Science.gov

Sample records for rock mechanics modelling

  1. Rock Mechanics Models and Measurements Challenges from Industry. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Nelson, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    Increased mutual dependence of the economies of Canada, the United States and Mexico has now been recognized formally by agreements between the respective national governments. Noting the basic economic role of rock mechanics in the resource recovery and construction industries, it is appropriate that the First North American Rock Mechanics Symposium should confirm mutual interest in rock mechanics research and engineering practice in the neighboring countries. Different government and industrial emphases in the NAFTA countries lead to complementary strengths in their research and engineering programs. The First NARM Symposium is the first opportunity to explore thoroughly, within the scope of a single meeting, rock mechanics research in progress and engineering achievements in the three countries. Individual papers abstracted separately.

  2. Rock mechanics. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Jumikis, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Rock Mechanics, 2nd Edition deals with rock as an engineering construction material-a material with which, upon which, and within which civil engineers build structures. It thus pertains to hydraulic structures engineering; to highway, railway, canal, foundation, and tunnel engineering; and to all kinds of rock earthworks and to substructures in rock. Major changes in this new edition include: rock classification, rock types and description, rock testing equipment, rock properties, stability effects of discontinuity and gouge, grouting, gunite and shotcrete, and Lugeon's water test. This new edition also covers rock bolting and prestressing, pressure-grouted soil anchors, and rock slope stabilization.

  3. Rock and soil mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Derski, W.; Izbicki, R.; Kisiel, I.; Mroz, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Although theoretical in character, this book provides a useful source of information for those dealing with practical problems relating to rock and soil mechanics - a discipline which, in the view of the authors, attempts to apply the theory of continuum to the mechanical investigation of rock and soil media. The book is in two separate parts. The first part, embodying the first three chapters, is devoted to a description of the media of interest. Chapter 1 introduces the main argument and discusses the essence of the discipline and its links with other branches of science which are concerned, on the one hand, with technical mechanics and, on the other, with the properties, origins, and formation of rock and soil strata under natural field conditions. Chapter 2 describes mechanical models of bodies useful for the purpose of the discourse and defines the concept of the limit shear resistance of soils and rocks. Chapter 3 gives the actual properties of soils and rocks determined from experiments in laboratories and in situ. Several tests used in geotechnical engineering are described and interconnections between the physical state of rocks and soils and their rheological parameters are considered.

  4. Towards a mechanical failure model for degrading permafrost rock slopes representing changes in rock toughness and infill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamot, Philipp; Krautblatter, Michael; Scandroglio, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    The climate-induced degradation of permafrost in mountain areas can reduce the stability of rock slopes. An increasing number of rockfalls and rockslides originate from permafrost-affected rock faces. Discontinuity patterns and their geometrical and mechanical properties play a decisive role in controlling rock slope stability. Under thawing conditions the shear resistance of rock reduces due to lower friction along rock-rock contacts, decreasing fracture toughness of rock-ice contacts, diminishing fracture toughness of cohesive rock bridges and altered creep or fracture of the ice itself. Compressive strength is reduced by 20 to 50 % and tensile strength decreases by 15 to 70 % when intact saturated rock thaws (KRAUTBLATTER ET AL. 2013). Elevated water pressures in fractures can lead to reduced effective normal stresses and thus to lower shear strengths of fractures. However, the impact of degrading permafrost on the mechanical properties of intact or fractured rock still remains poorly understood. In this study, we develop a new approach for modeling the influence of degrading permafrost on the stability of high mountain rock slopes. Hereby, we focus on the effect of rock- and ice-mechanical changes along striking discontinuities onto the whole rock slope. We aim at contributing to a better rock-ice mechanical process understanding of degrading permafrost rocks. For parametrisation and subsequent calibration of our model, we chose a test site (2885 m a.s.l.) close by the Zugspitze summit in Germany. It reveals i) a potential rockslide at the south face involving 10E4m³ of rock and ii) permafrost occurrence due to ice-filled caves and fractures. Here we combine kinematic, geotechnical and thermal monitoring in the field with rock-mechanical laboratory tests and a 2D numerical failure modeling. Up to date, the following results underline the potential effects of thawing rock and fracture infill on the stability of steep rock slopes in theory and praxis: i. ERT and

  5. Hydro-mechanically coupled modelling of deep-seated rock slides in the surroundings of reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Heidrun; Preh, Alexander; Zangerl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In order to enhance the understanding of the behaviour of deep-seated rock slides in the surroundings of large dam reservoirs, this study concentrates on failure mechanisms, deformation processes and the ability of self-stabilisation of rock slides influenced by reservoirs. Particular focus is put on internal rock mass deformations, progressive topographical slope changes due to reservoir impoundment and shear displacements along the basal shear zone in relation to its shear strength properties. In this study, a two-dimensional numerical rock slide model is designed by means of the Universal Distinct Element Code UDEC and investigated concerning different groundwater flow scenarios. These include: (i) a completely drained rock slide model, (ii) a model with fully saturated rock mass below an inclined groundwater table and (iii) a saturated groundwater model with a reservoir at the slope toe. Slope displacements initiate when the shear strength properties of the basal shear zone are at or below the critical parameters for the limit-equilibrium state and continue until a numerical equilibrium is reached due to deformation- and displacement-based geometrical changes. The study focuses on the influence of a reservoir at the toe of a rock slide and tries to evaluate the degree of displacement which is needed for a re-stabilisation in relation to the geometrical characteristics of the rock slide. Besides, challenges and limitations of applied distinct element methods to simulate large strain and displacements of deep-seated rock slides are discussed. The ongoing study will help to understand the deformation behaviour of deep-seated pre-existing rock slides in fractured rock mass during initial impounding and will be part of a hazard assessment for large reservoirs.

  6. The three-dimension model for the rock-breaking mechanism of disc cutter and analysis of rock-breaking forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Huang; Sun, Fei

    2012-06-01

    To study the rock deformation with three-dimensional model under rolling forces of disc cutter, by carrying out the circular-grooving test with disc cutter rolling around on the rock, the rock mechanical behavior under rolling disc cutter is studied, the mechanical model of disc cutter rolling around the groove is established, and the theory of single-point and double-angle variables is proposed. Based on this theory, the physics equations and geometric equations of rock mechanical behavior under disc cutters of tunnel boring machine (TBM) are studied, and then the balance equations of interactive forces between disc cutter and rock are established. Accordingly, formulas about normal force, rolling force and side force of a disc cutter are derived, and their validity is studied by tests. Therefore, a new method and theory is proposed to study rock-breaking mechanism of disc cutters.

  7. Discrete element modeling of indentation tests to investigate mechanisms of CO2-related chemomechanical rock alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhuang; Espinoza, D. Nicolas; Balhoff, Matthew T.

    2016-11-01

    During CO2 injection into geological formations, petrophysical and geomechanical properties of host formations can be altered due to mineral dissolution and precipitation. Field and laboratory results have shown that sandstone and siltstone can be altered by CO2-water mixtures, but few quantitative studies have been performed to fully investigate underlying mechanisms. Based on the hypothesis that CO2-water mixtures alter the integrity of rock structure by attacking cements rather than grains, we attempt to explain the degradation of cementation due to long-term contact with CO2 and water and mechanisms for changes in rock mechanical properties. Many sandstones, including calcite-cemented quartzitic sandstone, chlorite-cemented quartzitic sandstone, and hematite-cemented quartzitic sandstone, contain interparticle cements that are more readily affected by CO2-water mixtures than grains. A model that couples the discrete element method and the bonded-particle model is used to perform simulations of indentation tests on synthetic rocks with crystal and random packings. The model is verified against the analytical cavity expansion model and validated against laboratory indentation tests on Entrada sandstone with and without CO2 alteration. Sensitivity analysis is performed for cementation microscopic parameters including stiffness, size, axial, and shear strength. The simulation results indicate that the CO2-related degradation of mechanical properties in bleached Entrada sandstone can be attributed to the reduction of cement size rather than cement strength. Our study indicates that it is possible to describe the CO2-related rock alteration through particle-scale mechanisms.

