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Sample records for robust pore size

  1. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  2. A robust model for pore-water chemistry of clayrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucher, E. C.; Tournassat, C.; Pearson, F. J.; Blanc, P.; Crouzet, C.; Lerouge, C.; Altmann, S.

    2009-11-01

    The chemistry of pore water is an important property of clayrocks being considered as host rocks for long-term storage of radioactive waste. It may be difficult, if not impossible, to obtain water samples for chemical analysis from such rocks because of their low hydraulic conductivity. This paper presents an approach for calculating the pore-water compositions of clayrocks from laboratory-measured properties of core samples, including their leachable Cl and SO 4 concentrations and analysed exchangeable cations, and from mineral and cation exchange equilibria based on the formation mineralogy. New core sampling and analysis procedures are presented that reduce or quantify side reactions such as sample oxidation (e.g. pyrite) and soluble mineral dissolution (celestite, SrSO 4) that affect measured SO 4 concentrations and exchangeable cation distributions. The model considers phase equilibria only with minerals that are observed in the formation including the principal clay phases. The model has been used to calculate the composition of mobile pore water in the Callovo-Oxfordian clayrock and validated against measurements of water chemistry made in an underground research laboratory in that formation. The model reproduces the measured, in situ pore-water composition without any estimated parameters. All required parameters can be obtained from core sample analysis. We highlight the need to consider only those mineral phases which can be shown to be in equilibrium with contacting pore water. The consequence of this is that some conceptual models available in the literature appear not to be appropriate for modelling clayrocks, particularly those considering high temperature and/or high pressure detrital phases as chemical buffers of pore water. The robustness of our model with respect to uncertainties in the log K values of clay phases is also demonstrated. Large uncertainties in log K values for clay minerals have relatively small effects on modelled pore

  3. Effects of pore-size and shape distributions on diffusion pore imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In medical imaging and porous media research, NMR diffusion measurements are extensively used to investigate the structure of diffusion restrictions such as cell membranes. Recently, several methods have been proposed to unambiguously determine the shape of arbitrary closed pores or cells filled with an NMR-visible medium by diffusion experiments. The first approach uses a combination of a long and a short diffusion-weighting gradient pulse, while the other techniques employ short gradient pulses only. While the eventual aim of these methods is to determine pore-size and shape distributions, the focus has been so far on identical pores. Thus, the aim of this work is to investigate the ability of these different methods to resolve pore-size and orientation distributions. Simulations were performed comparing the various pore imaging techniques employing different distributions of pore size and orientation and varying timing parameters. The long-narrow gradient profile is most advantageous to investigate pore distributions, because average pore images can be directly obtained. The short-gradient methods suppress larger pores or induce a considerable blurring. Moreover, pore-shape-specific artifacts occur; for example, the central part of a distribution of cylinders may be largely underestimated. Depending on the actual pore distribution, short-gradient methods may nonetheless yield good approximations of the average pore shape. Furthermore, the application of short-gradient methods can be advantageous to differentiate whether pore-size distributions or intensity distributions, e.g., due to surface relaxation, are predominant.

  4. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui Zhu, Huaiyong; Shi, Jeffrey; Parkinson, Gordon; Lu, G.Q.

    2007-03-15

    The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

  5. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  6. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  7. THE SIZE OF SONOPORATION PORES ON THE CELL MEMBRANE

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Kumon, Ronald E.; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X.

    2009-01-01

    Sonoporation uses ultrasound (US) to generate transient non-selective pores on the cell membrane and has been exploited as a non-viral intracellular drug and gene delivery strategy. The pore size determines the size of agents that can be delivered into the cytoplasm using the technique. However, measurements of the dynamic, submicron-scale pores have not been readily available. Electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy has been used to gauge pore size but such techniques are intrinsically limited to post US measurements that may not accurately reveal the relevant information. As previously demonstrated, changes of the transmembrane current (TMC) of a single cell under voltage clamp can be used for monitoring sonoporation in real time. Because the TMC is related to the diffusion of ions through the pores on the membrane, it can potentially provide information of the pore size generated in sonoporation. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as the model system, the TMC of single cells under voltage clamp was measured in real time to assess formation of pores on the membrane in sonoporation. The cells were exposed to US (0.2 s, 0.3 MPa, 1.075 MHz) in the presence of Definity™ microbubbles. Experiments were designed to obtain the TMC corresponding to a single pore on the membrane. The size of the pores was estimated from an electro-diffusion model that relates the TMC with pore size from the ion transport through the pores on the membrane. The mean radius of single pores was determined to be 110 nm with standard deviation of 40 nm. This study reports the first results of pore size from the TMC measured using the voltage clamp technique. PMID:19647924

  8. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  9. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  10. Mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and pore solution of fly ash-belite cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, A.; Goni, S.; Macias, A.; Luxan, M.P.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and extracted pore solution of fly ash-belite cement (FABC) mortars were studied for a period of 200 days. The influence of the calcination temperature, which ranged from 700 to 900 C, of the fly ash-belite cement was discussed. The evolution with hydration time of the pore size distribution was followed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and the results correlated with those of flexural and compressive strength. The pore solution was expressed and analyzed at different times of hydration.

  11. Pore size engineering applied to starved electrochemical cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    To maximize performance in starved, multiplate cells, the cell design should rely on techniques which widen the volume tolerance characteristics. These involve engineering capillary pressure differences between the components of an electrochemical cell and using these forces to promote redistribution of electrolyte to the desired optimum values. This can be implemented in practice by prescribing pore size distributions for porous back-up plates, reservoirs, and electrodes. In addition, electrolyte volume management can be controlled by incorporating different pore size distributions into the separator. In a nickel/hydrogen cell, the separator must contain pores similar in size to the small pores of both the nickel and hydrogen electrodes in order to maintain an optimum conductive path for the electrolyte. The pore size distributions of all components should overlap in such a way as to prevent drying of the separator and/or flooding of the hydrogen electrode.

  12. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  13. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K(+) channels discriminate K(+) over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K(+) channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K(+) channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K(+) channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance.

  14. A fast and robust new pore-network extraction method based on hybrid median axis and maximal inscribed ball techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofey, Sizonenko; Karsanina, Marina; Byuk, Irina; Gerke, Kirill

    2016-04-01

    To characterize pore structure relevant to single and multi-phase flow modelling it is of special interest to extract topology of the pore space. This is usually achieved using so-called pore-network models. Such models are useful not only to characterize pore space and pore size distributions, but also provide means to simulate flow and transport with very limited computational resources compared to other pore-scale modelling techniques. The main drawback of the pore-network approach is that they have first to simplify the pore space geometry. This crucial step is both time consuming and prone to numerous errors. Two most popular methods based on median axis or inscribed maximal balls have their own strong sides and disadvantages. To address aforementioned problems related to pore-network extraction here we propose a novel method utilizing the advantages of both popular approaches. Combining two algorithms resulted in much faster and robust extraction methodology. Moreover, we have found that accurate topology representation requires extension of the conventional pore-body and pore-throat classification. We test our new methodology using pore structures with "analytical solutions" such as different sphere packs. In addition, we rigorously compare it against inscribed maximal balls methodology's results using numerous 3D images of sandstone and carbonate rocks, soils and some other porous materials. Another verification includes permeability calculations which are also compared both against lab data and voxel based pore-scale modelling simulations. This work was partially supported by RFBR grant 15-34-20989 (X-ray tomography and image fusion) and RSF grant 14-17-00658 (image segmentation and pore-scale modelling).

  15. Porous Boron Nitride with Tunable Pore Size.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-01-16

    On the basis of a global structural search and first-principles calculations, we predict two types of porous boron-nitride (BN) networks that can be built up with zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). The BNNRs are either directly connected with puckered B (N) atoms at the edge (type I) or connected with sp(3)-bonded BN chains (type II). Besides mechanical stability, these materials are predicted to be thermally stable at 1000 K. The porous BN materials entail large surface areas, ranging from 2800 to 4800 m(2)/g. In particular, type-II BN material with relatively large pores is highly favorable for hydrogen storage because the computed hydrogen adsorption energy (-0.18 eV) is very close to the optimal adsorption energy (-0.15 eV) suggested for reversible hydrogen storage at room temperature. Moreover, the type-II materials are semiconductors with width-dependent direct bandgaps, rendering the type-II BN materials promising not only for hydrogen storage but also for optoelectronic and photonic applications. PMID:26270717

  16. Estimation of pore size distribution using concentric double pulsed-field gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Nevo, Uri

    2013-05-01

    Estimation of pore size distribution of well calibrated phantoms using NMR is demonstrated here for the first time. Porous materials are a central constituent in fields as diverse as biology, geology, and oil drilling. Noninvasive characterization of monodisperse porous samples using conventional pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR is a well-established method. However, estimation of pore size distribution of heterogeneous polydisperse systems, which comprise most of the materials found in nature, remains extremely challenging. Concentric double pulsed-field gradient (CDPFG) is a 2-D technique where both q (the amplitude of the diffusion gradient) and φ (the relative angle between the gradient pairs) are varied. A recent prediction indicates this method should produce a more accurate and robust estimation of pore size distribution than its conventional 1-D versions. Five well defined size distribution phantoms, consisting of 1-5 different pore sizes in the range of 5-25 μm were used. The estimated pore size distributions were all in good agreement with the known theoretical size distributions, and were obtained without any a priori assumption on the size distribution model. These findings support that in addition to its theoretical benefits, the CDPFG method is experimentally reliable. Furthermore, by adding the angle parameter, sensitivity to small compartment sizes is increased without the use of strong gradients, thus making CDPFG safe for biological applications. PMID:23548563

  17. Estimation of pore size distribution using concentric double pulsed-field gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Nevo, Uri

    2013-05-01

    Estimation of pore size distribution of well calibrated phantoms using NMR is demonstrated here for the first time. Porous materials are a central constituent in fields as diverse as biology, geology, and oil drilling. Noninvasive characterization of monodisperse porous samples using conventional pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR is a well-established method. However, estimation of pore size distribution of heterogeneous polydisperse systems, which comprise most of the materials found in nature, remains extremely challenging. Concentric double pulsed-field gradient (CDPFG) is a 2-D technique where both q (the amplitude of the diffusion gradient) and φ (the relative angle between the gradient pairs) are varied. A recent prediction indicates this method should produce a more accurate and robust estimation of pore size distribution than its conventional 1-D versions. Five well defined size distribution phantoms, consisting of 1-5 different pore sizes in the range of 5-25 μm were used. The estimated pore size distributions were all in good agreement with the known theoretical size distributions, and were obtained without any a priori assumption on the size distribution model. These findings support that in addition to its theoretical benefits, the CDPFG method is experimentally reliable. Furthermore, by adding the angle parameter, sensitivity to small compartment sizes is increased without the use of strong gradients, thus making CDPFG safe for biological applications.

  18. Pore size effect of collagen scaffolds on cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-05-01

    Scaffold pore size is an important factor affecting tissue regeneration efficiency. The effect of pore size on cartilage tissue regeneration was compared by using four types of collagen porous scaffolds with different pore sizes. The collagen porous scaffolds were prepared by using pre-prepared ice particulates that had diameters of 150-250, 250-355, 355-425 and 425-500μm. All the scaffolds had spherical large pores with good interconnectivity and high porosity that facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution. Chondrocytes adhered to the walls of the spherical pores and showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffolds. The in vivo implantation results indicated that the pore size did not exhibit any obvious effect on cell proliferation but exhibited different effects on cartilage regeneration. The collagen porous scaffolds prepared with ice particulates 150-250μm in size best promoted the expression and production of type II collagen and aggrecan, increasing the formation and the mechanical properties of the cartilage.

  19. Using radial NMR profiles to characterize pore size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriche, Rachid; Treilhard, John

    2012-02-01

    Extracting information about axon diameter distributions in the brain is a challenging task which provides useful information for medical purposes; for example, the ability to characterize and monitor axon diameters would be useful in diagnosing and investigating diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)1 or autism.2 Three families of operators are defined by Ozarslan,3 whose action upon an NMR attenuation signal extracts the moments of the pore size distribution of the ensemble under consideration; also a numerical method is proposed to continuously reconstruct a discretely sampled attenuation profile using the eigenfunctions of the simple harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian: the SHORE basis. The work presented here extends Ozarlan's method to other bases that can offer a better description of attenuation signal behaviour; in particular, we propose the use of the radial Spherical Polar Fourier (SPF) basis. Testing is performed to contrast the efficacy of the radial SPF basis and SHORE basis in practical attenuation signal reconstruction. The robustness of the method to additive noise is tested and analysed. We demonstrate that a low-order attenuation signal reconstruction outperforms a higher-order reconstruction in subsequent moment estimation under noisy conditions. We propose the simulated annealing algorithm for basis function scale parameter estimation. Finally, analytic expressions are derived and presented for the action of the operators on the radial SPF basis (obviating the need for numerical integration, thus avoiding a spectrum of possible sources of error).

  20. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.

  1. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, tight sandstones, and shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2009-01-01

    Pore-throat sizes in silidclastic rocks form a continuum from the submillimeter to the nanometer scale. That continuum is documented in this article using previously published data on the pore and pore-throat sizes of conventional reservoir rocks, tight-gas sandstones, and shales. For measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median), pore-throat sizes (diameters) are generally greater than 2 μm in conventional reservoir rocks, range from about 2 to 0.03 μm in tight-gas sandstones, and range from 0.1 to 0.005 μm in shales. Hydrocarbon molecules, asphaltenes, ring structures, paraffins, and methane, form another continuum, ranging from 100 Å (0.01 μm for asphaltenes to 3.8 A (0.00038 μm) for methane. The pore-throat size continuum provides a useful perspective for considering (1) the emplacement of petroleum in consolidated siliciclastics and (2) fluid flow through fine-grained source rocks now being exploited as reservoirs.

  2. Pore sizes and filtration rates from two alumina slips

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.A. . Materials Science Dept.); Kerch, H.; Krueger, S.; Long, G.G. . Ceramics Div.); Keller, J.; Haber, R.A. . Dept. of Ceramics)

    1994-07-01

    The relationship between filtration rate and the resultant green body microstructure was examined for aqueous alumina slips cast at two different deflocculation states. The volume loading of both slips was 40%. Slip viscosities of 500 and 60 mPa[center dot]s were produced by different tetrasodium pyrophosphate additions. The filtration rate of these slips varied by a factor of 2; however, mercury porosimetry results showed the same average pore size for both samples. Single and multiple small-angle neutron scattering results showed the specimen cast with the higher-viscosity slip to possess a bimodal pore size distribution. The body cast with the low-viscosity slip showed unimodal porosity and, consequently, the filtration is attributed to the toroidal region between the packed particles. These results showed that mercury porosimetry does not provide a pore size that predicts filtration behavior of slips with different degrees of dispersion.

  3. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  4. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior.

  5. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior. PMID:23116121

  6. Pore-size distributions of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, D.H.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1993-11-01

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels at 25 and 32{degrees}C with swelling capacities 11.3 and 6.0 g swollen gel per g dry gel. The mixed-solute-exclusion method (introduced by Kuga) was used to obtain the experimental solute-exclusion curve which represents the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The pore-size distributions were obtained by using Casassa`s Brownian-motion model and numerically solving the Fredholm integral equation. The pore-size distributions of temperature-sensitive NIPA hydrogels are strongly dependent on temperature which determines swelling capacity. With increasing swelling capacity (from 6.0 to 11.3), the pore-size distribution shifts to higher mode values (27.3 to 50.6 {angstrom}) and to higher variance (1.07{center_dot}10{sup 3} to 3.58{center_dot}10{sup 3} {angstrom}{sup 2}).

  7. Unraveling the potential and pore-size dependent capacitance of slit-shaped graphitic carbon pores in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, R K; Biener, M M; Suss, M E; Merrill, M D; Stadermann, M; Santiago, J G; Baumann, T F; Biener, J; Striolo, A

    2013-02-21

    Understanding and leveraging physicochemical processes at the pore scale are believed to be essential to future performance improvements of supercapacitors and capacitive desalination (CD) cells. Here, we report on a combination of electrochemical experiments and fully atomistic simulations to study the effect of pore size and surface charge density on the capacitance of graphitic nanoporous carbon electrodes. Specifically, we used cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to study the effect of potential and pore size on the capacitance of nanoporous carbon foams. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the pore-size dependent accumulation of aqueous electrolytes in slit-shaped graphitic carbon pores of different widths (0.65 to 1.6 nm). Experimentally, we observe a pronounced increase of the capacitance of sub-nm pores as the applied potential window gets wider, from a few F g(-1) for narrow potential ranges (-0.3 to 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl) to ~40 F g(-1) for wider potential windows (-0.9 V to 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl). By contrast, the capacitance of wider pores does not depend significantly on the applied potential window. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that the penetration of ions into pores becomes more difficult with decreasing pore width and increasing strength of the hydration shell. Consistent with our experimental results, we observe a pore- and ion-size dependent threshold-like charging behavior when the pore width becomes comparable to the size of the hydrated ion (0.65 nm pores for Na(+) and 0.79 nm pores for Cl(-) ions). The observed pore-size and potential dependent accumulation of ions in slit-shaped carbon pores can be explained by the hydration structure of the ions entering the charged pores. The results are discussed in view of their effect on energy-storage and desalination efficiency.

  8. Simple thermal treatment for the size control of pore arrays in a polystyrene colloidal crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Fiorenza, Shane A.; Chen, Kevin; Tate, Alyssa M.; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Goldman, Yale E.

    Nanosphere Lithography (NSL) offers an attractive route to fabricating periodic structures with nanoscale features, without e-beam or deep UV lithography. In particular, it is uniquely suited to the low cost fabrication of large repeated arrays pores or pillars created by taking advantage of the interstitial spaces in close-packed monolayers of nano to micro-scale beads. However pore size, shape, and spacing cannot be controlled independently. We present both a robust method for producing large, approximately 1 cm2, hexagonally close packed monolayer films of 1 micron diameter polystyrene beads on glass substrates, and thermal treatment of these films near the glass temperature, Tg, of polystyrene to modify the pore size. This builds on earlier work showing that pore size can be modified for colloidal crystals formed at a liquid gas interface [2]. These processes promise a simple, reproducible, and low cost route to periodic pore arrays for nano-photonic applications such as zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) Funding: F30 AI114187 (RMJ), R01-GM080376 (YEG).

  9. Fabrication of Cell-Laden Macroporous Biodegradable Hydrogels with Tunable Porosities and Pore Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated a cytocompatible particulate leaching method for the fabrication of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels. We used dehydrated and uncrosslinked gelatin microspheres as leachable porogens to create macroporous oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels. Varying gelatin content and size resulted in a wide range of porosities and pore sizes, respectively. Encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited high viability immediately following the fabrication process, and culture of cell-laden hydrogels revealed improved cell viability with increasing porosity. Additionally, the osteogenic potential of the encapsulated MSCs was evaluated over 16 days. Overall, this study presents a robust method for the preparation of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels with desired porosity and pore size for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25156274

  10. Relation between the ion size and pore size for an electric double-layer capacitor.

    PubMed

    Largeot, Celine; Portet, Cristelle; Chmiola, John; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2008-03-01

    The research on electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC), also known as supercapacitors or ultracapacitors, is quickly expanding because their power delivery performance fills the gap between dielectric capacitors and traditional batteries. However, many fundamental questions, such as the relations between the pore size of carbon electrodes, ion size of the electrolyte, and the capacitance have not yet been fully answered. We show that the pore size leading to the maximum double-layer capacitance of a TiC-derived carbon electrode in a solvent-free ethyl-methylimmidazolium-bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) ionic liquid is roughly equal to the ion size (approximately 0.7 nm). The capacitance values of TiC-CDC produced at 500 degrees C are more than 160 F/g and 85 F/cm(3) at 60 degrees C, while standard activated carbons with larger pores and a broader pore size distribution present capacitance values lower than 100 F/g and 50 F/cm(3) in ionic liquids. A significant drop in capacitance has been observed in pores that were larger or smaller than the ion size by just an angstrom, suggesting that the pore size must be tuned with sub-angstrom accuracy when selecting a carbon/ion couple. This work suggests a general approach to EDLC design leading to the maximum energy density, which has been now proved for both solvated organic salts and solvent-free liquid electrolytes. PMID:18257568

  11. Relation between the ion size and pore size for an electric double-layer capacitor.

    PubMed

    Largeot, Celine; Portet, Cristelle; Chmiola, John; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2008-03-01

    The research on electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC), also known as supercapacitors or ultracapacitors, is quickly expanding because their power delivery performance fills the gap between dielectric capacitors and traditional batteries. However, many fundamental questions, such as the relations between the pore size of carbon electrodes, ion size of the electrolyte, and the capacitance have not yet been fully answered. We show that the pore size leading to the maximum double-layer capacitance of a TiC-derived carbon electrode in a solvent-free ethyl-methylimmidazolium-bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) ionic liquid is roughly equal to the ion size (approximately 0.7 nm). The capacitance values of TiC-CDC produced at 500 degrees C are more than 160 F/g and 85 F/cm(3) at 60 degrees C, while standard activated carbons with larger pores and a broader pore size distribution present capacitance values lower than 100 F/g and 50 F/cm(3) in ionic liquids. A significant drop in capacitance has been observed in pores that were larger or smaller than the ion size by just an angstrom, suggesting that the pore size must be tuned with sub-angstrom accuracy when selecting a carbon/ion couple. This work suggests a general approach to EDLC design leading to the maximum energy density, which has been now proved for both solvated organic salts and solvent-free liquid electrolytes.

  12. Pore size analysis of activated carbons from argon and nitrogen porosimetry using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, R.J.; Hyduke, D.R.; Lastoskie, C.M.

    2000-05-30

    The authors present isotherms calculated from density functional theory for the adsorption of argon in model slit-shaped carbon pores at 77 K. The model isotherms are used to interpret experimental argon uptake measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density functional theory isotherms, previously reported for nitrogen adsorption on carbon slit pores at 77 K, are used to determine pore size distributions for the same set of carbons. The pore size distribution maxima, mean pore widths, and specific pore volumes measured using the two different probe gases are all found to agree to within approximately 8% on average. Some of the differences in the pore size distributions obtained from argon and nitrogen porosimetry may be attributable to quadrupolar interactions of the nitrogen molecules with functional groups on the carbon surface.

  13. Silicon nanofilter with absolute pore size and high mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wen Hwa; Ferrari, Mauro

    1995-12-01

    Microfabricated silicon filters with a nominal pore size of 20 nm have been successfully fabricated and characterized. The filter consists of a filtration membrane on top of a silicon surface and a mechanical support on the silicon substrate. Two polysilicon layers together with a low temperature oxide layer are used to generate the filtration membrane on the front side of silicon wafers. The filtration function is accomplished by the flow channel generated from a sandwiched thin silicon dioxide layer. The thickness of the sandwiched oxide determines the particle size that can pass through the filter. Both distilled water and cell culture medium have been used to test the flow rate for this nanofilter. We have found that the flow rate of the nanofilter is highest at the beginning of the test, and then slowly decreases to its asymptotic values for both water and the cell culture medium. The observed flow rate is linearly proportional to the applied pressure in the ranges tested. The typical flow rate of distilled water for 20 nm filter with 1.19 cm2 effective filtration area is about 0.07 ml/min for applied pressure of 8 PSI. The filter successfully sustained pressure of up to 20 PSI.

  14. Pore size and pore throat types in a heterogeneous dolostone reservoir, Devonian Grosmont formation, western Canada sedimentary basin

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Machel, H. G.

    1995-11-01

    The Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a giant heavy-oil reservoir. The main reservoir rocks are dolomitized and karstified platform and ramp carbonates, and the best reservoir facies occur in the upper Grosmont (UGM) units 3 and 2. In these units, reservoir properties are highly heterogeneous. Hand specimen, thin section, UV, and SEM petrography, as well as grading scales, mercury capillary pressure curve analysis, and statistics, have been used to characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Our investigation led to a new pore size classification for carbonate reservoirs; this new classification has four pore sizes: microporosity (pore diameters <1 {mu}m), mesoporosity (pore diameters 1-1000 {mu}m), macroporosity (pore diameters 1-256 mm), and megaporosity (pore diameters >256 mm). A combination of microscopic observations and capillary pressure curve characteristics led to the recognition of four pore throat texture types on the microporosity scale, and to five types on the mesoporosity scale. Microporosity pore types include (1) intracrystal dissolution porosity, (2) pervasive intercrystal and intracrystal dissolution porosity, (3) intergranular and/or intercrystal porosity in grainstones, and (4) primary or solution microporosity in mud matrix (only in limestones). Mesoporosity pore types include (1) intercrystal porosity, (2) solution-enhanced intercrystal porosity, (3) oversized porosity, (4) intragranular solution porosity, and (5) intergranular solution porosity. Some of these types are homogeneous (e.g., non-fabric selective dissolution porosity and intercrystal primary porosity), whereas others are heterogeneous. Generally, hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is good in the homogeneous pore throat types, but poor in the heterogeneous types.

  15. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  16. Controlling the pore sizes and related properties of inverse opal scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Regan, Kevin P; Xia, Younan

    2013-03-25

    Inverse opal scaffolds are finding widespread use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Herein, the way in which the pore sizes and related physical properties of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) inverse opal scaffolds are affected by the fabrication conditions is systematically investigated. It is found that the window size of an inverse opal scaffold is mainly determined by the annealing temperature rather than the duration of time, and the surface pore size is largely determined by the concentration of the infiltration solution. Although scaffolds with larger pore or window sizes facilitate faster migration of cells, they show slightly lower compressive moduli than scaffolds with smaller pore or window sizes.

  17. Meristem size contributes to the robustness of phyllotaxis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Landrein, Benoit; Refahi, Yassin; Besnard, Fabrice; Hervieux, Nathan; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Vernoux, Teva; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Using the plant model Arabidopsis, the relationship between day length, the size of the shoot apical meristem, and the robustness of phyllotactic patterns were analysed. First, it was found that reducing day length leads to an increased meristem size and an increased number of alterations in the final positions of organs along the stem. Most of the phyllotactic defects could be related to an altered tempo of organ emergence, while not affecting the spatial positions of organ initiations at the meristem. A correlation was also found between meristem size and the robustness of phyllotaxis in two accessions (Col-0 and WS-4) and a mutant (clasp-1), independent of growth conditions. A reduced meristem size in clasp-1 was even associated with an increased robustness of the phyllotactic pattern, beyond what is observed in the wild type. Interestingly it was also possible to modulate the robustness of phyllotaxis in these different genotypes by changing day length. To conclude, it is shown first that robustness of the phyllotactic pattern is not maximal in the wild type, suggesting that, beyond its apparent stereotypical order, the robustness of phyllotaxis is regulated. Secondly, a role for day length in the robustness of the phyllotaxis was also identified, thus providing a new example of a link between patterning and environment in plants. Thirdly, the experimental results validate previous model predictions suggesting a contribution of meristem size in the robustness of phyllotaxis via the coupling between the temporal sequence and spatial pattern of organ initiations. PMID:25504644

  18. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-01

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications.

  19. Prediction of Hydraulic Conductivity as Related to Pore Size Distribution in Unsaturated Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil pore volume as well as pore size, shape, type (i.e. biopore versus crack), continuity, and distribution in soil affect soil water and gas exchange. Vertical and lateral drainage of water by gravitational forces occurs through large, non-capillary soil pores, but redistribution and upward moveme...

  20. The failure of hydrodynamic analysis to define pore size in cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Galey, W R; Brahm, J

    1985-09-10

    The equivalent pore theory predicts that the size of water transporting pores can be calculated from the ratio of osmotic (Pf, cm . s-1) to diffusive (Pd, cm . s-1) water permeability. Determinations of Pf and Pd in human red cells within the last thirty years have increased the ratio of Pf to Pd. According to the equivalent pore theory the pore diameter has increased from 9 A to 25 A. A pore diameter of 25 A is not compatible with the permeability characteristics of the red cell membrane. We conclude that the equivalent pore theory fails to determine pore size in red blood cells. We suggest that water transporting pores in human red cells transport water molecules in a single file fashion. PMID:2994730

  1. Pore size distribution of shaley rock by small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, P. L.; Mildner, D. F. R.; Borst, R. L.

    1983-08-01

    Information concerning pore microstructure of shaly rocks is of considerable relevance to petroleum exploration and production. Pore sizes and distributions within shaly samples have been determined by small angle neutron scattering. The data are indicative of a considerable spread of pore dimension, showing inhomogeneities with a range from 20 Å and greater. The cumulative pore volumes are compared with those derived from mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms.

  2. Pore size distribution of shaly rock by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.L.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Borst, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    Information concerning pore microstructure of shaly rocks is of considerable relevance to petroleum exploration and production. Pore sizes and distributions within shaly samples have been determined by small angle neutron scattering. The data are indicative of a considerable spread of pore dimension, showing inhomogeneities with a range from 20 A and greater. The cumulative pore volumes are compared with those derived from mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms.

  3. Two micron pore size MCP-based image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, John; Estrera, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Image intensifiers (I2) have many advantages as detectors. They offer single photon sensitivity in an imaging format, they're light in weight and analog I2 systems can operate for hours on a single AA battery. Their light output is such as to exploit the peak in color sensitivity of the human eye. Until recent developments in CMOS sensors, they also were one of the highest resolution sensors available. The closest all solid state solution, the Texas Instruments Impactron chip, comes in a 1 megapixel format. Depending on the level of integration, an Impactron based system can consume 20 to 40 watts in a system configuration. In further investing in I2 technology, L-3 EOS determined that increasing I2 resolution merited a high priority. Increased I2 resolution offers the system user two desirable options: 1) increased detection and identification ranges while maintaining field-of-view (FOV) or 2) increasing FOV while maintaining the original system resolution. One of the areas where an investment in resolution is being made is in the microchannel plate (MCP). Incorporation of a 2 micron MCP into an image tube has the potential of increasing the system resolution of currently fielded systems. Both inverting and non-inverting configurations are being evaluated. Inverting tubes are being characterized in night vision goggle (NVG) and sights. The non-inverting 2 micron tube is being characterized for high resolution I2CMOS camera applications. Preliminary measurements show an increase in the MTF over a standard 5 micron pore size, 6 micron pitch plate. Current results will be presented.

  4. Modelling mass transport through a porous partition: Effect of pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayet, Mohamed; Velázquez, Armando; Mengual, Juan I.

    2004-09-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation process has been studied using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene and polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. The membranes were characterized in terms of their non-wettability, pore size distribution and porosity. The mean pore sizes and pore size distributions were obtained by means of wet/dry flow method. The mean pore size and the effective porosity of the membranes were also determined from the gas permeation test. A theoretical model that considers the pore size distribution together with the gas transport mechanisms through the membrane pores was developed for this process. The contribution of each mass transport mechanism was analyzed. It was found that both membranes have pore size distributions in the Knudsen region and in the transition between Knudsen and ordinary diffusion region. The transition region was the major contribution to mass transport. The predicted water vapor permeability of the membranes were compared with the experimental ones. The effect of considering pore size distribution instead of mean pore size to predict the water vapor permeability of the membranes was investigated.

  5. A general diagram for estimating pore size of ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarbolouki, M. N.

    1982-01-01

    A slit sieve model has been used to develop a general correlation between the average pore size of the upstream surface of a membrane and the molecular weight of the solute which it retains by better than 80%. The pore size is determined by means of the correlation using the high retention data from an ultrafiltration (UF) or a reverse osmosis (RO) experiment. The pore population density can also be calculated from the flux data via appropriate equations.

  6. Effect of pore size and interpore distance on endothelial cell growth on polymers.

    PubMed

    Narayan, D; Venkatraman, S S

    2008-12-01

    The endothelization of polymers using surface modification has received great attention. In particular, creation of physical surface features such as craters or pores has been an active area of research. However, there have been no reported studies of the effects of pore sizes (wide range) and interpore distance on endothelial cell growth. This report details the study done on endothelial cell attachment on the surfaces of polymers modified by porogen leaching. The polymeric system studied includes PLLA and PLGA (80/20). Factors such as porogen type, pore size, and interpore distance were varied, and the surface was evaluated for its influence on endothelial cell growth. Three groups of pore sizes were evaluated: small (5-20 mum), medium (20-45 mum), and large pores (45-90 mum). Two porogens were evaluated: sugar and gelatin. In addition to counting the attached endothelial cells, their proliferation was also quantified. Pore size and interpore distances were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cell morphology was studied by staining with crystal violet. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the main parameters, pore size and interpore distance were significant in endothelial cell growth. In PLGA (80/20), it was found that endothelial cell growth was enhanced by smaller pore size and lower interpore distance, whereas the growth was poor on PLLA regardless of pore features. PMID:18200559

  7. Computer program calculates and plots surface area and pore size distribution data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, G.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program calculates surface area and pore size distribution of powders, metals, ceramics, and catalysts, and prints and plots the desired data directly. Surface area calculations are based on the gas adsorption technique of Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, and pore size distribution calculations are based on the gas adsorption technique of Pierce.

  8. Anomalous cyclic voltammetric response from pores smaller than ion size by voltage-induced force.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheol-Min; Jung, Hwan Jung; Kim, Yong Jung

    2015-05-15

    Nanoporous carbons, with different micropore size distributions, were prepared based on waste coffee grounds by a chemical activation process in order to elucidate the correlation between desolvated ions and pores smaller than the sizes of ions using an organic electrolyte. The pore structure of the coffee-based nanoporous carbon was strongly dependent on the heat-treatment temperature prior to the activation process. Cyclic voltammograms of the nanoporous carbons mainly dominated by the smaller pore relative to that of the bare ion size clearly showed deviation from an ideal feature of the current response. It was clearly envisaged that even a bare ion of a size larger than the pore size can penetrate into the pore by voltage-induced force. PMID:25668782

  9. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  10. Pore-size distribution in loamy soils: A comparison between microtomographic and capillarimetric determination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, E. V.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Dembovetskii, A. V.; Abrosimov, K. N.; Il'in, L. I.; Shnyrev, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    Pore-size distribution in a soddy-podzolic silt loamy soil developing from mantle loesslike loam (Eutric Albic Retisol (Loamic, Cutanic)) was calculated from the water retention curve according to Jurin's equation and directly determined in microtomographic experiments. Rounded macropores with the diameter of their sections from 75 to 1000 μm predominate in horizontal sections if the studied soil samples. A larger part of the soil pores (>30-35%) belongs to micro- and nanopores, and they cannot be quantitatively determined by the tomographic method, because their sizes are smaller than the detection limit of the applied X-ray microtomography (8.75 μm per pixel). This leads to a significantly larger pore volume determined from the water retention curve in comparison with the "tomographic" pore volume. A comparative analysis of pore-size distribution curves obtained by these methods shows that the major regularities of the pore-size distribution in the range from 30 to 5000 μm are similar in both cases. Fine macropores and, partly, mesopores predominate. Common characteristics of the pore-size distribution curves obtained by these methods, including the coincidence of the peaks, attest to the validity of classical approaches, according to which the hydrology of soil pore space can be perceived as a physical model of cylindrical capillaries of different sizes with capillary-sorbed water.

  11. Structure-assisted functional anchor implantation in robust metal-organic frameworks with ultralarge pores.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Feng, Dawei; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-02-01

    A facile functionalization assisted by the structural attributes of PCN-333 has been studied while maintaining the integrity of the parent MOF including ultralarge pores, chemical robustness, and crystallinity. Herein we thoroughly analyzed ligand exchange phenomena in PCN-333 and demonstrate that the extent of exchange can be tailored by varying the exchange conditions as potential applications may require. Through this method a variety of functional groups are incorporated into PCN-333. To further show the capabilities of this system introduction of a BODIPY fluorophore as a secondary functionality was performed to the functionalized framework via a click reaction. We anticipate the PCN-333 with functional anchor can serve as a stable platform for further chemistry to be explored in future applications.

  12. Effect on the Pore-Size Dependence of an Organic Electrolyte Supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Jin, Zhehui; Henderson, Douglous; Wu, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Organic electrolytes such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate dissolved in acetonitrile (TEA-BF{sub 4}/ACN) are widely used in commercial supercapacitors and academic research, but conflicting experimental results have been reported regarding the dependence of surface-area-normalized capacitance on the pore size. Here we show from a classical density functional theory the dependence of capacitance on the pore size from 0.5 to 3.0 nm for a model TEA-BF{sub 4}/ACN electrolyte. We find that the capacitance-pore size curve becomes roughly flat after the first peak around the ion diameter, and the peak capacitance is not significantly higher than the large-pore average. We attribute the invariance of capacitance with the pore size to the formation of an electric double-layer structure that consists of counterions and highly organized solvent molecules. This work highlights the role of the solvent molecules in modulating the capacitance and reconciles apparently conflicting experimental reports.

  13. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found.

  15. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-23

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found. PMID:27558725

  16. Magnetic relaxation - coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1994-10-26

    The aim of the contract was to employ electron and nuclear magnetic relaxation techniques to investigate solvent swelling of coals, solvent extraction of coals and molecular interaction with solvent coal pores. Many of these investigations have appeared in four major publications and a conference proceedings. Another manuscript has been submitted for publication. The set of Argonne Premium Coals was chosen as extensively characterized and representative samples for this project.

  17. Micron-pore-sized metallic filter tube membranes for filtration of particulates and water purification.

    PubMed

    Phelps, T J; Palumbo, A V; Bischoff, B L; Miller, C J; Fagan, L A; McNeilly, M S; Judkins, R R

    2008-07-01

    Robust filtering techniques capable of efficiently removing particulates and biological agents from water or air suffer from plugging, poor rejuvenation, low permeance, and high backpressure. Operational characteristics of pressure-driven separations are in part controlled by the membrane pore size, charge of particulates, transmembrane pressure and the requirement for sufficient water flux to overcome fouling. With long term use filters decline in permeance due to filter-cake plugging of pores, fouling, or filter deterioration. Though metallic filter tube development at ORNL has focused almost exclusively on gas separations, a small study examined the applicability of these membranes for tangential filtering of aqueous suspensions of bacterial-sized particles. A mixture of fluorescent polystyrene microspheres ranging in size from 0.5 to 6 microm in diameter simulated microorganisms in filtration studies. Compared to a commercial filter, the ORNL 0.6 microm filter averaged approximately 10-fold greater filtration efficiency of the small particles, several-fold greater permeance after considerable use and it returned to approximately 85% of the initial flow upon backflushing versus 30% for the commercial filter. After filtering several liters of the particle-containing suspension, the ORNL composite filter still exhibited greater than 50% of its initial permeance while the commercial filter had decreased to less than 20%. When considering a greater filtration efficiency, greater permeance per unit mass, greater percentage of rejuvenation upon backflushing (up to 3-fold), and likely greater performance with extended use, the ORNL 0.6 microm filters can potentially outperform the commercial filter by factors of 100-1,000 fold. PMID:17884208

  18. Micron-pore-sized metallic filter tube membranes for filtration of particulates and water purification

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Tommy Joe; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Bischoff, Brian L; Miller, Curtis Jack; Drake, Meghan M; Judkins, Roddie Reagan

    2008-01-01

    Robust filtering techniques capable of efficiently removing particulates and biological agents from water or air suffer from plugging, poor rejuvenation, low permeance, and high backpressure. Operational characteristics of pressure-driven separations are in part controlled by the membrane pore size, charge of particulates, transmembrane pressure and the requirement for sufficient water flux to overcome fouling. With long term use filters decline in permeance due to filter-cake plugging of pores, fouling, or filter deterioration. Though metallic filter tube development at ORNL has focused almost exclusively on gas separations, a small study examined the applicability of these membranes for tangential filtering of aqueous suspensions of bacterial-sized particles. A mixture of fluorescent polystyrene microspheres ranging in size from 0.5 to 6 {micro}m in diameter simulated microorganisms in filtration studies. Compared to a commercial filter, the ORNL 0.6 {micro}m filter averaged approximately 10-fold greater filtration efficiency of the small particles, several-fold greater permeance after considerable use and it returned to approximately 85% of the initial flow upon backflushing versus 30% for the commercial filter. After filtering several liters of the particle-containing suspension, the ORNL composite filter still exhibited greater than 50% of its initial permeance while the commercial filter had decreased to less than 20%. When considering a greater filtration efficiency, greater permeance per unit mass, greater percentage of rejuvenation upon backflushing (up to 3-fold), and likely greater performance with extended use, the ORNL 0.6 {micro}m filters can potentially outperform the commercial filter by factors of 100-1000 fold.

  19. Determination of the pore size distribution and hydraulic properties from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stingaciu, Laura R.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Stapf, Siegfried; Vereecken, Harry; Pohlmeier, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Known pore size distributions can be directly linked to the water retention characteristic which is essential for the prognosis of water and solute movement through the material. In our study, we evaluated the feasibility to use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements for the characterization of pore size distribution in four porous samples with different texture and composition. Therefore, NMR T2 and T1 relaxation measurements at 6.47 MHz were carried out for three model samples (medium sand; fine sand; and a homogenous sand / kaolin clay mixture) and a natural soil. To quantify the goodness of the approach, the NMR measurements were compared in terms of cumulated pore size distribution functions and mean pore diameter with the two classical techniques based on water retention and mercury porosimetry measurements. The results showed that T1 and T2 derived mean pore size diameters are in good agreement with each other but deviate from retention curve derived ones. This is especially the case for well sorted sands with n values > 2.7. For finer materials differences are less pronounced. A short study was performed to evaluate the influence of the variations observed in the pore diameter distributions on the hydraulic properties of the samples: θS, α, and n. In conclusion, NMR T1 and T2 relaxation measurements can be used to estimate pore size distribution, mean pore diameter, as well as the retention function and corresponding hydraulic properties.

  20. Exploring possible relationships between plate pore size character and cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Hill, Melvin; Tinker, Lawrence A.; Dell, R. Dan

    1991-01-01

    The pore size character and plate manufacturing information for selected samples of older plate material were reviewed. When compared to certain cell performance parameters, certain correlations were found between plate pore character and cell performance. This technique may be useful for screening out certain types of plate material prior to assembly into cells.

  1. Optimal flexible sample size design with robust power.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanju; Cui, Lu; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-30

    It is well recognized that sample size determination is challenging because of the uncertainty on the treatment effect size. Several remedies are available in the literature. Group sequential designs start with a sample size based on a conservative (smaller) effect size and allow early stop at interim looks. Sample size re-estimation designs start with a sample size based on an optimistic (larger) effect size and allow sample size increase if the observed effect size is smaller than planned. Different opinions favoring one type over the other exist. We propose an optimal approach using an appropriate optimality criterion to select the best design among all the candidate designs. Our results show that (1) for the same type of designs, for example, group sequential designs, there is room for significant improvement through our optimization approach; (2) optimal promising zone designs appear to have no advantages over optimal group sequential designs; and (3) optimal designs with sample size re-estimation deliver the best adaptive performance. We conclude that to deal with the challenge of sample size determination due to effect size uncertainty, an optimal approach can help to select the best design that provides most robust power across the effect size range of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26999385

  2. Controlling internal pore sizes in bicontinuous polymeric nanospheres.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Beulah E; Friedrich, Heiner; Wirix, Maarten J M; de Visser, Joël F; Monaghan, Olivia R; Bomans, Paul H H; Nudelman, Fabio; Holder, Simon J; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-16

    Complex polymeric nanospheres were formed in water from comb-like amphiphilic block copolymers. Their internal morphology was determined by three-dimensional cryo-electron tomographic analysis. Varying the polymer molecular weight (MW) and the hydrophilic block weight content allowed for fine control over the internal structure. Construction of a partial phase diagram allowed us to determine the criteria for the formation of bicontinuous polymer nanosphere (BPN), namely for copolymers with MW of up to 17 kDa and hydrophilic weight fractions of ≤0.25; and varying the organic solvent to water ratio used in their preparation allowed for control over nanosphere diameters from 70 to 460 nm. Significantly, altering the block copolymer hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance enabled control of the internal pore diameter of the BPNs from 10 to 19 nm. PMID:25640026

  3. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, siltstones, and shales: Reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2011-01-01

    In his discussion of my article (Nelson, 2009), W. K. Camp takes issue with the concept that buoyancy is not the dominant force in forming and maintaining the distribution of gas in tight-gas accumulations (Camp, 2011). I will restrict my response to the issues he raised regarding buoyant versus nonbuoyant drive and to a few comments regarding water saturation and production. I claim that the pressure generated in petroleum source rocks (Pg), instead of the buoyancy pressure (Pb), provides the energy to charge most tight sandstones with gas. The arguments are fourfold: (1) buoyant columns of sufficient height seldom exist in low-permeability sand-shale sequences, (2) tight-gas systems display a pressure profile that declines instead of increases upward, (3) gas is pervasive in overpressured systems, and (4) source rocks can generate pore pressures sufficiently high to charge tight sandstones.

  4. Anomalous increase in carbon capacitance at pore sizes less than 1 nanometer.

    PubMed

    Chmiola, J; Yushin, G; Gogotsi, Y; Portet, C; Simon, P; Taberna, P L

    2006-09-22

    Carbon supercapacitors, which are energy storage devices that use ion adsorption on the surface of highly porous materials to store charge, have numerous advantages over other power-source technologies, but could realize further gains if their electrodes were properly optimized. Studying the effect of the pore size on capacitance could potentially improve performance by maximizing the electrode surface area accessible to electrolyte ions, but until recently, no studies had addressed the lower size limit of accessible pores. Using carbide-derived carbon, we generated pores with average sizes from 0.6 to 2.25 nanometer and studied double-layer capacitance in an organic electrolyte. The results challenge the long-held axiom that pores smaller than the size of solvated electrolyte ions are incapable of contributing to charge storage.

  5. Facile fabrication of BiVO4 nanofilms with controlled pore size and their photoelectrochemical performances.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chenchen; Jiao, Zhengbo; Li, Shaopeng; Zhang, Yan; Bi, Yingpu

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a facile method for the rational fabrication of pore-size controlled nanoporous BiVO(4) photoanodes, and confirmed that the optimum pore-size distributions could effectively absorb visible light through light diffraction and confinement functions. Furthermore, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation than conventional particle films, induced by light confinement and rapid charge transfer in the inter-crossed worm-like structures.

  6. Laser damage dependence on the size and concentration of precursor defects in KDP crystals: view through differently sized filter pores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueliang; Zhao, Yuanan; Xie, Xiaoyi; Hu, Guohang; Yang, Liujiang; Xu, Ziyuan; Shao, Jianda

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the laser-induced damage performance at 1064 nm of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals grown using filters of different pore sizes. The aim is to explore a novel method for understanding laser-matter interactions with regard to physical parameters affecting the ability of damage precursors to initiate damage. By reducing the pore size of filters in continuous filtration growth, we can improve laser damage resistance. Furthermore, we develop a model based on a Gaussian distribution of precursor thresholds and heat transfer to obtain a size distribution of the precursor defects. Smaller size and/or lower concentration of precursor defects could lead to better damage resistance. PMID:27192280

  7. Pore formation of phospholipid membranes by the action of two hemolytic arachnid peptides of different size.

    PubMed

    Belokoneva, Olga S; Satake, Honoo; Mal'tseva, Elena L; Pal'mina, Nadezhda P; Villegas, Elba; Nakajima, Terumi; Corzo, Gerardo

    2004-08-30

    Pin2 and Oxki1 are cationic amphipathic peptides that permeate lipid membranes through formation of pores. Their mechanism of binding to phosphocholine (PC) membranes differs. Spin-probe experiments showed that both Pin2 and Oxki1 penetrate the lipid membrane of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs). Moreover, the leakage of calcein and dextrans from PC vesicles showed that Pin2 agrees with the accumulation of peptides on lipid membranes and form pores of different size. On the other hand, Oxki1 did not act strictly cooperatively and form pores of limited size.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous ZnS with narrow size distribution of small pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, L. C.; Mateescu, C. D.; Birjega, R.; Nistor, S. V.

    2008-08-01

    Pure, nanocrystalline cubic ZnS forming a stable mesoporous structure was synthesized at room temperature by a non-toxic surfactant-assisted liquid liquid reaction, in the 9.5 10.5 pH range of values. The appearance of an X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak in the region of very small angles (˜ 2°) reveals the presence of a porous material with a narrow pore size distribution, but with an irregular arrangement of the pores, a so-called worm hole or sponge-like material. The analysis of the wide angle XRD diffractograms shows the building blocks to be ZnS nanocrystals with cubic structure and average diameter of 2 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations confirm the XRD results; ZnS crystallites of 2.5 nm with cubic (blende) structure are the building blocks of the pore walls with pore sizes from 1.9 to 2.5 nm, and a broader size distribution for samples with smaller pores. Textural measurements (N2 adsorption desorption isotherms) confirm the presence of mesoporous ZnS with a narrow range of small pore sizes. The relatively lower surface area of around 100 m2/g is attributed to some remaining organic molecules, which are filling the smallest pores. Their presence, confirmed by IR spectroscopy, seems to be responsible for the high stability of the resulting mesoporous ZnS as well.

  9. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  10. Estimating the 3D pore size distribution of biopolymer networks from directionally biased data.

    PubMed

    Lang, Nadine R; Münster, Stefan; Metzner, Claus; Krauss, Patrick; Schürmann, Sebastian; Lange, Janina; Aifantis, Katerina E; Friedrich, Oliver; Fabry, Ben

    2013-11-01

    The pore size of biopolymer networks governs their mechanical properties and strongly impacts the behavior of embedded cells. Confocal reflection microscopy and second harmonic generation microscopy are widely used to image biopolymer networks; however, both techniques fail to resolve vertically oriented fibers. Here, we describe how such directionally biased data can be used to estimate the network pore size. We first determine the distribution of distances from random points in the fluid phase to the nearest fiber. This distribution follows a Rayleigh distribution, regardless of isotropy and data bias, and is fully described by a single parameter--the characteristic pore size of the network. The bias of the pore size estimate due to the missing fibers can be corrected by multiplication with the square root of the visible network fraction. We experimentally verify the validity of this approach by comparing our estimates with data obtained using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which represents the full structure of the network. As an important application, we investigate the pore size dependence of collagen and fibrin networks on protein concentration. We find that the pore size decreases with the square root of the concentration, consistent with a total fiber length that scales linearly with concentration. PMID:24209841

  11. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials.

    PubMed

    Félix, V; Jannot, Y; Degiovanni, A

    2012-05-01

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10(-1) to 10(5) Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent. PMID:22667640

  12. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, V.; Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2012-05-01

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10-1 to 105 Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent.

  13. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, V.; Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2012-05-15

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10{sup -1} to 10{sup 5} Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent.

  14. Determination of an equivalent pore size from acoustic flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Linde; Liu, Jin; Garrett, Steven

    2005-09-01

    The hydraulic radius, rh, is defined as the ratio of a channel's cross-sectional area to its perimeter. This parameter is important for specification of the performance of a porous medium that can be used as a regenerator in a Stirling engine or refrigerator. It is easy to calculate rh for pores of regular geometry, but difficult in more complex media. Two techniques which use oscillating flow to determine this parameter will be presented and compared. One technique extracts rh by finding the low velocity limit of the standard expression for viscous pressure drop in the Poiseuille flow regime. The other involves a plot of the nondimensional viscous flow resistance, Δpvis/Δxωρu, versus the reciprocal of the viscous penetration depth, 1/δν, in the laminar flow regime. When rh<δν, the flow behavior is frequency independent and the dynamics is characterized by rh only. When rh>δν, the flow resistance is frequency dependent and the dynamics is characterized by both rh and δν. It is possible to identify an effective hydraulic radius by equating it to the value of δν where that transition occurs. [Work supported by ONR.

  15. Relation between pore size and the compressibility of a confined fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Krekelberg, William P.; Shen, Vincent K.; Rasmussen, Christopher J.; Bernstein, Noam

    2015-11-21

    When a fluid is confined to a nanopore, its thermodynamic properties differ from the properties of a bulk fluid, so measuring such properties of the confined fluid can provide information about the pore sizes. Here, we report a simple relation between the pore size and isothermal compressibility of argon confined in such pores. Compressibility is calculated from the fluctuations of the number of particles in the grand canonical ensemble using two different simulation techniques: conventional grand-canonical Monte Carlo and grand-canonical ensemble transition-matrix Monte Carlo. Our results provide a theoretical framework for extracting the information on the pore sizes of fluid-saturated samples by measuring the compressibility from ultrasonic experiments.

