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Sample records for rock crystals

  1. Kinetics of crystallization of igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The geochemistry of igneous rocks is discussed, with the primary objectives of bringing together the theories underlying the kinetics of crystallization of igneous rocks and illustrating the use of these theories in understanding experimental and observational data. The primary purpose of the chapter is to introduce current thinking about the kinetics of igneous rocks and to provide a basis for understanding other work. A basic assumption made in the discussion is that the rate of any chemical reaction, including the crystallization of igneous rocks, is zero at equilibrium and proceeds at a finite rate only at a finite deviation from equilibrium. As such, an understanding of the processes operating in igneous rocks requires an understanding of how deviation from equilibrium affects the rates and mechanisms of the processes occurring during crystallization. These processes are detailed, with special emphasis given to nucleation and crystal growth. (JMT)

  2. Curved branching crystals and differentiation in comb-layered rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning two common features of comb layered rocks. Attention is given to the curvature of oriented, elongate, branching crystals and the tendency to form highly differentiated layers. Crystallization studies of plagioclase show that some degree of supercooling is necessary to produce the skeletal, curved, and branching plagioclase crystal morphologies found in comb-layered rocks and that curved crystals can be grown without the presence of a directed stress.

  3. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  4. High crystallization temperatures indicated for igneous rocks from tranquillity base.

    PubMed

    Skinner, B J

    1970-01-30

    Complex intergrowths of troilite (FeS) and iron in the igneous rocks from Tranquillity Base contain 8.4 percent native iron by volume. The intergrowths were derived from an initially homogeneous sulfide liquid that separated immiscibly from the magma at 1140 degrees C or above. Textures show that the sulfide liquid formed late in the crystallization and cooling history of the igneous rocks and after the major ilmenite and pyroxene had formed.

  5. Crystal size distribution (CSD) in rocks and the kinetics and dynamics of crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Ferry, John M.

    1988-08-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) measured in metamorphic rocks yield quantitative information about crystal nucleation and growth rates, growth times, and the degree of overstepping ( ΔT) of reactions during metamorphism. CSDs are described through use of a population density function n=dN/dL, where N is the cumulative number of crystals per unit volume and L is a linear crystal size. Plots of ln ( n) vs. L for olivine+pyroxene and magnetite in high-temperature (1000° C) basalt hornfelses from the Isle of Skye define linear arrays, indicating continuous nucleation and growth of crystals during metamorphism. Using the slope and intercept of these linear plots in conjunction with growth rate estimates we infer minimum mineral growth times of less than 100 years at ΔT<10° C, and nucleation rates between 10-4 and 10-1/cm3/s. Garnet and magnetite in regionally metamorphosed pelitic schists from south-central Maine have CSDs which are bell-shaped. We interpret this form to be the result of two processes: 1) initial continuous nucleation and growth of crystals, and 2) later loss of small crystals due to annealing. The large crystals in regional metamorphic rocks retain the original size frequency distribution and may be used to obtain quantitative information on the original conditions of crystal nucleation and growth. The extent of annealing increases with increasing metamorphic grade and could be used to estimate the duration of annealing conditions if the value of a rate constant were known. Finally, the different forms of crystal size distributions directly reflect differences in the thermal histories of regional vs. contact metamorphosed rocks: because contact metamorphism involves high temperatures for short durations, resulting CSDs are linear and unaffected by annealing, similar to those produced by crystallization from a melt; because regional metamorphism involves prolonged cooling from high temperatures, primary linear CSDs are later modified by annealing

  6. Crystal Size Distributions in Igneous rocks: Where are we now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M.

    2003-12-01

    Modern Crystal Size Distributions (CSD) studies started in 1988 and have expanded since then, albeit somewhat slowly. We have now measured CSDs in a variety of different compositions and for both plutonic and volcanic rocks. However, the subject still lags far behind chemical petrology and we need many more studies. CSD methodology has advanced considerably, both for 3D and 2D methods, but it is unfortunate that some 2D studies still do not use appropriate stereological conversions or publish their raw data. The nature of the lower size limit is very important, real or measurement artefact, but is not commonly stated. All this is especially important for comparing data with earlier studies. Individual CSDs of minerals are not always very informative. A much better approach is to look at suites of related CSDs. For instance, different minerals within a single sample, ensembles of related whole rock samples, comparison of late and early textures as preserved in oikocrysts, dykes or volcanic rocks. As more data become available it will be possible to compare usefully unrelated suites of rocks. Straight or nearly straight CSDs in volcanic rocks can be produced by steady-state crystallisation. If the growth rate is known then the residence time can be determined. In some rocks there is a good agreement with other chronometric techniques, but others show no such concordance. In the latter case another model may be more appropriate, such as textural coarsening. This model has been applied in some cases in inappropriate situations, which has cast doubt on the whole subject of CSDs. For plutonic rocks exponentially increasing undercooling can also produce straight CSDs. However, many CSDs are slightly curved and other models are possible, especially if no small crystals are present. Within ensembles of straight CSDs the slope and intercept are commonly correlated. This is mostly accounted for by closure and hence this correlation is not significant, although the variation

  7. Drinkable rocks: plants can use crystallization water from gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Some minerals hold water in their crystalline structure. Such is the case of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O), a rock forming mineral present in the arid and semi-arid regions of the five continents, including the dry most areas of the planet. Gypsum is also extensively found on Mars, where it constitutes a targeted substrate for the search of life. Under natural conditions and depending on the temperature, pressure, and dissolved electrolytes or organics, gypsum may lose crystallization water molecules, becoming bassanite (i.e. hemihydrate: CaSO4•½H2O) or anhydrite (CaSO4). As crystallization water can account for up to 20.8% of gypsum weight, it has been suggested that it could constitute a relevant source of water for organisms, particularly during summer. This suggestion is consistent with the phenology observed in some shallow-rooted plants growing on gypsum, which remain active when drought is intense, and with the increased soil moisture of gypsum soils during summer as compared to surrounding non-gypsum soils. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. These results significantly modify the current paradigm on water use by plants, where water held in the crystalline structure of mineral rocks is not regarded as a potential source. Given the existence of gypsum on the surface of Mars and its widespread occurrence on arid and semi-arid regions worldwide, our results have important implications for exobiology, the study of life under extreme conditions and arid land reclamation.

  8. Maximum probability domains in crystals: the rock-salt structure.

    PubMed

    Causà, Mauro; Savin, Andreas

    2011-11-17

    The present paper studies MX crystals in rock-salt structure (M: Li, Na, K; X: F, Cl, Br, I). They are often described as being formed by ions. Pictures based on quantum mechanical calculations sustain and quantify it. The tools used are (i) the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, (ii) the Electron Localization Function, and (iii) the maximization of the probability to find in a spatial domain a number of electrons equal to that of the ion under consideration. The present paper shows that the images provided by these three different tools to analyze the quantum mechanical calculations yield, for these systems, very similar results, in the sense that the spatial domains and probability distributions are close. While results for the first two methods are already present in the literature, the last of the methods is applied for the first time to these systems, and details about the method of calculation and program are also given.

  9. Crystallization studies of lunar igneous rocks: crystal structure of synthetic armalcolite.

    PubMed

    Lind, M D; Housley, R M

    1972-02-04

    Crystals of armalcolite, Mg(0.5)Fe(0.5)Ti(2)O(5), up to several millimeters in length have been grown from a glass initially having the composition of lunar rock 10017. A single-crystal x-ray study has confirmed that the crystals are isomorphous with pseudobrookite and has shown that the cations are strongly ordered, with the Ti(4+) ions occupying the 8f sites and the Fe(2+) and Mg(2+) ions randomly distributed over the 4c sites. An examination of karrooite, MgTi(2)O(5), has revealed a similar distribution of Mg(2+) and Ti(4+) ions. A reexamination of earlier x-ray and Mössbauer data for pseudobrookite, Fe(2)TiO(5), has shown that it is more consistent with this type of ordering than with the inverse structure that has been generally assumed.

  10. Solidification of Trapped Liquid in Rocks and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Trapped liquid in an igneous cumulate solidifies over a range of time and temperature that can be retrieved by use of the lever rule in binary solutions applied to plagioclase using the range in the An content found for the individual rock studied. The resident crystals in the cumulate count in the phase equilibria as though deposited by the resident liquid in pure fractional crystallization at the moment of trapping. The An range (Morse JPet 53:891, 2012) when measured in sufficient detail, defines the solidification history. The instantaneous solid composition along the solidus defines the zoning of the plagioclase as it follows the trapped liquid on the liquidus. The reference bulk composition of the trapped liquid is given by an intercept on the initial solid-liquid lever, defined by the fraction of plagioclase in the trapped parent magma times the residual porosity. The mafic fraction is assumed to solidify by reaction independently of the plagioclase zoning. The residual porosity is calculated from the An range when that is calibrated to a value independently determined from the evolved components. Examples from a recent treatment of residual porosity (cited above) will be given for the solidification of selected rock compositions from the Kiglapait and Skaergaard intrusions. The same principles apply to the solidification of melt inclusions, with the difference that the latter tend to sample an evolved sheath by capture, rather than a parent magma trapped by closure of a cumulate. Melt inclusions are evolved from birth, and then are likely to evolve further with continued growth and re-equilibration of the container. The cumulate, by contrast, given any small degree of adcumulus growth, has had time to exchange the evolved rejected solute owing to its slow solidification, so its trapped liquid is the contemporaneous magma at the cumulate interface. Experimental results on melt inclusions in mafic magma demonstrate their intrinsic evolved nature. For example

  11. Effect of crystal shape on neutron rocking curves of perfect single crystals designed for ultra-small-angle scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, A. K.; Rehm, C.

    2014-07-01

    The present study has been conducted in the framework of the channel-cut crystal design for the Kookaburra ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument to be installed at the OPAL reactor of ANSTO. This facility is based on the classical Bonse-Hart method that uses two multiple-reflection crystal systems. The dynamical theory of diffraction by perfect crystals distinguishes two cases: the Darwin case applying to infinitely thick crystals and the Ewald solution for very small absorption taking into account the reflection from the rear face of a plane-parallel crystal reflecting in Bragg geometry. The former is preferable because it yields narrower rocking curves. To prevent the neutrons to "see" the rear face, grooves were machined into the backside of perfect Si test crystals for single reflection and filled with neutron absorbing material. These samples were examined at the S18 instrument of the Institut Laue-Langevin. Unexpectedly the crystals with empty slots showed an increase of the rocking curve width. When filling the slots with an absorber the widths decreased, but without reaching that of the Darwin curve. Understanding the results and achieving a successful crystal design call for the development of a theory that permits to describe neutron diffraction from crystals with a structured back face.

  12. Rocking curve imaging of high quality sapphire crystals in backscattering geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Jafari, A.; European Synchrotron Radiation Facility; Univ. of Liege,; ...

    2017-01-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of high quality sapphire single crystals suitable for high-resolution X-ray optics at high energy. Investigations using rocking curve imaging reveal the crystals to be of uniformly good quality at the level of ~10-4 in lattice parameter variations, deltad/d. But, investigations using backscattering rocking curve imaging with lattice spacing resolution of deltad/d ~ 5.10-8 shows very diverse quality maps for all crystals. Our results highlight nearly ideal areas with edge length of 0.2-0.5 mm in most crystals, but a comparison of the back re ection peak positions shows that even neighboring ideal areas exhibit amore » relative difference in the lattice parameters on the order of deltad/d = 10-20.10-8; this is several times larger than the rocking curve width. Furthermore, the stress-strain analysis suggests that an extremely stringent limit on the strain at a level of ~100 kPa in the growth process is required in order to produce crystals with large areas of the quality required for X-ray optics at high energy.« less

  13. Rocking curve imaging of high quality sapphire crystals in backscattering geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Sergueev, I.; Bessas, D.; Klobes, B.; Roschin, B. S.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Alexeev, P.; Härtwig, J.; Chumakov, A. I.; Wille, H.-C.; Hermann, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the characterization of high quality sapphire single crystals suitable for high-resolution X-ray optics at high energy. Investigations using rocking curve imaging reveal the crystals to be of uniformly good quality at the level of ˜10-4 in lattice parameter variations, δd /d . However, investigations using backscattering rocking curve imaging with a lattice spacing resolution of δd /d ˜5 ×10-8 show very diverse quality maps for all crystals. Our results highlight nearly ideal areas with an edge length of 0.2-0.5 mm in most crystals, but a comparison of the back reflection peak positions shows that even neighboring ideal areas exhibit a relative difference in the lattice parameters on the order of δd /d =10 - 20 ×10-8 ; this is several times larger than the rocking curve width. Stress-strain analysis suggests that an extremely stringent limit on the strain at a level of ˜100 kPa in the growth process is required in order to produce crystals with large areas of the quality required for X-ray optics at high energy.

  14. Rocks Whose Compositions are NOT Determined by Crystal Sorting: Lessons From the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBirney, A. R.

    2002-12-01

    Wager and Deer's Skaergaard Memoir, published shortly after the appearance of Bowen's "Evolution of Igneous Rocks" was widely viewed as the ideal confirmation of the dominant role of crystal fractionation in magmatic differentiation. The mineralogical sequence followed a course predicted by phase equilibria, and the spectacular layering seemed to offer clear evidence of crystal settling. Although the liquid line of descent proposed by Wager was closer to the "Fenner trend" of iron enrichment than to the one Bowen favored, there was no evidence that the rocks represented liquid compositions; they must have been formed by crystal sorting. This interpretation was supported by the elegant "cumulate" concept proposed a few years later by Wager and Brown. An elaborate system based on petrographic textures seen in the Skaergaard rocks soon became a pervasive paradigm for interpreting coarse-grained igneous rocks. Because of its remote location, nearly half a century passed before the Skaergaard Intrusion was seen by geologists who were not members of Wager's team. When an independent group examined the body they reported two simple observations that conflicted with earlier interpretations. First, it was noted that the plagioclase in graded "sedimentary" layers was less dense than the liquid through which it was said to have settled, and, second, some of the rocks were found to have been severely altered, both in texture and in bulk composition. The most conspicuous evidence was found in swarms of angular anorthositic blocks that had fallen from the roof. The present composition of these blocks is much more felsic than that of the unit from which they fell. Rinds of ferromagnesian minerals appear to be the mafic component that was somehow expelled from the residual plagioclase. When examined under the microscope, the contact between the block and its host, which seems so sharp in outcrops, is seen to be indistinct and gradational. The changes seen in these blocks must have

  15. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  16. Measurement of group-velocity dispersion of Bloch modes in photonic-crystal-fiber rocking filters.

    PubMed

    Wong, G K L; Zang, L; Kang, M S; Russell, P St J

    2010-12-01

    We use low-coherence interferometry to measure the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) of the fast and slow Bloch modes of structural rocking filters, produced by twisting a highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber to and fro while scanning a focused CO(2) laser beam along it. The GVD curves in the vicinity of the resonant wavelength differ dramatically from those of the unperturbed fiber, suggesting that rocking filters could be used in the optimization of, e.g., four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation. Excellent agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  17. Crystallization from a vapor phase in igneous rocks -- A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect

    Kleck, W.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Euhedral, late-stage crystals in pocket pegmatite and in vesicles of volcanic rocks are commonly cited as examples of crystallization from a vapor phase. If, however, crystallization takes place only from the cavity forming vapor, that vapor cannot contain sufficient material for the formation of the observed crystals. The approximate amount of H[sub 2]O vapor and percentage of dissolved silicate matter (1) for shallow pocket pegmatite is 0.5 g/cm[sup 3] and 0.3 percent; (2) for vesicles is 0.002 g/cm[sup 3] and [much lt]1 percent. These values show that the silicate matter dissolved in the vapor is insufficient for the formation of the observed crystals. No (or little) recharge of the vapor is an unstated assumption in most discussions of enclosed cavities. This, however, is not quite correct. For a simplified system, four phases will exist in equilibrium: (1) mineral grains growing from liquid, (2) late-stage, H[sub 2]O-enriched, silicate liquid, (3) vapor, (4) crystals growing from vapor. The total system (for transferal of silicate matter) is given. Little silicate matter is dissolved in the vapor at any one time, but it is replenished as the crystals grow. The vapor becomes a continuously resupplied reservoir of dissolved silicate matter; crystallization from the vapor continues until the silicate liquid is depleted.

  18. Rock-magnetic properties of single zircon crystals sampled from the Tanzawa tonalitic pluton, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Ohno, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Maruyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the rock-magnetic properties of single zircon crystals, which are essential for future work establishing the paleointensity method using single zircon crystals. Zircon crystals used in this study were sampled from the Nakagawa River, which crosses the Tanzawa tonalitic pluton in central Japan. Rock-magnetic measurements were conducted on 1037 grains of zircons, but many of these measurements are below the limits of the sensitivity of the magnetometers employed. Isothermal remanent magnetizations (IRMs) of 876 zircon crystal are below the practical resolution of this study; we infer that these crystal contain no or only minute quantities of ferromagnetic minerals. The other zircon crystals contain enough magnetic minerals to be measured in the DC SQUID magnetometer. For 81 zircon crystals, IRM intensity (MIRM) are larger than 4 × 10-12 Am2, while natural remanent magnetization (NRM) intensity (MNRM) are below 4 × 10-12 Am2, indicating that these crystals are inappropriate for the paleomagnetic study. For the samples that had values of MNRM ≥ 4 × 10-12 Am2 and MIRM ≥ 4 × 10-12 Am2, combining the rock-magnetic parameter, we proposed the sample selection criteria for future study of paleointensity experiments using single zircon crystals. In the case that the samples had high Bc values (>10 mT) or high MNRM/MIRM values (>~0.1), main remanence carriers are probably pyrrhotite and these samples are inappropriate for the paleointensity study. In the case that the samples had low Bc values (<10 mT) and low MNRM/MIRM values (<~0.1), main remanence carrier seem to be nearly pure magnetite with PSD grain sizes and these samples are expected to appropriate for the paleointensity study. Total thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) acquisition experiments were also carried out for 12 samples of the zircon crystals satisfying the above criteria. The TRM intensity was comparable with that of NRM, and a rough estimation of the paleointensity using NRM

  19. Generation of continental adakitic rocks: Crystallization modeling with variable bulk partition coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hong-Kun; Zheng, Jianping; Zhou, Xiang; Griffin, W. L.

    2017-02-01

    The geochemical signatures (i.e., high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios) of adakitic rocks in continental settings, which are derived from the continental lower crust rather than from subducted slabs, may reflect high-pressure melting in the lower crust or may be inherited from their sources. The North China Craton (NCC) is an ideal place for investigation of this type of adakites due to its ubiquitous distribution. As an example, we explore the petrogenesis of the Jurassic ( 163 Ma) adakitic rocks in western Liaoning, in the NE part of the NCC, using elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analysis and crystallization modeling based on Rhyolite-MELTS. The modeling demonstrates that adakitic signatures can be generated by fractional crystallization of magmas within crust of normal thickness (i.e., 33 km). Partial-melting modeling based on the composition of the lower continental crust shows that only the adakitic rocks from orogenic belts require a thickened crust (i.e., 45 km). We suggest that continental adakitic rocks are not necessarily linked to high-pressure processes and their use as an indicator of thickened/delaminated continental crust should be regarded with caution.

  20. Rock-magnetic properties of single zircon crystals sampled from the Tanzawa tonalitic pluton, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Okada, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Masao; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Maruyama, Shigenori

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on the rock-magnetic properties of single zircon crystals, which are essential for future work establishing the reliable paleointensity method using single zircon crystals. Zircon crystals used in this study were sampled from the Nakagawa River, which crosses the Tanzawa tonalitic pluton in central Japan. Rock-magnetic measurements were conducted on 1037 grains of zircons, but many of these measurements are below the limits of the sensitivity of the magnetometers employed. Isothermal remanent magnetizations (IRMs) of 876 zircon crystal are below the practical resolution of this study; we infer that these crystals contain no or only minute quantities of ferromagnetic minerals. The other zircon crystals contain enough magnetic minerals to be measured in the DC SQUID magnetometer. For 81 zircon crystals, IRM intensities ( M IRM) are larger than 4 × 10-12 Am2, while natural remanent magnetization (NRM) intensities ( M NRM) are below 4 × 10-12 Am2, indicating that these crystals are inappropriate for the paleomagnetic study. For the samples that had values of M NRM ≥ 4 × 10-12 Am2 and M IRM ≥ 4 × 10-12 Am2 (80 zircons), combining the rock-magnetic parameter, we proposed the sample-selection criteria for future study of paleointensity experiments using single zircon crystals. In the case that the samples had high coercivity ( B c) values (>10 mT) or high M NRM/ M IRM values (>~0.1), main remanence carriers are probably pyrrhotite and these samples are inappropriate for the paleointensity study. In the case that the samples had low B c values (<10 mT) and low M NRM/ M IRM values (<~0.1), main remanence carriers seem to be nearly pure magnetite with pseudo-single-domain grain sizes, and these samples are expected to appropriate for the paleointensity study. Total thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) acquisition experiments were also carried out for 12 samples satisfying the above criteria. The TRM intensity was comparable with that of NRM, and a

  1. Crystal Size Distribution of Quartz Grains: A Means for Interpreting Igneous Textures in Dikes and Other Intrusive Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. J.; Candela, P. A.; Piccoli, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    Crystal size distribution analysis was applied to quartz crystals in intrusive igneous rocks in an attempt to describe quantitatively the degree to which the size distribution of the intrusive samples differs from that of extrusive rocks unaffected by near-solidus and sub-solidus recrystallization, grain boundary migration, and annealing. The samples include a seriate dike (width scale ~2 meters) found within the Courtright Shear Zone in the central Sierra Nevada (California), and three hypabyssal, Mesozoic-age plutons within the Great Basin (Nevada) including: the McCoy Pluton, granodiorite which exhibits a medium to coarse-grained hypidiomorphic texture; the Mill Canyon Stock, characterized by a hypidiomorphic-granular texture and which plots near the boundary between granite and granodiorite on a Streckeisen diagram; and the Trenton Canyon Pluton, which is a medium-grained hypidiomorphic-granular to slightly porphyritic granodiorite (Ratajeski, K., M.S. Thesis, Univ. MD, 1995). Crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis can be used to analyze quantitatively the texture of an igneous rock to derive information about the kinetics of crystallization. We used a batch crystallization formalism to model the crystallization kinetics of the intrusive rocks. In previous studies, CSD plots associated with extrusive samples have regularly exhibited a power-law crystal size distribution. In an attempt to determine the extent to which the CSD plots associated with intrusive samples approximate the CSD trends found for extrusive rocks, we measured the longest apparent diameters of quartz crystals in each sample for CSD analysis. Quartz was chosen for analysis because its aspect ratio approached unity. Therefore, the quartz grains can be approximated as a sphere in three dimensions, allowing for a simple area-to-volume conversion and minimizing stereological problems. Using the conductive heat transfer equation (dc = (κ t)1/2) applied to a dike with a cooling length of 1 meter

  2. Mineral chemical compositions of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the Giresun area, NE Turkey: Implications for the crystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oǧuz, Simge; Aydin, Faruk; Uysal, İbrahim; Şen, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    This contribution contains phenocryst assemblages and mineral chemical data of late Cretaceous volcanic (LCV) rocks from the south of Görele and Tirebolu areas (Giresun, NE Turkey) in order to investigate their crystallization conditions. The LCV rocks in the study area occur in two different periods (Coniasiyen-Early Santonian and Early-Middle Campanian), which generally consist of alternation of mafic-intermediate (basaltic to andesitic) and felsic rock series (dacitic and rhyolitic) within each period. The basaltic and andesitic rocks in both periods generally exhibit porphyritic to hyalo-microlitic porphyritic texture, and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene, whereas the dacitic and rhyolitic rocks of the volcanic sequence usually show a vitrophyric texture with predominant plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz and lesser amphibole-biotite phenocrysts. Zoned plagioclase crystals of the mafic and felsic rocks in different volcanic periods are basically different in composition. The compositions of plagioclase in the first-stage mafic rocks range from An52 to An78 whereas those of plagioclase from the first-stage felsic rocks have lower An content varying from An38 to An50. Rim to core profile for the zoned plagioclase of the first-stage mafic rocks show quite abrupt and notable compositional variations whereas that of the first-stage felsic rocks show slight compositional variation, although some of the grains may display reverse zoning. On the other hand, although no zoned plagioclase phenocryst observed in the second-stage mafic rocks, the compositions of microlitic plagioclase show wide range of compositional variation (An45-80). The compositions of zoned plagioclase in the second-stage felsic rocks are more calcic (An65-81) than those of the first-stage felsic rocks, and their rim to core profile display considerable oscillatory zoning. The compositions of pyroxenes in the first- and second-stage mafic-intermediate rocks vary over a wide range from

  3. Mineral inclusions in garnet crystals and their application in studies of high and ultrahigh pressure rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchuk, Alexei

    2010-05-01

    Mineral inclusions in crystals like garnet, zircon or clinopyroxene play a key role in identifying ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks and in deciphering their metamorphic (P) - temperature (T) history. In this contribution, we address the questions related to the modification of garnet interiors mediated by H2O and/or CO2 fluids released either from the mineral inclusions or from the exterior source. The data presented are based on experimental studies of eclogitic garnets containing various mineral inclusions and on petrologic studies of natural rocks from several HP and UHP complexes. An experimental study on eclogitic garnets with different min¬eral inclusions (including hydrous phases and carbonates) from several subduction-related complexes reveals considerable modification of garnet interiors at temperatures of 700-1100˚C and a pressure of 3-4 GPa, representative of different diamond-bearing metamorphic UHP terranes. Epidote, amphibole, and chlorite inclusions in the garnets underwent dehydration melting over the entire experimental PT range. In the presence of aqueous fluids, carbonate minerals in the inclusions began to melt at 800 °C and 3 GPa. Melting gave rise to new garnet, with the composition controlled by the chemistry of the primary inclusions and by PT run conditions. Garnet either grew directly from the melt or formed by metasomatic replacement of host garnet walls, leaving residual melt at the substitution front in the latter case. Partial melting of inclusions decreased the mechanical strength of the garnet host and led to local shearing. The following diagnostic criteria for melt in metamorphic garnet may be formulated on the basis of the experimental study: (1) (sub-) euhedral garnet grows within the inclusion and/or xenomorphic garnet replaces the garnet host; (2) newly formed garnet is characterized by a composition different from the garnet host; (3) the inclusion surface is features characteristic wedge-shaped ledges or radial

  4. Fluid-rock interaction controlling clay-mineral crystallization in quartz-rich rocks and its influence on the seismicity of the Carboneras fault area (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Espinosa, R.; Abad, I.; Jimenez-Millan, J.; Lorite-Herrera, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Carboneras Fault zone is one of the longest fault in the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) and it would be a good candidate to generate large magnitude earthquakes (Gracia et al., 2006). Seismicity in the region is characterised by low to moderate magnitude events, although large destructive earthquakes have occurred, which reveals significant earthquake and tsunami hazards (Masana et al., 2004). Due to the internal architecture of the fault zone, shear lenses of post-orogenic sediments of Miocene and Pliocene age including marls and sandstones sequences are juxtaposed to the predominant slaty gouges of the Alpine basement. Microcataclasites and gouges of the quartz-rich post-orogenic sediments are also developed as cm- to m-scale bands, allowing the comparison between the deformed materials and their protoliths. Red, yellow and white sandstones and their respective cataclasites can be identified. This communication is concerned with the clay mineral crystallization events in these materials and its possible influence on the seismicity model of the region. The presence of phyllosilicates in fault zones as either neoformed or inherited clays is commonly related with fluid circulation and a mechanically weak fault behaviour (e.g., Wang, 1984). A critical factor for the understanding of the mechanical role of clays in fault rocks is to determine the timing of formation of mineral assemblages and microstructure of fault rocks and protolith. The effects of post-faulting alteration limit inferences about fault behaviour that can be made from exhumed rocks. The Carboneras fault zone provides good opportunities to study mineral processes enhanced by deformation, given that it is located in a region of arid climate and shows outcroppings of quartzitic rocks included in slaty rocks. Combined XRD, optical microscopy and SEM analyses reveal that deformed quartzitic rocks are enriched in phyllosilicates, increasing especially the amount of chlorite. The samples strongly damaged

  5. X-Ray Rocking Curve and Ferromagnetic Resonance Investigations of Ion-Implanted Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speriosu, Virgil Simon

    constant A and the cubic anisotropy H(,1) was elucidated. Si-implanted {100} GaAs, Si, and Ge were studied by the rocking curve method. Sharp differences were found between the damage in GaAs on one hand and Si and Ge on the other. At a moderate damage level the GaAs crystal undergoes a transition from elastic to plastic behavior. The plastically deformed region presents a barrier to epitaxial regrowth and is consistent with the well-known high defect density in regrown GaAs.

  6. Rates and processes of crystal growth in the system anorthite-albite. [magmatic liquids in igneous rock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Klein, L.; Uhlmann, D. R.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The growth rates and interface morphologies of crystals of synthetic compositions in the anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8)-albite (NaAlSi3O8) plagioclase feldspar system are measured in an investigation of the crystallization of igneous rocks. Mixed plagioclase glasses with compositions of 75% and 50% anorthite were observed using the microscope heating technique as they crystallized at temperatures near the liquidus, and 75%, 50% and 20% anorthite crystals were treated by resistance heating and observed at greater degrees of undercooling. Growth rates were found to be independent of time and to decrease with increasing albite content, ranging from 0.5 to 2 x 10 to the -5th cm/min. The crystal morphologies for all compositions are faceted near the liquidus and become progressively skeletal, dendritic and fibrillar with increasing undercooling.

  7. A database of crystal preferred orientation of olivine in upper mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainprice, D.

    2012-12-01

    Olivine is the most volumetrically abundant mineral in the Earth's upper mantle, as such it dominates the mechanical and physical properties and has a controlling influence of the geodynamics of plate tectonics. Since the pioneering work of Hess and others we know that seismic anisotropy of the shallow mantle is related to olivine and it's crystal preferred orientation (CPO). With advent of plate tectonics the understanding of the key role of peridotite rocks became a major scientific objective and the measurement CPO of olivine in upper mantle samples became an important tool for studying the kinematics of these rocks. Our group originally lead by Adolphe Nicolas introduced the systematic use of CPO measured by U-stage for field studies all over the world for over 30 years, this tradition was extended in last 15 years by the use of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) to study of CPO and the associated digital microstructure. It is an appropriate time to analysis this significant database of olivine CPO, which represents the work of our group, both present and former members, as well as collaborating colleagues. It is also interesting to compare the natural record as illustrated by our database in the light of recent experimental results stimulated by the extended ranges in temperature, pressure and finite strain, as well as intrinsic olivine variables such as hydrogen content. To analysis the database, which is heterogeneous because it is constructed from the individual work of many people over a 45 year period containing U-stage data and EBSD measurements (manual indexing point per grain, automatic indexing one point per grain, automatic indexing gridded mapping data) of various formats, we need a flexible software tool that can handle large volumes of data in consistent way. We have used the state-of-art open source MTEX toolbox for quantitative texture analysis. MTEX is a scriptable MATLAB toolbox, which permits all aspects of quantitative texture

  8. Search for the origins of the geodynamo: Paleomagnetic studies of rocks and zircon crystals from the Jack Hills, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Andrade Lima, E.; Maloof, A. C.; Tailby, N.; Trail, D.; Ramezani, J.; Hanus, V.; Watson, E. B.; Fu, R. R.; Harrison, M.; Bowring, S. A.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is currently unknown when Earth's dynamo magnetic field originated. This timing has major implications for the thermal evolution of the interior, the physics of dynamo action, the surface cosmic ray flux, the evolution of the terrestrial atmosphere, and planetary habitability. Paleomagnetic studies of the oldest known unmetamorphosed rocks indicate that a field with intensity similar to that of the present existed at least 3.5 billion years ago (Ga). One of the very few sample suites predating this time are detrital zircon crystals found in quartz-rich siliciclastic rocks from the Jack Hills of Western Australia. With crystallization ages ranging from 3.0-4.38 Ga, they have the potential to preserve a record of the missing first billion years of Earth's magnetic field history. Over the last fourteen years, we have been studying individual Jack Hills zircon crystals and their host rocks to characterize the nature, age, and intensity of their paleomagnetism. Petrographic and rock magnetic studies suggest the zircons contain inclusions of ferromagnetic iron oxides and sulfides. Using a newly developed ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry technique implemented on our superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope, we have found that many zircons carry an extremely weak natural remanent magnetization (ranging from 5-10x10-14 Am2), essentially making them the most weakly magnetic samples studied in the history of paleomagnetism. They present tremendous analytical challenges associated with magnetic contamination and limitations on magnetic recording properties. We present the first magnetic field paleointensity studies of these zircons. The key unknown is the age and origin of their magnetization. In particular, the identification of >3.9 Ga (Hadean) field records requires at least establishing that the zircons have avoided post-depositional remagnetization. However, there are presently no paleomagnetic data that have confidently established the

  9. Petrology and crystal chemistry of poikilitic anorthositic gabbro 77017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.; Mathez, E. A.; Okamura, F. P.; Ghose, S.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of mineralogy are considered, taking into account the occurrence and the characteristics of plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine. Attention is also given to oxides, opaque minerals, and glass components. Questions regarding the temperature of formation and the origin of the considered lunar poikilitic rocks are discussed. It is pointed out that the presented hypothesis may not be applicable to other poikilitic lunar rocks.

  10. Strain maps with ppm resolution for single crystal wafers obtained from x-ray rocking curve maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, Albert; Zhong, Yuncheng; Maj, Josef; Chu, Yong; Krasnicki, Szczesny

    2006-03-01

    A double crystal (+, -) x-ray technique has been used to obtain separate maps of strain and tilt across single crystal samples of high crystalline perfection. Rocking curves were obtained for each pixel of a CCD detector and from these data angular shifts of the rocking curve center were mapped. By using data for two azimuthal rotations, that is, by combining data from two diffraction conditions separated by 180 rotation around the diffraction vector, we obtained separately the tilt and the strain. Data for diamonds has been obtained to demonstrate the technique in the case of a symmetric reflection[1]. Extensions of the method to asymmetric reflections in order to also extract strains parallel to the surface[2] will be discussed. Also a correction for wavelength dispersion in the case of different d-spacings for first and second crystals will be discussed. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences-Materials Science, under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38 and by NSF under contract No. EAR-0421020. [1] A.T. Macrander et al., Applied Physics Letters, 87, 194113 (2003). [2] V. Swaminathan and A.T. Macrander, ``Materials Aspects of GaAs and InP Based Structures'', Prentice Hall, 1991, ISBN 0-13-346826-7.

  11. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  12. The crystallization water of gypsum rocks is a relevant water source for plants.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2014-08-18

    Some minerals, like gypsum, hold water in their crystalline structure. Although still unexplored, the use of such crystallization water by organisms would point to a completely new water source for life, critical under dry conditions. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. Given the widespread occurrence of gypsum in dry lands throughout the Earth and in Mars, these results may have important implications for arid land reclamation and exobiology.

  13. Spinel-silicate co-crystallization relations in sample 15555. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J.; Hollister, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    The results on the crystallization history of medium-grained mare basalt sample 15555,171, based on microprobe analyses (Dalton, 1973) of host and inclusion mineral pairs are summarized with emphasis placed on that part of the crystallization history during which chromite and ulvospinel were crystallizing. Compositional data on pyroxene olivine, chromite and ulvospinel in 15555,171 were collected using microprobe; data are based on corrected counts ratios for nine elements. It is concluded that systematic chemical relations between host and inclusion minerals suggest continuous in situ nucleation and growth of these minerals; that the data allow the possibility of some minerals, especially chromite, settling out of the melt during crystallization; and that the chromite to ulvospinel transition is correlated with a compositional change of the melt resulting from nucleation and growth of plagioclase.

  14. About Small Streams and Shiny Rocks: Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we have grown diffraction quality protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. With this technology volumes smaller than achievable with any laboratory pipette can be dispensed with high accuracy. We have performed a feasibility study in which we crystallized several proteins with the aid of a LabChip device. The protein crystals are of excellent quality as shown by X-ray diffraction. The advantages of this new technology include improved accuracy of dispensing for small volumes, complete mixing of solution constituents without bubble formation, highly repeatable recipe and growth condition replication, and easy automation of the method. We have designed a first LabChip device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode and can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents. We are currently testing this design. Upon completion additional crystallization techniques, such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility aboard the International Space Station.

  15. Characterization of HgI/sub 2/ single crystals and detectors by x-ray rocking curve analysis and x-ray reflection topography

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, R.; Keller, L.; Wagner, N.J.; Schieber, M.M.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt has been made to establish a correlation between the results of x-ray rocking curves and x-ray reflection topographs for vapor grown HgI/sub 2/, single crystals. X-ray rocking curves were obtained by double crystal spectroscopy with Si as the first crystal and topographs were produced using the Berg-Barrett technique with an asymmetrically cut Si-disperser. The crystals were evaluated at different stages of detector preparation, i.e., cutting, polishing, etching, and deposition of contact. Multiple diffraction peaks could be observed as being indicative of small angle grain boundaries of up to 2/degree/. Definite nonuniformities on virgin single crystals as well as on detector crystals were observed by both methods. The crystal surface quality as assessed by these methods were used as a criterion to verify detector performance rating. No drastic improvement of surface quality on space grown crystals was indicated by these techniques. Efforts have also been devoted to determine intrinsic full width at half maximum of HgI/sub 2/ crystal for the crystallographic direction studied. 16 refs., 22 figs.

  16. The Magma Chamber Simulator: Modeling the Impact of Wall Rock Composition on Mafic Magmas during Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, J. B.; Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Although stoichiometric titration is often used to model the process of concurrent Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (AFC) within a compositionally evolving magma body, a more complete treatment of the problem involves simultaneous and self-consistent determination of stable phase relationships and separately evolving temperatures of both Magma (M) and Wall Rock (WR) that interact as a composite M-WR system. Here we present results of M-WR systems undergoing AFC forward modeled with the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS), which uses the phase modeling capabilities of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995) as the thermodynamic basis. Simulations begin with one of a variety of mafic magmas (e.g. HAB, MORB, AOB) intruding a set mass of Wall Rock (e.g. lherzolite, gabbro, diorite, granite, metapelite), and heat is exchanged as the M-WR system proceeds towards thermal equilibrium. Depending on initial conditions, the early part of the evolution can involve closed system FC while the WR heats up. The WR behaves as a closed system until it is heated beyond the solidus to critical limit for melt fraction extraction (fc), ranging between 0.08 and 0.12 depending on WR characteristics including composition and, rheology and stress field. Once fc is exceeded, a portion of the anatectic liquid is assimilated into the Magma. The MCS simultaneously calculates mass and composition of the mineral assemblage (Magma cumulates and WR residue) and melt (anatectic and Magma) at each T along the equilibration trajectory. Sensible and latent heat lost or gained plus mass gained by the Magma are accounted for by the MCS via governing Energy Constrained- Recharge Assimilation Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC) equations. In a comparison of two representative MCS results, consider a granitic WR intruded by HAB melt (51 wt. % SiO2) at liquidus T in shallow crust (0.1 GPa) with a WR/M ratio of 1.25, fc of 0.1 and a QFM oxygen buffer. In the first example, the WR begins at a temperature of 100o

  17. Melt-rock interaction at the Moho: Evidence from crystal cargo in lavas from near-ridge seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumans, J. P.; Stix, J.; Clague, D. A.; Minarik, W. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Taney Seamounts are a NW-SE trending linear, near mid-ocean ridge chain consisting of five volcanoes located on the Pacific plate 300 km west of San Francisco, California. Taney Seamount-A, the largest and oldest in the chain, is defined by four well-exposed calderas which reveal previously infilled lavas. The calderas can be differentiated in time by their cross-cutting relationships, creating a relative chronology. The caldera walls and intracaldera pillow mounds were sampled systematically by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to obtain stratigraphically-controlled samples, a unique aspect of this study. Lava geochemistry varies from more differentiated to more primitive with time (6.2 - 8.6 wt.% MgO), suggesting that the sub-caldera reservoir is open and undergoes periodic collapse, replenishment, shallow crystallization, and eruption. The primitive replenishing magmas entrain a crystal cargo of high-anorthite plagioclase (An80-90) with melt inclusion volatile saturation pressures (CO2 - H2O) indicating entrapment at the lower crust or upper mantle (8-12 km b.s.f). Melt inclusions exhibit positive Sr and Eu anomalies (e.g., SrPM / [CePMNdPM]1/2 ), negative Zr and Nb anomalies, and [Ba/Nb]PM >1 when normalized to primitive mantle. In comparison, the host lavas exhibit positive Sr anomalies but no concurrent Eu, Zr, and Nb anomalies and [Ba/Nb]PM <1. We propose that episodic partial melting and recrystallization of lower-crustal cumulates at the Moho result in melt inclusions with a plagioclase cumulate signal. Later percolating melts undergo diffusion with and entrain recrystallized plagioclase cumulates resulting in the positive Sr signal (but no Eu, Zr, Nb anomalies, and [Ba/Nb]PM <1). Geochemistry of the host lava and melt inclusions and crystal textures imply that melt-rock interaction is an important process in oceanic magmatic systems.