  8. Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-07-05

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

  9. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied. PMID:23997677

  10. Modeling the Progressive Failure of Jointed Rock Slope Using Fracture Mechanics and the Strength Reduction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui; Fan, Wenchen

    2015-03-01

    The fracturing process during the progressive failure of a jointed rock slope is numerically investigated by using fracture mechanics and the strength reduction method (SRM). A displacement discontinuity method containing frictional elements is developed for the calculation of the stress intensity factor (SIF). The failure initiation of the jointed rock slope is analyzed by evaluating the SIF. A new joint model is proposed by combining solid elements with interface elements in the commercial software FLAC3D. These represent the discontinuous planes in a rock mass on which sliding or separation can occur. The progressive failure process is simulated by reducing the shear strength of the rock mass, which includes the process of stress concentration, crack initiation, crack propagation, slip weakening, and coalescence of failure surfaces. The factor of safety (FS) and location of the critical failure surface are determined by the SRM. The influence of the joint inclination is investigated using the FS and the SIF. Laboratory experiments on specimens containing an inclined flaw under compression-shear stress are also conducted to investigate the effect of the angle between the shear direction and the flaw inclination, which provides an experimental explanation for the shear behavior of jointed rock. The results show that the joint inclination dominates the failure behavior of jointed rock slope, and two failure patterns have been classified.

  11. Experimental investigations for the modeling of chemo-mechanical processes of anhydritic rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Tara; Pimentel, Erich; Anagnostou, Georg

    2015-04-01

    When anhydritic rock comes into contact with water, the anhydrite dissolves and gypsum precipitates as a result of an oversaturation of the sulphate and calcium ions in the water. This anhydrite to gypsum transformation (AGT) leads to an increase in the solid volume by roughly 61% and possibly also of the pore volume, thus resulting in macroscopic swelling. In tunneling, swelling rock can cause massive damage, since it can exhibit high pressures on the lining or result in large deformations of the lining. Even though this phenomenon has already been observed more than a century ago, AGT in sulphatic rock still raises many open questions. One question we focus on is the mechanical (i.e. stress, strain) behavior of anhydritic rock during swelling. The coupled chemo-mechanical processes, i.e. the development of stresses and strains during AGT, has not been fully understood so far. A chemo-mechanical model must be considered which take anhydrite dissolution, gypsum precipitation as well as stresses and strains into account. In this contribution we present some fundamental research which was done in order to establish a relationship between AGT and the resulting or applied strains and stresses. The research contains experiments on samples consisting of anhydrite and kaolin under oedometric conditions. In order to reduce uncertainties due to swelling of clay as well as inhomogeneous compositions and structures of the natural rock samples, the experiments at the present stage of this research are performed on artificially created, reproducible samples. The samples contain 40% industrial anhydritic powder and 60% Polwhite E Chinaclay (of which the main component is kaolinite). The powders are mixed and compacted in a steel ring under high axial pressure, thus creating intact discs with a dry density of roughly 1.9 g/cm3. In a first series of Oedometer tests the swelling strain under various constant axial stress is measured until the maximal strain is reached. At the

  12. E. coli RS2GFP Retention Mechanisms in Laboratory-Scale Fractured Rocks: A Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. N.; Qu, J.; Dickson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    during the visualization experiments will help to draw conclusions regarding the retention mechanisms at play in the fractures. This paper will present a statistical model for the retention of E. coli RS2GFP in fractures as a function of aperture field characteristics and flow rate. The images of the E. coli RS2GFP travelling through the casts, in combination with direct aperture field measurements, will provide insight into the different mechanisms instrumental to particulate retention within the fractures. The results of these experiments will partially bridge the knowledge gap in fractured aquifers by furthering the understanding of transport and retention mechanisms of microorganisms within fractured rocks.

  13. A Dynamic Damage Mechanics Source Model for Explosions in Crystalline Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Bhat, H. S.; Sammis, C. G.; Rosakis, A.

    2011-12-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis [PAGEOPH, 1990] and generalized by Deshpande and Evans [J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 2008] has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative, and thus produces strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over strain rates ranging from to . This rate-dependent damage mechanics has been implemented in the ABAQUS dynamic finite element code and used to explore the effects of burn rate (loading rate) and lithostatic stress on the spatial extent of fracture damage and S waves generated by explosions in crystalline rock. Slower rise times and longer pressure pulses produce more damage and stronger S waves.

  14. A numerical model of hydro-thermo-mechanical coupling in a fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Kathleen Marie

    1996-06-01

    Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical codes with the ability to model fractured materials are used for predicting groundwater flow behavior in fractured aquifers containing thermal sources. The potential applications of such a code include the analysis of groundwater behavior within a geothermal reservoir. The capability of modeling hydro-thermo systems with a dual porosity, fracture flow model has been previously developed in the finite element code, FEHM. FEHM has been modified to include stress coupling with the dual porosity feature. FEHM has been further developed to implicitly couple the dependence of fracture hydraulic conductivity on effective stress within two dimensional, saturated aquifers containing fracture systems. The cubic law for flow between parallel plates was used to model fracture permeability. The Bartin-Bandis relationship was used to determine the fracture aperture within the cubic law. The code used a Newton Raphson iteration to implicitly solve for six unknowns at each node. Results from a model of heat flow from a reservoir to the moving fluid in a single fracture compared well with analytic results. Results of a model showing the increase in fracture flow due to a single fracture opening under fluid pressure compared well with analytic results. A hot dry rock, geothermal reservoir was modeled with realistic time steps indicating that the modified FEHM code does successfully model coupled flow problems with no convergence problems.

  15. Modeling naturally fractured reservoirs: From experimental rock mechanics to flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Margaretha Catharina Maria

    Fractures have a big impact on reservoir production but are inherently difficult to quantify. This study gives a robust and practical workflow to obtain a mechanically consistent naturally fractured reservoir model without direct sampling of the fracture network. The three tiers of the workflow are: (1) subcritical testing, (2) geomechanical modeling, and (3) flow modeling. Subcritical fracture index, a rock property, has been shown to influence fracture attributes such as length, spacing and connectivity. Subcritical tests show that the average subcritical index for sandstones in ambient air is around 62, whereas the average value for microstructurally comparable carbonates samples is 120. Thin-section analysis shows that an increase in cement content increases the subcritical index. Furthermore, sandstone samples containing more than 15% carbonate cement, sandstone samples containing more than 40% clay, and pure carbonate samples exhibit a large drop in subcritical index when the environment is changed from ambient air or oil to fresh water or brine. Geomechanical modeling has shown that the mechanical bed thickness has a large influence on fracture pattern characteristics and has the potential to overshadow fracture pattern changes due to strain level, strain anisotropy and subcritical index. Furthermore, an increase in strain anisotropy reduces the number of dominant through-going fracture sets and decreases the fracture spacing between the through-going fractures. This spacing variation not only influences the preferential drainage direction, it can also enhance the drainage efficiency, because more rock is exposed to the through-going fractures which are more likely to be intersected by a borehole. The level of detail provided by the geomechanical model greatly exceeds the level of detail normally used in reservoir simulation. Therefore, upscaling of the geomechanically generated fracture patterns is necessary for practical flow modeling. This study shows

  16. Observations, models, and mechanisms of failure of surface rocks surrounding planetary surface loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, R. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    Geophysical models of flexural stresses in an elastic lithosphere due to an axisymmetric surface load typically predict a transition with increased distance from the center of the load of radial thrust faults to strike-slip faults to concentric normal faults. These model predictions are in conflict with the absence of annular zones of strike-slip faults around prominent loads such as lunar maria, Martian volcanoes, and the Martian Tharsis rise. We suggest that this paradox arises from difficulties in relating failure criteria for brittle rocks to the stress models. Indications that model stresses are inappropriate for use in fault-type prediction include (1) tensile principal stresses larger than realistic values of rock tensile strength, and/or (2) stress differences significantly larger than those allowed by rock-strength criteria. Predictions of surface faulting that are consistent with observations can be obtained instead by using tensile and shear failure criteria, along with calculated stress differences and trajectories, with model stress states not greatly in excess of the maximum allowed by rock fracture criteria.