  16. Relation between pore size and the compressibility of a confined fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Rasmussen, Christopher J.; Krekelberg, William P.; Shen, Vincent K.; Bernstein, Noam

    2015-11-01

    When a fluid is confined to a nanopore, its thermodynamic properties differ from the properties of a bulk fluid, so measuring such properties of the confined fluid can provide information about the pore sizes. Here, we report a simple relation between the pore size and isothermal compressibility of argon confined in such pores. Compressibility is calculated from the fluctuations of the number of particles in the grand canonical ensemble using two different simulation techniques: conventional grand-canonical Monte Carlo and grand-canonical ensemble transition-matrix Monte Carlo. Our results provide a theoretical framework for extracting the information on the pore sizes of fluid-saturated samples by measuring the compressibility from ultrasonic experiments.

  17. Pore size effects on the sorption of supercritical carbon dioxide in mesoporous CPG-10 silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, Gernot; Krukowski, Elizabeth G; Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    Excess sorption isotherms of supercritical carbon dioxide in mesoporous CPG-10 silica glasses with nominal pore sizes of 75 (7.5 nm) and 350 (35 nm) were measured gravimetrically at 35 C and 50 C and pressures of 0-200 bar. Formation of broad maxima in the excess sorption was observed at fluid densities below the bulk critical density. Positive values of excess sorption were measured at bulk densities below about 0.65-0.7 g/cm3, whereas zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, indicating that the interfacial fluid becomes less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid at high fluid densities. A shift of the excess sorption peak position to higher fluid density is found with increasing pore width. The excess sorption of CO2 normalized to the specific surface area is higher for the 35 nm pore size material, suggesting pore confinement effects. Conversely, the pore volume normalized excess sorption is higher for the 7.5 nm pore size material. Assessment of mean pore density reveals regions of constant pore fluid density, located between the excess sorption peak and the adsorption/depletion transition. Both materials exhibit such regions of constant mean pore fluid density as a function of bulk CO2 density at the lower temperature of 35 C, but not at 50 C. The results of this study suggest that the CO2 storage capacity in quartz-rich reservoirs is higher for sites with low temperature and rock textures characterized by narrow pores with high surface to volume ratios.

  18. Protein adsorption on DEAE ion-exchange resins with different ligand densities and pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Li; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhu, Mi-Mi; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2012-11-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEC) is a common and powerful technique for the purification of proteins. The ligand density and pore properties of ion-exchange resins have significant effects on the separation behaviors of protein, however, the understandings are quite limited. In the present work, the adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated systematically with series of diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) ion-exchange resins, which have different ligand densities and pore sizes. The Langmuir equation was used to fit the experimental data and the influences of ligand density and pore size on the saturated adsorption capacity and the dissociation constant were discussed. The zeta potentials and hydrodynamic diameters of proteins at different pHs were also measured, and the surface charge characteristics of proteins and the adsorption mechanism were discussed. The results demonstrated that the ligand density, pore size, and protein properties affect the protein adsorption capacities in an integrative way. An integrative parameter was introduced to describe the complicated effects of ligand density and pore size on the protein adsorption. For a given protein, the ligand density and pore size should be optimized for improving the protein adsorption.

  19. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  20. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  1. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging. PMID:27111138

  2. Anomalous or regular capacitance? The influence of pore size dispersity on double-layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, N.; Rodner, M.; Schreiber, A.; Jeongwook, J.; Zeiger, M.; Aslan, M.; Weingarth, D.; Presser, V.

    2016-09-01

    The energy storage mechanism of electric double-layer capacitors is governed by ion electrosorption at the electrode surface. This process requires high surface area electrodes, typically highly porous carbons. In common organic electrolytes, bare ion sizes are below one nanometer but they are larger when we consider their solvation shell. In contrast, ionic liquid electrolytes are free of solvent molecules, but cation-anion coordination requires special consideration. By matching pore size and ion size, two seemingly conflicting views have emerged: either an increase in specific capacitance with smaller pore size or a constant capacitance contribution of all micro- and mesopores. In our work, we revisit this issue by using a comprehensive set of electrochemical data and a pore size incremental analysis to identify the influence of certain ranges in the pore size distribution to the ion electrosorption capacity. We see a difference in solvation of ions in organic electrolytes depending on the applied voltage and a cation-anion interaction of ionic liquids in nanometer sized pores.

  3. Improved capacitance characteristics of electrospun ACFs by pore size control and vanadium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Im, Ji Sun; Woo, Sang-Wook; Jung, Min-Jung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2008-11-01

    Nano-sized carbon fibers were prepared by using electrospinning, and their electrochemical properties were investigated as a possible electrode material for use as an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC). To improve the electrode capacitance of EDLC, we implemented a three-step optimization. First, metal catalyst was introduced into the carbon fibers due to the excellent conductivity of metal. Vanadium pentoxide was used because it could be converted to vanadium for improved conductivity as the pore structure develops during the carbonization step. Vanadium catalyst was well dispersed in the carbon fibers, improving the capacitance of the electrode. Second, pore-size development was manipulated to obtain small mesopore sizes ranging from 2 to 5 nm. Through chemical activation, carbon fibers with controlled pore sizes were prepared with a high specific surface and pore volume, and their pore structure was investigated by using a BET apparatus. Finally, polyacrylonitrile was used as a carbon precursor to enrich for nitrogen content in the final product because nitrogen is known to improve electrode capacitance. Ultimately, the electrospun activated carbon fibers containing vanadium show improved functionality in charge/discharge, cyclic voltammetry, and specific capacitance compared with other samples because of an optimal combination of vanadium, nitrogen, and fixed pore structures. PMID:18771778

  4. New and conventional pore size tests in virus-removing membranes.

    PubMed

    Duek, Aviv; Arkhangelsky, Elizabeth; Krush, Ronit; Brenner, Asher; Gitis, Vitaly

    2012-05-15

    Microorganisms are retained by ultrafiltration (UF) membranes mainly due to size exclusion. The sizes of viruses and membrane pores are close to each other and retention of viruses can be guaranteed only if the precise pore diameter is known. Unfortunately and rather surprisingly, there is no direct method to determine the membrane pore size. As a result, the UF membranes are not trusted to remove the viruses, and the treatment plants are required to enhance viral disinfection. Here we propose a new, simple and effective method for UF pore size determination using aquasols of gold and silver nanoparticles. We synthesized highly monodispersed suspensions ranging in diameter from 3 to 50 nm, which were later transferred through polymer and ceramic UF membranes. The retention percentage was plotted against the particle diameter to determine the pore size for which a membrane has a retention capability of 50, 90 and 100%. The d(50), d(90) and d(100) values were compared with data obtained from conventional transmembrane flux, polyethylene glycol, and dextran tests, and with the retention of phi X 174 and MS2 bacteriophages. The absolute pore size, d(100), for the majority of tested UF membranes is within 40-50 nm, and can only be detected with the new tests. The average 1.2 log retention of hydrophilic phi X 174 was predicted accurately by models based on the virus hydrodynamic radii and d(100) pore size. The 2.5 log MS2 retention suggests hydrophobic interactions in addition to simple ball-through-cylinder geometry. PMID:22265254

  5. Passive permeability and effective pore size of HeLa cell nuclear membranes.

    PubMed

    Samudram, Arunkarthick; Mangalassery, Bijeesh M; Kowshik, Meenal; Patincharath, Nandakumar; Varier, Geetha K

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane act as the sole gateway of transport of molecules from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and vice versa. Studies on biomolecular transport through nuclear membranes provide vital data on the nuclear pore complexes. In this work, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran molecules as a model system and study the passive nuclear import of biomolecules through nuclear pore complexes in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. Experiments are carried out under transient conditions in the time lapse imaging scheme using an in-house constructed confocal laser scanning microscope. Transport rates of dextran molecules having molecular weights of 4-70 kDa corresponding to Stokes radius of 1.4-6 nm are determined. Analyzing the permeability of the nuclear membrane for different sizes the effective pore radius of HeLa cell nuclear membrane is determined to be 5.3 nm, much larger than the value reported earlier using proteins as probe molecules. The range of values reported for the nuclear pore radius suggest that they may not be rigid structures and it is quite probable that the effective pore size of nuclear pore complexes is critically dependent on the probe molecules and on the environmental factors.

  6. Aromatization of Ethanol Over Desilicated ZSM-5 Zeolites: Effect of Pore Size in the Mesoporous Region.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Won; Hasan, Zubair; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-05-01

    Mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolites were obtained from microporous ZSM-5 by desilication using aqueous NaOH solutions, and their catalytic activity in the aromatization of ethanol was investigated in order to understand the effects of pore size, in the mesoporous region, on the product distribution and stability of the catalysts. Mesopores generally enhanced the selectivities towards aromatics and stability for aromatization. Mesopores with a maximum pore diameter of around 13 nm were the most effective in the aromatization process (especially for benzene and toluene), suggesting that pore-diameter optimization is necessary for efficient catalysis such as aromatization.

  7. Modeling of the lithium-air battery cathodes with broad pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Artem V.; Chertovich, Alexander V.; Itkis, Daniil M.

    2016-09-01

    Achieving theoretical promises of 1000 W h/kg specific energy for lithium-air batteries is quite challenging due to limited transport in the cathode along with electrode passivation. Transport can be enhanced in the electrodes with complex hierarchical pore architecture. Here, using computer simulations we analyze the effects of cathode pore size distribution (PSD) on capacity and discharge curve shape. Calculations considering a broad PSD revealed that even small discharge product resistivity prevents larger pores from accumulating the discharge product and thus turning them into non-clogging oxygen supply channels. Thus optimization of cathode architecture by adding of large-scale cavities enables cell capacity enhancement.

  8. Influence of pore size distribution on the adsorption of phenol on PET-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Diez, María A; Gryglewicz, Grazyna

    2016-05-01

    The role of pore size distribution in the adsorption of phenol in aqueous solutions on polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-based activated carbons (ACs) has been analyzed. The ACs were prepared from PET and mixtures of PET with coal-tar pitch (CTP) by means of carbonization and subsequent steam and carbon dioxide activation at 850 and 950 °C, respectively. The resultant ACs were characterized on the basis of similarities in their surface chemical features and differences in their micropore size distributions. The adsorption of phenol was carried out in static conditions at ambient temperature. The pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir model were found to fit the experimental data very well. The different adsorption capacities of the ACs towards phenol were attributed to differences in their micropore size distributions. Adsorption capacity was favoured by the volume of pores with a size smaller than 1.4 nm; but restricted by pores smaller than 0.8 nm. PMID:26890386

  9. Pore size assessment during corneal endothelial cells permeabilization by femtosecond laser activated carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumelle, C.; Mauclair, C.; Houzet, J.; Bernard, A.; He, Z.; Piselli, S.; Perrache, C.; Egaud, G.; Baubeau, E.; Gain, P.; Thuret, G.

    2015-07-01

    Corneal therapeutic molecules delivery represents a promising solution to maintain human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) viability, but the difficulty is transport across cell membrane. A new delivery method published recently consists in ephemerally permeabilizing cell membranes using a photo-acoustic reaction produced by carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and femtosecond laser (FsL). The aim of this work is to investigate the size of pores formed at cell membrane by this technique. To induce cell permeabilization, HCECs were put in contact with CNPs and irradiated with a 500 μm diameter Ti:Sa FsL focalized spot. Four sizes of marker molecules were delivered into HCECs to investigate pore sizes: calcein (1.2 nm), FITC-Dextran 4kDa (2.8 nm) and FITC-Dextran 70kDa (12 nm) and FITC-Dextran 2MDa (50 nm). Delivery of each molecule was assessed by flow cytometry, a technique able to measure their presence into cells. We showed that the delivery rate was dependent of their size. Calcein was delivered in 56.1±8.2% of HCECs, FITC-Dextran 4kDa in 42.2±3.5%, FITC-Dextran 70 kDa in 21.5±2.7% and finally FITC-Dextran 2MDa in 12.9±2.0%. It means that a large number of pores in the size ranging from 1.2 to 2.8 nm were formed. However, 12 nm and larger pores were almost half more infrequent. Pore sizes formed at cell membrane by the technique of cell permeabilization by FsL activated CNPs was investigated. The results indicated that the pore sizes are large enough for the efficient delivery of small, medium and big therapeutics molecules on HCECs by this technique.

  10. Adsorption of phenolics on activated carbon--impact of pore size and molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuli; Sorial, George A

    2004-05-01

    The impact of pore size of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on adsorption capacity and on the potential for oligomerization of phenolic compounds on the surface of ACFs in the presence of molecular oxygen has been investigated in this study. Compared with granular activated carbon (GAC), ACFs have unique pore size distributions, suitable to be used to elucidate the effect of pore structure on adsorption. Adsorption isotherm data were collected for o-cresol and 2-ethylphenol on four ACFs (ACC-10, ACC-15, ACC-20, and ACC-25) with different micropore volumes and BET surface area and on one type of GAC bituminous base. These isotherms were collected under anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) and oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) conditions. No significant impact of the presence of molecular oxygen on adsorption capacity was noted for ACC-10. ACC-10 has an average pore width of 19.2 A and total pore volume of 0.43 cm3g(-1). On the other hand, for the remaining ACFs, which have larger average pore width and larger pore volume, significant increase in the adsorptive capacity had been observed when molecular oxygen was present. The GAC gave the greatest difference between anoxic and oxic conditions when compared to all the ACFs studied. Binary adsorption of o-cresol and 2-ethylphenol on ACFs with the least pore size (ACC-10) also showed no significant differences between oxic and anoxic environment. The binary system under both anoxic and oxic conditions was well predicted by the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST).

  11. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2 MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future.

  12. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future. PMID:27371788

  13. Xenon porometry: a novel method for the derivation of pore size distributions.

    PubMed

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2007-05-01

    Xenon porometry is a novel method used for characterizing porous materials by the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance of xenon gas. With the method, the diffusion of gas is slowed down by immersing the material in a medium, which can be in liquid or solid state during measurements. Because of slow diffusion, the signal of a xenon atom is characteristic of the properties of only one pore, and the composite signal of all atoms represents the distribution of properties. The method is especially applicable for determining pore size distribution because the chemical shifts of two different xenon signals (one from liquid and the other from gas pockets in solid) are dependent on pore size. Therefore, the shapes of these signals represent pore size distribution function. In addition, the porosity of the material can be determined by comparing the intensities of two signals. This article focuses on describing xenon signals observed from gas pockets in a solid medium, which has turned out to be most convenient for pore size determination. PMID:17466763

  14. Tricontinuous Cubic Nanostructure and Pore Size Patterning in Mesostructured Silica Films Templated with Glycerol Monooleate.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Darren R; Garcia, Fred L; Kaehr, Bryan; Khripin, Constantine Y; Collord, Andrew D; Baca, Helen K; Tate, Michael P; Hillhouse, Hugh W; Strzalka, Joseph W; Jiang, Zhang; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2011-04-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured films possessing tricontinuous minimal surface mesophases with well-defined framework and pore connectivity remains a difficult task. As a new route to these structures, we introduce glycerol monooleate (GMO) as a template for evaporation-induced self-assembly. As deposited, a nanostructured double gyroid phase is formed, as indicated by analysis of grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering data. Removal of GMO by UV/O(3) treatment or acid extraction induces a phase change to a nanoporous body-centered structure which we tentatively identify as based on the IW-P surface. To improve film quality, we add a co-surfactant to the GMO in a mass ratio of 1:10; when this co-surfactant is cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we find an unusually large pore size (8-12 nm) in acid extracted films, while UV/O(3) treated films yield pores of only ca. 4 nm. Using this pore size dependence on film processing procedure, we create a simple method for patterning pore size in nanoporous films, demonstrating spatially-defined size-selective molecular adsorption.

  15. Strategies for Tailoring the Pore-Size Distribution of Virus Retention Filter Papers.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Simon; Mihranyan, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work is to demonstrate how the pore-size distribution of the nanocellulose-based virus-retentive filter can be tailored. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. green algae using the hot-press drying at varying drying temperatures. The produced filters were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and N2 gas sorption analysis. Further, hydraulic permeability and retention efficiency toward surrogate 20 nm model particles (fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene spheres) were assessed. It was shown that by controlling the rate of water evaporation during hot-press drying the pore-size distribution can be precisely tailored in the region between 10 and 25 nm. The mechanism of pore formation and critical parameters are discussed in detail. The results are highly valuable for development of advanced separation media, especially for virus-retentive size-exclusion filtration. PMID:27144657

  16. Investigation of the effect of pore size on gas uptake in two metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongming; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Wang, Haifeng; Dai, Fangna; Guo, Wenyue; Zhao, Lianming; Sun, Daofeng

    2014-05-18

    Two porous metal–organic frameworks (1 and 2) with a fsc topology based on mixed ligands have been assembled and characterized. The different pillared ligands (pyrazine for 1 and 4,4′-bipyridine for 2) significantly influence the pore size of the frameworks. Gas uptake measurements reveal that complex 1 possesses higher H2, CO2, and CH4 uptake capacities than 2, although the surface area of 1 is lower than that of complex 2. These results further experimentally prove that the pore size plays an important role in gas uptake in porous MOFs, and the slit pore with a size of ~6 Å exhibits stronger interactions with gas molecules.

  17. Strategies for Tailoring the Pore-Size Distribution of Virus Retention Filter Papers.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Simon; Mihranyan, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work is to demonstrate how the pore-size distribution of the nanocellulose-based virus-retentive filter can be tailored. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. green algae using the hot-press drying at varying drying temperatures. The produced filters were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and N2 gas sorption analysis. Further, hydraulic permeability and retention efficiency toward surrogate 20 nm model particles (fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene spheres) were assessed. It was shown that by controlling the rate of water evaporation during hot-press drying the pore-size distribution can be precisely tailored in the region between 10 and 25 nm. The mechanism of pore formation and critical parameters are discussed in detail. The results are highly valuable for development of advanced separation media, especially for virus-retentive size-exclusion filtration.

  18. Kinetics of pore size during irreversible electrical breakdown of lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, C; Winterhalter, M; Zimmermann, U; Benz, R

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of pore formation followed by mechanical rupture of lipid bilayer membranes were investigated in detail by using the charge-pulse method. Membranes of various compositions were charged to a sufficiently high voltage to induce mechanical breakdown. The subsequent decrease of membrane voltage was used to calculate the conductance. During mechanical breakdown, which was probably caused by the widening of one single pore, the membrane conductance was a linear and not exponential function of time after the initial starting process. In a large number of experiments using various lipids and electrolytes, the characteristic opening process of the pore turned out to be independent of the actual membrane potential and electrolyte concentration. Our theoretical analysis of the pore formation suggested that the voltage-induced irreversible breakdown is due to a decrease in edge energy when the pore had formed. After initiation of the pore, the electrical contribution to surface tension is negligible. The time course of the increase of pore size shows that our model of the irreversible breakdown is in good agreement with mechanical properties of membranes reported elsewhere. PMID:8431536

  19. Characterizing pore sizes and water structure in stimuli-responsive hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.S.; Antonsen, K.P.; Ashida, T.; Bohnert, J.L.; Dong, L.C.; Nabeshima, Y.; Nagamatsu, S.; Park, T.G.; Sheu, M.S.; Wu, X.S.; Yan, Q.

    1993-12-31

    Hydrogels have been extensively investigated as potential matrices for drug delivery. In particular, hydrogels responsive to pH and temperature changes have been of greatest interest most recently. Proteins and peptide drugs are especially relevant for delivery from such hydrogel matrices due to the relatively {open_quotes}passive{close_quotes} and biocompatible microenvironment which should exist within the hydrogel aqueous pores. The large molecular size of many proteins requires an interconnected large pore structure. Furthermore, the gel pore {open_quotes}walls{close_quotes} should not provide hydrophobic sites for strong interactions with proteins. In the special case of ion exchange release the protein would be attracted by opposite charges on the polymer backbones. Therefore, it is important both to control and to characterize the pore structure and the water character within a hydrogel to be used or protein or peptide drug delivery. This talk will critically review techniques for estimating these two key parameters in hydrogels.

  20. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Purewal, J J; Kabbour, H; Vajo, J J; Ahn, C C; Fultz, B

    2009-05-20

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  1. Pore Size Control of Ultra-thin Silicon Membranes by Rapid Thermal Carbonization

    PubMed Central

    Fang, David Z.; Striemer, Christopher C.; Gaborski, Thomas R.; McGrath, James L.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid thermal carbonization in a dilute acetylene (C2H2) atmosphere has been used to chemically modify and precisely tune the pore size of ultrathin porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si). The magnitude of size reduction was controlled by varying the process temperature and time. Under certain conditions, the carbon coating displayed atomic ordering indicative of graphene layer formation conformal to the pore walls. Initial experiments show that carbonized membranes follow theoretical predictions for hydraulic permeability and retain the precise separation capabilities of untreated membranes. PMID:20839831

  2. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-16

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (similar to 12 and 18 angstrom, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. Suppression, we found, is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient D-r and relaxation time [tau(0)] of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. We observed D-r values and tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient D-r of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient D-c associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio theta of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.

  3. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    DOE PAGES

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-16

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (similar to 12 and 18 angstrom, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. Suppression, we found, is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient D-r and relaxation timemore » [tau(0)] of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. We observed D-r values and tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient D-r of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient D-c associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio theta of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.« less

  4. Neovascularization in Biodegradable Inverse Opal Scaffolds with Uniform and Precisely Controlled Pore Sizes**

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Wook; Zhang, Yu; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a stable vascular network in a scaffold is one of the most challenging tasks in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Despite the common use of porous scaffolds in these applications, little is known about the effect of pore size on the neovascularization in these scaffolds. Here we fabricated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) inverse opal scaffolds with uniform pore sizes of 79, 147, 224, and 312 μm in diameter and then used them to systematically study neovascularization in vivo. Histology analyses revealed that scaffolds with small pores (<200 μm) favored the formation of vascular networks with small vessels at high densities and poor penetration depth. By contrast, scaffolds with large pores (>200 μm) favored the formation of vascular networks with large blood vessels at low densities and deep penetration depth. Based on the different patterns of vessel ingrowth as regulated by the pore size, we proposed a model to describe vascularization in a three-dimensional porous scaffold, which can potentially serve as a guideline for future design of porous scaffolds. PMID:23184495

  5. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (˜12 and 18 Å, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. This suppression is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient Dr and relaxation time <τ0> of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. The observed Dr values are tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient Dr of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient Dc associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio θ of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.

  6. A facile method to determine pore size distribution in porous scaffold by using image processing.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, G; Lopresti, F; Petrucci, G; Scaffaro, R

    2015-09-01

    Image processing permits scientists to investigate morphological properties of three-dimensional structures starting from their bi-dimensional gray-scale representation. In many cases porous structure with complex architecture has to be designed in order to attempt specific properties such in the case of scaffold for tissue engineering. Traditional morphological characterization, like scanning electron microscopy, should be coupled with quantitative information such as pore size distribution (PSD) in order to get a deeper understanding of the influence of the porous structure on tissue regeneration processes and on other related applications, it is remarkable to study a quantitative analysis of porosity and of pores dimension. In this work it was developed as a software able to accomplish the segmentation of images containing pores of any geometry in a semi-automatic way with the aim to measure the PSD. Case study constituted by PLA porous scaffolds with different pore size was adopted. Results indicate that image processing methods well fit the pore size features of PLA scaffolds, overcoming the limits of the more invasive porosimetry techniques. PMID:26026425

  7. Nondestructive technique for the characterization of the pore size distribution of soft porous constructs for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Laleh; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander

    2006-03-28

    Polymer scaffolds tailored for tissue engineering applications possessing the desired pore structure require reproducible fabrication techniques. Nondestructive, quantitative methods for pore characterization are required to determine the pore size and its distribution. In this study, a promising alternative to traditional pore size characterization techniques is presented. We introduce a quantitative, nondestructive and inexpensive method to determine the pore size distribution of large soft porous solids based on the on the displacement of a liquid, that spreads without limits though a porous medium, by nitrogen. The capillary pressure is measured and related to the pore sizes as well as the pore size distribution of the narrowest bottlenecks of the largest interconnected pores in a porous medium. The measured pore diameters correspond to the narrowest bottleneck of the largest pores connecting the bottom with the top surface of a given porous solid. The applicability and reproducibility of the breakthrough technique is demonstrated on two polyurethane foams, manufactured using the thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process, with almost identical overall porosity (60-70%) but very different pore morphology. By selecting different quenching temperatures to induce polymer phase separation, the pore structure could be regulated while maintaining the overall porosity. Depending on the quenching temperature, the foams exhibited either longitudinally oriented tubular macropores interconnected with micropores or independent macropores connected to adjacent pores via openings in the pore walls. The pore size and its distribution obtained by the breakthrough test were in excellent agreement to conventional characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy combined with image analysis, BET technique, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. This technique is suitable for the characterization of the micro- and macropore structure of soft porous solids

  8. Effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration to pores size diameter of silicon membrane.

    PubMed

    Burham, Norhafizah; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies parameters which affect the pore size diameter of a silicon membrane. Electrochemical etching is performed in characterise the parameter involved in this process. The parameter has been studied is volume ratio of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and ethanol as an electrolyte aqueous for electrochemical etch. This electrolyte aqueous solution has been mixed between HF and ethanol with volume ratio 3:7, 5:5, 7:3 and 9:1. As a result, the higher volume of HF in this electrolyte gives the smallest pore size diameter compared to the lower volume of HF. These samples have been dipped into HF and ethanol electrolyte aqueous with supplied 25 mA/cm2 current density for 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes. The samples will inspect under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to execute the pore formations on silicon membrane surface.

  9. The effect of magnetic particles on pore size distribution in soft polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, M.; Günther, S.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-07-01

    The combination of elastomeric matrices with magnetic particles to obtain magnetically controllable hybrid materials is an actual field of intense research. An important aspect in this context is the stiffness of the matrix, which determines the effectiveness of the magnetically driven changes in the material properties. In this paper an approach has been undertaken to use soft polyurethane foams as matrix material. By means of x-ray computed microtomography and digital image processing the pore size distribution has been determined to get information on how this distribution is affected by the introduction of magnetic microparticles. To do so, 20 000 to 40 000 pores per foam sample were evaluated. As a result, it could be proven that the pore sizes of the analysed foams clearly obey the Weibull distribution. Increasing the carbonyl iron particle concentrations leads to a decrement of the shape parameter of the distribution. Based on known particle stabilization mechanisms, an approach to explain the experimental results is proposed.

  10. Effect of pretreatments and fermentation on pore size in cellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, K.W.; Ladisch, M.R.; Voloch, M.; Patterson, J.A.; Noller, C.H.

    1985-10-01

    Surface area has been proposed as a major factor determining the extent of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. We used cornstalk residues (CR) and Solka Floc BW-300 (SF) as substrates and NaOH and iron sodium tartrate (FeTNa), as pretreatments to study the effect of surface area on extent of fermentation. Micropore sizes (8-130 A) were determined using glucose, cellobiose, and polyethylene glycols as molecular probes. The pore size distributions follow the logistic model function: l = a/(1 + exp(b-cX)) where l is pore volume; X = log D; D is the molecular probe diameter; and a, b, and c are constants. The pore volumes of CR (1.9 ml/g) and SF (1.6 ml/g) are increased to 2.1 ml/g by pretreatment with NaOH. Pretreatment of SF with NaOH and cornstalk residue with FeTNa caused an upward shift in the pore size distribution. Fermentation of untreated CR by rumen microbes resulted in a 46% loss of dry matter while increasing the internal pore size and decreasing the pore volume to 0.9 ml/g. Fermentation of NaOH pretreated CR resulted in a 73% loss of dry matter with little change in pore size, total pore volume, or fiber composition. Fiber analysis indicated that selective utilization of hemicellulose over cellulose in both fermentations was small. The data show that: 1) removal of hemicellulose and lignin increases dry matter disappearance upon fermentation of the remaining material; 2) relative to the size of bacterial cellulases (40-160A) the pretreatments have little effect on increasing accessibility of surface internal to the cellulose particles; and 3) the micropore changes caused by NaOH or FeTNa treatment do not explain the enhanced fermentation obtained for treated cr. These observations infer that external or macropore surface properties may be a significant factor in determining the extent of utilization of the solid substrates by cellulolytic microorganisms. 29 references.

  11. The effect of fiber size and pore size on cell proliferation and infiltration in PLLA scaffolds on bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejun; Lou, Tao; Zhao, Wenhua; Song, Guojun; Li, Chunyao; Cui, Guangpeng

    2016-05-01

    The scaffold microstructure has a great impact on cell functions in tissue engineering. Herein, the PLLA scaffolds with hierarchical fiber size and pore size were successfully fabricated by thermal-induced phase separation or combined thermal-induced phase separation and salt leaching methods. The PLLA scaffolds were fabricated as microfibrous scaffolds, microfibrous scaffolds with macropores (50-350 µm), nanofibrous scaffolds with micropores (100 nm to 10 µm), and nanofibrous scaffolds with both macropores and micropores by tailoring selective solvents for forming different fiber size and pre-sieved salts for creating controlled pore size. Among the four kinds of PLLA scaffolds, the nanofibrous scaffolds with both macropores and micropores provided a favorable microenvironment for protein adsorption, cell proliferation, and cell infiltration. The results further confirmed the significance of fiber size and pore size on the biological properties, and a scaffold with both micropores and macropores, and a nanofibrous matrix might have promising applications in bone tissue engineering.

  12. Facile fabrication of BiVO4 nanofilms with controlled pore size and their photoelectrochemical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chenchen; Jiao, Zhengbo; Li, Shaopeng; Zhang, Yan; Bi, Yingpu

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a facile method for the rational fabrication of pore-size controlled nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes, and confirmed that the optimum pore-size distributions could effectively absorb visible light through light diffraction and confinement functions. Furthermore, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation than conventional particle films, induced by light confinement and rapid charge transfer in the inter-crossed worm-like structures.We demonstrate a facile method for the rational fabrication of pore-size controlled nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes, and confirmed that the optimum pore-size distributions could effectively absorb visible light through light diffraction and confinement functions. Furthermore, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation than conventional particle films, induced by light confinement and rapid charge transfer in the inter-crossed worm-like structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06584d

  13. Size Control of Porous Silicon-Based Nanoparticles via Pore-Wall Thinning.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Leonard, Camille; Kelly, Stefan J; Uhl, Amanda; Cozzan, Clayton; Andrew, Jennifer S

    2016-02-01

    Photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals are very attractive for biomedical and electronic applications. Here a new process is presented to synthesize photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals with diameters smaller than 6 nm from a porous silicon template. These nanoparticles are formed using a pore-wall thinning approach, where the as-etched porous silicon layer is partially oxidized to silica, which is dissolved by a hydrofluoric acid solution, decreasing the pore-wall thickness. This decrease in pore-wall thickness leads to a corresponding decrease in the size of the nanocrystals that make up the pore walls, resulting in the formation of smaller nanoparticles during sonication of the porous silicon. Particle diameters were measured using dynamic light scattering, and these values were compared with the nanocrystallite size within the pore wall as determined from X-ray diffraction. Additionally, an increase in the quantum confinement effect is observed for these particles through an increase in the photoluminescence intensity of the nanoparticles compared with the as-etched nanoparticles, without the need for a further activation step by oxidation after synthesis.

  14. Reduction in glomerular pore size is not restricted to pregnant women. Evidence for a new syndrome: 'Shrunken pore syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Anders; Lindström, Veronica; Jonsson, Magnus; Bäck, Sten-Erik; Åhlund, Tomas; Rippe, Bengt; Christensson, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The plasma levels of cystatin C, β2-microglobulin, beta-trace protein, retinol binding protein (RBP) and creatinine were determined in plasma samples from 111 randomly selected patients with eGFRcystatin C ≤ 60% of eGFRcreatinine and from 55 control patients with 0.9eGFRcreatinine ≤ eGFRcystatin C ≤ 1.1eGFRcreatinine (eGFRcystatin C ≈ eGFRcreatinine). The concentration ratios of cystatin C/creatinine, β2-microglobulin/creatinine, beta-trace protein/creatinine and RBP/creatinine were significantly higher in patients with eGFRcystatin C ≤ 60% of eGFRcreatinine than in patients with eGFRcystatin C ≈ eGFRcreatinine. When the patients were divided into three groups with different estimated GFR intervals (≤ 40, 40-60 and ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73m(2)) the concentration ratios of cystatin C/creatinine, β2-microglobulin/creatinine, and beta-trace protein/creatinine were significantly higher in patients with eGFRcystatin C ≤ 60% of eGFRcreatinine than in patients with eGFRcystatin C ≈ eGFRcreatinine for all GFR intervals. Similar results were obtained when the population without pregnant women was studied as well as the subpopulations of men or of non-pregnant women. Populations of pre-eclamptic women and pregnant women in the third trimester display similar results. Since the production of these four proteins with sizes similar to that of cystatin C is not co-regulated, the most likely explanation for the simultaneous increase of their creatinine-ratios in patients with eGFRcystatin C ≤ 60% of eGFRcreatinine is that their elimination by glomerular filtration is decreased. We suggest that this is due to a reduction in pore diameter of the glomerular membrane and propose the designation 'Shrunken pore syndrome' for this pathophysiological state.

  15. A Model for Hydraulic Properties Based on Angular Pores with Lognormal Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durner, W.; Diamantopoulos, E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves are mandatory for modeling water flow in soils. It is a common approach to measure few points of the water retention curve and to calculate the hydraulic conductivity curve by assuming that the soil can be represented as a bundle of capillary tubes. Both curves are then used to predict water flow at larger spatial scales. However, the predictive power of these curves is often very limited. This can be very easily illustrated if we measure the soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) for a drainage experiment and then use these properties to predict the water flow in the case of imbibition. Further complications arise from the incomplete wetting of water at the solid matrix which results in finite values of the contact angles between the solid-water-air interfaces. To address these problems we present a physically-based model for hysteretic SHPs. This model is based on bundles of angular pores. Hysteresis for individual pores is caused by (i) different snap-off pressures during filling and emptying of single angular pores and (ii) by different advancing and receding contact angles for fluids that are not perfectly wettable. We derive a model of hydraulic conductivity as a function of contact angle by assuming flow perpendicular to pore cross sections and present closed-form expressions for both the sample scale water retention and hydraulic conductivity function by assuming a log-normal statistical distribution of pore size. We tested the new model against drainage and imbibition experiments for various sandy materials which were conducted with various liquids of differing wettability. The model described both imbibition and drainage experiments very well by assuming a unique pore size distribution of the sample and a zero contact angle for the perfectly wetting liquid. Eventually, we see the possibility to relate the particle size distribution with a model which describes the SHPs.

  16. Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications: Role of Porosity and Pore Size

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Qiu Li

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering applications commonly encompass the use of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds to provide a suitable microenvironment for the incorporation of cells or growth factors to regenerate damaged tissues or organs. These scaffolds serve to mimic the actual in vivo microenvironment where cells interact and behave according to the mechanical cues obtained from the surrounding 3D environment. Hence, the material properties of the scaffolds are vital in determining cellular response and fate. These 3D scaffolds are generally highly porous with interconnected pore networks to facilitate nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. This review focuses on the various fabrication techniques (e.g., conventional and rapid prototyping methods) that have been employed to fabricate 3D scaffolds of different pore sizes and porosity. The different pore size and porosity measurement methods will also be discussed. Scaffolds with graded porosity have also been studied for their ability to better represent the actual in vivo situation where cells are exposed to layers of different tissues with varying properties. In addition, the ability of pore size and porosity of scaffolds to direct cellular responses and alter the mechanical properties of scaffolds will be reviewed, followed by a look at nature's own scaffold, the extracellular matrix. Overall, the limitations of current scaffold fabrication approaches for tissue engineering applications and some novel and promising alternatives will be highlighted. PMID:23672709

  17. A solid with a hierarchical tetramodal micro-meso-macro pore size distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yu; Ma, Zhen; Morris, Russell E.; Liu, Zheng; Jiao, Feng; Dai, Sheng; Bruce, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Porous solids have an important role in addressing some of the major energy-related problems facing society. Here we describe a porous solid, α-MnO2, with a hierarchical tetramodal pore size distribution spanning the micro-, meso- and macro pore range, centred at 0.48, 4.0, 18 and 70 nm. The hierarchical tetramodal structure is generated by the presence of potassium ions in the precursor solution within the channels of the porous silica template; the size of the potassium ion templates the microporosity of α-MnO2, whereas their reactivity with silica leads to larger mesopores and macroporosity, without destroying the mesostructure of the template. The hierarchical tetramodal pore size distribution influences the properties of α-MnO2 as a cathode in lithium batteries and as a catalyst, changing the behaviour, compared with its counterparts with only micropores or bimodal micro/mesopores. The approach has been extended to the preparation of LiMn2O4 with a hierarchical pore structure. PMID:23764887

  18. Density-biased sampling: a robust computational method for studying pore formation in membranes.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, Vahid; Feig, Michael

    2015-01-13

    A new reaction coordinate to bias molecular dynamics simulation is described that allows enhanced sampling of density-driven processes, such as mixing and demixing two different molecular species. The methodology is validated by comparing the theoretical entropy of demixing two ideal gas species and then applied to induce deformation and pore formation in phospholipid membranes within an umbrella sampling framework. Comparison with previous biased simulations of membrane pore formation suggests overall quantitative agreement, but the density-based biasing potential results in a different, more realistic transition pathway than that in previous studies.

  19. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: model development and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Seetha, N; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe=0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high if

  20. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: Model development and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetha, N.; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe = 0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100 nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high

  1. A general approach to crystalline and monomodal pore size mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Altug S; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Biswas, Sourav; King'ondu, Cecil K; Suib, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous oxides attract a great deal of interest in many fields, including energy, catalysis and separation, because of their tunable structural properties such as surface area, pore volume and size, and nanocrystalline walls. Here we report thermally stable, crystalline, thermally controlled monomodal pore size mesoporous materials. Generation of such materials involves the use of inverse micelles, elimination of solvent effects, minimizing the effect of water content and controlling the condensation of inorganic frameworks by NO(x) decomposition. Nanosize particles are formed in inverse micelles and are randomly packed to a mesoporous structure. The mesopores are created by interconnected intraparticle voids and can be tuned from 1.2 to 25 nm by controlling the nanoparticle size. Such phenomena allow the preparation of multiple phases of the same metal oxide and syntheses of materials having compositions throughout much of the periodic table, with different structures and thermal stabilities as high as 800 °C. PMID:24335918

  2. Pore Size Effect on Methane Adsorption in Mesoporous Silica Materials Studied by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Jin-Hong; Liu, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Methane adsorption in model mesoporous silica materials with the size range characteristic of shale is studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Size effect on the temperature-dependent gas adsorption at methane pressure about 100 kPa is investigated by SANS using MCM-41 and SBA-15 as adsorbents. Above the gas-liquid condensation temperature, the thickness of the adsorption layer is found to be roughly constant as a function of the temperature. Moreover, the gas adsorption properties, such as the adsorbed layer thickness and the specific amount of adsorbed gas, have little dependence on the pore size being studied, i.e., pore radius of 16.5 and 34.1 Å, but are mainly affected by the roughness of the pore surfaces. Hence, the surface properties of the pore wall are more dominant than the pore size in determining the methane gas adsorption of pores at the nanometer size range. Not surprisingly, the gas-liquid condensation temperature is observed to be sensitive to pore size and shifts to higher temperature when the pore size is smaller. Below the gas-liquid condensation temperature, even though the majority of gas adsorption experiments/simulations have assumed the density of confined liquid to be the same as the bulk density, the measured methane mass density in our samples is found to be appreciably smaller than the bulk methane density regardless of the pore sizes studied here. The mass density of liquid/solid methane in pores with different sizes shows different temperature dependence below the condensation temperature. With decreasing temperature, the methane density in larger pores (SBA-15) abruptly increases at approximately 65 K and then plateaus. In contrast, the density in smaller pores (MCM-41) monotonically increases with decreasing temperature before reaching a plateau at approximately 30 K.

  3. Pore Size Effect on Methane Adsorption in Mesoporous Silica Materials Studied by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Jin-Hong; Liu, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Methane adsorption in model mesoporous silica materials with the size range characteristic of shale is studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Size effect on the temperature-dependent gas adsorption at methane pressure about 100 kPa is investigated by SANS using MCM-41 and SBA-15 as adsorbents. Above the gas-liquid condensation temperature, the thickness of the adsorption layer is found to be roughly constant as a function of the temperature. Moreover, the gas adsorption properties, such as the adsorbed layer thickness and the specific amount of adsorbed gas, have little dependence on the pore size being studied, i.e., pore radius of 16.5 and 34.1 Å, but are mainly affected by the roughness of the pore surfaces. Hence, the surface properties of the pore wall are more dominant than the pore size in determining the methane gas adsorption of pores at the nanometer size range. Not surprisingly, the gas-liquid condensation temperature is observed to be sensitive to pore size and shifts to higher temperature when the pore size is smaller. Below the gas-liquid condensation temperature, even though the majority of gas adsorption experiments/simulations have assumed the density of confined liquid to be the same as the bulk density, the measured methane mass density in our samples is found to be appreciably smaller than the bulk methane density regardless of the pore sizes studied here. The mass density of liquid/solid methane in pores with different sizes shows different temperature dependence below the condensation temperature. With decreasing temperature, the methane density in larger pores (SBA-15) abruptly increases at approximately 65 K and then plateaus. In contrast, the density in smaller pores (MCM-41) monotonically increases with decreasing temperature before reaching a plateau at approximately 30 K. PMID:27512895

  4. Improving prediction of hydraulic conductivity by constraining capillary bundle models to a maximum pore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Sascha C.; Peters, Andre; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve by pore-bundle models is a cost-effective and widely applied technique. One problem for conductivity predictions from retention functions with continuous derivatives, i.e. continuous water capacity functions, is that the hydraulic conductivity curve exhibits a sharp drop close to water saturation if the pore-size distribution is wide. So far this artifact has been ignored or removed by introducing an explicit air-entry value into the capillary saturation function. However, this correction leads to a retention function which is not continuously differentiable. We present a new parameterization of the hydraulic properties which uses the original saturation function (e.g. of van Genuchten) and introduces a maximum pore radius only in the pore-bundle model. In contrast to models using an explicit air entry, the resulting conductivity function is smooth and increases monotonically close to saturation. The model concept can easily be applied to any combination of retention curve and pore-bundle model. We derive closed-form expressions for the unimodal and multimodal van Genuchten-Mualem models and apply the model concept to curve fitting and inverse modeling of a transient outflow experiment. Since the new model retains the smoothness and continuous differentiability of the retention model and eliminates the sharp drop in conductivity close to saturation, the resulting hydraulic functions are physically more reasonable and ideal for numerical simulations with the Richards equation or multiphase flow models.

  5. Body size and postcranial robusticity of European Upper Paleolithic hominins.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Trenton W

    2002-10-01

    The robust diaphyses of Pleistocene hominins are said to indicate higher activity levels in these prehistoric humans than among people today. Thus, it could be argued that the prediction of body mass from fossil lower limb diaphyseal cortical area (CA) using recent human regressions might lead to erroneously high body mass estimates. This study uses three body mass prediction formulae based on the following features: reconstructed femoral 80% (subtrochanteric) CA, femoral head diameter (FH), and bi-iliac breadth and stature (BIB-St) among European Early and Late Upper Paleolithic (EUP and LUP) and recent humans from Africa and Europe. All three methods produce similar body mass estimates for all groups studied, including recent humans. Gleaning behavioral differences from these data is more difficult, as no significant differences in CA were found among the fossil and recent Europeans. It has been suggested that the EUP had less robust diaphyses than their LUP counterparts. However, here this result is only obtained when CA is size-standardized to femoral length(3) (Ruff et al., 1993, Am. J. phys. Anthrop.91, 21-53 Trinkaus et al., 1998, in Neandertals and Modern Humans in Western Asia, pp.391-404, New York: Plenum). This should not be interpreted as evidence for lower activity levels in the EUP, but rather as an artefact of standardization, for as Wolpoff (1999), Am. J. phys. Anthrop.109, 416-423 points out, these standardized variables are extremely sensitive to limb length differences, and the EUP have longer limbs than their LUP counterparts. With this in mind, these data do not support a pattern of behavioral differences between EUP and LUP humans, and therefore more sensitive measures than CA may be required to detect such differences.

  6. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity.

  7. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity. PMID:27439315

  8. Design of nanoporous metals with bimodal pore size distributions for enhanced biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Huajun; Dong, Xiaochen; Huang, Xirong

    2012-07-01

    Nanoporous gold (np-Au) has shown great potential in catalysis, plasmonics, sensing, etc. In this work, by two-step dealloying a well-designed AuAgAl ternary precursor alloy, np-Au with bimodal ligament/pore size distributions is successfully fabricated. The first dealloying in HCl solution removes Al and generates a nanoporous AuAg alloy which would be mildly annealed at 200 °C for 30 min to homogenize the alloy ligament and enlarge the ligament/pore size. Next, the nanoporous AuAg alloy is further dealloyed in a HNO3 solution to etch Ag and fabricate np-Au with a hierarchical microstructure. This novel bimodal np-Au is demonstrated to exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction and be a better support for the fabrication of an oxidase-based biosensor compared with normal np-Au, with a uniform pore/ligament size of 30-40 nm. In a proof-of-concept study, a sensitive glucose biosensor with a linear range up to 21 mM is fabricated by immobilization of glucose oxidase on the bimodal np-Au.Nanoporous gold (np-Au) has shown great potential in catalysis, plasmonics, sensing, etc. In this work, by two-step dealloying a well-designed AuAgAl ternary precursor alloy, np-Au with bimodal ligament/pore size distributions is successfully fabricated. The first dealloying in HCl solution removes Al and generates a nanoporous AuAg alloy which would be mildly annealed at 200 °C for 30 min to homogenize the alloy ligament and enlarge the ligament/pore size. Next, the nanoporous AuAg alloy is further dealloyed in a HNO3 solution to etch Ag and fabricate np-Au with a hierarchical microstructure. This novel bimodal np-Au is demonstrated to exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction and be a better support for the fabrication of an oxidase-based biosensor compared with normal np-Au, with a uniform pore/ligament size of 30-40 nm. In a proof-of-concept study, a sensitive glucose biosensor with a linear range up to 21 mM is fabricated by

  9. Scaffolds and cells for tissue regeneration: different scaffold pore sizes-different cell effects.

    PubMed

    Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Bironaitė, Daiva; Bagdonas, Edvardas; Bernotienė, Eiva

    2016-05-01

    During the last decade biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have become new scientific fields supplying rising demand of regenerative therapy. Tissue engineering requires consolidation of a broad knowledge of cell biology and modern biotechnology investigating biocompatibility of materials and their application for the reconstruction of damaged organs and tissues. Stem cell-based tissue regeneration started from the direct cell transplantation into damaged tissues or blood vessels. However, it is difficult to track transplanted cells and keep them in one particular place of diseased organ. Recently, new technologies such as cultivation of stem cell on the scaffolds and subsequently their implantation into injured tissue have been extensively developed. Successful tissue regeneration requires scaffolds with particular mechanical stability or biodegradability, appropriate size, surface roughness and porosity to provide a suitable microenvironment for the sufficient cell-cell interaction, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Further functioning of implanted cells highly depends on the scaffold pore sizes that play an essential role in nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. In addition, pore sizes strongly influence cell adhesion, cell-cell interaction and cell transmigration across the membrane depending on the various purposes of tissue regeneration. Therefore, this review will highlight contemporary tendencies in application of non-degradable scaffolds and stem cells in regenerative medicine with a particular focus on the pore sizes significantly affecting final recover of diseased organs.

  10. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agents for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.

  11. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agentsmore » for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.« less

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance pore size determination for unconsolidated sediments with strong internal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, M.; Pohlmeier, A. J.; Galvosas, P.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Water distribution and flow within porous media are mainly controlled by the pore space structure. Well established methods for the determination of pore sizes like multistep outflow and gas adsorption isotherms (BET) are often time consuming, expensive, or produce toxic waste. As an alternative fast and non-destructive technique, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used because it probes hydrogen and therefore the dynamics and interactions of water. Pore space is most easily characterized by NMR relaxometry where the total relaxation rate is controlled by the surface relaxivity ρ of the porous medium in combination with the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V) [1]. Furthermore, there are contributions of molecular diffusion through local magnetic field gradients which are created by susceptibility differences between solid and liquid phases [2] as well as by paramagnetic impurities [3]. Hence, surface to volume ratios and surface relaxivities of porous media cannot be measured individually with NMR relaxometry. Therefore, NMR diffusion measurements are applied to probe the S/V of pores without other contributions. In this study, we demonstrate that NMR diffusion measurements are feasible to determine the S/V ratio of the pore space of quartz sand coated with goethite (α-FeOOH) as paramagnetic impurity. Our findings were compared to BET measurements and we found no dependence of the S/V on the coating density with NMR diffusion and a clear dependence between coating density and S/V with krypton BET measurements. Possible explanations are the different characteristic length scales on which the pore space is probed, and the intrinsic fractal nature of porous media [4] together with the roughness of the pore surface on a nm-scale due to the coating process. After isolating the additional contribution of the paramagnetic impurities to the NMR relaxation and the calibration of the NMR relaxation signal for each coating density it was possible to use fast relaxometry

  13. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-01-01

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed. PMID:27509528

  14. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-01-01

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed. PMID:27509528

  15. Pore size engineering applied to the design of separators for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Britton, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Pore size engineering in starved alkaline multiplate cells involves adopting techniques to widen the volume tolerance of individual cells. Separators with appropriate pore size distributions and wettability characteristics (capillary pressure considerations) to have wider volume tolerances and an ability to resist dimensional changes in the electrodes were designed. The separators studied for potential use in nickel-hydrogen cells consist of polymeric membranes as well as inorganic microporous mats. In addition to standard measurements, the resistance and distribution of electrolyte as a function of total cell electrolyte content were determined. New composite separators consisting of fibers, particles and/or binders deposited on Zircar cloth were developed in order to engineer the proper capillary pressure characteristics in the separator. These asymmetric separators were prepared from a variety of fibers, particles and binders. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24571

  16. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  17. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Yu, Conrad M.; Raley, Norman F.

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  18. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionally high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.

  19. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    DOE PAGES

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionallymore » high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.« less

  20. In-situ method for determining pore size distribution, capillary pressure and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-02-17

    A method is described for determining the pore sizes entered by the oil phase in an oil-bearing formation, comprising: logging the formation of interest with an induced polarization logging tool having at least one source electrode; computing from the induced polarization measurements obtained by the logging tool a normalized induced polarization response function; obtaining core material from the formation of interest; extracting the water and hydrocarbons from the core material; resaturating the core material with formation brine; measuring the normalized induced polarization response function for the core material; and determining the pore sizes containing oil in the formation by comparing the normalized induced polarization response function from the formation with the normalized induced polarization response function of the core.

  1. Pore size engineering applied to the design of separators for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Britton, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Pore size engineering in starved alkaline multiplate cells involves adopting techniques to widen the volume tolerance of individual cells. Separators with appropriate pore size distributions and wettability characteristics (capillary pressure considerations) to have wider volume tolerances and an ability to resist dimensional changes in the electrodes were designed. The separators studied for potential use in nickel-hydrogen cells consist of polymeric membranes as well as inorganic microporous mats. In addition to standard measurements, the resistance and distribution of electrolyte as a function of total cell electrolyte content were determined. New composite separators consisting of fibers, particles and/or binders deposited on Zircar cloth were developed in order to engineer the proper capillary pressure characteristics in the separator. These asymmetric separators were prepared from a variety of fibers, particles and binders.

  2. Pore-size distributions of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels varying in initial monomer concentration and cross-linker/monomer ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Pothmann, E.; Roessler, T.; Baker, J.; Yee, A.; Blanch, H.; Prausnitz, J.M. )

    1994-05-23

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for cationic acrylamide-based hydrogels. The authors use the experimental mixed-solute-exclusion method, MSE (introduced by Kuga), to obtain the solute-exclusion curve representing the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The authors use the Brownian motion model (developed by Cassasa) to convert the size-exclusion curve into the pore-size distribution, which gives the frequency of pore radius R as a function of R. This theoretically-based interpretation of MSE data leads to the Fredholm integral equation that they solve numerically. Results are reported for a series of hydrogels containing acrylamide and 3% MAPTAC; the hydrogels differed in extent of cross-linking and/or initial concentration of monomer. Pore-size distributions shift to lower pore sizes with rising initial monomer concentration and with rising cross-linker-to-monomer ratio.