  18. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  19. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  20. High-Mg adakitic rocks and their complementary cumulates formed by crystal fractionation of hydrous mafic magmas in a continental crustal magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Xu, Yi-Gang; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Sun, Min; Griffin, William L.; Wei, Ying; Ma, Liang; Yu, Xiaolu

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how adakitic magmas form is important for understanding the formation of the continental crust. Generating such high-Sr/Y rocks by crystal fractionation of basalts/basaltic andesites in magma chambers has been proposed in a wide range of tectonic settings. However, the complementary cumulates predicted by this scenario have rarely been observed. The late Triassic ( 227 Ma) Ningcheng complex from the North China Craton is composed of a websterite - (Ol -/Hbl-) pyroxenite - gabbro unit and a quartz-diorite unit. They are interpreted as the products (cumulates and derivative melts, respectively) of fractionation from hydrous mafic magmas at mid- to lower-crustal pressures (4.9 8.3 kbar). The quartz diorites are high-Mg intermediate rocks with moderate SiO2 (57.0 62.9 wt%), high Mg# (> 49) and adakitic trace element signatures, such as high Sr (≥ 636 ppm) and light rare earth elements (REEs), low Y (≤ 17 ppm) and heavy REEs (Yb ≤ 1.8 ppm), lack of obvious Eu anomalies, and high Sr/Y (≥ 31) and La/Yb (≥ 24)). These adakitic signatures reflect differentiation of hydrous mantle-derived magmas in the deep crust, leaving behind a plagioclase-free residual solid assemblage in the early stages, which is represented by the coeval websterite-pyroxenite complex. This study therefore not only demonstrates that hydrous crystal fractionation is an important mechanism to form adakitic rocks, but also presents an example of a preserved fractionating system, i.e. high-Sr/Y rocks and their complementary cumulates. A geochemical comparison is made between representative adakitic rocks formed by fractionation of hydrous magmas and Archean TTGs. It is suggested that crystal fractionation is an efficient process for making Phanerozoic high Sr/Y rocks but was not responsible for the formation of Archean granitoids.

  1. Melt-rock interaction near the Moho: Evidence from crystal cargo in lavas from near-ridge seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumans, Jason P.; Stix, John; Clague, David A.; Minarik, William G.; Layne, Graham D.

    2016-10-01

    The Taney Seamounts are a NW-SE trending linear, near mid-ocean ridge chain consisting of five volcanoes located on the Pacific plate 300 km west of San Francisco, California. Taney Seamount-A, the largest and oldest in the chain, is defined by four well-exposed calderas, which expose previously infilled lavas. The calderas can be differentiated in time by their cross-cutting relationships, creating a relative chronology. The caldera walls and intracaldera pillow mounds were sampled systematically by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to obtain stratigraphically-controlled samples, a unique aspect of this study. The geochemistry of the seamount varies from more differentiated to more primitive with time (6.2-8.6 wt.% MgO), suggesting that the sub-caldera reservoir is open and undergoes periodic collapse, replenishment, crystallization, and eruption. The youngest and least differentiated lavas entrained a crystal cargo of plagioclase (An80-90) with melt inclusion volatile saturation pressures indicating entrapment in the lower oceanic crust and upper mantle (6-12 km, with 45% between 8 and 10 km below the sea floor). Melt inclusions exhibit high Al2O3, low SiO2, positive Sr and Eu anomalies and negative Zr and Nb anomalies when normalized to typical Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). In comparison, the host lavas exhibit positive Sr anomalies, but no concurrent Zr, and Nb anomalies. Based on thermodynamic modeling using alphaMELTS, we develop a melt-rock interaction model defined by melting and assimilation of plagioclase-rich cumulates by hot, primitive mantle-derived melts. Significantly, the variability of the negative Zr and Nb anomalies cannot be explained by either cumulate melting or AFC alone. We propose that the melt inclusions record the interaction between cumulate partial melts and the assimilating melt, demonstrating the importance of cumulate melting during the assimilation process. Later percolating melts underwent diffusive interaction with, and

  2. Long period gratings and rocking filters written with a CO 2 laser in highly-birefringent boron-doped photonic crystal fibers for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. P.; Anuszkiewicz, A.; Statkiewicz-Barabach, G.; Baptista, J. M.; Frazão, O.; Mergo, P.; Santos, J. L.; Urbanczyk, W.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of fabricating short-length long-period gratings and rocking filters in highly birefringent Photonic Crystal Fiber using a CO 2 laser. In our experiments both kinds of gratings were made in the same Boron doped highly birefringent PCF using similar exposure parameters. We also present the sensing capabilities of both fabricated gratings to temperature, strain and hydrostatic pressure by interrogation of the wavelength shifts at different resonances.

  3. Sensing characteristics of long period gratings and rocking filters based on highly birefringent boron-doped photonic crystal fiber and fabricated by a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. P.; Statkiewicz-Barabach, G.; Anuszkiewicz, A.; Baptista, J. M.; Frazão, O.; Wojcik, J.; Santos, J. L.; Urbanczyk, W.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of fabricating short LPGs and rocking filters in highly birefringent Photonic Crystal Fiber using CO2 laser. In our experiments both kinds of gratings were made in the same Boron doped highly birefringent PCF using similar exposure parameters. We also present the sensing capabilities of both fabricated gratings to temperature, strain and hydrostatic pressure by interrogation of the wavelength shifts at the different resonances.

  4. Evaluation of the Quality of Sapphire Using X-Ray Rocking Curves and Double-Crystal X-Ray Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    hard, high-strength, chemically resistant optical windows; and sub- srates for the growth of epitaxial films. The quality of a sapphire crystal can... crystal diffractometer. Single- crystal sapphire may be grown by a variety of different methods, of which the more common are Verneuil (flame fusion...Linear features (L), which may represent slight variations in lattice parameter along the crystal growth front, or dislocation networks, ad small

  5. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-01-01

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95oW and 85oW on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P2O5/K2O ratio implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns. The sequence of fractionated lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95oW. The mantle source regions for these two areas are interpreted to be depleted in incompatible (and volatile?) elements, although the source region beneath 95oW is less severely depleted in La and K. -Authors

  6. Contrasting sources and P-T crystallization conditions of epidote-bearing granitic rocks, northeastern Brazil: O, Sr, and Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, V. P.; Sial, A. N.; Pimentel, M. M.; Armstrong, R.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Guimarães, I. P.; da Silva Filho, A. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 618 Ma Curral de Cima tonalite and 577 Ma Lourenço monzodiorite, northeastern Brazil, are magmatic epidote-bearing plutons that carry ferrohornblende, biotite, titanite, and epidote. Major, trace, and isotope chemistry suggests that the major magmas of the two plutons followed similar differentiation trends but derived from source rocks that differed in age and isotopic composition. The mineral phases of the Curral de Cima tonalite, the presence of amphibole-rich clots, and juvenile component (average εNd = -3.55) point to an I-type source for these rocks. These data and high calculated δ18O(w.r.) (10.0‰) for the tonalite and high δ18O value for a clot (9.3‰) argue that the clots are fragments of a metabasaltic source rock that has been hydrothermally altered at a low temperature. In contrast, average calculated δ18O(w.r.) for the Lourenço monzodiorite = 7.8‰, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7083, εNd = -14.6, and TDM = 1.92 Ga. These data are compatible with a long crustal residence time of lower crust amphibolites source. Epidote in the Curral de Cima pluton crystallized close to the NNO buffer, and hornblende chemistry, due to Al reequilibration, yielded sub-solidus temperature and pressure. In contrast, in the Lourenço pluton epidote crystallized close to the HM buffer and Al-in-hornblende points to near-solidus solidification (685 °C) around 4.4 Kbar. This study confirms that magmatic epidote in granitic plutons can crystallize at pressures lower than 5.5 Kbar under higher fO2 as experimentally foreseen. Rapid magma transportation through hot continental crust during the peak of metamorphism in early stages of an orogenic cycle prevents epidote dissolution.

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the rocking curves measured for MoK{sub α} X-ray characteristic lines in the double-crystal nondispersive scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenkov, N. V. Chukhovskii, F. N.; Blagov, A. E.

    2015-03-15

    The rocking curves (RCs) for MoK{sub α1} and MoK{sub α2} characteristic X-ray lines have been experimentally and theoretically studied in the nondispersive scheme of an X-ray double-crystal TPC-K diffractometer. The results of measurements and theoretical calculations of double-crystal RCs for characteristic X-rays from tubes with a molybdenum anode and different widths of slits show that a decrease in the slit width leads to an increase in the relative contribution of the MoK{sub α2}-line RC in comparison with the intensity of the tails of the MoK{sub α1}-line RC. It is shown that the second peak of the MoK{sub α2} line becomes increasingly pronounced in the tail of the MoK{sub α1}-line RC with a decrease in the slit width. Two plane-parallel Si plates (input faces (110), diffraction vector h 〈220〉) were used as a monochromator crystal and a sample. The results of measuring double-crystal RCs are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  8. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  9. Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on the immobilization of aqueous Pb(II) using phosphate rock and different crystallized hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Cui, Jing; Wei, Zhenggui

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the transformation of Pb(II) to geochemically stable pyromorphite (PY) by apatite materials (AMs), has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for contaminated water and soil. In this study, we systematically investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by natural phosphate rock (PR) and different crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the absence and presence of LMWOAs (oxalic, malic and citric acids). The results indicated that the effectiveness of PR and HAp in immobilizing Pb(II) followed in descending order by HAp2 (the poorly crystallized HAp), HAp1 (the well crystallized HAp) and PR, regardlessof the presence of LMWOAs. The presence of malic and citric acids significantly decreased the immobilizationefficiency of Pb(II) by HAp1 and PR, clarifying the lower adsorption affinities of Pb(II)-organic acid complexes on HAp1 and PR rather than Pb(II) ion. On thecontrary, oxalic acid could markedly enhance the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by HAp1 and PR through the formation of lead oxalate, which was confirmed by FT-IR and XRDanalysis. Results also showed that LMWOAs had little promoting or inhibiting effect on the immobilization of Pb(II) by HAp2. This study suggested that the ubiquity of LMWOAs in natural environments could retard the transformation efficiency of Pb(II) to PY by AMs, especiallyin thepresenceof oxalic acid, and the poorly crystallized HAp2 had great potential to remediate Pb(II)-contaminated water and soil due to its insusceptibility to LMWOAs.

  10. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: Role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-10-10

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95/sup 0/ W and 85/sup 0/ W on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P/sub 2/O/sub 5//K/sub 2/O ratio averages 0.83 at 95/sup 0/W and 1.66 at 85/sup 0/W and implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns, with (La/Sm)/sub EF/ = 0.67 at 95/sup 0/W and 0.46 at 85/sup 0/W. The sequence of fractional lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95/sup 0/W. Incompatible trace element abundances in 26 samples are used to infer that the range of Fe-Ti-rich basalt from 85/sup 0/W represents 19 to 35% residual liquid following crystal fractionation of a mineral assemblage of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and lesser olivine. Most samples from 85/sup 0/W can be related to a common parental magma that contained approximately 9 wt %FeO*, 1 wt % TiO/sub 2/, and had an Mg number (Mg/sup 3/ = 100 Mg/(Mg+Fe/sup 2 +/)) of about 65. Although the samples from 95/sup 0/W cannot all be derived from a common parental magma, the inferred parental magmas may have been derived by varying degrees of partial melting of a common source. The fractionation sequence consists of two parts: an initial iron enrichment trend followed by a silica enrichment trend. The most iron rich lavas represent about 32% residual liquid derived by crystal fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and lesser olivine from a parental magma with an Mg number of about 66. The silicic enrichment trend results from crystallization of titanomagnetite and some apatite.

  11. Surface diffusivity of cleaved NaCl crystals as a function of humidity: Impedance spectroscopy measurements and implications for crack healing in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelemeijer, Paula J.; Peach, Colin J.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Rock salt offers an attractive host rock for geological storage applications, because of its naturally low permeability and the ability of excavation-induced cracks to heal by fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer. However, while diffusive transport rates in bulk NaCl solution are rapid and well characterized, such data are not directly applicable to storage conditions where crack walls are coated with thin adsorbed water films. To reliably predict healing times in geological storage applications, data on mass transport rates in adsorbed films are needed. We determined the surface diffusivity in such films for conditions with absolute humidities (AH) ranging from 1 to 18 g/m3 (relative humidities (RH) of 4%-78%) by measuring the surface impedance of single NaCl crystals. We use the impedance results to calculate the effective surface diffusivity S = DδCusing the Nernst-Einstein equation. TheS values obtained lie in the range 1 × 10-27 m3 s-1 at very dry conditions to 1 × 10-19 m3 s-1 for the deliquescence point at 296 K, which is in reasonable agreement with existing values for grain boundary diffusion under wet conditions. Estimates for the diffusivity D made assuming a film thickness δ of 50-90 nm and no major effects of thickness on the solubility C lie in the range of 1 × 10-14 to 8 × 10-12 m2 s-1 for the highest humidities studied (14-18 g/m3 AH, 60%-78% RH). For geological storage systems in rock salt, we predict S values between 1 × 10-22 - 8 × 10-18 m3 s-1. These imply crack healing rates 6 to 7 orders of magnitude lower than expected for brine-filled cracks.

  12. The Geysers - Cobb Mountain Magma System, California (Part 1): U-Pb zircon ages of volcanic rocks, conditions of zircon crystallization and magma residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Grove, Marty; Harrison, T. Mark; Lovera, Oscar; Hulen, Jeffrey; Walters, Mark

    2003-09-01

    Combined U-Pb zircon and 40Ar/ 39Ar sanidine data from volcanic rocks within or adjacent to the Geysers geothermal reservoir constrain the timing of episodic eruption events and the pre-eruptive magma history. Zircon U-Pb concordia intercept model ages (corrected for initial 230Th disequilibrium) decrease as predicted from stratigraphic and regional geological relationships (1σ analytical error): 2.47 ± 0.04 Ma (rhyolite of Pine Mountain), 1.38 ± 0.01 Ma (rhyolite of Alder Creek), 1.33 ± 0.04 Ma (rhyodacite of Cobb Mountain), 1.27 ± 0.03 Ma (dacite of Cobb Valley), and 0.94 ± 0.01 Ma (dacite of Tyler Valley). A significant (˜0.2-0.3 Ma) difference between these ages and sanidine 40Ar/ 39Ar ages measured for the same samples demonstrates that zircon crystallized well before eruption. Zircons U-Pb ages from the underlying main-phase Geysers Plutonic Complex (GPC) are indistinguishable from those of the Cobb Mountain volcanics. While this is in line with compositional evidence that the GPC fed the Cobb Mountain eruptions, the volcanic units conspicuously lack older (˜1.8 Ma) zircons from the shallowest part of the GPC. Discontinuous zircon age populations and compositional relationships in the volcanic and plutonic samples are incompatible with zircon residing in a single long-lived upper crustal magma chamber. Instead we favor a model in which zircons were recycled by remelting of just-solidified rocks during episodic injection of more mafic magmas. This is consistent with thermochronologic evidence that the GPC cooled below 350° C at the time the Cobb Mountain volcanics were erupted.

  13. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  14. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  15. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  16. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  17. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  18. Effects of fault-controlled CO2 alteration on mineralogical and geomechanical properties of reservoir and seal rocks, Crystal Geyser, Green River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Urquhart, A.; Dewers, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the coupled chemical and mechanical properties of reservoir and seal units undergoing CO2 injection is critical for modeling reservoir behavior in response to the introduction of CO2. The implementation of CO2 sequestration as a mitigation strategy for climate change requires extensive risk assessment that relies heavily on computer models of subsurface reservoirs. Numerical models are fundamentally limited by the quality and validity of their input parameters. Existing models generally lack constraints on diagenesis, failing to account for the coupled geochemical or geomechanical processes that affect reservoir and seal unit properties during and after CO2 injection. For example, carbonate dissolution or precipitation after injection of CO2 into subsurface brines may significantly alter the geomechanical properties of reservoir and seal units and thus lead to solution-enhancement or self-sealing of fractures. Acidified brines may erode and breach sealing units. In addition, subcritical fracture growth enhanced by the presence of CO2 could ultimately compromise the integrity of sealing units, or enhance permeability and porosity of the reservoir itself. Such unknown responses to the introduction of CO2 can be addressed by laboratory and field-based observations and measurements. Studies of natural analogs like Crystal Geyser, Utah are thus a critical part of CO2 sequestration research. The Little Grand Wash and Salt Wash fault systems near Green River, Utah, host many fossil and active CO2 seeps, including Crystal Geyser, serving as a faulted anticline CO2 reservoir analog. The site has been extensively studied for sequestration and reservoir applications, but less attention has been paid to the diagenetic and geomechanical aspects of the fault zone. XRD analysis of reservoir and sealing rocks collected along transects across the Little Grand Wash Fault reveal mineralogical trends in the Summerville Fm (a siltstone seal unit) with calcite and

  19. 'Escher' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

    The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water.

    Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend.

    These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  20. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  1. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  2. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  3. DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF ROCKS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    common crustal rocks: polycrystalline and single crystal quartz (40-450 kbar), anorthosite (to 620 kbar), microcline (to 580 kbar) olivine (to 780 kbar...shock-induced transitions to high pressure polymorphic forms occur. Release adiabats of polycrystalline quartz and anorthosite descending from various... anorthosite descending from shock states above 120 kbar are quite steep, indicating irreversible transformation to denser materials believed to be high

  4. Soil Rock Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A redesigned version of a soil/rock analyzer developed by Martin Marietta under a Langley Research Center contract is being marketed by Aurora Tech, Inc. Known as the Aurora ATX-100, it has self-contained power, an oscilloscope, a liquid crystal readout, and a multichannel spectrum analyzer. It measures energy emissions to determine what elements in what percentages a sample contains. It is lightweight and may be used for mineral exploration, pollution monitoring, etc.

  5. Single crystal U–Pb zircon age and Sr–Nd isotopic composition of impactites from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Comparison with country rocks and Ivory Coast tektites

    PubMed Central

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Thöni, Martin; Liang, Chen

    2010-01-01

    The 1.07 Myr old Bosumtwi impact structure (Ghana), excavated in 2.1–2.2 Gyr old supracrustal rocks of the Birimian Supergroup, was drilled in 2004. Here, we present single crystal U–Pb zircon ages from a suevite and two meta-graywacke samples recovered from the central uplift (drill core LB-08A), which yield an upper Concordia intercept age of ca. 2145 ± 82 Ma, in very good agreement with previous geochronological data for the West African Craton rocks in Ghana. Whole rock Rb–Sr and Sm–Nd isotope data of six suevites (five from inside the crater and one from outside the northern crater rim), three meta-graywacke, and two phyllite samples from core LB-08A are also presented, providing further insights into the timing of the metamorphism and a possibly related isotopic redistribution of the Bosumtwi crater rocks. Our Rb–Sr and Sm–Nd data show also that the suevites are mixtures of meta-greywacke and phyllite (and possibly a very low amount of granite). A comparison of our new isotopic data with literature data for the Ivory Coast tektites allows to better constrain the parent material of the Ivory Coast tektites (i.e., distal impactites), which is thought to consist of a mixture of metasedimentary rocks (and possibly granite), but with a higher proportion of phyllite (and shale) than the suevites (i.e., proximal impactites). When plotted in a Rb/Sr isochron diagram, the sample data points (n = 29, including literature data) scatter along a regression line, whose slope corresponds to an age of 1846 ± 160 Ma, with an initial Sr isotope ratio of 0.703 ± 0.002. However, due to the extensive alteration of some of the investigated samples and the lithological diversity of the source material, this age, which is in close agreement with a possible “metamorphic age” of ∼ 1.8–1.9 Ga tentatively derived from our U–Pb dating of zircons, is difficult to consider as a reliable metamorphic age. It may perhaps reflect a common ancient source

  6. Single crystal U-Pb zircon age and Sr-Nd isotopic composition of impactites from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Comparison with country rocks and Ivory Coast tektites.

    PubMed

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Thöni, Martin; Liang, Chen

    2010-08-01

    The 1.07 Myr old Bosumtwi impact structure (Ghana), excavated in 2.1-2.2 Gyr old supracrustal rocks of the Birimian Supergroup, was drilled in 2004. Here, we present single crystal U-Pb zircon ages from a suevite and two meta-graywacke samples recovered from the central uplift (drill core LB-08A), which yield an upper Concordia intercept age of ca. 2145 ± 82 Ma, in very good agreement with previous geochronological data for the West African Craton rocks in Ghana. Whole rock Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data of six suevites (five from inside the crater and one from outside the northern crater rim), three meta-graywacke, and two phyllite samples from core LB-08A are also presented, providing further insights into the timing of the metamorphism and a possibly related isotopic redistribution of the Bosumtwi crater rocks. Our Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd data show also that the suevites are mixtures of meta-greywacke and phyllite (and possibly a very low amount of granite). A comparison of our new isotopic data with literature data for the Ivory Coast tektites allows to better constrain the parent material of the Ivory Coast tektites (i.e., distal impactites), which is thought to consist of a mixture of metasedimentary rocks (and possibly granite), but with a higher proportion of phyllite (and shale) than the suevites (i.e., proximal impactites). When plotted in a Rb/Sr isochron diagram, the sample data points (n = 29, including literature data) scatter along a regression line, whose slope corresponds to an age of 1846 ± 160 Ma, with an initial Sr isotope ratio of 0.703 ± 0.002. However, due to the extensive alteration of some of the investigated samples and the lithological diversity of the source material, this age, which is in close agreement with a possible "metamorphic age" of ∼ 1.8-1.9 Ga tentatively derived from our U-Pb dating of zircons, is difficult to consider as a reliable metamorphic age. It may perhaps reflect a common ancient source whose Rb-Sr isotope

  7. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  8. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Opportunity Rocks!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows in superb detail a portion of the puzzling rock outcropping that scientists are eagerly planning to investigate. Presently, Opportunity is on its lander facing northeast; the outcropping lies to the northwest. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall and are thought to be either volcanic ash deposits or sediments carried by water or wind. The small rock in the center is about the size of a golf ball.

  10. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  11. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0??54-0??003 Ma) and St. George (2??8-1??4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups: group 1 is a high-MgO, low-SiO. 2 suite composed primarily of basanites; group 2 is a high-MgO, high-SiO 2 suite consisting predominantly of alkali basalts; group 3 is an intermediate- to low-MgO suite that includes plagioclase-phyric subalkali basalts and hawaiites. Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that groups 1 and 2 formed by small-degree partial melting of amphibole-bearing to amphibole-free garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were the earliest melts produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest geochemical signature of amphibole in their source. The suite of rocks from St. Paul ranges from 14??4 to 4??2 wt % MgO at relatively constant SiO 2 contents (43??1-47??3 wt %). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are modeled as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island, which subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved rocks. Plagioclase-phyric group 3 rocks from St. George are modeled as mixtures between an evolved melt similar to the evolved magmas on St. Paul and a fractionated group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts are ???1400??C and are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/. 86Sr and 143Nd/. 144Nd values for all rocks are MORB-like, in the range of 0??702704-0??703035 and 0??513026-0??513109, respectively. 208Pb/. 204Pb vs 206Pb/. 204Pb values lie near the MORB end-member but show a linear trend towards HIMU (high time-integrated 238U/. 204Pb). Despite isotopic similarities to MORB, many of the major and

  12. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  13. High alumina (HA) and very high potassium (VHK) basalt clasts from Apollo 14 breccias. II - Whole rock geochemistry - Further evidence for combined assimilation and fractional crystallization within the lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.; Schmitt, R. A.; Hughes, S. S.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    The understanding of basalt petrogenesis at the Apollo 14 site has increased markedly due to the study of 'new' samples from breccia 'pull-apart' efforts. Whole-rock compositions of 26 new high alumina (HA) and 7 very high potassium (VHK) basalts emphasize the importance of combined assimilation and fractional crystallization in a lunar regime. Previously formulated models for HA and VHK basalt petrogenesis are modified in order to accomodate these new data, although modeling parameters are essentially the same. The required range in HA basalt compositions is generated by the assimilation of KREEP by a 'primitive' parental magma. The VHK basalts can be generated by three parental HA basalts assimilating granite. Results indicate that VHK basalt compositions are dominated by the parental magma, and only up to 8 percent granite assimilation is required. This modeling indicates that at least three VHK basalt flows must be present at the Apollo 14 site.

  14. Extent and effect of fault-controlled CO2 alteration on reservoir and seal rocks and implications for geomechanical failure at Crystal Geyser, Green River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Dewers, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    A structural diagenesis approach involving the coupled chemical and mechanical properties of reservoir and seal rocks is necessary for assessing the short and long term security of sequestered CO2. Current numerical models used to model subsurface CO2 reservoirs do not account for such processes, and typically these use only linear-elastic geomechanical properties, ignoring failure parameters such as fracture toughness. In addition, numerical models normally lack constraints on long-term, geologic time scales. Study of fossil and active CO2 seeps found at Little Grand Wash and Salt Wash fault systems near Green River, Utah are invaluable to assess long-term storage and leakage behavior in natural systems. Observations from the site and geomechanical testing also indicate that fracture systems play a crucial role in leakage, and the extent of fracturing and CO2-related alteration extends from tens to over one-hundred meters. Failure parameters of reservoir and seal rocks under variable environmental conditions, such as fracture toughness should also be quantified as they likely play a role in fracturing and leakage. Subcritical fracture growth may also be involved. Transects across the Little Grand Wash fault show distinct mineralogical and isotopic trends related to alteration by CO2-rich fluids. Calcite is the dominant precipitated mineral, both in reservoir (sandstone) and seal (siltstone & mudrock) lithologies. Precipitated calcite is isotopically distinct and observed in bulk rock isotopic trends. Fracture toughness testing using the short rod method indicates that CO2-related alteration of rocks exposed at the field site has weakened one reservoir lithology by half (0.57 versus 0.27 MPa√m). A full suite of lithologies are being tested and compared with the double torsion test method under ambient air conditions. These same samples are also being tested in environmental conditions more like those encountered in a CO2 sequestration scenario. These data can and

  15. Ionium dating of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Kigoshi, K

    1967-05-19

    Local fractionation of uranium and thorium, between minerals within a sample of igneous rock at the time of crystallization, makes it possible to date its solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on samples of granite, pumice, and lava suggest that this method of dating is reliable.

  16. Microscopic tubes in igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, D.; Simmons, G.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic tubes have been observed in several igneous rocks and may be quite common. They occur in single crystals and have either elliptical or circular cross-sections 1 to 5 microns in diameter and are ten to hundreds of microns long. Microtubes may be hollow or partially or completely filled with another phase, but are distinct from acicular crystals of accessory minerals such as rutile. Microtubes can form by at least three processes: (1) the partial annealing of microcracks, (2) the natural etching of dislocations, or (3) the primary inclusion of fluid material during crystal growth.

  17. 'Wopmay' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an unusual, lumpy rock informally named 'Wopmay' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the Canadian bush pilot Wilfrid Reid 'Wop' May. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe the lumps in Wopmay may be related to cracking and alteration processes, possibly caused by exposure to water. The area between intersecting sets of cracks eroded in a way that created the lumpy appearance. Rover team members plan to drive Opportunity over to Wopmay for a closer look in coming sols. This image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 248 (Oct. 4, 2004), using its 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters.

  18. Topaz magmatic crystallization in rhyolites of the Central Andes (Chivinar volcanic complex, NW Argentina): Constraints from texture, mineralogy and rock chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioncada, Anna; Orlandi, Paolo; Vezzoli, Luigina; Omarini, Ricardo H.; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Lopez-Azarevich, Vanina; Sureda, Ricardo; Azarevich, Miguel; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Topaz-bearing rhyolite lavas were erupted as domes and cryptodomes during the early history of the Late Miocene Chivinar volcano, in Central Andes. These are the only topaz rhyolite lavas recognized in Central Andes. Textural, mineralogical and geochemical data on the Chivinar rhyolites suggest that topaz crystallized from strongly residual, fluorine-rich, peraluminous silicate melts of topazite composition before the complete solidification of the lava domes. Crystallization of the rhyolitic magma began with sodic plagioclase and alkali feldspar phenocrysts in the magma chamber, followed by groundmass quartz + alkali feldspar + minor sodic plagioclase during dome emplacement, and terminated with quartz + topaz + vapour bubbles forming small scattered miaroles. Fluorine partitioning into the fluid phase occurred only in the final stage of groundmass crystallization. The magmatic origin of topaz indicates the presence of a fluorine-rich highly differentiated magma in the early history of the Chivinar volcano and suggests the possibility of rare metals mineralizations related to the cooling and solidification of a silicic magma chamber. A late fluid circulation phase, pre-dating the andesitic phase of the Chivinar volcano, affected part of the topaz rhyolite lavas. The presence of Nb, Ta and Mn minerals as primary accessories in the rhyolites and as secondary minerals in veins suggests a connection of the fluid circulation phase with the silicic magmatic system. Although at the edge of the active volcanic arc, the Chivinar topaz rhyolites are in correspondence of the transtensive Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system, suggesting preferred extensional conditions for the formation of magmatic topaz in convergent settings, consistently with evidence from other known cases worldwide.

  19. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has…

  20. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  1. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  2. Fluid and rock interaction in permeable volcanic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, J.I.

    1985-02-01

    Four types of interrelated changes -geochemical, mineralogic, isotopic, and physical - occur in Oligocene volcanic units of the Mogollon-Datil volcanic field, New Mexico. These changes resulted from the operation of a geothermal system that, through fluid-rock interaction, affected 5 rhyolite ash-flow tuffs and an intercalated basaltic andesite lava flow causing a potassium metasomatism type of alteration. (1) Previous studies have shown enrichment of rocks in K/sub 2/O as much as 130% of their original values at the expense of Na/sub 2/O and CaO with an accompanying increase in Rb and decreases in MgO and Sr. (2) X-ray diffraction results of this study show that phenocrystic plagioclase and groundmass feldspar have been replaced with pure potassium feldspar and quartz in altered rock. Phenocrystic potassium feldspar, biotite, and quartz are unaffected. Pyroxene in basaltic andesite is replaced by iron oxide. (3) delta/sup 18/O increases for rhyolitic units from values of 8-10 permil, typical of unaltered rock, to 13-15 permil, typical of altered rock. Basaltic andesite, however, shows opposite behavior with a delta/sup 18/ of 9 permil in unaltered rock and 6 permit in altered. (4) Alteration results in a density decrease. SEM revealed that replacement of plagioclase by fine-grained quartz and potassium feldspar is not a volume for volume replacement. Secondary porosity is created in the volcanics by the chaotic arrangement of secondary crystals.

  3. Computer Modeling of Crystallization and Crystal Size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenta, R. V.

    2002-05-01

    The crystal size distribution of an igneous rock has been shown to be related to the crystallization kinetics. In order to better understand crystallization processes, the nucleation and growth of crystals in a closed system is modeled computationally and graphically. Units of volume analogous to unit cells are systematically attached to stationary crystal nuclei. The number of volume units attached to each crystal per growth stage is proportional to the crystal size insuring that crystal dimensional growth rates are constant regardless of their size. The number of new crystal nuclei per total system volume that form in each growth stage increases exponentially Cumulative crystal size distributions (CCSD) are determined for various stages of crystallization (30 percent, 60 pct, etc) from a database generated by the computer model, and each distribution is fit to an exponential function of the same form. Simulation results show that CCSD functions appear to fit the data reasonably well (R-square) with the greatest misfit at 100 pct crystallization. The crystal size distribution at each pct crystallization can be obtained from the derivative of the respective CCSD function. The log form of each crystal size distribution (CSD) is a linear function with negative slope. Results show that the slopes of the CSD functions at pcts crystallization up to 90 pct are parallel, but the slope at 100 pct crystallization differs from the others although still in approximate alignment. We suggest that real crystallization of igneous rocks may show this pattern. In the early stages of crystallization crystals are far apart and CSD's are ideal as predicted by theory based on growth of crystals in a brine. At advanced stages of crystallization growth collision boundaries develop between crystals. As contiguity increases crystals become blocked and inactive because they can no longer grow. As crystallization approaches 100 pct a significant number of inactive crystals exist resulting in

  4. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  5. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  6. Rock mechanics. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Jumikis, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Rock Mechanics, 2nd Edition deals with rock as an engineering construction material-a material with which, upon which, and within which civil engineers build structures. It thus pertains to hydraulic structures engineering; to highway, railway, canal, foundation, and tunnel engineering; and to all kinds of rock earthworks and to substructures in rock. Major changes in this new edition include: rock classification, rock types and description, rock testing equipment, rock properties, stability effects of discontinuity and gouge, grouting, gunite and shotcrete, and Lugeon's water test. This new edition also covers rock bolting and prestressing, pressure-grouted soil anchors, and rock slope stabilization.

  7. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  8. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of iron crystals which grow in a small vug or cavity in a recrystallized breccia (fragmented rock) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The largest crystal is three microns across. Perfectly developed crystals such as these indicate slow formation from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling. The crystals are resting on an interlocking lattice of pyroxene (calsium-magnesium-iron silicate).

  9. Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples, some of which can be seen in this photograph. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  10. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal growing on pyroxene crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of a four-micron size iron crystal growing on a pyroxene crystal (calcium-magnesium-iron silicate) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The well developed crystal faces indicate that the crystal was formed from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling.

  11. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  12. Accelerated Weathering of Rocks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    Dry tests en polished specimens with alternating heating and co- oling actions; ii) Wet tests in destilled water, with alternating...Rock-type Dry tests KxlO2 Wet tests KxlO2 Sound rock SR 3.64 8.31 Medium altered rock MAR 4.96 31.58 Very altered rock VAR 8.89 116.20 TABLE X...Sound rock SR Medium altered rock Very altered rock" KAR VAR ’ Reflectivity R (%) dry test wet test dry test wet test dry test wet

  13. Chromian spinels from Apollo 14 rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.

    1972-01-01

    Results of electron microprobe analysis of 13 pink, isotropic, high-relief grains from Apollo 14 elastic rock 14063,14 and a lithic fragment from the 1 to 2 mm fines, 14002,7, identifying them as spinel minerals dominated by the spinel component MgAl2O4 associated with a moderate content of chromite and hercynite. The spinel is thought to have crystallized from a magma high in aluminum and low in iron, with possible crystal separation, followed by incorporation in clastic rocks by impacts. Many bulk compositions of the elastic fragments fall near the field of primary spinel in the model system An-Fo-SiO2. Experimental syntheses of Apollo 14 rocks are needed to test the suggested primary origin.

  14. Spirit Discovers New Class of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During the past two-and-a-half years of traversing the central part of Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has analyzed the brushed and ground-into surfaces of multiple rocks using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which measures the abundance of major chemical elements. In the process, Spirit has documented the first example of a particular kind of volcanic region on Mars known as an alkaline igneous province. The word alkaline refers to the abundance of sodium and potassium, two major rock-forming elements from the alkali metals on the left-hand side of the periodic table.

    All of the relatively unaltered rocks -- those least changed by wind, water, freezing, or other weathering agents -- examined by Spirit have been igneous, meaning that they crystallized from molten magmas. One way geologists classify igneous rocks is by looking at the amount of potassium and sodium relative to the amount of silica, the most abundant rock-forming mineral on Earth. In the case of volcanic rocks, the amount of silica present gives scientists clues to the kind of volcanism that occurred, while the amounts of potassium and sodium provide clues about the history of the rock. Rocks with more silica tend to erupt explosively. Higher contents of potassium and sodium, as seen in alkaline rocks like those at Gusev, may indicate partial melting of magma at higher pressure, that is, deeper in the Martian mantle. The abundance of potassium and sodium determines the kinds of minerals that make up igneous rocks. If igneous rocks have enough silica, potassium and sodium always bond with the silica to form certain minerals.

    The Gusev rocks define a new chemical category not previously seen on Mars, as shown in this diagram plotting alkalis versus silica, compiled by University of Tennessee geologist Harry McSween. The abbreviations 'Na2O' and 'K2O' refer to oxides of sodium and potassium. The abbreviation 'SiO2' refers to silica. The abbreviation 'wt

  15. Igneous rocks from Apollo 16 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Keil, K.; Prinz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported for a study of seven holocrystalline feldspathic rocks (including a spinel troctolite and six melt rocks) and one mare basalt clast from the Apollo-16 rake samples. The composition and grain structure of each rock is described in detail. Only the spinel troctolite is considered a good candidate for a primary igneous cumulate formed during the original differentiation of the lunar crust. It is shown that the melt rocks probably resulted from shock melting followed by rapid crystallization of heterogeneous highland material and that compositional variations are probably due to mixing of various amounts of heterogeneous cumulates and KREEP components. It is suggested that the mare basalt clast may have been derived from Mare Fecunditatis, although the nearest mare to the Apollo-16 site is Nectaris.

  16. Getting lunar ilmenite: From soils or rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Lunar soils or rocks can be mined as sources of ilmenite for producing oxygen. However, separable crystals of loose ilmenite in lunar soils are rare (<2%) and small (<200 {mu}); most ilmenite in the regolith is locked together with silicate minerals as rock fragments. Since fragmentation of rock sources must be attempted to win appreciable amounts of ilmenite ({approximately}10% or more), selective collection of high-Ti basalt fragments larger than 1 cm for fragmentation and ilmenite beneficiation may be advantageous over extensive processing of fine lunar soil. Many alternative processing schemes for fragmenting rocks on the Moon have been proposed; one process which was tested early in the Apollo program successfully disaggregated lunar and terrestrial basalts by passive exposure to low-pressure alkali (K) vapor. This process is worthy of reinvestigation. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Geotechnical Descriptions of Rock and Rock Masses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    user of the field log can relate to the general class of rock being described. For example, the rock name " syenite " might be qualified by adding "the...FELDSPAR PRE-S---- Coarne Texture Granite Syenite Qts ononite Honzonite Cabbro Peridotite (Platonic or to Qtx Diorite to Diorite Pyroxenite intrusive

  18. Crystals in magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M.

    2011-12-01

    Differentiation processes in igneous systems are one way in which the diversity of igneous rocks is produced. Traditionally, magmatic diversity is considered as variations in the overall chemical composition, such as basalt and rhyolite, but I want to extend this definition to include textural diversity. Such textural variations can be manifested as differences in the amount of crystalline (and immiscible liquid) phases and in the origin and identity of such phases. One important differentiation process is crystal-liquid separation by floatation or decantation, which clearly necessitates crystals in the magma. Hence, it is important to determine if magmas in chambers (sensu lato) have crystals. The following discussion is framed in generalities - many exceptions occur. Diabase (dolerite) dykes are a common, widespread result of regional mafic magmatism. The rims of most diabase dykes have few or no phenocrysts and crystals in the cores are commonly thought to have crystallized in place. Hence, this major mafic magmatic source did not have crystals, although compositional diversity of these dykes is commonly explained by crystal-liquid separation. This can be resolved if crystallisation was on the walls on the magma chamber. Similarly, most flood basalts are low in crystals and separation of those that are present cannot always explain the observed compositional diversity. Crystal-rich flows do occur, for example the 'Giant Plagioclase Basalts' of the Deccan series, but the crystals are thought to form or accumulate in a crystal-rich zone beneath the roof of the chamber - the rest of the chamber probably has few crystals. Some magmas from Hawaii contain significant amounts of olivine crystals, but most of these are deformed and cannot have crystallised in the chamber. In this case the crystals are thought to grow as the magma passes through a decollement zone. They may have grown on the walls or been trapped by filters. Basaltic andesite ignimbrites generally have

  19. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  20. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  1. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  2. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  3. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  5. Isotopic heterogeneity in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.; Tollstrup, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    The growing microsample database on volcanic rocks is showing that isotopic disequilibrium between and among phenocryst phases, their melt inclusions, and groundmass is the rule rather than the exception. This applies even in cases of little or no petrographic evidence for disequilibrium. Erupted magmas must therefore be regarded, to some extent, as mechanical mixtures of isotopically distinct components assembled from different sources. The preservation of isotopic disequilibrium requires that the assembly takes place before diffusion can eradicate evidence of disequilibrium. For a wide range of magmas (mafic, intermediate and felsic, silica under- and oversaturated) from different volcano types (flood basalts, monogenetic cones, stratocones, silicic calderas) this timescale ranges from thousands of years down to one year or less, with no consistent pattern of mixing-to-eruption time vs. volcano or magma type. Among many issues arising from these findings, we note that estimation of magmatic temperatures from application of equilibrium thermodynamics to phenocryst assemblages in volcanic rocks should be approached with extreme caution. The isotope ratio variations observed among the components of a single volcanic rock sample, in most cases, indicate interaction between magma and the local wall-rock. This is consistent with the view that the vast majority of magmas undergo modification during transport through and residence within the crust. Three physical origins of heterogeneity have been proposed: melting of wallrock, magmatic recharge, and mixing of components within a magma chamber initially segregated into melt-rich and crystal-rich portions. Time constraints on preservation of disequilibrium imply either a causal link with eruption, or that these processes occur through the lifetime of a chamber.