  17. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability

  18. Mechanisms of large rock avalanche propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Elisabeth

    2014-05-01

    Large rock avalanches present a serious mountain hazard to lifelines, infrastructure and lives. They are one of a class of low frequency, high impact events for which there is a still considerable debate over the transport mechanism. The behaviour of large rock avalanches, sometimes referred to as sturzstrom or "stream flow" after Heim, is characterised by a volumetric dependence, so that very large rock avalanches tend to travel with a greater spreading "efficiency" than smaller ones. In this work we propose a mechanism for the volumetric dependence of rock avalanche spread (or runout) in light of the ubiquitous dynamic fragmentation behaviour of brittle solids, Terzaghi's principle of effective stress as used most commonly in soil mechanics, and concepts of momentum transfer. The proposed conceptual model is based on both observations of field scale events, such as made at Elm in Switzerland, Huascaran in Peru and Falling Mountain in New Zealand, and small scale physical model experiments using analogue rock materials which have been conducted at elevated g-level so as to increase stress levels within the experiments. In particular the model aims to explain how momentum transfer between elements within a fragmenting rock avalanche mass may lead to the greater mobility or spreading efficiency that is observed at large scale and may provide insight as to the conditions needed for rock avalanche propagation and arrest.

  19. A numerical manifold method model for analyzing fully coupled hydro-mechanical processes in porous rock masses with discrete fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mengsu; Rutqvist, Jonny; Wang, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a numerical manifold method (NMM) model was developed for fully coupled analysis of hydro-mechanical (HM) processes in porous rock masses with discrete fractures. Using an NMM two-cover-mesh system of mathematical and physical covers, fractures are conveniently discretized by dividing the mathematical cover along fracture traces to physical cover, resulting in a discontinuous model on a non-conforming mesh. In this model, discrete fracture deformation (e.g. open and slip) and fracture fluid flow within a permeable and deformable porous rock matrix are rigorously considered. For porous rock, direct pore-volume coupling was modeled based on an energy-work scheme. For mechanical analysis of fractures, a fracture constitutive model for mechanically open states was introduced. For fluid flow in fractures, both along-fracture and normal-to-fracture fluid flow are modeled without introducing additional degrees of freedom. When the mechanical aperture of a fracture is changing, its hydraulic aperture and hydraulic conductivity is updated. At the same time, under the effect of coupled deformation and fluid flow, the contact state may dynamically change, and the corresponding contact constraint is updated each time step. Therefore, indirect coupling is realized under stringent considerations of coupled HM effects and fracture constitutive behavior transfer dynamically. To verify the new model, examples involving deformable porous media containing a single and two sets of fractures were designed, showing good accuracy. Last, the model was applied to analyze coupled HM behavior of fractured porous rock domains with complex fracture networks under effects of loading and injection.

  20. Discrete Element Modelling of the Influence of Reinforcement in Structurally Controlled Squeezing Mechanisms in a Hard Rock Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampinos, Efstratios; Hadjigeorgiou, John; Turcotte, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Structurally defined squeezing mechanisms in hard rock mining often result in buckling failures and large deformations. In mining drives, the primary objective is to mitigate and manage, in a cost-effective way, as opposed to arrest the deformation. This paper is a contribution to an improved understanding of the impact of several reinforcement scenarios in structurally controlled deformations in hard rock mines. The influence of reinforcement in the 3D discrete element method is explored, extending previous numerical work that has captured the squeezing buckling mechanism driven by foliation and high stresses in the selected mine site. A comprehensive strategy for explicitly modelling rock reinforcement using the DEM was developed and implemented in a series of 3D numerical models. The models were calibrated based on field testing of reinforcement and observations at the LaRonde Mine. They were used to investigate the influence of different reinforcement strategies at different deformation stages. The numerical results were in agreement with the field observations and demonstrated the practical implications of using yielding reinforcement elements. This was supported by field data where the use of yielding bolts reduced the drift convergence and rehabilitation. The methodology is applicable to other mine sites facing structurally controlled large deformations.

  1. U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics; and Conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997--July 27, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided.

  2. Reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) simulator Sym.CS: Putting together water-rock interaction, multi-phase and heat flow, composite petrophysics model, and fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, C.; Park, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Castillo, J.

    2009-12-01

    A typical CO2 sequestration scenario involves the use of multiple simulators for addressing multiphase fluid and heat flow, water-rock interaction and mass-transfer, rock mechanics, and other chemical and physical processes. The benefit of such workflow is that each model can be constrained rigorously; however, the drawback is final modeling results may achieve only a limited extent of the theoretically possible capabilities of each model. Furthermore, such an approach in modeling carbon sequestration cannot capture the nonlinearity of the various chemical and physical processes. Hence, the models can only provide guidelines for carbon sequestration processes with large margins of error. As an alternative, a simulator is being constructed by a multi-disciplinary team with the aim of implementing a large array of fundamental phenomenologies, including, but not limited to: water-rock interaction using elemental mass-balance and explicit mass-transfer and reaction coupling methods; multi-phase and heat flow, including super-critical CO2 and oil; fracture mechanics with anisotropic permeabilities; rheological rock mechanics based on incremental stress theory; and a composite petrophysics model capable of describing changing rock composition and properties. The modules representing the processes will be solved using a layered iteration method, with the goal of capturing the nonlinear feedback among all of the processes. The simulator will be constructed using proven optimization and modular, object-oriented, and service-oriented programming methods. Finally, a novel AJAX (asynchronous JavaScript and XML) user interface is being tested to host the simulator that will allow usage through an Internet browser. Currently, the water-rock interaction, composite petrophysics, and multi-phase fluid and heat flow modules are available for integration. Results of the water-rock interaction and petrophysics coupling has been used to model interaction between a CO2-charged water and

  3. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  4. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  5. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-05-31

    Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in

  6. Fundamental Study on Applicability of Powder-Based 3D Printer for Physical Modeling in Rock Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereshtenejad, Sayedalireza; Song, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Applications of 3D printing technology become more widespread in many research fields because of its rapid development and valuable capabilities. In rock mechanics and mining engineering, this technology has the potential to become a useful tool that might help implement a number of research studies previously considered impractical. Most commercial 3D printers cannot print prototypes with mechanical properties that match precisely those of natural rock samples. Therefore, some additional enhancements are required for 3D printers to be effectively utilized for rock mechanics applications. In this study, we printed and studied specimens using a powder-based commercial ZPrinter® 450 with ZP® 150 powder and Zb® 63 binder used as raw materials. The specimens printed by this 3D printer exhibited relatively low strength and ductile behavior, implying that it needs further improvements. Hence, we focused on several ways to determine the best combination of printing options and post-processing including the effects of the printing direction, printing layer thickness, binder saturation level, and heating process on the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and stress-strain behavior of the printed samples. The suggested procedures have demonstrated their effectiveness by obtaining the printed samples that behave similarly to the natural rocks with low UCS. Although our optimization methods were particularly successful, further improvements are required to expand 3D printer application in the area of rock mechanics.

  7. Rock breakage mechanisms with a PDC cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Some aspects of chip generation by a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter moving through a rock can be understood by examining the shapes of the chips and the fracture patterns in the remaining rock. Data from laboratory experiments have led to general conclusions about the uniformity of chip generation mechanisms in different kinds of rock and about crack nucleation position relative to the cutter tip. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

  9. Mechanism of the Two-Phase Flow Model for Water and Gas Based on Adsorption and Desorption in Fractured Coal and Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shikuo; Yang, Tianhong; Ranjith, P. G.; Wei, Chenhui

    2017-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is an important high-efficiency, clean-energy raw material with immense potential for application; however, its occurrence in low-permeability reservoirs limits its application. Hydraulic fracturing has been used in low-permeability CBM exploration and as a new technique for preventing gas hazards in coal mines. Fractures are the main pathways of fluid accumulation and migration, and they exert some control over the stability of rock mass. However, the differences in progression between the original fractures of the coal mass and the new discrete fractures caused by hydraulic fracturing remain unclear, and the unsaturated seepage flows require further study. Therefore, a cross-scale hydraulic fractured rock mass numerical model was developed by using the 3D fractured extrusion coupling variables reconstruction technique. This paper uses fracture surface parameters combined with the fractal dimension and multi-medium theory to provide a high-precision characterization and interpretation of the fracture mechanics. The mechanism of the permeability evolution of fractured coal and rock under stress-releasing mining combined with water injection was studied by considering gas adsorption and desorption as well as the coupling characteristic of seepage-stress in fractured rock masses. Aperture, contact area ratio, and stress in permeability and fracture development have a strong influence on the permeability and seepage path, which in turn control the effective radius by absolute water injection. All of these factors should be considered when studying the structural characteristics of rock masses.