  3. Microfluidic Directed Synthesis of Alginate Nanogels with Tunable Pore Size for Efficient Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bazban-Shotorbani, Salime; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Jacob, Karl I

    2016-05-17

    Alginate is a biopolymer with favorable pH-sensitive properties for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. However, conventional alginate nanogels have limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency because of drug leaching during bead preparation and burst release in high pH values. These shortcomings originate from large pore size of the nanogels. In this work, we proposed an on-chip hydrodynamic flow focusing approach for synthesis of alginate nanogels with adjustable pore size to achieve fine-tunable release profile of the encapsulated bioactive agents. It is demonstrated that the microstructure of nanogels can be controlled through adjusting flow ratio and mixing time directed on microfluidic platforms consisting of cross-junction microchannels. In this study, the average pore size of alginate nanogels (i.e., average molecular weight between cross-links, Mc) was related to synthesis parameters. Mc was calculated from equations based on equilibrium swelling theory and proposed methods to modify the theory for pH-sensitive nanogels. In the equations we derived, size and compactness of nanogels are key factors, which can be adjusted by controlling the flow ratio. It was found that increase in flow ratio increases the size of nanogels and decreases their compactness. The size of on-chip generated nanogels for flow ratio of 0.02-0.2 was measured to be in the range of 68-138 nm. Moreover, a method based on the Mie theory was implemented to estimate the aggregation number (Nagg) of polymer chains inside the nanogels as an indicator of compactness. According to the size and compactness results along with equations of modified swelling theory, Mc obtained to be in the range of 0.5-0.8 kDa. The proposed method could be considered as a promising approach for efficient polypeptides encapsulation and their sustained release. PMID:26938744

  4. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  5. First Synthesis of Continuous Mesoporous Copper Films with Uniformly Sized Pores by Electrochemical Soft Templating.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiling; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Zhongli; Li, Yunqi; Hossain, Md Shahriar A; Kim, Jung Ho; Takei, Toshiaki; Henzie, Joel; Dag, Ömer; Bando, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-10-01

    Although mesoporous metals have been synthesized by electrochemical methods, the possible compositions have been limited to noble metals (e.g., palladium, platinum, gold) and their alloys. Herein we describe the first fabrication of continuously mesoporous Cu films using polymeric micelles as soft templates to control the growth of Cu under sophisticated electrochemical conditions. Uniformly sized mesopores are evenly distributed over the entire film, and the pore walls are composed of highly crystalized Cu. PMID:27554196

  6. Grainsize and pore size changes due to the flow of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Benjy; Einav, Itai

    2014-05-01

    Granular materials exhibit behaviour which can cause spatial or local changes in their grainsize distribution, such as crushing, mixing and segregation. These mechanisms are modelled simultaneously using a cellular automaton, and the complex phenomena that emerge as they interact are explored. We find that either power law or log-normal grainsize distributions can develop. Finally, detailed information about the evolution of the local grainsize distribution is used to describe the evolution of the pore size distribution.

  7. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. PMID:26185444

  8. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding–diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. PMID:26185444

  9. Control of Porosity and Pore Size of Metal Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dumee, Ludovic; Velleman, Leonora; Sears, Kallista; Hill, Matthew; Schutz, Jurg; Finn, Niall; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT) Bucky-Paper (BP) composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90%) and specific surface area (>400 m2/g). Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20–50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported. PMID:24957493

  10. Determining the dynamic range of MCPs based on pore size and strip current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C.; Adrian, M. L.; Herrero, F.; James, P.; Jones, H. H.; Rodriguez, M.; Roman, P.; Shappirio, M.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-Channel Plates (MCPs) are used as detectors for almost all detectors measuring particles (both ions, electrons and neutrals) below 30 keV. Recent advances in the manufacturing technology of the MCPs have increased the number of options one has when selecting plates for an instrument. But it is not clear how many of these options affect the performance of the MCPs. In particular the dynamic range is not a clear cut calculation to make from the strip current. There is also some evidence that pore size and coating play a role. We measured the dynamic range and pulse height distribution of MCPs detector chevron stacks with a wide variety of strip currents from the low “normal” range in the EDR range. We also looked at the effects of varying the pore size from 25 microns to 10 microns, partial plating of the MCP surface and coating one surface on each MCP with gold rather than the standard zinc chromium. We will show how the dynamic range and pulse height distributions vary vs. strip current, pore size, and surface plating configurations.

  11. Impact of pore size on the sorption of uranyl under seawater conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Richard T.; Gorka, Joanna; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-05

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has received significant interest recently, because of the possibility of a near-limitless supply of uranium to fuel the nuclear power industry. While sorbent development has focused primarily on polymeric sorbents, nanomaterials represent a new area that has the potential to surpass the current polymeric sorbents, because of the high surface areas that are possible. Mesoporous carbon materials are a stable, high-surface-area material capable of extracting various chemical species from a variety of environments. Herein, we report the use of a dual templating process to understand the effect of pore size on the adsorption ofmore » uranyl ions from a uranyl brine consisting of seawater-relevant sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions. It was found that pore size played a more significant role in the effective use of the grafted polymer, leading to higher uranium capacities than the surface area. Furthermore, the pore size must be tailored to meet the demands of the extraction medium and analyte metal to achieve efficacy as an adsorbent.« less

  12. Multiscale characterization of pore size distributions using mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Miranda, J. G. V.; Vidal Vázquez, E.

    2009-04-01

    The soil pore space is a continuum extremely variable in size, including structures smaller than nanometres and as large as macropores or cracks with millimetres or even centimetres size. Pore size distributions (PSDs) affects important soil functions, such as those related with transmission and storage of water, and root growth. Direct and indirect measurements of PSDs are becoming increasingly used to characterize soil structure. Mercury injection porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption isotherms are techniques commonly employed for assessing equivalent pore size diameters in the range from about 50 nm to 100 m and 2 to 500 nm, respectively. The multifractal formalism was used to describe Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms from two series of a Mollisol cultivated under no tillage and minimum tillage. Soil samples were taken from 0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm depths in two experimental fields located in the north of Buenos Aires and South of Santa Fe provinces, Argentina. All the data sets analyzed from the two studied soil attributes showed remarkably good scaling trends as assessed by singularity spectrum and generalized dimension spectrum. Both, experimental Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. A wide variety of singularity and generalized dimension spectra was found for the variables. The capacity dimensions, D0, for both Hg injection and N2 adsorption data were not significantly different from the Euclidean dimension. However, the entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2, obtained from mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data showed significant differences. So, D1 values were on average 0.868 and varied from 0.787 to 0.925 for Hg intrusion curves. Entropy dimension, D1, values for N2 adsorption isotherms were on average 0.582 significantly lower than those obtained when using the former technique. Twenty-three out of twenty-four N2 isotherms had D1 values in a

  13. Importance of Pore Size Distribution of Fine-grained Sediments on Gas Hydrate Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T. H.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, G. C.; Park, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Gas hydrates have been considered as a new source of natural gases. For the gas hydrate production, the gas hydrate reservoir should be depressurized below the equilibrium pressure of gas hydrates. Therefore, it is important to predict the equilibrium of gas hydrates in the reservoir conditions because it can be affected by the pore size of the host sediments due to the capillary effect. In this study, gas hydrates were synthesized in fine-grained sediment samples including a pure silt sample and a natural clayey silt sample cored from a hydrate occurrence region in Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea. Pore size distributions of the samples were obtained by the nitrogen adsorption and desorption test and the mercury intrusion porosimetry. The equilibrium curve of gas hydrates in the fine-grained sediments were found to be significantly influenced by the clay fraction and the corresponding small pores (>50 nm in diameter). For the clayey silt sample, the equilibrium pressure was higher by ~1.4 MPa than the bulk equilibrium pressure. In most cases of oceanic gas hydrate reservoirs, sandy layers are found interbedded with fine-grained sediment layers while gas hydrates are intensively accumulated in the sandy layers. Our experiment results reveal the inhibition effect of fine-grained sediments against gas hydrate formation, in which greater driving forces (e.g., higher pressure or lower temperature) are required during natural gas migration. Therefore, gas hydrate distribution in interbedded layers of sandy and fine-grained sediments can be explained by such capillary effect induced by the pore size distribution of host sediments.

  14. Systematic Design of Pore Size and Functionality in Isoreticular MOFs and Their Application in Methane Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel; Vodak, David; Wachter, Joseph; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2002-01-01

    A strategy based on reticulating metal ions and organic carboxylate links into extended networks has been advanced to a point that allowed the design of porous structures in which pore size and functionality could be varied systematically. Metal-organic framework (MOF-5), a prototype of a new class of porous materials and one that is constructed from octahedral Zn-O-C clusters and benzene links, was used to demonstrate that its three-dimensional porous system can be functionalized with the organic groups -Br, -NH2, -OC3H7, -OC5H11, -C2H4, and -C4H4 and that its pore size can be expanded with the long molecular struts biphenyl, tetrahydropyrene, pyrene, and terphenyl. We synthesized an isoreticular series (one that has the same framework topology) of 16 highly crystalline materials whose open space represented up to 91.1% of the crystal volume, as well as homogeneous periodic pores that can be incrementally varied from 3.8 to 28.8 angstroms. One member of this series exhibited a high capacity for methane storage (240 cubic centimeters at standard temperature and pressure per gram at 36 atmospheres and ambient temperature), and others the lowest densities (0.41 to 0.21 gram per cubic centimeter) for a crystalline material at room temperature.

  15. Porous carbon with defined pore size as anode of microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofen; Cui, Dan; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xianshu; Li, Weishan

    2015-07-15

    This paper reported a novel anode material, porous carbon with a defined pore size (DPC) matching bacteria, for microbial fuel cell (MFC). The DPC was prepared by using silica spheres as templates and sucrose as carbon precursor. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared DPC were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and its performance as anode of MFC based on Escherichia coli (E. coli) was evaluated with chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curve measurement. The result from SEM demonstrates that pores in the as-prepared DPC are well defined with an average diameter of 400nm, which is a little larger than that of E. coli, and the polarization curve measurement shows that the as-prepared DPC exhibits superior performance as anode material loaded on carbon felt, delivering a power output of 1606mWm(-2), compared to the 402mWm(-2) of naked carbon felt anode, in the solution containing 2g/L glucose. The excellent performance of the as-prepared DPC is attributed to its suitable pore size for accommodating E. coli strain, which facilitates the formation of bacterial biofilm and the electron transfer between bacteria and anode.

  16. Influence of the pore size in multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the hydrogen storage behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-10-15

    Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWCNTs) were prepared using a chemical activation method to obtain well-developed pore structures for use as hydrogen storage materials. The microstructure and crystallinity of the A-MWCNTs were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The textural properties of the A-MWCNTs were investigated by nitrogen gas sorption analysis at 77 K. The hydrogen storage capacity of the A-MWCNTs was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. The results showed that the specific surface area of the MWCNTs increased from 327 to 495 m{sup 2}/g as the activation temperature was increased. The highest hydrogen storage capacity was observed in the A-MWCNTs sample activated at 900 Degree-Sign C (0.54 wt%). This was attributed to it having the narrowest microporosity, which is a factor closely related to the hydrogen storage capacity. This shows that the hydrogen storage behaviors depend on the pore volume. Although a high pore volume is desirable for hydrogen storage, it is also severely affected if the pore size in the A-MWCNTs for the hydrogen molecules is suitable for creating the activation process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-800 and AT-900 samples were prepared by a chemical activation method at activation temperature of 800 and 900 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-900 sample has the narrowest peak in comparison with the AT-800 sample, resulting from the overlap of the two peaks (Peak I and Peak II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This overlapping effect is due to the newly created micropores or shrinkages of pores in Peak II. So, these determining characteristics are essential for designing materials that are suitable for molecular hydrogen storage.

  17. Controlled porosity and pore size substrates for nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordy, D. J.; Luksha, E.; Menard, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A novel process for the preparation of improved cadmium electrode plaques with precisely controlled pore size and porosity is described. The requirements for these plaques include far better uniformity, reproducibility, and life than is currently available with conventional materials. The key features of the work were preparation of plaques via a powder metallurgical technique which consisted of isostatically compacting a blend of a nickel powder with a fugitive pore-former and subsequently sintering the 'green' compact. Cadmium electrodes were prepared from these materials and were cycle tested in negative-limited cells using an accelerated, torturous test regime. Results were obtained which showed the new structures yielded electrodes that were superior to the conventional structures in mechanical properties and performance.

  18. Reversible control of pore size and surface chemistry of mesoporous silica through dynamic covalent chemistry: philicity mediated catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, M.

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli.Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02959g

  19. The investigation of gadolinium oxide porous structure and refinement of the pore size distribution based on the NLDFT-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, Maxim A.; Botalov, Maxim S.; Smyshlyaev, Denis V.; Kasimova, Renata E.; Bereskina, Polina A.; Vereshchagin, Artem O.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on the characterization of gadolinium oxide surface by the method of low-temperature adsorption/desorption of nitrogen. The specific surface area of gadolinium oxide, the average pore diameter and fractal dimensions were determined. The refinement of the pore distribution was performed on the basis of the NLDFT model. It was shown that there were three kinds of pores with average sizes of 150, 300 and 600 Å.

  20. Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling of the mixed CH4 + C3H8 clathrate hydrate equilibria in silica gel pores: effects of pore size and salinity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungmin; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-06-15

    We measured hydrate phase equilibria for the ternary CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) + water mixtures in silica gel pores with nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm and for the quaternary CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) + NaCl + water mixtures of two different NaCl concentrations (3 and 10 wt %) in silica gel pores with nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, and 30.0 nm. The CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) hydrate-water interfacial tension (sigma(HW)) of 42 +/- 3 mJ/m(2) was obtained through the Gibbs-Thomson equation for dissociation within cylindrical pores. With this value, the experimental results were in good agreement with the calculated ones based on the van der Waals and Platteeuw model. A correction term for the capillary effect and a Pitzer model for electrolyte solutions were adopted to calculate the activity of water in the aqueous electrolyte solutions within silica gel pores. At a specified temperature, three-phase H-L(W)-V equilibrium curves of pore hydrates were shifted to higher-pressure regions depending on pore sizes and NaCl concentrations. From the cage-dependent (13)C NMR chemical shifts of enclathrated guest molecules, the mixed CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) gas hydrate was confirmed to be structure II.

  1. Cell Contraction Forces in Scaffolds with Varying Pore Size and Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Corin, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    The contractile behavior of cells is relevant in understanding wound healing and scar formation. In tissue engineering, inhibition of the cell contractile response is critical for the regeneration of physiologically normal tissue rather than scar tissue. Previous studies have measured the contractile response of cells in a variety of conditions (e.g. on two-dimensional solid substrates, on free-floating tissue engineering scaffolds and on scaffolds under some constraint in a cell force monitor). Tissue engineering scaffolds behave mechanically like open-cell elastomeric foams: between strains of about 10 and 90%, cells progressively buckle struts in the scaffold. The contractile force required for an individual cell to buckle a strut within a scaffold has been estimated based on the strut dimensions (radius, r, and length, ℓ) and the strut modulus, Es. Since the buckling force varies, according to Euler's law, with r4∕ℓ2, and the relative density of the scaffold varies as (r∕ℓ)2, the cell contractile force associated with strut buckling is expected to vary with the square of the pore size for scaffolds of constant relative density. As the cell density increases, the force per cell to achieve a given strain in the scaffold is expected to decrease. Here we model the contractile response of fibroblasts by analyzing the response of a single tetrakaidecahedron to forces applied to individual struts (simulating cell contractile forces) using finite element analysis. We model tetrakaidecahedra of different strut lengths, corresponding to different scaffold pore sizes, and of varying numbers of loaded struts, corresponding to varying cell densities. We compare our numerical model with the results of free floating contraction experiments of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) in collagen-GAG scaffolds of varying pore size and with varying cell densities. PMID:20362329

  2. Choice of pore size can introduce artefacts when filtering picoeukaryotes for molecular biodiversity studies.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Nikolaj; Daugbjerg, Niels; Richardson, Katherine

    2013-05-01

    Published results of studies based on samples size fractionated by sequential filtration (e.g. 0.2-3 μm) indicate that many ciliate, dinoflagellate and rhizarian phylotypes are found among marine picoeukaryotes. This is somewhat surprising as these protists are typically known as being large organisms (often >10 μm) and no picoplanktonic species have so far been identified. Here, the abundances of ciliate and dinoflagellate phylotypes in published molecular studies of picoeukaryotes are shown to correlate negatively with the pore size chosen for the end filter in the sequential filtrations (i.e. the filter used to collect the microbial biomass). This suggests that extracellular DNA adhering to small particles may be the source of ciliate and dinoflagellate phylotypes in picoplanktonic size fractions. This hypothesis was confirmed using real-time qPCR, which revealed significantly less dinoflagellate 18S rDNA in a 0.8-3-μm size fraction compared to 0.2-3 μm. On average, the abundance of putative extracellular phylotypes decreased by 84-89 % when a 0.8- μm end filter was used rather than a 0.2-μm end filter. A 0.8-μm filter is, however, not sufficient to retain all picoeukaryotic cells. Thus, selection of filter pore size involves a trade-off between avoiding artefacts generated by extracellular DNA and sampling the entire picoeukaryotic community. In contrast to ciliate and dinoflagellate phylotypes, rhizarian phylotypes in the picoplankton size range do not display a pattern consistent with an extracellular origin. This is likely due to the documented existence of picoplanktonic swarmer cells within this group.

  3. Glycidol-modified gels for molecular-sieve chromatography. Surface hydrophilization and pore size reduction.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K O

    1987-11-01

    Divinyl sulfone-crosslinked agarose gels were made hydrophilic by coupling glycidol to the agarose chains. The concentration of glycidol in the reaction mixture determines the pore size of the gels (the glycidol molecules probably form polymers, the degree of polymerization increasing with the glycidol concentration). Gels prepared with moderate glycidol concentrations are still porous enough to be used for separation of proteins and peptides. Gels with a high degree of glycidol polymerization are suited for desalting of low-molecular-weight compounds, for instance peptides.

  4. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  5. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  6. IMPACT OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

    2007-12-04

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a new geometric form: hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with unique porous walls. The new geometric form combines the existing technology of HGMs with basic glass science knowledge in the realm of glass-in-glass phase separation. Conceptually, the development of a HGM with porous walls (referred to as a PWHGM) provides a unique system in which various media or filling agents can be incorporated into the PWHGM (via transport through the porous walls) and ultimately has the capacity to serve as a functional delivery system in various industrial applications. Applications of these types of systems could range from hydrogen storage, molecular sieves, drug and bioactive delivery systems, to environmental, chemical and biological indicators, relevant to Energy, Environmental Processing and Homeland Security fields. As a specific example, previous studies at SRNL have introduced materials capable of hydrogen storage (as well as other materials) into the interior of the PWHGMs. The goal of this project was to determine if the microstructure (i.e., pore size and pore size distribution) of a PWHGM could be altered or tailored by varying composition and/or heat treatment (time and/or temperature) conditions. The ability to tailor the microstructure through composition or heat treatments could provide the opportunity to design the PWHGM system to accommodate different additives or fill agents. To meet this objective, HGMs of various alkali borosilicate compositions were fabricated using a flame forming apparatus installed at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory (ACTL). HGMs were treated under various heat treatment conditions to induce and/or enhance glass in glass phase separation. Heat treatment temperatures ranged from 580 C to 620 C, while heat treatment times were either 8 or 24 hours. Of the two primary variables assessed in this study, heat treatment temperature was determined to be most effective in changing the

  7. Effect of collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold pore size on matrix mineralization and cellular behavior in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ciara M; Duffy, Garry P; Schindeler, Aaron; O'brien, Fergal J

    2016-01-01

    We have previously examined osteoblast behavior on porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds with a range of mean pore sizes demonstrating superior cell attachment and migration in scaffolds with the largest pores (325 μm). Scaffolds provide a framework for construct development; therefore, it is crucial to identify the optimal pore size for augmented tissue formation. Utilizing the same range of scaffolds (85 μm - 325 μm), this study aimed to examine the effects of mean pore size on subsequent osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization, and to understand the mechanism by which pore size influences behavior of different cell types. Consequently, primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were assessed and their behavior compared to osteoblasts. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with the largest pore size (325 μm) facilitated improved osteoblast infiltration, earlier expression of mature bone markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased mineralization. MSCs responded similarly to osteoblasts whereby cell attachment and scaffold infiltration improved with increasing pore size. However, MSCs showed reduced cell motility, proliferation, and scaffold infiltration compared to osteoblasts. This was associated with differences in the profile of integrin subunits (α2) and collagen receptors (CD44), indicating that osteoblasts have a stronger affinity for CG scaffolds compared to MSCs. In summary, these results reveal how larger pores promote improved cell infiltration, essential for construct development, however the optimal scaffold pore size can be cell type specific. As such, this study highlights a necessity to tailor both scaffold micro-architecture and cell-type when designing constructs for successful bone tissue engineering applications.

  8. Micro and nano-size pores of clay minerals in shale reservoirs: Implication for the accumulation of shale gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Han, Yufu; Fu, Changqin; Zhang, han; Zhu, Yanming; Zuo, Zhaoxi

    2016-08-01

    A pore is an essential component of shale gas reservoirs. Clay minerals are the adsorption carrier second only to organic matter. This paper uses the organic maturity test, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to study the structure and effect of clay minerals on storing gas in shales. Results show the depositional environment and organic maturity influence the content and types of clay minerals as well as their structure in the three types of sedimentary facies in China. Clay minerals develop multi-size pores which shrink to micro- and nano-size by close compaction during diagenesis. Micro- and nano-pores can be divided into six types: 1) interlayer, 2) intergranular, 3) pore and fracture in contact with organic matter, 4) pore and fracture in contact with other types of minerals, 5) dissolved and, 6) micro-cracks. The contribution of clay minerals to the presence of pores in shale is evident and the clay plane porosity can even reach 16%, close to the contribution of organic matter. The amount of clay minerals and pores displays a positive correlation. Clay minerals possess a strong adsorption which is affected by moisture and reservoir maturity. Different pore levels of clay minerals are mutually arranged, thus essentially producing distinct reservoir adsorption effects. Understanding the structural characteristics of micro- and nano-pores in clay minerals can provide a tool for the exploration and development of shale gas reservoirs.

  9. Effective pore size and radius of capture for K(+) ions in K-channels.

    PubMed

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; González-Nilo, Fernando; Naranjo, David

    2016-01-01

    Reconciling protein functional data with crystal structure is arduous because rare conformations or crystallization artifacts occur. Here we present a tool to validate the dimensions of open pore structures of potassium-selective ion channels. We used freely available algorithms to calculate the molecular contour of the pore to determine the effective internal pore radius (r(E)) in several K-channel crystal structures. r(E) was operationally defined as the radius of the biggest sphere able to enter the pore from the cytosolic side. We obtained consistent r(E) estimates for MthK and Kv1.2/2.1 structures, with r(E) = 5.3-5.9 Å and r(E) = 4.5-5.2 Å, respectively. We compared these structural estimates with functional assessments of the internal mouth radii of capture (r(C)) for two electrophysiological counterparts, the large conductance calcium activated K-channel (r(C) = 2.2 Å) and the Shaker Kv-channel (r(C) = 0.8 Å), for MthK and Kv1.2/2.1 structures, respectively. Calculating the difference between r(E) and r(C), produced consistent size radii of 3.1-3.7 Å and 3.6-4.4 Å for hydrated K(+) ions. These hydrated K(+) estimates harmonize with others obtained with diverse experimental and theoretical methods. Thus, these findings validate MthK and the Kv1.2/2.1 structures as templates for open BK and Kv-channels, respectively. PMID:26831782

  10. Effective pore size and radius of capture for K+ ions in K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; González-Nilo, Fernando; Naranjo, David

    2016-01-01

    Reconciling protein functional data with crystal structure is arduous because rare conformations or crystallization artifacts occur. Here we present a tool to validate the dimensions of open pore structures of potassium-selective ion channels. We used freely available algorithms to calculate the molecular contour of the pore to determine the effective internal pore radius (rE) in several K-channel crystal structures. rE was operationally defined as the radius of the biggest sphere able to enter the pore from the cytosolic side. We obtained consistent rE estimates for MthK and Kv1.2/2.1 structures, with rE = 5.3–5.9 Å and rE = 4.5–5.2 Å, respectively. We compared these structural estimates with functional assessments of the internal mouth radii of capture (rC) for two electrophysiological counterparts, the large conductance calcium activated K-channel (rC = 2.2 Å) and the Shaker Kv-channel (rC = 0.8 Å), for MthK and Kv1.2/2.1 structures, respectively. Calculating the difference between rE and rC, produced consistent size radii of 3.1–3.7 Å and 3.6–4.4 Å for hydrated K+ ions. These hydrated K+ estimates harmonize with others obtained with diverse experimental and theoretical methods. Thus, these findings validate MthK and the Kv1.2/2.1 structures as templates for open BK and Kv-channels, respectively. PMID:26831782

  11. 1.9 μm superficially porous packing material with radially oriented pores and tailored pore size for ultra-fast separation of small molecules and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Min, Yi; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ci; Xia, Simin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-08-22

    In this work, 1.9 μm reversed-phase packing materials with superficially porous structure were prepared to achieve the rapid and high efficient separation of peptides and proteins. The silica particles were synthesized via three steps, nonporous silica particle preparation by a modified seeded growth method, mesoporous shell formation by a one pot templated dissolution and redeposition strategy, and pore size expansion via acid-refluxing. By such a method, 1.9 μm superficially porous materials with 0.18 μm shell thickness and tailored pore diameter (10 nm, 15 nm) were obtained. After pore enlargement, the formerly dense arrays of mesoporous structure changed, the radially oriented pores dominated the superficially porous structure. The chromatographic performance of such particles was investigated after C18 derivatization. For packing materials with 1.9 μm diameter and 10 nm pore size, the column efficiency could reach 211,300 plates per m for naphthalene. To achieve the high resolution separation of peptides and proteins, particles with pore diameter of 15 nm were tailored, by which the baseline separation of 5 peptides and 5 intact proteins could be respectively achieved within 1 min, demonstrating the superiority in the high efficiency and high throughput analysis of biomolecules. Furthermore, BSA digests were well separated with peak capacity of 120 in 30 min on a 15 cm-long column. Finally, we compared our columns with a 1.7 μm Kinetex C18 column under the same conditions, our particles with 10nm pore size demonstrated similar performance for separation of the large intact proteins. Moreover, the particles with 15 nm pore size showed more symmetrical peaks for the separation of large proteins (BSA, OVA and IgG) and provided rapid separation of protein extracts from Escherichia coli in 5 min. All these results indicated that the synthesized 1.9 μm superficially porous silica packing materials would be promising in the ultra-fast and high

  12. Anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control for selective and effective particulate matter filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Yang; Tan, Yingling; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Zhu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution is widely considered as one of the most pressing environmental health issues. Particularly, atmospheric particulate matters (PM), a complex mixture of solid or liquid matter suspended in the atmosphere, are a harmful form of air pollution due to its ability to penetrate deep into the lungs and blood streams, causing permanent damages such as DNA mutations and premature death. Therefore, porous materials which can effectively filter out particulate matters are highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control fabricated through a scalable process can serve as effective and selective filtering materials for different types of particulate matters (such as PM2.5, PM10). Combining selective and dramatic filtering effect, fine pore size control and a scalable process, this type of anodic aluminum oxide templates can potentially serve as a novel selective filter for different kinds of particulate matters, and a promising and complementary solution to tackle this serious environmental issue.

  13. Pore-size-dependent calcium carbonate precipitation controlled by surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stack, Andrew G; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Allard, Lawrence F; Bañuelos, José L; Rother, Gernot; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Cole, David R; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2014-06-01

    Induced mineral precipitation is potentially important for the remediation of contaminants, such as during mineral trapping during carbon or toxic metal sequestration. The prediction of precipitation reactions is complicated by the porous nature of rocks and soils and their interaction with the precipitate, introducing transport and confinement effects. Here X-ray scattering measurements, modeling, and electron microscopies were used to measure the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in a porous amorphous silica (CPG) that contained two discrete distributions of pore sizes: nanopores and macropores. To examine the role of the favorability of interaction between the substrate and precipitate, some of the CPG was functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) similar to those known to enhance nucleation densities on planar substrates. Precipitation was found to occur exclusively in macropores in the native CPG, while simultaneous precipitation in nanopores and macropores was observed in the functionalized CPG. The rate of precipitation in the nanopores estimated from the model of the X-ray scattering matched that measured on calcite single crystals. These results suggest that the pore-size distribution in which a precipitation reaction preferentially occurs depends on the favorability of interaction between substrate and precipitate, something not considered in most studies of precipitation in porous media.

  14. Pore Size Distributions Inferred from Modified Inversion Percolation Modeling of Drainage Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralus, D. E.; Wang, H. F.; Strand, T. E.; Glass, R. J.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments have been conducted of drainage in sand packs. At equilibrium, the interface between the fluids forms a saturation transition fringe where the saturation decreases monotonically with height. This behavior was observed in a 1-inch thick pack of 20-30 sand contained front and back within two thin, 12-inch-by-24-inch glass plates. The translucent chamber was illuminated from behind by a bank of fluorescent bulbs. Acquired data were in the form of images captured by a CCD camera with resolution on the grain scale. The measured intensity of the transmitted light was used to calculate the average saturation at each point in the chamber. This study used a modified invasion percolation (MIP) model to simulate the drainage experiments to evaluate the relationship between the saturation-versus-height curve at equilibrium and the pore size distribution associated with the granular medium. The simplest interpretation of a drainage curve is in terms of a distribution of capillary tubes whose radii reproduce the the observed distribution of rise heights. However, this apparent radius distribution obtained from direct inversion of the saturation profile did not yield the assumed radius distribution. Further investigation demonstrated that the equilibrium height distribution is controlled primarily by the Bond number (ratio of gravity to capillary forces) with some influence from the width of the pore radius distribution. The width of the equilibrium fringe is quantified in terms of the ratio of Bond number to the standard deviation of the pore throat distribution. The normalized saturation-vs-height curves exhibit a power-law scaling behavior consistent with both Brooks-Corey and Van Genuchten type curves. Fundamental tenets of percolation theory were used to quantify the relationship between the apparent and actual radius distributions as a function of the mean coordination number and of the ratio of Bond number to standard deviation, which was supported by both MIP

  15. Characterization of pore scale NAPL morphology in homogeneous sands as a function of grain size and NAPL dissolution.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaehyun; Annable, Michael D

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we investigate pore scale morphology of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) trapped in different pore sizes using tracer techniques. Specific interfacial area and saturation of NAPL trapped in homogeneous sands were measured using the interfacial and partitioning tracer techniques. The observed NAPL-water interfacial areas increased in a log-linear fashion with decreasing sand grain size, but showed no clear trend with residual NAPL saturation formed in the various grain sizes. The measured values were used to calculate the NAPL morphology index, which characterizes the spatial NAPL distribution within the pore space. The NAPL morphology indices, increased exponentially with decreasing grain size, indicating that the NAPL becomes smaller, but more blobs. For a fixed grain size, the specific interfacial area and saturation of the NAPL were measured following changes caused by dissolution using alcohol. The observed interfacial areas showed a decrease linearly as a function of the NAPL saturation.

  16. Pore size distribution of a deeply excavated Oxisol after 19 years reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Batista Bonini, Carolina; de Cássia Marchini, Débora; Alves, Marlene Cristina; García de Arruda, Otton; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Digging of the local soil and using it as a raw material for construction purposes has been identified as a non-negligible source of land degradation. Techniques aimed at soil profile reconstruction and ecological restoration of soils truncated by mechanical excavation using heavy machinery have been investigated Both, total soil porosity and pore size distribution are important properties for soil management as well as for assessing the recovery of soil function after land degradation. In this way, macropores are responsible for aeration, whereas water storage depends on soil meso- and micropores in the soil and the optimal pore-size distribution is also an indicator of soil quality. We investigated the changes in the pore size distribution of a soil that was beheaded to extract raw materials after a 19 year period of reclamation, which involved the use of green manures, gypsum and pasture for the purpose of profile recovery. The studied area is located in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brzil. A field trial was performed following a completely randomized experimental design with seven treatments and four replications. Starting 1992, the initial treatments were: 1) control (tilled bare soil), 2)Stizolobium aterrium, 3)Cajanus cajan, 4)lime+S. aterrimum, 5) lime+C. cajan, 6) lime + gypsum + S. aterrimum, 7) lime + gypsum+C. cajan. In 1994, all treatments with C. cajan were replaced by Canavalia ensiformis and in 1999, Brachiaria decumbens was implanted in all the experimental plots. Data from vegetated treatments were compared with bare soil (control) and native vegetation (Savannah). Soil samples were collected in 2011 at the 0.00-0.10, 0.10-0.20, and 0.20-0.40 m depths. Treatment differences were assessed by analysis of variance, following the Scott-Knott test (5%) of probability to compare averages. Macroporosity of the 0.00-0.10 m top layer was above the 0.10 m3m-3 threshold considered as critical for plant growth. On the 0.10-0.20 m layer only treatments with C

  17. Evaluation of borate bioactive glass scaffolds with different pore sizes in a rat subcutaneous implantation model.

    PubMed

    Deliormanli, Aylin M; Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2014-01-01

    Borate bioactive glass has been shown to convert faster and more completely to hydroxyapatite and enhance new bone formation in vivo when compared to silicate bioactive glass (such as 45S5 and 13-93 bioactive glass). In this work, the effects of the borate glass microstructure on its conversion to hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro and its ability to support tissue ingrowth in a rat subcutaneous implantation model were investigated. Bioactive borate glass scaffolds, designated 13-93B3, with a grid-like microstructure and pore widths of 300, 600, and 900 µm were prepared by a robocasting technique. The scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously for 4 weeks in Sprague Dawley rats. Silicate 13-93 glass scaffolds with the same microstructure were used as the control. The conversion of the scaffolds to HA was studied as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. Histology and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate conversion of the bioactive glass implants to hydroxyapatite, as well as tissue ingrowth and blood vessel formation in the implants. The pore size of the scaffolds was found to have little effect on tissue infiltration and angiogenesis after the 4-week implantation.

  18. Sulfur infiltrated activated carbon cathodes for lithium sulfur cells: The combined effects of pore size distribution and electrolyte molarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Tae; Zhao, Youyang; Kim, Hyea; Cho, Won Il; Yushin, Gleb

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we adopted three different commercial activated carbon samples (ACs) having different particle size, specific surface area and pore size to make sulfur-carbon (S-AC) nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium sulfur batteries. The effect of the physical parameters of ACs and the combined effect of electrolyte molarity were investigated. The performance of the cells at two different temperatures of 25 and 70 °C were compared. For room temperature operation of the cells, the capacities of S infiltrated into microporous AC having smaller pore size and stronger interactions with sulfur and sulfides were lower than those of the S infiltrated into micro- and mesoporous ACs containing larger pores. In contrast, the microporous AC demonstrated higher capacity at the elevated temperature due to the improved ion transport rate. The effect of electrolyte molarity on the performance of Li/S cells was found to depend on the AC pore size and particle size distributions. Increasing electrolyte molarity from 1 to 3 M demonstrated improved cell performance and reduced polysulfide dissolution in all the studied S-AC samples. However, further increasing electrolyte salt concentration resulted in a high polarization and reduced cell performance in S-ACs having large particle size or smaller pores.

  19. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  20. Modeling the controllable pH-responsive swelling and pore size of networked alginate based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ariel W; Neufeld, Ronald J

    2009-10-01

    Semisynthetic network alginate polymer (SNAP), synthesized by acetalization of linear alginate with di-aldehyde, is a pH-responsive tetrafunctionally linked 3D gel network, and has potential application in oral delivery of protein therapeutics and active biologicals, and as tissue bioscaffold for regenerative medicine. A constitutive polyelectrolyte gel model based on non-Gaussian polymer elasticity, Flory-Huggins liquid lattice theory, and non-ideal Donnan membrane equilibria was derived, to describe SNAP gel swelling in dilute and ionic solutions containing uni-univalent, uni-bivalent, bi-univalent or bi-bi-valent electrolyte solutions. Flory-Huggins interaction parameters as a function of ionic strength and characteristic ratio of alginates of various molecular weights were determined experimentally to numerically predict SNAP hydrogel swelling. SNAP hydrogel swells pronouncedly to 1000 times in dilute solution, compared to its compact polymer volume, while behaving as a neutral polymer with limited swelling in high ionic strength or low pH solutions. The derived model accurately describes the pH-responsive swelling of SNAP hydrogel in acid and alkaline solutions of wide range of ionic strength. The pore sizes of the synthesized SNAP hydrogels of various crosslink densities were estimated from the derived model to be in the range of 30-450 nm which were comparable to that measured by thermoporometry, and diffusion of bovine serum albumin. The derived equilibrium swelling model can characterize hydrogel structure such as molecular weight between crosslinks and crosslinking density, or can be used as predictive model for swelling, pore size and mechanical properties if gel structural information is known, and can potentially be applied to other point-link network polyelectrolytes such as hyaluronic acid gel.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of SIO2 on porous alumina membranes: controlling the pore size and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velleman, Leonora; Traini, Gerry; Evans, Peter J.; Atanacio, Armand; Shapter, Joe G.; Losic, Dusan

    2008-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of SiO2 onto nanoporous alumina (PA) membranes was investigated with the aim of adjusting the pore size and transport properties. PA membranes from commercial sources with a range of pore diameters (20 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm) were used and modified by atomic layer deposition using tris(tert-butoxy)silanol and water as the precursor couple. By adjusting the number of deposition cycles, the thickness of the conformal silica coating was controlled, reducing the effective pore diameter, and subsequently changing the transport properties of the PA membrane. Silica coated PA membranes with desired pore diameters from <5 nm to 100 nm were fabricated. In addition to the pore size, the transport properties and selectivity of fabricated silica coated PA membranes were controlled by chemical functionalisation using a silane with hydrophobic properties. Structural and chemical properties of modified membranes were studied by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (DSIMS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spectrophotometric methods were used to evaluate the transport properties and selectivity of silica coated membranes by permeation studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic organic molecules. The resultant silica/PA membranes with specific surface chemistry and controlled pore size are applicable for molecular separation, cell culture, bioreactors, biosensing and drug delivery.

  2. Application of SAXS and SANS in evaluation of porosity, pore size distribution and surface area of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radlinski, A.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hinde, A.L.; Hainbuchner, M.; Rauch, H.; Baron, M.; Lin, J.S.; Fan, L.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the applicability of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques for determining the porosity, pore size distribution and internal specific surface area in coals. The method is noninvasive, fast, inexpensive and does not require complex sample preparation. It uses coal grains of about 0.8 mm size mounted in standard pellets as used for petrographic studies. Assuming spherical pore geometry, the scattering data are converted into the pore size distribution in the size range 1 nm (10 A??) to 20 ??m (200,000 A??) in diameter, accounting for both open and closed pores. FTIR as well as SAXS and SANS data for seven samples of oriented whole coals and corresponding pellets with vitrinite reflectance (Ro) values in the range 0.55% to 5.15% are presented and analyzed. Our results demonstrate that pellets adequately represent the average microstructure of coal samples. The scattering data have been used to calculate the maximum surface area available for methane adsorption. Total porosity as percentage of sample volume is calculated and compared with worldwide trends. By demonstrating the applicability of SAXS and SANS techniques to determine the porosity, pore size distribution and surface area in coals, we provide a new and efficient tool, which can be used for any type of coal sample, from a thin slice to a representative sample of a thick seam. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recommendation for Using Smaller (0.1 micro sign) Pore-Size Media for Filtration in Salt Waste Processing Project

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    2003-05-02

    Based on experimental studies with simulated and actual wastes, we recommend adopting the use of 0.1-micron pore-size, sintered stainless-steel filter elements within the design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Furthermore, adopting the smaller pore size elements for the Actinide Removal Process would result in a significant risk to the start-up schedule due to delays for buying, installing, and testing new equipment. The existing 0.5-micron pore-size filters will provide nearly equivalent service with no additional capital investment. Unless the planned filter test at Building 512-S fails to meet specifications, the project should proceed with the existing equipment, including spares. When the existing equipment reaches the end of the service life, management can consider replacement with the smaller pore-size elements. The laboratory studies indicate that use of the smaller pore size equipment will result in greater protection against particulate fines passing to downstream facilities while giving equivalent or superior processing rates than provided by the 0.5-micron elements.

  4. Linking Intra-Aggregate Pore Size Distribution with Organic Matter Decomposition Status, Evidence from FTIR and X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, E. R.; Quigley, M.; Kravchenko, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that conversion of intensively cultivated lands to less disturbed systems enhances soil OM storage capacity, primarily through OM stabilization in macroaggregates. We hypothesized that the potential for OM stabilization inside macro-aggregates is influenced by presence and abundance of intra-aggregate pores. Pores determine microbial access to OM and regulate diffusion of solution/gases within aggregates which drives microbial functioning. We investigated the influence of longterm disturbance intensity on soil OM composition and its relation to pore size distribution within macroaggregates. We used quantitative FTIR to determine OM decomposition status and X-ray micro-tomography to assess pore size distribution in macroaggregates as affected by management and landuse. Macroaggregates 4-6 mm in size where selected from topsoil under long term conventional tillage (CT), cover-crop (CC), and native succession vegetation (NS) treatments at Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan. Comparison of main soil OM functional groups suggested that with increasing disturbance intensity, the proportion of aromatic and carboxylic/carbohydrates associated compounds increased and it was concomitant with a decrease in the proportion of aliphatic associated compounds and lignin derivatives. Further, FTIR-based decomposition indices revealed that overall decomposition status of macroaggregates followed the pattern of CT > CC ≈ NS. X-ray micro-tomography findings suggested that greater OM decomposition within the macroaggregates was associated with i) greater percent of pores >13 micron in size within the aggregates, as well as ii) greater proportion of small to medium pores (13-110 micron). The results develop previous findings, suggesting that shift in landuse or management indirectly affects soil OM stabilization through alteration of pore size distribution within macroaggregates that itself, is coupled with OM decomposition status.

  5. A variable-step-size robust delta modulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, C. L.; Garodnick, J.; Schilling, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    Description of an analytically obtained optimum adaptive delta modulator-demodulator configuration. The device utilizes two past samples to obtain a step size which minimizes the mean square error for a Markov-Gaussian source. The optimum system is compared, using computer simulations, with a linear delta modulator and an enhanced Abate delta modulator. In addition, the performance is compared to the rate distortion bound for a Markov source. It is shown that the optimum delta modulator is neither quantization nor slope-overload limited. The highly nonlinear equations obtained for the optimum transmitter and receiver are approximated by piecewise-linear equations in order to obtain system equations which can be transformed into hardware. The derivation of the experimental system is presented.

  6. A macromolecular crowding study of RNA folding and activity: polymer pore size matters! (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Richard; Fiorini, Erica; Paudel, Bishnu; Rueda, David; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-03-01

    Catalytic RNAs, like the group IIB intron ribozyme of S. cerevesiae, require a high magnesium(II) concentration to show folding and function in vitro [1]. In contrast, in vivo conditions are characterized by a highly crowded cellular environment and much lower ion concentration. Molecular crowding agents are a widespread tool to mimic cellular crowding [2]. However, particular physical/chemical properties explaining the crowders influence are mostly not understood. In this study, we gain new insights on how polymer properties like viscosity, pore size etc. influence the activity and folding of a large RNA. We combined bulk activity assays and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer experiments, screening the PEG volume fraction (%) and molecular weight (MW). Our results revealed that upon the influence of crowding agents, a compaction of the underlying structure depends on the PEG % and the presence of different PEG MW and % unveiled an optimal pore size in terms of catalytic activity. In summary, an increasing density of the crowding environment shifts the RNA towards the most compact state, but the ribozyme is only active if the crowders network matches its size [4]. We interpret the most compact state as necessary, but not sufficient, to keep the ribozyme active. Financial support from the European Research Council (MIRNA N° 259092, to RKOS), the Swiss National Fund (SNF), and the Forschungskredit Grant of the University of Zürich (FK-14-096 and 15-092 to RB) are gratefully acknowledged. [1] Swisher J.F., Su L.J., Brenowitz M., Anderson V.E., Pyle A.M., J. Mol. Bio., 315, 297-310 (2002). [2] Kilburn D., Roh J.H., Guo L., Briber R.M., Woodson S.A., JACS, 132, 8690-6 (2010). [3] Steiner M., Karunatilaka K.S., Sigel R.K.O., Rueda D., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.,105, 13853-8 (2008). [4] aBörner R, Fiorini E, Sigel R.K.O., Chimia, 69, 207-212 (2015).; bFiorini E., Paudel B., Börner R., Rueda D., Sigel R.K.O., submitted. [5] König S.L.B., Hadzic M

  7. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  8. Quantitative Control of Pore Size of Mesoporous Carbon Nanospheres through the Self-Assembly of Diblock Copolymer Micelles in Solution.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Lin, Zhixing; Xu, Fugui; Zheng, Jingxu; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Mai, Yiyong; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports facile synthesis of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCNSs) with average diameters of around 300 nm and well-controlled pore sizes ranging from 8 to 38 nm, by employing polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblocks with different PS block lengths as the soft templates and dopamine as the carbon-rich precursor. For the first time, a linear equation is achieved for the quantitative control of the average pore size of MCNSs by simply adjusting a block length of diblock copolymer. The resultant MCNSs possess high surface areas of up to 450 m(2) g(-1) and nitrogen doping contents of up to ≈3 wt%. As electrode materials of supercapacitors, the MCNSs exhibit excellent electrochemical performance with high specific capacitances of up to 350 F g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) , superior rate capability, and cycling stability. Interestingly, the specific capacitance of the MCNSs reduces linearly with increasing pore size, whereas the normalized capacitance by specific surface area remains invariable. This represents a new spectrum of the relationship between electrochemical capacitance and pore size (>5 nm) for porous carbons, which makes a complement to the existing spectra focusing on pore diameters of <5 nm. PMID:27120340

  9. A direct and quantitative three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal structure of disordered mesoporous carbon with tailored pore size.

    PubMed

    Balach, Juan; Soldera, Flavio; Acevedo, Diego F; Mücklich, Frank; Barbero, César A

    2013-06-01

    A new technique that allows direct three-dimensional (3D) investigations of mesopores in carbon materials and quantitative characterization of their physical properties is reported. Focused ion beam nanotomography (FIB-nt) is performed by a serial sectioning procedure with a dual beam FIB-scanning electron microscopy instrument. Mesoporous carbons (MPCs) with tailored mesopore size are produced by carbonization of resorcinol-formaldehyde gels in the presence of a cationic surfactant as a pore stabilizer. A visual 3D morphology representation of disordered porous carbon is shown. Pore size distribution of MPCs is determined by the FIB-nt technique and nitrogen sorption isotherm methods to compare both results. The obtained MPCs exhibit pore sizes of 4.7, 7.2, and 18.3 nm, and a specific surface area of ca. 560 m(2)/g.

  10. Simulations of Pore Formation in Lipid Membranes: Reaction Coordinates, Convergence, Hysteresis, and Finite-Size Effects.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neha; Hub, Jochen S

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane pores play an important role in various biophysical processes such as membrane permeation, membrane fusion, and antimicrobial peptide activity. In principal, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide an accurate model of pore formation in lipid membranes. However, the free energy landscape of transmembrane pore formation remains poorly understood, partly because potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of pore formation strongly depend on the choice of the reaction coordinate. In this study, we used umbrella sampling to compute PMFs for pore formation using three different reaction coordinates, namely, (i) a coordinate that steers the lipids in the lateral direction away from the pore center, (ii) the distance of a single lipid phosphate group from the membrane center, and (iii) the average water density inside a membrane-spanning cylinder. Our results show that while the three reaction coordinates efficiently form pores in membranes, they suffer from strong hysteresis between pore-opening and pore-closing simulations, suggesting that they do not restrain the systems close to the transition state for pore formation. The two reaction coordinates that act via restraining the lipids lead to more pronounced hysteresis compared with the coordinate acting on the water molecules. By comparing PMFs computed from membranes with different numbers of lipids, we observed significant artifacts from the periodic boundary conditions in small simulation systems. Further analysis suggests that the formation and disruption of a continuous hydrogen-bonding network across the membrane corresponds to the transition state for pore formation. Our study provides molecular insights into the critical steps of transmembrane pore formation, and it may guide the development of efficient reaction coordinates for pore formation.

  11. Simulations of Pore Formation in Lipid Membranes: Reaction Coordinates, Convergence, Hysteresis, and Finite-Size Effects.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neha; Hub, Jochen S

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane pores play an important role in various biophysical processes such as membrane permeation, membrane fusion, and antimicrobial peptide activity. In principal, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide an accurate model of pore formation in lipid membranes. However, the free energy landscape of transmembrane pore formation remains poorly understood, partly because potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of pore formation strongly depend on the choice of the reaction coordinate. In this study, we used umbrella sampling to compute PMFs for pore formation using three different reaction coordinates, namely, (i) a coordinate that steers the lipids in the lateral direction away from the pore center, (ii) the distance of a single lipid phosphate group from the membrane center, and (iii) the average water density inside a membrane-spanning cylinder. Our results show that while the three reaction coordinates efficiently form pores in membranes, they suffer from strong hysteresis between pore-opening and pore-closing simulations, suggesting that they do not restrain the systems close to the transition state for pore formation. The two reaction coordinates that act via restraining the lipids lead to more pronounced hysteresis compared with the coordinate acting on the water molecules. By comparing PMFs computed from membranes with different numbers of lipids, we observed significant artifacts from the periodic boundary conditions in small simulation systems. Further analysis suggests that the formation and disruption of a continuous hydrogen-bonding network across the membrane corresponds to the transition state for pore formation. Our study provides molecular insights into the critical steps of transmembrane pore formation, and it may guide the development of efficient reaction coordinates for pore formation. PMID:27254744

  12. Critical assessment of the pore size distribution in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappia, F.; Pizzocri, D.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Paperini, G.; Pellottiero, D.; Macián-Juan, R.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    A new methodology is introduced to analyse porosity data in the high burnup structure. Image analysis is coupled with the adaptive kernel density estimator to obtain a detailed characterisation of the pore size distribution, without a-priori assumption on the functional form of the distribution. Subsequently, stereological analysis is carried out. The method shows advantages compared to the classical approach based on the histogram in terms of detail in the description and accuracy within the experimental limits. Results are compared to the approximation of a log-normal distribution. In the investigated local burnup range (80-200 GWd/tHM), the agreement of the two approaches is satisfactory. From the obtained total pore density and mean pore diameter as a function of local burnup, pore coarsening is observed starting from ≈100 GWd/tHM, in agreement with a previous investigation.