  6. Surface Relaxation in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boutet, S.; Robinson, I. K.; Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on (111) growth faces of crystals of the Cellular iron-storage protein horse spleen ferritin. Crystal Trunkation Rods (CTR) were measured. A fit of the measured profile of the CTR revealed a surface roughness of 48 +/- 4.5 A and a top layer spacing contraction of 3.9 +/- 1.5%. In addition to the peak from the CTR, the rocking curves of the crystals displayed unexpected extra peaks. Multiple-scattering is demonstrated to account for them. Future applications of the method could allow the exploration of hydration effects on the growth of protein crystals.

  7. Aftereffect in rocks caused by preexisting irreversible deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrogin, A.N.; Shirkes, O.A.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, rock specimens cut as cores of a diameter of 30 mm, 80 mm in length, were subjected to irreversible deformation in a high hydrostatic pressure chamber according to Karman's procedure. The types of rocks investigated were white Koelga marble, non-burst-hazardous (NBH) sandstone from Donets Basin, limestone from Estonslanets deposit and brown coal from Shurab coal deposit. Marble specimens were subjected to the most extensive studies. The aftereffect curves are shown for each type of rock studied. Aftereffect deformations of rocks are basically creep flows occurring under the effect of residual stresses introduced into the rock material on the course of its irreversible deformation by a high hydrostatic pressure, according to the authors. The physical nature of the residual stresses in the rocks and the mechanism of their creation are examined at the level of structural elements (grains or crystals).

  8. Microcrater investigations on lunar rock 12002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, J. B.; Hodges, F.; Horz, F.; Storzer, D.

    1975-01-01

    Relative ages of 26 submillimeter-sized pits from an equilibrium population in rock 12002 were measured by determining the densities of pits 0.7 microns in diameter and larger on the submillimeter-sized pits. Production rates for 0.7 micron diameter pits were determined from solar-flare track exposure age measurements, and the data for rock 12002 are consistent with previously obtained data for sample 15205 if a lower meteoroid flux prevailed in the past. Metal mounds or spherules within a microcrater pit glass were found to have a meteoritic composition, and an impact lining consisting of protruding crystals was observed. The crystals apparently developed during exposure to space immediately after the 200-micron diameter pit was formed by impact into an olivine grain.

  9. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  10. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  11. Bounce Rock Dimple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image shows the hole drilled by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' on Sol 65 of the rover's journey. The tool drilled about 7 millimeters (0.3 inches) into the rock and generated small piles of 'tailings' or rock dust around the central hole, which is about 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) across. The image from sol 66 of the mission was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  12. Rock Bites into 'Bounce'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features the 6.44 millimeter (0.25 inch) deep hole ground into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The tool took 2 hours and 15 minutes to grind the hole on sol 66 of the rover's journey. A combination of limited solar power and the rock's jagged texture led the rock abrasion tool team to set very aggressive grinding parameters to ensure that the end result was a full circle, suitable for a thorough read from the rover's spectrometers.

    Bounce's markedly different appearance (when compared to the rocks that were previously examined in the Eagle Crater outcrop) made it a natural target for rover research. In order to achieve an ideal position from which to grind into the rock, Opportunity moved in very close with its right wheel next to Bounce. In this image, the panoramic camera on the rover's mast is looking down, catching the tip of the solar panel which partially blocks the full circle ground by the rock abrasion tool.

    The outer ring consists of the cuttings from the rock, pushed out by the brushes on the grinding instrument. The dark impression at the top of the outer circle was caused by the instrument's contact mechanism which serves to stabilize it while grinding.

  13. Welcome to Rock Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Benhart, Jeaneen

    2004-01-01

    At the beginning of the school year, the authors, a first-grade teacher and a teacher educator, worked together to "spice up" the first-grade science curriculum. The teacher had taught the unit Rocks, Sand, and Soil several times, conducting hands-on explorations and using books to help students learn about properties of rocks, but she felt the…

  14. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  15. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  16. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Tranquility Base Moon Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.; Garvin, Jim; Viens, Mike; Kent, Ryan; Munoz, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was used for the first time on the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample number 10057.30, which had been previously maintained by the White House, then transferred back to NASA under the care of Goddard Space Flight Center. Results from this analysis show detailed images of the internal structure of the moon rock, including vesicles (pores), crystal needles, and crystal bundles. These crystals, possibly the common mineral ilmenite, are found in abundance and with random orientation. Future work, in particular a greater understanding of these crystals and their formation, may lead to a more in-depth understanding of the lunar surface evolution and mineral content.

  17. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  18. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J.; Tachibana, M.; Kojima, K.

    2014-10-06

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  19. Mineralogy of Apollo 15415 ?genesis rock' - Source of anorthosite on moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1971-01-01

    Results of electron microprobe analyses of plagioclase points and pyroxene grains of Apollo 15415 ?genesis rock.' It is pointed out that no evidence of cumulate textures has yet appeared to support suggestions of extensive crystal-liquid differentiation producing an anorthositic crust or a lunar crust composed of a mixture of plagioclase-rich rock, basalts and minor ultramafic material, which require that plagioclase crystals float in a basaltic liquid. The plagioclase in 15415 does not show cumulate texture either. It is noted that it remains to be seen whether rock 15415 is correctly named the ?genesis rock.'

  20. Our World: The Rock Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out how rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts have helped NASA learn more about the rock cycle. Compare igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks found on Earth to three types of ro...

  1. Rock Magnetism: Successes and Mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Louis Néel once proposed making ships "invisible" (i.e., magnetically undetectable) by giving them a permanent or remanent magnetism that would cancel the signal induced by the Earth's magnetic field. Like much of rock magnetism, this borders on the magical. Rocks possess a magnetic memory that verges on the phenomenal. An adequate magnetic lifetime for your credit card is until its expiry date and one must avoid exposure to magnetic fields and heat. But a rock's magnetic memory is forever, and the recipe for that durability includes, for igneous and metamorphic rocks, exposure to ancient fields while hot - near the Curie temperature in fact. The thermal remanent magnetism (TRM) thus produced is largely immune to later field changes at lower temperatures although luckily a fraction - a partial TRM overprint - does record later heating events, e.g., burial during major orogenies. When we lift the veil and look closely, on a microscale or nanoscale, it is perplexing to understand why paleomagnetism works so well when rocks seemingly contain so few of Néel's ideal recorders: single-domain grains with tightly coupled atomic spins. In larger grains with multiple domains, the walls between neighbouring domains move readily, like dislocations in crystals, enlarging some domains at the expense of others. This mutability makes any magnetic memory of multi-domain grains suspect. But around the threshold between single-domain and multi-domain structures - a specific grain size that varies widely from one magnetic mineral to another - there are recent predictions and observations of novel structures, including linked magnetic moments of nearby grains and interfacial moments of exsolved phases, that could go some way towards explaining why single-domain-like behaviour is so widespread. Many magnetic properties show an almost continuous variation with grain size, quite unlike the expected discontinuity at the single-domain threshold. Among these is initial susceptibility which

  2. Salt-induced rock fragmentation on Mars: The role of salt in the weathering of Martian rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, Emil

    2006-01-01

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos (except: Meridiani landing side, which formed by different processes, and is therefore not considered in this paper). Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently, it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases, transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the in situ fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in deserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape

  3. A chemical model for lunar non-mare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Nearly all rocks returned from the moon are readily divided into three broad categories on the basis of their chemical compositions: (1) mare basalts, (2) non-mare rocks of basaltic composition (KREEP, VHA), and (3) anorthositic rocks. Only mare basalts may unambiguously be considered to have original igneous textures and are widely understood to have an igneous origin. Nearly all other lunar rocks have lost their original textures during metamorphic and impact processes. It is shown that for these rocks one must work primarily with chemical data in order to recognize and define rock groups and their possible modes of origin. Non-mare rocks of basaltic composition have chemical compositions consistent with an origin by partial melting of the lunar interior. The simplest origin for rocks of anorthositic chemical composition is the crystallization and removal of ferromagnesian minerals. It is proposed that the rock groups of anorthositic and non-mare basaltic chemical composition could have been generated from a single series of original but not necessarily primitive lunar materials.

  4. A chemical model for lunar non-mare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Nearly all rocks returned from the moon are readily divided into three broad categories on the basis of their chemical compositions: (1) mare basalts, (2) non-mare rocks of basaltic composition (KREEP, VHA), and (3) anorthositic rocks. Only mare basalts may unambiguously be considered to have original igneous textures and are widely understood to have an igneous origin. Nearly all other lunar rocks have lost their original textures during metamorphic and impact processes. For these rocks one must work primarily with chemical data in order to recognize and define rock groups and their possible modes of origin. Non-mare rocks of basaltic composition have chemical compositions consistent with an origin by partial melting of the lunar interior. The simplest origin for rocks of anorthositic chemical composition is the crystallization and removal of ferromagnesian minerals. It is proposed that the rock groups of anorthositic and non-mare basaltic chemical composition could have been generated from a single series of original, but not necessarily primitive, lunar materials.

  5. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  6. Rock Garden Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image mosaic of part of the 'Rock Garden' was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 71 (September 14). The rock 'Shark' is at left center and 'Half Dome' is at right. Fine-scale textures on the rocks are clearly seen. Broken crust-like material is visible at bottom center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  7. Dirty Rotten Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a collection of rocks (upper right) at Gusev Crater that have captured the attention of scientists for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of the rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's 'Eagle Crater.' This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  8. Zapping Rocks on Mars

    ScienceCinema

    Wiens, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Better understanding Mars means better understanding its geology. That’s why, sitting atop NASA’s Curiosity rover, is ChemCam, an instrument built by Los Alamos National Laboratory that shoots lasers at Martian rocks and analyzes the data. After nearly 1,500 rock zaps, ChemCam has uncovered some surprising facts about the Red Planet, including the discovery of igneous rocks. Soon, a new Los Alamos-built instrument—the SuperCam—will ride aboard the Mars 2020 rover and bring with it enhanced capabilities to unlock new secrets about the planet.

  9. Zapping Rocks on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger

    2016-05-16

    Better understanding Mars means better understanding its geology. That’s why, sitting atop NASA’s Curiosity rover, is ChemCam, an instrument built by Los Alamos National Laboratory that shoots lasers at Martian rocks and analyzes the data. After nearly 1,500 rock zaps, ChemCam has uncovered some surprising facts about the Red Planet, including the discovery of igneous rocks. Soon, a new Los Alamos-built instrument—the SuperCam—will ride aboard the Mars 2020 rover and bring with it enhanced capabilities to unlock new secrets about the planet.

  10. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  11. Weird 'Endurance' Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a bizarre, lumpy rock dubbed 'Wopmay' on the inner slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 195 (Aug. 11, 2004). Opportunity will likely travel to this or a similar rock in coming sols for a closer look at the alien surface.

  12. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Other Parents Stories of Hope Crystal meth Crystal meth Story of Hope by giovanni January 3, ... about my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting ...

  13. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Home / Stories of Hope / Crystal meth Crystal meth Story Of Hope By giovanni January 3rd, 2013 ... my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting my ...

  14. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    distribution, bulk properties), (2) Acquiring and analyzing acoustic and environmental data collected during field tests in areas of known rock...resulted in good agreement between models and data. Figure 7 Scattering strength results from glacially plucked surface. The shape of the curves is...fact provide very similar fits to the SAS input data. Further analysis has shown that these estimate are only separated because their confidence

  15. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND...outcrops are intended to address many of the open questions which exist for scattering from these types of surfaces and include increasing our basic...understanding of: 1) geoacoustic characteristics of rock relevant to scattering, 2) scattering strength versus grazing angle, and 3

  16. Tithonium Chasma's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-565, 5 December 2003

    Exposures of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks are common in the deep troughs of the Valles Marineris system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from western Tithonium Chasma. The banding seen here is an eroded expression of layered rock. Sedimentary rocks can be composed of (1) the detritus of older, eroded and weathered rocks, (2) grains produced by explosive volcanism (tephra, also known as volcanic ash), or (3) minerals that were chemically precipitated out of a body of liquid such as water. These outcrops are located near 4.8oS, 89.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  17. Broken Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows broken-up blocks of sedimentary rock in western Candor Chasma. There are several locations in western Candor that exhibit this pattern of broken rock. The manner in which these landforms were created is unknown; it is possible that there was a landslide or a meteoritic impact that broke up the materials. One attribute that is known: in some of these cases, it seems that the rock was broken and then buried by later sedimentary rocks, before later being exhumed so that they can be seen from orbit today.

    Location near: 6.9oS, 75.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  18. Ancient Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-469, 31 August 2003

    The terraced area in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an outcropping of ancient, sedimentary rock. It occurs in a crater in western Arabia Terra near 10.8oN, 4.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments on Mars. Field work will likely be required to begin to get a good understanding of the nature of the record these rocks contain. Their generally uniform thickness and repeated character suggests that deposition of fine sediment in this crater was episodic, if not cyclic. These rocks might be indicators of an ancient lake, or they might have been deposited from grains settling out of an earlier, thicker, martian atmosphere. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the lower left.

  19. Writing Rock Music Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donal

    1980-01-01

    Suggests ways student reviewers of rock music groups can write better reviews. Among the suggestions made are that reviewers occasionally discuss the audience or what makes a particular group unique, support general comment with detail, and avoid ecstatic adjectives. (TJ)

  20. Rock in Its Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCluskey, Thomas

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the following musical elements of rock: rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. A impromptu analysis made at a session of the Youth Music Symposium, July 25, 1969. Remarks transcribed from tape. (Author/AP)

  1. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  2. Focus on the Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes historical accounts of the manipulation and importance of the Earth and its mineral resources. A foldout, "Out of the Rock," provides a collection of activities and information that helps make integration of the aforementioned concepts easy. (ZWH)

  3. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  4. East Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a thick, massive outcrop of light-toned rock exposed within eastern Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Dark, windblown sand has banked against the lower outcrop slopes. Outcrops such as this in the Valles Marineris chasms have been known since Mariner 9 images were obtained in 1972. However, the debate as to whether these represent sedimentary or igneous rocks has not been settled within the Mars science community. In either case, they have the physical properties of sedimentary rock (that is, they are formed of fine-grained materials), but some igneous rocks made up of volcanic ash may also exhibit these properties. This image is located near 7.8oS, 65.3oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  5. Our World: Lunar Rock

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about NASA'€™s Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. See how NASA protects these precious moon rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts. Explore t...

  6. Impedance spectra of hot, dry silicate minerals and rocks: qualitative interpretation of spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huebner, J.S.; Dillenburg, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy helps distinguish the contributions that grain interiors and grain boundaries make to electrical resistance of silicate minerals and rocks. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxenes, and both natural and synthetic clinopyroxenite were measured. A network of electrical elements is presented for use in interpreting impedance spectra and conductive paths in hot or cold, wet or dry, minerals and rocks at any pressure. In dry rocks, a series network path predominates; in wet rocks, aqueous pore fluid and crystals both conduct. Finite resistance across the sample-electrode interface is evidence that electronic charge carriers are present at the surface, and presumably within, the silicate minerals and rocks measured. -from Authors

  7. Fractal Geometry of Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Radlinski, A.P.; Radlinska, E.Z.; Agamalian, M.; Wignall, G.D.; Lindner, P.; Randl, O.G.

    1999-04-01

    The analysis of small- and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering data for sedimentary rocks shows that the pore-rock fabric interface is a surface fractal (D{sub s}=2.82) over 3 orders of magnitude of the length scale and 10 orders of magnitude in intensity. The fractal dimension and scatterer size obtained from scanning electron microscopy image processing are consistent with neutron scattering data. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Framboidal Structures in Earth Rocks and in Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafieva, M. M.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Framboidal structures are common both in Earth rocks and in meteorites - carbonaceous chondrites. The main methods of formation of these structures are discussed. The role of biologic factors in formation of framboids is evaluated. Comparison of crystal forms comprising framboids formed in laboratory conditions and in nature is provided. On the basis of investigations of framboidal structures the proposition that pyritoidal form of crystals is typical for the formation of biogenic framboidal structures.

  9. Alkali metal and rare earth element evolution of rock-forming minerals from the Gatumba area pegmatites (Rwanda): Quantitative assessment of crystal-melt fractionation in the regional zonation of pegmatite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsbosch, Niels; Hertogen, Jan; Dewaele, Stijn; André, Luc; Muchez, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    This study presents a general model for the evaluation of Rayleigh fractional crystallisation as the principal differentiation mechanism in the formation of regionally zoned common and rare-element pegmatites. The magmatic evolution of these systems from a granitic source is reconstructed by means of alkali element and rare earth element (REE) analyses of rock-forming minerals (feldspars, micas and tourmaline), which represent a whole sequence of regional pegmatite zonation. The Gatumba pegmatite field (Rwanda, Central Africa) is chosen as case study area because of its well-developed regional zonation sequence. The pegmatites are spatially and temporally related to peraluminous G4-granites (986 ± 10 Ma). The regional zonation is developed around a G4-granite and the proximal pegmatites grade outwardly into biotite, two-mica and muscovite pegmatites. Rare-element (Nb-Ta-Sn) pegmatites occur most distal from the granite.

  10. Rock and soil mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Derski, W.; Izbicki, R.; Kisiel, I.; Mroz, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Although theoretical in character, this book provides a useful source of information for those dealing with practical problems relating to rock and soil mechanics - a discipline which, in the view of the authors, attempts to apply the theory of continuum to the mechanical investigation of rock and soil media. The book is in two separate parts. The first part, embodying the first three chapters, is devoted to a description of the media of interest. Chapter 1 introduces the main argument and discusses the essence of the discipline and its links with other branches of science which are concerned, on the one hand, with technical mechanics and, on the other, with the properties, origins, and formation of rock and soil strata under natural field conditions. Chapter 2 describes mechanical models of bodies useful for the purpose of the discourse and defines the concept of the limit shear resistance of soils and rocks. Chapter 3 gives the actual properties of soils and rocks determined from experiments in laboratories and in situ. Several tests used in geotechnical engineering are described and interconnections between the physical state of rocks and soils and their rheological parameters are considered.

  11. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  12. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  13. The strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks: A 2D approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng; Tang, Chun'an

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rocks typically contain heterogeneities in the form of crystals and pores. We investigate here the influence of such heterogeneity on the strength of volcanic rocks using an elastic damage mechanics model in which we numerically deform two-dimensional samples comprising low-strength elements representing crystals and zero-strength elements representing pores. These circular elements are stochastically generated so that there is no overlap in a medium representing the groundmass. Our modelling indicates that increasing the fraction of pores and/or crystals reduces the strength of volcanic rocks, and that increasing the pore fraction results in larger strength reductions than increasing the crystal fraction. The model also highlights an important weakening role for pore diameter, but finds that crystal diameter has a less significant influence for strength. To account for heterogeneity (pores and crystals), we propose an effective medium approach where we define an effective pore fraction ϕp‧ = Vp/(Vp + Vg) where Vp and Vg are the pore and groundmass fractions, respectively. Highly heterogeneous samples (containing high pore and/or crystal fractions) will therefore have high values of ϕp‧, and vice-versa. When we express our numerical samples (more than 200 simulations spanning a wide range of crystal and pore fractions) in terms of ϕp‧, we find that their strengths can be described by a single curve for a given pore diameter. To provide a predictive tool for the strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks, we propose a modified version of 2D solution for the Sammis and Ashby (1986) pore-emanating crack model, a micromechanical model designed to estimate strength using microstructural attributes such as porosity, pore radius, and fracture toughness. The model, reformulated to include ϕp‧ (and therefore crystal fraction), captures the strength curves for our numerical simulations over a sample heterogeneity range relevant to volcanic systems. We find

  14. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  15. Ganges Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 May 2004 Mariner 9 images acquired in 1972 first revealed a large, light-toned, layered mound in Ganges Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a higher-resolution view of these rocks than was achieved by Mariner 9 or Viking, and higher than can be obtained by Mars Odyssey or Mars Express. The image, with a resolution of about 3.7 meters (12 feet) per pixel, shows eroded layered rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma. These rocks record a history of events that occurred either in Ganges Chasma, or in the rocks brought to the surface by the opening of Ganges Chasma. Either way, the story they might tell could be as fascinating and unprecedented as the story told by sedimentary rocks investigated this year in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover ... no one knows. The image is located near 7.3oS, 48.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  16. NWA 7533: An Overview of Melt Rocks and Breccia Assembly History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Zanda, B.; Humayun, M.; Leroux, H.

    2016-08-01

    NWA 7533 contains monzonitic melt rock clasts, in part enclosed in finer-grained clast-laden impact melt bodies, all crystallized at ~4.43 Ga. Precursor rocks had already incorporated water and the D17O MIF signal of a PreNoachian thin atmosphere.

  17. Magnetic Properties of the Precambrian Granitic Rocks in Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Jackson, M.; Kogiso, T.; Sato, M.; Seita, K.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2008-12-01

    It has been known that granitic rocks have stable components of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) as well as unstable NRM. It is noted that remanent magnetization of plagioclase crystals in granitic and basaltic rocks can yield reliable paleomagnetic data (e.g. Wu et al., 1974; Geissman et al., 1988; Tarduno et al., 2001; Wakabayashi et al., 2006). The acquisition process of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) of granitic rocks is not well-understood because the size of magnetic grains varies from less than a few μm to hundreds of μm and parts of them are included in each crystal of granitic rocks. Thus we have made rock-magnetic studies and microscopic observations on granitic rocks and their separated crystals. Samples used in this study are collected from multiple sites of the Sacred Heart Granite (2.6 Ga U-Pb zircon ages) and the St. Cloud Granite and Granodiorite (1.8 Ga U-Pb zircon age) in Minnesota. For most of the bulk samples from granitic rocks, the Verwey transition at 120 K is clearly recognized. Susceptibility- temperature (χ-T) curves show an abrupt drop at about 580°C. Hysteresis parameters of bulk samples are distributed along a mixing line between the multi-domain (MD) and pseudo-single-domain (PSD) areas on the Day plot. Saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM) cooling and warming curves indicate that low-temperature memories range in a few to several tens % of the initial SIRM. These results indicate the MD magnetite grains dominate the magnetic properties but more or less PSD (or single-domain (SD)) magnetite grains are present in the granitic rocks. The separated crystals of feldspar and quartz show the Verwey transition at 120 K and the Curie temperature of about 580°C. Hysteresis properties of them are similar to those of bulk samples. These suggest that the MD and PSD (or SD) magnetite are included in both feldspar and quartz, suggesting that those magnetite grains primarily formed during the initial formation of the granitic rocks. We

  18. Crystal Chemistry of Melanite Garnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dawn Marie

    1999-01-01

    This original project resulted in a detailed crystal chemical data map of a titanium rich garnet (melanite) suite that originates from the Crowsnest Volcanics of Alberta Canada. Garnet is typically present during the partial melting of the earth's mantle to produce basalt. Prior studies conducted at Youngstown State University have yielded questions as to the crystal structure of the melanite. In the Studies conducted at Youngstown State University, through the use of single crystal x-ray diffraction, the c-axis appears to be distorted creating a tetragonal crystal instead of the typical cubic crystal of garnets. The micro probe was used on the same suite of titanium rich garnets as used in the single crystal x-ray diffraction. The combination of the single crystal x-ray research and the detailed microprobe research will allow us to determine the exact crystal chemical structure of the melanite garnet. The crystal chemical data was gathered through the utilization of the SX100 Electron Probe Micro Analyzer. Determination of the exact chemical nature may prove useful in modeling the ultramafic source rock responsible for the formation of the titanium rich lunar basalts.

  19. Compositions of Mars Rocks: SNC Meteorites, Differentiates, and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Minitti, M.; Weitz, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The 13 samples from Mars identified in the terrestrial meteorite collections vary from dunite to pyroxenite to microgabbro or basalt. All of these rocks appear to have formed from primitive melts with similar major element compositional characteristics; i.e., FeO-rich and Al2O3-Poor melts relative to terrestrial basalt compositions. Although all of the SNC rocks can be derived by melting of the same Al-depleted mantle, contamination of SNC's by a Rb-enriched mantle or crustal source is required to explain the different REE characteristics of SNC rocks. Thus, there are indications of an old crustal rocktype on Mars, and this rock does not appear to have been sampled. This paper focuses primarily on the composition of the SNC basalts, however, and on the compositions of rocks which could be derived from SNC basaltic melt by magmatic processes. In particular, we consider the possible compositions which could be achieved through accumulation of early-formed crystals in the SNC primitive magma. Through a set of experiments we have determined (1) melt (magma) compositions which could be produced by melt evolution as crystals are removed from batches of this magma cooling at depth, and (2) which evolved (Si02enriched, MgO-depleted) rock compositions could be produced from the SNC magma, and how these compare with the Pathfinder andesite composition. Finally, we compare the SNC magma compositions to the Mars soil composition in order to determine whether any source other than SNC is required.

  20. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  2. Ladon Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks exposed by the fluids that carved the Ladon Valles system in the Erythraeum region of Mars. These rocks are so ancient that their sediments were deposited, cemented to form rock, and then eroded by the water (or other liquid) that carved Ladon Valles, so far back in Martian history that such liquids could still flow on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 20.8oS, 30.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  3. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-439, 1 August 2003

    Gale Crater, located in the Aeolis region near 5.5oS, 222oW, contains a mound of layered sedimentary rock that stands higher than the rim of the crater. This giant mound suggests that the entire crater was not only once filled with sediment, it was also buried beneath sediment. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the eroded remains of the sedimentary rock that once filled Gale Crater. The layers form terraces; wind has eroded the material to form the tapered, pointed yardang ridges seen here. The small circular feature in the lower right quarter of the picture is a mesa that was once a small meteor impact crater that was filled, buried, then exhumed from within the sedimentary rock layers exposed here. This image is illuminated from the left.

  4. Rock Deformation Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Harry

    The Third Rock Deformation Colloquium was held December 4, 1989, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Steve Kirby of the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif., reported on actions taken by the rock deformation steering committee. Brian Wernicke of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., talked on the structural geology of the Great Basin.The steering committee voted for “Committee on Deformation of Earth Materials” as the name for the AGU technical committee on rock deformation, Kirby said. Considerable discussion has occurred in the steering committee over our relationship to the AGU Mineral Physics Committee. Indeed, Kirby will become chairman of that committee in 1990, underlining the overlap of the two groups. It was agreed that we will pursue closer association with Mineral Physics.

  5. Eos Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in Eos Chaos, located near the east end of the Valles Marineris trough system. The outcrops occur in the form of a distinct, circular butte (upper half of image) and a high slope (lower half of image). The rocks might be sedimentary rocks, similar to those found elsewhere exposed in the Valles Marineris system and the chaotic terrain to the east of the region.

    Location near: 12.9oS, 49.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  6. Growth of crystals for synchrotron radiation Mössbauer investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrbova, M.; Hejduk, J.; Malnev, V. V.; Seleznev, V. N.; Yagupov, S. V.; Andronova, N. V.; Chechin, A. I.; Mikhailov, A. Yu.

    1991-10-01

    Iron borate crystals (FeBO 3) were flux grown at the Physical Institute (Prague) and at Simferopol State University. During the crystal growth procedure the temperature regime was held constant to 0.1°C accuracy. Crystals were investigated with the help of a double crystal X-ray diffractometer DRON-2 (SiO 2(30 overline33)FeBO 3(444), MoK α 1 radiation). The rocking curve measurements were carried out in a constant magnetic field of 1kG. Most of the crystal surface has a rocking curve 10″-15″ wide. Some parts of some crystals with the area 1 × 1 mm 2 have rocking curves of 3″-4″ width and can be considered ideal.

  7. Digital carbonate rock physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  8. Sedimentary Rocks and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows buttes composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion within a crater occurring immediately west of Schiaparelli Basin near 4.0oS, 347.9oW. Surrounding these buttes is a field of dark sand dunes and lighter-toned, very large windblown ripples. The sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater interior was once the site of a lake. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  10. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  11. Opportunity Rocks Again!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera highlights a portion of the puzzling rock outcropping that scientists eagerly wait to investigate. Presently, Opportunity is on its lander facing northeast; the outcropping lies to the northwest. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall and are thought to be either volcanic ash deposits or sediments carried by water or wind. Data from the panoramic camera's near-infrared, blue and green filters were combined to create this approximate true color image.

  12. Diverse Rock Named Squash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image from the Sojourner rover's right front camera was taken on Sol 27. The Pathfinder lander is seen at middle left. The large rock at right, nicknamed 'Squash', exhibits a diversity of textures. It looks very similar to a conglomerate, a type of rock found on Earth that forms from sedimentary processes.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  13. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  14. Rock Outcrops near Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in a pitted and eroded region just northeast of Hellas Planitia. The light-toned materials are most likely sedimentary rocks deposited early in martian history (but long after the Hellas Basin formed by a giant asteroid or comet impact). The scene also includes a plethora of large dark-toned, windblown ripples. The image is located near 27.2oS, 280.7oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  15. Layered Rocks In Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), image shows exposures of finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in western Melas Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Rocks similar to these occur in neighboring west Candor Chasma, as well. The picture is located near 9.1oS, 74.5oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  16. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  17. Rock and Mineral Bingo: Applying and Assessing Student Rock and Mineral Knowledge and Identification Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    A rock and mineral "Bingo" that is based on knowledge and identification skills (not luck) was developed to help teachers and introductory as well as more advanced-level students develop and improve rock and mineral identification skills. The game was initially designed to use a rock and mineral kit provided to all students in Lab Classes, but could be adapted for any suite of samples. The rock and mineral kits include 13 mineral samples (olivine, pyroxene, amphibole, biotite, muscovite, potassium feldspar, plagioclase, quartz, galena, gypsum, hematite, pyrite, calcite), 7 igneous rock samples (rhyolite, granite, andesite, diorite, basalt, gabbro, peridotite), 3 sedimentary rock samples (sandstone, shale, limestone), and 5 metamorphic rock samples (slate, mica schist, gneiss, marble, quartzite). The kit also includes a small magnifying glass, a streak plate and a tempered steel nail. The Bingo cards are composed of 9 squares ("questions") each. A total of 8 groups of questions have been developed to encompass introductory through more advanced levels. The question sets developed so far are: (a) General distinction between rocks and minerals; (b) Igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; (c) Mineral luster; (d) Mineral fracture and cleavage; (e) Mineral crystal form; (f) Mineral chemistry; (g) General mineralogy; (h) Geologic Context. Each square on the card is numbered (1-9). The same card is used for each group of questions. The questions are written on a separate set of small question cards that are color-coded (according to question set) and numbered. These cards are pulled out of the `bag' by the caller, and a copy of the question is posted for all to see. The players need to choose the sample from their collection that best fits the question or description given by the caller. The questions are set up so that some samples fit more than one answer, which requires the students to review their choices. The first person or group to win presents their board and

  18. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  19. Bounce Rock Close-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This high-resolution panoramic camera blue filter image of the rock dubbed 'Bounce' was obtained up close, just before the rover placed its instruments on the rock for detailed study. The rock has a number of shiny surfaces and textures on it, some of which are unlike those seen in the Eagle Crater rock outcrop. Also, the rock was apparently moved or shaken when it was hit with the airbags, as can be seen by the gap and cracks in the soil around the rock. This image from sol 65 of the rover's journey was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  20. Reducing Rock Climbing Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1998-01-01

    Provides checklists that can be used as risk-management tools to evaluate rock-climbing programs: developing goals, policies, and procedures; inspecting the climbing environment; maintaining and inspecting equipment; protecting participants; and managing staff (hiring, training, retraining, and evaluating) and campers (experience level, needs, and…

  1. Slippery Rock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  2. ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FORBES, JACK

    THE ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL IS LOCATED IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA, WHERE THE NAVAJO LANGUAGE IS UNIVERSALLY SPOKEN BY THE NAVAJO PEOPLE. IT IS LOCATED ON A NAVAJO RESERVATION AND WAS DESIGNED AS A BIA EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOL TO SERVE 200 ELEMENTARY PUPILS, MOST OF WHOM ARE IN THE BOARDING SCHOOL SITUATION. AN OBJECTIVE OF THE SCHOOL IS TO GAIN…

  3. The River Rock School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gereaux, Teresa Thomas

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the small Appalachian community of Damascus, Virginia, used private subscriptions and volunteer labor to build a 15-classroom school made of rocks from a nearby river and chestnut wood from nearby forests. The school building's history, uses for various community activities, and current condition are described. (SV)

  4. Rocking and Rolling Rattlebacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical and…

  5. 'Scarecrow' Climbs Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Scarecrow, a mobility-testing model for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, easily traverses large rocks in the Mars Yard testing area at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover is in development for launch in 2009. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the mission for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  6. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2000-01-01

    Resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM) and luminous signals prior to or during earthquakes have been reported, in addition to ground uplift and tilt, and to changes in the seismic wave propagation parameters. However, no physical model exists that ties these diverse phenomena together. Through time-resolved impacts experiments it has been observed that, when igneous rocks (gabbro, diorite, granite) are impacted at low velocities (approx. 100 m/sec), highly mobile electronic charge carriers are generated, spreading from a small volume near the impact point, causing electric potentials, EM and light emission. The rock becomes momentarily conductive. When impacted at higher velocities (approx. 1.5 km/sec), the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. At the same time, the rock volume is filled with mobile charge carriers, and a positive surface potential is registered. During the next 1-2 msec the surface potential oscillates, due to electron injection from ground. These observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g. defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, that can travel via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals at the speed of a phonon-mediated charge transfer. Before activation, the positive hole charge carriers lay dormant in form of positive hole pairs, PHP, electrically inactive, chemically equivalent to peroxy links in the structures of constituent minerals. PHPs are introduced by way of hydroxyl (O3Si-OH) incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals when they crystallize in water-laden environments. Given that sound waves of even relatively low intensity appear to cause PHPs dissociation, thus generating mobile positive holes, it is proposed that microfracturing during rock deformation cause PHP dissociation. Depending on where and how much the rock volume is stressed, the positive holes are expected to form fluctuating charge clouds in the

  7. Kilbuck terrane: Oldest known rocks in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Box, S.E. ); Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Wooden, J.L. ); Bradshaw, J.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2,070 {plus minus}16 and 2,040 {plus minus}74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = {minus}5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. However, Phanerozoic plutons cutting several continental terranes in Alaska (southern Brooks Range and Ruby, Seward, and Yukon-Tanana terranes) have Nd isotope compositions indicative of Early Proterozoic (or older) crustal components that could be correlative with rocks of the Kilbuck terrane. Rocks with similar igneous ages in cratonal North America are rare, and those few that are known have Nd isotope compositions distinct from those of the Kilbuck terrane. Conversely, provinces with Nd model ages of 2.0-2.1 Ga are characterized by extensive 1.8 Ga or younger plutonism, which is unknown in the Kilbuck terrane. At present the case for a North American parentage of the Kilbuck terrane is not compelling. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded.

  8. Teaching the Rock Cycle with Ease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereki, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson for teaching high school students the concept of the rock cycle using sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Students use a rock cycle diagram to identify pairs of rocks. From the rock cycle, students explain on paper how their first rock became the second rock and vice versa. (PVD)

  9. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  10. Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D.L.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Gorevan, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J.; Kusack, A.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Ruff, S.W.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic or impact in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in Martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Crumpler, Larry; Farrand, William H.; Gorevan, Stephen; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Hurowitz, Joel; Kusack, Alastair; McSween, Harry Y.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Ruff, Steven W.; Wang, Alian; Yen, Albert

    2006-02-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic or impact in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in Martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present.

  12. Growth, spectral and crystallization perfection studies of semi organic non linear optical crystal - L-alanine lithium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redrothu, Hanumantharao; Kalainathan, S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine lithium chloride single crystals were successfully grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique at constant temperature (303K). The formation of the new crystal has been confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR studies. The crystalline perfection was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve measurements. The powder second harmonic generation (SHG) has been confirmed by Nd: YAG laser. The results have been discussed in detail.

  13. Experiments and Spectral Studies of Martian Volcanic Rocks: Implications for the Origin of Pathfinder Rocks and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Mustard, Jack; Weitz, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The composition and spectral properties of the Mars Pathfinder rocks and soils together with the identification of basaltic and andesitic Mars terrains based on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data raised interesting questions regarding the nature and origin of Mars surface rocks. We have investigated the following questions: (1) are the Pathfinder rocks igneous and is it possible these rocks could have formed by known igneous processes, such as equilibrium or fractional crystallization, operating within SNC magmas known to exist on Mars? If it is possible, what P (depth) and PH2O conditions are required? (2) whether TES-based interpretations of plagioclase-rich basalt and andesitic terrains in the south and north regions of Mars respectively are unique. Are the surface compositions of these regions plagioclase-rich, possibly indicating the presence of old AI-rich crust of Mars, or are the spectra being affected by something like surface weathering processes that might determine the spectral pyroxene to plagioclase ratio?

  14. Virtual Crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  15. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  16. TEM studies of a circumstellar rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1992-01-01

    Reported here is the discovery of crystals of titanium carbide in a grain of silicon carbide which formed as a circumstellar dust particle in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star. Just as in the case of terrestrial rocks, whose assemblage of minerals gives us clues to the composition and conditions of the environment in which they formed, the titanium carbide crystals and their textural relationship to the silicon carbide give us important clues to the nature of the stellar atmosphere in which they formed. From microscopic studies of the relationships between the atomic planes of the silicon carbide and the titanium carbide, we can show that the titanium carbide cannot have existed as already-formed crystals in a gas around which silicon carbide subsequently condensed. An alternative possibility is that both minerals grew quickly and simultaneously from condensing gas in the rapidly cooling and expanding stellar atmosphere. Other microscopic features of the silicon carbide, such as abundant atomic layer disorder and crystal twinning, similarly suggest rapid grain growth. However, another possibility is that the titanium carbide grew inside of the silicon carbide by diffusion of titanium atoms. Our calculations suggest that this scenario is less likely, given the relatively short times (a year or less) for which stellar condensates can be expected to be exposed to temperatures high enough to make diffusion sufficiently rapid.