  10. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhengrong; Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Shuang; Bolton, Edward; Bercovici, David; Ague, Jay; Karato, Shun-Ichiro; Oristaglio, Michael; Zhu, Wen-Iu; Lisabeth, Harry; Johnson, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  11. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  12. Microplane constitutive model for porous isotropic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baant, Zdenk P.; Zi, Goangseup

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with constitutive modelling of contiguous rock located between rock joints. A fully explicit kinematically constrained microplane-type constitutive model for hardening and softening non-linear triaxial behaviour of isotropic porous rock is developed. The microplane framework, in which the constitutive relation is expressed in terms of stress and strain vectors rather than tensors, makes it possible to model various microstructural physical mechanisms associated with oriented internal surfaces, such as cracking, slip, friction and splitting of a particular orientation. Formulation of the constitutive relation is facilitated by the fact that it is decoupled from the tensorial invariance restrictions, which are satisfied automatically. In its basic features, the present model is similar to the recently developed microplane model M4 for concrete, but there are significant improvements and modifications. They include a realistic simulation of (1) the effects of pore collapse on the volume changes during triaxial loading and on the reduction of frictional strength, (2) recovery of frictional strength during shearing, and (3) the shear-enhanced compaction in triaxial tests, manifested by a deviation from the hydrostatic stress-strain curve. The model is calibrated by optimal fitting of extensive triaxial test data for Salem limestone, and good fits are demonstrated. Although these data do not cover the entire range of behaviour, credence in broad capabilities of the model is lend by its similarity to model M4 for concrete - an artificial rock. The model is intended for large explicit finite-element programs.

  13. Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times.

  14. Modeling Transport of Viruses in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, B. E.; Mondal, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are frequently used for water supply for human consumption. In many instances the fractured rock aquifers are vulnerable to contamination by pathogens, including viruses, due to co-location of on-site septic systems, wastewater discharges, biosolids and agricultural activities. Approximately half of the illnesses associated with groundwater consumption in the Unites States have been attributed to viral contamination. A number of these cases have been related to transport of viruses from septic systems to drinking water wells. Despite the potential for rapid transport of viruses through rock fractures to drinking water wells, the understanding of virus transport in fractured rock is limited. In particular, the impacts of virus size, fracture aperture variability and roughness, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and geochemical conditions have not been well studied. In this study, a multidimensional model for virus transport in variable aperture fractures is presented. The model is applied to laboratory experiments on transport of virus-sized latex microspheres (0.02 and 0.2 microns) and bacteriophages (MS2 and PR772) in artificially fractured dolomite rocks. In these experiments significant impacts of particle size, fracture characteristics, groundwater velocity, and geochemistry were observed. Given the variability in aperture distribution and associated spatial variation in groundwater flow field, one-dimensional models were not suitable for a comprehensive evaluation of the mechanisms governing the microsphere and bacteriophage transport. Various relationships for virus retention (attachment and detachment) are evaluated to provide insight into the governing processes in virus transport in fractured rock. In addition, the role of virus size, fracture aperture variability, fracture roughness, fracture surface charge, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and ionic strength in virus transport are evaluated. Scale-up to the field is

  15. Mechanical changes in thawing permafrost rocks and their influence on rock stability at the Zugspitze summit, Germany - a research concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamot, Philipp; Scandroglio, Riccardo; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    strength tests as well as P-wave velocity measurements of dozens of frozen and unfrozen Zugspitze limestone samples. Our future tasks are as follows: i) To assess the spatial permafrost distribution in the slope we plan to conduct further laboratory-calibrated ERT and SRT. A dense rock temperature measuring network as well as nearby weather stations will supply input data for a simple thermal model of the rock slope. ii) To assess the spatial and temporal pattern of rock instability at the test site we will continue measuring discontinuity movements. iii) Undertaking rock-mechanical laboratory tests on Zugspitze limestone and to focus on temperature related changes of friction along rock discontinuities without ice infill and fracture toughness KIIc of intact rock bridges. These tests will be carried out with a direct shear box in unfrozen and frozen state. The measurement of P-wave velocity of the same rock samples will help to upscale rock toughness values to the rock slope at the study site. We aim at developing and calibrating a discontinuum mechanical model of stability changes in thawing permafrost rocks. Krautblatter, M., Funk, D., Günzel, F. K. (2013): Why permafrost rocks become unstable: a rock-ice-mechanical model in time and space. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 876-887.

  16. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Synchronization of Local Oscillations in a Spatial Rock-Scissors-Paper Game Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rong-Sheng; Hua, Da-Yin

    2009-08-01

    We study a spatial rock-scissors-paper model in a square lattice and a quenched small-world network. The system exhibits a global oscillation in the quenched small-world network, but the oscillation disappears in the square lattice. We find that there is a local oscillation in the square lattice the same as in the quenched small-world network. We define (where di is the density of a kind of species and langledirangle is the average value) as the variance of the oscillation amplitude in a certain local patch. It is found that s decays in a power law with an increase of the local patch size R in the square lattice σ propto R-δ, but it remains constant with an increase of the patch size in the quenched small-world network. We can speculate that in the square lattice, superposition between the local oscillations in different patches leads to global stabilization, while in the quenched small-world network, long-range interactions can synchronize the local oscillations, and their coherence results in the global oscillation.

  17. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of rocks related to induced seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Gale, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Witherspoon, P.A. and Gale, J.E., 1977. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of rocks related to induced seismicity. Eng. Geol., 11(1): 23-55. The mechanical and hydraulic properties of fractured rocks are considered with regard to the role they play in induced seismicity. In many cases, the mechanical properties of fractures determine the stability of a rock mass. The problems of sampling and testing these rock discontinuities and interpreting their non-linear behavior are reviewed. Stick slip has been proposed as the failure mechanism in earthquake events. Because of the complex interactions that are inherent in the mechanical behavior of fractured rocks, there seems to be no simple way to combine the deformation characteristics of several sets of fractures when there are significant perturbations of existing conditions. Thus, the more important fractures must be treated as individual components in the rock mass. In considering the hydraulic properties, it has been customary to treat a fracture as a parallel-plate conduit and a number of mathematical models of fracture systems have adopted this approach. Non-steady flow in fractured systems has usually been based on a two-porosity model, which assumes the primary (intergranular) porosity contributes only to storage and the secondary (fracture) porosity contributes only to the overall conductivity. Using such a model, it has been found that the time required to achieve quasi-steady state flow in a fractured reservoir is one or two orders of magnitude greater than it is in a homogeneous system. In essentially all of this work, the assumption has generally been made that the fractures are rigid. However, it is clear from a review of the mechanical and hydraulic properties that not only are fractures easily deformed but they constitute the main flow paths in many rock masses. This means that one must consider the interaction of mechanical and hydraulic effects. A considerable amount of laboratory and field data is now

  18. Some observations on the mechanism of aircraft wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.; Pi, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    A pressure scale model of Northrop F-5A was tested in NASA Ames Research Center Eleven-Foot Transonic Tunnel to simulate the wing rock oscillations in a transonic maneuver. For this purpose, a flexible model support device was designed and fabricated which allowed the model to oscillate in roll at the scaled wing rock frequency. Two tunnel entries were performed to acquire the pressure (steady state and fluctuating) and response data when the model was held fixed and when it was excited by flow to oscillate in roll. Based on these data, a limit cycle mechanism was identified which supplied energy to the aircraft model and caused the Dutch roll type oscillations, commonly called wing rock. The major origin of the fluctuating pressures which contributed to the limit cycle was traced to the wing surface leading edge stall and the subsequent lift recovery. For typical wing rock oscillations, the energy balance between the pressure work input and the energy consumed by the model aerodynamic and mechanical damping was formulated and numerical data presented.