  13. Determination of pore size distributions in capillary-channeled polymer fiber stationary phases by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and implications for fast protein separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxin; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-07-18

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been utilized as liquid chromatography stationary phases, primarily for biomacromolecule separations on the analytical and preparative scales. The collinear packing of the eight-channeled C-CP fibers provides for very efficient flow, allowing operation at high linear velocity (u>100mm s(-1)) and low backpressure (<2000psi) in analytical-scale separations. To take advantage of these fluid transport properties, there must not be mass transfer limitations as would be imposed by having an appreciably porous phase, wherein solute diffusion limits the overall mass transport rates. To better understand the physical nano-/micro- structure of C-CP fibers, inverse size exclusion chromatography (iSEC) has been employed to determine the pore size distribution (PSD) within C-CP fibers. A diversity of test species (from metal ions to large proteins) was used as probes under non-retaining conditions to obtain a response curve reflecting the apparent partition coefficient (Kd) versus hydrodynamic radii (rm). A mean pore radius (rp) of 4.2nm with standard deviation (sp) of ±1.1nm was calculated by fitting the Kd versus rm data to model equations with a Gaussian pore size distribution, and a pore radius of 4.0±0.1nm was calculated based on a log-normal distribution. The derived mean pore radius is much smaller than traditional support materials, with the standard deviation showing a relatively uniform pore distribution. van Deemter plots were analyzed to provide practical confirmation of the structural implications. Large molecules (e.g., proteins) that are fully excluded from pores have no significant C-terms in the van Deemter plots whereas small molecules that can access the pore volumes display appreciable C-terms, as expected. Fitting of retention data to the Knox equation suggests that the columns operate with a characteristic particle diameter (dp) of ∼53μm. PMID:24877979

  14. Pore size is a critical parameter for obtaining sustained protein release from electrochemically synthesized mesoporous silicon microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Ester L.; Reguera-Nuñez, Elaine; Matveeva, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous silicon has become a material of high interest for drug delivery due to its outstanding internal surface area and inherent biodegradability. We have previously reported the preparation of mesoporous silicon microparticles (MS-MPs) synthesized by an advantageous electrochemical method, and showed that due to their inner structure they can adsorb proteins in amounts exceeding the mass of the carrier itself. Protein release from these MS-MPs showed low burst effect and fast delivery kinetics with complete release in a few hours. In this work, we explored if tailoring the size of the inner pores of the particles would retard the protein release process. To address this hypothesis, three new MS-MPs prototypes were prepared by electrochemical synthesis, and the resulting carriers were characterized for morphology, particle size, and pore structure. All MS-MP prototypes had 90 µm mean particle size, but depending on the current density applied for synthesis, pore size changed between 5 and 13 nm. The model protein α-chymotrypsinogen was loaded into MS-MPs by adsorption and solvent evaporation. In the subsequent release experiments, no burst release of the protein was detected for any prototype. However, prototypes with larger pores (>10 nm) reached 100% release in 24–48 h, whereas prototypes with small mesopores (<6 nm) still retained most of their cargo after 96 h. MS-MPs with ∼6 nm pores were loaded with the osteogenic factor BMP7, and sustained release of this protein for up to two weeks was achieved. In conclusion, our results confirm that tailoring pore size can modify protein release from MS-MPs, and that prototypes with potential therapeutic utility for regional delivery of osteogenic factors can be prepared by convenient techniques. PMID:26557423

  15. Robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.

    1993-01-01

    Robustness is a buzz word common to all newly proposed space systems design as well as many new commercial products. The image that one conjures up when the word appears is a 'Paul Bunyon' (lumberjack design), strong and hearty; healthy with margins in all aspects of the design. In actuality, robustness is much broader in scope than margins, including such factors as simplicity, redundancy, desensitization to parameter variations, control of parameter variations (environments flucation), and operational approaches. These must be traded with concepts, materials, and fabrication approaches against the criteria of performance, cost, and reliability. This includes manufacturing, assembly, processing, checkout, and operations. The design engineer or project chief is faced with finding ways and means to inculcate robustness into an operational design. First, however, be sure he understands the definition and goals of robustness. This paper will deal with these issues as well as the need for the requirement for robustness.

  16. New Pulp Biobleaching System Involving Manganese Peroxidase Immobilized in a Silica Support with Controlled Pore Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Toshiya; Kajino, Tsutomu; Li, Bo; Sugiyama, Hidehiko; Takahashi, Haruo

    2001-01-01

    Attempts have been made to use manganese peroxidase (MnP) for chlorine-free pulp biobleaching, but they have not been commercially viable because of the enzyme's low stability. We developed a new pulp biobleaching method involving mesoporous material-immobilized manganese peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. MnP immobilized in FSM-16, a folded-sheet mesoporous material whose pore size is nearly the same as the diameter of the enzyme, had the highest thermal stability and tolerance to H2O2. MnP immobilized in FSM-16 retained more than 80% of its initial activity even after 10 days of continuous reaction. We constructed a thermally discontinuous two-stage reactor system, in which the enzyme (39°C) and pulp-bleaching (70°C) reactions were performed separately. When the treatment of pulp with MnP by means of the two-stage reactor system and alkaline extraction was repeated seven times, the brightness of the pulp increased to about 88% within 7 h after completion of the last treatment. PMID:11319102

  17. Facile synthesis of diverse graphene nanomeshes based on simultaneous regulation of pore size and surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Song, Huaibing; Zeng, Dawen; Wang, Hao; Qin, Ziyu; Xu, Keng; Pang, Aimin; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-08-01

    Recently, graphene nanomesh (GNM) has attracted great attentions due to its unique porous structure, abundant active sites, finite band gap and possesses potential applications in the fields of electronics, gas sensor/storage, catalysis, etc. Therefore, diverse GNMs with different physical and chemical properties are required urgently to meet different applications. Herein we demonstrate a facile synthetic method based on the famous Fenton reaction to prepare GNM, by using economically fabricated graphene oxide (GO) as a starting material. By precisely controlling the reaction time, simultaneous regulation of pore size from 2.9 to 11.1 nm and surface structure can be realized. Ultimately, diverse GNMs with tunable band gap and work function can be obtained. Specially, the band gap decreases from 4.5–2.3 eV for GO, which is an insulator, to 3.9–1.24 eV for GNM-5 h, which approaches to a semiconductor. The dual nature of electrophilic addition and oxidizability of HO• is responsible for this controllable synthesis. This efficient, low-cost, inherently scalable synthetic method is suitable for provide diverse and optional GNMs, and may be generalized to a universal technique.

  18. Facile synthesis of diverse graphene nanomeshes based on simultaneous regulation of pore size and surface structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Song, Huaibing; Zeng, Dawen; Wang, Hao; Qin, Ziyu; Xu, Keng; Pang, Aimin; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene nanomesh (GNM) has attracted great attentions due to its unique porous structure, abundant active sites, finite band gap and possesses potential applications in the fields of electronics, gas sensor/storage, catalysis, etc. Therefore, diverse GNMs with different physical and chemical properties are required urgently to meet different applications. Herein we demonstrate a facile synthetic method based on the famous Fenton reaction to prepare GNM, by using economically fabricated graphene oxide (GO) as a starting material. By precisely controlling the reaction time, simultaneous regulation of pore size from 2.9 to 11.1 nm and surface structure can be realized. Ultimately, diverse GNMs with tunable band gap and work function can be obtained. Specially, the band gap decreases from 4.5–2.3 eV for GO, which is an insulator, to 3.9–1.24 eV for GNM-5 h, which approaches to a semiconductor. The dual nature of electrophilic addition and oxidizability of HO• is responsible for this controllable synthesis. This efficient, low-cost, inherently scalable synthetic method is suitable for provide diverse and optional GNMs, and may be generalized to a universal technique. PMID:27561350

  19. Statistical physics studies of multilayer adsorption isotherm in food materials and pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, F.; Knani, S.; Ben Yahia, M.; Ben Lamine, A.

    2015-08-01

    Water sorption isotherms of foodstuffs are very important in different areas of food science engineering such as for design, modeling and optimization of many processes. The equilibrium moisture content is an important parameter in models used to predict changes in the moisture content of a product during storage. A formulation of multilayer model with two energy levels was based on statistical physics and theoretical considerations. Thanks to the grand canonical ensemble in statistical physics. Some physicochemical parameters related to the adsorption process were introduced in the analytical model expression. The data tabulated in literature of water adsorption at different temperatures on: chickpea seeds, lentil seeds, potato and on green peppers were described applying the most popular models applied in food science. We also extend the study to the newest proposed model. It is concluded that among studied models the proposed model seems to be the best for description of data in the whole range of relative humidity. By using our model, we were able to determine the thermodynamic functions. The measurement of desorption isotherms, in particular a gas over a solid porous, allows access to the distribution of pore size PSD.

  20. Metal and Metalloid Size-Fractionation Strategies in Spatial High-Resolution Sediment Pore Water Profiles.

    PubMed

    Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Duester, Lars; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-09-01

    Sediment water interfaces (SWIs) are often characterized by steep biogeochemical gradients determining the fate of inorganic and organic substances. Important transport processes at the SWI are sedimentation and resuspension of particulate matter and fluxes of dissolved materials. A microprofiling and micro sampling system (missy), enabling high resolution measurements of sediment parameters in parallel to a direct sampling of sediment pore waters (SPWs), was combined with two fractionation approaches (ultrafiltration (UF) and cloud point extraction (CPE)) to differentiate between colloidal and dissolved fractions at a millimeter scale. An inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry method established for volumes of 300 μL enabled the combination of the high resolution fractionation with multi-element analyzes. UF and CPE comparably indicated that manganese is predominantly present in dissolved fractions of SPW profiles. Differences found for cobalt and iron showed that the results obtained by size-dependent UF and micelle-mediated CPE do not necessarily coincide, probably due to different fractionation mechanisms. Both methods were identified as suitable for investigating fraction-related element concentrations in SPW along sediment depth profiles at a millimeter scale. The two approaches are discussed with regard to their advantages, limitations, potential sources of errors, further improvements, and potential future applications. PMID:27504804

  1. Facile synthesis of diverse graphene nanomeshes based on simultaneous regulation of pore size and surface structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Song, Huaibing; Zeng, Dawen; Wang, Hao; Qin, Ziyu; Xu, Keng; Pang, Aimin; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene nanomesh (GNM) has attracted great attentions due to its unique porous structure, abundant active sites, finite band gap and possesses potential applications in the fields of electronics, gas sensor/storage, catalysis, etc. Therefore, diverse GNMs with different physical and chemical properties are required urgently to meet different applications. Herein we demonstrate a facile synthetic method based on the famous Fenton reaction to prepare GNM, by using economically fabricated graphene oxide (GO) as a starting material. By precisely controlling the reaction time, simultaneous regulation of pore size from 2.9 to 11.1 nm and surface structure can be realized. Ultimately, diverse GNMs with tunable band gap and work function can be obtained. Specially, the band gap decreases from 4.5-2.3 eV for GO, which is an insulator, to 3.9-1.24 eV for GNM-5 h, which approaches to a semiconductor. The dual nature of electrophilic addition and oxidizability of HO(•) is responsible for this controllable synthesis. This efficient, low-cost, inherently scalable synthetic method is suitable for provide diverse and optional GNMs, and may be generalized to a universal technique. PMID:27561350

  2. Surfactant-Free Assembly of Mesoporous Carbon Hollow Spheres with Large Tunable Pore Sizes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Noonan, Owen; Huang, Xiaodan; Yang, Yannan; Xu, Chun; Zhou, Liang; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-04-26

    Mesoporous carbon hollow spheres (MCHS) have wide applications, including catalysis, absorption, and energy storage/conversion. Herein, we report a one-pot, surfactant-free synthesis of MCHS using three molecules: resorcinol, formaldehyde, and tetrapropyl orthosilicate. The co-condensation process between the in situ generated silica primary particles and the polymer oligomers is regulated, leading to monodispersed MCHS with adjustable pore sizes from micropores to 13.9 nm. The resultant MCHS shows excellent performance for electrochemical double-layer capacitors with high capacitance (310 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)), excellent rate capability (157 F g(-1) at 50 A g(-1)), and outstanding cycling stability (98.6% capacity retention after 10 000 cycles at 10 A g(-1)). Our one-pot synthesis strategy is versatile and can be extended to fabricate metal oxide@mesoporous carbon yolk-shell structures in the absence of surfactant, paving the way toward designed synthesis of nanostructured mesoporous carbon composites for various applications. PMID:27050771

  3. Pore size dynamics in interpenetrated metal organic frameworks for selective sensing of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Myers, Matthew; Podolska, Anna; Heath, Charles; Baker, Murray V; Pejcic, Bobby

    2014-03-28

    The two-fold interpenetrated metal-organic framework, [Zn2(bdc)2(dpNDI)]n (bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, dpNDI=N'N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide) can undergo structural re-arrangement upon adsorption of chemical species changing its pore structure. For a competitive binding process with multiple analytes of different sizes and geometries, the interpenetrated framework will adopt a conformation to maximize the overall binding interactions. In this study, we show for binary mixtures that there is a high selectivity for the larger methylated aromatic compounds, toluene and p-xylene, over the small non-methylated benzene. The dpNDI moiety within [Zn2(bdc)2(dpNDI)]n forms an exciplex with these aromatic compounds. The emission wavelength is dependent on the strength of the host-guest CT interaction allowing these compounds to be distinguished. We show that the sorption selectivity characteristics can have a significant impact on the fluorescence sensor response of [Zn2(bdc)2(dpNDI)]n towards environmentally important hydrocarbons based contaminants (i.e., BTEX, PAH). PMID:24636414

  4. Effect of pore size on bone ingrowth into porous titanium implants fabricated by additive manufacturing: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoya; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Otsuki, Bungo; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique with the ability to produce metallic scaffolds with accurately controlled pore size, porosity, and interconnectivity for orthopedic applications. However, the optimal pore structure of porous titanium manufactured by SLM remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pore size with constant porosity on in vivo bone ingrowth in rabbits into porous titanium implants manufactured by SLM. Three porous titanium implants (with an intended porosity of 65% and pore sizes of 300, 600, and 900μm, designated the P300, P600, and P900 implants, respectively) were manufactured by SLM. A diamond lattice was adapted as the basic structure. Their porous structures were evaluated and verified using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Their bone-implant fixation ability was evaluated by their implantation as porous-surfaced titanium plates into the cortical bone of the rabbit tibia. Bone ingrowth was evaluated by their implantation as cylindrical porous titanium implants into the cancellous bone of the rabbit femur for 2, 4, and 8weeks. The average pore sizes of the P300, P600, and P900 implants were 309, 632, and 956μm, respectively. The P600 implant demonstrated a significantly higher fixation ability at 2weeks than the other implants. After 4weeks, all models had sufficiently high fixation ability in a detaching test. Bone ingrowth into the P300 implant was lower than into the other implants at 4weeks. Because of its appropriate mechanical strength, high fixation ability, and rapid bone ingrowth, our results indicate that the pore structure of the P600 implant is a suitable porous structure for orthopedic implants manufactured by SLM. PMID:26652423

  5. Impact of Matric Potential and Pore Size Distribution on Growth Dynamics of Filamentous and Non-Filamentous Soil Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Alexandra B.; Vos, Michiel; de Boer, Wietse; Kowalchuk, George A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to what extent, filamentous bacteria may also display similar advantages over non-filamentous bacteria in soils with low hydraulic connectivity. In addition to allowing for microbial interactions and competition across connected micro-sites, water films also facilitate the motility of non-filamentous bacteria. To examine these issues, we constructed and characterized a series of quartz sand microcosms differing in matric potential and pore size distribution and, consequently, in connection of micro-habitats via water films. Our sand microcosms were used to examine the individual and competitive responses of a filamentous bacterium (Streptomyces atratus) and a motile rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus weihenstephanensis) to differences in pore sizes and matric potential. The Bacillus strain had an initial advantage in all sand microcosms, which could be attributed to its faster growth rate. At later stages of the incubation, Streptomyces became dominant in microcosms with low connectivity (coarse pores and dry conditions). These data, combined with information on bacterial motility (expansion potential) across a range of pore-size and moisture conditions, suggest that, like their much larger fungal counterparts, filamentous bacteria also use this growth form to facilitate growth and expansion under conditions of low hydraulic conductivity. The sand microcosm system developed and used in this study allowed for precise manipulation of hydraulic properties and pore size distribution, thereby providing a useful approach for future examinations of how these properties influence the composition, diversity and function of soil-borne microbial communities. PMID:24391805

  6. Effect of pore size on bone ingrowth into porous titanium implants fabricated by additive manufacturing: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoya; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Otsuki, Bungo; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique with the ability to produce metallic scaffolds with accurately controlled pore size, porosity, and interconnectivity for orthopedic applications. However, the optimal pore structure of porous titanium manufactured by SLM remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pore size with constant porosity on in vivo bone ingrowth in rabbits into porous titanium implants manufactured by SLM. Three porous titanium implants (with an intended porosity of 65% and pore sizes of 300, 600, and 900μm, designated the P300, P600, and P900 implants, respectively) were manufactured by SLM. A diamond lattice was adapted as the basic structure. Their porous structures were evaluated and verified using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Their bone-implant fixation ability was evaluated by their implantation as porous-surfaced titanium plates into the cortical bone of the rabbit tibia. Bone ingrowth was evaluated by their implantation as cylindrical porous titanium implants into the cancellous bone of the rabbit femur for 2, 4, and 8weeks. The average pore sizes of the P300, P600, and P900 implants were 309, 632, and 956μm, respectively. The P600 implant demonstrated a significantly higher fixation ability at 2weeks than the other implants. After 4weeks, all models had sufficiently high fixation ability in a detaching test. Bone ingrowth into the P300 implant was lower than into the other implants at 4weeks. Because of its appropriate mechanical strength, high fixation ability, and rapid bone ingrowth, our results indicate that the pore structure of the P600 implant is a suitable porous structure for orthopedic implants manufactured by SLM.

  7. Pore size distribution of OPC and SRPC mortars in presence of chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Suryavanshi, A.K.; Scantlebury, J.D.; Lyon, S.B.

    1995-07-01

    The pore structure of chloride-free ordinary portland cement (OPC) and sulphate resistant portland cement (SRPC) mortars are compared with the corresponding mortars with NaCl and CaCl{sub 2} added during mixing. In both OPC and SRPC mortars the addition of chlorides reduced the total accessible pore volumes compared to the corresponding chloride-free mortars. Also, in the presence of chlorides, the number of coarse pores were increased. These changes in the pore structure are believed to be due to dense calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel morphology formed in the presence of chlorides. The SRPC showed greater changes in pore structures than the OPC with equivalent amounts of chlorides added. This may be due to the lower chloride binding capacity of the SRPC and hence the higher availability of free chlorides to modify the gel morphology.

  8. Pore-scale investigation of micron-size polyacrylamide elastic microspheres (MPEMs) transport and retention in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chuanjin; Lei, Guanglun; Cathles, Lawrence M; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery.

  9. Pore-scale investigation of micron-size polyacrylamide elastic microspheres (MPEMs) transport and retention in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chuanjin; Lei, Guanglun; Cathles, Lawrence M; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery. PMID:24749927

  10. Computer Simulation of Random Packings for Self-Similar Particle Size Distributions in Soil and Granular Materials: Porosity and Pore Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Miguel Angel; Muñoz, Francisco J.; Reyes, Miguel; Taguas, F. Javier

    2014-09-01

    A 2D computer simulation method of random packings is applied to sets of particles generated by a self-similar uniparametric model for particle size distributions (PSDs) in granular media. The parameter p which controls the model is the proportion of mass of particles corresponding to the left half of the normalized size interval [0,1]. First the influence on the total porosity of the parameter p is analyzed and interpreted. It is shown that such parameter, and the fractal exponent of the associated power scaling, are efficient packing parameters, but this last one is not in the way predicted in a former published work addressing an analogous research in artificial granular materials. The total porosity reaches the minimum value for p = 0.6. Limited information on the pore size distribution is obtained from the packing simulations and by means of morphological analysis methods. Results show that the range of pore sizes increases for decreasing values of p showing also different shape in the volume pore size distribution. Further research including simulations with a greater number of particles and image resolution are required to obtain finer results on the hierarchical structure of pore space.

  11. Experimental study on the influence of foam porosity and pore size on the melting of phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafdi, K.; Mesalhy, O.; Shaikh, S.

    2007-10-01

    Experimental study was carried out to study the phase change heat transfer within a composite of phase change material (PCM) infiltrated high thermal conductivity foam. An experimental setup was built to measure the temperature profiles and capture the melting evolution of the PCM inside aluminum foams. Aluminum foams were used as the porous material, and low melting temperature paraffin wax was used as the PCM. It was observed from the results that the system parameters of the wax/foam composite had a significant influence on its heat transfer behavior. By using higher porosity aluminum foam, the steady-state temperature was reached faster as compared to the foams with lower porosity. Similarly for the bigger pore size foams the steady state was attained faster as compared to the smaller pore size foams. This was due to the greater effect of convection in both the higher porosity and bigger pore size foams. However, for the lower porosity foams the heater temperature was comparatively lower than the higher porosity foams due to greater heat conduction through the foam material. Therefore, an optimal value should be selected for the foam porosity and pore size such that the effects of both conduction and convection heat transfers can be completely utilized to have a greater and improved thermal performance for the wax/aluminum foam composite.

  12. Tailoring Pore Size of Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for Confi ning Sulfur in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Weidong; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Quiglin; Abruna, Hector D.; He, Yang; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott X.; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2015-08-19

    Three types of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres with different pore sized porous shells are prepared to investigate the performance of sulfur confinement. The reason that why no sulfur is observed in previous research is determined and it is successfully demonstrated that the sulfur/polysulfide will overflow the porous carbon during the lithiation process.

  13. Effect of TiO2 microbead pore size on the performance of DSSCs with a cobalt based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Huang, Fuzhi; Xiang, Wanchun; Chen, Dehong; Cao, Lu; Spiccia, Leone; Caruso, Rachel A.; Cheng, Yi-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Mesoporous TiO2 microbeads with well-defined intra-bead pore sizes (14 nm, 23 nm or 33 nm) were employed to investigate the effect of pore size on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells constructed with an organic dye (MK2) and a [Co(bpy)3]2+/3+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine)-based electrolyte. The TiCl4 post treatment and film thickness were optimized for the TiO2 electrodes made from beads with 33 nm intra-bead pores, and an overall energy conversion efficiency of 8.5% was achieved for a device with a 6.5 μm thick TiO2 film treated with a 20 mM TiCl4 solution. Although beads with larger pores had a smaller specific surface area, devices derived from these beads produced better photovoltaic performance. This is attributed to the improved diffusion of cobalt species inside the working electrode, as evidenced by a higher electron lifetime and dye regeneration rate recorded on these solar cells.Mesoporous TiO2 microbeads with well-defined intra-bead pore sizes (14 nm, 23 nm or 33 nm) were employed to investigate the effect of pore size on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells constructed with an organic dye (MK2) and a [Co(bpy)3]2+/3+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine)-based electrolyte. The TiCl4 post treatment and film thickness were optimized for the TiO2 electrodes made from beads with 33 nm intra-bead pores, and an overall energy conversion efficiency of 8.5% was achieved for a device with a 6.5 μm thick TiO2 film treated with a 20 mM TiCl4 solution. Although beads with larger pores had a smaller specific surface area, devices derived from these beads produced better photovoltaic performance. This is attributed to the improved diffusion of cobalt species inside the working electrode, as evidenced by a higher electron lifetime and dye regeneration rate recorded on these solar cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Photocurrent transient plots of the devices treated with different concentrations of TiCl4 and UV-vis spectra of dye desorption

  14. Hydrogel Pore-Size Modulation for Enhanced Single-Cell Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Todd A; Kang, Chi-Chih; Maity, Santanu; Ward, Toby M; Pegram, Mark D; Murthy, Niren; Herr, Amy E

    2016-01-13

    Pore-gradient microgel arrays enable thousands of parallel high-resolution single-cell protein electrophoresis separations for targets accross a wide molecular mass (25-289 kDa), yet within 1 mm separation distances. Dual crosslinked hydrogels facilitate gel-pore expansion after electrophoresis for efficient and uniform immunoprobing. The photopatterned, light-activated, and acid-expandable hydrogel underpins single-cell protein analysis, here for oncoprotein-related signaling in human breast biopsy.

  15. The Nature of Tensile Ductility as Controlled by Extreme-Sized Pores in Powder Metallurgy Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Ravi Chandran, K. S.; Cao, F.; Koopman, M.; Fang, Z. Zak

    2016-05-01

    Tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, sintered by a new process (sintering, phase transformation, and dehydrogenation of titanium hydride compacts, termed HSPT process), were investigated to determine how the sintering pores influence the tensile strength and ductility. It was found that the ductility in the sintered alloy is severely affected by the size of the largest pore, referred here as extreme-sized pore, even when the average volume fraction of porosity is nearly constant between a large number of samples. It is shown that the rapid decrease in ductility, with an increase in the extreme pore size, is caused by strain localization around the extreme-sized pore and early crack initiation. This crack initiation leads to fracture of the plane containing the pore thereby limiting the extent of uniform plastic strain that can be attained before fracture. Interestingly, the strength properties are, however, found to be independent of the size of the extreme-sized pore. The results are explained on the basis of stress concentration and strain localization around the extreme-sized pores. The work also reveals that if the extreme-sized pores are eliminated, PM Ti-6Al-4V alloy with high strength (~1100 MPa) and good ductility (~12 pct), which is easily comparable to a wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloy, can be achieved even at oxygen levels up to 0.4 wt pct.

  16. Vesicular release of neurotransmitters: converting amperometric measurements into size, dynamics and energetics of initial fusion pores.

    PubMed

    Oleinick, Alexander; Lemaître, Frédéric; Collignon, Manon Guille; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Amperometric currents displaying a pre-spike feature (PSF) may be treated so as to lead to precise information about initial fusion pores, viz., about the crucial event initiating neurotransmitter vesicular release in neurons and medullary glands. However, amperometric data alone are not self-sufficient, so their full exploitation requires external calibration to solve the inverse problem. For this purpose we resorted to patch-clamp measurements published in the literature on chromaffin cells. Reported pore radii were thus used to evaluate the diffusion rate of neurotransmitter cations in the partially altered matrix located near the fusion pore entrance. This allowed an independent determination of each initial fusion pore radius giving rise to a single PSF event. The statistical distribution of the radii thus obtained provided for the first time an experimental access to the potential energy well governing the thermodynamics of such systems. The shape of the corresponding potential energy well strongly suggested that, after their creation, initial fusion pores are essentially controlled by the usual physicochemical laws describing pores formed in bilayer lipidic biological membranes, i.e., they have an essentially lipidic nature. PMID:24466657

  17. Pore-scale simulations of drainage in granular materials: Finite size effects and the representative elementary volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Chareyre, Bruno; Darve, Félix

    2016-09-01

    A pore-scale model is introduced for two-phase flow in dense packings of polydisperse spheres. The model is developed as a component of a more general hydromechanical coupling framework based on the discrete element method, which will be elaborated in future papers and will apply to various processes of interest in soil science, in geomechanics and in oil and gas production. Here the emphasis is on the generation of a network of pores mapping the void space between spherical grains, and the definition of local criteria governing the primary drainage process. The pore space is decomposed by Regular Triangulation, from which a set of pores connected by throats are identified. A local entry capillary pressure is evaluated for each throat, based on the balance of capillary pressure and surface tension at equilibrium. The model reflects the possible entrapment of disconnected patches of the receding wetting phase. It is validated by a comparison with drainage experiments. In the last part of the paper, a series of simulations are reported to illustrate size and boundary effects, key questions when studying small samples made of spherical particles be it in simulations or experiments. Repeated tests on samples of different sizes give evolution of water content which are not only scattered but also strongly biased for small sample sizes. More than 20,000 spheres are needed to reduce the bias on saturation below 0.02. Additional statistics are generated by subsampling a large sample of 64,000 spheres. They suggest that the minimal sampling volume for evaluating saturation is one hundred times greater that the sampling volume needed for measuring porosity with the same accuracy. This requirement in terms of sample size induces a need for efficient computer codes. The method described herein has a low algorithmic complexity in order to satisfy this requirement. It will be well suited to further developments toward coupled flow-deformation problems in which evolution of the

  18. Spindle Size Scaling Contributes to Robust Silencing of Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis hinges on proper assembly of the microtubule spindle that establishes bipolar attachment to each chromosome. Experiments demonstrate allometry of mitotic spindles and a universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size across metazoans, which indicates a conserved principle of spindle assembly at play during evolution. However, the nature of this principle is currently unknown. Researchers have focused on deriving the mechanistic underpinning of the size scaling from the mechanical aspects of the spindle assembly process. In this work we take a different standpoint and ask: What is the size scaling for? We address this question from the functional perspectives of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is the critical surveillance mechanism that prevents premature chromosome segregation in the presence of unattached or misattached chromosomes. The SAC signal gets silenced after and only after the last chromosome-spindle attachment in mitosis. We previously established a model that explains the robustness of SAC silencing based on spindle-mediated spatiotemporal regulation of SAC proteins. Here, we refine the previous model, and find that robust and timely SAC silencing entails proper size scaling of mitotic spindle. This finding provides, to our knowledge, a novel, function-oriented angle toward understanding the observed spindle allometry, and the universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size in metazoans. In a broad sense, the functional requirement of robust SAC silencing could have helped shape the spindle assembly mechanism in evolution. PMID:27602734

  19. Isolating the effect of pore size distribution on electrochemical double-layer capacitance using activated fluid coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliani, Jocelyn E.; Tong, Shitang; Kirk, Donald W.; Jia, Charles Q.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) use physical ion adsorption in the capacitive electrical double layer of high specific surface area (SSA) materials to store electrical energy. Previous work shows that the SSA-normalized capacitance increases when pore diameters are less than 1 nm. However, there still remains uncertainty about the charge storage mechanism since the enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is not observed in all microporous materials. In previous studies, the total specific surface area and the chemical composition of the electrode materials were not controlled. The current work is the first reported study that systematically compares the performance of activated carbon prepared from the same raw material, with similar chemical composition and specific surface area, but different pore size distributions. Preparing samples with similar SSAs, but different pores sizes is not straightforward since increasing pore diameters results in decreasing the SSA. This study observes that the microporous activated carbon has a higher SSA-normalized capacitance, 14.1 μF cm-2, compared to the mesoporous material, 12.4 μF cm-2. However, this enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is only observed above a threshold operating voltage. Therefore, it can be concluded that a minimum applied voltage is required to induce ion adsorption in these sub-nanometer micropores, which increases the capacitance.

  20. Effect of TiO₂ microbead pore size on the performance of DSSCs with a cobalt based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Huang, Fuzhi; Xiang, Wanchun; Chen, Dehong; Cao, Lu; Spiccia, Leone; Caruso, Rachel A; Cheng, Yi-Bing

    2014-11-21

    Mesoporous TiO2 microbeads with well-defined intra-bead pore sizes (14 nm, 23 nm or 33 nm) were employed to investigate the effect of pore size on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells constructed with an organic dye (MK2) and a [Co(bpy)3](2+/3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine)-based electrolyte. The TiCl4 post treatment and film thickness were optimized for the TiO2 electrodes made from beads with 33 nm intra-bead pores, and an overall energy conversion efficiency of 8.5% was achieved for a device with a 6.5 μm thick TiO2 film treated with a 20 mM TiCl4 solution. Although beads with larger pores had a smaller specific surface area, devices derived from these beads produced better photovoltaic performance. This is attributed to the improved diffusion of cobalt species inside the working electrode, as evidenced by a higher electron lifetime and dye regeneration rate recorded on these solar cells. PMID:25287230

  1. Determination by Small-angle X-ray Scattering of Pore Size Distribution in Nanoporous Track-etched Polycarbonate Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, A. M.; Legras, R.; Ferain, E.

    1998-03-01

    Nanoporous track-etched membranes with narrow pore size distributions and average pore size diameters tunable from 100 to 1000 Åare produced by the chemical etching of latent tracks in polymer films after irradiation by a beam of accelerated heavy ions. Nanoporous membranes are used for highly demanding filtration purposes, or as templates to obtain metallic or polymeric nanowires (L. Piraux et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. 1997, B131, 357). Such applications call for developments in nanopore size characterization techniques. In this respect, we report on the characterization by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of nanopore size distribution (nPSD) in polycarbonate track-etched membranes. The obtention of nPSD requires inverting an ill-conditioned inhomogeneous equation. We present different numerical routes to overcome the amplification of experimental errors in the resulting solutions, including a regularization technique allowing to obtain the nPSD without a priori knowledge of its shape. The effect of deviations from cylindrical pore shape on the resulting distributions are analyzed. Finally, SAXS results are compared to results obtained by electron microscopy and conductometry.

  2. Development of gelatin-chitosan-hydroxyapatite based bioactive bone scaffold with controlled pore size and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Kundu, Biswanath; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite-chitosan/gelatin (HA:Chi:Gel) nanocomposite scaffold has potential to serve as a template matrix to regenerate extra cellular matrix of human bone. Scaffolds with varying composition of hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and gelatin were prepared using lyophilization technique where glutaraldehyde (GTA) acted as a cross-linking agent for biopolymers. First, phase pure hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocrystals were in situ synthesized by coprecipitation method using a solution of 2% acetic acid dissolved chitosan and aqueous solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate [Ca(NO3)2,4H2O] and diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(NH4)2H PO4]. Keeping solid loading constant at 30 wt% and changing the composition of the original slurry of gelatin, HA-chitosan allowed control of the pore size, its distribution, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Microstructural investigation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a well interconnected porous scaffold with a pore size in the range of 35-150 μm. The HA granules were uniformly dispersed in the gelatin-chitosan network. An optimal composition in terms of pore size and mechanical properties was obtained from the scaffold with an HA:Chi:Gel ratio of 21:49:30. The composite scaffold having 70% porosity with pore size distribution of 35-150 μm exhibited a compressive strength of 3.3-3.5 MPa, which is within the range of that exhibited by cancellous bone. The bioactivity of the scaffold was evaluated after conducting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) - materials interaction and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using MSCs. The scaffold found to be conducive to MSC's adhesion as evident from lamellipodia, filopodia extensions from cell cytoskeleton, proliferation, and differentiation up to 14 days of cell culture.

  3. Pore size regulates operating stomatal conductance, while stomatal densities drive the partitioning of conductance between leaf sides

    PubMed Central

    Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Giday, Habtamu; Milla, Rubén; Pieruschka, Roland; Kjaer, Katrine H.; Bolger, Marie; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fiorani, Fabio; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf gas exchange is influenced by stomatal size, density, distribution between the leaf adaxial and abaxial sides, as well as by pore dimensions. This study aims to quantify which of these traits mainly underlie genetic differences in operating stomatal conductance (gs) and addresses possible links between anatomical traits and regulation of pore width. Methods Stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, gs-related anatomical traits of each leaf side and estimated gs (based on these traits) were determined for 54 introgression lines (ILs) generated by introgressing segments of Solanum pennelli into the S. lycopersicum ‘M82’. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for stomatal traits was also performed. Key Results A wide genetic variation in stomatal responsiveness to desiccation was observed, a large part of which was explained by stomatal length. Operating gs ranged over a factor of five between ILs. The pore area per stomatal area varied 8-fold among ILs (2–16 %), and was the main determinant of differences in operating gs between ILs. Operating gs was primarily positioned on the abaxial surface (60–83 %), due to higher abaxial stomatal density and, secondarily, to larger abaxial pore area. An analysis revealed 64 QTLs for stomatal traits in the ILs, most of which were in the direction of S. pennellii. Conclusions The data indicate that operating and maximum gs of non-stressed leaves maintained under stable conditions deviate considerably (by 45–91 %), because stomatal size inadequately reflects operating pore area (R2 = 0·46). Furthermore, it was found that variation between ILs in both stomatal sensitivity to desiccation and operating gs is associated with features of individual stoma. In contrast, genotypic variation in gs partitioning depends on the distribution of stomata between the leaf adaxial and abaxial epidermis. PMID:25538116

  4. Molecularly imprinted macroporous monoliths for solid-phase extraction: Effect of pore size and column length on recognition properties.

    PubMed

    Vlakh, E G; Stepanova, M A; Korneeva, Yu M; Tennikova, T B

    2016-09-01

    The series of macroporous monolithic molecularly imprinted monoliths differed by pore size, column length (volume) and amount of template used for imprinting was synthesized using methacrylic acid and glycerol dimethacrylate as co-monomers and antibiotic ciprofloxacin as a template. The prepared monoliths were characterized regarding to their permeability, pore size, porosity, and resistance to the flow of a mobile phase. The surface morphology was also analyzed. The slight dependence of imprinting factor on flow rate, as well as its independence on pore size of macroporous molecularly imprinted monolithic media was observed. The column obtained at different conditions exhibited different affinity of ciprofloxacin to the imprinted sites that was characterized with Kdiss values in the range of 10(-5)-10(-4)M. The solid-phase extraction of ciprofloxacin from such biological liquids as human blood serum, human urine and cow milk serum was performed using the developed monolithic columns. In all cases, the extraction was found to be 95.0-98.6%. Additionally, the comparison of extraction of three fluoroqinolone analogues, e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, from human blood plasma was carried out. Contrary to ciprofloxacin extracted with more than 95%, this parameter did not exceed 40% for its analogues. PMID:27433985

  5. Effect of Pore Size and Porosity on the Biomechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility of Porous NiTi Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Yu-Tao; Yang, Yue; Tian, Tian; Stanford, Clark; Zhang, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Five types of porous Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloy samples of different porosities and pore sizes were fabricated. According to compressive and fracture strengths, three groups of porous NiTi alloy samples underwent further cytocompatibility experiments. Porous NiTi alloys exhibited a lower Young’s modulus (2.0 GPa ~ 0.8 GPa). Both compressive strength (108.8 MPa ~ 56.2 MPa) and fracture strength (64.6 MPa ~ 41.6 MPa) decreased gradually with increasing mean pore size (MPS). Cells grew and spread well on all porous NiTi alloy samples. Cells attached more strongly on control group and blank group than on all porous NiTi alloy samples (p < 0.05). Cell adhesion on porous NiTi alloys was correlated negatively to MPS (277.2 μm ~ 566.5 μm; p < 0.05). More cells proliferated on control group and blank group than on all porous NiTi alloy samples (p < 0.05). Cellular ALP activity on all porous NiTi alloy samples was higher than on control group and blank group (p < 0.05). The porous NiTi alloys with optimized pore size could be a potential orthopedic material. PMID:26047515

  6. Effect of Pore Size and Porosity on the Biomechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility of Porous NiTi Alloys.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yu-Tao; Yang, Yue; Tian, Tian; Stanford, Clark; Zhang, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Five types of porous Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloy samples of different porosities and pore sizes were fabricated. According to compressive and fracture strengths, three groups of porous NiTi alloy samples underwent further cytocompatibility experiments. Porous NiTi alloys exhibited a lower Young's modulus (2.0 GPa ~ 0.8 GPa). Both compressive strength (108.8 MPa ~ 56.2 MPa) and fracture strength (64.6 MPa ~ 41.6 MPa) decreased gradually with increasing mean pore size (MPS). Cells grew and spread well on all porous NiTi alloy samples. Cells attached more strongly on control group and blank group than on all porous NiTi alloy samples (p < 0.05). Cell adhesion on porous NiTi alloys was correlated negatively to MPS (277.2 μm ~ 566.5 μm; p < 0.05). More cells proliferated on control group and blank group than on all porous NiTi alloy samples (p < 0.05). Cellular ALP activity on all porous NiTi alloy samples was higher than on control group and blank group (p < 0.05). The porous NiTi alloys with optimized pore size could be a potential orthopedic material.

  7. How robust are the size measurements of high-redshift compact galaxies?

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Roozbeh; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.; Huang, Song

    2014-05-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are apparently much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today. How robust are these size measurements? We perform comprehensive simulations to determine possible biases and uncertainties in fitting single-component light distributions to real galaxies. In particular, we examine the robustness of the measurements of the luminosity, size, and other structural parameters. We devise simulations with increasing realism to systematically disentangle effects due to the technique (specifically using GALFIT) and the intrinsic structures of the galaxies. By accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. In fact, we find that fitting multi-component galaxies with a single Sérsic profile, the procedure most commonly adopted in the literature, biases the inferred sizes higher by up to 10%-20%, which accentuates the amount of size evolution required. If the sky estimation has been done robustly and the model for the point-spread function is fairly accurate, GALFIT can retrieve the properties of single-component galaxies over a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios without introducing any systematic errors.

  8. Effect of hypercrosslinking conditions on pore size distribution and efficiency of monolithic stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jiří; Škeříková, Veronika

    2014-11-01

    Three dihalogenic solvents differing in the length of alkyl chain (1,2-dichloroethane, 1,4-dichlorobutane, and 1,6-dichlorohexane) with three Friedel-Crafts alkylation catalysts varying in reactivity (AlCl3 , FeCl3 , and SnCl4 ) have been used to prepare hypercrosslinked poly(styrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride-co-divinylbenzene) columns. Hydrodynamic characteristics as well as column efficiency and mass transfer resistance were tuned by the combination of swelling solvent and alkylation reaction catalyst in the modification mixture. The column swelled in 1,6-dichlorohexane and hypercrosslinked in the presence of AlCl3 provided the highest column efficiency and enabled fast isocratic separations of small molecules in a RP mode. To uncover factors controlling the efficiency of hypercrosslinked monolithic columns, we have studied pore volume distribution of prepared columns. We found that column efficiency increases with the higher pore volume of pores smaller than 2 nm. PMID:25113521

  9. Influence of pore size distributions on decomposition of maize leaf residue: evidence from X-ray computed micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negassa, Wakene; Guber, Andrey; Kravchenko, Alexandra; Rivers, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Soil's potential to sequester carbon (C) depends not only on quality and quantity of organic inputs to soil but also on the residence time of the applied organic inputs within the soil. Soil pore structure is one of the main factors that influence residence time of soil organic matter by controlling gas exchange, soil moisture and microbial activities, thereby soil C sequestration capacity. Previous attempts to investigate the fate of organic inputs added to soil did not allow examining their decomposition in situ; the drawback that can now be remediated by application of X-ray computed micro-tomography (µ-CT). The non-destructive and non-invasive nature of µ-CT gives an opportunity to investigate the effect of soil pore size distributions on decomposition of plant residues at a new quantitative level. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of pore size distributions on the decomposition of plant residue added to soil. Samples with contrasting pore size distributions were created using aggregate fractions of five different sizes (<0.05, 0.05-0.1, 0.10-05, 0.5-1.0 and 1.0-2.0 mm). Weighted average pore diameters ranged from 10 µm (<0.05 mm fraction) to 104 µm (1-2 mm fraction), while maximum pore diameter were in a range from 29 µm (<0.05 mm fraction) to 568 µm (1-2 mm fraction) in the created soil samples. Dried pieces of maize leaves 2.5 mg in size (equivalent to 1.71 mg C g-1 soil) were added to half of the studied samples. Samples with and without maize leaves were incubated for 120 days. CO2 emission from the samples was measured at regular time intervals. In order to ensure that the observed differences are due to differences in pore structure and not due to differences in inherent properties of the studied aggregate fractions, we repeated the whole experiment using soil from the same aggregate size fractions but ground to <0.05 mm size. Five to six replicated samples were used for intact and ground samples of all sizes with and without

  10. Strain-based in-situ study of anion and cation insertion into porous carbon electrodes with different pore sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M; Feng, Guang; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of porous carbon electrodes in a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) is studied using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of carbon surface area and pore size/pore size distribution on the observed strain profile and ion kinetics is examined. Also, the influence of potential scan rate on the strain response is investigated. By analyzing the strain data at various potential scan rates information on ion kinetics in the different carbon materials is obtained. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to compare with and provide molecular insights into experimental results, which is the first MD work investigating the pressure exerted on porous electrodes under applied potential in a RTIL electrolyte. Using MD, the pressure exerted on the pore wall is calculated as a function of potential/charge for both a micropore (1.2 nm) and a mesopore (7.0 nm). The shape of the calculated pressure profile matches closely with the strain profiles observed experimentally.

  11. The influence of pore size and surface area of activated carbons on the performance of ionic liquid based supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Sebastian; Lobato, Belén; Centeno, Teresa A; Balducci, Andrea

    2013-10-28

    This study analyses and compares the behaviour of 5 commercial porous carbons in the ionic liquid N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR14TFSI) and its mixture with propylene carbonate (PC) as electrolytes. The results of this investigation show that the existence of a distribution of pore sizes and/or constrictions at the entrance of the pores leads to significant changes in the specific capacitance of the investigated materials. The use of PYR14TFSI as an electrolyte has a positive effect on the EDLC energy storage, but its high viscosity limits the power density. The mixture 50 : 50 wt% propylene carbonate-PYR14TFSI provides high operative voltage as well as low viscosity and thus notably enhances EDLC operation. PMID:24019082

  12. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.; Sanford, W.E. |; Dugan, B.E.; Tourkow, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method.

  13. Transport of biocolloids in water saturated columns packed with sand: Effect of grain size and pore water velocity.

    PubMed

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2011-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of grain size and pore water velocity on the transport in water saturated porous media of three waterborne fecal indicator organisms (Escherichia coli, MS2, and ΦX174) in laboratory-scale columns packed with clean quartz sand. Three different grain sizes and three pore water velocities were examined and the attachment behavior of Escherichia coli, MS2, and ΦX174 onto quartz sand was evaluated. The mass recoveries of the biocolloids examined were shown to be highest for Escherichia coli and lowest for MS2. However, no obvious relationships between mass recoveries and water velocity or grain size could be established from the experimental results. The observed mean dispersivity values for each sand grain size were smaller for bacteria than coliphages, but higher for MS2 than ΦX174. The single collector removal and collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Furthermore, theoretical collision efficiencies were estimated only for E. coli by the Interaction-Force-Boundary-Layer, and Maxwell approximations. Better agreement between the experimental and Maxwell theoretical collision efficiencies were observed.

  14. Phylogenetic characterization of 16S rRNA gene clones from deep-groundwater microorganisms that pass through 0.2-micrometer-pore-size filters.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tatsuo; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2005-02-01

    A total of 247 clones of 16S rRNA genes from microorganisms captured by 0.2- and 0.1-microm-pore-size filters from sedimentary and granite rock aquifers were amplified and yielded 37 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Fifteen OTUs captured by 0.1-microm-pore-size filters were affiliated with the candidate divisions OD1 and OP11, representing novel lineages. On the other hand, OTUs captured by 0.2-microm-pore-size filters were largely affiliated with Betaproteobacteria.

  15. Antimicrobial performance of mesoporous titania thin films: role of pore size, hydrophobicity, and antibiotic release

    PubMed Central

    Atefyekta, Saba; Ercan, Batur; Karlsson, Johan; Taylor, Erik; Chung, Stanley; Webster, Thomas J; Andersson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Implant-associated infections are undesirable complications that might arise after implant surgery. If the infection is not prevented, it can lead to tremendous cost, trauma, and even life threatening conditions for the patient. Development of an implant coating loaded with antimicrobial substances would be an effective way to improve the success rate of implants. In this study, the in vitro efficacy of mesoporous titania thin films used as a novel antimicrobial release coating was evaluated. Mesoporous titania thin films with pore diameters of 4, 6, and 7 nm were synthesized using the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. The films were characterized and loaded with antimicrobial agents, including vancomycin, gentamicin, and daptomycin. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to evaluate their effectiveness toward inhibiting bacterial colonization. Drug loading and delivery were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, which showed successful loading and release of the antibiotics from the surfaces. Results from counting bacterial colony-forming units showed reduced bacterial adhesion on the drug-loaded films. Interestingly, the presence of the pores alone had a desired effect on bacterial colonization, which can be attributed to the documented nanotopographical effect. In summary, this study provides significant promise for the use of mesoporous titania thin films for reducing implant infections. PMID:27022263

  16. Impact of the carbon pore size and topology on the equilibrium quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes at zero coverage and finite pressures.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2009-04-01

    Carbonaceous slit-shaped and square-shaped pores efficiently differentiate adsorbed hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K. Extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the square-shaped carbon pores enhanced the selectivity of deuterium over hydrogen in comparison to equivalent slit-shaped carbon pores at zero coverage as well as at finite pressures (i.e. quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes is pore-topology-dependent). We show that this enhancement of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity results from larger localization of hydrogen isotopes in square-shaped pores. The operating pressures for efficient quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes are strongly dependent on the topology as well as on the size of the carbon pores. However, for both considered carbon pore topologies the highest D(2)/H(2) separation factor is observed at zero-coverage limit. Depending on carbon pore size and topology we predicted monotonic decreasing and non-monotonic shape of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity at finite pressures. For both kinds of carbonaceous pores of molecular sizes we predict high compression of hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K (for example, the pore density of compressed hydrogen isotopes at 77 K and 0.25 MPa in a square-shaped carbon pore of size 2.6 Å exceeds 60 mmol cm(-3); for comparison, the liquid density of para-H(2) at 30 K and 30 MPa is 42 mmol cm(-3)). Finally, by direct comparison of simulation results with experimental data it is explained why 'ordinary' carbonaceous materials are not efficient quantum sieves.

  17. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells.

  18. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells. PMID:26961859

  19. Thermal Investigations of Periodically Nanoporous Si Films -- The Impact of Structure Sizes and Pore-Edge Amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongchao; Zhao, Hongbo; Hao, Qing

    In recent years, nanoporous Si films have been intensively studied as promising thermoelectric materials, which mainly benefits from their dramatically reduced lattice thermal conductivity kL and bulk-like electrical properties.1,2 Despite many encouraging results, challenges still exist in the theoretical explanation of the observed low kL.3 Existing studies mainly attribute the low kL to 1) phonon bandstructure modification by coherent phonon processes in a periodic structure (phononic effects), and/or 2) pore-edge defects. In this work, temperature-dependent kL is measured for nanoporous Si films with different pore sizes and spacing to compare with model predictions. For systematic studies, two fabrication techniques are used to drill the nanopores: 1) reactive ion etching, and 2) a focus ion beam to introduce more pore-edge defects. The results from this work will provide guidance for phonon engineering in general materials with periodic interfaces or boundaries. References: 1. Tang et al., Nano Letters 10, 4279-4283 (2010). 2. Yu et al., Nature Nanotechnology 5, 718-721 (2010). 3. Cahill et al., Applied Physics Reviews 1, 011305/1-45 (2014) Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012.

  20. Optimization of protein fractionation by skim milk microfiltration: Choice of ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Camilla Elise; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Rukke, Elling-Olav; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Schüller, Reidar B; Skeie, Siv B

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature influence the protein fractionation of skim milk by cross flow microfiltration (MF). Microfiltration was performed at a uniform transmembrane pressure with constant permeate flux to a volume concentration factor of 2.5. Three different membrane pore sizes, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20µm, were used at a filtration temperature of 50°C. Furthermore, at pore size 0.10µm, 2 different filtration temperatures were investigated: 50 and 60°C. The transmission of proteins increased with increasing pore size, giving the permeate from MF with the 0.20-µm membrane a significantly higher concentration of native whey proteins compared with the permeates from the 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes (0.50, 0.24, and 0.39%, respectively). Significant amounts of caseins permeated the 0.20-µm membrane (1.4%), giving a permeate with a whitish appearance and a casein distribution (αS2-CN: αS1-CN: κ-CN: β-CN) similar to that of skim milk. The 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes were able to retain all caseins (only negligible amounts were detected). A permeate free from casein is beneficial in the production of native whey protein concentrates and in applications where transparency is an important functional characteristic. Microfiltration of skim milk at 50°C with the 0.10-µm membrane resulted in a permeate containing significantly more native whey proteins than the permeate from MF at 60°C. The more rapid increase in transmembrane pressure and the significantly lower concentration of caseins in the retentate at 60°C indicated that a higher concentration of caseins deposited on the membrane, and consequently reduced the native whey protein transmission. Optimal protein fractionation of skim milk into a casein-rich retentate and a permeate with native whey proteins were obtained by 0.10-µm MF at 50°C. PMID:27265169

  1. Optimization of protein fractionation by skim milk microfiltration: Choice of ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Camilla Elise; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Rukke, Elling-Olav; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Schüller, Reidar B; Skeie, Siv B

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature influence the protein fractionation of skim milk by cross flow microfiltration (MF). Microfiltration was performed at a uniform transmembrane pressure with constant permeate flux to a volume concentration factor of 2.5. Three different membrane pore sizes, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20µm, were used at a filtration temperature of 50°C. Furthermore, at pore size 0.10µm, 2 different filtration temperatures were investigated: 50 and 60°C. The transmission of proteins increased with increasing pore size, giving the permeate from MF with the 0.20-µm membrane a significantly higher concentration of native whey proteins compared with the permeates from the 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes (0.50, 0.24, and 0.39%, respectively). Significant amounts of caseins permeated the 0.20-µm membrane (1.4%), giving a permeate with a whitish appearance and a casein distribution (αS2-CN: αS1-CN: κ-CN: β-CN) similar to that of skim milk. The 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes were able to retain all caseins (only negligible amounts were detected). A permeate free from casein is beneficial in the production of native whey protein concentrates and in applications where transparency is an important functional characteristic. Microfiltration of skim milk at 50°C with the 0.10-µm membrane resulted in a permeate containing significantly more native whey proteins than the permeate from MF at 60°C. The more rapid increase in transmembrane pressure and the significantly lower concentration of caseins in the retentate at 60°C indicated that a higher concentration of caseins deposited on the membrane, and consequently reduced the native whey protein transmission. Optimal protein fractionation of skim milk into a casein-rich retentate and a permeate with native whey proteins were obtained by 0.10-µm MF at 50°C.