  17. Petrology of Eocene volcanic rocks of Moalleman Damghan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, Seddigheh; Kohansal, Reza; Hashem Emami, Mohammad

    2010-05-01

    The Moalleman area is situated to the south of Damghan City, in the central of Torud sheet (scale 1:250000). The area is part of central Iran structural zone. The oldest and the youngest rocks units of the area include schists and limestone ascribed to Silurian and Devonian periods, and the fluvial terraces of Quaternary periods. Most of the volcanic rocks of the area are respectively related to Lutetion stage till upper Eocene, and are exposed between the Torud Angilu faults. Following to the eruption of these rocks, during upper Eocene to Oligocene, subvolcanic cryptodomes, hypoabyssal plutons and several dikes have intruded into this volcanic sequence. Igneous rocks of the study area may be classified into three main groups: Lavas, Pyroclastics and subvolcanic. Lavas include basalts, andesite, dacitic andesites and quartztrachyandesite, Trachyandesites form the major volume of these volcanic rocks with in the study. Pyroclastic rocks mainly consist of cryptallic tuff (with an andesitic to trachyandesitic composition) and crystal tuff. (With an andesitic to dacitic composition). The Major volume of volcanic rocks of study area have suffered alterations which gave rise to the formation of secondary minerals such as calcite, chlorite, sericite, epidote, serpentine, and iddingsite. It appears that the faults and fractures with in these rocks have facilitated the transition of hydrothermal solutions and the subsequent alteration. Microscopic evidences of magmatic contamination in lavas include phenomena such as resorption, formations of sieve texture, and osciliatory zoning in plagioclases, corrosion of pyroxenes and plagioclases, and two types of altered and unaltered plagioclases concurrence. According to the geochemical diagrams, the rocks of the study area of the alkaline and calc-alkaline types and have a tendency to potassium enrichment (probably related to contamination of their magma). Geochemical evidences such as great scatter in the diagrams and showing no

  18. Mafic and felsic igneous rocks at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Cousin, Agnès; Mangold, Nicolas; Toplis, Michael; Fabre, Cécile; Forni, Olivier; Payré, Valérie; Gasnault, Olivier; Ollila, Anne; Rapin, William; Fisk, Martin; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Maurice, Sylvestre; Lasue, Jérémie; Newsom, Horton; Lanza, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian terrains on Mars. The rover encountered a great variety of igneous rocks to the west of the Yellow Knife Bay sedimentary unit (from sol 13 to 800) which are float rocks or clasts in conglomerates. Textural and compositional analyses using MastCam and ChemCam Remote micro Imager (RMI) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with a ˜300-500 µm laser spot lead to the recognition of 53 massive (non layered) igneous targets, both intrusive and effusive, ranging from mafic rocks where feldspars form less than 50% of the rock to felsic samples where feldspar is the dominant mineral. From morphology, color, grain size, patina and chemistry, at least 5 different groups of rocks have been identified: (1) a basaltic class with shiny aspect, conchoidal frature, no visible grains (less than 0.2mm) in a dark matrix with a few mm sized light-toned crystals (21 targets) (2) a porphyritic trachyandesite class with light-toned, bladed and polygonal crystals 1-20 mm in length set in a dark gray mesostasis (11 targets); (3) light toned trachytes with no visible grains sometimes vesiculated or forming flat targets (6 targets); (4) microgabbro-norite (grain size < 1mm) and gabbro-norite (grain size >1 mm) showing dark and light toned crystals in similar proportion ( 8 targets); (5) light-toned diorite/granodiorite showing coarse granular (>4 mm) texture either pristine or blocky, strongly weathered rocks (9 rock targets). Overall, these rocks comprise 2 distinct geochemical series: (i) an alkali-suite: basanite, gabbro trachy-andesite and trachyte) including porphyritic and aphyric members; (ii) quartz-normative intrusives close to granodioritic composition. The former looks like felsic clasts recently described in two SNC meteorites (NWA 7034 and 7533), the first Noachian breccia sampling the martian regolith. It is geochemically consistent with differentiation of liquids produced by low

  19. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  20. Finding of corundum-bearing rocks in the Lapland granulite belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, E. N.; Shcherbakova, T. F.; Konilov, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Corundum-bearing rocks are described for the first time in the Kandalaksha structure of the Lapland granulite belt. Corundum is confined to rocks of two types: metagabbro‒anorthosites constituting lenses among metaanarthosites of the Kandalaksha massif and basic granulites. Corundum crystals (up to 200 μm long) occur in plagioclase and garnet and differ from each other depending on the host mineral, which serves as evidence against their xenogenic nature. Some corundum crystals exhibit an axial zone, which may indicate their crystallization from the gaseous phase. Corundum-bearing rocks are accompanied by piclogites (pyroxene‒garnet varieties with olivine). Piclogites and their minerals (clinopyroxene, garnet) are characterized by a positive Eu anomaly, which implies rock reworking by fluids during corundum formation, when deep-seated complexes were subjected to exhumation.

  1. Astronaut Charles Duke stands at rock adjacent to 'House Rock'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Apollo 16 lunar module pilot, stands at a rock adjacent (south) to the huge 'House Rock' (barely out of view at right edge). Note shadow at extreme right center where the two moon-exploring crewmen of the mission sampled what they referred to as the 'eastwest split of House Rock' or the open space between this rock and 'House Rock'. Duke has a sample bag in his hand, and a lunar surface rake leans against the large boulder.

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of Li3Mg2OsO6, a geometrically frustrated osmium(V) oxide with an ordered rock salt structure: comparison with isostructural Li3Mg2RuO6.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong-Hieu T; Ramezanipour, Farshid; Greedan, John E; Cranswick, Lachlan M D; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2012-11-05

    The novel osmium-based oxide Li(3)Mg(2)OsO(6) was synthesized in polycrystalline form by reducing Li(5)OsO(6) by osmium metal and osmium(IV) oxide in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of magnesium oxide. The crystal structure was refined using powder X-ray diffraction data in the orthorhombic Fddd space group with a = 5.88982(5) Å, b = 8.46873(6) Å, and c = 17.6825(2) Å. This compound is isostructural and isoelectronic with the ruthenium-based system Li(3)Mg(2)RuO(6). The magnetic ion sublattice Os(5+) (S = 3/2) consists of chains of interconnected corner- and edge-shared triangles, which brings about the potential for geometric magnetic frustration. The Curie-Weiss law holds over the range 80-300 K with C = 1.42(3) emu·K/mol [μ(eff) = 3.37(2) μ(B)] and θ(C) = -105.8(2) K. Below 80 K, there are three anomalies at 75, 30, and 8 K. Those at 75 and 30 K are suggestive of short-range antiferromagnetic correlations, while that at 8 K is a somewhat sharper maximum showing a zero-field-cooled/field-cooled divergence suggestive of perhaps spin freezing. The absence of magnetic Bragg peaks at 3.9 K in the neutron diffraction pattern supports this characterization, as does the absence of a sharp peak in the heat capacity, which instead shows only a very broad maximum at ∼12 K. A frustration index of f = 106/8 = 13 indicates a high degree of frustration. The magnetic properties of the osmium phase differ markedly from those of the isostructural ruthenium material, which shows long-range antiferromagnetic order below 17 K, f = 6, and no unusual features at higher temperatures. Estimates of the magnetic exchange interactions at the level of spin-dimer analysis for both the ruthenium and osmium materials support a more frustrated picture for the latter. Errors in the calculation and assignment of the exchange pathways in the previous report on Li(3)Mg(2)RuO(6) are identified and corrected.

  3. Laboratory experiments for defining scaling relations between rock material properties and rock resistance to erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklar, L. S.; Beyeler, J. D.; Collins, G. C.; Farrow, J. W.; Hsu, L.; Litwin, K. L.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Rock resistance to erosion is a key variable that limits rates of morphologic change and mass flux in landscapes. However, we have limited knowledge of how measurable material properties influence rock resistance to specific erosion processes. Rock 'erodibility' is commonly a free parameter in surface process models, where users assign or solve for numerical values that lack meaning outside of the model. Moreover, erodibility parameters often lump material resistance to erosion together with aspects of the forces driving erosion that are not explicitly represented in the model. Laboratory experiments in which rock types are varied, while erosive forces are held constant, can be used to develop scaling relationships between rock properties and erosion resistance for individual detachment mechanisms. With knowledge of why erosion rates vary between rock types for constant erosive forces, laboratory and field experiments that vary erosive intensity can be used to quantify the absolute susceptibility to erosion in physically explicit terms. Here we synthesize data collected over the past decade from a suite of laboratory investigations of rock resistance to wear by sediment particle impacts, and wear of sediment particles themselves, in experiments replicating fluvial and granular flow conditions. Materials tested included: field-sampled bedrock and sediment covering the widest feasible range of apparent durability and lithologic type; synthetic sandstones made from mixtures of sand and Portland cement; and water ice, both pure and containing solid impurities, tested over a wide range of temperatures. Material properties measured included: dry-bulk and saturated density, porosity, tensile strength, fracture toughness, elastic moduli, mineralogy, cement type, and the grain size of mineral crystals and cemented clasts. Erosion rates were measured by mass or volume loss divided by run time, in bedrock abrasion mills, barrel tumblers, and a large rotating drum. We find

  4. Kinetic Controls on Formation of Textures in Rapidly Cooled Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary E.

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization of silicate melts is a complex process involving melts usually produced by partial melting and cooling environments that are rapid in volcanic lavas or so slow as to be auto-metamorphic in plutonic regimes. The volcanic lavas are amenable to laboratory study as are chondrules that comprise the bulk of chondritic meteorites. Dynamic crystallization studies of basalt and chondrule melts have shown that nucleation has a more profound effect on the final texture than the cooling or crystal growth rates. The sequence of crystal shapes grown at increasing degrees of supercooling (DELTA T) or cooling rate demonstrates the effect of increasing growth rate. Equant or euhedral crystals become skeletal, then dendritic and ultimately spherulitic indicating the nucleation temperature and the DELTA T when growth began. Because crystals cannot grow until they nucleate, cooling rate does not always correlate with crystal growth rate and thus crystal shape. Silicate melts cooled at the same rate can have drastically different textures depending on the temperature of nucleation. A dynamic crystallization study of basaltic rocks shows that basaltic lavas must erupt with sufficient crystals present in the melt to act as nuclei and foster growth. With nuclei present, growth will begin when the temperature drops below the liquidus temperature and typical basaltic textures such as intersertal, intergranular or subophitic will form. If nuclei are not present, crystallization will not begin immediately and the DELTA T will increase until embryos in the melts become nuclei. The DELTA T present when grow begins dictates the growth rate and the crystal shapes and thus the rock texture. If nucleation is delayed, growth will take place at high DELTA T and the crystals will favor skeletal or dendritic shapes. Chondrules are usually considered crystallized melt droplets and clearly some are, but most are not. Most chondrules have porphyritic textures that cannot develop from

  5. Unboxing Space Rocks

    ScienceCinema

    Bruck Syal, Megan

    2016-07-12

    The box was inconspicuous, but Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) postdoctoral researcher Megan Bruck Syal immediately knew its contents: two meteorites around the size of walnuts. They formed about 4.6 billion years ago and survived a history of violent collisions in the asteroid belt before being bumped into a near-Earth-object orbit by gravitational interactions with the planets. After finally raining down on Earth, these rocks were scavenged in Antarctica by researchers, sorted and classified at NASA Johnson Space Center, then mailed first-class to Bruck Syal. Now that these space rocks are in Bruck Syal’s hands, they are mere months away from fulfilling their destiny. They are to be vaporized by a high-powered laser, and the data they yield on asteroid deflection could one day save the planet.

  6. Soil and rock 'Yogi'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several possible targets of study for rover Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 2. The smaller rock at left has been dubbed 'Barnacle Bill,' while the larger rock at right, approximately 3-4 meters from the lander, is now nicknamed 'Yogi.' Barnacle Bill is scheduled to be the first object of study for the APXS. Portions of a petal and deflated airbag are also visible at lower right.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  7. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 April 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of layered, sedimentary rock in eastern Gale Crater. North-central Gale Crater is the site of a mound that is more than several kilometers thick and largely composed of sedimentary rocks that record a complex history of deposition and erosion. At one time, Gale Crater might have been completely filled and buried beneath the martian surface.

    Location near: 4.9oS, 221.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  8. Schiaparelli's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 October 2004 Schiaparelli Basin is a large, 470 kilometer (292 miles) impact crater located east of Sinus Meridiani. The basin might once have been the site of a large lake--that is, if the sedimentary rocks exposed on its northwestern floor were deposited in water. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meter per pixel (5 ft per pixel) view of some of the light-toned, finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in northwestern Schiaparelli. The image is located near 1.0oS, 346.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  9. Sedimentary Rock Outcrops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    16 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded layered rock outcrops in a crater north of Meridiani Planum near 2.7oN, 359.1oW. The dozens and dozens of sedimentary rock layers of repeated thickness and similar physical properties at this location suggest that they may have been deposited in a lacustrine (lake) setting. The crater in which these layers occur may once have been completely filled and buried, as is the case for many craters in the Sinus Meridiani region. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  10. Sedimentary Rock Near Coprates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-420, 13 July 2003

    This mosaic of two Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera images, one from 2001, the other from 2003, shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops exposed on the floor of a trough that parallels Coprates Chasma in the Valles Marineris system. Layered rocks form the pages from which the history of a place can be read. It may be many years before the story is read, but or now at least we know where one of the books of martian history is found. This picture is located near 15.2oS, 60.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  11. Unboxing Space Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck Syal, Megan

    2016-05-09

    The box was inconspicuous, but Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) postdoctoral researcher Megan Bruck Syal immediately knew its contents: two meteorites around the size of walnuts. They formed about 4.6 billion years ago and survived a history of violent collisions in the asteroid belt before being bumped into a near-Earth-object orbit by gravitational interactions with the planets. After finally raining down on Earth, these rocks were scavenged in Antarctica by researchers, sorted and classified at NASA Johnson Space Center, then mailed first-class to Bruck Syal. Now that these space rocks are in Bruck Syal’s hands, they are mere months away from fulfilling their destiny. They are to be vaporized by a high-powered laser, and the data they yield on asteroid deflection could one day save the planet.

  12. Apoferritin crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Alexander Chernov, of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and based at Marshall Space Flight Center, is investigating why protein crystals grown in space are, in about 20 percent of cases, better-ordered than those grown on the ground. They are testing the idea that the amount of impurities trapped by space-grown crystals may be different than the amount trapped by crystals grown on Earth because convection is negligible in microgravity. The concentrations or impurities in many space-grown crystals turned out to be several times lower than that in the terrestrial ones, sometimes below the detection limit. The ground-based experiment also showed that the amount of impurities per unit volume of the crystals was usually higher than the amount per unit volume of the solution. This means that a growing crystal actually purifies the solution in its immediate vicinity. Here, an impurity depletion zone is created around apoferritin crystals grown in gel, imitating microgravity conditions.

  13. Melting behavior and phase relations of lunar samples. [Apollo 12 rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Cooling rate studies of 12002 were conducted and the results interpreted in terms of the crystallization history of this rock and certain other picritic Apollo 12 samples. Calculations of liquid densities and viscosities during crystallization, crystal settling velocities, and heat loss by the parent rock body are discussed, as are petrographic studies of other Apollo 12 samples. The process of magmatic differentiation that must have accompanied the early melting and chemical fractionation of the moon's outer layers was investigated. The source of regions of both high- and low-titanium mare basalts were also studied.

  14. Terby Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 December 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Terby Crater, located near 27.7oS, 285.4oW. The layered sediments in Terby are several kilometers thick, attesting to a long history of deposition in this ancient basin. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  15. Iani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    23 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rocks exposed by erosion in the Iani Chaos region of Mars.

    Location near: 4.2oS, 18.7oW Image width: 1 km (0.6 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  16. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in southwestern Melas Chasma, one of the troughs of the vast Valles Marineris system. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left; it is located near 9.8oS, 76.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  17. Eroded Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-372, 26 May 2003

    This high resolution Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, layered sedimentary rock exposures in an unnamed western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. The dark material is windblown sand; much of the erosion of these layers may have also been caused by wind. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  18. Kilbuck terrane: oldest known rocks in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, S.E.; Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Wooden, J.L.; Bradshaw, J.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2070 ?? 16 and 2040 ?? 74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite (??Nd[T] = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton (??Nd[T] = -5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded. -from Authors

  19. Rock pushing and sampling under rocks on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.; Liebes, S.; Crouch, D.S.; Clark, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Viking Lander 2 acquired samples on Mars from beneath two rocks, where living organisms and organic molecules would be protected from ultraviolet radiation. Selection of rocks to be moved was based on scientific and engineering considerations, including rock size, rock shape, burial depth, and location in a sample field. Rock locations and topography were established using the computerized interactive video-stereophotogrammetric system and plotted on vertical profiles and in plan view. Sampler commands were developed and tested on Earth using a full-size lander and surface mock-up. The use of power by the sampler motor correlates with rock movements, which were by plowing, skidding, and rolling. Provenance of the samples was determined by measurements and interpretation of pictures and positions of the sampler arm. Analytical results demonstrate that the samples were, in fact, from beneath the rocks. Results from the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Molecular Analysis experiment and the Gas Exchange instrument of the Biology experiment indicate that more adsorbed(?) water occurs in samples under rocks than in samples exposed to the sun. This is consistent with terrestrial arid environments, where more moisture occurs in near-surface soil un- der rocks than in surrounding soil because the net heat flow is toward the soil beneath the rock and the rock cap inhibits evaporation. Inorganic analyses show that samples of soil from under the rocks have significantly less iron than soil exposed to the sun. The scientific significance of analyses of samples under the rocks is only partly evaluated, but some facts are clear. Detectable quantities of martian organic molecules were not found in the sample from under a rock by the Molecular Analysis experiment. The Biology experiments did not find definitive evidence for Earth-like living organisms in their sample. Significant amounts of adsorbed water may be present in the martian regolith. The response of the soil

  20. Salty Martian Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which produces a spectrum, or fingerprint, of chemicals in martian rocks and soil. The instrument contains a radioisotope, curium-244, that bombards a designated area with alpha particles and X-rays, causing a cascade of reflective fluorescent X-rays. The energies of these fluorescent X-rays are unique to each atom in the periodic table, allowing scientists to determine a target's chemical composition.

    Both 'Tarmac' and 'McKittrick' are located within the small crater where Opportunity landed. The full spectra are expressed as X-ray intensity (logarithmic scale) versus energy. When comparing two spectra, the relative intensities at a given energy are proportional to the elemental concentrations, however these proportionality factors can be complex. To be precise, scientists extensively calibrate the instrument using well-analyzed geochemical standards.

    Both the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer and the rock abrasion tool are located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm.

  1. Mechanisms of Porphyroblast Crystallization: Results from High-Resolution Computed X-ray Tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlson, W D; Denison, C

    1992-08-28

    Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of rock textures is now possible with the use of high-resolution computed x-ray tomography. When applied to metamorphic rocks, this technique provides data on the sizes and positions of minerals that allow mechanisms of porphyroblast crystallization to be identified. Statistical analysis of the sizes and spatial disposition of thousands of garnet crystals in three regionally metamorphosed rocks with diverse mineralogies, in conjunction with simple numerical models for crystallization, reveals in all cases the dominance of crystallization mechanisms whose kinetics are governed by rates of intergranular diffusion of nutrients.

  2. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  3. Three classes of Martian rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this portion of the 360-degree color gallery pan, looking to the northeast, the colors have been exaggerated to highlight the differences between rocks and soils. Visible are the downwind sides of rocks, not exposed to wind scouring like Barnacle Bill (which faces upwind). There is a close correspondence between the shapes and colors of the rocks. Three general classes of rocks are recognized: large rounded rocks with weathered coatings, small gray angular rocks lacking weathered coatings, and flat white rocks. The large rounded rocks in the distance, marked by the red arrows, are comparable to Yogi. Spectral properties show that these rocks have a highly weathered coating in addition to a distinctive shape. A second population of smaller, angular rocks (blue arrows) in the foreground have unweathered surfaces even on the downwind side, except where covered on their tops by drift. These are comparable to Barnacle Bill. They may have been emplaced at the site relatively recently, perhaps as ejecta from an impact crater, so they have not had time to weather as extensively as the larger older rocks. The third kind of rock (white arrows) is white and flat, and includes Scooby Doo in the foreground and a large deposit in the background called Baker's Bank. The age of the white rock relative to the other two classes is still being debated. One representative rock of each class (Yogi, Barnacle Bill, and Scooby Doo) has been measured by the rover.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  4. Grinding into Soft, Powdery Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This hole in a rock dubbed 'Clovis' is the deepest hole drilled so far in any rock on Mars. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this view with its microscopic imager on martian sol 217 (Aug. 12, 2004) after drilling 8.9 millimeters (0.35 inch) into the rock with its rock abrasion tool. The view is a mosaic of four frames taken by the microscopic imager. The hole is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter. Clovis is key to a developing story about environmental change on Mars, not only because it is among the softest rocks encountered so far in Gusev Crater, but also because it contains mineral alterations that extend relatively deep beneath its surface. In fact, as evidenced by its fairly crumbly texture, it is possibly the most highly altered volcanic rock ever studied on Mars.

    Scientific analysis shows that the rock contains higher levels of the elements sulfur, chlorine, and bromine than are normally encountered in basaltic rocks, such as a rock dubbed 'Humphrey' that Spirit encountered two months after arriving on Mars. Humphrey showed elevated levels of sulfur, chlorine, and bromine only in the outermost 2 millimeters (less than 0.1 inch) of its surface. Clovis shows elevated levels of the same elements along with the associated softness of the rock within a borehole that is 4 times as deep. Scientists hope to compare Clovis to other, less-altered rocks in the vicinity to assess what sort of water-based processes altered the rock. Hypotheses include transport of sulfur, chlorine, and bromine in water vapor in volcanic gases; hydrothermal circulation (flow of volcanically heated water through rock); or saturation in a briny soup containing the same elements.

    In this image, very fine-grained material from the rock has clumped together by electrostatic attraction and fallen into the borehole. NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS

  5. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite. However, rock as any other material if exposed to exogenous processes starts to deteriorate. Especially mechanical weathering can be very intensive if rock with unsuitable rock properties is used. For long it had been believed that repeated freezing and thawing in relation to high absorption is the main reason of the rock deterioration. In Slovakia for many years the high water absorption was set as exclusion criterion for use of rocks and stones in building industry. Only after 1989 the absorption was accepted as merely informational rock property and not exclusion. The reason of the change was not the understanding of the relationship between the porosity and rock deterioration, but more or less good experiences with some high porous rocks used in constructions exposed to severe weather conditions and proving a lack of relationship between rock freeze-thaw resistivity and water absorption. Results of the recent worldwide research suggest that understanding a resistivity of rocks against deterioration is hidden not in the absorption but in the structure of rock pores in relation to thermodynamic properties of pore water and tensile strength of rocks and rock minerals. Also this article presents some results of research on rock deterioration and pore structure performed on 88 rock samples. The results divide the rocks tested into two groups - group N in which the pore water does not freeze

  6. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  7. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  8. Evolution of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizer, J.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2003-12-01

    For almost a century, it has been recognized that the present-day thickness and areal extent of Phanerozoic sedimentary strata increase progressively with decreasing geologic age. This pattern has been interpreted either as reflecting an increase in the rate of sedimentation toward the present (Barrell, 1917; Schuchert, 1931; Ronov, 1976) or as resulting from better preservation of the younger part of the geologic record ( Gilluly, 1949; Gregor, 1968; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971a; Veizer and Jansen, 1979, 1985).Study of the rocks themselves led to similarly opposing conclusions. The observed secular (=age) variations in relative proportions of lithological types and in chemistry of sedimentary rocks (Daly, 1909; Vinogradov et al., 1952; Nanz, 1953; Engel, 1963; Strakhov, 1964, 1969; Ronov, 1964, 1982) were mostly given an evolutionary interpretation. An opposing, uniformitarian, approach was proposed by Garrels and Mackenzie (1971a). For most isotopes, the consensus favors deviations from the present-day steady state as the likely cause of secular trends.This chapter attempts to show that recycling and evolution are not opposing, but complementary, concepts. It will concentrate on the lithological and chemical attributes of sediments, but not deal with the evolution of sedimentary mineral deposits (Veizer et al., 1989) and of life ( Sepkoski, 1989), both well amenable to the outlined conceptual treatment. The chapter relies heavily on Veizer (1988a) for the sections dealing with general recycling concepts, on Veizer (2003) for the discussion of isotopic evolution of seawater, and on Morse and Mackenzie (1990) and Mackenzie and Morse (1992) for discussion of carbonate rock recycling and environmental attributes.

  9. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  10. Experimental petrology and origin of rocks from the Descartes Highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Grove, T. L.; Stolper, E.; Hays, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Petrographic studies of Apollo 16 samples indicate that rocks 62295 and 68415 are crystallization products of highly aluminous melts. 60025 is a shocked, crushed and partially annealed plagioclase cumulate. 60315 is a recrystallized noritic breccia of disputed origin. 60335 is a feldspathic basalt filled with xenoliths and xenocrysts of anorthosite, breccia, and anorthite. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) of plagioclase appears to be a relative crystallization index. Low pressure melting experiments with controlled Po2 indicate that the igneous samples crystallized at oxygen fugacities well below the Fe/FeO buffer. Crystallization experiments at various pressures suggest that the 62295 and 68415 compositions were produced by partial or complete melting of lunar crustal materials, and not by partial melting of the deep lunar interior.

  11. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 August 2004 Light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops are common within the vast martian Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a recent example from southern Melas Chasma at 1.5 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) resolution. The image is located near 11.3oS, 73.9oW, and covers an area about 1.8 km (1.1 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  12. Sedimentary Rocks in Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a butte and several other landforms eroded into light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock in southern Melas Chasma. Melas is part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 11.8oS, 74.6oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  13. Sedimentary Rocks in Ganges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows portions of two massifs composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock in Ganges Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris trough system. On the steeper slopes in this vista, dry talus shed from the outcrop has formed a series of dark fans. Surrounded by dark, windblown sand, these landforms are located near 8.6oS, 46.8oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  14. Sedimentary Rock in Candor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dozens of light- and a few dark-toned sedimentary rock layers exposed by faulting and erosion in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 6.5oS, 77.0oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  15. From stones to rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  16. Comparative petrogenesis of anorthositic and troctolitic series rocks of the Duluth Complex, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D. Jr.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of new mapping in the NW part of the Middle Proterozoic Duluth Complex in NE Minnesota reinforces the view that the Complex consists dominantly of two major lithostratigraphic units: an Anorthositic Series (AS) and a Troctolitic Series (TS) dominated by troctolite and olivine gabbro. Consistent intrusive and inclusive relationships confirm that AS rocks are older than TS. Interpretations of field, petrographic, and petrochemical data imply that the petrogenesis of the two rock series differed in at least four significant ways: 1) While parent magmas to both rock series could have been derived from high-Al olivine tholeiite primary magmas by fractional crystallization of Pl+Ol+Cpx+Sp in lower to intermediate crustal (40-15 km) chambers, AS parent magmas were generally more evolved than TS magmas upon their introduction into the Duluth Complex. 2) As magmas were intruded as plagioclase crystal muses (less than or equal to50% crystals), whereas later TS intrusions contained rare or minor intratelluric plagioclase and olivine. Periodic intrusions of viscous AS mushes probably caused much of the structural complexity ubiquitous to these rocks. 3) Although parent magmas to both rock series were saturated in plagioclase upon intrusion, AS magmas were less often saturated in olivine than were TS magmas. 4) TS rocks record fractional crystallization within Duluth Complex chambers; however, the extent and pattern of differentiation often reflects repeated replenishment of more primitive magmas.

  17. Positive anomalous concentrations of Pb in some gabbroic rocks of Afikpo basin southeastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onwualu-John, J N

    2016-08-01

    Gabbroic rocks have intruded the sedimentary sequence at Ameta in Afikpo basin southeastern Nigeria. Petrographic and geochemical features of the rocks were studied in order to evaluate their genetic and geotectonic history. The petrographic results show that the rocks contain plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene, biotite, iron oxide, and traces of quartz in three samples. Major element characteristics show that the rocks are subalkaline. In addition, the rocks have geochemical characteristics similar to basaltic andesites. The trace elements results show inconsistent concentrations of high field strength elements (Zr, Nb, Th, Ta), moderate enrichment of large-ion lithophile elements (Rb, Sr, Ba) and low concentrations of Ni and Cr. Rare earth element results show that the rocks are characterized by enrichment of light rare earth elements, middle rare earth elements enrichment, and depletion of heavy rare earth elements with slight positive europium anomalies. Zinc concentrations are within the normal range in basaltic rocks. There are extremely high concentrations of Pb in three of the rock samples. The high Pb concentrations in some of these rocks could be as a result of last episodes of magmatic crystallization. The rocks intruded the Asu River Group; organic components in the sedimentary sequence probably contain Pb which has been assimilated into the magma at the evolutionary stage of the magma. Weathering of some rocks that contain galena could lead to an increase in the concentration of lead in the gabbroic rocks, especially when the migration and crystallization of magma take place in an aqueous environment. Nevertheless, high concentration of lead is hazardous to health and environment.

  18. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  19. Schiaparelli Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-403, 26 June 2003

    Some of the most important high resolution imaging results of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) experiment center on discoveries about the presence and nature of the sedimentary rock record on Mars. This old meteor impact crater in northwestern Schiaparelli Basin exhibits a spectacular view of layered, sedimentary rock. The 2.3 kilometer (1.4 miles) wide crater may have once been completely filled with sediment; the material was later eroded to its present form. Dozens of layers of similar thickness and physical properties are now expressed in a wedding cake-like stack in the middle of the crater. Sunlight illuminating the scene from the left shows that the circle, or mesa top, at the middle of the crater stands higher than the other stair-stepped layers. The uniform physical properties and bedding of these layers might indicate that they were originally deposited in a lake (it is possible that the crater was at the bottom of a much larger lake, filling Schiaparelli Basin); alternatively, the layers were deposited by settling out of the atmosphere in a dry environment. This picture was acquired on June 3, 2003, and is located near 0.9oS, 346.2oW.

  20. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  1. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1993-01-01

    We study out Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are not on top of a mountain may once have been on the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of the Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  2. Rocks as poroelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    1998-04-30

    In Biot's theory of poroelasticity, elastic materials contain connected voids or pores and these pores may be filled with fluids under pressure. The fluid pressure then couples to the mechanical effects of stress or strain applied externally to the solid matrix. Eshelby's formula for the response of a single ellipsoidal elastic inclusion in an elastic whole space to a strain imposed at infinity is a very well-known and important result in elasticity. Having a rigorous generalization of Eshelby's results valid for poroelasticity means that the hard part of Eshelby' work (in computing the elliptic integrals needed to evaluate the fourth-rank tensors for inclusions shaped like spheres, oblate and prolate spheroids, needles and disks) can be carried over from elasticity to poroelasticity - and also thermoelasticity - with only trivial modifications. Effective medium theories for poroelastic composites such as rocks can then be formulated easily by analogy to well-established methods used for elastic composites. An identity analogous to Eshelby's classic result has been derived [Physical Review Letters 79:1142-1145 (1997)] for use in these more complex and more realistic problems in rock mechanics analysis. Descriptions of the application of this result as the starting point for new methods of estimation are presented.

  3. A smart rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  4. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  5. Overview - Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James C.

    1992-03-24

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  6. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  7. Search for magnetite in lunar rocks and fines.

    PubMed

    Jedwab, J; Herbosch, A; Wollast, R; Naessens, G; Van Geen-Peers, N

    1970-01-30

    Magnetite crystals larger than 2 micrometers are absent from rocks and fines. Smaller opaque spheres in the fines can tentatively be identified as magnetite. Their concentration is not higher than 1 x 10(-6) particle per particle smaller than 1 millimeter. In the fines from the sampling site, the contribution of material similar to type 1 carbonaceous meteorites is insignificant, either because it never existed, or because it was evaporated or comminuted by impact or was diluted by indigenous material. Other magnetite habits typical of carbonaceous meteorites or possibly of cosmic dust or comets were also sought without success-such as rods, platelets, framboids, spherulites, and idiomorphic crystals.

  8. Sr isotopic microsampling of magmatic rocks; a review (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Sr isotopes have been used since the 1960s as powerful tracers of source for igneous rocks. In the past 10 years in-situ isotopic microsampling has afforded us tremendous progress in our capacity to understand magmatic processes. This progress is underpinned by analytical advances particularly in sample extraction through laser or micromill and in multicollector mass spectrometer improvements to sensitivity and precision. Perhaps the biggest surprise was the recognition in the 1990s that young magmatic rocks are commonly isotopically heterogeneous at the component (inter- or intra- crystal) scale. Given that melting and fractionation do not affect 87Sr/86Sr we would not a priori expect isotopic variations within or among crystals in a young igneous rock. This observation alone attests to open system behavior in magmas, and tells us that many of the crystals have been mechanically aggregated and not grown directly from the melt in which they are found solidified (a conclusion that can also commonly be drawn from cursory petrographic examination). This recognition in turn means that we can make use of the crystals as recorders of the isotopic environments in which they crystallise: If a crystal grows progressively from a melt which changes its isotopic composition through processes such as contamination and mixing, then the only record of the melt evolution is in the core-rim compositions of the crystals - analogous to the environmental record of tree rings. Plagioclase crystals in mafic enclaves from Lassen (CA) and Purico-Chascon (Chile), for instance, have isotopic records that reflect origination from the more silicic host. Core-rim records of evolution can also be integrated with textural measurements. At Stromboli we have shown how isotopic zoning correlates with crystal size distribution. The detailed records of single crystals can be complemented by multi crystal core analyses which can be used to distinguish specific populations. This approach was used on

  9. Building The Bell Rock Lighthouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the first mariners sailed off the east coast of Scotland the Bell Rock has claimed many vessels and countless lives. Also known as the Inch Cape Rocks they lie 18 km off the coast at Arbroath. Located near the mouth of the Firth of Forth and its important shipping ports these dangerous rocks cover an area some 440 m long and 90 m wide.…

  10. Mars Rock Formation Poses Mystery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This sharp, close-up image taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows a rock target dubbed 'Robert E,' located on the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are studying this area for clues about the rock outcrop's composition. This image measures 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and was taken on the 15th day of Opportunity's journey (Feb. 8, 2004).

  11. [Hearing disorders and rock music].

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2008-12-15

    Only few studies have investigated the frequency of hearing disorders in rock musicians. Performing rock music is apparently associated with a hearing loss in a fraction of musicians. Tinnitus and hyperacusis are more common among rock musicians than among the background population. It seems as if some sort of resistance against further hearing loss is developed over time. The use of ear protection devices have not been studied systematically but appears to be associated with diminished hearing loss.

  12. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (<55%). From the economic point of view, the Pure Gypsum Rocks, displaying a resistivity value of >800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship

  13. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  14. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  15. Hydrogen in rocks: an energy source for deep microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Freund, Friedemann; Dickinson, J Thomas; Cash, Michele

    2002-01-01

    To survive in deep subsurface environments, lithotrophic microbial communities require a sustainable energy source such as hydrogen. Though H2 can be produced when water reacts with fresh mineral surfaces and oxidizes ferrous iron, this reaction is unreliable since it depends upon the exposure of fresh rock surfaces via the episodic opening of cracks and fissures. A more reliable and potentially more voluminous H2 source exists in nominally anhydrous minerals of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Our experimental results indicate that H2 molecules can be derived from small amounts of H2O dissolved in minerals in the form of hydroxyl, OH- or O3Si-OH, whenever such minerals crystallized in an H2O-laden environment. Two types of experiments were conducted. Single crystal fracture experiments indicated that hydroxyl pairs undergo an in situ redox conversion to H2 molecules plus peroxy links, O3Si/OO\\SiO3. While the peroxy links become part of the mineral structure, the H2 molecules diffused out of the freshly fractured mineral surfaces. If such a mechanism occurred in natural settings, the entire rock column would become a volume source of H2. Crushing experiments to facilitate the outdiffusion of H2 were conducted with common crustal igneous rocks such as granite, andesite, and labradorite. At least 70 nmol of H2/g diffused out of coarsely crushed andesite, equivalent at standard pressure and temperature to 5,000 cm3 of H2/m3 of rock. In the water-saturated, biologically relevant upper portion of the rock column, the diffusion of H2 out of the minerals will be buffered by H2 saturation of the intergranular water film.

  16. Hydrogen in rocks: an energy source for deep microbial communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Dickinson, J. Thomas; Cash, Michele

    2002-01-01

    To survive in deep subsurface environments, lithotrophic microbial communities require a sustainable energy source such as hydrogen. Though H2 can be produced when water reacts with fresh mineral surfaces and oxidizes ferrous iron, this reaction is unreliable since it depends upon the exposure of fresh rock surfaces via the episodic opening of cracks and fissures. A more reliable and potentially more voluminous H2 source exists in nominally anhydrous minerals of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Our experimental results indicate that H2 molecules can be derived from small amounts of H2O dissolved in minerals in the form of hydroxyl, OH- or O3Si-OH, whenever such minerals crystallized in an H2O-laden environment. Two types of experiments were conducted. Single crystal fracture experiments indicated that hydroxyl pairs undergo an in situ redox conversion to H2 molecules plus peroxy links, O3Si/OO\\SiO3. While the peroxy links become part of the mineral structure, the H2 molecules diffused out of the freshly fractured mineral surfaces. If such a mechanism occurred in natural settings, the entire rock column would become a volume source of H2. Crushing experiments to facilitate the outdiffusion of H2 were conducted with common crustal igneous rocks such as granite, andesite, and labradorite. At least 70 nmol of H2/g diffused out of coarsely crushed andesite, equivalent at standard pressure and temperature to 5,000 cm3 of H2/m3 of rock. In the water-saturated, biologically relevant upper portion of the rock column, the diffusion of H2 out of the minerals will be buffered by H2 saturation of the intergranular water film.

  17. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  18. Classification Scheme for Diverse Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks Encountered by MSL in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Fisk, M.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D. W.; Sumner, D.; Sautter, V.; Williams, A. J.; Gellert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed in a lithologically and geochemically diverse region of Mars. We present a recommended rock classification framework based on terrestrial schemes, and adapted for the imaging and analytical capabilities of MSL as well as for rock types distinctive to Mars (e.g., high Fe sediments). After interpreting rock origin from textures, i.e., sedimentary (clastic, bedded), igneous (porphyritic, glassy), or unknown, the overall classification procedure (Fig 1) involves: (1) the characterization of rock type according to grain size and texture; (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers according to Figs 3 and 4; and if applicable, in depth study of (3) mineralogy and (4) geologic/stratigraphic context. Sedimentary rock types are assigned by measuring grains in the best available resolution image (Table 1) and classifying according to the coarsest resolvable grains as conglomerate/breccia, (coarse, medium, or fine) sandstone, silt-stone, or mudstone. If grains are not resolvable in MAHLI images, grains in the rock are assumed to be silt sized or smaller than surface dust particles. Rocks with low color contrast contrast between grains (e.g., Dismal Lakes, sol 304) are classified according to minimum size of apparent grains from surface roughness or shadows outlining apparent grains. Igneous rocks are described as intrusive or extrusive depending on crystal size and fabric. Igneous textures may be described as granular, porphyritic, phaneritic, aphyric, or glassy depending on crystal size. Further descriptors may include terms such as vesicular or cumulate textures.

  19. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  20. Meridiani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-545, 15 November 2003

    Northern Sinus Meridiani is a region of vast exposures of layered, sedimentary rock. Buried within these layers are many filled impact craters. Erosion has re-exposed several formerly-buried craters in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. Arrows 1 and 2 indicate craters that are still emerging from beneath layered material; arrow 3 indicates a crater that has been fully re-exposed. This image is located near 5.1oN, 2.7oW. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated from the left/upper left.