  19. Some observations on the mechanism of aircraft wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.; Pi, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    A scale model of the Northrop F-5A was tested in NASA Ames Research Center Eleven-Foot Transonic Tunnel to simulate the wing rock oscillations in a transonic maneuver. For this purpose, a flexible model support device was designed and fabricated, which allowed the model to oscillate in roll at the scaled wing rock frequency. Two tunnel entries were performed to acquire the pressure (steady state and fluctuating) and response data when the model was held fixed and when it was excited by flow to oscillate in roll. Based on these data, a limit cycle mechanism was identified, which supplied energy to the aircraft model and caused the Dutch roll type oscillations, commonly called wing rock. The major origin of the fluctuating pressures that contributed to the limit cycle was traced to the wing surface leading edge stall and the subsequent lift recovery. For typical wing rock oscillations, the energy balance between the pressure work input and the energy consumed by the model's aerodynamic and mechanical damping was formulated and numerical data presented.

  20. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on MechanicalProperties

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2004-05-04

    We describe a general, physics-based approach to numericalreconstruction of the geometrical structure and mechanical properties ofnatural sedimentary rock in 3D. Our procedure consists of three mainsteps: sedimentation, compaction, and diagenesis, followed by theverification of rock mechanical properties. The dynamic geologicprocesses of grain sedimentation and compaction are simulated by solvinga dimensionless form of Newton's equations of motion for an ensemble ofgrains. The diagenetic rock transformation is modeled using a cementationalgorithm, which accounts for the effect of rock grain size on therelative rate of cement overgrowth. Our emphasis is on unconsolidatedsand and sandstone. The main input parameters are the grain sizedistribution, the final rock porosity, the type and amount of cement andclay minerals, and grain mechanical properties: the inter-grain frictioncoefficient, the cement strength, and the grain stiffness moduli. We usea simulated 2D Fontainebleau sandstone to obtain the grain mechanicalproperties. This Fontainebleau sandstone is also used to study theinitiation, growth, and coalescence of micro-cracks under increasingvertical stress. The box fractal dimension of the micro-crackdistribution, and its variation with the applied stress areestimated.

  1. Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft

    SciTech Connect

    Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

    1981-10-01

    Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

  2. Simulation of Electrical Transport in Rocks under Mechanical Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro da Silva, M. A.; Seixas, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Rock's electrical properties can be changed by mechanical action, especially when deformation is accompanied by micro-fracturing processes. Knowing how electrical charge is generated in inelastically deformed rocks, the nature and properties of the generated charge carriers, and their spatial distribution and propagation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of seismo-electromagnetic signals. In this work, we describe briefly a model for the numerical simulation of electrical transport in rocks under mechanical action, assuming that high and low mobility charge carriers of opposite signs can be simultaneously generated by micro-fracturing processes and recombine, diffuse and drift across the sample rock. The electrical behavior can then be described using an adaptation of the formalism applied to semiconductors. We provide simulation results on a one-dimensional lattice using finite-difference discretization. Our results show that a large mobility contrast among charge carriers allows charge separation inside the deformation region, which leads to the formation of charged layers of alternate signs. Inside these layers, rapid electric field variations are observed which can lead to the emission of electromagnetic radiation. With proper positioning of current electrodes inside the deformation region, it is possible to collect electrical current even without any applied voltage. We discuss our results in the light of available experimental results on the generation of electrical and electromagnetic signals in deformed rocks.

  3. A Preliminary Study of 3D Printing on Rock Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    3D printing is an innovative manufacturing technology that enables the printing of objects through the accumulation of successive layers. This study explores the potential application of this 3D printing technology for rock mechanics. Polylactic acid (PLA) was used as the printing material, and the specimens were constructed with a "3D Touch" printer that employs fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests and direct tensile strength (DTS) tests were performed to determine the Young's modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( υ) for these specimens. The experimental results revealed that the PLA specimens exhibited elastic to brittle behaviour in the DTS tests and exhibited elastic to plastic behaviour in the UCS tests. The influence of structural changes in the mechanical response of the printed specimen was investigated; the results indicated that the mechanical response is highly influenced by the input structures, e.g., granular structure, and lattice structure. Unfortunately, our study has demonstrated that the FDM 3D printing with PLA is unsuitable for the direct simulation of rock. However, the ability for 3D printing on manufactured rock remains appealing for researchers of rock mechanics. Additional studies should focus on the development of an appropriate substitution for the printing material (brittle and stiff) and modification of the printing technology (to print 3D grains with arbitrary shapes).

  4. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  5. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  6. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4

  7. MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

    2006-02-27

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

  8. A Refined Model for Solid Particle Rock Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momber, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    A procedure for the estimation of distribution parameters of a Weibull distribution model K 1 = f( K Ic 12/4 / σ C 23/4 ) for solid particle erosion, as recently suggested in Rock Mech Rock Eng, doi: 10.1007/s00603-014-0658-x, 2014, is derived. The procedure is based on examinations of elastic-plastically responding rocks (rhyolite, granite) and plastically responding rocks (limestone, schist). The types of response are quantified through SEM inspections of eroded surfaces. Quantitative numbers for the distribution parameter K 1 are calculated for 30 rock materials, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties. The ranking according to the parameter K 1 is related to qualitative rock classification schemes. A modified proposal for the erosion of schist due to solid particle impingement at normal incidence is introduced.

  9. Prediction of Fracture Behavior in Rock and Rock-like Materials Using Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaga, T.; Young, P.

    2009-05-01

    The study of fracture initiation and propagation in heterogeneous materials such as rock and rock-like materials are of principal interest in the field of rock mechanics and rock engineering. It is crucial to study and investigate failure prediction and safety measures in civil and mining structures. Our work offers a practical approach to predict fracture behaviour using discrete element models. In this approach, the microstructures of materials are presented through the combination of clusters of bonded particles with different inter-cluster particle and bond properties, and intra-cluster bond properties. The geometry of clusters is transferred from information available from thin sections, computed tomography (CT) images and other visual presentation of the modeled material using customized AutoCAD built-in dialog- based Visual Basic Application. Exact microstructures of the tested sample, including fractures, faults, inclusions and void spaces can be duplicated in the discrete element models. Although the microstructural fabrics of rocks and rock-like structures may have different scale, fracture formation and propagation through these materials are alike and will follow similar mechanics. Synthetic material provides an excellent condition for validating the modelling approaches, as fracture behaviours are known with the well-defined composite's properties. Calibration of the macro-properties of matrix material and inclusions (aggregates), were followed with the overall mechanical material responses calibration by adjusting the interfacial properties. The discrete element model predicted similar fracture propagation features and path as that of the real sample material. The path of the fractures and matrix-inclusion interaction was compared using computed tomography images. Initiation and fracture formation in the model and real material were compared using Acoustic Emission data. Analysing the temporal and spatial evolution of AE events, collected during the

  10. A Random Network Model of Electrical Conduction in Hydrous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Seki, M.; Katsura, T.; Ichiki, M.

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the variation in conductivity of hydrous rock during the dehydration, it is essential to comprehend the mechanism of electrical conduction network in rock. In the recent past, several attempts have been made to demonstrate the mechanism of electrical conduction network in hydrous rock. However, realistic conduction mechanism within the crustal rock and mineral is unknown and relevant theories have not been successful. The aim of our study is to quantify the electrical conduction network in the rock and/or mineral. We developed a cell-type lattice network model to evaluate the electrical conduction mechanism of fluid-mineral interaction. Using cell-type lattice model, we simulated the various electrical paths and connectivity in the rock and/or mineral sample. First, we assumed a network model consists of 100 by 100 elementary cells as matrix configuration. We also settled the current input and output layers at the edge of the lattice model. Second, we randomly generated and put the conductive and resistive cells using the scheme of Mersenne Twister. Third, we applied the current for this model and performed a great number of realization on each mineral distribution patterns explaining realistic conduction network model. Considering fractal dimensions, our model has been compared with images from Electron Probe Micro Analysis. To evaluate the distribution pattern of conductive and resistive cells quantitatively, we have determined fractal dimensions by box-counting method. Assessing the bulk conductivity change as a function of conductor ratio in the hydrous rock, the model has been examined successfully both against simulated data and experimental data.