  2. Experimental Study of Porosity Changes in Shale Caprocks Exposed to CO2-Saturated Brines I: Evolution of Mineralogy, Pore Connectivity, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    DOE PAGES

    Mouzakis, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Rother, Gernot; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Wang, Xiuyu; Kaszuba, John P.; Heath, Jason E.; Miller, Quin R. S.; Alvarado, Vladimir; McCray, John E.

    2016-07-18

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage, one proposed method of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, relies on low permeability formations, such as shales, above injection formations to prevent upward migration of the injected CO2. Porosity in caprocks evaluated for sealing capacity before injection can be altered by geochemical reactions induced by dissolution of injected CO2 into pore fluids, impacting long-term sealing capacity. Therefore, long-term performance of CO2 sequestration sites may be dependent on both initial distribution and connectivity of pores in caprocks, and on changes induced by geochemical reaction after injection of CO2, which are currently poorly understood. This paper presentsmore » results from an experimental study of changes to caprock porosity and pore network geometry in two caprock formations under conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration. Pore connectivity and total porosity increased in the Gothic Shale; while total porosity increased but pore connectivity decreased in the Marine Tuscaloosa. Gothic Shale is a carbonate mudstone that contains volumetrically more carbonate minerals than Marine Tuscaloosa. Carbonate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than silicate minerals in Gothic Shale under high CO2 conditions, leading to increased porosity at length scales <~200 nm that contributed to increased pore connectivity. In contrast, silicate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than carbonate minerals in Marine Tuscaloosa leading to increased porosity at all length scales, and specifically an increase in the number of pores >~1 μm. Mineral reactions also contributed to a decrease in pore connectivity, possibly as a result of precipitation in pore throats or hydration of the high percentage of clays. Finally, this study highlights the role that mineralogy of the caprock can play in geochemical response to CO2 injection and resulting changes in sealing capacity in long-term CO2 storage projects.« less

  3. Nanometer scale pores similar in size to the entrance of the ribosomal exit cavity are a common feature of large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Mario; Tran, Quyen; Fox, George E.

    2013-01-01

    The highly conserved peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of the ribosome contains an RNA pore that serves as the entrance to the exit tunnel. Analysis of available ribosome crystal structures has revealed the presence of multiple additional well-defined pores of comparable size in the ribosomal (rRNA) RNAs. These typically have dimensions of 1–2 nm, with a total area of ∼100 Å2 or more, and most are associated with one or more ribosomal proteins. The PTC example and the other rRNA pores result from the packing of helices. However, in the non-PTC cases the nitrogenous bases do not protrude into the pore, thereby limiting the potential for hydrogen bonding within the pore. Instead, it is the RNA backbone that largely defines the pore likely resulting in a negatively charged environment. In many but not all cases, ribosomal proteins are associated with the pores to a greater or lesser extent. With the exception of the PTC case, the large subunit pores are not found in what are thought to be the evolutionarily oldest regions of the 23S rRNA. The unusual nature of the PTC pore may reflect a history of being created by hybridization between two or more RNAs early in evolution rather than simple folding of a single RNA. An initial survey of nonribosomal RNA crystal structures revealed additional pores, thereby showing that they are likely a general feature of RNA tertiary structure. PMID:23940386

  4. Robust independent component analysis by iterative maximization of the kurtosis contrast with algebraic optimal step size.

    PubMed

    Zarzoso, Vicente; Comon, Pierre

    2010-02-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) aims at decomposing an observed random vector into statistically independent variables. Deflation-based implementations, such as the popular one-unit FastICA algorithm and its variants, extract the independent components one after another. A novel method for deflationary ICA, referred to as RobustICA, is put forward in this paper. This simple technique consists of performing exact line search optimization of the kurtosis contrast function. The step size leading to the global maximum of the contrast along the search direction is found among the roots of a fourth-degree polynomial. This polynomial rooting can be performed algebraically, and thus at low cost, at each iteration. Among other practical benefits, RobustICA can avoid prewhitening and deals with real- and complex-valued mixtures of possibly noncircular sources alike. The absence of prewhitening improves asymptotic performance. The algorithm is robust to local extrema and shows a very high convergence speed in terms of the computational cost required to reach a given source extraction quality, particularly for short data records. These features are demonstrated by a comparative numerical analysis on synthetic data. RobustICA's capabilities in processing real-world data involving noncircular complex strongly super-Gaussian sources are illustrated by the biomedical problem of atrial activity (AA) extraction in atrial fibrillation (AF) electrocardiograms (ECGs), where it outperforms an alternative ICA-based technique.

  5. Relationships between specific surface area and pore size in electrospun polymer fibre networks

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, S. J.; Sampson, W. W.

    2010-01-01

    From consideration of the extent of contact between fibres in electrospun polymer networks, we provide theory relating the specific surface area of the network to the characteristic dimensions of interfibre voids. We show that these properties are strongly influenced by the cross-sectional morphologies of fibres. Whereas porosity has a strong influence on pore dimensions, in the range of porosities typically obtained in real networks, its influence on specific surface area is weak. By considering reference geometries of collapsed ribbons and fibres with circular cross sections, we demonstrate that at a given network porosity, fibre parameters that increase the specific surface area reduce the characteristic dimensions of voids. The implications of the theory, mainly in the context of cell proliferation on electrospun polymer scaffolds, are discussed; the theory has relevance also to future applications of these materials in composites. PMID:19812071

  6. Adaptive step-size strategy for noise-robust Fourier ptychographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Chen, Qian

    2016-09-01

    The incremental gradient approaches, such as PIE and ePIE, are widely used in the field of ptychographic imaging due to their great flexibility and computational efficiency. Nevertheless, their stability and reconstruction quality may be significantly degraded when non-negligible noise is present in the image. Though this problem is often attributed to the non-convex nature of phase retrieval, we found the reason for this is more closely related to the choice of the step-size, which needs to be gradually diminishing for convergence even in the convex case. To this end, we introduce an adaptive step-size strategy that decreases the step-size whenever sufficient progress is not made. The synthetic and real experiments on Fourier ptychographic microscopy show that the adaptive step-size strategy significantly improves the stability and robustness of the reconstruction towards noise yet retains the fast initial convergence speed of PIE and ePIE. More importantly, the proposed approach is simple, nonparametric, and does not require any preknowledge about the noise statistics. The great performance and limited computational complexity make it a very attractive and promising technique for robust Fourier ptychographic microscopy under noisy conditions. PMID:27607676

  7. Analysis and Visualization of 2D and 3D Grain and Pore Size ofFontainebleau Sandstone Using Digital Rock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latief, FDE

    2016-08-01

    Fontainebleau sandstone is sandstone found in one of the cities in France. This sandstone has unique characteristics, which is a clean-fme sandstone, composed of 99% quartz, virtually devoid of clay, with the grain size of about 200 μm. Fontainebleau sandstone is widely used as a reference in the study of rock microstructure analysis and modelling. In this work analysis regarding the grain and pore size of Fontainebleau is presented. Calculation of 2D pore size and grain size distribution were done on the 299 slice of digital image of the Fontainebleau sandstone using Feret's diameters, equivalent diameters (d = 4A/P), and by means of local thickness/separation using plate model. For the 3D grain and pore size distribution, calculation of local thickness and local separation of the structure were used. Two dimensional analysis by means of Feret's diameter and equivalent diameter reveal that both grain and pore size distributions are in the form of reverse-J shaped (right skewed) while the local thickness/separation approach produces almost similar to symmetric Gaussian distribution. Three dimensional analysis produces fairly symmetric Gaussian distribution for both the grain and pore size. Further image processing were conducted and were succeed in producing three dimensional visual of the colour coded structure thickness (grain related) and structure separation (pore related).

  8. Porous Carbon Fibers Containing Pores with Sizes Controlled at the Ångstrom Level by the Cavity Size of Pillar[6]arene.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yoshikoshi, Kumiko; Sueto, Ryuta; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki

    2015-05-26

    We report a new synthesis method of fibrous carbon material with pores sizes that are precisely controlled at the Ångstrom level, by carbonization of two dimensional (2D) porous sheets of pillar[6]arenes. The 2D porous sheets were prepared by 2D supramolecular polymerization induced by oxidation of hydroquinone units of pillar[6]arenes. Owing to the hexagonal structure of pillar[6]arene, the assembly induced by 2D supramolecular polymerization gave hexagonal 2D porous sheets, and the highly ordered structure of the 2D porous sheets formed regular fibrous structures. Then, carbonization of the 2D porous sheets afforded fibrous carbon materials with micropores. The micropore size of the fibrous porous carbon prepared from pillar[6]arene was the same size as that of the starting material pillar[6]arene assembly.

  9. An Interface Coassembly in Biliquid Phase: Toward Core-Shell Magnetic Mesoporous Silica Microspheres with Tunable Pore Size.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qin; Li, Jialuo; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Wang, Xiqing; Wang, Chun; Li, Wei; Cheng, Xiaowei; Alghamdi, Abdulaziz; Abdullah, Aboubakr M; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2015-10-21

    Core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres (Magn-MSMs) with tunable large mesopores in the shell are highly desired in biocatalysis, magnetic bioseparation, and enrichment. In this study, a shearing assisted interface coassembly in n-hexane/water biliquid systems is developed to synthesize uniform Magn-MSMs with magnetic core and mesoporous silica shell for an efficient size-selective biocatalysis. The synthesis features the rational control over the electrostatic interaction among cationic surfactant molecules, silicate oligomers, and Fe3O4@RF microspheres (RF: resorcinol formaldehyde) in the presence of shearing-regulated solubilization of n-hexane in surfactant micelles. Through this multicomponent interface coassembly, surfactant-silica mesostructured composite has been uniformly deposited on the Fe3O4@RF microspheres, and core-shell Magn-MSMs are obtained after removing the surfactant and n-hexane. The obtained Magn-MSMs possess excellent water dispersibility, uniform diameter (600 nm), large and tunable perpendicular mesopores (5.0-9.0 nm), high surface area (498-623 m(2)/g), large pore volume (0.91-0.98 cm(3)/g), and high magnetization (34.5-37.1 emu/g). By utilization of their large and open mesopores, Magn-MSMs with a pore size of about 9.0 nm have been demonstrated to be able to immobilize a large bioenzyme (trypsin with size of 4.0 nm) with a high loading capacity of ∼97 μg/mg via chemically binding. Magn-MSMs with immobilized trypsin exhibit an excellent convenient and size selective enzymolysis of low molecular proteins in the mixture of proteins of different sizes and a good recycling performance by using the magnetic separability of the microspheres.

  10. An Interface Coassembly in Biliquid Phase: Toward Core-Shell Magnetic Mesoporous Silica Microspheres with Tunable Pore Size.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qin; Li, Jialuo; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Wang, Xiqing; Wang, Chun; Li, Wei; Cheng, Xiaowei; Alghamdi, Abdulaziz; Abdullah, Aboubakr M; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2015-10-21

    Core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres (Magn-MSMs) with tunable large mesopores in the shell are highly desired in biocatalysis, magnetic bioseparation, and enrichment. In this study, a shearing assisted interface coassembly in n-hexane/water biliquid systems is developed to synthesize uniform Magn-MSMs with magnetic core and mesoporous silica shell for an efficient size-selective biocatalysis. The synthesis features the rational control over the electrostatic interaction among cationic surfactant molecules, silicate oligomers, and Fe3O4@RF microspheres (RF: resorcinol formaldehyde) in the presence of shearing-regulated solubilization of n-hexane in surfactant micelles. Through this multicomponent interface coassembly, surfactant-silica mesostructured composite has been uniformly deposited on the Fe3O4@RF microspheres, and core-shell Magn-MSMs are obtained after removing the surfactant and n-hexane. The obtained Magn-MSMs possess excellent water dispersibility, uniform diameter (600 nm), large and tunable perpendicular mesopores (5.0-9.0 nm), high surface area (498-623 m(2)/g), large pore volume (0.91-0.98 cm(3)/g), and high magnetization (34.5-37.1 emu/g). By utilization of their large and open mesopores, Magn-MSMs with a pore size of about 9.0 nm have been demonstrated to be able to immobilize a large bioenzyme (trypsin with size of 4.0 nm) with a high loading capacity of ∼97 μg/mg via chemically binding. Magn-MSMs with immobilized trypsin exhibit an excellent convenient and size selective enzymolysis of low molecular proteins in the mixture of proteins of different sizes and a good recycling performance by using the magnetic separability of the microspheres. PMID:26186087

  11. Topical application of a cleanser containing extracts of Diospyros kaki folium, Polygonum cuspidatum and Castanea crenata var. dulcis reduces skin oil content and pore size in human skin

    PubMed Central

    LEE, BO MI; AN, SUNGKWAN; KIM, SOO-YEON; HAN, HYUN JOO; JEONG, YU-JIN; LEE, KYOUNG-ROK; ROH, NAM KYUNG; AHN, KYU JOONG; AN, IN-SOOK; CHA, HWA JUN

    2015-01-01

    The effects of skin pores on skin topographic features can be reduced by decreasing excessive production and accumulation of sebum and elimination of comedones. Therefore, a cosmetic cleanser that regulates sebum homeostasis is required. In the present study, the effects of a cosmetic cleanser that contained Diospyros kaki folium, Polygonum cuspidatum and Castanea crenata var. dulcis (DPC) was examined on the removal of sebum and on skin pore size. Healthy volunteers (n=23) aged 20–50 years were asked to apply the test materials to the face. Skin oil content, pore size, pore number and extracted sebum surface area were measured using various measurement methods. All the measurements were performed at pre- and post-application of the test materials. When the cosmetic cleanser containing DPC was applied to the skin, the oil content decreased by 77.3%, from 6.19 to 1.40. The number of skin pores decreased by 24.83%, from 125.39 to 94.23. Skin pore size decreased from 0.07 to 0.02 µm3 (71.43% decrease). The amount of extracted sebum increased by 335% when the DPC cleanser was used. Compared to the control cleanser, skin oil content was significantly decreased when the cleanser that contained DPC was used. The cleanser containing DPC also decreased pore size and number. Finally, the DPC cleanser easily removed solidified sebum from the skin. PMID:26137233

  12. A combinatorial variation in surface chemistry and pore size of three-dimensional porous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds modulates the behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingdi; Tan, Ke; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial properties play significant roles in controlling cellular behaviors. The objective of the present study was to investigate how pore size and surface chemistry of three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds regulate the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro in combination. First, on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films, the hydrolytic treatment was found to stimulate the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human MSCs (hMSCs) in comparison with pristine films, while the aminolysis showed mixed effects. Then, 3D porous PCL scaffolds with varying pore sizes (100-200μm, 200-300μm and 300-450μm) were fabricated and subjected to either hydrolysis or aminolysis. It was found that a pore size of 200-300μm with hydrolysis in 3D scaffolds was the most favorable condition for growth of hMSCs. Importantly, while a pore size of 200-300μm with hydrolysis for 1h supported the best osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, the chondrogenic differentiation was greatest in scaffolds with a pore size of 300-450μm and treated with aminolysis for 1h. Taken together, these results suggest that surface chemistry and pore size of 3D porous scaffolds may potentially have a synergistic impact on the behaviors of MSCs.

  13. Slip-weakening zone sizes at nucleation of catastrophic subaerial and submarine landslides by gradually increasing pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We address the nucleation of dynamic landslide rupture in response to gradual pore pressure increases. Nucleation marks the onset of acceleration of the overlying slope mass due to the suddenly rapid enlargement of a sub-surface zone of shear failure, previously deforming quasi-statically. We model that zone as a planar surface undergoing initially linear slip-weakening frictional failure within a bordering linear-elastic medium. The results are also relevant to earthquake nucleation. The sub-surface rupture zone considered runs parallel to the free surface of a uniform slope, under a 2D plane-strain deformation state. We show results for ruptures with friction coefficients following linear slip weakening (i.e., the residual friction is not yet reached). For spatially broad increases in pore pressure, the nucleation length depends on a ratio of depth to a cohesive zone length scale. In the very broad-increase limit, a direct numerical solution for nucleation lengths compares well with solutions to a corresponding eigenvalue problem (similar to Uenishi and Rice [JGR '03]), in which spatial variations in normal stress are neglected. We estimate nucleation lengths for subaerial and submarine conditions using data [e.g., Bishop et al., Géotech. '71; Stark et al., JGGE '05] from ring-shear tests on sediments (peak friction fp = 0.5, frictional slip-weakening rate within the range w = -df/d(slip) = 0.1/cm-1/cm). We assume that only pre-stresses, and not material properties, vary with depth. With such fp and w, we find for a range of subsurface depths and shear moduli μ that nucleation lengths are typically several hundred meters long for shallow undersea slopes, and up to an order of magnitude less for steeper slopes on the Earth's surface. In the submarine case, this puts nucleation lengths in a size range comparable to observed pore-pressure-generated seafloor disturbances as pockmarks [e.g., Gay et al., MG '06].

  14. Modified Landweber algorithm for robust particle sizing by using Fraunhofer diffraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Wei, Tianxiao; Zhou, Jiayi; Cao, Zhang

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, a robust modified Landweber algorithm was proposed to retrieve the particle size distributions from Fraunhofer diffraction. Three typical particle size distributions, i.e., Rosin-Rammler, lognormal, and bimodal normal distributions for particles ranging from 4.8 to 96 μm, were employed to verify the performance of the algorithm. To show its merits, the proposed algorithm was compared with the Tikhonov regularization algorithm and the ℓ1-norm-based algorithm. Simulation results showed that, for noise-free data, both the modified Landweber algorithm and the ℓ1-norm-based algorithm were better than the Tikhonov regularization algorithm in terms of accuracy. When the data was noise-contaminated, the modified Landweber algorithm was superior to the other two algorithms in both accuracy and speed. An experimental setup was also established and the results validated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Characterization and structural investigation of fractal porous-silica over an extremely wide scale range of pore size.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yusuke; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Furó, István; Sagidullin, Alexander I; Matsushima, Keiichiro; Ura, Haruo; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2009-08-01

    We have succeeded in creating Menger sponge-like fractal body, i.e., porous-silica samples with Menger sponge-like fractal geometries, by a novel template method utilizing template particles of alkylketene dimer (AKD) and a sol-gel synthesis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS). We report here the first experimental results on characterization and structural investigations of the fractal porous-silica samples prepared with various conditions such as calcination temperature and packing condition of the template particles. In order to characterize the fractal porous-silica samples, pore volume distribution, porosity and specific surface area were measured over an extremely wide scale from 1 nm to 100 microm by means of mercury porosimetry, (1)H NMR cryoporometry, nitrogen gas adsorption experiments together with direct evaluations of cross-sectional fractal dimension D(cs), and size limits of D(cs). We have found that the pore volume distribution and specific surface area of the fractal porous-silica samples can be discussed in terms of different fractal porous structures at different scale regions. PMID:19406424

  16. Robust Variance Estimation with Dependent Effect Sizes: Practical Considerations Including a Software Tutorial in Stata and SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Methodologists have recently proposed robust variance estimation as one way to handle dependent effect sizes in meta-analysis. Software macros for robust variance estimation in meta-analysis are currently available for Stata (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA) and SPSS (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), yet there is little guidance for authors regarding…

  17. Modulation of pore sizes of titanium dioxide photocatalysts by a facile template free hydrothermal synthesis method: implications for photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Rasalingam, Shivatharsiny; Wu, Chia-Ming; Koodali, Ranjit T

    2015-02-25

    Mesoporous TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared in ethanol media by using relatively green, template free sol-gel technique. A mild hydrothermal treatment procedure was employed to tune the pore sizes of the materials. Comprehensive techniques that include powder X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, specific surface area analysis, electron microscopy, FT-IR, TGA, and ζ-potential measurements were used to characterize the titania materials. Porosity (pore size and pore volume) of the materials were found to be key factors for the variation in the rate of photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B; in addition to specific surface area, and surface hydroxyl groups. An increase in porosity permits effective transport of the dye molecules resulting in an increase in the rate of the degradation in materials having larger pores. A detailed electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) study was carried out for selected materials to identify photodegraded intermediates and products formed during the degradation of rhodamine B. In addition, experiments were also carried out to understand the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In summary, this work provides a simple way to tune pore sizes without the use of any template and an insight into the influence of pore size for the photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B. PMID:25633643

  18. Relating pore size variation of poly (ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds to molecular weight of porogen and evaluation of scaffold properties after degradation.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Soumya; Krishnan, Lissy K; Kalliyana Krishnan, V

    2014-05-01

    The major challenge in designing a scaffold for fabricating tissue engineered blood vessels is optimization of its microstructure for supporting uniform cellular in-growth with good mechanical integrity and degradation kinetics suitable for long-term implantation. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of varying the pore size of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold by altering the molecular weight of porogen and studied the effect of degradation on morphological characteristics and mechanical properties of scaffolds by correlating to the extent of degradation. Scaffolds with two different pore sizes were prepared by solvent casting and particulate leaching where poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) porogens having two molecular weights (3400 and 8000) were used and subjected to in vitro degradation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) upto six months. Microcomputed tomography studies of scaffolds revealed narrower pore size distribution when PEG-3400 was used as porogen and had 78% pores in the 12-24 µ range, whereas incorporation of PEG-8000 resulted in broader distribution with only 65% pores in the same range. Degradation resulted in scaffolds with narrower pore size distribution to have better retention of morphological and mechanical characteristics compared to scaffolds with broader distribution. Gravimetric and molecular weight studies also showed that scaffold degradation in both cases was only in initial stages after 6 months and PCL scaffolds had potential to be recommended for vascular tissue engineering applications.

  19. Modulation of pore sizes of titanium dioxide photocatalysts by a facile template free hydrothermal synthesis method: implications for photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Rasalingam, Shivatharsiny; Wu, Chia-Ming; Koodali, Ranjit T

    2015-02-25

    Mesoporous TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared in ethanol media by using relatively green, template free sol-gel technique. A mild hydrothermal treatment procedure was employed to tune the pore sizes of the materials. Comprehensive techniques that include powder X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, specific surface area analysis, electron microscopy, FT-IR, TGA, and ζ-potential measurements were used to characterize the titania materials. Porosity (pore size and pore volume) of the materials were found to be key factors for the variation in the rate of photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B; in addition to specific surface area, and surface hydroxyl groups. An increase in porosity permits effective transport of the dye molecules resulting in an increase in the rate of the degradation in materials having larger pores. A detailed electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) study was carried out for selected materials to identify photodegraded intermediates and products formed during the degradation of rhodamine B. In addition, experiments were also carried out to understand the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In summary, this work provides a simple way to tune pore sizes without the use of any template and an insight into the influence of pore size for the photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B.

  20. Estimation of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity by minidisk infiltrometers for soils with wide pore-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas

    2010-05-01

    Disk infiltrometers are widely used devices for quick and convenient measurement of soil surface hydraulic properties. In the present study, several estimation procedures, commonly used for the determination of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity from disk infiltration data, are evaluated using numerical modeling of three-dimensional axisymmetric flow below infiltrometer disk. The analysis is performed for a set of soils representing a wide spectrum of textural classes. Special attention is paid to the sandy loam soils typical for the mountain regions of Central Europe (classified as Cambisols). Improved conductivity estimates, specifically for the soils with low value of van Genuchten's parameter n (characterized by wide pore-size distribution), are obtained by extending the semi-empirical estimation procedure of Zhang (1997).

  1. Synthesis of microtubes with a surface of "house of cards" structure via needlelike particles and control of their pore size.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kohei; Tagami, Naoki; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sakai, Hideki; Koishi, Masumi; Abe, Masahiko

    2005-04-12

    The conditions for synthesizing microtubes with a surface of "house of cards" structure via needlelike particles were examined in detail. Magnesium carbonate trihydrate was formed as a metastable phase in the reaction process using magnesium hydroxide and carbon dioxide as starting materials. Subsequently, in the formation of basic magnesium carbonate from magnesium carbonate trihydrate, microtubes with a surface of house of cards structure were obtained via needlelike particles of magnesium carbonate trihydrate under certain conditions where the temperature and added amount of sodium hydroxide were properly controlled. The pore size of the microtubes could be controlled within a range of 0.5-6 microm by adjusting the condition of needlelike particle formation. In addition, the sustainability of naphthalene release from the microtube was found to be about 6 times higher than that from naphthalene crystal. PMID:15807617

  2. Non-linear behaviour of electrical parameters in porous, water-saturated rocks: a model to predict pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallbauer-Zadorozhnaya, Valeriya; Santarato, Giovanni; Abu Zeid, Nasser

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, two separate but related goals are tackled. The first one is to demonstrate that in some saturated rock textures the non-linear behaviour of induced polarization (IP) and the violation of Ohm's law not only are real phenomena, but they can also be satisfactorily predicted by a suitable physical-mathematical model, which is our second goal. This model is based on Fick's second law. As the model links the specific dependence of resistivity and chargeability of a laboratory sample to the injected current and this in turn to its pore size distribution, it is able to predict pore size distribution from laboratory measurements, in good agreement with mercury injection capillary pressure test results. This fact opens up the possibility for hydrogeophysical applications on a macro scale. Mathematical modelling shows that the chargeability acquired in the field under normal conditions, that is at low current, will always be very small and approximately proportional to the applied current. A suitable field test site for demonstrating the possible reliance of both resistivity and chargeability on current was selected and a specific measuring strategy was established. Two data sets were acquired using different injected current strengths, while keeping the charging time constant. Observed variations of resistivity and chargeability are in agreement with those predicted by the mathematical model. These field test data should however be considered preliminary. If confirmed by further evidence, these facts may lead to changing the procedure of acquiring field measurements in future, and perhaps may encourage the design and building of a new specific geo-resistivity meter. This paper also shows that the well-known Marshall and Madden's equations based on Fick's law cannot be solved without specific boundary conditions.

  3. A multifunctional role of trialkylbenzenes for the preparation of aqueous colloidal mesostructured/mesoporous silica nanoparticles with controlled pore size, particle diameter, and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hironori; Ujiie, Hiroto; Urata, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Eisuke; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Both the pore size and particle diameter of aqueous colloidal mesostructured/mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMSS/CMPS) derived from tetrapropoxysilane were effectively and easily controlled by the addition of trialkylbenzenes (TAB). Aqueous highly dispersed CMPS with large pores were successfully obtained through removal of surfactants and TAB by a dialysis process. The pore size (from 4 nm to 8 nm) and particle diameter (from 50 nm to 380 nm) were more effectively enlarged by the addition of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), and the enlargement did not cause the variation of the mesostructure and particle morphology. The larger molecular size and higher hydrophobicity of TIPB than TMB induce the incorporation of TIPB into micelles without the structural change. When TMB was used as TAB, the pore size of CMSS was also enlarged while the mesostructure and particle morphology were varied. Interestingly, when tetramethoxysilane and TIPB were used, CMSS with a very small particle diameter (20 nm) with concave surfaces and large mesopores were obtained, which may strongly be related to the initial nucleation of CMSS. A judicious choice of TAB and Si sources is quite important to control the mesostructure, size of mesopores, particle diameter, and morphology.Both the pore size and particle diameter of aqueous colloidal mesostructured/mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMSS/CMPS) derived from tetrapropoxysilane were effectively and easily controlled by the addition of trialkylbenzenes (TAB). Aqueous highly dispersed CMPS with large pores were successfully obtained through removal of surfactants and TAB by a dialysis process. The pore size (from 4 nm to 8 nm) and particle diameter (from 50 nm to 380 nm) were more effectively enlarged by the addition of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), and the enlargement did not cause the variation of the mesostructure and particle morphology. The larger molecular size

  4. Transform Domain Robust Variable Step Size Griffiths' Adaptive Algorithm for Noise Cancellation in ECG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Veena; Deekshit, Ravishankar; Satyanarayana, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely used for diagnosis of heart diseases. Good quality of ECG is utilized by physicians for interpretation and identification of physiological and pathological phenomena. However, in real situations, ECG recordings are often corrupted by artifacts or noise. Noise severely limits the utility of the recorded ECG and thus needs to be removed, for better clinical evaluation. In the present paper a new noise cancellation technique is proposed for removal of random noise like muscle artifact from ECG signal. A transform domain robust variable step size Griffiths' LMS algorithm (TVGLMS) is proposed for noise cancellation. For the TVGLMS, the robust variable step size has been achieved by using the Griffiths' gradient which uses cross-correlation between the desired signal contaminated with observation or random noise and the input. The algorithm is discrete cosine transform (DCT) based and uses symmetric property of the signal to represent the signal in frequency domain with lesser number of frequency coefficients when compared to that of discrete Fourier transform (DFT). The algorithm is implemented for adaptive line enhancer (ALE) filter which extracts the ECG signal in a noisy environment using LMS filter adaptation. The proposed algorithm is found to have better convergence error/misadjustment when compared to that of ordinary transform domain LMS (TLMS) algorithm, both in the presence of white/colored observation noise. The reduction in convergence error achieved by the new algorithm with desired signal decomposition is found to be lower than that obtained without decomposition. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is better than traditional adaptive filter using LMS algorithm in the aspects of retaining geometrical characteristics of ECG signal.

  5. Magnetic relaxation -- coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the CW (continuous wave) and pulsed EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) have been examined of the swelled Argonne Premium whole coals and the swelled residues of these coals. The CW EPR spectra will not be of high quality due to the unexpectedly microwave-lossy character of the pyridine used for swelling. Being relatively unaffected by this characteristic, the pulsed EPR measurements of the spin relaxation times of the broad (non-inertinite) and narrow (inertinite) macerals have been completed. Although detailed analyses of these results have not yet been done, marked differences have been found between the relaxation times of the swelled and unswelled coals and residues. The most startling are the less than 200 nsec times T{sub 1} of the spin-lattice relaxation of the inertinite radicals in the swelled samples. The T{sub 1} of this maceral in the unswelled coal were approaching 1 millisecond. The T{sub 1} contrast was much less pronounced between the swelled and non-swelled non-inertinite macerals. The prospects of significant progress in coal pore size measurements with xenon and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) have dimmed since the beginning of this project. This assessment is based on the dearth of these types of studies, a paper at a contractors` meeting on this subject that did not materialize, and discussions with colleagues with experience with the technique in coals. Instead, the authors have been developing a pulsed EPR technique for the spin probing of molecular motion to be applied to pores in carbonaceous materials. This report contains a copy of a nearly final draft of a paper being prepared on the development of this technique, entitled {open_quotes}Physical Characterization of the State of Motion of the Phenalenyl Spin Probe in Cation-Exchanged Faujasite Zeolite Supercages with Pulsed EPR.{close_quotes}

  6. Mesoporous Silica Gel–Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4–30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores. PMID:26592565

  7. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  8. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-23

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  9. Robust design of adenovirus purification by two-column, simulated moving-bed, size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nestola, Piergiuseppe; Silva, Ricardo J S; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Mota, José P B

    2015-11-10

    A simple, yet efficient, two-column simulated moving-bed (2CSMB) process for purifying adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is presented and validated experimentally, and a general procedure for its robust design under parameter uncertainty is described. The pilot-scale run yielded a virus recovery of 86 percent and DNA and HCP clearances of 90 and 89 percent, respectively, without any fine tuning of the operating parameters. This performance compares very favorably against that of single-column batch chromatography for the same volume of size-exclusion resin. To improve the robustness of the 2CSMB-SEC process the best set of operating parameters is selected only among candidate solutions that are robust feasible, that is, remain feasible for all parameter perturbations within their uncertainty intervals. This robust approach to optimal design replaces the nominal problem by a worst case problem. Computational tractability is ensured by formulating the robust design problem with only the vertices of the uncertainty region that have the worst effect on the product purity and recovery. The robust design is exemplified on the case where the column volume and interparticle porosity are subject to uncertainty. As expected, to increase the robustness of the 2CSMB-SEC process it is necessary to reduce its productivity and increase its solvent consumption. Nevertheless, the design solution given by our robust approach is the least detrimental of all feasible operating conditions for the 2CSMB-SEC process.

  10. Mesoporous calcium-silicon xerogels with mesopore size and pore volume influence hMSC behaviors by load and sustained release of rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenhua; Li, Xiangde; Qian, Jun; Lv, Guoyu; Yan, Yonggang; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium-silicon xerogels with a pore size of 15 nm (MCS-15) and pore volume of 1.43 cm(3)/g were synthesized by using 1,3,5-mesitylene (TMB) as the pore-expanding agent. The MCS-15 exhibited good degradability with the weight loss of 50 wt% after soaking in Tris-HCl solution for 56 days, which was higher than the 30 wt% loss shown by mesoporous calcium-silicon xerogels with a pore size of 4 nm (MCS-4). The pore size and pore volume of MCS-15 had significant influences on load and release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The MCS-15 had a higher capacity to encapsulate a large amount of rhBMP-2; it could adsorb 45 mg/g of rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered saline after 24 hours, which was more than twice that with MCS-4 (20 mg/g). Moreover, the MCS-15 system exhibited sustained release of rhBMP-2 as compared with MCS-4 system (showing a burst release). The MCS-15/rhBMP-2 system could promote the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, showing good cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The results indicated that MCS-15, with larger mesopore size and higher pore volume, might be a promising carrier for loading and sustained release of rhBMP-2, which could be used as bone repair material with built-in osteoinduction function in bone reconstruction.

  11. Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with mesopore size and pore volume influence hMSC behaviors by load and sustained release of rhBMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenhua; Li, Xiangde; Qian, Jun; Lv, Guoyu; Yan, Yonggang; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a pore size of 15 nm (MCS-15) and pore volume of 1.43 cm3/g were synthesized by using 1,3,5-mesitylene (TMB) as the pore-expanding agent. The MCS-15 exhibited good degradability with the weight loss of 50 wt% after soaking in Tris-HCl solution for 56 days, which was higher than the 30 wt% loss shown by mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a pore size of 4 nm (MCS-4). The pore size and pore volume of MCS-15 had significant influences on load and release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The MCS-15 had a higher capacity to encapsulate a large amount of rhBMP-2; it could adsorb 45 mg/g of rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered saline after 24 hours, which was more than twice that with MCS-4 (20 mg/g). Moreover, the MCS-15 system exhibited sustained release of rhBMP-2 as compared with MCS-4 system (showing a burst release). The MCS-15/rhBMP-2 system could promote the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, showing good cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The results indicated that MCS-15, with larger mesopore size and higher pore volume, might be a promising carrier for loading and sustained release of rhBMP-2, which could be used as bone repair material with built-in osteoinduction function in bone reconstruction. PMID:25784801

  12. Robust reverse engineering of dynamic gene networks under sample size heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Ankur P; Wu, Wei; Xing, Eric P

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneously reverse engineering a collection of condition-specific gene networks from gene expression microarray data to uncover dynamic mechanisms is a key challenge in systems biology. However, existing methods for this task are very sensitive to variations in the size of the microarray samples across different biological conditions (which we term sample size heterogeneity in network reconstruction), and can potentially produce misleading results that can lead to incorrect biological interpretation. In this work, we develop a more robust framework that addresses this novel problem. Just like microarray measurements across conditions must undergo proper normalization on their magnitudes before entering subsequent analysis, we argue that networks across conditions also need to be "normalized" on their density when they are constructed, and we provide an algorithm that allows such normalization to be facilitated while estimating the networks. We show the quantitative advantages of our approach on synthetic and real data. Our analysis of a hematopoietic stem cell dataset reveals interesting results, some of which are confirmed by previously validated results.

  13. Effect of rock composition and texture on pore size distributions in shales: Applications in low field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidian, Milad

    There are various methods to assess the pore size distribution (PSD) of porous materials; amongst all, NMR is the only technique that can be utilized for subsurface applications. The key parameter to transform NMR time domain response to PSD size domain data is surface relaxivity. The common practice is to consider a constant surface relaxivity throughout a well, formation or rock type regardless of the variations in rock compositions; this results in inaccurate PSD estimation using NMR log data. In this thesis I established a methodology to calculate the surface relaxivity in shales considering the rock composition and texture. I present the steps to achieve this goal in three steps: (a) Understanding the challenges of NMR acquisition, analysis and interpretation in shales, (b) Measuring the porosity, PSD and surface area and providing a practice to check the reliability of these measurements in shales, (c) Developing a methodology to calculate the surface relaxivity honoring the variations paramagnetic mineral content, susceptibility, distribution and texture. Application of NMR in unconventional rocks requires adjustment of NMR data acquisition and analysis to the unique properties of these rocks such as high level of heterogeneity, complex pore structure, fine grains, and presence of nano-scale pores. Identifying these challenges improves our understanding of NMR response in shales and increases the quality of the acquired and analyzed data. Calculation of surface relaxivity, as a measure of how fluids and rock surfaces react, requires reliable measurement of different petrophysical properties of the rock such as porosity, total specific surface area, and PSD using other techniques. I studied the reliability of different techniques to measure these petrophysical properties for shales by performing a thorough comparative study of porosity and PSD for different shale formations. The result of my study showed that clay type and content, total organic carbon (TOC

  14. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; O'Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  15. The Pore Size of Non-Graminaceous Plant Cell Walls Is Rapidly Decreased by Borate Ester Cross-Linking of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II1

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Axel; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Ehwald, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan II (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH ≤ 2.0 or by treatment with Ca2+-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca2+, but not by Na+ or Mg2+ ions at pH 1.5. The Ca2+-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Our results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed. PMID:10557231

  16. Nonlinear Effect of Moisture Content on Effective Thermal Conductivity of Building Materials with Different Pore Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Ma, Chao; Wang, Dengjia; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and the moisture content of a material is required to accurately calculate the envelope heat and mass transfer and, subsequently, the building energy consumption. We experimentally analyzed the pore size distributions and porosities of common building materials and the influence of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity of building materials. We determined the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and moisture content of building materials. The results showed that a larger porosity led to a more significant effect of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity. When the volumetric moisture content reached 10 %, the thermal conductivities of foam concrete and aerated concrete increased by approximately 200 % and 100 %, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity increased rapidly in the low moisture content range and increased slowly in the high moisture content range. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the moisture content of the materials through an approximate power function. As the moisture content in the walls of a new building stabilizes, the effective thermal conductivity of normal concrete varies only slightly, whereas that of aerated concrete varies more significantly. The effective thermal conductivity of the material is proportional to the relative humidity of the environment. This trend is most noticeable when the wall material is aerated concrete.

  17. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  18. Nonparametric pore size distribution using d-PFG: comparison to s-PFG and migration to MRI.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Nevo, Uri

    2014-09-01

    Here we present the successful translation of a pore size distribution (PSD) estimation method from NMR to MRI. This approach is validated using a well-characterized MRI phantom consisting of stacked glass capillary arrays (GCA) having different diameters. By employing a double pulsed-field gradient (d-PFG) MRI sequence, this method overcomes several important theoretical and experimental limitations of previous single-PFG (s-PFG) based MRI methods by allowing the relative diffusion gradients' direction to vary. This feature adds an essential second dimension in the parameters space, which can potentially improve the reliability and stability of the PSD estimation. To infer PSDs from the MRI data in each voxel an inverse linear problem is solved in conjunction with the multiple correlation function (MCF) framework, which can account for arbitrary experimental parameters (e.g., long diffusion pulses). This scheme makes no a priori assumptions about the functional form of the underlying PSD. Creative use of region of interest (ROI) analysis allows us to create different underlying PSDs using the same GCA MRI phantom. We show that an s-PFG experiment on the GCA phantom fails to accurately reconstruct the size distribution, thus demonstrating the superiority of the d-PFG experiment. In addition, signal simulations corrupted by different noise levels were used to generate continuous and complex PSDs, which were then successfully reconstructed. Finally, owing to the reduced q- or b- values required to measure microscopic PSDs via d-PFG MRI, this method will be better suited to biomedical and clinical applications, in which gradient strength of scanners is limited. PMID:25064269

  19. Robust SMES controller design for stabilization of inter-area oscillation considering coil size and system uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamroo, Issarachai

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is able to quickly exchange active and reactive power with the power system. The SMES is expected to be the smart storage device for power system stabilization. Although the stabilizing effect of SMES is significant, the SMES is quite costly. Particularly, the superconducting magnetic coil size which is the essence of the SMES, must be carefully selected. On the other hand, various generation and load changes, unpredictable network structure, etc., cause system uncertainties. The power controller of SMES which is designed without considering such uncertainties, may not tolerate and loses stabilizing effect. To overcome these problems, this paper proposes the new design of robust SMES controller taking coil size and system uncertainties into account. The structure of the active and reactive power controllers is the 1st-order lead-lag compensator. No need for the exact mathematical representation, system uncertainties are modeled by the inverse input multiplicative perturbation. Without the difficulty of the trade-off of damping performance and robustness, the optimization problem of control parameters is formulated. The particle swarm optimization is used for solving the optimal parameters at each coil size automatically. Based on the normalized integral square error index and the consideration of coil current constraint, the robust SMES with the smallest coil size which still provides the satisfactory stabilizing effect, can be achieved. Simulation studies in the two-area four-machine interconnected power system show the superior robustness of the proposed robust SMES with the smallest coil size under various operating conditions over the non-robust SMES with large coil size.

  20. Robust variance estimation with dependent effect sizes: practical considerations including a software tutorial in Stata and spss.

    PubMed

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Methodologists have recently proposed robust variance estimation as one way to handle dependent effect sizes in meta-analysis. Software macros for robust variance estimation in meta-analysis are currently available for Stata (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA) and spss (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), yet there is little guidance for authors regarding the practical application and implementation of those macros. This paper provides a brief tutorial on the implementation of the Stata and spss macros and discusses practical issues meta-analysts should consider when estimating meta-regression models with robust variance estimates. Two example databases are used in the tutorial to illustrate the use of meta-analysis with robust variance estimates.

  1. Extreme accumulation of nucleotides in simulated hydrothermal pore systems

    PubMed Central

    Baaske, Philipp; Weinert, Franz M.; Duhr, Stefan; Lemke, Kono H.; Russell, Michael J.; Braun, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    We simulate molecular transport in elongated hydrothermal pore systems influenced by a thermal gradient. We find extreme accumulation of molecules in a wide variety of plugged pores. The mechanism is able to provide highly concentrated single nucleotides, suitable for operations of an RNA world at the origin of life. It is driven solely by the thermal gradient across a pore. On the one hand, the fluid is shuttled by thermal convection along the pore, whereas on the other hand, the molecules drift across the pore, driven by thermodiffusion. As a result, millimeter-sized pores accumulate even single nucleotides more than 108-fold into micrometer-sized regions. The enhanced concentration of molecules is found in the bulk water near the closed bottom end of the pore. Because the accumulation depends exponentially on the pore length and temperature difference, it is considerably robust with respect to changes in the cleft geometry and the molecular dimensions. Whereas thin pores can concentrate only long polynucleotides, thicker pores accumulate short and long polynucleotides equally well and allow various molecular compositions. This setting also provides a temperature oscillation, shown previously to exponentially replicate DNA in the protein-assisted PCR. Our results indicate that, for life to evolve, complicated active membrane transport is not required for the initial steps. We find that interlinked mineral pores in a thermal gradient provide a compelling high-concentration starting point for the molecular evolution of life. PMID:17494767

  2. Size of seismic events during borehole injections: the effects of source mechanisms, stress and pore pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Ondovcin, T.; Zhao, P.

    2012-12-01

    The fluid injection in boreholes is usually carried out during industrial operations targeted to permeability enhacement of hydrocarbon reservoirs and geothermal heat exchangers. Pressures in the order of 10 MPa are used in order to decrease the effective normal stress that results in shearing of preexisting fractures and/or creating new tensile fractures. A part of the deformation is brittle, which is expressed in the form of small seismic events. In most cases only microearthquakes with manitudes below 2 are generated, which is namely the case of treatments in hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, treatments of geothermal fields are often associated with small magnitude earthquakes (ML from 2 to 4), which represents a concern for the seismic risk of these operations. This happened in the Soultz (France), Basel (Switzerland) and also Berlin (Salvador) geothermal projects. Interestingly, the largest events occurred after shut-in of the well, or during the latest phase of injection. However, increased seismicity usually continues even long after bleeding-off the well. The largest events occur not only late during the injections, but also far from the injection well, at the edge of the seismically activated rock volume. Recent results of the frequency-magnitude analysis of the Basel seismicity show anticorrelation of b-value with the distance from the well, which proves the tendency of larger events to occurr far from the well. Other studies show the increase of stress drops with the distance to the injection, which might indicate a common intrinsic mechanism reposnsible for these two observations. The existing data point to two apparent discrepancies: (i) the largest events occur at larger distances where the stress field is less perturbed by the fluid injection and (ii) the largest events occur after injection when the fluid pressure in the rock volume is decreasing. We use the available results of fluid injection seismicity and apply our own analyses of frequency size

  3. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-04-01

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: • Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. • SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. • Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. • Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  4. Cell Wall-Degrading Enzymes Enlarge the Pore Size of Intervessel Pit Membranes in Healthy and Xylella fastidiosa-Infected Grapevines1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Donoso, Alonso G.; Sun, Qiang; Roper, M. Caroline; Greve, L. Carl; Kirkpatrick, Bruce; Labavitch, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The pit membrane (PM) is a primary cell wall barrier that separates adjacent xylem water conduits, limiting the spread of xylem-localized pathogens and air embolisms from one conduit to the next. This paper provides a characterization of the size of the pores in the PMs of grapevine (Vitis vinifera). The PM porosity (PMP) of stems infected with the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was compared with the PMP of healthy stems. Stems were infused with pressurized water and flow rates were determined; gold particles of known size were introduced with the water to assist in determining the size of PM pores. The effect of introducing trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), oligogalacturonides, and polygalacturonic acid into stems on water flux via the xylem was also measured. The possibility that cell wall-degrading enzymes could alter the pore sizes, thus facilitating the ability of X. fastidiosa to cross the PMs, was tested. Two cell wall-degrading enzymes likely to be produced by X. fastidiosa (polygalactuoronase and endo-1,4- β -glucanase) were infused into stems, and particle passage tests were performed to check for changes in PMP. Scanning electron microscopy of control and enzyme-infused stem segments revealed that the combination of enzymes opened holes in PMs, probably explaining enzyme impacts on PMP and how a small X. fastidiosa population, introduced into grapevines by insect vectors, can multiply and spread throughout the vine and cause Pierce's disease. PMID:20107028

  5. Fine Tuning of Nanocrystal and Pore Sizes of TiO2 Submicrospheres toward High Performance Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Qian; Ding, Yong; Mo, Li-E; Hu, Lin-Hua; Wu, Ji-Huai; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2015-10-14

    In general, the properties and performance of mesoporous TiO2 are greatly dependent on its crystal size, crystallinity, porosity, surface area, and morphology; in this regard, design and fine-tuning the crystal and pore sizes of the TiO2 submicrospheres and investigating the effect of these factors on the properties and photoelectric performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is essential. In this work, uniform TiO2 submicrospheres were synthesized by a two-step procedure containing hydrolysis and solvothermal process. The crystal and pore sizes of the TiO2 submicrospheres were fine-tuned and controlled in a narrow range by adjusting the quantity of NH4OH during the solvothermal process. The effect of crystal and pore size of TiO2 submicrosphere on the performance of the DSSCs and their properties including dye-loading capacity, light scattering effect, power conversion efficiency (PCE), incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies (IPCEs), and electron recombination were compared and analyzed. The results show that increasing pore size plays a more significant role in improving the dye-loading capacity and PCE than increasing surface area, and an overall PCE value of 8.62% was obtained for the device with a 7.0 μm film thickness based on the TiO2 submicrospheres treated with 0.6 mL of NH4OH. Finally, the best TiO2 submicrosphere based photoanode film was optimized by TiCl4 treatment, and increasing film thickness and a remarkable PCE up to 11.11% were achieved.

  6. Fine Tuning of Nanocrystal and Pore Sizes of TiO2 Submicrospheres toward High Performance Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Qian; Ding, Yong; Mo, Li-E; Hu, Lin-Hua; Wu, Ji-Huai; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2015-10-14

    In general, the properties and performance of mesoporous TiO2 are greatly dependent on its crystal size, crystallinity, porosity, surface area, and morphology; in this regard, design and fine-tuning the crystal and pore sizes of the TiO2 submicrospheres and investigating the effect of these factors on the properties and photoelectric performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is essential. In this work, uniform TiO2 submicrospheres were synthesized by a two-step procedure containing hydrolysis and solvothermal process. The crystal and pore sizes of the TiO2 submicrospheres were fine-tuned and controlled in a narrow range by adjusting the quantity of NH4OH during the solvothermal process. The effect of crystal and pore size of TiO2 submicrosphere on the performance of the DSSCs and their properties including dye-loading capacity, light scattering effect, power conversion efficiency (PCE), incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies (IPCEs), and electron recombination were compared and analyzed. The results show that increasing pore size plays a more significant role in improving the dye-loading capacity and PCE than increasing surface area, and an overall PCE value of 8.62% was obtained for the device with a 7.0 μm film thickness based on the TiO2 submicrospheres treated with 0.6 mL of NH4OH. Finally, the best TiO2 submicrosphere based photoanode film was optimized by TiCl4 treatment, and increasing film thickness and a remarkable PCE up to 11.11% were achieved. PMID:26393366

  7. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  8. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  9. Oriented bioactive glass (13-93) scaffolds with controllable pore size by unidirectional freezing of camphene-based suspensions: microstructure and mechanical response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Fu, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Scaffolds of 13-93 bioactive glass (composition 6Na2O, 8K2O, 8MgO, 22CaO, 2P2O5, 54SiO2; mol %), containing oriented pores with controllable diameter, were prepared by unidirectional freezing of camphene-based suspensions (10 vol% particles) on a cold substrate (−196°C or 3°C). By varying the annealing time (0–72 h) to coarsen the camphene phase, constructs with the same porosity (86 ± 1%) but with controllable pore diameters (15–160 μm) were obtained after sublimation of the camphene. The pore diameters had a self-similar distribution that could be fitted by a diffusion-controlled coalescence model. Sintering (1 h at 690°C) was accompanied by a decrease in the porosity and pore diameter, the magnitude of which depended on the pore size of the green constructs, giving scaffolds with a porosity of 20–60% and average pore diameter of 6–120 μm. The compressive stress vs. deformation response of the sintered scaffolds in the orientation direction was linear, followed by failure. The compressive strength and elastic modulus in the orientation direction varied from 180 MPa and 25 GPa, respectively, (porosity = 20%) to 16 MPa and 4 GPa, respectively, (porosity = 60%), which were 2–3 times larger than the values in the direction perpendicular to the orientation. The potential use of these 13-93 bioactive glass scaffolds for the repair of large defects in load-bearing bones, such as segmental defects in long bones, is discussed. PMID:20807594

  10. Fabrication of Controllable Pore and Particle Size of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles via a Liquid-phase Synthesis Method and Its Absorption Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, Asep Bayu Dani; Iskandar, Ferry; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2011-12-01

    Monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a liquid-phase synthesis method. The result showed particles with controllable pore size from several to tens nanometers with outer diameter of several tens nanometers. The ability in the control of pore size and outer diameter was altered by adjusting the precursor solution ratios. In addition, we have conducted the adsorption ability of the prepared particles. The result showed that large organic molecules were well-absorbed to the prepared silica porous particles, in which this result was not obtained when using commercial dense silica particle and/or hollow silica particle. With this result, the prepared mesoporous silica particles may be used efficiently in various applications, such as sensors, pharmaceuticals, environmentally sensitive pursuits, etc.

  11. Isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, process for forming the same, and systematic design of pore size and functionality therein, with application for gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Li, Hailian; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel

    2005-08-16

    An isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) and method for systematically forming the same. The method comprises the steps of dissolving at least one source of metal cations and at least one organic linking compound in a solvent to form a solution; and crystallizing the solution under predetermined conditions to form a predetermined IRMOF. At least one of functionality, dimension, pore size and free volume of the IRMOF is substantially determined by the organic linking compound.