  1. Rover, airbags, & surrounding rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the Martian surface was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) before sunset on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on Mars. The airbags have been partially retracted, and portions the petal holding the undeployed rover Sojourner can be seen at lower left. The rock in the center of the image may be a future target for chemical analysis. The soil in the foreground has been disturbed by the movement of the airbags as they retracted.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  2. Rocks of low permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 17th International Congress of the IAH (International Association of Hydrogeologists) will meet in Tucson, Ariz., January 7-10, 1985. The deadline for abstracts is March 1, 1984, and final papers are due October 15, 1984.The topic of the congress will be “Hydrogeology of Rocks of Low Permeability,” and speakers will include W. Back, J. F. Bredehoeft, G. de Marsily, J. E. Gale, P. Fritz, L. W. Gelhar, G. E. Grisak, C. W. Kreitler, M. R. Llamas, T. N. Narasimhan, I. Neretnieks, and E. P. Weeks. The congress will conclude with a panel discussion moderated by S. P. Neuman. Panelists include S. N. Davis, G. de Marsily, R. A. Freeze, P. A. Witherspoon, and I. Neretnieks.

  3. Rocks That Remember (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Parts of the continental crust preserve a magnetic memory that is billions of years old. Why do some rocks remember where they were born and others forget? Through time, continents travel over the world, but the memory preserved in some minerals remembers where they originated from, with a positioning system that can be envied even by modern technology. These magnetic mineral memory systems survived harsh environments, persevering in a magnetic field which changed in intensity and alternated in direction thousands of times, while also traveling the globe and possibly being subjected to enhanced temperatures. During all this, some crustal rocks retained most "magnetic sectors" in their "hard disk", and today create remanent magnetic anomalies reflecting the time and position of their initial remanent magnetization. Magnetic anomalies in planetary crusts are deviations from a global internal magnetic field. Measured over many length scales and at elevations ranging from near surface to satellites, crustal anomalies reflect the magnetic minerals, which respond to the changing planetary magnetic field. Anomalies are influenced by the geometry of the geological bodies, and by the magnetic and mineralogical properties of the constitutive rocks. Previously, magnetism of the continental crust has been completely described in terms of bulk ferrimagnetism of crustal minerals, and much of it due to induced magnetization. Even though remanent magnetization of the crust proved crucial for dating the ocean floor, and also is important for mineral exploration, the contribution of remanence to continental magnetic anomalies has been largely underestimated. In the course of studying remanent anomalies and the minerals responsible for them, a new interface-based remanence type, "lamellar magnetism", was discovered in rather common, slowly cooled, igneous and metamorphic rocks containing finely exsolved (10 microns to 1 nm) members of the rhombohedral hematite-ilmenite series

  4. Robotic Rock Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Martial

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a three-month research program undertook jointly by the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and Ames Research Center as part of the Ames' Joint Research Initiative (JRI.) The work was conducted at the Ames Research Center by Mr. Liam Pedersen, a graduate student in the CMU Ph.D. program in Robotics under the supervision Dr. Ted Roush at the Space Science Division of the Ames Research Center from May 15 1999 to August 15, 1999. Dr. Martial Hebert is Mr. Pedersen's research adviser at CMU and is Principal Investigator of this Grant. The goal of this project is to investigate and implement methods suitable for a robotic rover to autonomously identify rocks and minerals in its vicinity, and to statistically characterize the local geological environment. Although primary sensors for these tasks are a reflection spectrometer and color camera, the goal is to create a framework under which data from multiple sensors, and multiple readings on the same object, can be combined in a principled manner. Furthermore, it is envisioned that knowledge of the local area, either a priori or gathered by the robot, will be used to improve classification accuracy. The key results obtained during this project are: The continuation of the development of a rock classifier; development of theoretical statistical methods; development of methods for evaluating and selecting sensors; and experimentation with data mining techniques on the Ames spectral library. The results of this work are being applied at CMU, in particular in the context of the Winter 99 Antarctica expedition in which the classification techniques will be used on the Nomad robot. Conversely, the software developed based on those techniques will continue to be made available to NASA Ames and the data collected from the Nomad experiments will also be made available.

  5. Bakhtin's Dialogics and Rock Lyrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jeff Parker

    Rock music is ideological both implicitly (in its intrinsic valuing of change, and resistance to authority, for instance), and explicitly (in political records from activist artists such as John Lennon and U2). The texts of the rock genre offer rhetorical experiences. A dialogic conception may help scholars to account for and describe the…

  6. The Rock Climbing Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudlas, John

    The product of 10 years of rock climbing instruction, this guide provides material from which an instructor can teach basic climbing concepts and safety skills as well as conduct a safe, enjoyable rock climbing class in a high school setting. It is designed for an instructor with limited experience in climbing; however, the need for teacher…

  7. Rocking Ratchets at High Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, Peter

    A pedagogical introduction to basic physical and mathematical concepts of stochastic modeling is given for the specific example of a rocking ratchet system. Perturbative methods are illustrated by deriving the leading order behavior of the particle current for asymptotically fast rocking forces.

  8. 'Mister Badger' Pushing Mars Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking's soil sampler collector arm successfully pushed a rock on the surface of Mars during the afternoon of Friday, October 8. The irregular-shaped rock was pushed several inches by the Lander's collector arm, which displaced the rock to the left of its original position, leaving it cocked slightly upward. Photographs and other information verified the successful rock push. Photo at left shows the soil sampler's collector head pushing against the rock, named 'Mister Badger' by flight controllers. Photo at right shows the displaced rock and the depression whence it came. Part of the soil displacement was caused by the collector s backhoe. A soil sample will be taken from the site Monday night, October 11. It will then be delivered to Viking s organic chemistry instrument for a series of analyses during the next few weeks. The sample is being sought from beneath a rock because scientists believe that, if there are life forms on Mars, they may seek rocks as shelter from the Sun s intense ultraviolet radiation.

  9. Rockin' around the Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frack, Susan; Blanchard, Scott Alan

    2005-01-01

    In this activity students will simulate how sedimentary rocks can be changed into metamorphic rocks by intense pressure. The materials needed are two small pieces of white bread, one piece of wheat bread, and one piece of a dark bread (such as pumpernickel or dark rye) per student, two pieces of waxed paper, scissors, a ruler, and heavy books.…

  10. Further Reflections on Little Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Danielle S.

    2007-01-01

    The famous photo of Hazel Bryan jeering at Elizabeth Eckford as a mob helped drive Elizabeth from Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on September 4, 1957, compels meditation on the nature of democratic politics. This scene is commemorative of the Little Rock events where school segregation was rampant. The author believes that the photo…

  11. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  12. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  13. Classification scheme for sedimentary and igneous rocks in Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.; Schmidt, M. E.; Fisk, M. R.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. W.; Sautter, V.; Sumner, D.; Williams, A. J.; Clegg, S. M.; Cousin, A.; Gasnault, O.; Gellert, R.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Wiens, R. C.

    2017-03-01

    Rocks analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater include a variety of clastic sedimentary rocks and igneous float rocks transported by fluvial and impact processes. To facilitate the discussion of the range of lithologies, we present in this article a petrological classification framework adapting terrestrial classification schemes to Mars compositions (such as Fe abundances typically higher than for comparable lithologies on Earth), to specific Curiosity observations (such as common alkali-rich rocks), and to the capabilities of the rover instruments. Mineralogy was acquired only locally for a few drilled rocks, and so it does not suffice as a systematic classification tool, in contrast to classical terrestrial rock classification. The core of this classification involves (1) the characterization of rock texture as sedimentary, igneous or undefined according to grain/crystal sizes and shapes using imaging from the ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager (RMI), Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam instruments, and (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers based on the abundances of Fe, Si, alkali, and S determined by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments. The aims are to help understand Gale crater geology by highlighting the various categories of rocks analyzed by the rover. Several implications are proposed from the cross-comparisons of rocks of various texture and composition, for instance between in place outcrops and float rocks. All outcrops analyzed by the rover are sedimentary; no igneous outcrops have been observed. However, some igneous rocks are clasts in conglomerates, suggesting that part of them are derived from the crater rim. The compositions of in-place sedimentary rocks contrast significantly with the compositions of igneous float rocks. While some of the differences between sedimentary rocks and igneous floats may be related to physical sorting and diagenesis of the sediments, some of the sedimentary rocks (e

  14. Crystal clear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    A semiconductor is usually opaque to any light whose photon energy is larger than the semiconductor bandgap. Nature Photonics spoke to Stephen Durbin about how to render GaAs semiconductor crystals transparent using intense X-ray pulses.

  15. On the weathering of Martian igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    Besides the young crystallization age, one of the first arguments for the martian origin of shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites came from the chemical similarity of the meteorite Shergotty and the martian soil as measured by Viking XRF analyses. In the meantime, the discovery of trapped rare gas and nitrogen components with element and isotope ratios closely matching the highly characteristic ratios of the Mars atmosphere in the shock glasses of shergottite EETA79001 was further striking evidence that the SNC's are martian surface rocks. The martian soil composition as derived from the Viking mission, with its extremely high S and Cl concentrations, was interpreted as weathering products of mafic igneous rocks. The low SiO2 content and the low abundance of K and other trace elements in the martian soils point to a mafic crust with a considerably smaller degree of fractionation compared to the terrestrial crust. However, the chemical evolution of the martian regolith and soil in respect to surface reaction with the planetary atmosphere or hydrosphere is poorly understood. A critical point in this respect is that the geochemical evidence as derived from the SNC meteorites suggests that Mars is a very dry planet that should have lost almost all its initially large water inventory during its accretion.

  16. Crystallization, flow and thermal histories of lunar and terrestrial compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhlmann, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Contents: a kinetic treatment of glass formation; effects of nucleating heterogeneities on glass formation; glass formation under continuous cooling conditions; crystallization statistics; kinetics of crystal nucleation; diffusion controlled crystal growth; crystallization of lunar compositions; crystallization between solidus and liquidus; crystallization on reheating a glass; temperature distributions during crystallization; crystallization of anorthite and anorthite-albite compositions; effect of oxidation state on viscosity; diffusive creep and viscous flow; high temperature flow behavior of glass-forming liquids, a free volume interpretation; viscous flow behavior of lunar compositions; thermal history of orange soil material; breccias formation by viscous sintering; viscous sintering; thermal histories of breccias; solute partitioning and thermal history of lunar rocks; heat flow in impact melts; and thermal histories of olivines.

  17. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  18. Analysis of Inflatable Rock Bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Charlie C.

    2016-01-01

    An inflatable bolt is integrated in the rock mass through the friction and mechanical interlock at the bolt-rock interface. The pullout resistance of the inflatable bolt is determined by the contact stress at the interface. The contact stress is composed of two parts, termed the primary and secondary contact stresses. The former refers to the stress established during bolt installation and the latter is mobilized when the bolt tends to slip in the borehole owing to the roughness of the borehole surface. The existing analysis of the inflatable rock bolt does not appropriately describe the interaction between the bolt and the rock since the influence of the folded tongue of the bolt on the stiffness of the bolt and the elastic rebound of the bolt tube in the end of bolt installation are ignored. The interaction of the inflatable bolt with the rock is thoroughly analysed by taking into account the elastic displacements of the rock mass and the bolt tube during and after bolt installation in this article. The study aims to reveal the influence of the bolt tongue on the contact stress and the different anchoring mechanisms of the bolt in hard and soft rocks. A new solution to the primary contact stress is derived, which is more realistic than the existing one in describing the interaction between the bolt and the rock. The mechanism of the secondary contact stress is also discussed from the point of view of the mechanical behaviour of the asperities on the borehole surface. The analytical solutions are in agreement with both the laboratory and field pullout test results. The analysis reveals that the primary contact stress decreases with the Young's modulus of the rock mass and increases with the borehole diameter and installation pump pressure. The primary contact stress can be easily established in soft and weak rock but is low or zero in hard and strong rock. In soft and weak rock, the primary contact stress is crucially important for the anchorage of the bolt, while

  19. Electron microprobe evaluation of terrestrial basalts for whole-rock K-Ar dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1972-01-01

    Four basalt samples for whole-rock K-Ar dating were analyzed with an electron microprobe to locate potassium concentrations. Highest concentrations of potassium were found in those mineral phases which were the last to crystallize. The two reliable samples had potassium concentrated in fine-grained interstitial feldspar and along grain boundaries of earlier formed plagioclase crystals. The two unreliable samples had potassium concentrated in the glassy matrix, demonstrating the ineffectiveness of basaltic glass as a retainer of radiogenic argon. In selecting basalt samples for whole-rock K-Ar dating, particular emphasis should be placed on determining the nature and condition of the fine-grained interstitial phases. ?? 1972.

  20. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOEpatents

    Ruzzi, Peter L.; Morrell, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  1. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  3. Rock Dusting Leaves 'Mickey Mouse' Mark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Humphrey' and the circular areas on the rock that were wiped off by the rover. The rover used a brush on its rock abrasion tool to clean these spots before examining them with its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Later, the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, exposing fresh rock underneath.

  4. Rust and schreibersite in Apollo 16 highland rocks - Manifestations of volatile-element mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, R. H.; Taylor, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    Rust is a manifestation of halogen and volatile-metal mobility in the lunar environment. Schreibersite is stable as the primary phosphorus-bearing phase in the highland rocks, a consequence of the inherently low oxygen fugacity within impact-generated melts. Apatite and whitlockite are subordinate in these rocks. The partitioning of P into phosphide in impact-generated melts, and the failure of phosphate to crystallize, effects a decoupling of the halogens and phosphorus. Of the Apollo 16 rocks, 63% contain rust, 70% contain schreibersite, and 52% contain both phases, thereby establishing the pervasiveness of volatile-elements throughout the highland rocks. The major portion of these volatile-bearing phases occur in impact melt-rocks or in breccia matrices. Rhabdites of schreibersite in some of the FeNi grains indicate that there is a meteoritic contribution to the phosphorus in these rocks. Cl/P2O5 ratios in lunar highland rocks are a function of secondary effects, with any apparent Cl-P correlations being coincidential. The present observations preclude the validity of models based on such elemental ratios in these rocks. The presence of rust in the clast laden matrices of pristine rocks indicates fugitive element localization. Pristine clasts may have been contaminated. The basis for a pristine volatile chemistry is questioned.

  5. Magnetic and mineralogical properties of salt rocks from the Zechstein of the Northern German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Frances C.; Schmidt, Volkmar; Schramm, Michael; Mertineit, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic properties of rocks are often studied to characterize composition and fabric of rocks. For salt rocks, the basic relationships between their magnetic properties and composition, which are necessary to interpret rock magnetic data, are not yet established. Therefore, we studied different types of natural salt rock and pure salt minerals. We measured their magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility, IRM acquisition curves, FORC diagrams, temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility) and used analytical methods such as microscopy, XRD and ICP-OES to understand the relationship between magnetic properties and mineralogy. Salt rocks mainly consist of the diamagnetic minerals halite, carnallite, sylvine and anhydrite with negative magnetic susceptibilities. The magnetic susceptibilities of pure synthetic NaCl and KCl single crystals, show values of -14.5 × 10-6 SI and -13.5 × 10-6 SI, respectively. In contrast, in natural salt rocks higher magnetic susceptibility values were measured. The magnetic susceptibility of the samples investigated in this study shows a general increase from light rock salt (max. -10 × 10-6 SI) over carnallitite (max. 134 × 10-6 SI) to red sylvinite (max. 270 × 10-6 SI). Whole rock analyses suggests that increased magnetic susceptibility can be attributed to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic minerals that are contained within the insoluble residue. The magnetic susceptibility is mainly controlled by magnetite and phyllosilicates. Its measurement can therefore be used to detect subtle changes in the content of these minerals.

  6. Major element variation and possible source materials of apollo 12 crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, I; Haramura, H

    1971-03-26

    Nine different crystalline rocks of the Apollo 12 samples have been analyzed with conventional chemical rock analysis methods. Five of the rocks have normative quartz, whereas the others have normative olivine and hypersthene. The rocks show a wide range in the ratio of iron to magnesium, and their compositions fall on relatively smooth curves in the oxide variation diagram. It is suggested that these rocks, with one exception, represent different parts of a differentiated magmatic body, in which magmatic differentiation by crystallization and settling of olivine was most effective. The source material of the original magma may be peridotite with or without minor amounts of plagioclase or spinel or garnet, with the presence or absence of these minerals dependent on the depth of magma generation.

  7. Rock River Geographic Information System: ROCK-GIS (User Manual)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    Rock River GIS application was created using Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS8.X software and Microsoft’s Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), which is included with ArcGIS8.X products.

  8. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  9. Astronomy and Rock Art Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, William Breen

    Rock art is often used as evidence for the earliest phases of prehistoric celestial knowledge and sky observation. Like the sky, rock art is a global phenomenon and it is also one of the earliest manifestations of human cognitive awareness. Similarities in iconography and visual context may provide evidence of sky-watching activity, and in some cases, ethnographic analogies, ethnohistoric documentation, and surviving archaeological evidence may confirm that these activities were related to rock art production. Nevertheless, the problem of random matches makes proofs of intentional relation more complicated. Probabilities are measured differently in archaeology and astronomy and can sometimes lead to ambiguous or contradictory conclusions.

  10. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  11. Mineral Detector for Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, S. T.; Hart, S. D.; Gulick, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a Raman spectral analysis tool that uses machine learning algorithms to classify pure minerals in igneous rocks. Experiments show greater than 90% accuracy classifying a test set of pure minerals against a database of similar reference minerals using an artificial neural network. Efforts are currently underway to improve this tool for use as a mineral detector in rock samples, an important milestone toward autonomously classifying rocks based on spectral, and previous imaging work. Although pure mineral classification has been widely successful, applying the same methods to rocks is difficult because the spectra may represent a combination of multiple, and often competing, mineral signatures. In such cases some minerals may appear with more intensity than others resulting in masking of weaker minerals. Furthermore, with our particular spectrometer (852 nm excitation, ~50 micron spot size), minerals such as potassium feldspar fluoresce, both obscuring its characteristic Raman features and suppressing those of weaker minerals. For example, plagioclase and quartz, two key minerals for determining the composition of igneous rocks, are often hidden by minerals such as potassium feldspar and pyroxene, and are consequently underrepresented in the spectral analysis. These technicalities tend to skew the perceived composition of a rock from its actual composition. Despite these obstacles, an experiment involving a training set of 26 minerals (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz) and a test set of 57 igneous rocks (basalt, gabbro, andesite, diorite, dacite, granodiorite, rhyolite, granite) shows that generalizations derived from their spectral data are consistent with expected trends: as rock composition goes from felsic to mafic there is a marked increase in the detection of minerals such as plagioclase and pyroxene along with a decrease in the detection of minerals such as quartz and potassium feldspar. The results suggest that phaneritic

  12. Petrogenesis of calcic plagioclase megacrysts in Archean rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Morrison, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Anorthositic complexes with large equidimensional plagioclase grains of highly calcic composition occur in nearly all Archean cratons. Similar plagioclase occur as megacrysts in many Archean sills, dikes, and volcanic flows. In the Canadian Shield these units occur throughout the Archean portions of the entire shield and are particularly common as dikes over an area of a few 100,000 sq km in Ontario and Manitoba during a period of at least 100 m.y. in many different rock types and metamorphic grades. The plagioclase generally occurs in three modes: as inclusions in mafic intrusions at various stages of fractionation, as crystal segregations in anorthosite complexes, or as megacrysts in fractionated sills, dikes, and flows. Most occurrences suggest that the plagioclase was formed elsewhere before being transported to its present location. The evidence seems to be quite clear that occurrences of these types of calcic plagioclase require: (1) ponding of a relatively undifferentiated Archean tholeiitic melt at some depth; (2) isothermal crystallization of large, equidimensional homogeneous plagioclase crystals; (3) separation of the plagioclase crystals from any other crystalline phases; (4) further fractionation of melt; (5)transport of various combinations of individual plagioclase crystals and clusters of crystals by variously fractionated melts; and (6) emplacement as various types of igneous intrusions or flows.

  13. Measurement and models of bent KAP(001) crystal integrated reflectivity and resolution (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G. P.; Wu, M.; Stolte, W.; Kruschwitz, C.; Lake, P.; Dunham, G. S.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source beamline-9.3.1 x-rays are used to calibrate the rocking curve of bent potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals in the 2.3-4.5 keV photon-energy range. Crystals are bent on a cylindrically convex substrate with a radius of curvature ranging from 2 to 9 in. and also including the flat case to observe the effect of bending on the KAP spectrometric properties. As the bending radius increases, the crystal reflectivity converges to the mosaic crystal response. The X-ray Oriented Programs (xop) multi-lamellar model of bent crystals is used to model the rocking curve of these crystals and the calibration data confirm that a single model is adequate to reproduce simultaneously all measured integrated reflectivities and rocking-curve FWHM for multiple radii of curvature in both 1st and 2nd order of diffraction.

  14. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  15. Anthropic Rock: a brief history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, R. B.

    2011-03-01

    Stone tool-making is a reductive process. Synthetic rock manufacturing, preeminently an additive process, will not for-ever be confined to only the Earth-biosphere. This brief focuses on humanity's ancient past, hodiernal and possible future even more massive than present-day creation of artificial rocks within our exploitable Solar System. It is mostly Earth-centric account that expands the factual generalities underlying the unique non-copyrighted systemic technogenic rock classification first publicly presented (to the American Geological Society) during 2001, by its sole intellectual innovator, James Ross Underwood, Jr. His pioneering, unique exposition of an organization of this ever-increasingly important aspect of the Anthropic Rock story, spatially expansive material lithification, here is given an amplified discussion for the broader geo and space science social group-purpose of encouragement of a completer 21st Century treatment of Underwood's explicative subject-chart (Fig. 2).

  16. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. City Rocks and National Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Martin; Slattery, William; Finegan-Stoll, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Presents a weeklong earth science module that allows students to explore the relationships between natural and manufactured materials. Relates rocks and minerals in the earth science curriculum to observations students make in their urban and suburban travels. (DDR)

  18. The Rock Your Students Dig.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a field trip in which eighth grade earth science students map the rock types located on the side of a mountain. Pretrip preparation, equipment, procedures, and posttrip analysis are discussed. (CW)

  19. Rock Mass Persistence. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    Apertures 3.4 Geometry and Assumptions for Analysis of Slope in Jointed Rock 3.5 Deformation of Rock Mass after Excavation without Flow 3.6 Water ...open joint measured perpendicularly to joint walls (only ioints filled with air or water are considered open, while 3oints containing filler between...geometry models whith a suitable model representing flow in jointed media one can determine the hydraulic performance of such media. The flow of water

  20. Rock expansion caused by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, C.; Gray, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has during many years been reported that materials' elastic modulus decrease when exposed to influences like mechanical impacts, ultrasound, magnetic fields, electricity and even humidity. Non-perfect atomic structures like rocks, concrete, or damaged metals exhibit a larger effect. This softening has most often been recorded by wave resonance measurements. The motion towards equilibrium is slow - often taking hours or days, which is why the effect is called Slow Dynamics [1]. The question had been raised, if a material expansion also occurs. 'The most fundamental parameter to consider is the volume expansion predicted to occur when positive hole charge carriers become activated, causing a decrease of the electron density in the O2- sublattice of the rock-forming minerals. This decrease of electron density should affect essentially all physical parameters, including the volume.' [2]. A new type of configuration has measured expansion of a rock subjected to ultrasound. A PZT was used as a pressure sensor while the combined thickness of the rock sample and the PZT sensor was held fixed. The expansion increased the stress in both the rock and the PZT, which gave an out-put voltage from the PZT. Knowing its material properties then made it possible to calculate the rock expansion. The equivalent strain caused by the ultrasound was approximately 3 x 10-5. The temperature was monitored and accounted for during the tests and for the maximum expansion the increase was 0.7 C, which means the expansion is at least to some degree caused by heating of the material by the ultrasound. The fraction of bonds activated by ultrasound was estimated to be around 10-5. References: [1] Guyer, R.A., Johnson, P.A.: Nonlinear Mesoscopic Elasticity: The Complex Behaviour of Rocks, Soils, Concrete. Wiley-VCH 2009 [2] M.M. Freund, F.F. Freund, Manipulating the Toughness of Rocks through Electric Potentials, Final Report CIF 2011 Award NNX11AJ84A, NAS Ames 2012.

  1. Institute for Rock Magnetism established

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subir K.

    There is a new focal point for cooperative research in advanced rock magnetism. The University of Minnesota in Minneapolis has established an Institute for Rock Magnetism (IRM) that will provide free access to modern equipment and encourage visiting fellows to focus on important topics in rock magnetism and related interdisciplinary research. Funding for the first three years has been secured from the National Science Foundation, the W.M. Keck Foundation, and the University of Minnesota.In the fall of 1986, the Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP) section of the AGU held a workshop at Asilomar, Calif., to pinpoint important and emerging research areas in paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, and the means by which to achieve them. In a report of this workshop published by the AGU in September 1987, two urgent needs were set forth. The first was for interdisciplinary research involving rock magnetism, and mineralogy, petrology, sedimentology, and the like. The second need was to ease the access of rock magnetists and paleomagnetists around the country to the latest equipment in modern magnetics technology, such as magneto-optics or electronoptics. Three years after the publication of the report, we announced the opening of these facilities at the GP section of the AGU Fall 1990 Meeting. A classified advertisement inviting applications for visiting fellowships was published in the January 22, 1991, issue of Eos.

  2. Cretaceous source rocks in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Kari, I.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Pakistan is located at the converging boundaries of the Indian, Arabian, and Eurasian plates. Evolution of this tectonic setting has provided an array of environmental habitats for deposition of petroleum source rocks and development of structural forms. The potential Cretaceous source rocks in Central and South Indus Basin are spread over an area of about 300,000 km[sup 2]. With 2% cutoff on Total Organic Carbon, the average source rock thickness is 30-50 m, which is estimated to have generated more than 200 billion bbl of oil equivalent. To date, production of more than 30,000 bbl of oil and about 1200 million ft[sup 3] of gas per day can be directly attributed to Cretaceous source. This basin was an area of extensional tectonics during the Lower to Middle Cretaceous associated with slightly restricted circulation of the sea waters at the north-western margin of Indian Plate. Lower Cretaceous source rocks (Sembar Formation) were deposited while the basin was opening up and anoxia was prevailing. Similarly Middle to Upper Cretaceous clastics were deposited in setting favorable for preservation of organic matter. The time and depth of burial of the Cretaceous source material and optimum thermal regime have provided the requisite maturation level for generation of hydrocarbons in the basin. Central Indus basin is characterized by Cretaceous source rocks mature for gas generation. However, in South Indus Basin Cretaceous source rocks lie within the oil window in some parts and have gone past it in others.

  3. How fluids eat their way through rocks: Reactive-transport processes in low-permeability rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluemper, O.

    2013-12-01

    pseudomorphically replaced by a porous product phase, where porosity development is controlled by molar volume changes and relative solubilities of the reagent and product. Porosity development in natural and experimental samples can be evaluated based on three-dimensional reconstructed volumes across reaction interfaces that are coupled with numerical simulations. Fluid-induced mineral reactions may not only produce porosity at the reaction interface during pseudomorphic replacement, but also cause fracturing due to crystal growth. Natural observations of serpentinization/carbonation in mantle rocks indicate that the associated positive solid volume change alone exerts enough stress on the surrounding rock to build up a fracture network and that the influence of external tectonic forces are not required. Through various feedbacks these systems can either become self-sustaining, when an interconnected fracture network is formed, or self-limiting due to fluid pathway obstruction. However, little is known about the positive and negative feedbacks and whether there is a fundamental difference between hydration and carbonation reactions. I will use micro- and nanostructural observations at the reaction-interface scale to provide new insight into this reactive-transport mechanism.

  4. Laboratory multiple-crystal X-ray topography and reciprocal-space mapping of protein crystals: influence of impurities on crystal perfection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Double-axis multiple-crystal X-ray topography, rocking-curve measurements and triple-axis reciprocal-space mapping have been combined to characterize protein crystals using a laboratory source. Crystals of lysozyme and lysozyme crystals doped with acetylated lysozyme impurities were examined. It was shown that the incorporation of acetylated lysozyme into crystals of lysozyme induces mosaic domains that are responsible for the broadening and/or splitting of rocking curves and diffraction-space maps along the direction normal to the reciprocal-lattice vector, while the overall elastic lattice strain of the impurity-doped crystals does not appear to be appreciable in high angular resolution reciprocal-space maps. Multiple-crystal monochromatic X-ray topography, which is highly sensitive to lattice distortions, was used to reveal the spatial distribution of mosaic domains in crystals which correlates with the diffraction features in reciprocal space. Discussions of the influence of acetylated lysozyme on crystal perfection are given in terms of our observations.

  5. SYMMETRICAL LASER CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL GROWTH , SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), LASERS, SYNTHESIS, FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS , FLUORESCENCE, IMPURITIES, BARIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONATES...STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, TITANATES, STANNATES, SAMARIUM, MANGANESE, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, OXIDES, SINGLE CRYSTALS .

  6. Integrating isotopic fingerprinting with petrology: how do igneous rocks evolve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    In the title of his seminal work, N.L. Bowen recognized the fundamental importance of magmatic evolution in producing the spectrum of igneous rocks. Indeed it is difficult to imagine a hot highly reactive fluid passing through c. 100 km of a chemically distinct medium (lithosphere) without evolving through cooling, crystallization and interaction with the wall rocks. The fact that magmas evolve - almost invariably through open system processes - has been largely marginalized in the past 30 years by the desire to use them as probes of mantle source regions. This perspective has been driven principally by advances offered by isotope geochemistry, through which components and sources can be effectively fingerprinted. Two fundamental observations urge caution in ignoring differentiation effects; 1) the scarcity of truly primary magmas according to geochemical criteria (recognized long ago by petrologists), and 2) the common occurrence of petrographic criteria attesting to open system evolution. Recent advances in multicollector mass spectrometry permit integration of the powerful diagnostic tools of isotope geochemistry with petrographic observations through accurate and precise analysis of small samples. Laser ablation and microdrilling enable sampling within and between mineral phases. The results of our microsampling investigations give widespread support for open system evolution of magmas, and provide insights into the mechanisms and timescales over which this occurs. For example; 1) core-rim decreases in 87Sr/86Sr in zoned plagioclase crystals from 1982 lavas of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, argue that the zoning and isotopic changes are in response to magma recharge mixing with an originally contaminated resident magma; 2) Single grain and intra-grain isotopic analyses of mineral phases from Ngauruhoe andesites (New Zealand) are highly variable, arguing that bulk rock data reflect mechanical aggregations of components which have evolved in discrete domains of the

  7. Method and apparatus for producing monochromatic radiography with a bent laue crystal

    DOEpatents

    Zhong, Zhong; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Thomlinson, William C.

    2000-03-14

    A method and apparatus for producing a monochromatic beam. A plurality of beams are generated from a polyenergetic source. The beams are then transmitted through a bent crystal, preferably a bent Laue crystal, having a non-cylindrical shape. A position of the bent crystal is rocked with respect to the polyenergetic source until a plurality of divergent monochromatic beams are emitted from the bent crystal.

  8. Laboratory studies of crystal growth in magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Welsch, B. T.; First, E.; Shea, T.

    2012-12-01

    The proportions, compositions, and interrelationships among crystalline phases and glasses in volcanic rocks cryptically record pre-eruptive intensive conditions, the timing of changes in crystallization environment, and the devolatilization history of eruptive ascent. These parameters are recognized as important monitoring tools at active volcanoes and interpreting geologic events at prehistoric and remote eruptions, thus motivating our attempts to understand the information preserved in crystals through an experimental appoach. We are performing laboratory experiments in mafic, felsic, and intermediate composition magmas to study the mechanisms of crystal growth in thermochemical environments relevant to volcanic environments. We target features common to natural crystals in igneous rocks for our experimental studies of rapid crystal growth phenomena: (1) Surface curvature. Do curved interfaces and spongy cores represent evidence of dissolution (i.e., are they corrosion features), or do they record the transition from dendritic to polyhedral morphology? (2) Trapped melt inclusions. Do trapped liquids represent bulk (i.e., far-field) liquids, boundary layer liquids, or something intermediate, depending on individual species diffusivity? What sequence of crystal growth rates leads to preservation of sealed melt inclusions? (3) Subgrain boundaries. Natural phenocrysts commonly exhibit tabular subgrain regions distinguished by small angle lattice misorientations or "dislocation lamellae" and undulatory extinction. Might these crystal defects be produced as dendrites undergo ripening? (4) Clusters. Contacting clusters of polymineralic crystals are the building blocks of cumulates, and are ubiquitous features of mafic volcanic rocks. Are plagioclase and clinopyroxene aligned crystallographically, suggesting an epitaxial (surface energy) relationship? (5) Log-normal size distribution. What synthetic cooling histories produce "natural" distributions of crystal sizes, and

  9. Therapeutic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  10. Comparing Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Janet; Hoiberg, Karen; Chumbley, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This standard lesson on identifying salt and sugar crystals expands into an opportunity for students to develop their observation, questioning, and modeling skills. Although sugar and salt may look similar, students discovered that they looked very different under a magnifying glass and behaved differently when dissolved in water. In addition,…

  11. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  12. Quantifying rock mass strength degradation in coastal rock cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, Matthew; Lim, Michael; Rosser, Nick; Petley, David; Norman, Emma; Barlow, John

    2010-05-01

    Although rock cliffs are generally perceived to evolve through undercutting and cantilever collapse of material, the recent application of high-resolution three-dimensional monitoring techniques has suggested that the volumetric losses recorded from layers above the intertidal zone produce an equally significant contribution to cliff behaviour. It is therefore important to understand the controls on rockfalls in such layers. Here we investigate the progressive influence of subaerial exposure and weathering on the geotechnical properties of the rocks encountered within the geologically complex coastal cliffs of the northeast coast of England, UK. Through a program of continuous in situ monitoring of local environmental and tidal conditions and laboratory rock strength testing, we aim to better quantify the relationships between environmental processes and the geotechnical response of the cliff materials. We have cut fresh (not previously exposed) samples from the three main rock types (sandstone, mudstone and shale) found within the cliff to uniform size, shape and volume, thus minimizing variability and removing previous surface weathering effects. In order to characterise the intact strength of the rocks, we have undertaken unconfined compressive strength and triaxial strength tests using high pressure (400 kN maximum axial load; 64 MPa maximum cell pressure) triaxial testing apparatus. The results outline the peak strength characteristics of the unweathered materials. We then divided the samples of each lithology into different experimental groups. The first set of samples remained in the laboratory at constant temperature and humidity; this group provides our control. Samples from each of the three rock types were located at heights on the cliff face corresponding with the different lithologies: at the base (mudstone), in the mid cliff (shale) and at the top of the cliff (sandstone). This subjected them to the same conditions experienced by the in situ cliff

  13. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs.

  14. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  15. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting. All... content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40 feet of all working faces,...

  16. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting. All... content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40 feet of all working faces,...

  17. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  18. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting. All... content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40 feet of all working faces,...

  19. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting. All... content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40 feet of all working faces,...

  20. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  1. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting. All... content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40 feet of all working faces,...

  2. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  3. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  4. 30 CFR 57.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Support-Surface and Underground § 57.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall... grouting material shall not be used. (f) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means...

  5. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means of ground support, (1) Selected tension level... § 56.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall— (1) Obtain a...

  6. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means of ground support, (1) Selected tension level... § 56.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall— (1) Obtain a...

  7. 30 CFR 57.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Support-Surface and Underground § 57.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall... grouting material shall not be used. (f) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means...

  8. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means of ground support, (1) Selected tension level... § 56.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall— (1) Obtain a...

  9. 30 CFR 57.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Support-Surface and Underground § 57.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall... grouting material shall not be used. (f) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means...

  10. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means of ground support, (1) Selected tension level... § 56.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall— (1) Obtain a...

  11. 30 CFR 57.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Support-Surface and Underground § 57.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in ASTM F432-95, “Standard Specification for Roof and Rock Bolts and Accessories,” the mine operator shall... grouting material shall not be used. (f) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means...

  12. Paleomagnetism carried by crystal inclusions: The effect of preferred crystallographic orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.

    1994-08-01

    Randomly oriented phlogopite crystals from a pegmatite contain submicroscopic inclusions of magnetite. The inclusions have oblate magnetic fabrics, subparallel to the ab crystal plane. Alternating field demagnetization of individual crystals shows that the remanence is influenced by the crystal symmetry of the phlogopite host. The magnetizations isolated by alternating field demagnetization either cluster close to the a-axis or scatter in the ab plane. Coarse-grained igneous and metamorphic rocks can only record a paleofield direction accurately if there is a suitable orientation distribution of the rock-forming minerals that host the ferromagnets. An isotropic distribution of rock-forming minerals is preferable but it is not obligatory. Rock-forming minerals that have L-fabrics or S-fabrics with a strong L-component are also suitable if they contain oblate inclusion fabrics of ferromagnets.

  13. Penalobo "Castle Rocks" - First approach to valuing this geoforms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinharandas, Carlos; Nobre, José; Gomes, Ana

    2013-04-01

    The village of Penalobo, located in the municipality of Sabugal (Portugal) is characterized by hercynian granites with interesting geological features, including pegmatite veins and quartz crystals with exotic forms, and presents some steep slopes and plateaus. From the mountainous configuration highlight some more pronounced elevations called "Castle Rocks". Such structures are composed by granites, which present greater fracturing at the top, which leads to the formation of large granite blocks. In less fractured zones it is possible to observe small folds. An excavation existing in one of those elevations allows us to observe a basic rock outcropping with clusters of crystals mottled with circular shape, which are indicative of the presence of late fluid during crystallization. In the zone of contact with the enclosing granite, there are small folds caused by magma intrusion. Those evidences led us to hypothesize that the peaks observed in the area of Penalobo village were due to the intrusion on basic magma. All this framework and geological environment becomes an asset for the scientific, educational and economic development of the region. On the other hand, it has a vital importance in the context of a strategy of forming a geological park, in the point of view of tourism, research and interpretation.

  14. A survey of lunar rock types and comparison of the crusts of earth and moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The principal known types of lunar rocks are briefly reviewed, and their chemical relationships discussed. In the suite of low-KREEP highland rocks, Fe/(Fe + Mg) in the normative mafic minerals increases and the albite content of normative plagio-clase decreases as the total amount of normative plagioclase increases, the opposite of the trend predicted by the Bowen reaction principle. The distribution of compositions of rocks from terrestrial layered mafic intrusives is substantially different: here the analyses fall in several discrete clusters (anorthositic rocks, norites, granophyres and ferrogabbros, ultramafics), and the chemical trends noted above are not reproduced. It is suggested that the observed trends in lunar highland rocks could be produced by crystal fractionation in a deep global surface magma system if (1) plagiociase tended to float, upon crystallization, and (2) the magma was kept agitated and well mixed (probably by thermal convection) until crystallization was far advanced and relatively little residual liquid was left. After the crustal system solidified, but before extensive cooling had developed a thick, strong lithosphere, mantle convection was able to draw portions of the lunar anorthositic crust down into the mantle.

  15. Crystals and Crystals: On the Mythology of Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B.

    2008-12-01

    The intimate records of the deep functioning of magmatic systems reside in the temporal and spatial records of magma flux, composition and crystal load. The records for a single system are piecemeal: Plutons show good spatial records, but poor temporal records. Volcanoes give through lava sequences good temporal records, but no spatial context. Because of this dichotomy, two, almost mutually exclusive, branches of magmatology have developed, whereas in Nature there is only a single process. The processes envisioned in these schools necessary to deliver the end rock record are distinct. It is our tools and historic perspectives that have steered the science, not the subject itself. Due to this approach an almost mythical conception of how magmas function has become commonplace. The circumvention of this dilemma rests in carefully evaluating the records on hand in the light of a broad understanding of the fundamental mechanics of how magma lives and dies. It is these basic principles that promise to unify plutonic and volcanic evidence to reveal the full nature of magmatism on all scales. The two most basic features of all magmatic processes are the universal presence of solidification fronts and the presence or absence of a crystal cargo. Almost without exception (e.g., shallow pressure quenching) all first generation crystals grow in marginal solidification fronts (SFs) bordering all magmas. The package of isotherms bounded by the liquidus and solidus define SFs, which propagate in response to the rate of cooling. All physical and chemical processes occurring within SFs compete with the advancement or retreat of solidification. SFs are governed by crystallinity regimes: Suspension Zone (<25 % xtals), Capture Front (~25 %), Mush Zone (25-55%), Rigidity Front (~55%; Critical Crystallinity), and Rigid Crust Zone (>55% xtals). Magmas are laced with nuclei that multiply and grow when overtaken. Crystal growth rates are bounded; tiny crystals reside at the front of SFs

  16. Rb-Sr age of lunar igneous rocks 62295 and 14310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. K.; Lee-Hu, C.-N.; Wetherill, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of Rb-Sr ages of crystallization performed on igneous lunar highland rocks 62295 and 14310 are reported. Lunar sample 62295 is a mesostasis-rich spinel-troctolite very-high-alumina basalt exhibiting a variable igneous structure. Sample 14310 is a feldspathic KREEP-rich basalt. The determined ages probably date the cooling of shock melts.