  11. Indentation as an extrusion mechanism of lower crustal rocks: Insight from analogue and numerical modelling, application to the Eastern Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Schulmann, K.; Gapais, D.; Kermarrec, J.-J.

    2011-05-01

    Recent petrological, structural and geochronological studies of the eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) suggest a conceptual geodynamical model to explain exhumation of lower crustal (20 kbar, 800 °C) felsic rocks. The model involves indentation of a weak orogenic lower crust by an adjacent rigid mantle lithosphere, resulting in crustal-scale buckling of the weak orogenic lower/middle crust interface followed by extrusion of a ductile nappe over the rigid promontory. The hypothesis has been investigated using both analogue and numerical models. Analogue experiments using a three layer sand-silicone setup were carried out in Rennes laboratory (France). Results show that the most important features of the conceptual model can be reproduced: extrusion of lowermost silicone over the indenter and flow of horizontal viscous channel underneath a rigid lid above the actively progressing promontory. Furthermore, experimental results show that a plateau develops above the channelling lower crust. Two sets of sandbox-scale numerical simulations were performed. The first set of experiments is designed to study the influence of viscosity stratification within the crust on the extrusion process. A second set of experiments were performed in order to quantify the influence of the viscosity and the geometry of the indentor. Non-dimensional scaling laws were derived to predict the maximum extrusion rates associated with the indentation mechanism. Such laws enable the computation vertical extrusion rates that are in good agreement with natural exhumation rates inferred from petrological data. Finally, we discuss the potential positive feedback of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on vertical extrusion for the case of Eastern Bohemian Massif.

  12. Compaction bands in porous rocks: localization analysis using breakage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arghya; Nguyen, Giang; Einav, Itai

    2010-05-01

    It has been observed in fields and laboratory studies that compaction bands are formed within porous rocks and crushable granular materials (Mollema and Antonellini, 1996; Wong et al., 2001). These localization zones are oriented at high angles to the compressive maximum principal stress direction. Grain crushing and pore collapse are the integral parts of the compaction band formation; the lower porosity and increased tortuosity within such bands tend to reduce their permeability compared to the outer rock mass. Compaction bands may thereafter act as flow barriers, which can hamper the extraction or injection of fluid into the rocks. The study of compaction bands is therefore not only interesting from a geological viewpoint but has great economic importance to the extraction of oil or natural gas in the industry. In this paper, we study the formation of pure compaction bands (i.e. purely perpendicular to the principal stress direction) or shear-enhanced compaction bands (i.e. with angles close to the perpendicular) in high-porosity rocks using both numerical and analytical methods. A model based on the breakage mechanics theory (Einav, 2007a, b) is employed for the present analysis. The main aspect of this theory is that it enables to take into account the effect that changes in grain size distribution has on the constitutive stress-strain behaviour of granular materials at the microscopic level due to grain crushing. This microscopic phenomenon of grain crushing is explicitly linked with a macroscopic internal variable, called Breakage, so that the evolving grain size distribution can be continuously monitored at macro scale during the process of deformation. Through the inclusion of an appropriate parameter the model is also able to capture the effects of pore collapse on the macroscopic response. Its possession of few physically identifiable parameters is another important feature which minimises the effort of their recalibration, since those become less

  13. Probing Mechanical Properties of Rock with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations from satellites have revolutionized our crustal deformation measurement capabilities with its high spatial resolution, global coverage, and low cost. The high spatial resolution (typically 5-20 m) allows us to map many small-scale surface deformation phenomena in great detail. These include surface faulting, fissuring, fault creep, and other strain localization phenomena. Another advantage of the small-scale deformation mapping is that it can provide information about mechanical properties of near-surface rocks. Several studies have already been published on using InSAR to probe material properties of rock. Strain localizations at fault zones have been observed in co-seismic deformation fields near to large earthquakes and interpreted as expressions of weak fault zone materials that are a factor of two more compliant than the surrounding unbroken rock [Fialko et al., 2002]. Peltzer et al. [1999] argued that asymmetries in coseismic deformation patterns observed by InSAR showed evidence for non-linear elasticity, i.e. that the elastic moduli of shallow crustal material are different for compression and extension, due to small-scale cracks in the medium. This interpretation was later disputed by Funning et al. [2007], who provided an alternative explanation for observed deformation pattern based on along-strike variations in fault geometry and slip. In addition, observations and modeling of poro-elastic rebound after earthquakes have provided information about the difference in undrained and drained Poisson's ratio values of the near-surface rocks [Peltzer et al., 1996; Jónsson et al., 2003]. More recently we have used InSAR observations to put bounds on the tensional bulk strength of surface rocks. A dyke intrusion that took place in western Saudi Arabia in 2009 caused many moderate-sized earthquakes and extensive surface faulting. InSAR data of the area show that large-scale (40 km x 40 km) east

  14. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  15. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  16. Microstructure in linear elasticity and scale effects: a reconsideration of basic rock mechanics and rock fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exadaktylos, George E.; Vardoulakis, Ioannis

    2001-06-01

    An account on the role of higher order strain gradients in the mechanical behavior of elastic-perfectly brittle materials, such as rocks, is given that is based on a special grade-2 elasticity theory with surface energy as this was originated by Casal and Mindlin and further elaborated by the authors. The fundamental idea behind the theory is that the effect of the granular and polycrystalline nature of geomaterials (i.e. their microstructural features) on their macroscopic response may be modeled through the concept of volume cohesion forces, as well as surface forces rather than through intractable statistical mechanics concepts of the Boltzmann type. It is shown that the important phenomena of the localization of deformation in macroscopically homogeneous rocks under uniform tractions and of dependence of rock behavior on the specimen's dimensions, commonly known as size or scale effect, can be interpreted by using this 'non-local', higher order theory. These effects are demonstrated for the cases of the unidirectional tension test, and for the small circular hole under uniform internal pressure commonly known as the inflation test. The latter configuration can be taken as a first order approximation of the indentation test that is frequently used for the laboratory or in situ characterization of geomaterials. In addition, it is shown that the solution of the three basic crack deformation modes leads to cusping of the crack tips that is caused by the action of 'cohesive' double forces behind and very close to the tips, that tend to bring the two opposite crack lips in close contact, and further, it is demonstrated that the fracture toughness depends on the size of the crack, and thus it is not a fundamental property of the material. This latter outcome agrees with experimental results which indicate that materials with smaller cracks are more resistant to fracture than those with larger cracks.

  17. Review of Rock Joint Models

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P

    2003-06-06

    This report discusses several constitutive models for joint behavior with emphasis upon the experimental data which motivates them. Particular emphasis is placed upon data available for granite. The LDEC joint model is presented in detail and LDEC simulations using this model are compared against data from constant normal stiffness and constant normal load tests.

  18. Stochastic multiscale model for carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Biswal, B; Oren, P-E; Held, R J; Bakke, S; Hilfer, R

    2007-06-01

    A multiscale model for the diagenesis of carbonate rocks is proposed. It captures important pore scale characteristics of carbonate rocks: wide range of length scales in the pore diameters; large variability in the permeability; and strong dependence of the geometrical and transport parameters on the resolution. A pore scale microstructure of an oolithic dolostone with generic diagenetic features is successfully generated. The continuum representation of a reconstructed cubic sample of side length 2mm contains roughly 42 x 10{6} crystallites and pore diameters varying over many decades. Petrophysical parameters are computed on discretized samples of sizes up to 1000{3}. The model can be easily adapted to represent the multiscale microstructure of a wide variety of carbonate rocks.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  20. New Mechanisms of rock-bit wear in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Macini, Paolo

    1996-01-24

    This paper presents recent results of an investigation on failure mode and wear of rock-bits used to drill geothermal wells located in the area of Larderello (Italy). A new wear mechanism, conceived from drilling records and dull bit evaluation analysis, has been identified and a particular configuration of rock-bit has been developed and tested in order to reduce drilling costs. The role of high Bottom Hole Temperature (BHT) on rock-bit performances seems not yet very well understood: so far, only drillability and formation abrasiveness are generally considered to account for poor drilling performances. In this paper, the detrimental effects of high BHT on sealing and reservoir system of Friction Bearing Rock-bits (FBR) have been investigated, and a new bearing wear pattern for FBR's run in high BHT holes has been identified and further verified via laboratory inspections on dull bits. A novel interpretation of flat worn cutting structure has been derived from the above wear pattern, suggesting the design of a particular bit configuration. Test bits, designed in the light of the above criteria, have been prepared and field tested successfully. The paper reports the results of these tests, which yielded a new rock-bit application, today considered as a standad practice in Italian geothermal fields. This application suggests that the correct evaluation of rock-bit wear can help to improve the overall drilling performances and to minimize drilling problems through a better interpretation of the relationships amongst rock-bits, formation properties and downhole temperature.

