyte extract that lacks the enzymes that carry out ubiquitin-protein conjugation. ATP markedly stimulated degradation of the lysozyme moiety of ubiquitin conjugates to products soluble in trichloroacetic acid. By contrast, free 125I-labeled lysozyme was not degraded under these conditions, unless ubiquitin and the three enzymes required for ubiquitin conjugation were supplemented. Mg2+ was absolutely required for conjugate breakdown. Of various nucleotides, only CTP replaced ATP. Nonhydrolyzable analogs of ATP were not effective. In the absence of ATP, free lysozyme is released from ubiquitin-lysozyme conjugates by isopeptidases present in the extract. Thus, ATP is involved in both the formation and the breakdown of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Images PMID:6324208

  7. [ATP pool and bioluminescence in psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum].

    PubMed

    Alekserova, L É; Alenina, K A; Efremenko, E N; Mazhul', M M; Piskunova, N F; Ismailov, A D

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence activity and ATP pool were investigated in the culture of psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum collected-from the exponential and stationary growth phases, as well as immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel. In liquid culture, ATP pool remained at an almost a constant level throughout the luminescence cycle (over 100 h). The ATP pool in the stationary-phase and PVA-immobilizedl cells remained constant throughout their incubation in the medium (over 200 h) and in 3% NaCl solution (over 100 h): Quantitative assessment of integral photon yield and ATP pool indicated that bioluminescence decay in growing or stationary cells was not caused by limitation by the energy substrates of the luciferase reaction. Kinetic and quantitative parameters of emission activity and ATP pool excluded the possibility of formation of the aldehyde substrate for luciferase via reduction of the relevant fatty acids in NADPH and ATP-dependent reductase reaction and its oxidation in the monooxygenase reaction. Our results indicate that the aliphatic aldehyde is not utilized in the process of light emission.

  8. Catalytic Mechanism of the Maltose Transporter Hydrolyzing ATP.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenting; Liao, Jie-Lou

    2016-01-12

    We use quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations to study ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the maltose transporter. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family that consists of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The ABC proteins catalyze ATP hydrolysis to perform a variety of biological functions. Despite extensive research efforts, the precise molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the ABC enzymes remains elusive. In this work, the reaction pathway for ATP hydrolysis in the maltose transporter is evaluated using a QM/MM implementation of the nudged elastic band method without presuming reaction coordinates. The potential of mean force along the reaction pathway is obtained with an activation free energy of 19.2 kcal/mol in agreement with experiments. The results demonstrate that the reaction proceeds via a dissociative-like pathway with a trigonal bipyramidal transition state in which the cleavage of the γ-phosphate P-O bond occurs and the O-H bond of the lytic water molecule is not yet broken. Our calculations clearly show that the Walker B glutamate as well as the switch histidine stabilizes the transition state via electrostatic interactions rather than serving as a catalytic base. The results are consistent with biochemical and structural experiments, providing novel insight into the molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis in the ABC proteins.

  9. A genetically encoded fluorescent reporter of ATP/ADP ratio

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jim; Hung, Yin Pun; Yellen, Gary

    2008-01-01

    A fluorescent sensor of adenylate nucleotides was constructed by combining a circularly permuted variant of green fluorescent protein with a bacterial regulatory protein, GlnK1, from Methanococcus jannaschii. The affinity for Mg-ATP is below 100 nM, as seen for the other members of the bacterial PII regulator family – a surprisingly high affinity given normal intracellular [ATP] in the millimolar range. ADP binds to the same site, competing with Mg-ATP but producing a smaller change in fluorescence. With normal physiological concentrations of ATP and ADP, the binding site is saturated, but competition between the two substrates causes the sensor to behave as a nearly ideal reporter of the ATP/ADP concentration ratio. This principle for sensing the ratio of two analytes by competition at a high affinity site probably underlies the normal functioning of PII regulatory proteins. The engineered sensor, Perceval, can be used to monitor the ATP/ADP ratio during live cell imaging. PMID:19122669

  10. CMS Preprocessing Subsystem user`s guide: Software Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Didier, B.T.; Gash, J.D.; Greitzer, F.L.; Havre, S.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Turney, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    The Common Mapping Standard (CMS) Data Production System (CDPS) produces and distributes CMS data in compliance with the Common Mapping Standard Interface Control Document. CDPS is composed of two subsystems, the CMS Preprocessing Subsystem (CPS) and the CMS Distribution Subsystem (CDS). This guide describes the operation of CPS. CPS is responsible for the management of source data and the production of CMS data from source data. The CPS system was developed for use on a workstation running Ultrix 4.2, the X Window System Version X11R4, and motif Version 1.1. This subsystem is organized into four major functional groups and supports production of CMS data from source chart, indose, and elevation data products.

  11. Transient Analysis of Pressurization and Pneumatic Subsystems of the X-34 Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Knight, K. C.; Chamption, R. H., Jr.; Kennedy, Jim W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Transient models for the pressurization, vent/relief, and pneumatic subsystems of the X-34 Main Propulsion System are presented and simulation of their operation within prescribed requirements are provided. First, using ROCket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) program, pressurization subsystem operation was simulated and helium requirements and the ullage thermodynamic condition within each propellant tank were calculated. Then, Overpressurization scenarios of propellant tanks and the response of vent/relief valves were evaluated using ROCETS simulation of simultaneous operation of the pressurization and vent/relief subsystems by incorporating the valves data into the model. Finally, the ROCETS simulation of in-flight operation of pneumatic subsystem predicted the overall helium consumption, Inter-Propellant Seal (IPS) purge flowrate and thermodynamic conditions, and Spin Start power.