  17. Volcanic rock petrochemistry as an exploration technique for geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, L.A.; Bell, E.J.; Trexler, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    Large high-level silicic magma chambers offer a high potential for economically viable geothermal systems. While purely basic volcanic systems rarely form thermal anomalies, they may provide the necessary long-term heat input to silicic systems, by underplating, to sustain a high-temperature geothermal system. Petrographic and microprobe, geochemical, geochronologic, and isotopic data on young volcanic rocks in west-central Nevada indicate compositions that may result from magmatic differentiation, crystal fractionation, variation in magmatic source regions and in particular, magma mixing. Analysis of the petrochemistry and the recognition of magma mixing textures of extrusive rocks may indicate interacting mafic magma with buried shallow silicic magma systems. These systems may provide a shallow heat source for development of geothermal resources.

  18. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Lunar Rocks from Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Mineralogy and Petrology of Unbrecciated Lunar Basaltic Meteorite LAP 02205; LAP02205 Lunar Meteorite: Lunar Mare Basalt with Similarities to the Apollo 12 Ilmenite Basalt; Mineral Chemistry of LaPaz Ice Field 02205 - A New Lunar Basalt; Petrography of Lunar Meteorite LAP 02205, a New Low-Ti Basalt Possibly Launch Paired with NWA 032; KREEP-rich Basaltic Magmatism: Diversity of Composition and Consistency of Age; Mineralogy of Yamato 983885 Lunar Polymict Breccia with Alkali-rich and Mg-rich Rocks; Ar-Ar Studies of Dhofar Clast-rich Feldspathic Highland Meteorites: 025, 026, 280, 303; Can Granulite Metamorphic Conditions Reset 40Ar-39Ar Ages in Lunar Rocks? [#1009] A Ferroan Gabbronorite Clast in Lunar Meteorite ALHA81005: Major and Trace Element Composition, and Origin; Petrography of Lunar Meteorite PCA02007, a New Feldspathic Regolith Breccia; and Troilite Formed by Sulfurization: A Crystal Structure of Synthetic Analogue

  19. X-Ray Double-Crystal Diffractometry of Verneuil-Grown SrTiO3 Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Junji

    2001-11-01

    Using a double-crystal arrangement of nearly parallel setting, X-ray Bragg-case diffraction curves were measured for (100) and (110) surfaces of SrTiO3 crystals, grown by the Verneuil method and used widely as a substrate for fabricating electronic thin film devices. The peak height and half-width of rocking curves (200 and 220 reflections, Cu Kα1) measured from local areas of samples varied over a wide range with the samples and probed areas, presumably due to the effect of dislocations and other imperfections. A certain proportion of the measured curves was in fair agreement with the theoretical curve for a perfect crystal, being only 1-2 arcsec broader in half-width. The local-area rocking curve measurement provides like this useful information on the perfection characterization of SrTiO3 crystals. The measurement shows that mechanochemically polished surfaces of the sample crystals are significantly free of polishing strain in both the (100) and (110) samples, while the assessment of the bulk-crystal perfection by the experimental results needs a discussion. Rocking curves were also measured from the entire surface of the sample crystals to obtain an evaluation of overall misorientaion.

  20. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; Zagalsky, Peter F.; Bi, Ru-Chang; Helliwell, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for X-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The methods of protein crystal growth are under increasing study whereby different methods are being compared via diagnostic monitoring including Charge Coupled Device (CCD) video and interferometry. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and X-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. Choice of a liquid-liquid linear crystal growth geometry and microgravity can yield a spatial stability of growing crystals and fluid, as seen in protein crystallization experiments on the unmanned platform EURICA. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. The results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to earth, by rocking curve experiments and full X-ray data collection on LMS and earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  1. Brillouin spectroscopy of fluid inclusions proposed as a paleothermometer for subsurface rocks.

    PubMed

    El Mekki-Azouzi, Mouna; Tripathi, Chandra Shekhar Pati; Pallares, Gaël; Gardien, Véronique; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-08-28

    As widespread, continuous instrumental Earth surface air temperature records are available only for the last hundred fifty years, indirect reconstructions of past temperatures are obtained by analyzing "proxies". Fluid inclusions (FIs) present in virtually all rock minerals including exogenous rocks are routinely used to constrain formation temperature of crystals. The method relies on the presence of a vapour bubble in the FI. However, measurements are sometimes biased by surface tension effects. They are even impossible when the bubble is absent (monophasic FI) for kinetic or thermodynamic reasons. These limitations are common for surface or subsurface rocks. Here we use FIs in hydrothermal or geodic quartz crystals to demonstrate the potential of Brillouin spectroscopy in determining the formation temperature of monophasic FIs without the need for a bubble. Hence, this novel method offers a promising way to overcome the above limitations.

  2. Brillouin spectroscopy of fluid inclusions proposed as a paleothermometer for subsurface rocks

    PubMed Central

    Mekki-Azouzi, Mouna El; Tripathi, Chandra Shekhar Pati; Pallares, Gaël; Gardien, Véronique; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    As widespread, continuous instrumental Earth surface air temperature records are available only for the last hundred fifty years, indirect reconstructions of past temperatures are obtained by analyzing “proxies”. Fluid inclusions (FIs) present in virtually all rock minerals including exogenous rocks are routinely used to constrain formation temperature of crystals. The method relies on the presence of a vapour bubble in the FI. However, measurements are sometimes biased by surface tension effects. They are even impossible when the bubble is absent (monophasic FI) for kinetic or thermodynamic reasons. These limitations are common for surface or subsurface rocks. Here we use FIs in hydrothermal or geodic quartz crystals to demonstrate the potential of Brillouin spectroscopy in determining the formation temperature of monophasic FIs without the need for a bubble. Hence, this novel method offers a promising way to overcome the above limitations. PMID:26316328

  3. Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markun, C. D.

    1988-01-01

    Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks, clastic and nonclastic, should represent a high priority target in any future return-sample mission. The discovery of such materials and their subsequent analysis in terrestrial laboratories, would greatly increase the understanding of the Martian paleoclimate. The formation of Martian clastic sedimentary rocks, under either present, low-pressure, xeric conditions or a postulated, high-pressure, hydric environment, depends upon the existence of a supply of particles, various cementing agents and depositional basins. A very high resolution (mm-cm range) photographic reconnaissance of these areas would produce a quantum jump in the understanding of Martian geological history. Sampling would be confined to more horizontal (recent) surfaces. Exploration techniques are suggested for various hypothetical Martian sedimentary rocks.

  4. 2012 Problem 10: Rocking Bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaohua; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui; Zhou, Huijun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the motion of a bottle partly filled with water is investigated. Two stages of motion showing different kinetic properties, named as "moving stage" and "rocking stage", can be clearly identified in the experiment. In the moving stage, the bottle moves forward with a short period vibration, while in the rocking stage, the bottle oscillates with a significantly longer period around a certain spot. Theoretical and numerical methods are employed to explain these phenomena. By simplifying the system into a rigid body model, it is found that in the moving stage, classical mechanical method gives results that fit our experiment well. And the rocking stage is thought to be the result of the asymmetric torque generated by the gravity of a liquid layer adhered to the inside wall of the bottle.

  5. SHINING ROCK WILDERNESS, NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Dunn, Maynard L.

    1984-01-01

    The Shining Rock Wilderness, in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Haywood County, North Carolina, is underlain by complexly folded mica gneiss and schist of Precambrian age. A mineral-resource survey determined that two commodities, quartz as a source of silica (SiO//2) and gneiss and schist suitable for common building stone and crushed rock, are present in large quantities. Demonstrated resources of silica occur at Shining Rock Mountain and small amounts of sheet muscovite (mica) and scrap mica are present at about 10 localities. Until deep drilling is done to test the results of the seismic studies, no estimate of the potential for gas can be made, but the presence of gas cannot be totally discounted.

  6. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  7. Sojourner near the Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the Sojourner rover was taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 42. The rover is between the rocks 'Wedge' (left) and 'Flute Top' (right). Other rocks visible include 'Flat Top' (behind Flute Top) and those in the Rock Garden, at the top of the frame. The cylindrical object extending from the back end of Sojourner is the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  8. Measuring and predicting the diffraction properties of cylindrically bent potassium acid phthalate, KAP(001), crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Jacoby, K. D.

    2017-02-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray diffraction properties of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two measurement methods. One method used a diode type X-ray source and a dual goniometer analysis system, utilizing a flat, perfect KAP(001) crystal as the monochromator. The second method used a synchrotron source and dual crystal Si(111) monochromator. Bent crystals are used in X-ray spectrometers as dispersion elements. These crystals are bent into a circular cylinder section, and this bending can alter the rocking curve properties. The crystal rocking curves were measured for spectral energies ranging from 1250 to 4500 eV. A multi-lamellar model was compared to the measurements and showed good quantitative agreement. This provides a valuable tool for predicting the changes to the KAP (001) for any radius of curvature when the crystal is bent into a cylindrical section.

  9. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2002-01-01

    Various electrical phenomena have been reported prior to or concurrent with earthquakes such as resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM), and luminous signals. Doubts have been raised as to whether some of these phenomena are real and indeed precursory. One of the reasons for uncertainty is that, despite decades of intense work, there is still no physically coherent model. Using low- to medium-velocity impacts to measure electrical signals with microsecond time resolution, it has now been observed that when dry gabbro and diorite cores are impacted at relatively low velocities, approximately 100 m/s, highly mobile charge carriers are generated in a small volume near the impact point. They spread through the rocks, causing electric potentials exceeding +400 mV, EM, and light emission. As the charge cloud spreads, the rock becomes momentarily conductive. When a dry granite block is impacted at higher velocity, approximately 1.5 km/s, the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. After the sound waves have passed, the surface of the granite block becomes positively charged, suggesting the same charge carriers as observed during the low-velocity impact experiments, expanding from within the bulk. During the next 2-3 ms the surface potential oscillates, indicating pulses of electrons injected from ground and contact electrodes. The observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g., defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, traveling via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals. Before activation, the positive holes lay dormant in the form of electrically inactive positive hole pairs (PHP), chemically equivalent to peroxy links, O3X/OO\\XO3, with X=Si(4+), Al(3+), etc. PHPs are introduced into the minerals by way of hydroxyl,O3X-OH, which all nominally anhydrous minerals incorporate when crystallizing in H2O-laden environments. The fact that positive holes can be

  10. Sedimentary Rocks in Ladon Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 January 2004 This is a Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture of an outcrop of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in Ladon Vallis. These rocks preserve clues to the martian past. However, like books in a library, one needs to go there and check them out if one wishes to read what the layers have to say. This November 2003 picture is located near 21.1oS, 29.8oW, and covers an area 3km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  11. Sedimentary Rocks of Aram Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 February 2004 Aram Chaos is a large meteor impact crater that was nearly filled with sediment. Over time, this sediment was hardened to form sedimentary rock. Today, much of the eastern half of the crater has exposures of light-toned sedimentary rock, such as the outcrops shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The picture is located near 2.0oN, 20.3oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  12. Source rock potential of middle cretaceous rocks in Southwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Palacas, J.G.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The middle Cretaceous in southwestern Montana is composed of a marine and nonmarine succession of predominantly clastic rocks that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior Seaway. In places, middle Cretaceous rocks contain appreciable total organic carbon (TOC), such as 5.59% for the Mowry Shale and 8.11% for the Frontier Formation in the Madison Range. Most samples, however, exhibit less than 1.0% TOC. The genetic or hydrocarbon potential (S1+S2) of all the samples analyzed, except one, yield less than 1 mg HC/g rock, strongly indicating poor potential for generating commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. Out of 51 samples analyzed, only one (a Thermopolis Shale sample from the Snowcrest Range) showed a moderate petroleum potential of 3.1 mg HC/g rock. Most of the middle Cretaceous samples are thermally immature to marginally mature, with vitrinite reflectance ranging from about 0.4 to 0.6% Ro. Maturity is high in the Pioneer Mountains, where vitrinite reflectance averages 3.4% Ro, and at Big Sky Montana, where vitrinite reflectance averages 2.5% Ro. At both localities, high Ro values are due to local heat sources, such as the Pioneer batholith in the Pioneer Mountains.

  13. Source rock potential of middle Cretaceous rocks in southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Dyman, T.S.; Palacas, J.G.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J. Jr.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    The middle Cretaceous in southwestern Montana is composed of a marine and nonmarine succession of predominantly clastic rocks that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior Seaway. In places, middle Cretaceous rocks contain appreciable total organic carbon (TOC), such as 5.59% for the Mowry Shale and 8.11% for the Frontier Formation in the Madison Range. Most samples, however, exhibit less than 1.0% TOC. The genetic or hydrocarbon potential (S{sub 1}+S{sub 2}) of all the samples analyzed, except one, yield less than 1 mg HC/g rock, strongly indicating poor potential for generating commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. Out of 51 samples analyzed, only one (a Thermopolis Shale sample from the Snowcrest Range) showed a moderate petroleum potential of 3.1 mg HC/g rock. Most of the middle Cretaceous samples are thermally immature to marginally mature, with vitrinite reflectance ranging from about 0.4 to 0.6% R{sub o}. Maturity is high in the Pioneer Mountains, where vitrinite reflectance averages 3.4% R{sub o}, and at Big Sky, Montana, where vitrinite reflectance averages 2.5% R{sub o}. At both localities, high R{sub o} values are due to local heat sources, such as the Pioneer batholith in the Pioneer Mountains.

  14. Widespread evidences of hoarfrost formation at a rock glacier in the Seckauer Tauern, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, A.; Winkler, G.; Pauritsch, M.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of deep reversible air circulation (the so called "chimney effect" or "wind tube") is known to be a process of ground overcooling in the lower and deeper parts of porous sediments and related landforms such as scree slopes or intact and relict rock glaciers. Warm air outflow emerging from relatively small voids within these mostly coarse-grained sediment bodies is sometimes noticeable. However, easier to identify are associated phenomena such as snowmelt windows, snow cover depressions and hoarfrost formations. Generally, these indications for warm air outflow are found at the upper part of scree slopes or the rooting zone of rock glaciers. Here we present widespread field evidences of hoarfrost from the pseudo-relict Schöneben Rock Glacier in the Seckauer Tauern Range, Austria located at E14°40'26'' and N47°22'31''. Herewith, a pseudo-relict rock glacier is defined as an intermediate rock glacier type between a relict and a climatic-inactive rock glacier, hence a relict rock glacier with locally isolated patches of permafrost. The rock glacier covers an area of about 0.11km2, ranges from ca. 1720 to 1905 m a.s.l., and consists predominantly of coarse-grained gneissic sediments with blocks up to a size of several cubic metres at the surface. In particular the lower part and some ridges in the central and upper part are covered by dwarf pines (pinus mugo) mirroring the flow structure of the previously active rock glacier. Isolated permafrost occurs presumably at the rooting zone of the rock glacier as indicated by evidences from a neighbouring rock glacier in a comparable setting. Field observations in November 2011 showed widespread occurrences of hoarfrost crystals growing around the funnel edge indicating the sublimation of vapour from warm funnels. Such hoarfrost sites were found at more than 50 single locations distributed over the entire rock glacier from the tongue to the rooting zone generally. The occurrence of hoarfrost can get classified

  15. Experimental Fractional Crystallization of the Lunar Magma Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The current paradigm for lunar evolution is of crystallization of a global scale magma ocean, giving rise to the anorthositic crust and mafic cumulate interior. It is thought that all other lunar rocks have arisen from this differentiated interior. However, until recently this paradigm has remained untested experimentally. Presented here are the first experimental results of fractional crystallization of a Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) using the Taylor Whole Moon (TWM) bulk lunar composition [1].

  16. Rock 14068 - An unusual lunar breccia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helz, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Rock 14068 is a walnut-sized clast of dark breccia from station C1 near Cone Crater. The rock's dominant component is an olivine-rich groundmass. Petrographic and chemical studies were made of polished sections of the rock. The origin of the material is discussed. It is thought possible that the melt was produced by remelting a preexisting lunar rock of the same composition. Another possibility considered is that the rock composition constitutes a mixture of several rock types of partly meteoritic origin.

  17. Coal-rock interface detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, S. D.; Crouch, C. E.; Jones, E. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coal-rock interface detector is presented which employs a radioactive source and radiation sensor. The source and sensor are separately and independently suspended and positioned against a mine surface of hydraulic pistons, which are biased from an air cushioned source of pressurized hydraulic fluid.

  18. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  19. Microwave dielectric spectrum of rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bengal, T.; East, J.; Dobson, M. C.; Garvin, J.; Evans, D.

    1988-01-01

    A combination of several measurement techniques was used to investigate the dielectric properties of 80 rock samples in the microwave region. The real part of the dielectric constant, epsilon', was measured in 0.1 GHz steps from 0.5 to 18 GHz, and the imaginary part, epsilon'', was measured at five frequencies extending between 1.6 and 16 GHz. In addition to the dielectric measurements, the bulk density was measured for all the samples and the bulk chemical composition was determined for 56 of the samples. The study shows that epsilon' is frequency-dependent over the 0.5 to 18 GHz range for all rock samples, and that the bulk density rho accounts for about 50 percent of the observed variance of epsilon'. For individual rock types (by genesis), about 90 percent of the observed variance may be explained by the combination of density and the fractional contents of SiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, and TiO2. For the loss factor epsilon'', it was not possible to establish statistically significant relationships between it and the measured properties of the rock samples (density and chemical composition).

  20. Constitutive Equation for Anisotropic Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, O.

    2006-12-01

    In many rocks, due to the existence of well-defined fabric elements such as bedding, layering, foliation or lamination planes, or due to the existence of linear structures, anisotropy can be important. The symmetries most frequently encountered are: transverse isotropy and orthotropy. By adopting both theoretical and experimental approaches, many authors have investigated the effect of the presence within the rock of pronounced anisotropic feature on the mechanical behavior in the elastic regime and on strength properties. Fewer attempts however have been made to capture the anisotropy of rocks in the plastic range. In this paper an elastic/viscoplastic non-associated constitutive equation for an initially transversely isotropic material is presented. The model captures the observed dependency of the elastic moduli on the stress state. The limit of the elastic domain is given by an yield function whose expression is a priori unknown and is determined from data. The basic assumption adopted is that the type of anisotropy of the rock does not change during the deformation process. The anisotropy is thus described by a fourth order tensor invariant with respect to any transformation belonging to the symmetry group of the material. This tensor is assumed to be constant: it does not depend on time nor on deformation; A is involved in the expression of the flow rule, of the yield function, and of the failure criterion in the form of a transformed stress tensor. The components of the anisotropic tensor A are determined from the compressive strengths in conjunction with an anisotropic short- term failure The irreversibility is supposed to be due to transient creep, the irreversible stress work per unit volume being considered as hardening parameter. The adequacy of the model is demonstrated by applying it to a stratified sedimentary rock, Tournemire shale.

  1. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  2. Preliminary Study on Rock Avalanche in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Wen, Y.; Hsieh, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rock avalanche is a kind of rapid (average >100 km/h) granule flow caused by crushing and pulverization of rock materials during catastrophic rock slide. Literature researches show that rock avalanches typically occur on steep, high-relief slopes underlain by hard rocks, and have volumes >10,000,000 m3. Rock avalanches also are characterized by long runout distances, which are 5 to 10 times the total fall heights. Some cases can run up the opposing valley wall. Rock avalanches generally occurred in active mountains (e.g., New Zealand) and were triggered by earthquakes or rainfall (snowmelt), but with exceptions. There were few rock avalanches in historical time in Taiwan. This could reflect: (1) intrinsic instability of hillslopes due to weak rock, frequent earthquakes/heavy rains, which resulted in landslides of high frequency/low magnitude; (2) limited runout space along deeply incised river-valley systems, which increased the likelihood of rock-slope failures to transform to debris flows. However, there are ancient rock-avalanche records, found at Shou-shan coast (SW Taiwan) and Shin-she, Chang-pin, Tu-lan along Hua-tung coast (E Taiwan), which is likely to have undergone coseismic uplift. These places, with steep slopes, underlain by hard rock, and free for materials to run, are most prone to rock avalanches in the future.

  3. The Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Crumpler, Larry; Farrand, William H.; Gorevan, Stephen; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Hurowitz, Joel; Kusack, Alastair; McSween, Harry Y.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Ruff, Steven W.; Wang, Alian; Yen, Albert

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly-sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously-altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly-sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands, and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks, and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present.

  4. Thermal Waters in Maguarichi, Chihuahua, Mexico: Influence on Volcanic Rocks Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascote, C. R.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.

    2013-05-01

    Piedras de Lumbre, Maguarichi, is located 294 km. to the SW of Chihuahua city, in northern Mexico, in the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO). The study area is composed of a set of igneous volcanic rocks affected by hydrothermal flows, which apparently run along a fault. Outcrops of hot springs, going out with high pressure, are active all over the year and have no seasonal flow changes. The hydrothermal flows, approximately 20, that reach the surface area at Piedras de Lumbre, are altering the volcanic rocks that surround the hot springs. The study area is highly altered, and evidenced by a variety range of colors in the rock surfaces. The rock samples collected at the region show a crystal growth due to the influence of the salts from the thermal water. The rocks closest to the water openings have a change in its mineralogy, with the mafic minerals, present in andesites, been replaced by carbonates and sulfates, leaving only the clear mineral pseudomorphs. On the crust of the rocks a white layer of material (salts), product of the thermal waters has precipitated. The alteration is perceived only about 5 m. or less around the hot springs. The water, which has high contents of arsenic and sulfates has exerted a strong alteration in rhyolitic and andesitic rocks.

  5. Resetting of RbSr ages of volcanic rocks by low-grade burial metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asmeroma, Y.; Damon, P.; Shafiqullah, M.; Dickinson, W.R.; Zartman, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    We report a nine-point RbSr whole-rock isochron age of 70??3 Ma (MSWD 3.97) for Mid-Jurassic volcanic rocks. The same rocks have also been dated by the UThPb method on zircon, giving a crystallization age of 166 ?? 11 Ma, over twice as old as the RbSr age. The data demonstrate that whole-rock RbSr ages of volcanic rocks, even lava flows with SiO2 content as low as 57 wt.%, are susceptible to complete resetting. The rocks range in composition from rhyodacite tuffs to andesite lavas. The complete breakdown of all major minerals that contain Rb and Sr resulted in an alteration mineral assemblage consisting of phengite, albite, secondary quartz, and minor amounts of chlorite and epidote. Phengite is the K-bearing product of the breakdown of biotite and K-feldspar. Pressure during low-grade metamorphism of the volcanic rocks, estimated from phengite composition to have been in the range of 4 to 6 kbar, points to thrust-related burial as the main cause of resetting. Consequently, such reset isochrons may date large-scale events such as regional thrusting and metamorphism. The coherent resetting of the RbSr isochron suggests large-scale pervasive fluid movement during thrust-related burial metamorphism. ?? 1991.

  6. Petrological and Geochemical Studies of the Igneous Rocks at Cerro EL Borrego, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, V. M.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.

    2013-05-01

    Cerro El Borrego, which is a hill composed of igneous rocks, is located 13.7 km to the SW of Chihuahua city, in northern Mexico. The coordinates of the hill are 28° 11' 07'' N latitude and 105° 33' 23'' W longitude. The study area is within the Basin and Range Physiographic Province, characterized by a complex tectonic-structural pattern, such as elongated ranges with folds and igneous rock formations of Paleogene age. A lava flow of Oligocene age is part of the large volcanic and plutonic activity at the early times of the Cenozoic, which occurred to the NW portion of Mexico. In Cerro El Borrego, the rocks that outcrop are middle Oligocene's rhyolitic tuff to the NW of the hill, while to its SE there is a Pleistocene polymictic conglomerate. Previous work shows different interpretations about the origin and composition of the igneous rocks at Cerro El Borrego. This project includes whole rock and textural analyses, which helped to discern the petrogenesis of these rocks. Preliminary petrographic analyses indicate that the Cerro El Borrego, is a structural dome, and its feldspar-rich rocks contain large crystals that can be appreciated without a microscope. The presence of a porphyritic texture, suggest a sallow intrusion origin. A preliminary conclusion is that Cerro El Borrego is a shallow depth intrusive body with a syenitic composition derived from the Oligocene plutonic activity.

  7. Petrological and geochemical studies of ultramafic-mafic rocks from the North Puruliya Shear Zone (eastern India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aditi; Ray, Arijit

    2015-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic rocks occur within a linear belt, trending nearly E-W along North Puruliya Shear Zone of the Chhotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC). These rocks are classified as gabbro, norite, gabbro-norite, dolerite, diorite, olivine-websterite and lherzolite. Mafic rocks (Group 1) often occur in association with ultramafic variants (Group 2) and sometimes in isolation. A genetic link has been established between these mafic and ultramafic rocks using disposition of ultramafic and mafic rocks in the outcrop, systematic variation in modal mineralogy, co-linearity of plots in biaxial chemical variation diagram. Chemical composition of biotite and clinopyroxene reveal calc-alkaline nature and arc signature in these mafic-ultramafic rocks and whole rock geochemical characters indicate similarity with arc magma in subduction zone setting. The high values of Mg no. (47-81) and Al 2 O 3 (5.5-17.9) of mafic rocks indicate primitive, aluminous nature of the parental melt and presence of amphibole and biotite indicate its hydrous nature. The parent mafic melt evolved through fractionation of olivine, spinel, clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The crystal cumulates gave rise to the ultramafic rocks and the associated mafic rocks formed from residual melt. Crustal contamination played an important role in magmatic evolution as evident from variation in abundance of Rb in different lithomembers. Mafic-ultramafic rocks of the present study have been compared with intra-cratonic layered complexes, mafic-ultramafic rocks of high grade terrain, Alaskan type ultramafic-mafic complex and ophiolites. It is observed that the ultramafic-mafic rocks of present study have similarity with Alaskan type complex.

  8. Rock strength under confined shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, C.H.

    1982-10-01

    This report addresses the laboratory measurements of the static strength of rock needed to simulate the response of rock to an underground explosion. The approach is to identify the variables that affect the strength of rock and to discuss each effect in terms of the underlying processes that cause it. Most of the report is the result of a literature review, although some new analyses and concepts are presented. Attention is directed at three basic rock types: low porosity brittle rock such as granodiorite, high porosity brittle rock such as volcanic tuff, and a rock that may be ductile under the relevant conditions, salt. These three rock types are sufficiently different that somewhat different constitutive laws may have to be used to model their behavior.

  9. Exercise Desert Rock Letter Orders. Army, Camp Desert Rock, Nevada.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-08-01

    WILF.iED J MSGT A19032i3 HJ;,ŕWAY, ELLafGzJN 8FC Xf,37791267 INOZ W, P. 1. PVT2 US52401808 KELLEY, JESSIE J SFC R1� EVaS, LOUIS PFC .,53073109...Ord Co (HAM) Camo Desert Rock, Nevada You will preeeed to Reynolds Funeral Vome, Sigourney, Iowa 0/a 24 AU ist 1957 for apprx fourteen (14) days to

  10. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  11. Rock sampling. [apparatus for controlling particle size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    An apparatus for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The device includes grinding means for cutting grooves in the rock surface and to provide a grouping of thin, shallow, parallel ridges and cutter means to reduce these ridges to a powder specimen. Collection means is provided for the powder. The invention relates to rock grinding and particularly to the sampling of rock specimens with good size control.

  12. Synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of nonlinear optical organic crystal: p-Toluidinium p-toluenesulphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, P.; Anandha Babu, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2012-04-15

    Graphical abstract: p-Toluidinium p-toluenesulphonate (p-TTS) an organic nonlinear optical crystal has been grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that p-TTS crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system. p-TTS single crystal belongs to negative birefringence crystal. Second harmonic conversion efficiency of p-TTS has been found to be 1.3 times higher than that of KDP. Multiple shot surface laser damage threshold is determined to be 0.30 GW/cm{sup 2} at 1064 nm laser radiation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It deals with the synthesis, growth and characterization of p-TTS an organic NLO crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wide optical transparency window between 280 nm and 1100 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative birefringence crystal and dispersion of birefringence is negligibly small. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal study reveals that the grown crystal is stable up to 210 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple shot surface laser damage threshold is 0.30 GW/cm{sup 2} at 1064 nm laser radiation. -- Abstract: p-Toluidinium p-toluenesulphonate (p-TTS) an organic nonlinear optical crystal has been grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that p-TTS crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system. The structural perfection of the grown p-TTS single crystal has been analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve measurements. Fourier transform infrared spectral studies have been performed to identify the functional groups. The optical transmittance window and the lower cutoff wavelength of the grown crystals have been identified by UV-vis-IR studies. Birefringence of p-TTS crystal has been studied using channel spectrum measurement. The laser damage threshold value was measured using Nd:YAG laser. The second harmonic conversion efficiency of p-TTS has

  13. Geochronology: New techniques provide knowledge of the time and mode of formation and subsequent evolution of rock systems.

    PubMed

    Tilton, G R; Hart, S R

    1963-04-26

    In summary, it now seems possible to obtain accurate ages for many of the common rock types. When rocks have been affected by metamorphic episodes after the time of crystallization, it is possible to recognize this from the age values and, in some cases, to date both the time of crystallization and the time of metamorphism. Work is under way that will make it possible to draw accurate geochronological maps of the continents. An impressive regularity is already evident in the map for North America. Knowledge of the temporal and areal distribution of ages should have an important bearing on theories of the origin of continents and of mountain-building processes (50).

  14. Planetary rock corer and drill concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imus, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Several planetary rock corers and drill design concepts have been developed for obtaining subsurface rock samples in future planetary explorations. Tools are designed for unmanned space vehicles. Two devices are rotary impact multiple chisel trepan rock corer and hole drilling tool.

  15. Rock Music's Place in the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Politis, John

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the importance of rock music as an expression of aural culture includes its history, rock music today, and the development of a rock music collection in the library (placement of collection and books which aid in developing a collection of permanent value). Three references are included. (EJS)

  16. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  17. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  18. Geochemistry of intrusive rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field, New Mexico, and contrasts between evolution of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Czamanske, G.K.; Lipman, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonic rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field comprise three groups: 1) ???25 Ma high-level resurgent plutons composed of monzogranite and silicic metaluminous and peralkaline granite, 2) 23-25 Ma syenogranite, and alkali-feldspar granite intrusions emplaced along the southern caldera margin, and 3) 19-23 Ma granodiorite and granite plutons emplaced south of the caldera. Major-element compositions of both extrusive and intrusive suites in the Latir field are broadly similar; both suites include high-SiO2 rocks with low Ba and Sr, and high Rb, Nb, Th, and U contents. Moreover, both intermediateto siliciccomposition volcanic and plutonic rocks contain abundant accessory sphene and apatite, rich in rare-earth elements (REE), as well as phases in which REE's are essential components. Strong depletion in Y and REE contents, with increasing SiO2 content, in the plutonic rocks indicate a major role for accessory mineral fractionation that is not observed in volcanic rocks of equivalent composition. Considerations of the rheology of granitic magma suggest that accessory-mineral fractionation may occur primarily by filter-pressing evolved magmas from crystal-rich melts. More limited accessory-mineral crystallization and fractionation during evolution of the volcanic magmas may have resulted from markedly lower diffusivities of essential trace elements than major elements. Accessory-mineral fractionation probably becomes most significant at high crystallinities. The contrast in crystallization environments postulated for the extrusive and intrusive rocks may be common to other magmatic systems; the effects are particularly pronounced in highly evolved rocks of the Latir field. High-SiO2 peralkaline porphyry emplaced during resurgence of the Questa caldera represents non-erupted portions of the magma that produced the Amalia Tuff during caldera-forming eruption. The peralkaline porphyry continues compositional and mineralogical trends found in the tuff. Amphibole

  19. Crystallization of Magma. CEGS Programs Publication Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, R. W.

    Crystallization of Magma is one of a series of single-topic problem modules intended for use in undergraduate geology and earth science courses. Through problems and observations based on two sets of experiments, this module leads to an understanding of how an igneous rock can form from molten material. Environmental factors responsible for…

  20. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  1. Crystallization process

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  2. Imaging of rock climbing injuries.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bianchi, Stefano; Cotten, Anne

    2005-12-01

    Competition climbing has grown increasingly in popularity, and many people are being drawn to this sport with a parallel increase in the occurrence of sport-related injuries. One of the most common and unique lesions occurring in the rock climbing population is the closed rupture of the flexor pulley system of the fingers. This lesion is strictly related to some climbing techniques in which the entire body weight is placed on fingerholds, which causes bowstringing of the flexor tendons with subsequent loss of strength across the full range of motion of the finger. This article summarizes the current literature regarding the application of imaging modalities in the diagnosis of rock climbing injuries with a specific focus on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Biomechanics of the sporting activity and resultant pathophysiologic and clinical considerations concerning flexor pulley system injuries are also discussed.

  3. Feet injuries in rock climbers.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, Volker; Küpper, Thomas

    2013-10-18

    While injuries of the upper extremity are widely discussed in rock climbers, reports about the lower extremity are rare. Nevertheless almost 50 percent of acute injuries involve the leg and feet. Acute injuries are either caused by ground falls or rock hit trauma during a fall. Most frequently strains, contusions and fractures of the calcaneus and talus. More rare injuries, as e.g., osteochondral lesions of the talus demand a highly specialized care and case presentations with combined iliac crest graft and matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation are given in this review. The chronic use of tight climbing shoes leads to overstrain injuries also. As the tight fit of the shoes changes the biomechanics of the foot an increased stress load is applied to the fore-foot. Thus chronic conditions as subungual hematoma, callosity and pain resolve. Also a high incidence of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus is described.

  4. Sojourner Sits Near Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Rover Sojourner is images by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder as it nears the rock 'Wedge.' Part of the Rock Garden is visible in the upper right of the image.

    Pathfinder, a low-cost Discovery mission, is the first of a new fleet of spacecraft that are planned to explore Mars over the next ten years. Mars Global Surveyor, already en route, arrives at Mars on September 11 to begin a two year orbital reconnaissance of the planet's composition, topography, and climate. Additional orbiters and landers will follow every 26 months.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  5. Feet injuries in rock climbers

    PubMed Central

    Schöffl, Volker; Küpper, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    While injuries of the upper extremity are widely discussed in rock climbers, reports about the lower extremity are rare. Nevertheless almost 50 percent of acute injuries involve the leg and feet. Acute injuries are either caused by ground falls or rock hit trauma during a fall. Most frequently strains, contusions and fractures of the calcaneus and talus. More rare injuries, as e.g., osteochondral lesions of the talus demand a highly specialized care and case presentations with combined iliac crest graft and matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation are given in this review. The chronic use of tight climbing shoes leads to overstrain injuries also. As the tight fit of the shoes changes the biomechanics of the foot an increased stress load is applied to the fore-foot. Thus chronic conditions as subungual hematoma, callosity and pain resolve. Also a high incidence of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus is described. PMID:24147257

  6. Distribution of manganese between coexisting biotite and hornblende in plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Gottfried, D.; Tilling, R.I.

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of manganese between coexisting biotite and hornblende for 80 mineral pairs from igneous rocks of diverse provenance (including Southern California, Sierra Nevada, Boulder, and Boulder Creek batholiths and the Jemez Mountains volcanics) has been determined by neutron activation analysis. Data on the distribution ratio (Kd = Mnhornblende Mnbiotite) indicate that an equilibrium distribution of Mn is closely approached, though not completely attained, in most samples from plutonic environments. Comparison of Kd values of mineral pairs with bulk chemical composition of host rocks reveals no correlation. Because initial crystallization temperatures vary with rock composition, the lack of correlation of composition with Kd suggests that the equilibrium distribution of Mn between biotite and hornblende reflects exchange at subsolidus temperatures rather than initial crystallization temperatures. The highest Kd values are for volcanic rocks, in which rapid quenching prevents subsolidus redistribution of Mn. For sample pairs from the Southern California and Sierra Nevada batholiths there is a positive correlation of Kd with TiO2 content of biotite. Though the evidence is not compelling, Kd may also correlate with the rate of cooling and/or the presence or absence of sphene in the rock. ?? 1968.

  7. Trace element evaluation of a suite of rocks from Reunion Island, Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Reunion Island consists of an olivine-basalt shield capped by a series of flows and intrusives ranging from hawaiite through trachyte. Eleven rocks representing the total compositional sequence have been analyzed for U, Th and REE. Eight of the rocks (group 1) have positive-slope, parallel, chondrite-normalized REE fractionation patterns. Using a computer model, the major element compositions of group 1 whole rocks and observed phenocrysts were used to predict the crystallization histories of increasingly residual liquids, and allowed semi-quantitative verification of origin by fractional crystallization of the olivine-basalt parent magma. Results were combined with mineral-liquid distribution coefficient data to predict trace element abundances, and existing data on Cr, Ni, Sr and Ba were also successfully incorporated in the model. The remaining three rocks (group 2) have nonuniform positive-slope REE fractionation patterns not parallel to group 1 patterns. Rare earth fractionation in a syenite is explained by partial melting of a source rich in clinopyroxene and/or hornblende. The other two rocks of group 2 are explained as hybrids resulting from mixing of syenite and magmas of group 1. ?? 1975.

  8. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  9. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  10. Sedimentary Rocks of Aram Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock within Aram Chaos, an ancient, partly-filled impact crater located near 3.2oN, 19.9oW. This 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel picture is illuminated by sunlight from the left and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  11. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  12. Properties of carbonate rocks related to SO2 reactivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgwardt, R.H.; Harvey, R.D.

    1972-01-01

    Petrographic examination and grain size-distribution measurements were made on 11 specimens representing a broad spectrum of limestones and dolomites. The SO2 reaction kinetics of calcines prepared from each rock type were determined at 980??C. Stones of various geological types yield calcines of distinctly different physical structures that show correspondingly large differences in both rate of reaction and capacity for SO2 sorption. Pore size and particle size together determine the extent to which the interiors of individual particles react. Particles smaller than 0.01 cm with pores larger than 0.1 ?? react throughout their internal pore structure at a rate directly proportional to the BET surface. The rate decays exponentially as sulfation proceeds until the pores are filled with reaction product. The ultimate capacity of small particles is determined by the pore volume available for product accumulation, which is generally equivalent to about 50% conversion of the CaO in limestones. Variations in effectiveness of carbonate rocks for flue gas desulfurization are explained by the physical properties of their calcines, which are related to the crystal structure of the original rock. The high reaction rates achieved in the limestone injection process apparently result from the large surface area existing for short periods immediately following the dissociation of CaCO3.

  13. Rock strength reductions during incipient weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Anderson, S. P.; Blum, A.

    2012-12-01

    Patrick Kelly, Suzanne Anderson, Alex Blum In rock below the surface, temperature swings are damped, water flow is limited, and biota are few. Yet rock weathers, presumably driven by these environmental parameters. We use rock strength as an indicator of rock weathering in Gordon Gulch in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, a watershed at 2500 m underlain by Proterozoic gneiss intruded by the Boulder Creek granodiorite. Fresh rock is found at depths of 8-30 m in this area, and the thickness of the weathered rock zone imaged with shallow seismic refraction is greater on N-facing slopes than S-facing slopes (Befus et al., 2011, Vadose Zone J.). We use the Brazilian splitting test to determine tensile strength of cores collected with a portable drilling rig. Spatial variations in rock strength that we measure in the top 2 m of the weathered rock mantle can be connected to two specific environmental variables: slope aspect and the presence of a soil mantle. We find weaker rock on N-facing slopes and under soil. There is no clear correlation between rock strength and the degree of chemical alteration in these minimally weathered rocks. Denudation rates of 20-30 microns/yr imply residence times of 105-106 years within the weathered rock layers of the critical zone. Given these timescales, rock weathering is more likely to have occurred under glacial climate conditions, when periglacial processes prevailed in this non-glaciated watershed. Incipient weathering of rock appears to be controlled by water and frost cracking in Gordon Gulch. Water is more effectively delivered to the subsurface on N-facing slopes, and is more likely held against rock surfaces under soil than on outcrops. These moisture conditions, and the lower surface temperatures that prevail on N-facing slopes also favor frost cracking as an important weathering process.