  12. Relationship between pore size and reversible and irreversible immobilization of ionic liquid electrolytes in porous carbon under applied electric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahurin, Shannon M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Thompson, Matthew W.; Zhang, Pengfei; Turner, C. Heath; Cummings, Peter T.; Dai, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Transport of electrolytes in nanoporous carbon-based electrodes largely defines the function and performance of energy storage devices. Using molecular dynamics simulation and quasielastic neutron scattering, we investigate the microscopic dynamics of a prototypical ionic liquid electrolyte, [emim][Tf2N], under applied electric potential in carbon materials with 6.7 nm and 1.5 nm pores. The simulations demonstrate the formation of dense layers of counter-ions near the charged surfaces, which is reversible when the polarity is reversed. In the experiment, the ions immobilized near the surface manifest themselves in the elastic scattering signal. The experimentally observed ion immobilization near the wall is fully reversible as a function of the applied electric potential in the 6.7 nm, but not in the 1.5 nm nanopores. In the latter case, remarkably, the first application of the electric potential leads to apparently irreversible immobilization of cations or anions, depending on the polarity, near the carbon pore walls. This unexpectedly demonstrates that in carbon electrode materials with the small pores, which are optimal for energy storage applications, the polarity of the electrical potential applied for the first time after the introduction of an ionic liquid electrolyte may define the decoration of the small pore walls with ions for prolonged periods of time and possibly for the lifetime of the electrode.

  13. Relationship between pore size and reversible and irreversible immobilization of ionic liquid electrolytes in porous carbon under applied electric potential

    DOE PAGES

    Mahurin, Shannon M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Thompson, Matthew W.; Zhang, Pengfei; Turner, C. Heath; Cummings, Peter T.; Dai, Sheng

    2016-10-04

    Transport of electrolytes in nanoporous carbon-based electrodes largely defines the function and performance of energy storage devices. Here, using molecular dynamics simulation and quasielastic neutron scattering, we investigate the microscopic dynamics of a prototypical ionic liquid electrolyte, [emim][Tf2N], under applied electric potential in carbon materials with 6.7 nm and 1.5 nm pores. The simulations demonstrate the formation of dense layers of counter-ions near the charged surfaces, which is reversible when the polarity is reversed. In the experiment, the ions immobilized near the surface manifest themselves in the elastic scattering signal. The experimentally observed ion immobilization near the wall is fullymore » reversible as a function of the applied electric potential in the 6.7 nm, but not in the 1.5 nm nanopores. In the latter case, remarkably, the first application of the electric potential leads to apparently irreversible immobilization of cations or anions, depending on the polarity, near the carbon pore walls. This unexpectedly demonstrates that in carbon electrode materials with the small pores, which are optimal for energy storage applications, the polarity of the electrical potential applied for the first time after the introduction of an ionic liquid electrolyte may define the decoration of the small pore walls with ions for prolonged periods of time and possibly for the lifetime of the electrode.« less

  14. A feasible way for the fabrication of single walled carbon nanotube/polypyrrole composite film with controlled pore size for neural interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hengyang; Zhang, Min; Xiao, Yinghong; Che, Jianfei

    2015-02-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polypyrrole (PPy) composite films with controlled pore size and strong adhesive force was prepared as electrode material for improving the performance of neural electrodes. SWNT film with controlled pore size was first fabricated through electrophoresis with a merit that the pore size can be well tuned by changing the concentration of metal ions in the electrolyte. An ultrathin conformal PPy layer around SWNT bundles in a uniform manner within the entire films was subsequently obtained by pulsed electropolymerization. The adhesion of the SWNT coated electrodes was tested by repeatedly inserting the coated electrode into agar gel to demonstrate the better adhesive force of the coating. Electrochemical results showed that the SWNT/PPy coated metal electrodes have much lower impedance and higher charge storage capacity than the bare metal substrates. Further in vitro culture of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells revealed that the porous SWNT/PPy composite film was non-toxic and well supported the growth of neurons. We demonstrate that the prepared composite film has potential applications in chronic implantable neural electrodes for neural stimulation and recording.

  15. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics studies of the concentration and size dependence of fifth- and seventh-generation PAMAM dendrimers on pore formation in DMPC bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu; Larson, Ronald G

    2008-07-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of multiple copies of unacetylated G5 and G7 and acetylated G5 dendrimers in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers with explicit water using the coarse-grained model developed by Marrink et al. (J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 7812) with the inclusion of long-range electrostatics. When initially clustered together near the bilayer, neutral acetylated dendrimers aggregate, whereas cationic unacetylated dendrimers do not aggregate, but separate from each other, similar to the observations from atomic force microscopy by Mecke et al. (Chem. Phys. Lipids 2004, 132, 3). The bilayers interacting with unacetylated dendrimers of higher concentration are significantly deformed and show pore formation on the positively curved portions, while acetylated dendrimers are unable to form pores. Unacetylated G7 dendrimers bring more water molecules into the pores than do unacetylated G5 dendrimers. These results agree qualitatively with experimental results showing that significant cytoplasmic-protein leakage is produced by unacetylated G7 dendrimers at concentrations as low as 10 nM, but only at a much higher concentration of 400 nM for unacetylated G5 dendrimers (Bioconjugate Chem. 2004, 15, 774). This good qualitative agreement indicates that the effect on pore formation of the concentration and size of large nanoparticles can be studied through coarse-grained MD simulations, provided that long-range electrostatic interactions are included.

  16. A Generally Robust Approach for Testing Hypotheses and Setting Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keselman, H. J.; Algina, James; Lix, Lisa M.; Wilcox, Rand R.; Deering, Kathleen N.

    2008-01-01

    Standard least squares analysis of variance methods suffer from poor power under arbitrarily small departures from normality and fail to control the probability of a Type I error when standard assumptions are violated. This article describes a framework for robust estimation and testing that uses trimmed means with an approximate degrees of…

  17. ON THE ROBUSTNESS OF z = 0-1 GALAXY SIZE MEASUREMENTS THROUGH MODEL AND NON-PARAMETRIC FITS

    SciTech Connect

    Mosleh, Moein; Franx, Marijn; Williams, Rik J.

    2013-11-10

    We present the size-stellar mass relations of nearby (z = 0.01-0.02) Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, for samples selected by color, morphology, Sérsic index n, and specific star formation rate. Several commonly employed size measurement techniques are used, including single Sérsic fits, two-component Sérsic models, and a non-parametric method. Through simple simulations, we show that the non-parametric and two-component Sérsic methods provide the most robust effective radius measurements, while those based on single Sérsic profiles are often overestimates, especially for massive red/early-type galaxies. Using our robust sizes, we show for all sub-samples that the mass-size relations are shallow at low stellar masses and steepen above ∼3-4 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}. The mass-size relations for galaxies classified as late-type, low-n, and star-forming are consistent with each other, while blue galaxies follow a somewhat steeper relation. The mass-size relations of early-type, high-n, red, and quiescent galaxies all agree with each other but are somewhat steeper at the high-mass end than previous results. To test potential systematics at high redshift, we artificially redshifted our sample (including surface brightness dimming and degraded resolution) to z = 1 and re-fit the galaxies using single Sérsic profiles. The sizes of these galaxies before and after redshifting are consistent and we conclude that systematic effects in sizes and the size-mass relation at z ∼ 1 are negligible. Interestingly, since the poorer physical resolution at high redshift washes out bright galaxy substructures, single Sérsic fitting appears to provide more reliable and unbiased effective radius measurements at high z than for nearby, well-resolved galaxies.

  18. A size-based emphysema severity index: robust to the breath-hold-level variations and correlated with clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Lee, Minho; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the power-law exponents (D) of emphysema hole-size distributions as a competent emphysema index. Robustness to extreme breath-hold-level variations and correlations with clinical parameters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were investigated and compared to a conventional emphysema index (EI%). Patients and methods A total of 100 patients with COPD (97 males and three females of mean age 67±7.9 years) underwent multidetector row computed tomography scanning at full inspiration and full expiration. The diameters of the emphysematous holes were estimated and quantified with a fully automated algorithm. Power-law exponents (D) of emphysematous hole-size distribution were evaluated. Results The diameters followed a power-law distribution in all cases, suggesting the scale-free nature of emphysema. D of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography of patients showed intraclass correlation coefficients >0.8, indicating statistically absolute agreement of different breath-hold levels. By contrast, the EI% failed to agree. Bland–Altman analysis also revealed the superior robustness of D to EI%. D also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as airflow limitation, diffusion capacity, exercise capacity, and quality of life. Conclusion The D of emphysematous hole-size distribution is robust to breath-hold-level variations and sensitive to the severity of emphysema. This measurement may help rule out the confounding effects of variations in breath-hold levels. PMID:27536095

  19. Alkali metal ion storage properties of sulphur and phosphorous molecules encapsulated in nanometer size carbon cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Yuki; Song, Hayong; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nishiwaki, Yoshiki; Al-zubaidi, Ayar; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical stabilities of sulfur and phosphorus molecules encapsulated in a mesoporous carbon (MPC) and two kinds of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having different cylindrical pore diameters. The sublimation temperatures of sulfur molecules encapsulated in MPC and the two kinds of SWCNTs were measured by thermo-gravimetric measurements. It was found that the sublimation temperature of sulfur molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs having mean tube diameter of 1.5 nm is much higher than any other molecules encapsulated in larger pores. It was also found that the capacity fading of lithium-sulfur battery can be diminished by encapsulation of sulfur molecules in SWCNTs. We also investigated the electrochemical properties of phosphorus molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs (P@SWCNTs). It was shown that P@SWCNT can adsorb and desorb both Li and Na ions reversibly.

  20. Development of a new, robust and accurate, spectroscopic metric for scatterer size estimation in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassinopoulos, Michalis; Pitris, Costas

    2016-03-01

    The modulations appearing on the backscattering spectrum originating from a scatterer are related to its diameter as described by Mie theory for spherical particles. Many metrics for Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) take advantage of this observation in order to enhance the contrast of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. However, none of these metrics has achieved high accuracy when calculating the scatterer size. In this work, Mie theory was used to further investigate the relationship between the degree of modulation in the spectrum and the scatterer size. From this study, a new spectroscopic metric, the bandwidth of the Correlation of the Derivative (COD) was developed which is more robust and accurate, compared to previously reported techniques, in the estimation of scatterer size. The self-normalizing nature of the derivative and the robustness of the first minimum of the correlation as a measure of its width, offer significant advantages over other spectral analysis approaches especially for scatterer sizes above 3 μm. The feasibility of this technique was demonstrated using phantom samples containing 6, 10 and 16 μm diameter microspheres as well as images of normal and cancerous human colon. The results are very promising, suggesting that the proposed metric could be implemented in OCT spectral analysis for measuring nuclear size distribution in biological tissues. A technique providing such information would be of great clinical significance since it would allow the detection of nuclear enlargement at the earliest stages of precancerous development.

  1. Porous carbon spheres and monoliths: morphology control, pore size tuning and their applications as Li-ion battery anode materials.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aled D; Li, Xu; Zhang, Haifei

    2014-07-01

    The development of the next generation of advanced lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) requires new & advanced materials and novel fabrication techniques in order to push the boundaries of performance and open up new and exciting markets. Structured carbon materials, with controlled pore features on the micron and nanometer scales, are explored as advanced alternatives to conventional graphite as the active material of the LIB anode. Mesoporous carbon materials, carbon nanotube-based materials, and graphene-based materials have been extensively investigated and reviewed. Morphology control (e.g., colloids, thin films, nanofibrous mats, monoliths) and hierarchical pores (particularly the presence of large pores) exhibit an increasing influence on LIB performance. This tutorial review focuses on the synthetic techniques for preparation of porous carbon spheres and carbon monoliths, including hydrothermal carbonization, emulsion templating, ice templating and new developments in making porous carbons from sustainable biomass and metal-organic framework templating. We begin with a brief introduction to LIBs, defining key parameters and terminology used to assess the performance of anode materials, and then address synthetic techniques for the fabrication of carbon spheres & monoliths and the relevant composites, followed, respectively, by a review of their performance as LIB anode materials. The review is completed with a prospective view on the possible direction of future research in this field.

  2. Can carbon surface oxidation shift the pore size distribution curve calculated from Ar, N2 and CO2 adsorption isotherms? Simulation results for a realistic carbon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Harris, Peter J. F.; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2009-08-01

    Using the virtual porous carbon model proposed by Harris et al, we study the effect of carbon surface oxidation on the pore size distribution (PSD) curve determined from simulated Ar, N2 and CO2 isotherms. It is assumed that surface oxidation is not destructive for the carbon skeleton, and that all pores are accessible for studied molecules (i.e., only the effect of the change of surface chemical composition is studied). The results obtained show two important things, i.e., oxidation of the carbon surface very slightly changes the absolute porosity (calculated from the geometric method of Bhattacharya and Gubbins (BG)); however, PSD curves calculated from simulated isotherms are to a greater or lesser extent affected by the presence of surface oxides. The most reliable results are obtained from Ar adsorption data. Not only is adsorption of this adsorbate practically independent from the presence of surface oxides, but, more importantly, for this molecule one can apply the slit-like model of pores as the first approach to recover the average pore diameter of a real carbon structure. For nitrogen, the effect of carbon surface chemical composition is observed due to the quadrupole moment of this molecule, and this effect shifts the PSD curves compared to Ar. The largest differences are seen for CO2, and it is clearly demonstrated that the PSD curves obtained from adsorption isotherms of this molecule contain artificial peaks and the average pore diameter is strongly influenced by the presence of electrostatic adsorbate-adsorbate as well as adsorbate-adsorbent interactions.

  3. Can carbon surface oxidation shift the pore size distribution curve calculated from Ar, N(2) and CO(2) adsorption isotherms? Simulation results for a realistic carbon model.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Harris, Peter J F; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2009-08-01

    Using the virtual porous carbon model proposed by Harris et al, we study the effect of carbon surface oxidation on the pore size distribution (PSD) curve determined from simulated Ar, N(2) and CO(2) isotherms. It is assumed that surface oxidation is not destructive for the carbon skeleton, and that all pores are accessible for studied molecules (i.e., only the effect of the change of surface chemical composition is studied). The results obtained show two important things, i.e., oxidation of the carbon surface very slightly changes the absolute porosity (calculated from the geometric method of Bhattacharya and Gubbins (BG)); however, PSD curves calculated from simulated isotherms are to a greater or lesser extent affected by the presence of surface oxides. The most reliable results are obtained from Ar adsorption data. Not only is adsorption of this adsorbate practically independent from the presence of surface oxides, but, more importantly, for this molecule one can apply the slit-like model of pores as the first approach to recover the average pore diameter of a real carbon structure. For nitrogen, the effect of carbon surface chemical composition is observed due to the quadrupole moment of this molecule, and this effect shifts the PSD curves compared to Ar. The largest differences are seen for CO(2), and it is clearly demonstrated that the PSD curves obtained from adsorption isotherms of this molecule contain artificial peaks and the average pore diameter is strongly influenced by the presence of electrostatic adsorbate-adsorbate as well as adsorbate-adsorbent interactions. PMID:21828590

  4. Effects of coarse grain size distribution and fine particle content on pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in experimental debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa C.; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Debris flows are typically a saturated mixture of poorly sorted particles and interstitial fluid, whose density and flow properties depend strongly on the presence of suspended fine sediment. Recent research suggests that grain size distribution (GSD) influences excess pore pressures (i.e., pressure in excess of predicted hydrostatic pressure), which in turn plays a governing role in debris flow behaviors. We report a series of controlled laboratory experiments in a 4 m diameter vertically rotating drum where the coarse particle size distribution and the content of fine particles were varied independently. We measured basal pore fluid pressures, pore fluid pressure profiles (using novel sensor probes), velocity profiles, and longitudinal profiles of the flow height. Excess pore fluid pressure was significant for mixtures with high fines fraction. Such flows exhibited lower values for their bulk flow resistance (as measured by surface slope of the flow), had damped fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress, and had velocity profiles where the shear was concentrated at the base of the flow. These effects were most pronounced in flows with a wide coarse GSD distribution. Sustained excess fluid pressure occurred during flow and after cessation of motion. Various mechanisms may cause dilation and contraction of the flows, and we propose that the sustained excess fluid pressures during flow and once the flow has stopped may arise from hindered particle settling and yield strength of the fluid, resulting in transfer of particle weight to the fluid. Thus, debris flow behavior may be strongly influenced by sustained excess fluid pressures controlled by particle settling rates.

  5. A characterization of the coupled evolution of grain fabric and pore space using complex networks: Pore connectivity and optimized flows in the presence of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Scott; Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2016-03-01

    A framework for the multiscale characterization of the coupled evolution of the solid grain fabric and its associated pore space in dense granular media is developed. In this framework, a pseudo-dual graph transformation of the grain contact network produces a graph of pores which can be readily interpreted as a pore space network. Survivability, a new metric succinctly summarizing the connectivity of the solid grain and pore space networks, measures material robustness. The size distribution and the connectivity of pores can be characterized quantitatively through various network properties. Assortativity characterizes the pore space with respect to the parity of the number of particles enclosing the pore. Multiscale clusters of odd parity versus even parity contact cycles alternate spatially along the shear band: these represent, respectively, local jamming and unjamming regions that continually switch positions in time throughout the failure regime. Optimal paths, established using network shortest paths in favor of large pores, provide clues on preferential paths for interstitial matter transport. In systems with higher rolling resistance at contacts, less tortuous shortest paths thread through larger pores in shear bands. Notably the structural patterns uncovered in the pore space suggest that more robust models of interstitial pore flow through deforming granular systems require a proper consideration of the evolution of in situ shear band and fracture patterns - not just globally, but also inside these localized failure zones.

  6. Robust organelle size extractions from elastic scattering measurements of single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaday, Ashley E.; Draham, Robert; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate non-nuclear organelle size distributions in single cells by measuring angular scattering patterns and fitting them with Mie theory. Simulations have indicated that the large relative size distribution of organelles (mean:width≈2) leads to unstable Mie fits unless scattering is collected at polar angles less than 20 degrees. Our optical system has therefore been modified to collect angles down to 10 degrees. Initial validations will be performed on polystyrene bead populations whose size distributions resemble those of cell organelles. Unlike with the narrow bead distributions that are often used for calibration, we expect to see an order-of-magnitude improvement in the stability of the size estimates as the minimum angle decreases from 20 to 10 degrees. Scattering patterns will then be acquired and analyzed from single cells (EMT6 mouse cancer cells), both fixed and live, at multiple time points. Fixed cells, with no changes in organelle sizes over time, will be measured to determine the fluctuation level in estimated size distribution due to measurement imperfections alone. Subsequent measurements on live cells will determine whether there is a higher level of fluctuation that could be attributed to dynamic changes in organelle size. Studies on unperturbed cells are precursors to ones in which the effects of exogenous agents are monitored over time.

  7. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong-Xu; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Jiang, Hao; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-22

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e., Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Y(3+)) fcu metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cutoff, ideal for selective adsorption kinetics based separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the first RE-fcu-MOF platform, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded notable gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol, and butanol/water pair systems. PMID:25825923

  8. Size Regulation in the Segmentation of Drosophila: Interacting Interfaces between Localized Domains of Gene Expression Ensure Robust Spatial Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Manu; Reinitz, John; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2009-10-01

    We propose a new mechanism for robust biological patterning. The mechanism bears analogy to interface dynamics in condensed media. We apply this method to study how gene networks control segmentation of Drosophila. The proposed model is minimal involving only 4 genes and a morphogen gradient. We discuss experimental data for which developmental genes are expressed within domains spatially limited by kinks (interfaces) and the gene interaction scheme contains both weak and strong repulsion. We show how kink-kink interactions can be calculated from the gene interactions and how the gene interaction scheme ensures the control of proportions (size regulation).

  9. Ovariectomized rats' femur treated with fibrates and statins. Assessment of pore-size distribution by ¹H-NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Şipoş, Remus Sebastian; Fechete, Radu; Chelcea, Ramona Ioana; Moldovan, Dumitriţa; Pap, Zsuzsánna; Pávai, Zoltán; Demco, Dan Eugen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of two wonder drugs, simvastatins and fenofibrates on the proximal part of the femoris of a series of ovariectomized and non-ovariectomized Wistar albino rats was estimated qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by the modern method of 1D 1H-NMR T2-distribution. The 72 rats subjected to this study were divided in six groups and were sacrificed at two, four, six and eight weeks after ovariectomy and the proximal part of femoris was harvested. The CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) echoes train curves were measured for the bones fully saturated with water during two months after two months of natural drying. These decays were analyzed by Laplace inversion and an average of normalized T2-distributions was considered for all rat's groups. The 1D averaged T2-distributions present four peaks, which were associated with protons in four major environments, from which the free water protons are used as spy molecules to explore the boundaries of cavities. In the approximation of spherical pores, the averaged T2-distributions were transformed in distributions of pores diameters. These were found in the range from 2 μm up to 2 mm. The relative amplitudes, widths and position of deconvoluted distributions of small, medium and large cavities are used for a qualitatively analysis of the effect of our lipid-lowering drugs. For a semi-quantitatively analysis, we chose the diameter d of proximal part of femoris' trabecular cavities. We show that the positive or negative effects of treatments with simvastatins and fenofibrates are strongly dependent on the duration of treatment. Moreover, the treatment of healthy bone is generally counter-indicated. PMID:26429167

  10. Experimental Estimates of the Impacts of Class Size on Test Scores: Robustness and Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Weili; Lehrer, Steven F.

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of class size reductions (CSRs) draw heavily on the results from Project Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio to support their initiatives. Adding to the political appeal of these initiative are reports that minority and economically disadvantaged students received the largest benefits from smaller classes. We extend this research in two…

  11. A Probability-Based Measure of Effect Size: Robustness to Base Rates and Other Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruscio, John

    2008-01-01

    Calculating and reporting appropriate measures of effect size are becoming standard practice in psychological research. One of the most common scenarios encountered involves the comparison of 2 groups, which includes research designs that are experimental (e.g., random assignment to treatment vs. placebo conditions) and nonexperimental (e.g.,…

  12. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research. PMID:25787226

  13. A ROBUST DETERMINATION OF THE SIZE OF QUASAR ACCRETION DISKS USING GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using microlensing measurements for a sample of 27 image pairs of 19 lensed quasars we determine a maximum likelihood estimate for the accretion disk size of an average quasar of r{sub s} = 4.0{sup +2.4}{sub -3.1} lt-day at rest frame ({lambda}) = 1736 Angstrom-Sign for microlenses with a mean mass of (M) = 0.3 M{sub Sun }. This value, in good agreement with previous results from smaller samples, is roughly a factor of five greater than the predictions of the standard thin disk model. The individual size estimates for the 19 quasars in our sample are also in excellent agreement with the results of the joint maximum likelihood analysis.

  14. Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene-Based Adsorbents Reduce Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion Under Septic Conditions in a Pore Size-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Tanja; Rauscher, Sabine; Hammer, Caroline; Gröger, Marion; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial activation with excessive recruitment and adhesion of immune cells plays a central role in the progression of sepsis. We established a microfluidic system to study the activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by conditioned medium containing plasma from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood or from septic blood and to investigate the effect of adsorption of inflammatory mediators on endothelial activation. Treatment of stimulated whole blood with polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based cytokine adsorbents (average pore sizes 15 or 30 nm) prior to passage over the endothelial layer resulted in significantly reduced endothelial cytokine and chemokine release, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 secretion, adhesion molecule expression, and in diminished monocyte adhesion. Plasma samples from sepsis patients differed substantially in their potential to induce endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion despite their almost identical interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels. Pre-incubation of the plasma samples with a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbent (30 nm average pore size) reduced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression to baseline levels, resulting in significantly diminished monocyte adhesion. Our data support the potential of porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbents to reduce endothelial activation under septic conditions by depletion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators. PMID:27503310

  15. How realistic is the pore size distribution calculated from adsorption isotherms if activated carbon is composed of fullerene-like fragments?

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Harris, Peter J F; Gauden, Piotr A; Włoch, Jerzy; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Rychlicki, Gerhard

    2007-11-28

    A plausible model for the structure of non-graphitizing carbon is one which consists of curved, fullerene-like fragments grouped together in a random arrangement. Although this model was proposed several years ago, there have been no attempts to calculate the properties of such a structure. Here, we determine the density, pore size distribution and adsorption properties of a model porous carbon constructed from fullerene-like elements. Using the method proposed recently by Bhattacharya and Gubbins (BG), which was tested in this study for ideal and defective carbon slits, the pore size distributions (PSDs) of the initial model and two related carbon models are calculated. The obtained PSD curves show that two structures are micro-mesoporous (with different ratio of micro/mesopores) and the third is strictly microporous. Using the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method, adsorption isotherms of Ar (87 K) are simulated for all the structures. Finally PSD curves are calculated using the Horvath-Kawazoe, non-local density functional theory (NLDFT), Nguyen and Do, and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) approaches, and compared with those predicted by the BG method. This is the first study in which different methods of calculation of PSDs for carbons from adsorption data can be really verified, since absolute (i.e. true) PSDs are obtained using the BG method. This is also the first study reporting the results of computer simulations of adsorption on fullerene-like carbon models.

  16. Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene-Based Adsorbents Reduce Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion Under Septic Conditions in a Pore Size-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Tanja; Rauscher, Sabine; Hammer, Caroline; Gröger, Marion; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial activation with excessive recruitment and adhesion of immune cells plays a central role in the progression of sepsis. We established a microfluidic system to study the activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by conditioned medium containing plasma from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood or from septic blood and to investigate the effect of adsorption of inflammatory mediators on endothelial activation. Treatment of stimulated whole blood with polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based cytokine adsorbents (average pore sizes 15 or 30 nm) prior to passage over the endothelial layer resulted in significantly reduced endothelial cytokine and chemokine release, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 secretion, adhesion molecule expression, and in diminished monocyte adhesion. Plasma samples from sepsis patients differed substantially in their potential to induce endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion despite their almost identical interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels. Pre-incubation of the plasma samples with a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbent (30 nm average pore size) reduced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression to baseline levels, resulting in significantly diminished monocyte adhesion. Our data support the potential of porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbents to reduce endothelial activation under septic conditions by depletion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators.

  17. Effect of seawater salinity on pore-size distribution on a poly(styrene)-based HP20 resin and its adsorption of diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Sun, Geng; Qiu, Jiangbing; Ma, Qimin; Hess, Philipp; Li, Aifeng

    2014-12-19

    In the present study, okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1) were spiked into artificial seawater at low, medium and high estuarine salinities (9‰, 13.5‰ and 27‰). Passive samplers (HP20 resin) used for solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) technology were exposed in these seawaters for 12-h periods. Adsorption curves well fitted a pseudo-secondary kinetics model. The highest initial sorption rates of both toxins occurred in the seawater of medium salinity, followed by seawater of low and high estuarine salinity. Pore volumes of micropores (<2 nm) and small mesopores (2 nmsize) in seawaters of high and low salinity. More toxin or other matrix agglomerates were displayed on the surface of resin deployed in the seawater of medium salinity. Taking into consideration the pore-size distribution and surface images, it appears that intra-particle diffusion governs toxin adsorption in seawater at high salinity while film diffusion mainly controls the adsorption process in seawater at medium salinity. This is the first study to confirm that molecules of OA and DTX1 are able to enter into micropores (<2nm) and small mesopores (2-10nm) of HP20 resin in estuarine seawater with high salinity (∼27‰).

  18. A comparison study of mass-area ratio for large size x-ray telescope optics in pore and very thin glass sheets configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, S.

    2006-06-01

    Dealing with very large size optics for the next generation of X-ray telescopes, like XEUS or ConX/SXT, it's necessary to build segmented mirrors which are assembled in petals because it's impossible to realize them in a monolithic form. The shape of these petals can be square or circular. The main problem is that such optics must have a very low weight compared to past X-ray telescopes, but assuring optimal imaging capabilities. In this paper I compare two different techniques that can achieve this so low weight. One is known as High Precision pore Optics (HPO) and the other one is based on a more classical shaped segments, assembled together, but built with very thin (in the 100-300 μm range) glass sheets that are stiffened with ribs. In this study, the main geometrical differences between the two approaches assumed, is that the first one has a pore size that doesn't change along the optics radius while the second one is based on a constant length. The main purpose of this study is to understand when one concept can be better than the other, depending on a given set of parameters, such as the focal length of the telescope, the filling factor of optic, the thickness of the walls, the radius of the segment, etc. The final goal is to achieve the best optimization of the mass to area ratio.

  19. Effects of pore sizes and oxygen-containing functional groups on desulfurization activity of Fe/NAC prepared by ultrasonic-assisted impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Song; Guo, Jia-Xiu; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Yin, Hua-Qiang; Luo, De-Ming

    2016-01-01

    A series of Fe-loaded activated carbons treated by HNO3 (Fe/NAC) were prepared by incipient impregnation method with or without ultrasonic assistance and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy with energy disperse spectroscope (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N2 adsorption/desorption. The desulfurization activities were evaluated at a fixed bed reactor under a mixed gas simulated from flue gas. The results showed that desulfurization activity from excellent to poor is as follows: Fe/NAC-60 > Fe/NAC-80 > Fe/NAC-30 > Fe/NAC-15 > Fe/NAC-0 > Fe/NAC-100 > NAC. Fe/NAC-60 exhibits the best desulfurization activity and has breakthrough sulfur capacity of 319 mg/g and breakthrough time of 540 min. The introduction of ultrasonic oscillation does not change the form of Fe oxides on activated carbon but can change the dispersion and relative contents of Fe3O4. The types of oxygen-containing functional groups have no obvious change for all samples but the texture properties show some differences when they are oscillated for different times. The fresh Fe/NAC-60 has a surface area of 1045 m2/g and total pore volume of 0.961 cm3/g with micropore volume of 0.437 cm3/g and is larger than Fe/NAC-0 (823 m2/g, 0.733 and 0.342 cm3/g). After desulfurization, surface area and pore volume of all samples decrease significantly, and those of the exhausted Fe/NAC-60 decrease to 233 m2/g and 0.481 cm3/g, indicating that some byproducts deposit on surface to cover pores. Pore size distribution influences SO2 adsorption, and fresh Fe/NAC-60 has more pore widths centralized at about 0.7 nm and 1.0-2.0 nm and corresponds to an excellent desulfurization activity, showing that micropore is conducive to the removal of SO2.

  20. Use of Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava penetration to quantitatively assess the impact of filtration parameters for 0.2-micrometer-pore-size filters.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; McVey, J; Faustino, P; Lute, S; Sweeney, N; Pawar, V; Khan, M; Brorson, K; Hussong, D

    2010-02-01

    Filters rated as having a 0.2-microm pore size (0.2-microm-rated filters) are used in laboratory and manufacturing settings for diverse applications of bacterial and particle removal from process fluids, analytical test articles, and gasses. Using Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava, a diminutive bacterium with an unusual geometry (i.e., it is very thin), we evaluated passage through 0.2-microm-rated filters and the impact of filtration process parameters and bacterial challenge density. We show that consistent H. pseudoflava passage occurs through 0.2-microm-rated filters. This is in contrast to an absence of significant passage of nutritionally challenged bacteria that are of similar size (i.e., hydrodynamic diameter) but dissimilar geometry. PMID:19966023

  1. The effects of CeO{sub 2} addition on crystallization behavior and pore size in microporous calcium titanium phosphate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, F.; Rezvani, M.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► We prepare a phosphate glass ceramic in the system of CaO–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and add 2 to 6 mol% CeO{sub 2} to it. We determine the optimum percentage of CeO{sub 2} addition. ► We study phase separation, suitable time and temperature for crystallization in the microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics utilizing DTA, SEM and XRD. ► We investigate on pore size utilizing BET and SEM techniques before and after CeO{sub 2} addition. ► CeO{sub 2} increases the pore size in the Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics. -- Abstract: In this research the effect of the addition of CeO{sub 2} to microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate glass ceramics was studied. Different molar percentages of CeO{sub 2} were added to three samples of a base glass whose composition was P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 30, CaO 45, TiO{sub 2} 25 (mol%). The first sample had 2 mol% CeO{sub 2}, the second sample had 4 mol% CeO{sub 2}, and the third sample had 6 mol% CeO{sub 2}. The fourth sample did not contain any CeO{sub 2}. The glass samples were melted and crystallized to bulk glass ceramics by a conventional method. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) was utilized to determine the appropriate nucleation and crystallization temperatures. Among the samples, the DTA curve of the sample which had 2 mol% CeO{sub 2} had the sharpest crystallization peak. Therefore, this sample was chosen to prepare the glass ceramics. Using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) it was found that in all samples β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} were the major phases. The β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} phase was dissolved away by soaking the glass ceramics in HCl, leaving a porous skeleton of CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}. CeO{sub 2} addition increased the glass transition temperature and decreased the crystallization time and temperature. It was shown that CeO{sub 2} addition resulted in an increase in the mean pore diameter while the specific surface area decreased

  2. Dip TIPS as a Facile and Versatile Method for Fabrication of Polymer Foams with Controlled Shape, Size and Pore Architecture for Bioengineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Kumorek, Marta M.; Kříž, Jan; Fábryová, Eva; Machová, Lud'ka; Kovářová, Jana; Rypáček, František

    2014-01-01

    The porous polymer foams act as a template for neotissuegenesis in tissue engineering, and, as a reservoir for cell transplants such as pancreatic islets while simultaneously providing a functional interface with the host body. The fabrication of foams with the controlled shape, size and pore structure is of prime importance in various bioengineering applications. To this end, here we demonstrate a thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based facile process for the fabrication of polymer foams with a controlled architecture. The setup comprises of a metallic template bar (T), a metallic conducting block (C) and a non-metallic reservoir tube (R), connected in sequence T-C-R. The process hereinafter termed as Dip TIPS, involves the dipping of the T-bar into a polymer solution, followed by filling of the R-tube with a freezing mixture to induce the phase separation of a polymer solution in the immediate vicinity of T-bar; Subsequent free-drying or freeze-extraction steps produced the polymer foams. An easy exchange of the T-bar of a spherical or rectangular shape allowed the fabrication of tubular, open- capsular and flat-sheet shaped foams. A mere change in the quenching time produced the foams with a thickness ranging from hundreds of microns to several millimeters. And, the pore size was conveniently controlled by varying either the polymer concentration or the quenching temperature. Subsequent in vivo studies in brown Norway rats for 4-weeks demonstrated the guided cell infiltration and homogenous cell distribution through the polymer matrix, without any fibrous capsule and necrotic core. In conclusion, the results show the “Dip TIPS” as a facile and adaptable process for the fabrication of anisotropic channeled porous polymer foams of various shapes and sizes for potential applications in tissue engineering, cell transplantation and other related fields. PMID:25275373

  3. Tailoring the Pore Size and Functionality of UiO-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks for Optimal Nerve Agent Destruction.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gregory W; Moon, Su-Young; Wagner, George W; Hall, Morgan G; DeCoste, Jared B; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-10-19

    Evaluation of UiO-66 and UiO-67 metal-organic framework derivatives as catalysts for the degradation of soman, a chemical warfare agent, showed the importance of both the linker size and functionality. The best catalysts yielded half-lives of less than 1 min. Further testing with a nerve agent simulant established that different rate-assessment techniques yield similar values for degradation half-lives. PMID:26431370

  4. Efficient and robust pupil size and blink estimation from near-field video sequences for human-machine interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Epps, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring pupil and blink dynamics has applications in cognitive load measurement during human-machine interaction. However, accurate, efficient, and robust pupil size and blink estimation pose significant challenges to the efficacy of real-time applications due to the variability of eye images, hence to date, require manual intervention for fine tuning of parameters. In this paper, a novel self-tuning threshold method, which is applicable to any infrared-illuminated eye images without a tuning parameter, is proposed for segmenting the pupil from the background images recorded by a low cost webcam placed near the eye. A convex hull and a dual-ellipse fitting method are also proposed to select pupil boundary points and to detect the eyelid occlusion state. Experimental results on a realistic video dataset show that the measurement accuracy using the proposed methods is higher than that of widely used manually tuned parameter methods or fixed parameter methods. Importantly, it demonstrates convenience and robustness for an accurate and fast estimate of eye activity in the presence of variations due to different users, task types, load, and environments. Cognitive load measurement in human-machine interaction can benefit from this computationally efficient implementation without requiring a threshold calibration beforehand. Thus, one can envisage a mini IR camera embedded in a lightweight glasses frame, like Google Glass, for convenient applications of real-time adaptive aiding and task management in the future. PMID:24691198

  5. Efficient and robust pupil size and blink estimation from near-field video sequences for human-machine interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Epps, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring pupil and blink dynamics has applications in cognitive load measurement during human-machine interaction. However, accurate, efficient, and robust pupil size and blink estimation pose significant challenges to the efficacy of real-time applications due to the variability of eye images, hence to date, require manual intervention for fine tuning of parameters. In this paper, a novel self-tuning threshold method, which is applicable to any infrared-illuminated eye images without a tuning parameter, is proposed for segmenting the pupil from the background images recorded by a low cost webcam placed near the eye. A convex hull and a dual-ellipse fitting method are also proposed to select pupil boundary points and to detect the eyelid occlusion state. Experimental results on a realistic video dataset show that the measurement accuracy using the proposed methods is higher than that of widely used manually tuned parameter methods or fixed parameter methods. Importantly, it demonstrates convenience and robustness for an accurate and fast estimate of eye activity in the presence of variations due to different users, task types, load, and environments. Cognitive load measurement in human-machine interaction can benefit from this computationally efficient implementation without requiring a threshold calibration beforehand. Thus, one can envisage a mini IR camera embedded in a lightweight glasses frame, like Google Glass, for convenient applications of real-time adaptive aiding and task management in the future.

  6. Controlled Expansion of Supercritical Solution: A Robust Method to Produce Pure Drug Nanoparticles With Narrow Size-Distribution.

    PubMed

    Pessi, Jenni; Lassila, Ilkka; Meriläinen, Antti; Räikkönen, Heikki; Hæggström, Edward; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a robust, stable, and reproducible method to produce nanoparticles based on expansion of supercritical solutions using carbon dioxide as a solvent. The method, controlled expansion of supercritical solution (CESS), uses controlled mass transfer, flow, pressure reduction, and particle collection in dry ice. CESS offers control over the crystallization process as the pressure in the system is reduced according to a specific profile. Particle formation takes place before the exit nozzle, and condensation is the main mechanism for postnucleation particle growth. A 2-step gradient pressure reduction is used to prevent Mach disk formation and particle growth by coagulation. Controlled particle growth keeps the production process stable. With CESS, we produced piroxicam nanoparticles, 60 mg/h, featuring narrow size distribution (176 ± 53 nm). PMID:27368121

  7. Effect of variation of average pore size and specific surface area of ZnO electrode (WE) on efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized with tremendous increase in specific surface area of up to 578 m2/g which was 5.54 m2/g in previous reports (J. Phys. Chem. C 113:14676-14680, 2009). Different mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles with average pore sizes ranging from 7.22 to 13.43 nm and specific surface area ranging from 50.41 to 578 m2/g were prepared through the sol-gel method via a simple evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The hydrolysis rate of zinc acetate was varied using different concentrations of sodium hydroxide. Morphology, crystallinity, porosity, and J-V characteristics of the materials have been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and Keithley instruments. PMID:25339855

  8. Isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, process for forming the same, and systematic design of pore size and functionality therein, with application for gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Li, Hailian; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel

    2007-03-27

    The ability to design and construct solid-state materials with pre-determined structures is a grand challenge in chemistry. An inventive strategy based on reticulating metal ions and organic carboxylate links into extended networks has been advanced to a point that has allowed the design of porous structures in which pore size and functionality can be varied systematically. MOF-5, a prototype of a new class of porous materials and one that is constructed from octahedral Zn--O--C clusters and benzene links, was used to demonstrate that its 3-D porous system can be functionalized with the organic groups, --Br, --NH2, --OC3H7, --OC5H11, --H4C2, and --H4C4, and its pore size expanded with the long molecular struts biphenyl, tetrahydropyrene, pyrene, and terphenyl. The ability to direct the formation of the octahedral clusters in the presence of a desired carboxylate link is an essential feature of this strategy, which resulted in the design of an isoreticular (having the same framework topology) series of sixteen well-defined materials whose crystals have open space representing up to 91.1% of the crystal volume, and homogeneous periodic pores that can be incrementally varied from 3.8 to 28.8 angstroms. Unlike the unpredictable nature of zeolite and other molecular sieve syntheses, the deliberate control exercised at the molecular level in the design of these crystals is expected to have tremendous implications on materials properties and future technologies. Indeed, data indicate that members of this series represent the first monocrystalline mesoporous organic/inorganic frameworks, and exhibit the highest capacity for methane storage (155 cm3/cm3 at 36 atm) and the lowest densities (0.41 to 0.21 g/cm3) attained to date for any crystalline material at room temperature.

  9. Transport of viruses in water saturated columns packed with sand: Effect of pore water velocity, sand grain size, and suspended colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syngouna, V.; Chrysikopoulos, C.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the attachment behavior of model viruses (bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174) onto quartz sand of three different grain sizes for various pore water velocities with and without the presence of suspended model clay colloids (kaolinite: KGa-1b and montmorillonite: STx-1b) were evaluated. No obvious relationships between virus mass recoveries and water velocity or grain size could be established from the experimental results. The observed mean dispersivity values for each sand grain size were higher for MS2 than ΦX174. The interaction of viruses with KGa-1b and STx-1b was investigated with batch as well as virus-clay cotransport experiments. The batch experimental data suggested that virus attachment onto KGa-1b and STx-1b is adequately described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. The presence of suspended colloids was shown to significantly influence virus deposition. In both batch and co-transport experiments, MS2 and ΦX174 were attached in greater amounts onto KGa-1b than STx-1b with MS2 having greater affinity than ΦX174 for both clays. Furthermore, extended-DLVO interaction energy calculations explained that the attachment of viruses onto model clay colloids was primarily caused by hydrophobic interaction. The theoretical and experimental results of this study were found to be in good agreement with previous findings.

  10. An Alternative to Cohen's Standardized Mean Difference Effect Size: A Robust Parameter and Confidence Interval in the Two Independent Groups Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algina, James; Keselman, H. J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2005-01-01

    The authors argue that a robust version of Cohen's effect size constructed by replacing population means with 20% trimmed means and the population standard deviation with the square root of a 20% Winsorized variance is a better measure of population separation than is Cohen's effect size. The authors investigated coverage probability for…

  11. Effect of the measurement size on the robustness of the assessment of the features specific for cylinder liner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimkovski, Z.; Ohlsson, R.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the cylinder liner surface is of great importance due to its impact on the fuel/oil consumption and emissions of the internal combustion engine. A good liner function depends on the size and distribution of the deep honing grooves and the amount of the cold work material (Blechmantel) left inside the grooves after finishing. A fast evaluation of these features requires optical three-dimensional measurements with a large area and good resolution, but many interferometers used today have limited resolution when measuring larger areas. To find out how the measurement size and resolution would affect the quantification and the variation of the parameters, two objectives, 2.5 × and 10 × , were used for measuring a cylinder liner from a truck engine. The Blechmantel was of special interest as it first comes into contact with piston/rings, detaches as particles and wears the running surfaces. The 2.5 × objective showed more robust assessment than the 10 × one, manifested by a lower coefficient of variation for the parameters describing the features: Blechmantel, groove width and height, groove balance and number of grooves. This means that fewer measurements are required if a 2.5 × objective is used in production and hence the time and cost of the liner would be decreased.

  12. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was. PMID:23528781

  13. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was.

  14. Mass transfer kinetic mechanism in monolithic columns and application to the characterization of new research monolithic samples with different average pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-06-01

    A general reduced HETP (height equivalent to a theoretical plate) equation is proposed that accounts for the mass transfer of a wide range of molecular weight compounds in monolithic columns. The detailed derivatization of each one of the individual and independent mass transfer contributions (longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, film mass transfer resistance, and trans-skeleton mass transfer resistance) is discussed. The reduced HETPs of a series of small molecules (phenol, toluene, acenaphthene, and amylbenzene) and of a larger molecule, insulin, were measured on three research grade monolithic columns (M150, M225, M350) having different average pore size (approximately 150, 225, and 350 A, respectively) but the same dimension (100 mm x 4.6 mm). The first and second central moments of 2 muL samples were measured and corrected for the extra-column contributions. The h data were fitted to the new HETP equation in order to identify which contribution controls the band broadening in monolithic columns. The contribution of the B-term was found to be negligible compared to that of the A-term, even at very low reduced velocities (nu<1). At moderate velocities (1size and molecular diffusivity of the compound studied due to faster mass transfer across the column. Experimental chromatograms exhibited variable degrees of systematic peak fronting, depending on the column studied. The heterogeneity of the distribution of eluent velocities from the column center to its wall (average 5%) is the source of this peak fronting. At high reduced velocities (nu>5), the C-term of the monolithic columns is controlled by film mass transfer resistance between the eluent circulating in the large throughpores and the eluent stagnant inside the thin porous skeleton. The experimental Sherwood number measured on the monolith columns increases from 0.05 to 0.22 while the adsorption energy increases by nearly 6 k

  15. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  16. Scaling of spin-echo amplitudes with frequency, diffusion coefficient, pore size, and susceptibility difference for the NMR of fluids in porous media and biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, Giulio C.; Brown, Robert J. S.; Fantazzini, Paola

    1995-03-01

    Both Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements and single-spin-echo measurements have been made at frequencies of ν=10, 20, and 50 MHz for two relatively homogeneous porous porcelain materials with different pore sizes, both saturated separately with three liquids of different diffusion coefficients. The CPMG transverse relaxation rate is increased by an amount R by diffusion in the inhomogeneous fields caused by susceptibility differences χ R shows the dependence on τ (half the echo spacing) given by the model of Brown and Fantazzini [Phys. Rev. B 47, 14 823 (1993)] if relaxation is slow enough that there are several CPMG echoes in a transverse relaxation time. For τ values over a range of a factor of about 40, the increase of R with τ is nearly linear, with a slope that is independent of pore dimension a and diffusion coefficient D. For this nearly linear region and a short initial region quadratic in τ, we find R~(χν)2. In these regions we can scale and compare measurements of R taken for different values of χ ν, a, and D by plotting RD/(1/3χνa)2 vs Dτ/a2. The asymptotic values of R for large τ for CPMG data can be inferred from the asymptotic slope, -Rs, of lnM (magnetization) for single spin echoes as a function of echo time t=2τ. It is shown from the Bloch-Torrey equations for NMR with diffusion that, for any combination of parameters χ, ν, a, or D, the magnetization M is a function of both a dimensionless time (either tu=Dt/a2 or tv=1/3χνt) and a dimensionless parameter ξ=1/3χνa2/D. If ξ<2 (for our particular porous media and definition of the distance a), the asymptotic slope of -lnM is approximately Rs=1/3χν, that is, it is proportional to only the first power of χν and does not depend on either a or D. These results are compatible with the existence of a long-tailed distribution of phases, such as a truncated Cauchy distribution, at echo time. Diffusion does not lead to a reduction of Rs because averages of choices from a

  17. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  18. A hybrid electrospun PU/PCL scaffold satisfied the requirements of blood vessel prosthesis in terms of mechanical properties, pore size, and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi-Hiep; Padalhin, Andrew R; Seo, Hyung Seok; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel hybrid polyurethane/polycaprolactone (PU/PCL) tubular scaffold was fabricated using the electrospinning process for blood vessel prosthesis applications. The detailed microstructure and material properties such as porosity, tensile and bust strength, contact angle, and biocompatibility were investigated and compared with those of monolithic PU and PCL scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the hybrid PU/PCL scaffold (tensile strength: 18 MPa, pressure strength: 590 mmHg) were found to be within the range needed for artificial blood vessel applications. The pore sizes of the PU/PCL scaffold ranged from 5-150 um in diameter, are sufficient enough to allow nutrient diffusion across the membrane. The reduced hydrophobic property of the PU/PCL scaffold was the result of the addition of relatively less hydrophobic PU compared with monolithic PCL scaffold. The biocompatibility of the PU/PCL scaffold was evaluated through cytotoxicity testing, and morphological observation by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy using cow pulmonary artery endothelial cells and fibroblast like cells (L929). PMID:23627704

  19. Development of high-productivity, strong cation-exchange adsorbers for protein capture by graft polymerization from membranes with different pore sizes

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Robinson, Julie R.; Hobley, Eboni; Husson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the surface modification of macroporous membranes using ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) to create cation-exchange adsorbers with high protein binding capacity at high product throughput. The work is motivated by the need for a more economical and rapid capture step in downstream processing of protein therapeutics. Membranes with three reported nominal pore sizes (0.2, 0.45, 1.0 μm) were modified with poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) tentacles, to create a high density of protein binding sites. A special formulation was used in which the monomer was protected by a crown ether to enable surface-initiated ATRP of this cationic polyelectrolyte. Success with modification was supported by chemical analysis using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and indirectly by measurement of pure water flux as a function of polymerization time. Uniformity of modification within the membranes was visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Static and dynamic binding capacities were measured using lysozyme protein to allow comparisons with reported performance data for commercial cation-exchange materials. Dynamic binding capacities were measured for flow rates ranging from 13 to 109 column volumes (CV)/min. Results show that this unique ATRP formulation can be used to fabricate cation-exchange membrane adsorbers with dynamic binding capacities as high as 70 mg/mL at a throughput of 100 CV/min and unprecedented productivity of 300 mg/mL/min. PMID:23175597

  20. Evaluation of Surface Enthalpy of Porous Aluminosilicates of the MCM-41 Type Using Immersional Calorimetry: Effect of the Pore Size and Framework Si:Al Ratio.

    PubMed

    Meziani; Zajac; Douillard; Jones; Partyka; Rozière

    2001-01-15

    Surface properties of porous aluminosilicates of the MCM-41 type have been tested by immersional calorimetry. Two series of materials, referred to as SiAlxCn, where x is the Si : Al mole ratio and n the chain length of the surfactant template, having (1) x=32 and n=8, 12, 14, 16, 18 and (2) n=14 and x=8, 32, infinity, were used. The results of thermogravimetric analysis on these samples served to evaluate the surface density of hydroxyl groups. This parameter is rather sensitive to the pore size than to the aluminium content in the solid matrix. Based on the experimentally measured enthalpies of immersion in n-heptane, water, and formamide per unit BET specific surface area, estimates could be made of the apolar, Lewis acid, and Lewis base contributions to the total surface enthalpy of MCM-41 materials. The samples studied have a predominant surface acidic character, which is markedly enhanced by incorporating aluminium into the silica matrix. Surface acidity is also modified by changes in the porous structure, although the trends are less noticeable here. Nevertheless, the total surface enthalpy of MCM-41 aluminosilicates appears to be small in comparison with typical inorganic oxides, such as silica or alumina. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Is the ANOVA F-Test Robust to Variance Heterogeneity When Sample Sizes are Equal?: An Investigation via a Coefficient of Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogan, Joanne C.; Keselman, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of variance heterogeneity on the empirical probability of a Type I error for the analysis of variance (ANOVA) F-test are examined. The rate of Type I error varies as a function of the degree of variance heterogeneity, and the ANOVA F-test is not always robust to variance heterogeneity when sample sizes are equal. (Author/JAC)

  2. Reconstruction and analysis of fuel cell gas diffusion layers using fiber spacing rather than pore size data: Questioned validity of widely-used porosity-based thermal conductivity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    Porosity and pore size data have long been used for reconstructing (two directional) fibrous materials. The present study is aimed to explain the overlooked fact that pore size parameter, bundling several other geometric parameters together, cannot be directly used for the reconstruction and geometrical modeling of gas diffusion layers (GDLs) of fuel cells. Instead, it has to be converted to fiber spacing, for which purpose it is a useful parameter. A technical approach is presented on how to reach fiber spacing from pore size (diameter) data. The reason why GDLs with the same porosity, fiber diameter and angle, but with unequal fiber spacing, may have different properties is also explained by providing physical evidence. The present study clearly demonstrates that the traditional notion that fibrous materials with lower porosity have higher thermal conductivity does not necessary hold. In addition, it is shown that GDLs with the same porosity and the same pore size may have different fiber spacing and thus, distinct properties. It is found that the thermal conductivity models based solely upon porosity can be off by several hundred percent and must be either discarded or used over the narrow range of conditions under which they have been formulated.

  3. The first systematic analysis of 3D rapid prototyped poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds manufactured through BioCell printing: the effect of pore size and geometry on compressive mechanical behaviour and in vitro hMSC viability.