  12. Six-man, self-contained carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem for Space Station Prototype (SSP) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostell, G. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Shumar, J. W.; Hallick, T. M.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    A six man, self contained, electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrating subsystem for space station prototype use was successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. A test program was successfully completed which covered shakedown testing, design verification testing, and acceptance testing.

  13. Error Suppression for Hamiltonian-Based Quantum Computation Using Subsystem Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    We present general conditions for quantum error suppression for Hamiltonian-based quantum computation using subsystem codes. This involves encoding the Hamiltonian performing the computation using an error detecting subsystem code and the addition of a penalty term that commutes with the encoded Hamiltonian. The scheme is general and includes the stabilizer formalism of both subspace and subsystem codes as special cases. We derive performance bounds and show that complete error suppression results in the large penalty limit. To illustrate the power of subsystem-based error suppression, we introduce fully two-local constructions for protection against local errors of the swap gate of adiabatic gate teleportation and the Ising chain in a transverse field.

  14. System Simulation by Recursive Feedback: Coupling a Set of Stand-Alone Subsystem Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    Conventional construction of digital dynamic system simulations often involves collecting differential equations that model each subsystem, arran g them to a standard form, and obtaining their numerical gin solution as a single coupled, total-system simultaneous set. Simulation by numerical coupling of independent stand-alone subsimulations is a fundamentally different approach that is attractive because, among other things, the architecture naturally facilitates high fidelity, broad scope, and discipline independence. Recursive feedback is defined and discussed as a candidate approach to multidiscipline dynamic system simulation by numerical coupling of self-contained, single-discipline subsystem simulations. A satellite motion example containing three subsystems (orbit dynamics, attitude dynamics, and aerodynamics) has been defined and constructed using this approach. Conventional solution methods are used in the subsystem simulations. Distributed and centralized implementations of coupling have been considered. Numerical results are evaluated by direct comparison with a standard total-system, simultaneous-solution approach.

  15. Thematic mapper flight model preshipment review data package. Volume 2, part C: Subsystem data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Reference lists are provided to acceptance data for each of the major subsystems of the thematic mapper. Configuration reports, lists and copies of all failure reports, and requests for deviation/waiver are included.

  16. Large area crop inventory experiment crop assessment subsystem software requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The functional data processing requirements are described for the Crop Assessment Subsystem of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. These requirements are used as a guide for software development and implementation.

  17. CMS Distribution Subsystem user`s guide. Software Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, J.D.; Greitzer, F.L.; Hatfield, L.D.; Portwood, M.H.; Turney, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    The Common Mapping Standard (CMS) Data Production System (CDPS) produces and distributes CMS data in compliance with the Common Mapping Standard Interface Control Document. CDPS is composed of two subsystems the CMS Distribution Subsystem (CDS) and the CMS Preprocessing Subsystem (CPS). This guide describes the operation of CDS. CDS is responsible for the management of archived CMS data, the management of production orders, and the generation of theater databases. This subsystem was developed for use on a workstation running Ultrix 4.2, the X Window System Version X11R4, and motif Version 1.1. CDS is organized into seven major functional groups and supports archiving and distributing CMS data for selected products.

  18. Error Suppression for Hamiltonian-Based Quantum Computation Using Subsystem Codes.

    PubMed

    Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel A

    2017-01-20

    We present general conditions for quantum error suppression for Hamiltonian-based quantum computation using subsystem codes. This involves encoding the Hamiltonian performing the computation using an error detecting subsystem code and the addition of a penalty term that commutes with the encoded Hamiltonian. The scheme is general and includes the stabilizer formalism of both subspace and subsystem codes as special cases. We derive performance bounds and show that complete error suppression results in the large penalty limit. To illustrate the power of subsystem-based error suppression, we introduce fully two-local constructions for protection against local errors of the swap gate of adiabatic gate teleportation and the Ising chain in a transverse field.

  19. Ice pack heat sink subsystem, phase 2. [astronaut life support cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the design, development, fabrication, and test at one gravity of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions; the investigation of thermal storage material with the objective of uncovering materials with heats of fusion and/or solution in the range of 300 Btu/lb (700 kilojoules/kilogram); and the planned procedure for implementing an ice pack heat sink subsystem flight experiment. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  20. MIT's role in project Apollo. Volume 2: Optical, radar, and candidate subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of optical, radar, and candidate subsystems for Project Apollo is discussed. The design and development of the optical subsystems for both the Apollo command and lunar spacecraft are described. Design approaches, problems, and solutions are presented. The evolution of radar interfaces with the GN&C system is discussed; these interfaces involved both hardware and software in a relatively complex interrelationship. The design and development of three candidate subsystems are also described. The systems were considered for use in Apollo, but were not incorporated into the final GN&C system. The three subsystems discussed are the star tracker-horizon photometer, the map and data viewer and the lunar module optical rendezvous system.