  14. Dynamic crystallization and kinetic melting of the lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Smith, D. P.; Brown, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Dynamic crystallization and kinetic melting tests have been conducted for a lunar soil that resembles the bulk composition of the matrices of melt-rock breccias. The melting tests indicate that plagioclase and olivine can exist for finite times above their equilibrium liquidus temperatures; within 20-30 C below its liquidus temperature the sample is choked with crystals. A range of textures from radiate to porphyritic pyroxene-plagioclase granophyric to subophitic to intergranular to intersertal to very fine-grained poikilitic is found in the dynamic crystallization experiments. The number of nuclei, as deduced from the textures, increases as the melting temperature deceases from above the liquidus to below.

  15. Crystal fractionation in the SNC meteorites: Implications for sample selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1988-01-01

    Almost all rock types in the SNC meteorites are cumulates, products of magma differentiation by crystal fractionation (addition or removal of crystals). If the SNC meteorites are from the surface of Mars or near subsurface, then most of the igneous units on Mars are differentiated. Basaltic units probably experienced minor to moderate differientation, but ultrabasic units probably experienced extreme differentiation. Products of this differentiation may include Fe-rich gabbro, pyroxenite, periodotite (and thus serpentine), and possibly massive sulfides. The SNC meteorites include ten lithologies (three in EETA79001), eight of which are crystal cumulates. The other lithologies, EETA79001 A and B are subophitic basalts.

  16. Thermal conductivity of carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.; Frost, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of several well-defined carbonate rocks were determined near 40??C. Values range from 1.2 W m-1 C-1 for a highly porous chalk to 5.1 W m-1 C-1 for a dolomite. The thermal conductivity of magnesite (5.0) is at the high end of the range, and that for Iceland Spar Calcite (3.2) is near the middle. The values for limestones decrease linearly with increasing porosity. Dolomites of comparable porosity have greater thermal conductivities than limestones. Water-sorbed samples have expected greater thermal conductivities than air-saturated (dry) samples of the same rock. An anomalously large increase in the thermal conductivity of a water-sorbed clayey dolomite over that of the same sample when dry is attributed to the clay fraction, which swells during water inhibition, causing more solid-to-solid contacts within the dolomite framework. Measurements were made with a Colora Thermoconductometer. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were made and tabulated. Porosity of the rocks was determined by mercury porosimetry and also from density measurements. The Iceland Spar Calcite and magnesite were included for reference. ?? 1973.

  17. The Call of the Dark Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color rendering from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a set of darker rocks dubbed 'Toltecs' lying southeast of the rover's current position. These rocks are believed to be basaltic, or volcanic, in composition, because their spectral properties match those of other basaltic rocks studied in Gusev Crater. Scientists hope to use these presumably unaltered rocks as a geologic standard for comparison to altered rocks in the area, such as 'Clovis.' This image was taken with the panoramic camera's 600-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters on sol 220 (Aug. 15, 2004).

  18. The Call of the Dark Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a group of darker rocks dubbed 'Toltecs,' lying to the southeast of the rover's current position. The rocks are believed to be basaltic, or volcanic, in composition because their color and spectral properties resemble those of basaltic rocks studied so far at Gusev Crater. Scientists hope to use these presumably unaltered rocks as a geologic standard for comparison to altered rocks in the area, such as 'Clovis.' This image was taken by the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters of rover's panoramic camera on sol 220 (August 15, 2004).

  19. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. 3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED MARCH 19, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 61, Rodman Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  1. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. LOOKING NORTH AFTER ADDITION OF CONICAL ROOF. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1887. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 53, North Avenue North of Midpoint, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  2. 9. Photograph of photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST AND NORTH ELEVATIONS. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1887. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  3. 7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS. DATED MARCH 19, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 62, Rodman Avenue between First & Second Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  4. 3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 103, Rodman Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  5. 8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATON IN UNALTERED CONDITION. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 68, Rodman Avenue between Fourth Street & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  6. 10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. DATED OCTOBER 2, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 138, Second Avenue between South Avenue & Ramsey Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  7. 10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED APRIL 18, 1941. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 56, North Avenue & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  8. 11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. BASEMENT, SHOWING ORIGINAL OPEN INTERIOR PLAN. DATED APRIL 7, 1942. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 56, North Avenue & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 109, Rodman Avenue & Fourth Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  10. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 108, Rodman Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  11. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR AFTER REMODELING INTO OFFICE SPACE. DATED FEBRUARY 13, 1943. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 67, Rodman Avenue & Fourth Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 280, Sylvan Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. 23. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. VERTICAL WESTINGHOUSE GENERATORS IN 1919 ADDITION. DATED FEBRUARY 19, 1919. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 160, Sylvan Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. Petrology of unshocked crystalline rocks and shock effects in lunar rocks and minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; James, O.B.; Minkin, J.A.; Boreman, J.A.; Jackson, E.D.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of rock modes, textures, and mineralogy, unshocked crystalline rocks are classified into a dominant ilmenite-rich suite (subdivided into intersertal, ophitic, and hornfels types) and a subordinate feldspar-rich suite (subdivided into poikilitic and granular types). Weakly to moderately shocked rocks show high strain-rate deformation and solid-state transformation of minerals to glasses; intensely shocked rocks are converted to rock glasses. Data on an unknown calcium-bearing iron metasilicate are presented.

  15. Chip-off-the-old-rock: the study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; de Haas, Thomas W; Fadaei, Hossein; Sinton, David

    2014-11-21

    We present a real-rock micromodel approach whereby microfluidic channels are fabricated in a naturally occurring mineral substrate. The method is applied to quantify calcite dissolution which is relevant to oil/gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, and wastewater disposal in carbonate formations - ubiquitous worldwide. The key advantage of this method is the inclusion of both the relevant substrate chemistry (not possible with conventional microfluidics) and real-time pore-scale resolution (not possible with core samples). Here, microchannels are etched into a natural calcite crystal and sealed with a glass slide. The approach is applied to study acidified brine flow through a single channel and a two-dimensional micromodel. The single-channel case conforms roughly to a 1-D analytical description, with crystal orientation influencing the local dissolution rate an additional 25%. The two-dimensional experiments show highly flow-directed dissolution and associated positive feedback wherein acid preferentially invades high conductivity flow paths, resulting in higher dissolution rates ('wormholing'). These experiments demonstrate and validate the approach of microfabricating fluid structures within natural minerals for transport and geochemical studies. More broadly, real-rock microfluidics open the door to a vast array of lab-on-a-chip opportunities in geology, reservoir engineering, and earth sciences.

  16. Stress Activation and Propagation of Electronic Charge Carriers in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, J.; Freund, F. T.

    2007-12-01

    Igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks in the Earth's crust generate electric currents when subjected to deviatoric stresses. The reason is that these rocks contain dormant electronic charge carriers in the form of peroxy links. Peroxy links are sites in the crystal structures of the constituent minerals where oxygen anions have converted from their common 2- valence state to the 1- valence state, O3X-OO-XO3 with X=Si4+, Al3+ etc. As rocks are stressed and dislocations sweep through the mineral grains, the peroxy links break up, activating electrons and pholes ("phole" is an abbreviation for "positive hole", a defect electron on the oxygen sublattice, chemically O- in a matrix of O2-). The pholes are mobile electronic charge carriers that can spread out of the stressed rock into the surrounding unstressed rock. They travel via energy levels at the upper edge of the valence bands, cross grain boundaries and achieve a phase velocity on the order of 200±50 m/sec, consistent with phonon-assisted electron hopping. Due to mutual repulsion inside the rock volume the pholes spread to the surface, where they build up a positive surface charge. The surface charge can be measured with a non-contact capacitive sensor. If a Cu contact is applied to the surface of the rock, electrons are injected from ground into the rock in response to the evolving positive charge on the rock surface. We modeled surface potentials and burst-like electron injections following low and medium velocity impact experiments, 100 m/sec and 1.5 km/sec respectively.

  17. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  18. Water in evolved lunar rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Katharine Lynn

    The Moon was thought to be completely anhydrous until indigenous water was found in lunar samples in 2008. This discovery raised two fundamental questions about the Moon: how much water is present in the bulk Moon and is water uniformly distributed in the lunar interior? To address these questions, I studied a suite of lunar samples rich in a chemical component called KREEP (K, Rare Earth Elements, P), all of which are incompatible elements. Water behaves as an incompatible element in magmas, so KREEP-rich lunar samples are potentially water rich. In this dissertation, I present the results of a petrologic study of KREEP-rich lunar rocks, measurements of their water contents and deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) ratios (D/H), and examined where these rocks fit into our understanding of water in the Moon as a whole. We performed a study of highly evolved, KREEP-rich lunar rocks called felsites and determined that they contain quartz. Using cooling rates derived from quartz-Ti thermometry, we show the felsites originated at a minimum pressure of ˜1 kbar, corresponding to a minimum depth of 20-25 km in the lunar crust. We calculate that at that pressure water would have been soluble in the melt, indicating that degassing of H2O from the felsite parental melts was likely minimal and hydrogen isotopes in intrusive rocks are likely unfractionated. We then measured D/H in apatite in KREEP-rich intrusive rocks to clarify the solar system source of the Moon's water. When viewed in the context of other lunar D/H studies, our results indicate there are at least three distinctive reservoirs in the lunar interior, including an ultra-low D reservoir that could represent a primitive component in the Moon's interior. Furthermore, our measurements of residual glass in a KREEP basalt show that the KREEP basaltic magmas contained 10 times less water than the source of the Apollo 17 pyroclastic glass beads, indicating that, though wetter than previously thought, the concentration of

  19. Magmatic and crustal differentiation history of granitic rocks from Hf-O isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Foster, G L; Paterson, B A; Woodhead, J D; Hergt, J M; Gray, C M; Whitehouse, M J

    2007-02-16

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust.

  20. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  1. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-04

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  2. Mineral artefacts mimicking microfossils in Archean rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepot, K.; Philippot, P.; Benzerara, K.

    2009-04-01

    Because prokaryotes populating the early Earth were structurally and morphologically very simple, it is difficult to obtain taxonomic information from microfossils, and even more problematic, to distinguish true fossils from abiotic objects. For example, many self-assembly processes associated with the precipitation of nanoscale minerals in the presence of organic compounds generate cell-like structures. Based on high resolution microscopy observations on natural samples, we describe three types of features common to Archean rocks and suggest that they represent microfossil-like artefacts. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy we have observed carbon-free silica inclusions in carbonate sediments that are very similar in size and shape (rods and spheres) to microorganisms. The common distribution of organic carbon at grain boundaries in those rocks indicate that such cell-like minerals, when coated by secondarily-migrated carbonaceous mater, could easily be mistaken for microfossils. The organisation and the micro- to nano-structure of bacteriomorphs might be even more confusing. We have observed chains of spheres that match in size and arrangement with some coccoid bacteria such as streptococci. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observation of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) sections cut through these spheres shows that they are composed of TiO2nanocrystallites partly rimmed or linked by nanoscale chlorite films. This assemblage creates smooth cell-like structures at the micron-scale. However, the absence of organic carbon in those structures as well as the observation of many similar TiO2 chains of spheres dispersed in volcanic glass shards argue against a biologic origin. Ambient inclusions trails also generate filamentous structures that can be mistaken for microfossils. (Knoll and Barghoorn, 1974) suggested that such pseudofossils could have formed by the displacement of a crystal (e.g. pyrite) in its mineral matrix owing to pressure solution processes linked to gas

  3. Rock support system development test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Patricio, J.G. . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1984-03-30

    The Test Plan has been prepared to support design activities for the development of a rock support system for a Nuclear Waste Repository in Basalt (NWRB). The rock support system is assumed to consist of a combination of shotcrete and rock bolts. The seven testing activities include mix development and physical testing of shotcrete, durability testing of shotcrete, durability testing of rock bolt grouts, field tests on rock bolts, field testing of shotcrete, and heated room test. The objective of the Test Plan is to develop required data through combined laboratory, field, and office studies for design and design validation of the rock support system. The overall Test Plan is developed to provide a logical progression from laboratory tests performed to characterize fundamental thermomechanical properties of shotcrete and grouts, to field tests on rock bolts and shotcrete, and in situ performance tests. 21 refs., 15 figs., 33 tabs.

  4. Proterozoic massif anorthosites and related rocks in Labrador: the anorthosite-charnockite connection

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Massif anorthosites of Labrador are closely associated in space and time with voluminous, felsic, fayalite- and ferrous pyroxene-bearing igneous rocks. These include charnockites, monzonites, biotite-hornblende granites, and locally syenites. Igneous charnockites form major parts of some of the granitic complexes. In Mistastin batholith for example, charnockitic assemblages comprise about 35% of a total area of 6500 sq. km. Feldspar pairs and coexisting fayalite-opx-qtz in these rocks indicate P and T near 3.5 kb, 750/sup 0/C, assumed to represent near solidus equilibration. Diorites and monzonites intruded by charnockite have mesoperthites implying crystallization T>900/sup 0/C presumably recording earlier stages of crystallization. Oxide and silicate assemblages indicate redox conditions between FMQ and WM oxygen buffers and water pressures well below Ptotal. Younger biotite-hornblende granites and quartz syenites lack Ti-mt. but retain fayalite suggesting that magmatic crystallization was largely closed to water and oxygen. Initial Sr isotope ratios in charnockite-granite suites of central labrador support derivation of the magmas largely or entirely from crustal source rocks. Compositions of mafic silicates and plagioclase, associated Fe-Ti oxide concentrations, trace elements and Sr isotopes in massif anorthosites are in accord with the rocks being crystallization products of substantially fractionated, originally more mafic, mantle magmas. Close association of high temperature, water-poor, reduced crustal melts is consistent with a fusion process in which heat supply and oxygen buffering were controlled by fractional crystallization of a substantial body of mafic magma subjacent to continental crust.

  5. The role of diffusion-controlled oscillatory nucleation in the formation of line rock in pegmatite-aplite dikes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webber, K.L.; Falster, A.U.; Simmons, W.B.; Foord, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The George Ashley Block (GAB), located in the Pala Pegmatite District, San Diego County, California, is a composite pegmatite-aplite dike of 8 m thickness displaying striking mineralogical layering in the aphte portion of the dike, referred to as line rock. Rhythmic layering is characterized by garnet-rich bands alternating with albite-quartz-muscovite-rich bands. Cumulus textures are notably absent from the layered portion of the dike. Elongated quartz, megacrysts are oriented perpendicular to the garnet-rich layers and poikilitically include garnet, albite, and muscovite. Calculated crystal-free magma viscosity with 3% H2O is 106.2 Pa s and the calculated settling velocity for garnet is 0??51 cm/year. Conductive cooling calculations based on emplacement of a 650??C dike into 150?? C fractured gabbroic country rock at 1??5 kbar, and accounting for latent heat of crystallization, demonstrate that the line rock portion of the dike cools to 550?? C in about 1 year. Crystal size distribution studies also suggest very rapid nucleation and crystallization. Diffusion-controlled gel crystallization experiments yield textures virtually identical to those observed in the layered aplite, including rhythmic banding, colloform layering, and band discontinuities. Thus, observed textures and calculated magmatic parameters suggest that mineralogical layering in the GAB results from an in situ diffusion-controlled process of oscillatory nucleation and crystallization. We propose that any event that promotes strong undercooling has the potential to initiate rapid heterogeneous nucleation and oscillatory crystal growth, leading to the development of a layer of excluded components in front of the crystallization front, and the formation of line rock.

  6. On Risk Forecast and Risk Reduction of Tectonic Rock Bursts and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazhibaev, Kushbakali

    2015-04-01

    Avershin, Shrepp, Kvochkin, Bojarkin and others observed that before strong rock bursts, considered as weak earthquakes, for several hours, sometimes for 2-5 days, there occurred spasmodic and sign-variable changes in deformations of rock massif adjacent areas. The works of seismologists Rikitaki, Asada, Isibasi, Matsuda, Saverensky, etc. describe a number of cases of an earthquake before which spasmodic and sign-variable deformations of earth's crust have been observed. The results of our own experimental research conducted during last decades show that abnormal spasmodic and sign-variable deformations are observed only in rocks having residual stresses. As a rule, these rocks at test after such abnormal deformations collapse dynamically, like explosions, and as a rule, such rocks represent dangerous rock bursts in deposits, located in seismically active areas (Tazhibaev K. Conditions of dynamic destruction of rocks and causes of rock bursts, Frunze 1989). It is necessary to notice that these spasmodic deformations are accompanied by formation and movement of internal discontinuities: dislocations, micro-cracks, and, hence, by redistribution of electric charges in a crystal lattice, and also in the rock as a whole. Redistribution and change in position of electric charges lead to the change of the natural electric potential and intensity of the magnetic field in the rocks massif. Before tectonic rock bursts and earthquakes together with abnormal changes of deformation, the same spasmodic and sign-variable changes of the natural electric and magnetic fields intensity occur. Based on the above-stated experimental findings, for solution of the problem of tectonic earthquakes forecast, we suggest placing the deformation measuring tool, the magnetic field intensity measuring tool and the device for measurement of natural electric potential along with seismic measurement into the seismic stations. Using abnormal, simultaneous changes of indications of all above listed

  7. X-ray Characterization of Detached-Grown Germanium Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Schweizer, M.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Szoke, J.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2005-01-01

    Germanium (111)-oriented crystals have been grown by the vertical Bridgman technique, in both detached and attached configurations. Microstructural characterization of these crystals has been performed using synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) and double axis x-ray diffraction. Dislocation densities were measured from x-ray topographs obtained using the reflection geometry. For detached-grown crystals, the dislocation density is 4-6 x 10(exp 4) per square centimeter in the seed region, and decreases in the direction of growth to less than 10(exp 3) per square centimeter, and in some crystals reaches less than 10(exp 2) per square centimeter. For crystals grown in the attached configuration, dislocation densities were on the order of 10(exp 4) per square centimeter in the middle of the crystals, increasing to greater than 10(exp 5) per square centimeter near the edge. The measured dislocation densities are in excellent agreement with etch pit density results. The rocking curve linewidths were relatively insensitive to the dislocation densities. However, broadening and splitting of the rocking curves were observed in the vicinity of subgrain boundaries identified by x-ray topography in some of the attached-grown crystals.

  8. Interpretation of Ti-in-zircon Thermometery in Plutonic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M.; Watson, B.

    2006-12-01

    The advent of the empirical Ti-in-zircon thermometer resulted in its immediate application to a large number of geological problems as well as on-going tests of its validity. Among the consequences of note is a new appreciation that zircon growth in slowly crystallizing systems is a complex process rather unlike the widely adopted model in geochronology where a U-Pb zircon date is ascribed to a single temperature. Tests of the thermometer also require recognition of the interplay between zircon solubility and melt chemistry in any liquid- line-of-descent. Possibly complicating such tests is the use of zircon saturation thermometry based on whole rock [Zr] data as a benchmark for comparison with the zircon thermometer. Take, for example, tonalite 101 of Carroll and Wyllie (J. Pet. 46, 275, 1990) with M = (K+Na+2Ca)/(Si Al) =1.9. Assuming [Zr] = 150 ppm (Condie, Chem. Geol. 104, 1, 1993), a completely molten rock of this composition would saturate in zircon at 748°C. However, crystallization of modal phases prior to the onset of zircon stability drives up melt [Zr] while lowering M and thus zircon solubility. By parameterizing the Carroll and Wyllie glass compositions (2.4- 5.2% H2O) with temperature, approximating the crystallization sequence between 1100-700°C as an error function, and assuming negligible Zr partition into modal phases, we find that zircon would first begin to grow at 827°C when the melt reached 280 ppm Zr. The predicted form of the zircon crystallization temperature distribution depends on specific assumptions regarding the crystallization path, but in our case yields a broad spectrum declining with temperature with less than 20% of zircon growing between 750- 700°C. If grown as rims on large zircons, this potentially corresponds to an even smaller fraction of area exposed in sectioned grains. We previously proposed the existence of wet, minimum melting conditions throughout the Hadean Eon based on a distinctive peak in crystallization

  9. Ophiolite Tectonics, Rock Magnetism and Palaeomagnetism, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Lagroix, F.; Hamilton, T. D.; Trebilcock, D.-A.

    2010-06-01

    -Messinian tectonic fabrics, the Troodos-Mamonia terrane boundary and the Arakapas-Transform fault form an approximate E-W composite boundary that we term the Troodos Tectonic Front. Miocene deformation remagnetized the ophiolite and its sedimentary cover in many places and also affects the Mamonia terrane to the SW, with which the Troodos terrane docked in the late Cretaceous. Magnetic mineralogy, particularly of the RBM traces the progressive un-roofing of the ophiolite during the deposition of its sedimentary cover. During the submarine exposure and erosion of the ophiolite, the contribution of RBM clasts to the overlying sedimentary cover changed qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus, magnetic mineralogy of the sedimentary rock cover records the progressive denudation of the ophiolite from lavas, down through dikes, to gabbros and deeper mantle rocks. Palaeomagnetic studies previously revealed the anticlockwise rotation of the Troodos terrane and its northwards migration. Characteristic remanent magnetism (ChRM) is most reliable for lavas and dikes although it is usually carried by recrystallized RBM. These correspond to the age of greenschist facies ocean-floor metamorphism, perhaps 7-15 Ma after igneous crystallization with an extent and depth dependent on depth and degree of hydrothermal circulation. The gabbros and mantle rocks commonly bear young (<12 Ma) remanences probably acquired (or re-acquired) during uplift of the Troodos terrane. In the cover of pre-Messinian deformed limestone (>8 Ma), the remagnetizing effects of penetrative strain have been under-estimated. Where strain has occurred, un-tilting procedures produce erroneous restorations for the remanence vectors, and thus for the associated paleopoles. We find that de-straining of limestone sites most appropriately restores ChRM vectors to their original orientation. The best-determined and restored ChRMs define an apparent polar wander path (APWP). Since the APWP terminates at the present N-pole, we inverted it

  10. High Sr/Y rocks are not all adakites!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Jean-François

    2010-05-01

    The name of "adakite" is used to describe a far too large group of rocks, whose sole common feature is high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios. Defining adakites only by this criterion is misleading, as the definition of this group of rocks does include many other criteria, including major elements. In itself, high (or commonly moderate!) Sr/Y ratios can be achieved via different processes: melting of a high Sr/Y (and La/Yb) source; deep melting, with abundant residual garnet; fractional crystallization or AFC; or interactions of felsic melts with the mantle, causing selective enrichment in LREE and Sr over HREE. A database of the compositions of "adakitic" rocks - including "high silica" and "low silica" adakites, "continental" adakites and Archaean adakites—was assembled. Geochemical modeling of the potential processes is used to interpret it, and reveals that (1) the genesis of high-silica adakites requires high pressure evolution (be it by melting or fractionation), in equilibrium with large amounts of garnet; (2) low-silica adakites are explained by garnet-present melting of an adakite-metasomatized mantle, i.e at depths greater than 2.5 GPa; (3) "Continental" adakites is a term encompassing a huge range of rocks, with a corresponding diversity of petrogenetic processes, and most of them are different from both low- and high- silica adakites; in fact in many cases it is a complete misnomer and the rocks studied are high-K calc-alkaline granitoids or even S-type granites; (4) Archaean adakites show a bimodal composition range, with some very high Sr/Y examples (similar to part of the TTG suite) reflecting deep melting (> 2.0 GPa) of a basaltic source with a relatively high Sr/Y, while lower Sr/Y rocks formed by shallower (1.0 GPa) melting of similar sources. Comparison with the Archaean TTG suite highlights the heterogeneity of the TTGs, whose composition spreads the whole combined range of HSA and Archaean adakites, pointing to a diversity of sources and processes

  11. The Pressure induced by salt crystallization in confinement

    PubMed Central

    Desarnaud, J.; Bonn, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a major cause of weathering of rocks, artworks and monuments. Damage can only occur if crystals continue to grow in confinement, i.e. within the pore space of these materials, thus generating mechanical stress. We report the direct measurement, at the microscale, of the force exerted by growing alkali halide salt crystals while visualizing their spontaneous nucleation and growth. The experiments reveal the crucial role of the wetting films between the growing crystal and the confining walls for the development of the pressure. Our results suggest that the measured force originates from repulsion between the similarly charged confining wall and the salt crystal separated by a ~1.5 nm liquid film. Indeed, if the walls are made hydrophobic, no film is observed and no repulsive forces are detected. We also show that the magnitude of the induced pressure is system specific explaining why different salts lead to different amounts of damage to porous materials. PMID:27493020

  12. Molecular tectonics: from crystals to crystals of crystals.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Gabriela; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2013-12-11

    The in situ combination of M(II) cations (Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) with 2,4,6-pyridinetricarboxylic acid as a ligand, a bisamidinium dication as a H-bond donor tecton and NaOH leads to the formation of anionic metal complexes ML2(2-) and their interconnection into isomorphous 3D H-bonded networks displaying different colours which were used as preformed seed crystals for the formation of crystals of crystals by 3D epitaxial growth.

  13. Infiltration flux distributions in unsaturated rock deposits andtheir potential implications for fractured rock formations

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-11-01

    Although water infiltration through unconsolidated rocks and fractured rock formations control flow and transport to groundwater, spatial distributions of flow paths are poorly understood. Infiltration experiments conducted on packs of rocks showed that a well-constrained distribution of fluxes develops despite differences in rock type (angular diabase and sandstone, and subangular serpentinite), rock size (30 to 200mm), and packing (up to 42 rock layers). Fluxes stabilize into a geometric (exponential) distribution that keeps about half of the system depleted of flow, retains a small fraction of high flow regions, and has a characteristic scale determined by the rock size. Modification of a statistical mechanical model shows that gravity-directed, random flowpaths evolve to the observed flux distribution, and that it represents the most probable distribution. Key similarities between infiltration in rock deposits and fractured rock formations indicate that the geometric flow distribution may also apply in the latter systems.

  14. Spectral characterization of igneous rocks in the 8- to 12-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S.; Salisbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper investigates the crystal-chemistry basis for the variation in spectral behavior of ingneous rocks, with the purpose of developing relationships useful for applications in the lithologic characterization of terrestrial and extraterrestrial surfaces. A new parameter is proposed for characterizing general rock and mineral type. The parameter, SCFM, defined as the ratio SiO2/(SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO), reflects the degree of depolymerization of the silica tetrahedra in both fine-grained and coarse-grained igneous rocks, and is a good descriptor of the composition of these rocks. Using spectra obtained in the laboratory on coarse-particulate mineral and solid-rock samples, the SCFM parameter was used to assess the effects of variations in the rock composition on the location, number, and width of spectral bands. A regression analysis of bands varying in width from 0.2 micron to 1.4 microns versus the SCFM value resulted in correlation coefficients ranging from 0.88 to 0.97.

  15. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  16. Mars Rocks Continue to Fascinate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Proving once again that Mars is a complex and fascinating place, NASA's Opportunity rover has entered new terrain and is providing scientists with more discoveries and puzzles to solve. 'One of the things we've been wondering,' said principal investigator Steve Squyres, 'is whether the rounded concretions we call 'blueberries' are the same everywhere. It turns out they're not. The berries are more numerous here, and some seem to be smaller than any we've ever seen.'

    This microscopic image of a drill hole cut into a martian rock nicknamed 'Ice Cream' by the rover's rock abrasion tool shows cross sections of round concretions 1 to 2 millimeters (0.04 to 0.08 inches) wide. Science team members are debating whether the grayish-looking smudges that are not as round are concretions or some other feature.

    Opportunity is now almost 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) south of 'Endurance Crater,' where the rover spent from May through December of 2004 reading the story of a watery past recorded in the martian rocks. After exiting 'Endurance' on martian day, or sol, 316 (Dec. 13, 2004), Opportunity turned south and continued the trek across land where no human has trod, demonstrating that endurance is more than just a name.

    Opportunity took this mosaic of images with its microscopic imager on sol 546 (Aug. 6, 2005). The area shown is approximately 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) wide. The shaded portions on the left side of each quadrangle in the mosaic are silhouettes of the rover's robotic arm.

  17. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  18. Sedimentary rocks of early Mars.

    PubMed

    Malin, M C; Edgett, K S

    2000-12-08

    Layered and massive outcrops on Mars, some as thick as 4 kilometers, display the geomorphic attributes and stratigraphic relations of sedimentary rock. Repeated beds in some locations imply a dynamic depositional environment during early martian history. Subaerial (such as eolian, impact, and volcaniclastic) and subaqueous processes may have contributed to the formation of the layers. Affinity for impact craters suggests dominance of lacustrine deposition; alternatively, the materials were deposited in a dry, subaerial setting in which atmospheric density, and variations thereof mimic a subaqueous depositional environment. The source regions and transport paths for the materials are not preserved.

  19. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-07

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  20. Rock Goes to School on Screen: A Model for Teaching Non-"Learned" Musics Derived from the Films "School of Rock" (2003) and "Rock School" (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Michael

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from two films with "rock" and "school" in their titles, about rock in school and about music and schooling more broadly? "School of Rock" (2003), a "family comedy," and "Rock School" (2005), a documentary, provoke a range of questions, ideological and otherwise, surrounding the inclusion of rock in formal instructional…

  1. Drilling technique for crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, T.; Miyagawa, I.

    1977-01-01

    Hole-drilling technique uses special crystal driller in which drill bit rotates at fixed position at speed of 30 rpm while crystal slowly advances toward drill. Technique has been successfully applied to crystal of Rochell salt, Triglycine sulfate, and N-acetyglycine. Technique limits heat buildup and reduces strain on crystal.

  2. Seismic anisotropy in the lower crust: The link between rock composition, microstructure, texture and seismic properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplinska, Daria; Piazolo, Sandra; Almqvist, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy observed in Earth's interior is caused by the presence of aligned anisotropic minerals (crystallographic and shape preferred orientation; CPO and SPO respectively), and fluid and/or melt inclusions related to deformation. Therefore, the variations in seismic anisotropy carry valuable information about the structure of the mantle and crust. For example, anisotropy observed in the upper mantle is mainly attributed to the CPO of olivine, and provides strong evidence for the flow within the upper mantle. Seismic anisotropy in the crust is still poorly constrained, mostly due to the much larger heterogeneity of the crustal rocks in comparison with the more homogenous mantle. Anisotropy in the crust will be affected by the variations in rock composition, microstructure, texture (presence or lack of CPO), brittle structures (e.g. fracture systems) and chemical composition of the minerals. However, once the relationships between those variables and seismic properties of the crustal rocks are established, seismic anisotropy can be used to derive characteristics of rocks otherwise out of reach. Our study focuses on two sets of samples of middle to lower crustal rocks collected in Fiordland (New Zealand) and in Sweden. Samples from Fiordland represent a root of a thick (ca. 80 km) magmatic arc and comprise igneous rocks, which crystallized at high P and T conditions and were subsequently metamorphosed and deformed. Samples from Sweden are derived from a metasedimentary nappe in the Caledonian orogenic belt, which is mostly composed of gneisses, amphibolites and calc-silicates that have experienced different amounts of strain. We use large area EBSD mapping to measure the CPO of the constituent phases and record the geometric relationships of the rock microstructure. Data is then used to calculate the elastic properties of the rock from single-crystal stiffnesses. Here, we utilize the EBSD GUI software (Cook et al., 2013), which offers varied homogenization

  3. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  4. Crystallization kinetics in magmas during decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; Carroll, Michael R.

    2016-04-01

    Many variables play a role during magma crystallization at depth or in a volcanic conduit, and through experimentally derived constraints we can better understand pre- and syn-eruptive magma crystallization behavior. The thermodynamic properties of magmas have been extensively investigated as a function of T, P, fO2 and magma composition [1], and this allows estimation of the stability of equilibrium phases and physical parameters (e.g., density, viscosity). However, many natural igneous rocks contain geochemical, mineralogical and textural evidence of disequilibrium, suggesting that magmas frequently follow non-equilibrium, time-dependent pathways that are recorded in the geochemical and petrographic characteristics of the rocks. There are currently no suitable theoretical models capable of calculating nucleation and growth rates in disequilibrium conditions without experimental constraints. The aim of this contribution is provide quantitative data on growth and nucleation rates of feldspar crystals in silicate melts obtained through decompression experiments, in order to determine the magma evolution in pre- and sin-eruptive conditions. Decompression is one of the main processes that induce the crystallization of feldspar during the magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. Decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic and basaltic melts to investigate crystallization kinetics of feldspar as a function of the effect of the degassing, undercooling and time on nucleation and crystal growth process [2; 3]. Furthermore, feldspar is the main crystals phase present in magmas, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. Crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts show that long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations [2]. This is an important

  5. Evolution of the martian mantle as recorded by igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Martian igneous rocks provide our best window into the current state of the martian mantle and its evolution after accretion and differentiation. Currently, those rocks have been examined in situ by rovers, characterized in general from orbiting spacecraft, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories when found as meteorites. However, these data have the potential to bias our understanding of martian magmatism, as most of the available meteorites and rover-analyzed rocks come from the Amazonian (<2 Ga) and Hesperian (~3.65 Ga) periods respectively, while igneous rocks from the Noachian (>3.8 Ga) have only been examined by orbiters and as the unique meteorite ALH 84001. After initial differentiation, the main planetary-scale changes in the structure of Mars which impact igneous compositions are cooling of the planet and thickening of the crust with time. As the shergottite meteorites give ages <500 Ma1, they might be expected to represent thick-crust, recent volcanism. Using spacecraft measurements of volcanic compositions and whole rock compositions of meteorites, we demonstrate that the shergottite meteorites do not match the composition of the igneous rocks composing the young volcanoes on Mars, particularly in their silica content, and no crystallization or crustal contamination trend reproduces the volcanoes from a shergottite-like parent magma. However, we show that the shergottite magmas do resemble older martian rocks in composition and mineralogy. The Noachian-aged meteorite ALH 84001 has similar radiogenic-element signatures to the shergottites and may derive from a similar mantle source despite the age difference2. Thus, shergottite-like magmas may represent melting of mantle sources that were much more abundant early in martian history. We propose that the shergottites represent the melting products of an originally-hydrous martian mantle, containing at least several hundred ppm H2O. Dissolved water can increase the silica content of magmas and thus

  6. Rethinking how Undergraduate ``Hard Rock'' Petrology is Taught

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    A course in "hard rock" petrology forms a core component of undergraduate training in the geosciences. In most cases, the subjects of igneous and metamorphic petrology are combined in a single course and the course is traditionally structured so that the two subjects are covered in series. This approach enables students to focus on each subject separately, with knowledge of igneous rocks helping students to understand metamorphic rock protoliths. Student assessment shows, however, that this approach tends to compartmentalize learning and the two main subjects might just as well be taught in separate courses. In practical applications such as fieldwork, students must be able to access their understanding of igneous and metamorphic rocks virtually simultaneously. To better integrate student learning, I developed a spiral learning approach to teaching petrology (e.g., Bruner, 1990; Dyar et al., 2004) so that commonalities could be revisited several times over the course of a semester and, in so doing, students' grasp of the fundamental insights provided by igneous and metamorphic rocks could be scaffolded into greater understanding. The course initially focuses on the dynamics of the environments in which igneous and metamorphic rocks form: heat flow, fluid flow, and plate tectonics. Several subsequent weeks explore topics relevant to identifying and understanding igneous and metamorphic rocks in the field: crystal nucleation and growth, the roles of pressure and heat, and field classification. Laboratory exercises parallel this structure, also emphasizing observations that are valuable in the field: the relationship between minerals and rocks, textural observations, and general rock classification. The final portion of the course explores “hard rocks” in more detail with a greater emphasis on the interplay between chemistry and mineralogy. A variety of learner-centered activities in the course help students bridge the gap between novice and expert and include

  7. The nakhlite meteorites: Augite-rich igneous rocks from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2005-01-01

    The seven nakhlite meteorites are augite-rich igneous rocks that formed in flows or shallow intrusions of basaltic magma on Mars. They consist of euhedral to subhedral crystals of augite and olivine (to 1 cm long) in fine-grained mesostases. The augite crystals have homogeneous cores of Mg' = 63% and rims that are normally zoned to iron enrichment. The core-rim zoning is cut by iron-enriched zones along fractures and is replaced locally by ferroan low-Ca pyroxene. The core compositions of the olivines vary inversely with the steepness of their rim zoning - sharp rim zoning goes with the most magnesian cores (Mg' = 42%), homogeneous olivines are the most ferroan. The olivine and augite crystals contain multiphase inclusions representing trapped magma. Among the olivine and augite crystals is mesostasis, composed principally of plagioclase and/or glass, with euhedra of titanomagnetite and many minor minerals. Olivine and mesostasis glass are partially replaced by veinlets and patches of iddingsite, a mixture of smectite clays, iron oxy-hydroxides and carbonate minerals. In the mesostasis are rare patches of a salt alteration assemblage: halite, siderite, and anhydrite/ gypsum. The nakhlites are little shocked, but have been affected chemically and biologically by their residence on Earth. Differences among the chemical compositions of the nakhlites can be ascribed mostly to different proportions of augite, olivine, and mesostasis. Compared to common basalts, they are rich in Ca, strongly depleted in Al, and enriched in magmaphile (incompatible) elements, including the LREE. Nakhlites contain little pre-terrestrial organic matter. Oxygen isotope ratios are not terrestrial, and are different in anhydrous silicates and in iddingsite. The alteration assemblages all have heavy oxygen and heavy carbon, while D/H values are extreme and scattered. Igneous sulfur had a solar-system isotopic ratio, but in most minerals was altered to higher and lower values. High precision

  8. A comparative study of seed crystals for the phosphorus crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Yim, S; Kim, E-H

    2004-07-01

    This study was performed to select a preferred seed crystal material for the phosphorus crystallization process through a comparative study of four materials: electron arc furnace, blast furnace and converter slag, and phosphate rock. Leaching and phosphorus removal tests were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the four materials as seeding agents. Converter slag demonstrated a much larger leaching capacity with respect to calcium and hydroxide ions than did either electron arc furnace or blast furnace slag. The average phosphorus removal efficiencies of phosphorus rock, and the electron arc furnace, blast furnace and converter slag were 35.9%, 74.2%, 99.1%, and 94.5% following 20, 17, 32, and 175 days of leach time, respectively. Consideration of both technical and cost factors suggests that converter slag may have competitive advantages over the other three seed materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that peak patterns for hydroxyapatite increased slightly as the hydrous flow time was extended. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images revealed that finely distributed cubic crystals were deposited on the surfaces of converter slag. When analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS) mapping, the crystals gave a composition mole ratio (Ca/P) of 1.97 and they were determined to be hydroxyapatite.

  9. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  10. Multisensor classification of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane

    1988-01-01

    A comparison is made between linear discriminant analysis and supervised classification results based on signatures from the Landsat TM, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and airborne SAR, alone and combined into extended spectral signatures for seven sedimentary rock units exposed on the margin of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. Results from a linear discriminant analysis showed that training-area classification accuracies based on the multisensor data were improved an average of 15 percent over TM alone, 24 percent over TIMS alone, and 46 percent over SAR alone, with similar improvement resulting when supervised multisensor classification maps were compared to supervised, individual sensor classification maps. When training area signatures were used to map spectrally similar materials in an adjacent area, the average classification accuracy improved 19 percent using the multisensor data over TM alone, 2 percent over TIMS alone, and 11 percent over SAR alone. It is concluded that certain sedimentary lithologies may be accurately mapped using a single sensor, but classification of a variety of rock types can be improved using multisensor data sets that are sensitive to different characteristics such as mineralogy and surface roughness.