  1. Mechanisms for fast flow in unsaturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin

    1998-03-01

    Although fractures in rock are well-recognized as pathways for fast percolation of water, the possibility that fast flow could occur along unsaturated fracture pathways is commonly not considered in vadose zone hydrology. In this study, two mechanisms for fast flow along unsaturated fractures were investigated, film flow and surface zone flow. The importance of fracture surface roughness was demonstrated through experiments conducted on ceramic blocks having simple surface topographies. Those experiments showed that film flow on fracture surfaces is largely due to flow along continuous surface channels which become water-filled at near-zero matric (capillary) potentials. The second mechanism, surface zone flow, is important when the permeability of the rock along fractures (fracture skin) is significantly greater than that of the bulk rock matrix. Surface zone fast flow was demonstrated through water imbibition (sorptivity) experiments. These mechanisms help explain observations of rapid solute transport in unsaturated subsurface environments.

  2. New depositional models for Cretaceous source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, E.G.; Villamil, T. )

    1993-02-01

    The Cretaceous marks one of the greatest periods of source rock development in geologic history, especially in coastal and epi-continental marine basins where the number, duration, and geographic extent of Corg-rich intervals exceeds that of oceanic basins. Large-scale factors regulating Cretaceous source rocks include sealevel, sedimentation rate/type, paleoclimate and marine thermal gradients, paleoceanography (circulation, stratification, chemistry, upwelling, nutrient supply), and surface water productivity. Marine dispositional settings favored as models for Corg concentration include silled and tectonically depressed basins, intersection of OMZ's with shallow continental seas, coastal upwelling, highly stratified shallow seas, and oceanic anoxic events (OAE's). All of these settings are thought to be characterized by stagnant, anoxic/highly dysoxic water masses above the sediment-water interface, and highly stressed benthic environments. This seemingly supported by fine lamination, spare bioturbation, high pyrite and Corg content of most source rocks. But high-resolution (cm-scale) sedimentologic, paleobiologic, and geochemical analyses of Jurassic-Cretaceous source rocks reveal, instead, dynamic benthic environments with active currents, episodically crowded with diverse life in event communities, and persistently characterized by longer term, low diversity resident benthic communities. These characteristics indicate rapidly fluctuating, predominantly dysoxic to oxic waters at and above the sediment-water interface for most Corg-rich black shales. A new model for source rock generation is proposed which retains the redox boundary at or near the sediment-water interface over large areas of seafloor, in part aided by extensive development of benthic microbial mats which may contribute up to 30% of the Corg to marine source rocks.

  3. Experimental Studies on the Mechanical Behaviour of Rock Joints with Various Openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Oh, J.; Mitra, R.; Hebblewhite, B.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanical behaviour of rough joints is markedly affected by the degree of joint opening. A systematic experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of the initial opening on both normal and shear deformations of rock joints. Two types of joints with triangular asperities were produced in the laboratory and subjected to compression tests and direct shear tests with different initial opening values. The results showed that opened rock joints allow much greater normal closure and result in much lower normal stiffness. A semi-logarithmic law incorporating the degree of interlocking is proposed to describe the normal deformation of opened rock joints. The proposed equation agrees well with the experimental results. Additionally, the results of direct shear tests demonstrated that shear strength and dilation are reduced because of reduced involvement of and increased damage to asperities in the process of shearing. The results indicate that constitutive models of rock joints that consider the true asperity contact area can be used to predict shear resistance along opened rock joints. Because rock masses are loosened and rock joints become open after excavation, the model suggested in this study can be incorporated into numerical procedures such as finite-element or discrete-element methods. Use of the model could then increase the accuracy and reliability of stability predictions for rock masses under excavation.

  4. Heterogeneities of mechanical properties in potential geothermal reservoir rocks of the North German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, D.; Philipp, S. L.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous rock properties in terms of layering and complex infrastructure of fault zones are typical phenomena in sedimentary basins such as the North German Basin. To be able to model reservoir stimulation in layered stratifications and to better adapt the drilling strategy to the rock mechanical conditions it is important to have knowledge about the effects of heterogeneous rock properties on fracture propagation and fault zone infrastructure for typical sedimentary reservoir rocks in the North German Basin. Therefore we aim at quantifying these properties by performing structural geological field studies in outcrop analogues combined with laboratory analyses. The field studies in Rotliegend sandstones (Lower Permian), the sandstones of the Middle Bunter (Lower Triassic) and the sandstones of the Upper Keuper (Upper Triassic) focus on 1) host rock fracture systems and 2) fault zone infrastructure. We analyse quantitatively the dimension, geometry, persistence and connectivity of fracture systems separately for host rocks and fault damage zones. The results show that in rocks with distinctive layering (sandstones and shales) natural fractures are often restricted to individual layers, that is, they are stratabound. The probability of fracture arrest seems to depend on the stiffness contrast between the two layers and on the thickness of the softer layer. The field studies are complemented by systematic sampling to obtain mechanical property variations caused by the layering. For the samples we measure the parameters Young's modulus, compressive and tensile strengths, elastic strain energy, density and porosity. The results show that the mechanical properties vary considerably and many samples are clearly anisotropic. That is, samples taken perpendicular to layering commonly have higher strengths but lower stiffnesses than those taken parallel to layering. We combine the results of laboratory analyses and field measurements to specify the mechanical

  5. Distributed snow and rock temperature modelling in steep rock walls using Alpine3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, Anna; Wever, Nander; Hoelzle, Martin; Phillips, Marcia; Kenner, Robert; Bavay, Mathias; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    In this study we modelled the influence of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous snow cover on the surface energy balance and thus on rock temperatures in two rugged, steep rock walls on the Gemsstock ridge in the central Swiss Alps. The heterogeneous snow depth distribution in the rock walls was introduced to the distributed, process-based energy balance model Alpine3D with a precipitation scaling method based on snow depth data measured by terrestrial laser scanning. The influence of the snow cover on rock temperatures was investigated by comparing a snow-covered model scenario (precipitation input provided by precipitation scaling) with a snow-free (zero precipitation input) one. Model uncertainties are discussed and evaluated at both the point and spatial scales against 22 near-surface rock temperature measurements and high-resolution snow depth data from winter terrestrial laser scans.In the rough rock walls, the heterogeneously distributed snow cover was moderately well reproduced by Alpine3D with mean absolute errors ranging between 0.31 and 0.81 m. However, snow cover duration was reproduced well and, consequently, near-surface rock temperatures were modelled convincingly. Uncertainties in rock temperature modelling were found to be around 1.6 °C. Errors in snow cover modelling and hence in rock temperature simulations are explained by inadequate snow settlement due to linear precipitation scaling, missing lateral heat fluxes in the rock, and by errors caused by interpolation of shortwave radiation, wind and air temperature into the rock walls.Mean annual near-surface rock temperature increases were both measured and modelled in the steep rock walls as a consequence of a thick, long-lasting snow cover. Rock temperatures were 1.3-2.5 °C higher in the shaded and sunny rock walls, while comparing snow-covered to snow-free simulations. This helps to assess the potential error made in ground temperature modelling when neglecting snow in steep bedrock.