    PubMed

    Domingos, M; Intranuovo, F; Russo, T; De Santis, R; Gloria, A; Ambrosio, L; Ciurana, J; Bartolo, P

    2013-12-01

    Novel additive manufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D biodegradable structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. With regard to the mechanical and biological performances of 3D scaffolds, pore size and geometry play a crucial role. In this study, a novel integrated automated system for the production and in vitro culture of 3D constructs, known as BioCell Printing, was used only to manufacture poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds for tissue engineering; the influence of pore size and shape on their mechanical and biological performances was investigated. Imposing a single lay-down pattern of 0°/90° and varying the filament distance, it was possible to produce scaffolds with square interconnected pores with channel sizes falling in the range of 245-433 µm, porosity 49-57% and a constant road width. Three different lay-down patterns were also adopted (0°/90°, 0°/60/120° and 0°/45°/90°/135°), thus resulting in scaffolds with quadrangular, triangular and complex internal geometries, respectively. Mechanical compression tests revealed a decrease of scaffold stiffness with the increasing porosity and number of deposition angles (from 0°/90° to 0°/45°/90°/135°). Results from biological analysis, carried out using human mesenchymal stem cells, suggest a strong influence of pore size and geometry on cell viability. On the other hand, after 21 days of in vitro static culture, it was not possible to detect any significant variation in terms of cell morphology promoted by scaffold topology. As a first systematic analysis, the obtained results clearly demonstrate the potential of the BioCell Printing process to produce 3D scaffolds with reproducible well organized architectures and tailored mechanical properties.

  4. Robust relations between CCN and the vertical evolution of cloud drop size distribution in deep convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freud, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Andreae, M. O.; Costa, A. A.; Artaxo, P.

    2005-10-01

    In-situ measurements in convective clouds (up to the freezing level) over the Amazon basin show that smoke from deforestation fires prevents clouds from precipitating until they acquire a vertical development of at least 4 km, compared to only 1-2 km in clean clouds. The average cloud depth required for the onset of warm rain increased by ~350 m for each additional 100 cloud condensation nuclei per cm3 at a super-saturation of 0.5% (CCN0.5%). In polluted clouds, the diameter of modal liquid water content grows much slower with cloud depth (at least by a factor of ~2), due to the large number of droplets that compete for available water and to the suppressed coalescence processes. Contrary to what other studies have suggested, we did not observe this effect to reach saturation at 3000 or more accumulation mode particles per cm3. The CCN0.5% concentration was found to be a very good predictor for the cloud depth required for the onset of warm precipitation and other microphysical factors, leaving only a secondary role for the updraft velocities in determining the cloud drop size distributions. The effective radius of the cloud droplets (re) was found to be a quite robust parameter for a given environment and cloud depth, showing only a small effect of partial droplet evaporation from the cloud's mixing with its drier environment. This supports one of the basic assumptions of satellite analysis of cloud microphysical processes: the ability to look at different cloud top heights in the same region and regard their re as if they had been measured inside one well developed cloud. The dependence of re on the adiabatic fraction decreased higher in the clouds, especially for cleaner conditions, and disappeared at re≥~10 µm. We propose that droplet coalescence, which is at its peak when warm rain is formed in the cloud at re~10 µm, continues to be significant during the cloud's mixing with the entrained air, canceling out the decrease in re due to evaporation.

  5. Robust relations between CCN and the vertical evolution of cloud drop size distribution in deep convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freud, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Andreae, M. O.; Costa, A. A.; Artaxo, P.

    2008-03-01

    In-situ measurements in convective clouds (up to the freezing level) over the Amazon basin show that smoke from deforestation fires prevents clouds from precipitating until they acquire a vertical development of at least 4 km, compared to only 1-2 km in clean clouds. The average cloud depth required for the onset of warm rain increased by ~350 m for each additional 100 cloud condensation nuclei per cm3 at a super-saturation of 0.5% (CCN0.5%). In polluted clouds, the diameter of modal liquid water content grows much slower with cloud depth (at least by a factor of ~2), due to the large number of droplets that compete for available water and to the suppressed coalescence processes. Contrary to what other studies have suggested, we did not observe this effect to reach saturation at 3000 or more accumulation mode particles per cm3. The CCN0.5% concentration was found to be a very good predictor for the cloud depth required for the onset of warm precipitation and other microphysical factors, leaving only a secondary role for the updraft velocities in determining the cloud drop size distributions. The effective radius of the cloud droplets (re) was found to be a quite robust parameter for a given environment and cloud depth, showing only a small effect of partial droplet evaporation from the cloud's mixing with its drier environment. This supports one of the basic assumptions of satellite analysis of cloud microphysical processes: the ability to look at different cloud top heights in the same region and regard their re as if they had been measured inside one well developed cloud. The dependence of re on the adiabatic fraction decreased higher in the clouds, especially for cleaner conditions, and disappeared at re≥~10 μm. We propose that droplet coalescence, which is at its peak when warm rain is formed in the cloud at re=~10 μm, continues to be significant during the cloud's mixing with the entrained air, cancelling out the decrease in re due to evaporation.

  6. Pore size and LbL chitosan coating influence mesenchymal stem cell in vitro fibrosis and biomineralization in 3D porous poly(epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mehr, Nima Ghavidel; Li, Xian; Chen, Gaoping; Favis, Basil D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) is a hydrophobic bioplastic under development for bone tissue engineering applications. Limited information is available on the role of internal geometry and cell-surface attachment on osseous integration potential. We tested the hypothesis that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) deposit more mineral inside porous 3D PCL scaffolds with fully interconnected 84 or 141 µm pores, when the surfaces are coated with chitosan via Layer-by-Layer (LbL)-deposited polyelectrolytes. Freshly trypsinized MSCs were seeded on PCL 3D cylinders using a novel static cold seeding method in 2% serum to optimally populate all depths of the scaffold discs, followed by 10 days of culture in proliferation medium and 21 additional days in osteogenic medium. MSCs were observed by SEM and histology to spread faster and to proliferate more on chitosan-coated pore surfaces. Most pores, with or without chitosan, became filled by collagen networks sparsely populated with fibroblast-like cells. After 21 days of culture in osteogenic medium, sporadic matrix mineralization was detected histologically and by micro-CT in highly cellular surface layers that enveloped all scaffolds and in cell aggregates in 141 µm pores near the edges. LbL-chitosan promoted punctate mineral deposition on the surfaces of 84 µm pores (p < 0.05 vs. PCL-only) but not the 141 µm pores. This study revealed that LbL-chitosan coatings are sufficient to promote MSC attachment to PCL but only enhance mineral formation in 84 µm pores, suggesting a potential inhibitory role for MSC-derived fibroblasts in osteoblast terminal differentiation. PMID:25504184

  7. Metal structures with parallel pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Four methods of fabricating metal plates having uniformly sized parallel pores are studied: elongate bundle, wind and sinter, extrude and sinter, and corrugate stack. Such plates are suitable for electrodes for electrochemical and fuel cells.

  8. Controlled nucleation in freeze-drying: effects on pore size in the dried product layer, mass transfer resistance, and primary drying rate.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Alex K; Kuu, Wei; Otten, Lori; Nail, Steven L; Sever, Robert R

    2011-08-01

    A novel and scalable method has been developed to enable control of the ice nucleation step for the freezing process during lyophilization. This method manipulates the chamber pressure of the freeze dryer to simultaneously induce nucleation in all product vials at a desired temperature. The effects of controlled nucleation on the drying rate of various formulations including 5% (w/w) mannitol, 5% (w/w) sucrose, and a mixture of 3% (w/w) mannitol and 2% (w/w) sucrose were studied. For a 5% (w/w) mannitol, uncontrolled ice nucleation occurred randomly at product temperatures between -8.0°C and -15.9°C as the vials were cooled to -40°C. Controlled ice nucleation was achieved at product temperatures between -2.3°C and -3.7°C. The effect of nucleation control on the effective pore radius (r(e) ) of the cake was determined from the product temperature profiles using a pore diffusion model in combination with a nonlinear parameter estimation approach reported earlier. Results show that the value of r(e) for 5% (w/w) mannitol was enlarged from 13 to 27 μm by uniformly inducing nucleation at higher temperatures. Applying the resistance parameters obtained from the pore diffusion model for 5% (w/w) mannitol, optimized cycles were theoretically generated and experimentally tested, resulting in a 41% reduction in primary drying time.

  9. Scandium functionalized carbon aerogel: Synthesis of nanoparticles and structure of a new ScOCl and properties of NaAlH4 as a function of pore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadian, Payam; Nielsen, Thomas K.; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.; Jepsen, Lars H.; Polanski, Marek; Plocinski, Tomasz; Kunce, Izabela; Besenbacher, Flemming; Bystrzycki, Jerzy; Jensen, Torben R.

    2015-11-01

    A new method for scandium-functionalization of carbon aerogels forming nanoparticles of a new scandiumoxochloride, ScOCl is presented. Sodium aluminiumhydride, NaAlH4, is successfully melt infiltrated into the nano porous scaffolds with pore sizes of Dmax=7, 10, 13, 21, 26 and 39 nm, containing scandium based nano particles (<2.9 wt%) confirmed by elemental analysis and scanning electron microscopy. A systematic study of hydrogen storage properties of the nano composite materials is presented. An aqueous solution of ScCl3 was initially infiltrated and formed nanoconfined [Sc(OH)(H2O)5]2Cl4(H2O)2, which transforms to nanoparticles of a new scandium oxochloride, ScOCl at 192 °C and to Sc2O3 at 420 °C. ScOCl crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell a=3.4409(8), b=3.9613(6) and c=8.178(2) Å, space group Pmmn, and is built from layers of [ScO4Cl2] octahedra forming neutral ScOCl layers. Temperature programmed desorption mass spectroscopy shows slightly improved kinetics for release of hydrogen with decreasing pore size. Continuous cycling of hydrogen release and uptake measured by the Sieverts' method reveal a larger preserved hydrogen storage capacity for scandium-functionalized aerogel with the larger pores (39 nm).

  10. Re-evaluation of Pleistocene and Holocene long bone robusticity trends with regards to age-at-death estimates and size standardization procedures.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Lukáš; Eisová, Stanislava; Holliday, Trenton W

    2016-08-01

    Long-term trends in robusticity of lower limb bones in the genus Homo through the Pleistocene until the present have been proposed, which have been interpreted as a consequence of decreasing levels of mobility and activity patterns, changes in lifestyle, and environmental factors. There has also long been evidence that skeletal strength increases over an individual's lifespan. This increase is caused by continuous bone remodeling that optimizes the structure of a bone to resist mechanical loadings and creates a balance between endosteal resorption and subperiosteal apposition. However, none of the previous studies of temporal trends in robusticity has considered both processes and analyzed how individual age-related robusticity might influence higher-level temporal trends. This paper therefore explores temporal trends in robusticity of lower limb long bones within the genus Homo and considers how individual ages-at-death can confound published evolutionary trends, given the fact that some aspects of relative bone strength tend to increase over individual lifespans. Cross-sectional diaphyseal properties of the midshaft and proximal femur and midshaft tibia of Pleistocene and early Holocene individuals, together with data on age-at-death are used to analyze changes in relative bone strength relative to individuals' ages and evolutionary time. The results show increasing bone strength in adulthood until the fourth decade and then a slight decrease, an observation that conforms to previously published results on recent human populations. However, no significant impact of age-at-death on the trends along an evolutionary trajectory has been detected. The evolutionary trends in femoral and tibial relative strength can be described as fluctuating, probably as a consequence of changing mobility patterns, environmentally and technologically influenced behaviors, and demographic processes. The differences between evolutionary trends published in several studies are explained

  11. High-resolution dielectric study reveals pore-size-dependent orientational order of a discotic liquid crystal confined in tubular nanopores.

    PubMed

    Całus, Sylwia; Kityk, Andriy V; Borowik, Lech; Lefort, Ronan; Morineau, Denis; Krause, Christina; Schönhals, Andreas; Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    We report a high-resolution dielectric study on a pyrene-based discotic liquid crystal (DLC) in the bulk state and confined in parallel tubular nanopores of monolithic silica and alumina membranes. The positive dielectric anisotropy of the DLC molecule at low frequencies (in the quasistatic case) allows us to explore the thermotropic collective orientational order. A face-on arrangement of the molecular discs on the pore walls and a corresponding radial arrangement of the molecules is found. In contrast to the bulk, the isotropic-to-columnar transition of the confined DLC is continuous, shifts with decreasing pore diameter to lower temperatures, and exhibits a pronounced hysteresis between cooling and heating. These findings corroborate conclusions from previous neutron and x-ray-scattering experiments as well as optical birefringence measurements. Our study also indicates that the relative simple dielectric technique presented here is a quite efficient method in order to study the thermotropic orientational order of DLC-based nanocomposites. PMID:26274191

  12. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of mudrock saprolite from the Nolichucky Shale within Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation: Implications for contaminant transport and retardation through matrix diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.

    1996-05-01

    Specimens of saprolite developed from mudrock of the Nolichucky Shale (Upper Cambrian, Conasauga Group) from the Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheet on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were analyzed. Petrophysical techniques include helium porosimetry and mercury porosimetry. Petrophysical data obtained from the laboratory experiments include effective porosity, pore-throat sizes and their distribution, specimen bulk-density, and specimen grain-density. It is expected that the data from this study will significantly contribute to constraining the modeling of the hydrologic behavior of saprolite developed from mudrock of the Conasauga Group in general and from the Nolichucky Shale specifically.

  13. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  14. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  15. Poring over two-pore channel pore mutants

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore channels are members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily. They localise to the endolysosomal system and are likely targets for the Ca2+ mobilising messenger NAADP. In this brief review, we relate mutagenesis of the TPC pore to a recently published homology model and discuss how pore mutants are informing us of TPC function. Molecular physiology of these ubiquitous proteins is thus emerging. PMID:27226934

  16. On the edge energy of lipid membranes and the thermodynamic stability of pores

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2015-01-21

    To perform its barrier function, the lipid bilayer membrane requires a robust resistance against pore formation. Using a self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a molecularly detailed model for membranes composed of charged or zwitterionic lipids, it is possible to predict structural, mechanical, and thermodynamical parameters for relevant lipid bilayer membranes. We argue that the edge energy in membranes is a function of the spontaneous lipid monolayer curvature, the mean bending modulus, and the membrane thickness. An analytical Helfrich-like model suggests that most bilayers should have a positive edge energy. This means that there is a natural resistance against pore formation. Edge energies evaluated explicitly in a two-gradient SCF model are consistent with this. Remarkably, the edge energy can become negative for phosphatidylglycerol (e.g., dioleoylphosphoglycerol) bilayers at a sufficiently low ionic strength. Such bilayers become unstable against the formation of pores or the formation of lipid disks. In the weakly curved limit, we study the curvature dependence of the edge energy and evaluate the preferred edge curvature and the edge bending modulus. The latter is always positive, and the former increases with increasing ionic strength. These results point to a small window of ionic strengths for which stable pores can form as too low ionic strengths give rise to lipid disks. Higher order curvature terms are necessary to accurately predict relevant pore sizes in bilayers. The electric double layer overlap across a small pore widens the window of ionic strengths for which pores are stable.

  17. Effect of content of chiral selector and pore size of core-shell type silica support on the performance of amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate)-based chiral stationary phases in nano-liquid chromatography and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Silvia; Fanali, Salvatore; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2014-10-10

    In this study the separation performance of various chiral stationary phases (CSPs) made of polysaccharide-based chiral selectors coated onto superficially porous (core-shell or fused-core) silica supports were evaluated. The CSPs obtained by coating of various amounts of chiral selector (1-5%) onto supports of various pore size (100 and 300 Å) were studied. Their evaluation was pursued in both chiral nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) and chiral capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Among the goals of this study was to re-examine our previous unexpected finding of better performance of superficially porous CSP under CEC conditions compared to nano-LC conditions for a new set of chiral compounds, as well as to study the effect of varying the chiral selector content and nominal pore size of supporting silica on the performance of core-shell silica-based polysaccharide-type CSPs. Based on the results of this study it can be seen that CSPs based on superficially porous silica can successfully be used for the separation of enantiomers in both nano-LC and CEC mode. Only a slight advantage of CEC over nano-LC mode was observed in this study from the viewpoint of plate numbers, especially at higher mobile phase flow rates. It must also be noted that the optimal theoretical plate height is still too high and further optimization of superficially porous CSPs is necessary for both nano-LC and CEC applications.

  18. Immobilization of nanobeads on a surface to control the size, shape and distribution of pores in electrochemically generated sol-gel films

    PubMed Central

    Ciabocco, Michela; Berrettoni, Mario; Zamponi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically assisted deposition of an ormosil film at a potential where hydrogen ion is generated as the catalyst yields insulating films on electrodes. When the base electrode is modified with 20-nm poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS, beads bound to the surface with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and using (CH3)3SiOCH3 as the precursor, the resulting film of organically modified silica (ormosil) has cylindrical channels that reflect both the diameter of the PSS and the distribution of the APTES-PSS on the electrode. At an electrode modified by a 20-min immersion in 0.5 mmol dm-3 APTES followed by a 30-s immersion in PSS, a 20-min electrolysis at 1.5 V in acidified (CH3)3SiOCH3 resulted in an ormosil film with 20-nm pores separated by 100 nm. Cyclic voltammetry of Ru(CN)64- at scan rates above 5 mVs-1 yielded currents controlled primarily by linear diffusion. Below 5 mVs-1, convection rather than the expected factor, radial diffusion, apparently limited the current. PMID:26167128

  19. Measuring kinetic drivers of pneumolysin pore structure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C; Sonnen, Andreas F-P

    2016-05-01

    Most membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins are thought to form pores in target membranes by assembling into pre-pore oligomers before undergoing a pre-pore to pore transition. Assembly during pore formation is into both full rings of subunits and incomplete rings (arcs). The balance between arcs and full rings is determined by a mechanism dependent on protein concentration in which arc pores arise due to kinetic trapping of the pre-pore forms by the depletion of free protein subunits during oligomerization. Here we describe the use of a kinetic assay to study pore formation in red blood cells by the MACPF/CDC pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that cell lysis displays two kinds of dependence on protein concentration. At lower concentrations, it is dependent on the pre-pore to pore transition of arc oligomers, which we show to be a cooperative process. At higher concentrations, it is dependent on the amount of pneumolysin bound to the membrane and reflects the affinity of the protein for its receptor, cholesterol. A lag occurs before cell lysis begins; this is dependent on oligomerization of pneumolysin. Kinetic dissection of cell lysis by pneumolysin demonstrates the capacity of MACPF/CDCs to generate pore-forming oligomeric structures of variable size with, most likely, different functional roles in biology. PMID:26906727

  20. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    the connectivity of the pore system. Examples are given for T1-T2 correlation of some soil samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a Natural soil: Comparison of Relaxometric Imaging, T1 - T2 Correlation and Fast-Field Cycling NMR." The Open Magnetic Resonance Journal: in print. Pohlmeier, A., S. Haber-Pohlmeier, et al. (2009). "A Fast Field Cycling NMR Relaxometry Study of Natural Soils." Vadose Zone J. 8: 735-742. Stingaciu, L. R., A. Pohlmeier, et al. (2009). "Characterization of unsaturated porous media by high-field and low-field NMR relaxometry." Water Resources Research 45: W08412

  1. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  2. Effect of Pore Size and Film Thickness on Gold-Coated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensor.

    PubMed

    Kassu, Aschalew; Farley, Carlton; Sharma, Anup; Kim, Wonkyu; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-11-30

    A sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering chemical sensor is demonstrated by using inexpensive gold-coated nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrates. To optimize the performance of the substrates for sensing by the Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, the size of the nanopores is varied from 18 nm to 150 nm and the gold film thickness is varied from 30 nm to 120 nm. The sensitivity of gold-coated nanoporous surface enhanced Raman scattering sensor is characterized by detecting low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G laser dye molecules. The morphology of the SERS substrates is characterized by atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of the nanoporous SERS substrates including transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance are also investigated. Relative signal enhancement is plotted for a range of substrate parameters and a detection limit of 10(-6) M is established.

  3. Effect of Pore Size and Film Thickness on Gold-Coated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensor.

    PubMed

    Kassu, Aschalew; Farley, Carlton; Sharma, Anup; Kim, Wonkyu; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering chemical sensor is demonstrated by using inexpensive gold-coated nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrates. To optimize the performance of the substrates for sensing by the Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, the size of the nanopores is varied from 18 nm to 150 nm and the gold film thickness is varied from 30 nm to 120 nm. The sensitivity of gold-coated nanoporous surface enhanced Raman scattering sensor is characterized by detecting low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G laser dye molecules. The morphology of the SERS substrates is characterized by atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of the nanoporous SERS substrates including transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance are also investigated. Relative signal enhancement is plotted for a range of substrate parameters and a detection limit of 10(-6) M is established. PMID:26633402

  4. Effect of Pore Size and Film Thickness on Gold-Coated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Kassu, Aschalew; Farley, Carlton; Sharma, Anup; Kim, Wonkyu; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering chemical sensor is demonstrated by using inexpensive gold-coated nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrates. To optimize the performance of the substrates for sensing by the Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, the size of the nanopores is varied from 18 nm to 150 nm and the gold film thickness is varied from 30 nm to 120 nm. The sensitivity of gold-coated nanoporous surface enhanced Raman scattering sensor is characterized by detecting low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G laser dye molecules. The morphology of the SERS substrates is characterized by atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of the nanoporous SERS substrates including transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance are also investigated. Relative signal enhancement is plotted for a range of substrate parameters and a detection limit of 10−6 M is established. PMID:26633402

  5. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below.more » The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid

  6. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below. The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid velocities

  7. Experimental implementation of a robust damped-oscillation control algorithm on a full-sized, two-degree-of-freedom, AC induction motor-driven crane

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Noakes, M.W.

    1994-05-01

    When suspended payloads are moved with an overhead crane, pendulum like oscillations are naturally introduced. This presents a problem any time a crane is used, especially when expensive and/or delicate objects are moved, when moving in a cluttered an or hazardous environment, and when objects are to be placed in tight locations. Damped-oscillation control algorithms have been demonstrated over the past several years for laboratory-scale robotic systems on dc motor-driven overhead cranes. Most overhead cranes presently in use in industry are driven by ac induction motors; consequently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has implemented damped-oscillation crane control on one of its existing facility ac induction motor-driven overhead cranes. The purpose of this test was to determine feasibility, to work out control and interfacing specifications, and to establish the capability of newly available ac motor control hardware with respect to use in damped-oscillation-controlled systems. Flux vector inverter drives are used to investigate their acceptability for damped-oscillation crane control. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experimental implementation of a control algorithm on a full-sized, two-degree-of-freedom, industrial crane; describe the experimental evaluation of the controller including robustness to payload length changes; explain the results of experiments designed to determine the hardware required for implementation of the control algorithms; and to provide a theoretical description of the controller.

  8. Characteristics of pore migration controlled by diffusion through the pore-filling fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishcheva, E.; Renner, J.

    2010-10-01

    We analyze drag and drop of pores filled with a fluid phase, e.g., water or melt, in which the constituting elements of the solid matrix are dissolved. Assuming that the diffusion through the fluid-phase dominates bulk transport kinetics, we address the problem of pore motion and calculate the pore mobility and the critical velocity of elongated and lenticular pores on a grain boundary for arbitrary dihedral angle. The found variations in critical velocity and mobility with dihedral angle are modest for given volume of pores with the two considered geometries. For given pore size, however, the dependence on dihedral angle accounts for several orders of magnitude in pore mobility and critical velocity.

  9. Surface area and pore size characteristics of nanoporous gold subjected to thermal, mechanical, or surface modification studied using gas adsorption isotherms, cyclic voltammetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yih Horng; Davis, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ganesh, N. Vijaya; Demchenko, Alexei V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms are used to investigate the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution of physically modified, thermally annealed, and octadecanethiol functionalized np-Au monoliths. We present the full adsorption-desorption isotherms for N2 gas on np-Au, and observe type IV isotherms and type H1 hysteresis loops. The evolution of the np-Au under various thermal annealing treatments was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both the exterior and interior of the thermally annealed np-Au show that the porosity of all free standing np-Au structures decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases. The modification of the np-Au surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of C18-SH (coverage of 2.94 × 1014 molecules cm−2 based from the decomposition of the C18-SH using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), was found to reduce the strength of the interaction of nitrogen gas with the np-Au surface, as reflected by a decrease in the ‘C’ parameter of the BET equation. From cyclic voltammetry studies, we found that the surface area of the np-Au monoliths annealed at elevated temperatures followed the same trend with annealing temperature as found in the BET surface area study and SEM morphology characterization. The study highlights the ability to control free-standing nanoporous gold monoliths with high surface area, and well-defined, tunable pore morphology. PMID:22822294

  10. Evaluation of lexicon size variations on a verification and rejection system based on SVM, for accurate and robust recognition of handwritten words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricquebourg, Yann; Coüasnon, Bertrand; Guichard, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The transcription of handwritten words remains a still challenging and difficult task. When processing full pages, approaches are limited by the trade-off between automatic recognition errors and the tedious aspect of human user verification. In this article, we present our investigations to improve the capabilities of an automatic recognizer, so as to be able to reject unknown words (not to take wrong decisions) while correctly rejecting (i.e. to recognize as much as possible from the lexicon of known words). This is the active research topic of developing a verification system that optimize the trade-off between performance and reliability. To minimize the recognition errors, a verification system is usually used to accept or reject the hypotheses produced by an existing recognition system. Thus, we re-use our novel verification architecture1 here: the recognition hypotheses are re-scored by a set of support vector machines, and validated by a verification mechanism based on multiple rejection thresholds. In order to tune these (class-dependent) rejection thresholds, an algorithm based on dynamic programming has been proposed which focus on maximizing the recognition rate for a given error rate. Experiments have been carried out on the RIMES database in three steps. The first two showed that this approach results in a performance superior or equal to other state-of-the-art rejection methods. We focus here on the third one showing that this verification system also greatly improves results of keywords extraction in a set of handwritten words, with a strong robustness to lexicon size variations (21 lexicons have been tested from 167 entries up to 5,600 entries) which is particularly relevant to our application context cooperating with humans, and only made possible thanks to the rejection ability of this proposed system. The proposed verification system, compared to a HMM with simple rejection, improves on average the recognition rate by 57% (resp. 33% and 21%) for

  11. Characterisation of pore structures in nanoporous materials for advanced bionanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heo, K; Yoon, J; Jin, K S; Jin, S; Ree, M

    2006-08-01

    Porous materials are potential candidates for applications in various fields, such as bionanotechnology, gas separation, catalysts and micro-electronics. In particular, their applications in bionanotechnology include biosensors, biomedical implants and microdevices, biosupporters, bio-encapsules, biomolecule separations and biomedical therapy. All these bionanotechnology applications utilise the shape, size and size distribution of pores in porous materials. Therefore the controlled creation of pores with desired shape, size and size distribution is most important in the development of nanoporous materials. Accordingly, the accurate evaluation of pore structure is necessary in the development of nanoporous materials and their applications. This article reviews recent developments in analytical techniques to characterise the pore structures of nanoporous materials.

  12. Magnetic relaxation: Coal swelling, extraction, pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1992-11-06

    The goals for year I of the grant were to extract the Argonne Coals, to swell them, to reswell their residues, to seal the various samples for measurements, to perform analyses of the samples and to measure their NMR decays. Because of an unexpected characteristic of the extraction process, more detailed analyses of the samples are being done than originally anticipated. The mass spectrometric analyses have not been completed. Because routine NMR analyses needed to be done in greater detail than anticipated, the NMR decay measurements have also been delayed. In order to offset these delays, all of the EPR samples, which were to have been examined in year III, have been prepared and a substantial proportion of the pulsed EPR measurements have been made.

  13. Thermal analysis of porous medium with ellipsoidal pores using a homogenization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    Effective thermal conductivity including radiation is analyzed using a homogenization method. This method can precisely represent the microstructure of a porous medium with ellipsoidal pores. Here, the effects of parameters such as porosity, pore shape, pore distribution, and temperature of the porous medium on the conductivity are estimated to clarify the mechanisms in complex pore structures. For example, heat transfer by radiation does not dominate if the medium has pores of less than 1 mm in size. Moreover, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity is found to depend on temperature, pore shape, pore size, and pore distribution.

  14. Morphology and Size Evolution of Interlamellar Two-Dimensional Pores in Plasma-Sprayed La2Zr2O7 Coatings During Thermal Exposure at 1300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Luo, Xiao-Tao; Chen, Xu; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-06-01

    La2Zr2O7 (LZO) is widely expected to be one of the promising thermal barrier coating materials for application in high-temperature conditions (1200 °C). However, high-temperature exposure causes sintering which heals interlamellar two-dimensional (2D) pores and intrasplat pores. This sintering effect increases the stiffness and thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings, consequently reducing their durability. In this study, to reveal the possible critical opening of 2D pores above which they are free from sintering, LZO coating and splat were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying and were exposed to 1300 °C for different durations. Thereafter, the evolution of the parameters of residual 2D pores in the coating and the surface morphology of LZO splat were characterized. It was found that there is a critical opening width for 2D pores above which grain bridging does not occur across the gaps. Accordingly, pores with an opening larger than this critical width are free from sintering across the 2D pores despite surface roughening of splats, whereas pores with an opening less than the critical width sinter rapidly at the early stage of thermal exposure through the formation of grain bridges.

  15. Robust, Flexible and Lightweight Dielectric Barrier Discharge Actuators Using Nanofoams/Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Robust, flexible, lightweight, low profile enhanced performance dielectric barrier discharge actuators (plasma actuators) based on aerogels/nanofoams with controlled pore size and size distribution as well as pore shape. The plasma actuators offer high body force as well as high force to weight ratios (thrust density). The flexibility and mechanical robustness of the actuators allows them to be shaped to conform to the surface to which they are applied. Carbon nanotube (CNT) based electrodes serve to further decrease the weight and profile of the actuators while maintaining flexibility while insulating nano-inclusions in the matrix enable tailoring of the mechanical properties. Such actuators are required for flow control in aeronautics and moving machinery such as wind turbines, noise abatement in landing gear and rotary wing aircraft and other applications.

  16. Free Energy Landscape of Rim-Pore Expansion in Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Smirnova, Yuliya; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The productive fusion pore in membrane fusion is generally thought to be toroidally shaped. Theoretical studies and recent experiments suggest that its formation, in some scenarios, may be preceded by an initial pore formed near the rim of the extended hemifusion diaphragm (HD), a rim-pore. This rim-pore is characterized by a nontoroidal shape that changes with size. To determine this shape as well as the free energy along the pathway of rim-pore expansion, we derived a simple analytical free energy model. We argue that dilation of HD material via expansion of a rim-pore is favored over a regular, circular pore. Further, the expanding rim-pore faces a free energy barrier that linearly increases with HD size. In contrast, the tension required to expand the rim-pore decreases with HD size. Pore flickering, followed by sudden opening, occurs when the tension in the HD competes with the line energy of the rim-pore, and the rim-pore reaches its equilibrium size before reaching the critical pore size. The experimental observation of flickering and closing fusion pores (kiss-and-run) is very well explained by the observed behavior of rim-pores. Finally, the free energy landscape of rim-pore expansion/HD dilation may very well explain why some cellular fusion reactions, in their attempt to minimize energetic costs, progress via alternative formation and dilation of microscopic hemifusion intermediates. PMID:25418297

  17. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  18. Fusion pore regulation of transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Peruchena, Carlos; Navas, Sergio; Montes, María A; Alvarez de Toledo, Guillermo

    2005-09-01

    During the last decade a wealth of new information about the properties of the exocytotic fusion pore is changing our current view of exocytosis. The exocytotic fusion pore, a necessary stage before the full merging of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane, is becoming a key cellular structure that might critically control the amount of neurotransmitter released into the synaptic cleft and that can be subjected to control by second messengers and phosphorylated proteins. Fusion pores form, expand to fully merge membranes, or can close leaving an intact and identical synaptic vesicle in place for a new round of exocytosis. Transient formation of fusion pores is the mechanistic representation of the "kiss-and-run" hypothesis of transmitter release and offers new alternatives for synaptic vesicle recycling besides to the classical mechanism mediated by clathrin coat endocytosis. For vesicle recycling transient fusion pores ensures a fast mechanism for maintaining an active pool of synaptic vesicles. The size reached by transient fusion pores and the time spent on the open state can determine the release of subquantal synaptic transmission, which could be a mechanism of synaptic potentiation. In this review we will described the electrophysiological and fluorescence methods that contribute to further explore the biophysical properties of the exocytotic fusion pore and the relevant experiments obtained by these methods.

  19. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study.

    PubMed

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm(2)) and determination of their respective sizes in mm(2). Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having "enlarged pores" like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore's morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  20. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale.

  1. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale. PMID:20042215

  2. Emergence of a large pore subpopulation during electroporating pulses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle C; Son, Reuben S; Gowrishankar, T R; Weaver, James C

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation increases ionic and molecular transport through cell membranes by creating transient aqueous pores. These pores cannot be directly observed experimentally, but cell system modeling with dynamic electroporation predicts pore populations that produce cellular responses consistent with experiments. We show a cell system model's response that illustrates the life cycle of a pore population in response to a widely used 1 kV/cm, 100 μs trapezoidal pulse. Rapid pore creation occurs early in the pulse, followed by the gradual emergence of a subpopulation of large pores reaching ~30 nm radius. After the pulse, pores rapidly contract to form a single thermally broadened distribution of small pores (~1 nm radius) that slowly decays. We also show the response of the same model to pulses of 100 ns to 1 ms duration, each with an applied field strength adjusted such that a total of 10,000±100 pores are created. As pulse duration is increased, the pore size distributions vary dramatically and a distinct subpopulation of large pores emerges for pulses of microsecond and longer duration. This subpopulation of transient large pores is relevant to understanding rapid transport of macromolecules into and out of cells during a pulse. PMID:24290730

  3. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  4. On the cavitation and pore blocking in slit-shaped ink-bottle pores.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2011-04-01

    We present GCMC simulations of argon adsorption in slit pores of different channel geometry. We show that the isotherm for an ink-bottle pore can be reconstructed as a linear combination of the local isotherms of appropriately chosen independent unit cells. Second, depending on the system parameters and operating conditions, the phenomena of cavitation and pore blocking can occur for a given configuration of the ink-bottle pore by varying the geometrical aspect ratio. Although it has been argued in the literature that the geometrical aspects of the system govern the evaporation mechanism (either cavitation or pore blocking), we here put forward an argument that the local compressibility in different parts of the ink-bottle pore is the deciding factor for evaporation. When the fluid in the small neck is strongly bound, cavitation is the governing process, and molecules in the cavity evaporate to the surrounding bulk gas via a mass transfer mechanism through the pore neck. When the pore neck is sufficiently large, the system of neck and cavity evaporates at the same pressure, which is a consequence of the comparable compressibility between the fluid in the neck and that in the cavity. This suggests that local compressibility is the measure of cohesiveness of the fluid prior to evaporation. One consequence that we derive from the analysis of isotherms of a number of connected pores is that by analyzing the adsorption branch or the desorption branch of an experimental isotherm may not lead to the correct pore sizes and the correct pore volume distribution. PMID:21370903

  5. Soil pore structure and substrate C mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Steven; Maenhout, Peter; Vanhoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle; De Neve, Stefaan

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to investigate the complex interactions between soil pore structure, soil biota and decomposition of added OM substrates. We report on a lab incubation experiment in which CO2 respiration from soil cores was monitored (headspace GC analysis) and an X-ray CT approach yielded soil pore size distributions. Such combined use of X-ray CT with soil incubation studies was obstructed, until now, by many practical constraints such as CT-volume quality, limited resolution, scanning time and complex soil pore network quantification, which have largely been overcome in this study. We incubated a sandy loam soil (with application of ground grass or sawdust) in 18 small aluminium rings (Ø 1 cm, h 1 cm). Bulk density was adjusted to 1.1 or 1.3 Mg m-3 (compaction) and 6 rings were filled at a coarser Coarse Sand:Fine Sand:Silt+Clay ratio. While compaction induced a strong reduction in the cumulative C mineralization for both grass and sawdust substrates, artificial change to a coarser soil texture only reduced net C mineralization from the added sawdust. There thus appears to be a strong interaction effect between soil pore structure and substrate type on substrate decomposition. Correlation coefficients between the C mineralization rates and volumes of 7 pore size classes (from the X-ray CT data) also showed an increasing positive correlation with increasing pore size. Since any particulate organic matter initially present in the soil was removed prior to the experiment (sieving, ashing the >53µm fraction and recombining with the <53µm fraction), the added OM can be localized by means of X-ray CT. Through on-going image analysis the surrounding porosity of the added grass or sawdust particles is being quantified to further study the interaction between the soil pore structure and substrate decomposition.

  6. Pore structure analysis of American coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, D.P.; Smith, D.M.; Stermer, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The pore structure of 19 American coals, representing a wide range of rank and geographic origin, has been studied via gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry, helium displacement and NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Nitrogen adsorption at 77 K was used to determine surface area in the pore range of r/sub p/ > approx. = 1nm and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K was used to obtain the total surface area. Porosimetry results were complicated by inter-particle void filling, surface roughness/porosity and sample compression. By employing a range of particle sizes, information concerning the relative magnitude of these mechanisms was ascertained as a function of pressure. Spin-lattice relaxation measurements of water contained in saturated coal were used to find pore size distributions over a broad range of T/sub 1/, the spin-lattice relaxation time. Good qualitative agreement was obtained between these measurements and gas adsorption/condensation results. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. In vivo measurement of the size of oil bodies in plant seeds using a simple and robust pulsed field gradient NMR method.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Marina; Guillermo, Armel; Bayle, Pierre-Alain; Bardet, Michel

    2015-04-01

    An easy to implement and convenient method to measure the mean size of oil bodies (OBs) in plant seeds is proposed using a pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFGNMR) approach. PFGNMR is a well-known technique used to study either free or restricted diffusion of molecules. As triacylglycerols (TAG) are confined in OBs, analysis of their diffusion properties is a well-suited experimental approach to determine OB sizes. In fact, at long diffusion time, TAG mean squared displacement is limited by the size of the domain where these molecules are confined. In order to access the OB size distribution, strong intensities of magnetic field gradients are generally required. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that a standard liquid-phase NMR probe equipped with a weak-intensity gradient coil can be used to determine the mean size of OBs. Average sizes were measured for several seeds, and OB diameters obtained by PFGNMR were fully consistent with previously published values obtained by microscopy techniques. Moreover, this approach provided evidence of TAG transfer through the network of interconnected OBs, which is dependent on the ability of adjacent membranes to open diffusion routes between OBs. The main advantage of the NMR method is that it does not require any sample preparation and experiments are performed with whole seeds directly introduced in a standard NMR tube.

  8. Comparison of unimodal versus bimodal pore catalysts in residues hydrotreating

    SciTech Connect

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.; Al-Zaid, H.

    1994-12-31

    Catalyst pore structure is a critical factor influencing the performance of residues hydroprocessing catalysts. The effect is reflected in both hydrodesulfurization activity of the catalyst and its rate of deactivation. In this paper, the pore size distributions of two categories of catalysts, unimodal and bimodal, were systematically varied. Performance evaluation tests in a fixed bed reactor using vacuum residues under conditions comparable to typical refinery operations were conducted. Two series of unimodal and bimodal catalyst extrudates were prepared starting from boehmite gel, whereby the pore structure was systematically varied using hydrothermal treatment and organic additives. For the unimodal catalysts, the pore maxima ranged between 50 and 500 {angstrom} with 70--80% of the pore volume in the desired pore diameter range. The bimodal catalysts had narrow pores with pore diameters less than 100 {angstrom} and wide pres with pore diameter around 5,000 {angstrom}. For bimodal catalyst, an increase in the average wide pore diameter, while maintaining the narrow pore constant, had no significant effect on the catalyst performance. For monomodal catalyst, the activity of the catalyst was noted to have an optimum between 150--350 {angstrom} diameter. Furthermore, the performance of the catalyst concerning its desulfurization activity and deactivation was superior to that of the bimodal catalysts.

  9. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  10. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  11. Robust Regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Cabral, Ricardo; De la Torre, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Discriminative methods (e.g., kernel regression, SVM) have been extensively used to solve problems such as object recognition, image alignment and pose estimation from images. These methods typically map image features ( X) to continuous (e.g., pose) or discrete (e.g., object category) values. A major drawback of existing discriminative methods is that samples are directly projected onto a subspace and hence fail to account for outliers common in realistic training sets due to occlusion, specular reflections or noise. It is important to notice that existing discriminative approaches assume the input variables X to be noise free. Thus, discriminative methods experience significant performance degradation when gross outliers are present. Despite its obvious importance, the problem of robust discriminative learning has been relatively unexplored in computer vision. This paper develops the theory of robust regression (RR) and presents an effective convex approach that uses recent advances on rank minimization. The framework applies to a variety of problems in computer vision including robust linear discriminant analysis, regression with missing data, and multi-label classification. Several synthetic and real examples with applications to head pose estimation from images, image and video classification and facial attribute classification with missing data are used to illustrate the benefits of RR. PMID:26761740

  12. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies.

  13. Pore networks in continental and marine mudstones: Characteristics and controls on sealing behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, J.E.; Dewers, T.A.; McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Petrusak, R.; Chidsey, T.C.; Rinehart, A.J.; Mozley, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Mudstone pore networks are strong modifiers of sedimentary basin fluid dynamics and have a critical role in the distribution of hydrocarbons and containment of injected fluids. Using core samples from continental and marine mudstones, we investigate properties of pore types and networks from a variety of geologic environments, together with estimates of capillary beam- scanning electron microscopy, suggest seven dominant mudstone pore types distinguished by geometry and connectivity. A dominant planar pore type occurs in all investigated mudstones and generally has high coordination numbers (i.e., number of neighboring connected pores). Connected networks of pores of this type contribute to high mercury capillary pressures due to small pore throats at the junctions of connected pores and likely control most matrix transport in these mudstones. Other pore types are related to authigenic (e.g., replacement or pore-lining precipitation) clay minerals and pyrite nodules; pores in clay packets adjacent to larger, more competent clastic grains; pores in organic phases; and stylolitic and microfracture-related pores. Pores within regions of authigenic clay minerals often form small isolated networks (<3 ??m). Pores in stringers of organic phases occur as tubular pores or slit- and/or sheet-like pores. These form short, connected lengths in 3D reconstructions, but appear to form networks no larger than a few microns in size. Sealing efficiency of the studied mudstones increases with greater distal depositional environments and greater maximum depth of burial. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  14. Dependence of hydrogen permeabilities of isotropic graphites on the pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    1991-03-01

    The permeation behavior of molecular hydrogen through isotropic graphites is investigated. The observed dependences of the permeation rate on pressure, specimen thickness, temperature and molecular weight suggest that hydrogen permeates by molecular flow, probably through open pores. A simple pore structure model is developed and is compared with the experimental results. It is revealed that hydrogen permeation through isotropic graphites depends not only on the pore size or the porosity, but also on the pore size distribution and tortuosity.

  15. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    PubMed Central

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2) and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore’s morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  16. Optical detection of pores in adipocyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, I. Yu.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Structures that can be interpreted as cytoplasm droplets leaking through the membrane are experimentally detected on the membranes of adipocytes using optical digital microscopy. The effect of an aqueous alcohol solution of brilliant green on the amount and sizes of structures is studied. It is demonstrated that the optical irradiation of the adipocytes that are sensitized with the aid of the brilliant green leads to an increase in the amount of structures (pores) after the irradiation. The experimental results confirm the existence of an earlier-proposed effect of photochemical action on the sensitized cells of adipose tissue that involves additional formation of pores in the membrane of the sensitized cell under selective optical irradiation. The proposed method for the detection of micropores in the membrane of adipose tissue based on the detection of the cytoplasm droplets leaking from the cell can be considered as a method for the optical detection of nanosized pores.

  17. The pore space scramble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  18. Pore volume accessibility of particulate and monolithic stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jiří

    2015-05-29

    A chromatographic characterization of pore volume accessibility for both particulate and monolithic stationary phases is presented. Size-exclusion calibration curves have been used to determine the pore volume fraction that is accessible for six alkylbenzenes and twelve polystyrene standards in tetrahydrofuran as the mobile phase. Accessible porosity has been then correlated with the size of the pores from which individual compounds are just excluded. I have determined pore volume accessibility of commercially available columns packed with fully and superficially porous particles, as well as with silica-based monolithic stationary phase. I also have investigated pore accessibility of polymer-based monolithic stationary phases. Suggested protocol is used to characterize pore formation at the early stage of the polymerization, to evaluate an extent of hypercrosslinking during modification of pore surface, and to characterize the pore accessibility of monolithic stationary phases hypercrosslinked after an early termination of polymerization reaction. Pore volume accessibility was also correlated to column efficiency of both particulate and monolithic stationary phases. PMID:25892635

  19. Partitioning of habitable pore space in earthworm burrows

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Jose A.

    2010-01-01

    Earthworms affect macro-pore structure of soils. However, some studies suggest that earthworm burrow walls and casts themselves differ greatly in structure from surrounding soils, potentially creating habitat for microbivorours nematodes which accelerate the decomposition and C and N mineralization. In this study aggregates were sampled from the burrow walls of the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris and bulk soil (not altered by earthworms) from mesocosm incubated in the lab for 0, 1, 3, 5 and 16 weeks. Pore volumes and pore sizes were measured in triplicate with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP). This method is well suited to establish pore size structure in the context of habitat, because it measures the stepwise intrusion of mercury from the outside of the aggregate into ever smaller pores. The progress of mercury into the aggregate interior thus resembles potential paths of a nematode into accessible habitable pore spaces residing in an aggregate. Total specific pore volume, Vs, varied between 0.13 and 0.18 mL/g and increased from 3 to 16 weeks in both burrow and bulk soil. Differences between total Vs of bulk and burrow samples were not significant on any sampling date. However, differences were significant for pore size fractions at the scale of nematode body diameter. PMID:22736839

  20. Partitioning of habitable pore space in earthworm burrows.

    PubMed

    Gorres, Josef H; Amador, Jose A

    2010-03-01

    Earthworms affect macro-pore structure of soils. However, some studies suggest that earthworm burrow walls and casts themselves differ greatly in structure from surrounding soils, potentially creating habitat for microbivorours nematodes which accelerate the decomposition and C and N mineralization. In this study aggregates were sampled from the burrow walls of the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris and bulk soil (not altered by earthworms) from mesocosm incubated in the lab for 0, 1, 3, 5 and 16 weeks. Pore volumes and pore sizes were measured in triplicate with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP). This method is well suited to establish pore size structure in the context of habitat, because it measures the stepwise intrusion of mercury from the outside of the aggregate into ever smaller pores. The progress of mercury into the aggregate interior thus resembles potential paths of a nematode into accessible habitable pore spaces residing in an aggregate. Total specific pore volume, V(s), varied between 0.13 and 0.18 mL/g and increased from 3 to 16 weeks in both burrow and bulk soil. Differences between total V(s) of bulk and burrow samples were not significant on any sampling date. However, differences were significant for pore size fractions at the scale of nematode body diameter. PMID:22736839

  1. Robust quantum spatial search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulsi, Avatar

    2016-07-01

    Quantum spatial search has been widely studied with most of the study focusing on quantum walk algorithms. We show that quantum walk algorithms are extremely sensitive to systematic errors. We present a recursive algorithm which offers significant robustness to certain systematic errors. To search N items, our recursive algorithm can tolerate errors of size O(1{/}√{ln N}) which is exponentially better than quantum walk algorithms for which tolerable error size is only O(ln N{/}√{N}). Also, our algorithm does not need any ancilla qubit. Thus our algorithm is much easier to implement experimentally compared to quantum walk algorithms.

  2. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrophilic Pores in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophilic pores are formed in peptide free lipid bilayers under mechanical stress. It has been proposed that the transport of ionic species across such membranes is largely determined by the existence of such meta-stable hydrophilic pores. To study the properties of these structures and understand the mechanism by which pore expansion leads to membrane rupture, a series of molecular dynamics simulations of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer have been conducted. The system was simulated in two different states; first, as a bilayer containing a meta-stable pore and second, as an equilibrated bilayer without a pore. Surface tension in both cases was applied to study the formation and stability of hydrophilic pores inside the bilayers. It is observed that below a critical threshold tension of ∼38 mN/m the pores are stabilized. The minimum radius at which a pore can be stabilized is 0.7 nm. Based on the critical threshold tension the line tension of the bilayer was estimated to be ∼3 × 10−11 N, in good agreement with experimental measurements. The flux of water molecules through these stabilized pores was analyzed, and the structure and size of the pores characterized. When the lateral pressure exceeds the threshold tension, the pores become unstable and start to expand causing the rupture of the membrane. In the simulations the mechanical threshold tension necessary to cause rupture of the membrane on a nanosecond timescale is much higher in the case of the equilibrated bilayers, as compared with membranes containing preexisting pores. PMID:15041656

  4. A lipocentric view of peptide-induced pores.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Gustavo; Giménez, Diana; Esteban-Martín, Santi; Sánchez-Muñoz, Orlando L; Salgado, Jesús

    2011-04-01

    Although lipid membranes serve as effective sealing barriers for the passage of most polar solutes, nonmediated leakage is not completely improbable. A high activation energy normally keeps unassisted bilayer permeation at a very low frequency, but lipids are able to self-organize as pores even in peptide-free and protein-free membranes. The probability of leakage phenomena increases under conditions such as phase coexistence, external stress or perturbation associated to binding of nonlipidic molecules. Here, we argue that pore formation can be viewed as an intrinsic property of lipid bilayers, with strong similarities in the structure and mechanism between pores formed with participation of peptides, lipidic pores induced by different types of stress, and spontaneous transient bilayer defects driven by thermal fluctuations. Within such a lipocentric framework, amphipathic peptides are best described as pore-inducing rather than pore-forming elements. Active peptides bound to membranes can be understood as a source of internal surface tension which facilitates pore formation by diminishing the high activation energy barrier. This first or immediate action of the peptide has some resemblance to catalysis. However, the presence of membrane-active peptides has the additional effect of displacing the equilibrium towards the pore-open state, which is then maintained over long times, and reducing the size of initial individual pores. Thus, pore-inducing peptides, regardless of their sequence and oligomeric organization, can be assigned a double role of increasing the probability of pore formation in membranes to high levels as well as stabilizing these pores after they appear.

  5. Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

    2004-08-19

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

  6. Latent fingermark pore area reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Buckley, K; Sutton, R

    2008-08-01

    The study of the reproducibility of friction ridge pore detail in fingermarks is a measure of their usefulness in personal identification. Pore area in latent prints developed using cyanoacrylate and ninhydrin were examined and measured by photomicrography using appropriate software tools. The data were analysed statistically and the results showed that pore area is not reproducible in developed latent prints, using either of the development techniques. The results add further support to the lack of reliability of pore area in personal identification. PMID:18617339

  7. Pore-scale imaging and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko; Dong, Hu; Gharbi, Oussama; Iglauer, Stefan; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Paluszny, Adriana; Pentland, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Pore-scale imaging and modelling - digital core analysis - is becoming a routine service in the oil and gas industry, and has potential applications in contaminant transport and carbon dioxide storage. This paper briefly describes the underlying technology, namely imaging of the pore space of rocks from the nanometre scale upwards, coupled with a suite of different numerical techniques for simulating single and multiphase flow and transport through these images. Three example applications are then described, illustrating the range of scientific problems that can be tackled: dispersion in different rock samples that predicts the anomalous transport behaviour characteristic of highly heterogeneous carbonates; imaging of super-critical carbon dioxide in sandstone to demonstrate the possibility of capillary trapping in geological carbon storage; and the computation of relative permeability for mixed-wet carbonates and implications for oilfield waterflood recovery. The paper concludes by discussing limitations and challenges, including finding representative samples, imaging and simulating flow and transport in pore spaces over many orders of magnitude in size, the determination of wettability, and upscaling to the field scale. We conclude that pore-scale modelling is likely to become more widely applied in the oil industry including assessment of unconventional oil and gas resources. It has the potential to transform our understanding of multiphase flow processes, facilitating more efficient oil and gas recovery, effective contaminant removal and safe carbon dioxide storage.