  11. Electrical properties of dry rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, H.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism by which atmospheric moisture affects the conductivity and dielectric constant of rock specimens was studied in time and frequency domains. It is suggested that adsorbed water molecules alter the surface conductivity in a manner similar to that observed in semiconductors and insulators. Powdered basalts show a low-frequency dispersion produced by the atmospheric moisture remaining in the pore system of the sample in a high vacuum; this effect is attributed to isolated adsorption centers. Simulated lunar permafrost at 100 K and a vacuum of 10 to the -8th power torr together with data on lunar samples contaminated with atmospheric moisture and the dielectric properties of ice at various temperatures indicate that, if permafrost exists in the moon it should present a relaxation peak at approximately 300 Hz; for temperatures up to 263 K it may go up to 20 KHz. It is concluded that in order to have electrical steady state conditions in rock samples it is necessary to have volume charge accumulations at interfaces within the sample and at the electrode sample interface. A method for measuring heterogeneous dielectrics with non-negligible ohmic and dielectric conductivities is proposed and experimentally verified.

  12. Multiversos: Rock'n'Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; Arias, A.; García, N.

    2011-11-01

    Imagine that you can use your fingers only for typing target coordinates at thetelescope, reduce images and spectra with IRAF, or write papers for Astronomy &Astrophysics, but you would never be able to play an electric guitar.Imagine that you love music, work in front of the computer always withheadphones, and dream of playing with your favourite rock band in a tumultuousconcert.Imagine that you are an astronomer who, after a "cosmic fluke", share stagewith the band which themes you have always hummed since you were a teenager.Imagine that you were born for rock, played a main role in the best Spanishalbum of the 90s (Omega, with Enrique Morente), and your songs arerutinary played by Radio 3, but you would never be able to detect an exoplanetor a galaxy at a high redshift.Imagine that you love Astronomy, try to see the Moon craters and Andromeda withyour small telescope through the light pollution of your city, and explain yourdaughter that Pluto is not a planet any longer. Imagine that you are a musician who, after a "cosmic fluke", give a talk justafter a Nobel laureate that discovered the cosmic microwave backgroundradiation.Such "cosmic flukes" sometimes happen. If you were not at the dinner of the SEA meeting and do not believe us, visithttp://www.myspace.com/antonioariasmultiverso or open the proceedings DVD andlisten "El ordenador simula el nacimiento de las estrella...".

  13. Hand injuries in rock climbers.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Erik N; Klugman, Jeffrey A; Bosco, Joseph A

    2006-01-01

    Rock climbing, whether practiced in nature on cliffs and boulders or indoors on walls made of resin and wood, has grown in popularity in recent years. An estimated five million people participate in "rocking" at least three times a year. Climbing places unique demands on the upper extremity, especially the hands. The flexor tendons and flexor pulleys are prone to sprains and ruptures. Pulley injuries occur in up to 20% of climbers. The A2 pulley of the ring finger is the most frequently injured. Most pulley injuries can be successfully treated with a week of immobilization, followed by a range of motion (ROM) exercises for one week. Isometric training on a finger board can be started once ROM exercises are painless. A return to climbing can be initiated when the climber is able to avoid grip positions that produce pain; however, the closed crimp grip should be avoided at this time. Surgical reconstruction using the technique described by Widstrom is recommended for acute injuries with clinical evidence of bowstringing. Ultrasound and MRI are the current modalities best suited for confirming clinical findings.

  14. Late Cretaceous intraplate silicic volcanic rocks from the Lake Chad region: An extension of the Cameroon volcanic line?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T.-Y.; Torng, P.-K.; Yang, C.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2016-07-01

    Silicic volcanic rocks at Hadjer el Khamis, near Lake Chad, are considered to be an extension of the Cameroon volcanic line (CVL) but their petrogenetic association is uncertain. The silicic rocks are divided into peraluminous and peralkaline groups with both rock types chemically similar to within-plate granitoids. In situ U/Pb zircon dating yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 1.3 Ma indicating the magmas erupted ˜10 million years before the next oldest CVL rocks (i.e., ˜66 Ma). The Sr isotopes (i.e., ISr = 0.7021-0.7037) show a relatively wide range but the Nd isotopes (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51268-0.51271) are uniform and indicate that the rocks were derived from a moderately depleted mantle source. Thermodynamic modeling shows that the silicic rocks likely formed by fractional crystallization of a mafic parental magma but that the peraluminous rocks were affected by low temperature alteration processes. The silicic rocks are more isotopically similar to Late Cretaceous basalts identified within the Late Cretaceous basins (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51245-0.51285) of Chad than the uncontaminated CVL rocks (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51270-0.51300). The age and isotopic compositions suggest the silicic volcanic rocks of the Lake Chad region are related to Late Cretaceous extensional volcanism in the Termit basin. It is unlikely that the silicic volcanic rocks are petrogenetically related to the CVL but it is possible that magmatism was structurally controlled by suture zones that formed during the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean and/or the Pan-African Orogeny.

  15. 'Pot of Gold' and 'Rotten Rocks'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Pot of Gold' (upper left), located near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. Scientists are intrigued by this unusual-looking, nodule-covered rock and plan to investigate its detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 159 (June 14, 2004).

    To the right is a set of rocks referred to as 'Rotten Rocks' for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of these rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's 'Eagle Crater.' This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  16. Sizes and spatial relationships of crystals in granitic plutons: Exploring the crystallization gaps, heterogeneous nucleation, and mechanical clustering of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, V.; Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    Quantitative measurements on magmatic textures provide an important insight into nucleation and growth rates as well as mechanical effects such as crystal settling and melt extraction in magma reservoirs. Crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements and spatial analysis are routinely applied to dilute volcanic suspensions but comparable data on holocrystalline multiphase plutonic rocks are uncommon. We present quantitative description of CSDs and spatial relationships for all rock-forming minerals from an intrusive suite of the Fichtelgebirge/Smrčiny granite batholith in central Europe. This composite body represents two spatially unrelated chambers, consisting of peraluminous biotite, two-mica, and tourmaline-muscovite granites, crystallized as texturally diverse batches covering equigranular, serial porphyritic, and hiatal porphyritic fine- to coarse-grained types. All granite samples exhibit straight to concave-up CSDs in the natural log of population density vs. crystal size projection. Straight CSDs were only found in fine-grained biotite-rich granites representing early crystallizing roof facies of the batholith. For all other samples, the slope decreases from -65 to nearly 0 mm-1 as grain size increases. The curvature can result from superposition of two quasilinear segments. It cannot be produced by two separate crystallization events because the population of larger grains is about 10 times more abundant by volume than the fine one. Instead, we propose that the concave-up CSDs developed in situ, with enhanced nucleation and/or reduced growth rates during the final stage of solidification. Spatial analysis and measurements of contact relationships reveal significant clustering of crystals except near the roof of the batholith. The clustering index decreases to 0.6 for the smallest crystals (random = 1), Ripley's Ľ-function reaches 0.8 mm, and the clusters are mineral sensitive: pairs of like phases appear to be more clustered than the unlike pairs. The

  17. Targeting ROCK2 rather than ROCK1 inhibits Ewing sarcoma malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Pinca, Rosa Simona; Manara, Maria Cristina; Chiadini, Valentina; Picci, Piero; Zucchini, Cinzia; Scotlandi, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the molecular processes characterizing Ewing sarcoma (EWS) cell migration is crucial to highlight novel therapies for patients with disseminated disease. In this study we analyzed the role of ROCK kinases in the regulation of cell migration, growth and differentiation of EWS cells. Overexpression of ROCK promotes invasion and metastasis in many solid tumors. However, the effect of ROCK in EWS has not been extensively investigated. Expression of ROCK1 and ROCK2 was analyzed by western blotting in a representative panel of human EWS cell lines, in comparison with the parameters of in vitro malignancy. We investigated the effects of a ROCK2 specific inhibitor toward those of a pan-ROCK inhibitor on the growth, migration and differentiation of two EWS cell lines. ROCK2 but not ROCK1 expression was found to be associated with in vitro cell migration and anchorage-independent growth capabilities. Exposure of EWS cells to ROCK inhibitors significantly reduced migration and growth, while favoring morphology changes and neural differentiation. These effects were more striking when cells were specifically deprived of ROCK2 activity. Our findings lead to consider ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, as a possible molecular target for the treatment of EWS. PMID:28112365

  18. Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, Graham

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen high resolution (21-51 step) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra are obtained for six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks of different compositions, using a continuous laser system on submilligram subsamples and on single crystal plagioclase clasts. Four of the six samples gave reproducible age spectra with well-defined intermediate temperature plateaus over 48 percent or more of the Ar-39 released; the plateaus are interpreted as crystallization ages. Samples 15304,7,69, 15294,6,21 and 15314,26,156 gave virtually identical plateau ages whose weighted mean is 3870 + or - 6 Ma. These three melt rocks differ in composition and likely formed in three separate impact events.

  19. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Granitic rocks within Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, T.; KIM, Y.; Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Woo, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study areas, Lichen Hills and Outback Nunatak are located in the Northern Victoria Land which is close to Pacific Ocean side of Transantarctic Mountain (TAM), Antarctica. According to the study of Zeller and Dreschoff (1990), the radioactivity values of Lichen hills and Frontier Mt. area in the Victoria Land were very high. To identify the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks in these areas, 13 samples of Lichen Hills rocks and 4 samples of Outback Nunatak rocks are analyzed. For mineralogical study, samples were observed in macroscale as well as microscale including microscope electron probe analysis. Rock samples of Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak are mainly leucogranite and granitic pegmatite. These rock samples are composed of quartz, k-feldspar, plagioclase, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline like granite. In SEM-EDS analysis, the observed light colored minerals show relatively high Th, U, Dy, Ce, Nb concentration. This suggests that rock samples may contain minerals such as fergusonite, monazite, thorite, allanite, karnasurtite which are considered to be REE-bearing minerals. Samples of related rocks have been analyzed in terms of major, trace and rare earth element (REE) concentrations using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). As concentration of SiO2 increase, Al2O3, TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, P2O5 concentration decrease and Na2O, K2O, MnO concentration increase. Analyzed trace elements and REE are normalized using CI Chondrite, Primitive mantle. The normalized data show that LREE are enriched compared to HREE. The distinct negative anomalies of Eu, Sr are observed, indicating that rock-forming melts are fairly processed state of fractional crystallization. It means that Th, U, Nb, Ta are much enriched in the melts.

  20. Tertiary epizonal plutonic rocks of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Motzer, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness identified approximately 731 kmS of epizonal plutonic granitic rocks within the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho batholith. From north to south, the intrusions are the Rock Lake Creek stock and the Whistling Pig, Running Creek, Bad Luck and Painted Rocks plutons. The stock and plutons consist of medium- to coarse-grained biotite and hornblende-biotite syenorgranite to monzogranite and quartz syenite capped by fine-grained biotite leucogranite. These rocks are intruded by late-synplutonic leucogranite dikes and post plutonic porphyritic rhyolite to rhyodacite and basalt dikes. The medium-grained granitic rocks are high in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, Ga, Th, U, W and Zr, but low in Al7O3, CaO, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co and V. Most of the granites are peraluminous. Rare-earth element (REE) plots (rock sample/chondrite) show enrichment in light REE over heavy REE with strong EU depletions. K-Ar biotite radiometric age determinations for medium-grained granites in all of the plutons range from approximately 51 Ma (Whistling Pig pluton) to 43.7 Ma (Painted Rocks pluton). Petrogenetic studies suggest that the plutons were rapidly emplaced to within 3.0 km of the paleosurface. The types, textures and color of the rocks result from devolatilization of the crystallizing melt and very low-grade hydrothermal alteration. The fluorine-rich melts are the fractionated with accumulate residue; they are considered to be anorogenic (A-type) granites intruded into the center of a metamorphic core complex.

  1. Metamorphosed ultramafic rocks in east Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kays, M. A.; Dorais, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The compositional and mineralogical characteristics of Archean ultramafic rocks in Kangerdlugssuaq Fjord are summarized: the first provides information important to understanding the primary character of the rock suite, whereas the latter provides data necessary to determine the conditions of their equilibrium during the latest metamorphism. This information will be of value in determining the affinity of the suite to similar Archean rocks in other areas of the North Atlantic craton.

  2. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks.

    PubMed

    French, Katherine L; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M; Schoon, Petra L; Zumberge, J Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A; George, Simon C; Love, Gordon D; Brocks, Jochen J; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E

    2015-05-12

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼ 2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  3. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    PubMed Central

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories. PMID:25918387

  4. Rock breakage mechanisms with a PDC cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Some aspects of chip generation by a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter moving through a rock can be understood by examining the shapes of the chips and the fracture patterns in the remaining rock. Data from laboratory experiments have led to general conclusions about the uniformity of chip generation mechanisms in different kinds of rock and about crack nucleation position relative to the cutter tip. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-05-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  6. The importance of stress percolation patterns in rocks and other polycrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Burnley, P C

    2013-01-01

    A new framework for thinking about the deformation behavior of rocks and other heterogeneous polycrystalline materials is proposed, based on understanding the patterns of stress transmission through these materials. Here, using finite element models, I show that stress percolates through polycrystalline materials that have heterogeneous elastic and plastic properties of the same order as those found in rocks. The pattern of stress percolation is related to the degree of heterogeneity in and statistical distribution of the elastic and plastic properties of the constituent grains in the aggregate. The development of these stress patterns leads directly to shear localization, and their existence provides insight into the formation of rhythmic features such as compositional banding and foliation in rocks that are reacting or dissolving while being deformed. In addition, this framework provides a foundation for understanding and predicting the macroscopic rheology of polycrystalline materials based on single-crystal elastic and plastic mechanical properties.

  7. Subdivision of the Mg-suite noritic rocks into Mg-gabbronorites and Mg-norites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.; Flohr, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    Mg-suite noritic rocks can be divided into two groups, the Mg-gabbronorites and the Mg-norites. The rocks of these groups differ in ratios of high-Ca pyroxene to total pyroxene, compositions of pyroxene and plagioclase, assemblages of Ti-, Nb-, and Zr-bearing minerals, compositions of chrome spinel, bulk-rock Ti/Sm and Sc/Sm, and measured ages. The two groups probably crystallized from different types of parent magmas. Two hypotheses are offered for the differences in composition of the parent magmas. One hypothesis ascribes the differences to compositional heterogeneity of the mantle source areas. The other hypothesis ascribes the differences to variations in extent of partial melting of the mantle source regions and variations in extent of assimilation of the anorthosite and the highly differentiated residual liquid that were produced during the primordial lunar differentiation.

  8. Layering in the wall rock of Valles Marineris: intrusive and extrusive magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Paige, David A.; Manning, Craig E.

    2003-06-01

    High-resolution images of the walls exposed in Valles Marineris reveal variations in appearance and degree of layering indicating various lithologies comprise the Tharsis plateau. The layered wall rock has been proposed to result from effusive flood basalt volcanism or interbedded sediments and volcanics. We present observations of unlayered rock that indicate layering extends to a greater depth in the western half of Valles Marineris and is confined to the Tharsis plateau, a region of thickened, uplifted crust resulting from prolonged intrusive activity. Consistent with this view, we propose that the observed layering may be a manifestation of intrusive rocks resulting from crystal fractionation of intruded basaltic magmas. Terrestrial layered plutons provide analogs for comparison such as those of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) a large igneous province associated with crustal rifting and exposures of thick sequences of layered flood basalts and intruded layered cumulates.

  9. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  10. UV, visible, and near-IR reflectivity data for magnetic soils/rocks from Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vempati, R. K.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Coey, J. M. D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to obtain UV, visible, and near-IR reflectivity spectra for several magnetic Brazilian soils/rocks and compare them to corresponding data for Mars to see if these materials satisfy both magnetic and spectral constraints for Mars. Selected physical properties of the magnetic Brazilian soils/rocks are presented. In general, the spectral features resulting from ferric crystal-field transitions are much better defined in the spectra of the magnetic Brazilian soils/rocks than in Martian spectral data. Presumably, this results from a relatively higher proportion of crystalline ferric oxides for the former. The apparent masking of the spectral signature of maghemite by hematite or goethite for the Brazilian samples implies the magnetic and spectral constraints for Mars can be decoupled. That is, maghemite may be present in magnetically-significant but optically-insignificant amounts compared to crystalline hematite.

  11. Nature of differentiation trends in some volcanic rocks from the Galapagos spreading center

    SciTech Connect

    Byerly, G.

    1980-07-10

    The Galapagos spreading center has produced a suite of volcanic rocks which include (1) typical ocean floor tholeiites, (2) iron- and tianium-enriched tholeiites, (3) andesites, and (4) rhyodacites. Interpretation of major element compositions determined for these rocks, associated glassy selvedges, and mineral phases suggests that the entire suite can be produced by fractional crystallization of the observed low-pressure phenocrysts.The unusual extent of fractionation for this region may be related to the size, morphology, and eruption and resupply rates of the magma chambers associated with the Galapagos spreading center. This and the regional distribution of these highly fractionated rocks suggest and important, though indirect, influence of the Galapagos hot spot.

  12. Soft Rock Yields Clues to Mars' Past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock outcrop dubbed 'Clovis.' The rock was discovered to be softer than other rocks studied so far at Gusev Crater after the rover easily ground a hole into it with its rock abrasion tool. Spirit's solar panels can be seen in the foreground. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera on sol 205 (July 31, 2004).

    Elemental Trio Found in 'Clovis' Figure 1 above shows that the interior of the rock dubbed 'Clovis' contains higher concentrations of sulfur, bromine and chlorine than basaltic, or volcanic, rocks studied so far at Gusev Crater. The data were taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer after the rover dug into Clovis with its rock abrasion tool. The findings might indicate that this rock was chemically altered, and that fluids once flowed through the rock depositing these elements.

  13. Evaluation of multiband photography for rock discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raines, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the multiband photography concept that tonal differences between rock formations on aerial photography can be improved through the selection of the appropriate bands. The concept involves: (1) acquiring band reference data for the rocks being considered; (2) selecting the best combination of bands to discriminate the rocks using these reference data; (3) acquiring aerial photography using these selected bands; and (4) extracting the desired geologic information in an optimum manner. The test site geology and rock reflectance are discussed in detail. The evaluation found that the differences in contrast ratios are not statistically significant, and the spectral information in different bands is not advantageous.

  14. Rock Art of the Greater Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Edwin C.

    Archaeoastronomical studies in the American Southwest began in 1955 with recognition of what seemed to be pictorial eyewitness records of the Crab supernova of 1054 AD In time, reports of seasonally significant light-and-shadow effects on rock art and associations of rock art with astronomical alignments also emerged. Most astronomical rock art studies remained problematic, however, because criteria for proof of ancient intent were elusive. Disciplined methods for assessing cultural function were difficult to develop, but review of ethnographically documented astronomical traditions of California Indians and of Indians in the American Southwest subsequently increased confidence in the value of some astronomical rock art initiatives.

  15. Rayleigh wave studies in lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.

    1972-01-01

    An ultrasonic surface wave technique described by the author (1971) is used to verify a hypothesis that links the seismic wave propagation velocities in lunar crust, much too low as compared to those on earth, to the extensive fracturing of lunar rock in the absence of liquids and gases which changed drastically the elastic and inelastic properties of lunar rock. Measurements on lunar rock samples and synthetic analogs suggest that the presence of microfractures have influence on both the wave velocity and Q factor in lunar rocks.

  16. Crack initiation around prestressed rock bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijk, G.

    1982-07-01

    The stress fields in the rock in the immediate vicinities of the ends of prestressed rock bolts are considered. In particular, the tensile stresses that are likely to initiate cracks are studies. A fracture mechanics analysis shows that if cracks are initiated they will normally not be extended more than a few bore hole diameters and cause negligable reduction of the tensile force in the rock bolts. It is suggested that the initiated cracks can be considerably extended by blasting activities in the neighborhood and accordingly cause loss of bolt tension. If so retensioning of the rock bolts is quite meaningless.

  17. Meteorite Linked to Rock at Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This meteorite, a basalt lava rock nearly indistinguishable from many Earth rocks, provided the first strong proof that meteorites could come from Mars. Originally weighing nearly 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds), it was collected in 1979 in the Elephant Moraine area of Antarctica. The side of the cube at the lower left in this image measures 1 centimeter (0.4 inches).

    This picture shows a sawn face of this fine-grained gray rock. (The vertical stripes are saw marks.) The black patches in the rock are melted rock, or glass, formed when a large meteorite hit Mars near the rock. The meteorite impact probably threw this rock, dubbed 'EETA79001,' off Mars and toward Antarctica on Earth. The black glass contains traces of martian atmosphere gases.

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has discovered that a rock dubbed 'Bounce' at Meridiani Planum has a very similar mineral composition to this meteorite and likely shares common origins. Bounce itself is thought to have originated outside the area surrounding Opportunity's landing site; an impact or collision likely threw the rock away from its primary home.

  18. Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

  19. Impact of Rock Bolts on Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    F. C. Ahlers

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured tuff is a key factor for assessing the long-term viability of the proposed high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Rock bolts are among the methods proposed for ground control in the emplacement drifts. They may provide a conduit whereby percolating water that would otherwise bypass the drift will seep into the drift. The objective of this study is to assess the impact that the use of rock bolts may have on seepage. The impact of rock bolts on seepage is studied using a numerical model that is finely discretized around the rock bolt. There are several sources of uncertainty and variability with respect to the flow system around the drift and rock bolt. There is uncertainty about the capillary strength of the fractures around the drift. There is also uncertainty about how the permeability and capillary strength of the grout used to cement the steel rock bolts into the bolt holes will change over time. There is variability expected in the percolation rates incident upon the drifts depending on location. The uncertainty and variability of these parameters are approached by evaluating the rock bolt impact over a range of values for several model parameters. It is also important to consider where the last fracture capable of carrying flow away from the rock bolt intersects the rock bolt. Three models are used where the last fracture is 0, 10 and 50 cm above the drift.

  20. Opaque mineralogy - Apollo 17, rock 75035

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. O. A.; Boctor, N. Z.

    1974-01-01

    Rock 75035 is a medium-grained, holocrystalline, subophitic ilmenite basalt collected from the rim of Camelot Crater, and is believed to represent the subfloor basalts of the Taurus-Littrow valley. The rock consists of the major minerals pyroxene (45%), plagioclase (31%), and ilmenite (17%). Minor minerals include cristobalite (about 5%), troilite, native Fe, tranquillityite, baddeleyite, zirconolite, and rare ulvospinel. No olivine or armalcolite was observed in the specimen 75035,76. Mineralogically and chemically, as well as in age, this rock is similar to others collected from Camelot and other stations during the Apollo 17 mission. These rocks are almost identical to the Type B ilmenite basalts of Mare Tranquillitatis.

  1. Using crystal zoning to track crystal mush differentiation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M.

    2010-12-01

    Exposed plutonic rocks contain clues to the differentiation and fractionation processes that may be operating beneath currently active volcanoes. There is potential to gain insights into phenomena including crystal fractionation, the movement of evolved fluids within a porous crystal mush, the extraction of late-stage melts, and the formation of precious metal deposits. In layered intrusions, attention has commonly focused on bulk magma differentiation, with the differentiation of interstitial liquids remaining in the mush being relatively neglected. However, μm-scale study of minor element zonation in intercumulus overgrowths and interstitial phases can help to understand the intricacies of crystal mush processes. By studying very slowly diffusing elements or components (such as TiO2 or anorthite content) it is possible to essentially eliminate problems relating to diffusive equilibration during prolonged slow cooling, and infer the evolving composition of the residual liquid. For layered intrusions, insights into crystal mush differentiation mechanisms can be obtained by comparing interstitial zoning profiles with the cryptic chemical changes that are observed in primocrysts with increasing stratigraphic height. The Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, formed from essentially a single pulse of magma that solidified by near-perfect fractional crystallisation. The anorthite content (XAn) of the plagioclase primocrysts decreases monotonically with increasing stratigraphic height, as a result of crystallisation at lower temperatures and from increasingly evolved liquids. Ti contents of plagioclase increase systematically with stratigraphic height until cumulus Fe-Ti oxides appear, and then decrease as a result of falling liquid TiO2. However, interstitial Ti zoning follows different trends, which demonstrates that the interstitial and bulk liquids undergo very different liquid lines of descent. Distinct compositional trends develop adjacent to fine-grained, mafic

  2. Plutonium-244 fission tracks - Evidence in a lunar rock 3.95 billion years old.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Price, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Tracks attributed to the spontaneous fission of plutonium-244 and of uranium-238 were detected in a large whitlockite crystal in the lunar breccia 14321 from the Fra Mauro formation. For a track-retention age of 3.95 b.y., the number of plutonium tracks relative to the number of uranium tracks is 0.51 plus or minus 0.15, provided that the rock was not heavily neutron-irradiated 3.95 b.y. ago.

  3. Elastic Properties of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez Martinez, Jaime

    Sedimentary rocks are an important research topic since such rocks are associated to sources of ground water as well as oil, gas, and mineral reservoirs. In this work, elastic and physical properties of a variety of sedimentary samples that include glacial sediments, carbonates, shales, one evaporite, and one argillite from a variety of locations are investigated. Assuming vertical transverse isotropy, ultrasonic compressional- and shear-waves (at 1 MHz central frequency) were measured as a function of confining pressure on all samples with the exception of glacial samples which were tested assuming isotropy. Tensile strength tests (Brazilian test) were also carried out on selected glacial samples and, in addition, static-train measurements were conducted on shales and argillite samples. Lithological and textural features of samples were obtained through thin section techniques, scanning electron microscopy images and micro-tomography images. X-ray diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence provided the mineralogical oxides content information. Porosity, density, and pore structure were studied by using a mercury intrusion porosimeter and a helium pycnometer. The wide range of porosities of the studied samples (ranging from a minimum of 1% for shales to a maximum 45% for some glacial sediments) influence the measured velocities since high porosity sample shows an noticeable velocity increment as confining pressure increases as a consequence of closure of microcracks and pores, unlike low porosity samples where increment is quasi-lineal. Implementation of Gassmann's relation to ultrasonic velocities obtained from glacial samples has negligible impact on them when assuming water saturated samples, which suggests that state of saturation it is no so important in defining such velocities and instead they are mainly frame-controlled. On the other hand, velocities measured on carbonate and evaporite samples show that samples are at best weak anisotropic, thus the intrinsic

  4. Effects of magmatic and metamorphic volatiles on the evolution of fluid-rock interactions and fluid pressure during contact metamorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Finite difference models of hydrothermal flow around a cooling intrusion that include fluid production from the magma during crystallization and from wall rocks during heating are used to investigate the evolution of fluid pressure and fluid-rock interactions during the contact metamorphism. For a granodiorite intrusion with a width of 9 km and releasing just 1: H[sub 2]O linearly during crystallization, fluid production elevates fluid pressures to lithostatic values above and adjacent to the intrusion when permeabilities are less than 1 [mu]D (10[sup [minus]18] m[sup 2]). Alternatively, hydrofracturing resulting from fluid production would be sufficient to create and maintain a time-averaged permeability of 1 [mu]D for 50,000 years: permeability decreases gradually with time afterward until the magma crystallizes (350,000 years). In detail, the history depends strongly on how fluids are released from the crystallizing magma. The effect is comparable to that obtained for devolatilization of 5% H[sub 2]O by weight over heating of 400 C in adjacent wall rocks. Fluid production dominates other mechanisms for elevating fluid pressures such as thermal expansion of pore fluids or ductile strain. In models with both magmatic and metamorphic fluids, fluid flow is outward from the inner aureole for much of the cooling history at wall-rock permeabilities of [le]100 [mu]D. Extensive up-temperature flow is not predicted. The evolution of flow is such that magmatic fluids can initially dominate fluid-rock interactions in a plume above the intrusion, although the timing of interaction of magmatic and metamorphic waters is sensitive to the detailed devolatilization histories. Initial pore fluids rapidly become insignificant in the overall fluid budget. Surface or external fluids infiltrate only late in the cooling history, as rocks within a few kilometers of the intrusion are cooling.

  5. Some influences of rock strength and strain rate on propagation of rock avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Rait, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are extreme and destructive mass movements in which large volumes of rock (typically >1 million cubic metres) travel at high speeds, covering large distances, and the occurrence of which is highly unpredictable. The "size effect" in rock avalanches, whereby those with larger volumes produce greater spreading efficiency (as defined by an increase in normalised runout) or lower farboschung angle (defined as the tangent of the ratio of fall height to runout length), is well known. Studies have shown that rock strength is a controlling factor in the mobility of rock avalanches - that is, mass movements involving lower strength rock are generally found to produce greater mobility as evidenced by the spread of deposits or low farboschung angle. However, there are conflicting ideas as to how and why this influence is manifested. This paper discusses different theories of rock comminution in light of numerical simulations of rock clasts undergoing normal and shear induced loading, experimental work on rock avalanche behaviour, and dynamic fracture mechanics. In doing so, we introduce the idea of thresholds of strain rate for the production of dynamic fragmentation (as opposed to pseudo-static clast crushing) that are based, inter alia, on static rock strength. To do this, we refer to data from physical models using rock analogue materials, field data on chalk cliff collapses, and field statistics from documented rock avalanches. The roles of normal and shear loading and loading rate within a rock avalanche are examined numerically using 3D Discrete Element Method models of rock clasts loaded to failure. Results may help to reconcile the observations that large rock avalanches in stronger materials tend not to fragment as much as those in weaker materials and also possess lower mobility, while small cliff collapses (typically > 1000 cubic metres) in weak chalk can exhibit rock avalanche-like behaviour at much smaller volumes.

  6. Complex igneous processes and the formation of the primitive lunar crustal rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.; Boudreau, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Crystallization of a magma ocean with initial chondritic Ca/Al and REE ratios such as proposed by Taylor and Bence (TB, 1975), is capable of producing the suite of primitive crustal rocks if the magma ocean underwent locally extensive assimilation and mixing in its upper layers as preliminary steps in formation of an anorthositic crust. Lunar anorthosites were the earliest permanent crustal rocks to form the result of multiple cycles of suspension and assimilation of plagioclase in liquids fractionating olivine and pyroxene. There may be two series of Mg-rich cumulate rocks: one which developed as a result of the equilibration of anorthositic crust with the magma ocean; the other which formed in the later stages of the magma ocean during an epoch of magma mixing and ilmenite crystallization. This second series may be related to KREEP genesis. It is noted that crystallization of the magma ocean had two components: a low pressure component which produced a highly fractionated and heterogeneous crust growing downward and a high pressure component which filled in the ocean from the bottom up, mostly with olivine and low-Ca pyroxene.

  7. Abiogenic methanogenesis in crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lollar, B.S.; Frape, S.K. ); Weise, S.M. , Neuherberg ); Fritz, P. ); Macko, S.A. ); Welhan, J.A. )

    1993-12-01

    Isotopically anomalous CH[sub 4]-rich gas deposits are found in mining sites on both the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields. With [delta][sup 13]C[sub CH4] values from -22.4 to -48.5% and [delta]D[sub CH4] values from -133 to -372%, these methane deposits cannot be accounted for by conventional processes for bacterial or thermogenic methanogenesis. Compositionally the gases are similar to other CH[sub 4]-rich gas occurrences found in Canadian and Fennoscandian shield rocks. However, the isotopically anomalous gases of this study are characterized by unexpectedly high concentrations of H[sub 2] gas, ranging from several volume percent up to 30 vol%. The H[sub 2] gases are consistently depleted in the heavy isotope, with [delta]D[sub H[sub 2

  8. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  9. On wettability of shale rocks.

    PubMed

    Roshan, H; Al-Yaseri, A Z; Sarmadivaleh, M; Iglauer, S

    2016-08-01

    The low recovery of hydraulic fracturing fluid in unconventional shale reservoirs has been in the centre of attention from both technical and environmental perspectives in the last decade. One explanation for the loss of hydraulic fracturing fluid is fluid uptake by the shale matrix; where capillarity is the dominant process controlling this uptake. Detailed understanding of the rock wettability is thus an essential step in analysis of loss of the hydraulic fracturing fluid in shale reservoirs, especially at reservoir conditions. We therefore performed a suit of contact angle measurements on a shale sample with oil and aqueous ionic solutions, and tested the influence of different ion types (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2), concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1M), pressures (0.1, 10 and 20MPa) and temperatures (35 and 70°C). Furthermore, a physical model was developed based on the diffuse double layer theory to provide a framework for the observed experimental data. Our results show that the water contact angle for bivalent ions is larger than for monovalent ions; and that the contact angle (of both oil and different aqueous ionic solutions) increases with increase in pressure and/or temperature; these increases are more pronounced at higher ionic concentrations. Finally, the developed model correctly predicted the influence of each tested variable on contact angle. Knowing contact angle and therefore wettability, the contribution of the capillary process in terms of water uptake into shale rocks and the possible impairment of hydrocarbon production due to such uptake can be quantified.

  10. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  11. Petrography, chemistry and distribution of platinum and palladium in ultramafic rocks of the Bird River Sill, SE Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theyer, P.

    1991-07-01

    The ultramafic portion of the Archean Bird River Sill, a mafic-ultramafic stratiform intrusion in southeastern Manitoba, is divided into a “lower” and an “upper” series. These series may be the product of two separate magmatic injection pulses that differ in their chemistry, mode of crystallization and petrography. The lower series consists of 80 m of ultramafic rocks and 10 m of mafic rocks. The ultramafic rocks are subdivided into ten periodic units that exhibit gradational variations in major element, sulfur, platinum and palladium concentrations concurrent with systematically evolved changes of the olivine crystal habits. The upper series is divided into a “crackle zone” and a “massive zone”. The 27 m thick crackle zone, consists of a homogeneous olivine cumulate disrupted by a network of conduits containing a fine grained groundmass and olivine crystals that exhibit hopper olivine morphology (Donaldson, 1976). The 38 m thick massive zone comprises mainly subhedral to euhedral olivine crystals hosting PGE enriched layers and chromitite layers near its stratigraphic top. The contrasting petrography, major element, sulfur, platinum and palladium distribution of the lower and the upper series are attributed to different a) parental magmas and b) emplacement mechanisms and crystallization histories.

  12. Timescales of storage and recycling of crystal mush at Krafla Volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kari M.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Eiler, John M.; Banerjee, Neil

    2016-06-01

    Processes in upper-crustal magma reservoirs such as recharge, magma mixing, recycling of previously crystallized material, and eruption affect both the physical state and the chemical composition of magmas. A growing body of evidence shows that crystals in intermediate or silicic volcanic rocks preserve records of these processes that may be obscured due to mixing in the liquid fraction of magmas. Fewer studies have focused on crystals in basaltic lavas, but these show evidence for a more subtle, but still rich record of magmatic processes. We present new 238U-230Th-226Ra data for plagioclase, combined with δ18O and trace-element measurements of the same crystal populations, from basalts erupted at Krafla Volcanic Center, Iceland. These data document the presence of multiple crystal populations within each sample, with chemical and oxygen isotope heterogeneity at a variety of scales: within individual crystals, between crystals in a given population, between crystal populations within the same sample, and between crystals in lavas erupted from different vents during the same eruption. Comparison to whole-rock or groundmass data shows that the majority of macroscopic crystals are not in trace-element or oxygen isotope equilibrium with their host liquids. The most likely explanation for these data is that the macroscopic crystals originated within a highly heterogeneous crystal mush in the shallow magma reservoir system. U-series and diffusion data indicate that the crystals (and therefore the mush) formed recently (likely within a few thousand years of eruption, and with a maximum age of 8-9 ka), and that the crystals resided in their host magma prior to eruption for decades to a few centuries at most. These data, in conjunction with other recent studies, suggest a model where erupted Icelandic magmas are the result of diverse magmas entering the crust, followed by complex interactions between melts and previously crystallized material at all crustal levels.

  13. Fracturing of Etnean and Vesuvian rocks at high temperatures and low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, Valentina; Sammonds, P. R.; Kilburn, C. R. J.

    2004-04-01

    The mechanical properties of volcanic rocks at high temperatures and low pressures are key properties in the understanding of a range of volcanological problems, in particular lava flow dynamics. The measurement of these properties on extrusive volcanic samples under the appropriate pressure and temperature conditions has a direct application in the assessment of volcanic hazards. A new triaxial deformation cell has been designed to obtain mechanical strength data on rock samples at temperatures up to 1000°C and pressures up to 30 MPa. Significantly, the cell uses large cylindrical rock specimens, 25 mm diameter by 75 mm long, never previously employed in such a high-temperature apparatus. The large specimen size is necessary to test volcanic rocks with their large crystals and vesicles. The design of this novel apparatus is presented. Its operating temperature and pressure range encompasses the conditions of an advancing flow from the vent to the front, as well as the conditions of the volcanic rocks hosting magma at equivalent depths of up to 2 km. Experimental results are presented for tests on Vesuvian and Etnean rocks. Results show that the Vesuvius and the Etnean rocks remain fully brittle up to 600°C with typical strengths of 90 MPa and 100 MPa and Young's moduli of 60 GPa and 40 GPa, respectively. Above these temperatures the elastic modulus and compressive strength decreases steadily in both the Vesuvian and Etnean rocks, reaching 10% of the original values at 900°C and 800°C, respectively, when partial melting occurred. Full melting occurs at 1100°C in the Vesuvian rock and at 1040°C in the Etnean rock. Results also show that confining pressure has only a small effect on the strength of the rock at these low pressures, and that strain rates are important at high temperatures. Fracture energy release rates have been calculated and show an inversely proportional relationship with temperature. Results reveal why fracturing is important on the crust of

  14. Rb-Sr ages of igneous rocks from the Apollo 14 mission and the age of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Internal Rb-Sr isochrons were determined on four basaltic rocks and on a basaltic clast from a breccia from the Fra Mauro landing site. An internal isochron was determined for rock 12004 and yielded a value in agreement with previous results for basaltic rocks from the Apollo 12 site. The crystallization ages for Apollo 14 basalts are only 0.2 to 0.3 AE older than were found for mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility. Assuming these leucocratic igneous rocks to be representative of the Fra Mauro site, it follows that there were major igneous processes active in these regions, and presumably throughout the highlands, at times only slightly preceding the periods at which the maria were last flooded.

  15. Correlation of rock dehydration and dynamic micro state-rate friction law to coseismic fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Shi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the coseismic fault rock dehydration and micro state-rate friction law have been explored at multi temporal scales level by using hybrid hypersingular integral equation & Lattice Boltzmann method (HHIE-LBM) under parallel CPU and GPU platform. First, seven standard rock specimens from Continental Scientific Drilling Project in China were studied. Based on the micro tomography technology, digital restructure technology and first principle, molecular scale (10nm) virtual modules, micro crystal scale (30~50nm) and meso crystals scale (2um~10um) were established, respectively. The mechanism of structural OH and molecular H2O translate through internal crystal structure, the mechanism of molecular H2O translate through crystal spaces and the supercritical water through crystal spaces and dislocations were explored and the relatively critical temperature and pressure to these specimens were obtained. The simulation results show that the diffusion, transport and dehydration energy of structural OH is two orders of magnitude than molecular H2O, and the diffusion, transport and dehydration energy of molecular H2O is one order of magnitude than supercritical water. Second, the diffusion, transport and dehydration process of structural OH, molecular H2O and supercritical water on the coseismic fault is studied and the relationship between micro dynamics friction coefficient, dehydration process and ultra temperature and pressure is presentation. The classical state and rate friction law is revised and extended micro state and rate friction law which consider the effect of fault interface rock dehydration and thermal diffusion is obtained, and these formulation will helpful understand the earthquake triggering mechanism and provide theoretical suggestion for earthquake early warning system. Key words Structural HO, molecular H2O and supercritical water, Diffusion transport and dehydration; Ultra high temperature and pressure; Developed

  16. Making "Rock Hounds" of "City Slickers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Rosario P.; Nye, Osborne

    1980-01-01

    Described are ways in which urban "rocks" (building stones, curbstones, sidewalks, etc.) can be used as resources for earth science teachers. Discussed are such activities as: classifying buildings according to rock type and mineral composition, extrapolating geologic history by examining common building materials, economics of stone industry, and…

  17. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  18. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  19. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance,"…

  20. Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: source characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keefer, D K

    1984-03-23

    Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed of intensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.