  8. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Sheng; Hu, Qinhong; Dultz, Stefan; Zhang, Ming

    2012-11-23

    X-raycomputedtomography (XCT) is a powerful tool for detecting the micro-scale porestructure and has been applied to many natural and synthetic porous media. However, due to the resolution limitations, either non-representative view of the sample or inaccurate results can be produced from the XCT image processing. In this paper, two XCT (micro-CT and CT with synchrotron radiation) with different resolutions of 12.7 μm and 0.35 μm, as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) with a minimum detection limit of 3 nm, were used for Berea sandstone to investigate the effect of detecting resolution on the porestructure. Several key porestructure parameters, including porosity, pore size distribution, pore connectivity, surface area, hydraulic radius, and aspect ratio were analyzed in a manner of quantitative comparison between different resolutions of XCT and MIP. The low resolution XCT can capture the large-pore porosity, while overestimates the pore size and pore connectivity. The high resolution XCT is more accurate in describing the pore shape, porosity, pore size; however, it is not representative since narrower detecting pore size range and small volume represented. A representative element volume related to large-pore porosity and probably large-pore connectivity with diameter and height of 2.8 mm is obtained through scale effect analysis. Therefore, selecting an appropriate resolution should be a compromise between the pore size and the representative element volume for the specific property or process of interest.

  9. Cilia and Nuclear Pore Proteins: Pore No More?

    PubMed

    Obado, Samson O; Rout, Michael P

    2016-09-12

    Nuclear pore proteins at the base of cilia were thought to regulate transport into cilia. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Del Viso et al. (2016) challenge this view, showing instead that pore proteins localize to ciliary basal bodies and that their perturbation leads to congenital heart disease. PMID:27623377

  10. Pore architecture of nanoporous gold and titania by hydrogen thermoporometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, L. T.; Biener, M. M.; Ye, J. C.; Baumann, T. F.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) and materials derived from it by templating have complex pore architecture that determines their technologically relevant physical properties. Here, we apply high-resolution hydrogen thermoporometry to study the pore structure of NPG and NPG-derived titania nanofoam (TNF). Results reveal complex multimodal pore size distributions for NPG and TNF. The freezing-melting hysteresis is pronounced, with freezing and melting scans having entirely different shapes. Experiments involving partial freeze-melt cycles reveal the lack of direct correlation between individual freezing and melting peaks, pointing to phenomena that are beyond the Gibbs-Thomson formalism. The depression of the average freezing temperature scales linearly with the ratio of the internal surface area (measured by gas sorption) and the total pore volume derived from the density of monoliths. Thermoporometry yields total pore volumes in good agreement with those derived from monolith densities for both NPG and TNF.

  11. Surface and pore properties of ANL and PETC coals

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.; White, W.E.; Thornock, D.; Wells, W.F.; Hecker, W.C.; Smoot, L.D.; Smith, D.M.; Williams, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    Surface areas, pore volumes, pore size distribution, and solid densities were measured for three ANL coals (Pittsburgh No. 8, Wyodak, and Beulah Zap Lignite), two PETC coals (Lower Wilcox, and Dietz) and a Utah Scofield coal and for chars derived from these coals. Surface areas were measured using nitrogen and carbon dioxide adsorptions; pore volumes were determined using nitrogen adsorption, mercury porosimetry, and NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements of samples saturated with water. Solid densities were obtained using helium displacement. The results indicate that chars have larger surface areas and pores relative to coals; large fractions of the internal surfaces of coals are not penetrated by nitrogen molecules but are penetrated by carbon dioxide suggesting that the pores are mostly smaller than 1 nm.

  12. Pore Structure and the Low Frequency Permittivity of Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sadnick, M.; Ingham, M.; Eicken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Field and laboratory measurements of the dielectric permittivity of first-year sea ice both show that below a frequency of about 10 Hz the real part of the relative permittivity (ɛ') increases with decreasing frequency. Field measurements in Barrow, Alaska and McMurdo Sound suggest that this rise in low frequency ɛ' steepens as the ice warms, and is confined primarily to the upper 0.50m of the ice cover as it approaches maximum thickness. We propose that this behaviour may be related to membrane polarization occurring in the pore structure within the ice. With ice-liquid interfaces carrying a net charge, an electric double layer forms within the brine filled pores. Polarization occurs at grain boundaries, intragranular films and "necks" in the pore structure where the effective thickness of the double layer approaches the width of the pore resulting in differential transport of ions. This process is dependent on both the characteristic lengths and radii of pores relative to the length and radii of the "necks" or the geometry of inter/intragranular brine layers. By representing the measured dielectric permittivity in terms of a Cole-Cole model it is possible to show that the distribution of pore sizes evolves with temperature. Derived values of complex conductivity are also examined in relationship to the temporal evolution of pore geometry including smoothness of the pore-ice interface.

  13. Pore morphology study of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D.W.; Anderson, J.; Haereid, S.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Silica aerogels have numerous properties which suggest applications such as ultra high efficiency thermal insulation. These properties relate directly to the aerogel`s pore size distribution. The micro and meso pore size ranges can be investigated by normal small angle x-ray scattering and possibly, nitrogen adsorption. However, the measurement of larger pores (> 250 {angstrom}) is more difficult. Due to their limited mechanical strength, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation can disrupt the gel structure and electron microscopy provides only limited large scale structure information. The use of small angle light scattering techniques seems to have promise, the only hurdle is that aerogels exhibit significant multiple scattering. This can be avoided if one observes the gels in the wet stage since the structure of the aerogel should be very similar to the wet gel (as the result of supercritical drying). Thus, if one can match the refractive index, the morphology can be probed. The combination of certain alcoholic solvents fit this index matching criteria. Preliminary results for the gel network (micron range) and primary particle structure (manometer) are reported by using small angle light scattering and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The effects on structure over the length scale range of <1 nm to >5 {mu}m under different conditions (precursors, pH, etc.) are presented. The change in structure of an aerogel during isostatic compaction to 228 MPa (to simulate drying from wetting solvents) are also discussed.

  14. Pore Structure Reconstruction and Moisture Migration in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiayi; Shi, Xing; Shi, Juan; Chen, Zhenqian

    2014-09-01

    Three kinds of porous media (isotropic, perpendicular anisotropic and parallel anisotropic porous media) with the same porosity, different pore size distributions and fractal spectral dimensions were reconstructed by random growth method. It was aimed to theoretically study the impact of microscopic pore structure on water vapor diffusion process in porous media. The results show that pore size distribution can only denote the static characteristics of porous media but cannot effectively reflect the dynamic transport characteristics of porous media. Fractal spectral dimension can effectively analyze and reflect pores connectivity and moisture dynamic transport properties of porous media from the microscopic perspective. The pores connectivity and water vapor diffusion performance in pores of porous media get better with the increase of fractal spectral dimension of porous media. Fractal spectral dimension of parallel anisotropic porous media is more than that of perpendicular anisotropic porous media. Fractal spectral dimension of isotropic porous media is between parallel anisotropic porous media and perpendicular anisotropic porous media. Other macroscopic parameters such as equilibrium diffusion coefficient of water vapor, water vapor concentration variation at right boundary in equilibrium, the time when water vapor diffusion process reaches a stable state also can characterize the pores connectivity and water vapor diffusion properties of porous media.

  15. Comparative study of pore structure evolution during solvent and thermal debinding of powder injection molded parts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.S.; Hsieh, Y.M.

    1996-02-01

    The solvent debinding process has been widely accepted in the powder injection molding (PIM) industry due to its short debinding cycle. In the current study, specimens were immersed in a heptane bath for different lengths of time, and the pore structure evolvement in the compact was analyzed. Mercury porosimetry analyses and scanning electron micrographs showed that the binder extraction started from the surface and progressed toward the center of the compacts. As the debinding continued, the pores grew and were widely distributed in size. This pore structure evolvement was different from that of straight thermal debinding in which the pore size distribution was quite narrow and the mean pore diameter shifted toward smaller sizes as debinding time increased. After the soluble binders were extracted, parts were subjected to a subsequent thermal debinding during which these pores served as conduits for decomposed gas to escape. Concurrently, the remaining binder became fluidlike and was redistributed within the compact due to capillarity. This pore structure, as observed from the mercury intrusion curves, showed a sharp increase in the pore volume at the 0.8-{micro}m size, followed by a series of fine pores, which is different from the pore structure of straight thermal debinding. The difference in the pore structure evolvement between solvent and thermal debinding and its effect on the debinding rate are discussed.

  16. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  17. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the application of low-field NMR to both surface area and pore structure analysis of catalyst supports will be presented. Low-field (20 MHz) spin-lattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) experiments are performed on fluids contained in alumina and silica catalyst supports. Pore size distributions (PSD) calculated from these NMR experiments are compared to those obtained from mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Multiscale pore-network representation of heterogeneous carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Tannaz; Butler, Ian B.; Geiger, Sebastian; van Dijke, Marinus I. J.; Jiang, Zeyun; Surmas, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    A multiscale network integration approach introduced by Jiang et al. (2013) is used to generate a representative pore-network for a carbonate rock with a pore size distribution across several orders of magnitude. We predict the macroscopic flow parameters of the rock utilising (i) 3-D images captured by X-ray computed microtomography and (ii) pore-network flow simulations. To capture the multiscale pore size distribution of the rock, we imaged four different rock samples at different resolutions and integrated the data to produce a pore-network model that combines information at several length-scales that cannot be recovered from a single tomographic image. A workflow for selection of the number and length-scale of the required input networks for the network integration process, as well as fine tuning the model parameters is presented. Mercury injection capillary-pressure data were used to evaluate independently the multiscale networks. We explore single-scale, two-scale, and three-scale network models and discuss their representativeness by comparing simulated capillary-pressure versus saturation curves with laboratory measurements. We demonstrate that for carbonate rocks with wide pore size distributions, it may be required to integrate networks extracted from two or three discrete tomographic data sets in order to simulate macroscopic flow parameters.

  19. Bacterial secretins form constitutively open pores akin to general porins.

    PubMed

    Disconzi, Elena; Guilvout, Ingrid; Chami, Mohamed; Masi, Muriel; Huysmans, Gerard H M; Pugsley, Anthony P; Bayan, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Proteins called secretins form large multimeric complexes that are essential for macromolecular transit across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Evidence suggests that the channels formed by some secretin complexes are not tightly closed, but their permeability properties have not been well characterized. Here, we used cell-free synthesis coupled with spontaneous insertion into liposomes to investigate the permeability of the secretin PulD. Leakage assays using preloaded liposomes indicated that PulD allows the efflux of small fluorescent molecules with a permeation cutoff similar to that of general porins. Other secretins were also found to form similar pores. To define the polypeptide region involved in determining the pore size, we analyzed a collection of PulD variants and studied the roles of gates 1 and 2, which were previously reported to affect the pore size of filamentous phage f1 secretin pIV, in assembly and pore formation. Liposome leakage and a novel in vivo assay showed that replacement of the conserved proline residue at position 443 in PulD by leucine increased the apparent size of the pore. The in vitro approach described here could be used to study the pore properties of membrane proteins whose production in vivo is toxic.

  20. Bacterial Secretins Form Constitutively Open Pores Akin to General Porins

    PubMed Central

    Disconzi, Elena; Guilvout, Ingrid; Chami, Mohamed; Masi, Muriel; Huysmans, Gerard H. M.; Pugsley, Anthony P.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins called secretins form large multimeric complexes that are essential for macromolecular transit across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Evidence suggests that the channels formed by some secretin complexes are not tightly closed, but their permeability properties have not been well characterized. Here, we used cell-free synthesis coupled with spontaneous insertion into liposomes to investigate the permeability of the secretin PulD. Leakage assays using preloaded liposomes indicated that PulD allows the efflux of small fluorescent molecules with a permeation cutoff similar to that of general porins. Other secretins were also found to form similar pores. To define the polypeptide region involved in determining the pore size, we analyzed a collection of PulD variants and studied the roles of gates 1 and 2, which were previously reported to affect the pore size of filamentous phage f1 secretin pIV, in assembly and pore formation. Liposome leakage and a novel in vivo assay showed that replacement of the conserved proline residue at position 443 in PulD by leucine increased the apparent size of the pore. The in vitro approach described here could be used to study the pore properties of membrane proteins whose production in vivo is toxic. PMID:24142256

  1. Highly Efficient Electronic Sensitization of Non-oxidized Graphene Flakes on Controlled Pore-loaded WO3 Nanofibers for Selective Detection of H2S Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seon–Jin; Choi, Chanyong; Kim, Sang-Joon; Cho, Hee-Jin; Hakim, Meggie; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kim, Il–Doo

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring of semiconducting metal oxide nanostructures, which possess controlled pore size and concentration, is of great value to accurately detect various volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath, which act as potential biomarkers for many health conditions. In this work, we have developed a very simple and robust route for controlling both the size and distribution of spherical pores in electrospun WO3 nanofibers (NFs) via a sacrificial templating route using polystyrene colloids with different diameters (200 nm and 500 nm). A tentacle-like structure with randomly distributed pores on the surface of electrospun WO3 NFs were achieved, which exhibited improved surface area as well as porosity. Porous WO3 NFs with enhanced surface area exhibited high gas response (Rair/Rgas = 43.1 at 5 ppm) towards small and light H2S molecules. In contrast, porous WO3 NFs with maximized pore diameter showed a high response (Rair/Rgas = 2.8 at 5 ppm) towards large and heavy acetone molecules. Further enhanced sensing performance (Rair/Rgas = 65.6 at 5 ppm H2S) was achieved by functionalizing porous WO3 NFs with 0.1 wt% non-oxidized graphene (NOGR) flakes by forming a Schottky barrier (ΔΦ = 0.11) at the junction between the WO3 NFs (Φ = 4.56 eV) and NOGR flakes (Φ = 4.67 eV), which showed high potential for the diagnosis of halitosis.

  2. Designed membrane channels and pores.

    PubMed

    Bayley, H

    1999-02-01

    Advances in the synthesis and assembly of designed membrane channels and pores include addressable template-assisted synthetic protein (TASP) syntheses of helix bundles, the production of a new class of nanotubes and the ability to purify hetero-oligomeric pores. Channels and pores with altered functional properties and with built-in triggers and switches have been prepared. Progress in applications has been greatest in sensor technology, where sensor elements based on ligand activation, channel selectivity and channel block have been made. Structural information about natural membrane proteins is emerging to inspire new designs.

  3. Controlling Pore Geometries and Interpore Distances of Anodic Aluminum Oxide Templates via Three-Step Anodization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jin-Hee; Wiley, John B

    2015-01-01

    Porous alumina membranes have attracted much attention because they are very useful templates for the fabrication of various nanostructures important to nanotechnology. However, there are challenges in controlling pore geometries and interpore distances in alumina templates while maintaining highly ordered hexagonal pore structures. Herein, a three-step anodization method is utilized to prepare anodic alumina templates with various pore morphologies (e.g., arched-shape, tree-like, branched-shape) and tunable interpore distances. Such structures are not found within the more traditional alumina templates fabricated by a two-step anodization of aluminum films. The range of interpore distances and pore diameters within the modified templates increases with increasing voltages. In contrast, under decreasing voltages, hexagonally ordered pores can also branch into several pores with smaller sizes and reduced interpore distances. Electrochemical growth of metal nanowires in the modified templates helps to highlight details of the pore structures and which pore channels are active.

  4. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle -the fusion pore- can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, "flipped" t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  5. Velocity Profiles in Pores with Undulating Opening Diameter and Their Importance for Resistive-Pulse Experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pores with undulating opening diameters have emerged as an analytical tool enhancing the speed of resistive-pulse experiments, with a potential to simultaneously characterize size and mechanical properties of translocating objects. In this work, we present a detailed study of the characteristics of resistive-pulses of charged and uncharged polymer particles in pores with different aspect ratios and pore topography. Although no external pressure difference was applied, our experiments and modeling indicated the existence of local pressure drops, which modified axial and radial velocities of the solution. As a consequence of the complex velocity profiles, pores with undulating pore diameter and low-aspect ratio exhibited large dispersion of the translocation times. Distribution of the pulse amplitude, which is a measure of the object size, was not significantly affected by the pore topography. The importance of tuning pore geometry for the application in resistive-sensing and multipronged characterization of physical properties of translocating objects is discussed. PMID:25245282

  6. Investigation of the pore geometrical structure of nanofibrous membranes using statistical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi Khoshui, Sedigheh; Hosseini Ravandi, Seyed Abdolkarim; Bagherzadeh, Roohollah; Saberi, Zahra; Karimi, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    The pore size and its distribution are the two main geometrical properties of nanofibrous membranes in various applications such as filtration and tissue engineering. In the current paper, a modified approach (model) is suggested to predict pore size and its distribution in nanofibrous membranes. In the present work, inter-fibre pores are considered as polygons arising from the fibre contacts. For the first time, these polygons are assumed to be three-, four- and five-gons, and the hydraulic radius of the pores was obtained instead of the equal radius. The pore size of multilayer mats was provided with a different insight. The pore mean size and its distribution were obtained by statistical methods. In order to validate the model, polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous mats were electrospun, and the mean pore size and its distribution were measured using porosimetry. It was found that the probability distribution function of the pore size in both single and multi nanofibrous layers was the Gamma function with two parameters. The effect of the fibre width and porosity raise was increasing of mean pore diameter of multilayer networks. A comparison between the modified model and previous models revealed that the modified approach was more realistic.

  7. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  8. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-01-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir.

  9. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N.; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-01-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir. PMID:26310236

  10. The importance of dehydration in determining ion transport in narrow pores.

    PubMed

    Richards, Laura A; Schäfer, Andrea I; Richards, Bryce S; Corry, Ben

    2012-06-11

    The transport of hydrated ions through narrow pores is important for a number of processes such as the desalination and filtration of water and the conductance of ions through biological channels. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to systematically examine the transport of anionic drinking water contaminants (fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and nitrite) through pores ranging in effective radius from 2.8 to 6.5 Å to elucidate the role of hydration in excluding these species during nanofiltration. Bulk hydration properties (hydrated size and coordination number) are determined for comparison with the situations inside the pores. Free energy profiles for ion transport through the pores show energy barriers depend on pore size, ion type, and membrane surface charge and that the selectivity sequence can change depending on the pore size. Ion coordination numbers along the trajectory showed that partial dehydration of the transported ion is the main contribution to the energy barriers. Ion transport is greatly hindered when the effective pore radius is smaller than the hydrated radius, as the ion has to lose some associated water molecules to enter the pore. Small energy barriers are still observed when pore sizes are larger than the hydrated radius due to re-orientation of the hydration shell or the loss of more distant water. These results demonstrate the importance of ion dehydration in transport through narrow pores, which increases the current level of mechanistic understanding of membrane-based desalination and transport in biological channels.

  11. Tunable ultrathin membranes with nonvolatile pore shape memory.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Hidenori; Islam, Crescent; Tokarev, Igor; Hu, Heng; Liu, Guojun; Minko, Sergiy

    2015-05-20

    The concept of a responsive nanoporous thin-film gel membranes whose pores could be tuned to a desired size by a specific "molecular signal" and whose pore geometry becomes "memorized" by the gel is reported. The ∼100 nm thick membranes were prepared by dip-coating from a solution mixture of a random copolymer comprising responsive and photo-cross-linkable units and monodisperse latex nanoparticles used as a sacrificial colloidal template. After stabilization of the films by photo-cross-linking the latex template was removed, yielding nanoporous structures with a narrow pore size distribution and a high porosity. The thin-film membranes could be transferred onto porous supports to serve as tunable size-selective barriers in various colloids separation applications. The pore dimensions and hence the membrane's colloidal-particle-size cutoff were reversibly regulated by swelling-shrinking of the polymer network with a specially selected low-molar-mass compound. The attained pore shape was "memorized" in aqueous media and "erased" by treatment in special solvents reverting the membrane to the original state.

  12. Pore destruction resulting from mechanical thermal expression

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, S.A.; Wheeler, R.A.; Hoadley, A.F.A.

    2007-07-01

    Mechanical thermal expression (MTE) is a dewatering technology ideally suited for the dewatering of internally porous biomaterials. For such materials, the combined application of temperature and compressive force in the MTE process enhances the collapse of the porous structure, resulting in effective water removal. In this article, a comparison of the dewatering of titanium dioxide, which is an ideal incompressible, non-porous material, and lignite, which is a porous plant-based biomaterial, is presented. The comparison is based on the parameters critical to dewatering, namely the material compressibility and the permeability. With the aid of mercury porosimetry results, a detailed discussion of the pore destruction of lignite resulting from MTE processing is presented. It is illustrated that there is a well-defined relationship between the pore size distribution after MTE dewatering and the MTE temperature and pressure. The discussion is extended to an investigation of the effects of MTE processing conditions on the effective and noneffective porosity. The effective porosity is defined as the interconnected porosity, which contributes to flow through the compressed matrix, while the non-effective porosity is the remaining porosity, which does not contribute to flow. It is illustrated that there is a linear relationship in both the effective and non-effective porosity with the total porosity. The linear relationship is independent of the processing conditions. It is also shown that MTE processing collapses the effective and non-effective pores at roughly the same rate.

  13. Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, M.R.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddigui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  14. Application of real rock pore-threat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Rakibul, M.; Sarker, H.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddiqui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  15. A preliminary study of pores on epidermal ridges: Are there any sex differences and age related changes?

    PubMed

    Nagesh, K R; Bathwal, Shikha; Ashoka, B

    2011-10-01

    The pore characteristics on the epidermal friction ridges are individualistic and thereby useful in the process of identification when used along with other minutiae details. The present work was undertaken with the objective of studying the sex difference and influence of age on the pore morphology. The study included 230 Indians belonging to various age groups. There was no significant difference in the pore characteristics between both the sexes. The average number of pores per centimeter of friction ridge was 8.40 in males and 8.83 in females. The closed type was the commonest type of pores seen. The size of pores varied from 69 μm to 284 μm in males and 66 μm-287 μm in females. The medium-sized pores were more common than the small and large-sized pores. The majority of the pores were situated in the periphery of the ridge. The commonest shape of pores seen was circular and oval shaped pores. As the age advances, the number of pores does not significantly vary. But, the size gradually increases, and the position and shape of pores changes with the age.

  16. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  17. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable. PMID:26285123

  18. Gaseous Diffusion and Pore Structure in Nuclear Graphites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Timothy John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. With the incentive of providing more information for oxidation and safety studies of graphite components in thermal nuclear reactors, a new method has been developed to determine the gas transport pore structure in nuclear graphites. It involves an analysis of the dependence on pressure of the isobaric, isothermal (room temperature) diffusivity ratios of components in a binary gas mixture flowing through annular graphite samples. A Wicke-Kallenbach apparatus was specially built to measure He-Ar diffusivity ratios at pressures below 100 Torr. The new apparatus incorporates capacitance manometers and servovalves for pressure measurement and control, hot wire meters for flow rate measurements, and a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. As pressure decreased, the diffusivity ratios were observed to decrease non-linearly, indicating that the mechanism of flow in the materials was in the transition region between molecular and Knudsen diffusion. A mathematical model was derived to relate the pressure dependence of the transition diffusivity ratio to gas transport pore structure, and a statistical analysis based on Tikhonov regularisation was developed which gave a good fit of the model to the data, and optimal estimates of the number of model capillary pores, and the distribution of pore sizes. In comparison, the established methods of molecular diffusion and permeation (flow of pure gases) only give mean data on the pore size distribution. Pore structure data from the new method accurately predicted CO_2-Ar molecular diffusivity ratios, but overestimated N_2 permeability coefficients, due, it was assumed, to differences between diffusion and permeation pore structure. The cumulative volume distributions for transport pores from the transition diffusion data were similar in shape to those for open pores from mercury porosimetry, but shifted towards higher pore radii, indicating that diffusion is not so influenced

  19. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Sohn, D.-S.; Jamison, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE's Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  20. Exocytotic fusion pores are composed of both lipids and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel; Jeggle, Pia; Chanda, Baron; Edwardson, J Michael; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    During exocytosis, fusion pores form the first aqueous connection that allows escape of neurotransmitters and hormones from secretory vesicles. Although it is well established that SNARE proteins catalyze fusion, the structure and composition of fusion pores remain unknown. Here, we exploited the rigid framework and defined size of nanodiscs to interrogate the properties of reconstituted fusion pores, using the neurotransmitter glutamate as a content-mixing marker. Efficient Ca2+-stimulated bilayer fusion, and glutamate release, occurred with approximately two molecules of mouse synaptobrevin 2 reconstituted into ~6-nm nanodiscs. The transmembrane domains of SNARE proteins assumed distinct roles in lipid mixing versus content release and were exposed to polar solvent during fusion. Additionally, tryptophan substitutions at specific positions in these transmembrane domains decreased glutamate flux. Together, these findings indicate that the fusion pore is a hybrid structure composed of both lipids and proteins. PMID:26656855

  1. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M.; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R.; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle –the fusion pore– can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, “flipped” t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  2. Scale parameter-estimating method for adaptive fingerprint pore extraction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yao; Cao, Liangcai; Guo, Wei; Luo, Yaping; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-11-01

    Sweat pores and other level 3 features have been proven to provide more discriminatory information about fingerprint characteristics, which is useful for personal identification especially in law enforcement applications. With the advent of high resolution (>=1000 ppi) fingerprint scanning equipment, sweat pores are attracting increasing attention in automatic fingerprint identification system (AFIS), where the extraction of pores is a critical step. This paper presents a scale parameter-estimating method in filtering-based pore extraction procedure. Pores are manually extracted from a 1000 ppi grey-level fingerprint image. The size and orientation of each detected pore are extracted together with local ridge width and orientation. The quantitative relation between the pore parameters (size and orientation) and local image parameters (ridge width and orientation) is statistically obtained. The pores are extracted by filtering fingerprint image with the new pore model, whose parameters are determined by local image parameters and the statistically established relation. Experiments conducted on high resolution fingerprints indicate that the new pore model gives good performance in pore extraction.

  3. Ion exclusion by sub-2-nm carbon nanotube pores

    PubMed Central

    Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K.; Stadermann, Michael; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2008-01-01

    Biological pores regulate the cellular traffic of a large variety of solutes, often with high selectivity and fast flow rates. These pores share several common structural features: the inner surface of the pore is frequently lined with hydrophobic residues, and the selectivity filter regions often contain charged functional groups. Hydrophobic, narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes can provide a simplified model of membrane channels by reproducing these critical features in a simpler and more robust platform. Previous studies demonstrated that carbon nanotube pores can support a water flux comparable to natural aquaporin channels. Here, we investigate ion transport through these pores using a sub-2-nm, aligned carbon nanotube membrane nanofluidic platform. To mimic the charged groups at the selectivity region, we introduce negatively charged groups at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by plasma treatment. Pressure-driven filtration experiments, coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of the permeate and feed, are used to quantify ion exclusion in these membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion that can be as high as 98% under certain conditions. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, whereas steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. PMID:18539773

  4. Pore distributions in nanocrystalline metals from small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Eastman, J.A.

    1998-07-24

    Recent upgrades in inert-gas condensation processing equipment have produced nanocrystalline metal samples with high densities and low-impurity levels. Typical Cu and Pd samples have densities {ge}98% of theoretical and oxygen and hydrogen impurity concentrations {le}0.5 at. %. Lower porosity and impurity levels may make it difficult to produce and maintain samples with the smallest nanocrystalline grain sizes. These improved samples were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to determine the volume fraction and size distribution of pores. Excellent correlation was obtained between the total volume fraction of pores and the Archimedes density for Pd, signifying that most of the pores were relatively small and in the detectability range of SANS ({approx}1--100 nm). Nanocrystalline Cu is shown to exhibit a wider pore size distribution. For Pd, the average pore sizes were slightly smaller than the average grain size, while for Cu the pore size and grain size were about the same. Both materials exhibited a trend of increasing pore size with increasing grain size. In terms of processing prerequisites, the principal condition for the production of high-density nanocrystalline Cu is an exceptionally clean synthesis environment, while nanocrystalline Pd requires compaction at elevated temperatures. These differences are the result of Cu having both a lower melting point and a greater susceptibility to contamination by gaseous impurities such as oxygen.

  5. Electrolytic Transport Through Cylindrical Etched Pores in Polyethylene Terepthalate Track-Etched Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    In the present work, electrolytic transport phenomena is studied for different electrolytes (LiCl, NaCl, KCl of different concentrations) at room temperature (25 ± 2°C) through etched pores with different diameters having cylindrical shape in track-etched membranes of polyethylene terepthalate (PET) with pore density of the order of 106/cm2. Electric potential has been used as the driving force. It has been observed that electrolytic transport through pores is different for different electrolytes, depending strongly on size of cations and is independent of size of anions. In the case of cylindrical pores, there has not been found appreciable change in forward and backward resistances.

  6. Multiple Approaches to Characterizing Nano-Pore Structure of Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Gao, Z.; Ewing, R. P.; Dultz, S.; Kaufmann, J.; Hamamoto, S.; Webber, B.; Ding, M.

    2013-12-01

    Microscopic characteristics of porous media - pore shape, pore-size distribution, and pore connectivity - control fluid flow and mass transport. This presentation discusses various approaches to investigating nano-pore structure of Barnett shale, with its implications in gas production behavior. The innovative approaches include imbibition, tracer diffusion, edge-accessible porosity, porosimetry (mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen and water vapor sorption isotherms, and nuclear magnetic resonance cyroporometry), and imaging (Wood's metal impregnation followed with laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, and small angle neutron scattering). Results show that the shale pores are predominantly in the nm size range, with measured median pore-throat diameters about 5 nm. But small pore size is not the major contributor to low gas recovery; rather, the low mass diffusivity appears to be caused by low pore connectivity of Barnett shale. Chemical diffusion in sparsely-connected pore spaces is not well described by classical Fickian behavior; anomalous behavior is suggested by percolation theory, and confirmed by results of imbibition and diffusion tests. Our evolving complementary approaches, with their several advantages and disadvantages, provide a rich toolbox for tackling the nano-pore structure characteristics of shales and other natural rocks.

  7. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  8. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular

  9. Application of low-voltage field-emission SEM to the study of internal pore structures of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Ornberg, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon has interesting and useful properties for industrial applications. It has been used extensively in purification, separation, chemical recovery and catalysis. To achieve a predictable performance of activated carbon materials, it is necessary to develop a comprehensive understanding of the pore structure including pore size, pore shape, and pore surface chemistry. Macropores (> 50 nm), mesopores (2-50 nm) and micropores (< 2 nm) generally coexist in activated carbon. It is thus desirable to synthesize activated carbon with controlled pore structures to optimize its performance. We previously reported the characterization of the surface pore structure of activated carbon by field emission SEM (FESEM) and the examination of the internal pore structure by HAADF/HRTEM techniques. However, both HAADF and HRTEM techniques give only limited information about the carbon pore structure. We report here some preliminary observation of the internal pore structure of activated carbon by high resolution low voltage FESEM technique.

  10. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Junesch, Juliane; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows "disposal" of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape. PMID:25129640

  11. Transport pathways within percolating pore space networks of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Kevin; Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2013-06-01

    Granular media can be regarded as a mixture of two components: grains and the material filling the voids or pores between the grains. Pore properties give rise to a range of applications such as modelling ground water flow, carbon capture and sequestration. The grains within a dense granular material respond to deformation (e.g., shearing or compression) by rearranging to create local zones of compression and zones of dilatation (i.e., regions of high pore space). Descriptions of the deformation are typically focused on analysis of the solid skeleton via topology of physical contact networks of grains but an alternative perspective is to consider network representations of the evolving anisotropic pore space. We demonstrate how to construct pore space networks that express the local size of voids about a grain through network edge weights. We investigate sectors of the loading history when a percolating giant component of the pore space network exists. At these states the grains are in a configuration more prone to the efficient transport of material (e.g., fluid flow, mineral/gas deposits). These pathways can be found through examination of the weighted shortest paths percolating the boundaries of the material. In particular, network weights biased towards large void space results in efficient percolating pathways traversing the shear band in the direction of principal stress within a 2D granular assembly subject to high strains.

  12. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K G; Wiegand, Simone

    2016-04-19

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007)Proc Natl Acad Sci USA104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ∼85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of[Formula: see text]wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth. PMID:27044100

  13. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K G; Wiegand, Simone

    2016-04-19

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007)Proc Natl Acad Sci USA104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ∼85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of[Formula: see text]wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth.

  14. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases

    PubMed Central

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2016-01-01

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(22):9346−9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ∼85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45–90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of 10−3 wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth. PMID:27044100

  15. Modeling permeability evolution by precipitation and dissolution: from a single-pore channel to heterogeneous multi-pore systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, D.; Molins, S.

    2011-12-01

    Permeability modification by mineral precipitation or dissolution can significantly affect injection well performance in a bioremediation project. Well clogging may occur due to massive mineral deposition on the pore walls near the wellbore. Although the size of a cleanup site can be measured in hundreds of meters or even kilometers, the underlying geochemical and hydrologic processes in individual pores eventually define where and how fast the permeability will decline. Therefore, it is important to understand these pore-scale mechanisms in order to reduce the hindering effect of pore clogging and develop efficient well treatment procedures when its injectivity drops below the minimal-tolerance level. Additionally, model-based permeability-porosity correlations for pore space evolution caused by precipitation or dissolution are needed for realistic reservoir-scale numerical simulations. To gain insights into the pore-scale mechanisms of permeability modification by mineral precipitation and dissolution, we have developed a model describing the dynamic coupling between flow and reactive transport. The model relies on a sequential approach where alternating finite-volume multicomponent reactive transport and flow simulations evaluate the local precipitation-dissolution rates, update the pore space geometry from the mass balance considerations, the re-compute the flow field on the updated sample model. Segmented three dimensional micro-tomography images of the sediment, the chemical composition of the fluid, and the mineral composition of the rock are the input data for simulations. Some model details were reported at previous AGU meetings. We validate the model against a single-pore calcite dissolution experiment. Building on this problem, we use the model to evaluate the precipitation-dissolution patterns for a range of flow rates. We then simulate multi-pore systems to qualitatively reproduce the pattern of precipitation observed in experiments. For that purpose

  16. Fast robust correlation.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Alistair J; Kadyrov, Alexander; Christmas, William J; Kittler, Josef

    2005-08-01

    A new, fast, statistically robust, exhaustive, translational image-matching technique is presented: fast robust correlation. Existing methods are either slow or non-robust, or rely on optimization. Fast robust correlation works by expressing a robust matching surface as a series of correlations. Speed is obtained by computing correlations in the frequency domain. Computational cost is analyzed and the method is shown to be fast. Speed is comparable to conventional correlation and, for large images, thousands of times faster than direct robust matching. Three experiments demonstrate the advantage of the technique over standard correlation.

  17. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl Borate Potentiates CRAC Current by Directly Dilating the Pore of Open Orai1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaolan; Ali, Sher; Li, Yufeng; Yu, Haijie; Zhang, Mingshu; Lu, Jingze; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) elicits potentiation current (Ip) on Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. An accurate investigation into this modulation mechanism would reveal how STIM1-dependent channel gating is enhanced, and benefit the future immune enhancer development. Here, we directly probed the pore diameter of CRAC channels and found that 2-APB enlarged the pore size of STIM1-activated Orai1 from 3.8 to 4.6 Å. We demonstrated that ions with small sizes, i.e., Ca2+ and Na+, mediated prominent 2-APB-induced Ip on the wildtype (WT) Orai1 channels of narrow pore sizes, while conducted decreased or no Ip on Orai1-V102C/A/G mutant channels with enlarged pore diameters. On the contrary, large Cs+ ions blocked the WT channels, while displayed large 2-APB induced Ip on pore-enlarged Orai1-V102C/A/G mutant channels, and the potentiation ratio was highest on Orai1-V102C with an intermediate pore size. Furthermore, we showed that 2-APB potentiated Cs+ current on constitutively active Orai1-V102C/A/G mutants independent of STIM1. Our data suggest that 2-APB directly dilates the pore of open Orai1 channels, both ion size and pore diameter jointly determine the amplitude of Ip on CRAC channels, and the generation of Ip requires the open state of Orai1, not STIM1 itself. PMID:27373367

  18. Fabrication, pore structure and compressive behavior of anisotropic porous titanium for human trabecular bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuping; Li, Jinshan; Xu, Guangsheng; Liu, Gejun; Kou, Hongchao; Zhou, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Porous titanium with average pore size of 100-650 μm and porosity of 30-70% was fabricated by diffusion bonding of titanium meshes. Pore structure was characterized by Micro-CT scan and SEM. Compressive behavior of porous titanium in the out-of-plane direction was studied. The effect of porosity and pore size on the compressive properties was also discussed based on the deformation mode. The results reveal that the fabrication process can control the porosity precisely. The average pore size of porous titanium can be tailored by adjusting the pore size of titanium meshes. The fabricated porous titanium possesses an anisotropic structure with square pores in the in-plane direction and elongated pores in the out-of-plane direction. The compressive Young's modulus and yield stress are in the range of 1-7.5 GPa and 10-110 MPa, respectively. The dominant compressive deformation mode is buckling of mesh wires, but some uncoordinated buckling is present in porous titanium with lower porosity. Relationship between compressive properties and porosity conforms well to the Gibson-Ashby model. The effect of pore size on compressive properties is fundamentally ascribed to the aspect ratio of titanium meshes. Porous titanium with 60-70% porosity has potential for trabecular bone implant applications.

  19. The role of pore structure on char reactivity. Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    In order to examine the role of pore structure, studies will be conducted on coal chars in the electrodynamic balance. Larger particles will also be examined using a fluidized bed to examine diffusion control reactions, and soot will also be investigated to examine the role of meso- and micro-pores without macro-pore interference. These studies will allow a full range of particles sizes and temperatures to be investigated and eventually modeled.

  20. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  1. Membrane pores induced by magainin

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtke, S.J.; He, Ke; Heller, W.T.

    1996-10-29

    Magainin, found in the skin of Xenopus laevis, belongs to a broad class of antimicrobial peptides which kill bacteria by permeabilizing the cytoplasmic membrane but do not lyse eukaryotic cells. The 23-residue peptide has been shown to form an amphiphilic helix when associated with membranes. However, its molecular mechanism of action has been controversial. Oriented circular dichroism has detected helical magainin oriented perpendicular to the plane of the membrane at high peptide concentrations, but Raman, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR all indicate that the peptide is associated with the head groups of the lipid bilayer. Here we show that neutron in-plane scattering detects pores formed by magainin 2 in membranes only when a substantial fraction of the peptide is oriented perpendicular to the membrane. The pores are almost twice as large as the alamethicin pores. On the basis of the in-plane scattering data, we propose a toroidal (or wormhole) model, which differs from the barrel-stave model of alamethicin in that the lipid bends back on itself like the inside of a torus. The bending requires a lateral expansion in the head group region of the bilayer. Magainin monomers play the role of fillers in the expansion region thereby stabilizing the pore. This molecular configuration is consistent with all published magainin data. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Statistical geometry of pores and statistics of porous nanofibrous assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Stephen J; Sampson, William W

    2005-01-01

    The application of theoretical models to describe the structure of the types of fibrous network produced by the electrospinning of polymers for use in tissue engineering and a number of other applications is presented. Emphasis is placed on formal analyses of the pore size distribution and porosities that one would encounter with such structures and the nature of their relationships with other structural characteristics likely to be important for the performance of nanofibrous materials. The theoretical structures considered result from interactions between randomly placed straight rods that represent fibres with nanoscale dimensions. The dominant role of fibre diameter in controlling the pore diameter of the networks is shown and we discuss the perhaps counter-intuitive finding that at a given network mass per unit area and porosity, increasing fibre diameter results in an increase in mean pore radius. Larger pores may be required for ingrowth of cells to nanofibrous networks, hence this study clarifies that simply making the diameters of the fibres smaller might not be the way to improve cell proliferation on such substrates. An extensive review of structural features of the network such as the distribution of mass, inter-fibre contacts and available surface for cell attachment, fibre contact distributions for integrity of the networks and the porosity and pore size distributions is given, with emphasis placed on nanofibre dimensions for the first time. PMID:16849188

  3. Rock-fabric/petrophysical classification of carbonate pore space for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, F.J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper defines the important geologic parameters that can be described and mapped to allow accurate petrophysical quantification of carbonate geologic models. All pore space is divided into interparticle (intergrain and intercrystal) and vuggy pores. In nonvuggy carbonate rocks, permeability and capillary properties can be described in terms of particle size, sorting, and interparticle porosity (total porosity minus vuggy porosity). Particle size and sorting in limestones can be described using a modified Dunham approach, classifying packstone as grain dominated or mud dominated, depending on the presence or absence of intergrain pore space. To describe particle size and sorting in dolostones, dolomite crystal size must be added to the modified Dunham terminology. Larger dolomite crystal size improves petrophysical properties in mud-dominated fabrics, wheras variations in dolomite crystal size have little effect on the petrophysical properties of grain-dominated fabrics. A description of vuggy pore space that relates to petrophysical properties must be added to the description of interparticle pore space to complete the petrophysical characterization. Vuggy pore space is divided into separate vugs and touching vugs on the basis of vug interconnection. Separate vugs are fabric selective and are connected only through the interparticle pore network. Separate vug porosity contributes little to permeability and should be subtracted from total porosity to obtain interparticle porosity for permeability estimation. Separate-vug pore space is generally considered to by hydrocarbon filled in reservoirs; however, intragranular microporosity is composed of small pore sizes and may contain capillary-held connate water within the reservoir. Touching vugs are nonfabric selective and form an interconnected pore system independent of the interparticle system.

  4. Transport of Ions and Particles Through Single Pores of Controlled Geometry and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevarnik, Matthew A.

    Synthetic nanopores are a powerful tool to control the transport of ions, molecules, and water at the molecular level, mimicking biological systems. In this research, polymer pores are prepared of different geometries, sizes, and surface chemistry to utilize features seen in naturally occurring systems. Specifically, it was one of the goals of this research to prepare and characterize single polymer pores that rectify the current due to a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, similar to naturally occurring ion channels. Prior to modification, aqueous electrolytic solutions are able to conduct readily through the single polymer pores, but after the chemisorption of hydrophobic chemical groups, the pore demonstrates open and closed states. This behavior is also observed to be voltage dependent. Increasing voltage increases the probability of the pore to be in the open states. There is also a voltage range where the pore does not conduct at all. The hydrophobic gating was studied as a function of pore diameter and charge of the residual groups and could be used for an on demand drug delivery system. Another technique that was utilized in this research is the resistive-pulse technique, which is a powerful approach to detect single molecules and particles. A single particle passing through a pore can be observed as a transient drop of the transmembrane current. This research focuses on resistive-pulse sensing experiments performed with track-etched polymer pores characterized by an undulating diameter along the pore length. The resistive pulses generated by spherical beads passing through these pores have a repeatable pattern of large variations corresponding to these diameter changes. We show that this pattern of variations enables the unambiguous resolution of multiple particles simultaneously in the pore, the detection of transient sticking of particles within the pore, and confirmation whether any individual particle completely translocates the

  5. A network property necessary for concentration robustness

    PubMed Central

    Eloundou-Mbebi, Jeanne M. O.; Küken, Anika; Omranian, Nooshin; Kleessen, Sabrina; Neigenfind, Jost; Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of functionality of complex cellular networks and entire organisms exposed to environmental perturbations often depends on concentration robustness of the underlying components. Yet, the reasons and consequences of concentration robustness in large-scale cellular networks remain largely unknown. Here, we derive a necessary condition for concentration robustness based only on the structure of networks endowed with mass action kinetics. The structural condition can be used to design targeted experiments to study concentration robustness. We show that metabolites satisfying the necessary condition are present in metabolic networks from diverse species, suggesting prevalence of this property across kingdoms of life. We also demonstrate that our predictions about concentration robustness of energy-related metabolites are in line with experimental evidence from Escherichia coli. The necessary condition is applicable to mass action biological systems of arbitrary size, and will enable understanding the implications of concentration robustness in genetic engineering strategies and medical applications. PMID:27759015

  6. Magnetic relaxation--coal swelling, extraction, pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The grant activities during this period fall into four categories: (1) Completion of preparatory work, (2) Procedure refinement and actual preparation of whole coal, coal residue, coal extract and swelled coal samples for NMR studies, (3) Related studies of coal photolysis that employ materials from preliminary extractions and that examine the u.v.-visible and mass spectra of the extracts and (4) Continued investigations of the pulsed EPR characteristics of the whole coal samples that were prepared in the first quarter of the grant.

  7. Bimodal mesoporous silica with bottleneck pores.

    PubMed

    Reber, M J; Brühwiler, D

    2015-11-01

    Bimodal mesoporous silica consisting of two sets of well-defined mesopores is synthesized by a partial pseudomorphic transformation of an ordered mesoporous starting material (SBA-15 type). The introduction of a second set of smaller mesopores (MCM-41 type) establishes a pore system with bottlenecks that restricts the access to the core of the bimodal mesoporous silica particles. The particle size and shape of the starting material are retained, but micropores present in the starting material disappear during the transformation, leading to a true bimodal mesoporous product. A varying degree of transformation allows the adjustment of the pore volume contribution of the two mesopore domains. Information on the accessibility of the mesopores is obtained by the adsorption of fluorescence-labeled poly(amidoamine) dendrimers and imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This information is correlated with nitrogen sorption data to provide insights regarding the spatial distribution of the two mesopore domains. The bimodal mesoporous materials are excellent model systems for the investigation of cavitation effects in nitrogen desorption isotherms. PMID:26399172

  8. The Description of Shale Reservoir Pore Structure Based on Method of Moments Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjie; Wang, Changcheng; Shi, Zejin; Wei, Yi; Zhou, Huailai; Deng, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Shale has been considered as good gas reservoir due to its abundant interior nanoscale pores. Thus, the study of the pore structure of shale is of great significance for the evaluation and development of shale oil and gas. To date, the most widely used approaches for studying the shale pore structure include image analysis, radiation and fluid invasion methods. The detailed pore structures can be studied intuitively by image analysis and radiation methods, but the results obtained are quite sensitive to sample preparation, equipment performance and experimental operation. In contrast, the fluid invasion method can be used to obtain information on pore size distribution and pore structure, but the relative simple parameters derived cannot be used to evaluate the pore structure of shale comprehensively and quantitatively. To characterize the nanoscale pore structure of shale reservoir more effectively and expand the current research techniques, we proposed a new method based on gas adsorption experimental data and the method of moments to describe the pore structure parameters of shale reservoir. Combined with the geological mixture empirical distribution and the method of moments estimation principle, the new method calculates the characteristic parameters of shale, including the mean pore size (x¯), standard deviation (σ), skewness (Sk) and variation coefficient (c). These values are found by reconstructing the grouping intervals of observation values and optimizing algorithms for eigenvalues. This approach assures a more effective description of the characteristics of nanoscale pore structures. Finally, the new method has been applied to analyze the Yanchang shale in the Ordos Basin (China) and Longmaxi shale from the Sichuan Basin (China). The results obtained well reveal the pore characteristics of shale, indicating the feasibility of this new method in the study of the pore structure of shale reservoir. PMID:26992168

  9. The Description of Shale Reservoir Pore Structure Based on Method of Moments Estimation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjie; Wang, Changcheng; Shi, Zejin; Wei, Yi; Zhou, Huailai; Deng, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Shale has been considered as good gas reservoir due to its abundant interior nanoscale pores. Thus, the study of the pore structure of shale is of great significance for the evaluation and development of shale oil and gas. To date, the most widely used approaches for studying the shale pore structure include image analysis, radiation and fluid invasion methods. The detailed pore structures can be studied intuitively by image analysis and radiation methods, but the results obtained are quite sensitive to sample preparation, equipment performance and experimental operation. In contrast, the fluid invasion method can be used to obtain information on pore size distribution and pore structure, but the relative simple parameters derived cannot be used to evaluate the pore structure of shale comprehensively and quantitatively. To characterize the nanoscale pore structure of shale reservoir more effectively and expand the current research techniques, we proposed a new method based on gas adsorption experimental data and the method of moments to describe the pore structure parameters of shale reservoir. Combined with the geological mixture empirical distribution and the method of moments estimation principle, the new method calculates the characteristic parameters of shale, including the mean pore size (mean), standard deviation (σ), skewness (Sk) and variation coefficient (c). These values are found by reconstructing the grouping intervals of observation values and optimizing algorithms for eigenvalues. This approach assures a more effective description of the characteristics of nanoscale pore structures. Finally, the new method has been applied to analyze the Yanchang shale in the Ordos Basin (China) and Longmaxi shale from the Sichuan Basin (China). The results obtained well reveal the pore characteristics of shale, indicating the feasibility of this new method in the study of the pore structure of shale reservoir.

  10. Entropic selectivity of binary mixtures in cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; White, J. A.; Román, F. L.; Velasco, S.

    2011-10-01

    We show that a simple model consisting of a binary hard-sphere mixture in a narrow cylindrical pore can lead to strong size selectivity by considering a situation where each species of the mixture sees a different radius of the cylinder. Two mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results depending on the radius of the cylinder: for large radii the selectivity is driven by an enhancement of the depletion forces at the cylinder walls whereas for the narrowest cylinders excluded-volume effects lead to a shift of the effective chemical potential of the particles in the pore.

  11. Quantifying barriers to monovalent anion transport in narrow non-polar pores.

    PubMed

    Richards, Laura A; Schäfer, Andrea I; Richards, Bryce S; Corry, Ben

    2012-09-01

    The transport of anionic drinking water contaminants (fluoride, chloride, nitrate and nitrite) through narrow pores ranging in effective radius from 2.5 to 6.5 Å was systematically evaluated using molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the magnitude and origin of energetic barriers encountered in nanofiltration. Free energy profiles for ion transport through the pores show that energy barriers depend on pore size and ion properties and that there are three key regimes that affect transport. The first is where the ion can fit in the pore with its full inner hydration shell, the second is where the pore size is between the bare ion and hydrated radius, and the third is where the ion size approaches that of the pore. Energy barriers in the first regime are relatively small and due to rearrangement of the inner hydration shell and/or displacement of further hydration shells. Energy barriers in the second regime are due to partial dehydration and are larger than barriers seen in the first regime. In the third regime, the pore becomes too small for bare ions to fit regardless of hydration and thus energy barriers are very high. In the second regime where partial dehydration controls transport, the trend in the slopes of the change in energy barrier with pore size corresponds to the hydration strength of the anions.

  12. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF FINE PORE CERAMIC DIFFUSERS AT MONROE, WISCONSIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the fine pore aeration system at the Monroe, Wisconsin wastewater treatment plant was conducted to monitor, over a 2-year period, the oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) and fouling tendencies of four different effective pore size ceramic discs. The plant treats a mixtur...

  13. Microporous silica prepared by organic templating: Relationship between the molecular template and pore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Brinker, C.J. |; Cao, G.; Kale, R.P.; Prabakar, S.; Lopez, G.P.

    1999-05-01

    Microporous silica materials with a controlled pore size and a narrow pore size distribution have been prepared by sol-gel processing using an organic-templating approach. Microporous networks were formed by pyrolytic removal of organic ligands (methacryloxypropyl groups) from organic/inorganic hybrid materials synthesized by copolymerization of 3-methacryloxypropylsilane (MPS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Molecular simulations and experimental measurements were conducted to examine the relationship between the microstructural characteristics of the porous silica (e.g., pore size, total pore volume, and pore connectivity) and the size and amount of organic template ligands added. Adsorption measurements suggest that the final porosity of the microporous silica is due to both primary pores (those present in the hybrid material prior to pyrolysis) and secondary pores (those created by pyrolytic removal of organic templates). Primary pores were inaccessible to N{sub 2} at 77 K but accessible to CO{sub 2} at 195 K; secondary pores were accessible to both N{sub 2} (at 77 K) and CO{sub 2} (at 195 K) in adsorption measurements. Primary porosity decreases with the amount of organic ligands added because of the enhanced densification of MPS/TEOS hybrid materials as the mole fraction of trifunctional MPS moieties increases. Pore volumes measured by nitrogen adsorption experiments at 77 K suggest that the secondary (template-derived) porosity exhibits a percolation behavior as the template concentration is increased. Gas permeation experiments indicate that the secondary pores are approximately 5 {angstrom} in diameter, consistent with predictions based on molecular simulations.

  14. Perimeter-area power-law relationship of pores in sedimentary rocks and implications for permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.; Zimmerman, R.W.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1994-12-31