  6. Modeling rock weathering in small watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2014-05-01

    Many mountainous watersheds are conceived as aquifer media where multiple groundwater flow systems have developed (Tóth, 1963), and as bimodal landscapes where differential weathering of bare and soil-mantled rock has occurred (Wahrhaftig, 1965). The results of a weathering algorithm (Pacheco and Van der Weijden, 2012a, 2014), which integrates topographic, hydrologic, rock structure and chemical data to calculate weathering rates at the watershed scale, validated the conceptual models in the River Sordo basin, a small watershed located in the Marão cordillera (North of Portugal). The coupling of weathering, groundwater flow and landscape evolution analyses, as accomplished in this study, is innovative and represents a remarkable achievement towards regionalization of rock weathering at the watershed scale. The River Sordo basin occupies an area of approximately 51.2 km2 and was shaped on granite and metassediment terrains between the altitudes 185-1300 m. The groundwater flow system is composed of recharge areas located at elevations >700 m, identified on the basis of δ18O data. Discharge cells comprehend terminations of local, intermediate and regional flow systems, identified on the basis of spring density patterns, infiltration depth estimates based on 87Sr/86Sr data, and spatial distributions of groundwater pH and natural mineralization. Intermediate and regional flow systems, defined where infiltration depths >125 m, develop solely along the contact zone between granites and metassediments, because fractures in this region are profound and their density is very large. Weathering is accelerated where rocks are covered by thick soils, being five times faster relative to sectors of the basin where rocks are covered by thin soils. Differential weathering of bare and soil-mantled rock is also revealed by the spatial distribution of calculated aquifer hydraulic diffusivities and groundwater travel times.

  7. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  8. 3-D models and structural analysis of rock avalanches: the study of the deformation process to better understand the propagation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, Céline; Abellan, Antonio; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Manzella, Irene

    2016-09-01

    Rock avalanches are extremely destructive and uncontrollable events that involve a great volume of material (> 106 m3) and several complex processes, and they are difficult to witness. For this reason the study of these phenomena using analog modeling and the accurate analysis of deposit structures and features of laboratory data and historic events become of great importance in the understanding of their behavior.The main objective of this research is to analyze rock avalanche dynamics and deformation process by means of a detailed structural analysis of the deposits coming from data of 3-D measurements of mass movements of different magnitudes, from decimeter level scale laboratory experiments to well-studied rock avalanches of several square kilometers' magnitude.Laboratory experiments were performed on a tilting plane on which a certain amount of a well-defined granular material is released, propagates and finally stops on a horizontal surface. The 3-D geometrical model of the deposit is then obtained using either a scan made with a 3-D digitizer (Konica Minolta VIVID 9i) or a photogrammetric method called structure from motion (SfM), which requires taking several pictures from different point of view of the object to be modeled.In order to emphasize and better detect the fault structures present in the deposits, we applied a median filter with different moving window sizes (from 3 × 3 to 9 × 9 nearest neighbors) to the 3-D datasets and a gradient operator along the direction of propagation.The application of these filters on the datasets results in (1) a precise mapping of the longitudinal and transversal displacement features observed at the surface of the deposits and (2) a more accurate interpretation of the relative movements along the deposit (i.e., normal, strike-slip, inverse faults) by using cross sections. Results show how the use of filtering techniques reveals disguised features in the original point cloud and that similar displacement patterns

  9. Modelling rock avalanche propagation onto glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosio, Rosanna; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Chen, Joanna H.; Hungr, Oldrich

    2012-07-01

    Ice-rock avalanches which occur in glacial environments are controlled by the presence of snow and ice in the moving material and by possible propagation onto icy basal surfaces. All these factors contribute to enhancing the flow mobility. Mixing with ice and snow hampers block collisions and favours dense flow behaviour. Ice melting reduces granular friction by saturation of the basal material and fluidization effects. Propagating onto glaciers offers a smooth surface with low shear resistance. This work is a review of the best documented ice-rock avalanches and focuses on evaluating their mobility for hazard analysis purposes by providing a set of calibrated cases. The rock avalanches have volumes ranging from 5*106 m3 to 25*106 m3. We replicate these events by using SPH and FEM numerical methods, assuming frictional and Voellmy basal rheologies. The Voellmy rheology best performs at replicating the landslide propagation. Among the back analyzed cases, the frictional coefficient ranges in the interval 0.03-0.1, the turbulent coefficient within 1000 m s-2-2000 m s-2. The bulk basal friction angle ranges within 2.75° and 14° with values inversely related to event volumes. Forward selection of the basal friction angle based on event volume, allows the replication of the Mount Cook ice-rock avalanche predicting a maximum runout which is less than 4% larger than observed. In the perspective of forward modelling, large uncertainty is related to the reconstruction of the post-event topographies, particularly for the sliding surface. Mixing with ice and snow reduces basal friction proportionally to ice and snow content. Pure ice has a basal friction which is reduced by about 75% than basal friction of pure rock. Melting of ice during rock avalanche propagation has been evaluated for the Sherman event. The frictional heat generated at the glacier surface results in the melting of 86.2 ± 5.9 kg m-2, which could have contributed to a minimum 20-35% (±10%) reduction of

  10. A mechanism for high wall-rock velocities in rockbursts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been reported for wall-rock velocities during rockbursts in deep gold mines that are substantially greater than ground velocities associated with the primary seismic events. Whereas varied evidence suggests that slip across a fault at the source of an event generates nearby particle velocities of, at most, several m/s, numerous observations, in nearby damaged tunnels, for instance, imply wall-rock velocities of the order of 10 m/s and greater. The common observation of slab buckling or breakouts in the sidewalls of damaged excavations suggests that slab flexure may be the mechanism for causing high rock ejection velocities. Following its formation, a sidewall slab buckles, causing the flexure to increase until the stress generated by flexure reaches the limit 5 that can be supported by the sidewall rock. I assume here that S is the uniaxial compressive strength. Once the flexural stress exceeds S, presumably due to the additional load imposed by a nearby seismic event, the slab fractures and unflexes violently. The peak wall-rock velocity v thereby generated is given by v=(3 + 1-??2/2)1 2 S/?????E for rock of density ??, Young's modulus E, and Poisson's ratio ??. Typical values of these rock properties for the deep gold mines of South Africa yield v= 26 m/s and for especially strong quartzites encountered in these same mines, v> 50m/s. Even though this slab buckling process leads to remarkably high ejection velocities and violent damage in excavations, the energy released during this failure is only a tiny fraction of that released in the primary seismic event, typically of magnitude 2 or greater.

  11. Centrifuge modeling of rocking-isolated inelastic RC bridge piers

    PubMed Central

    Loli, Marianna; Knappett, Jonathan A; Brown, Michael J; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis; Gazetas, George

    2014-01-01

    Experimental proof is provided of an unconventional seismic design concept, which is based on deliberately underdesigning shallow foundations to promote intense rocking oscillations and thereby to dramatically improve the seismic resilience of structures. Termed rocking isolation, this new seismic design philosophy is investigated through a series of dynamic centrifuge experiments on properly scaled models of a modern reinforced concrete (RC) bridge pier. The experimental method reproduces the nonlinear and inelastic response of both the soil-footing interface and the structure. To this end, a novel scale model RC (1:50 scale) that simulates reasonably well the elastic response and the failure of prototype RC elements is utilized, along with realistic representation of the soil behavior in a geotechnical centrifuge. A variety of seismic ground motions are considered as excitations. They result in consistent demonstrably beneficial performance of the rocking-isolated pier in comparison with the one designed conventionally. Seismic demand is reduced in terms of both inertial load and deck drift. Furthermore, foundation uplifting has a self-centering potential, whereas soil yielding is shown to provide a particularly effective energy dissipation mechanism, exhibiting significant resistance to cumulative damage. Thanks to such mechanisms, the rocking pier survived, with no signs of structural distress, a deleterious sequence of seismic motions that caused collapse of the conventionally designed pier. © 2014 The Authors Earthquake Engineering & Structural Dynamics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26300573

  12. Centrifuge modeling of rocking-isolated inelastic RC bridge piers.

    PubMed

    Loli, Marianna; Knappett, Jonathan A; Brown, Michael J; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis; Gazetas, George

    2014-12-01

    Experimental proof is provided of an unconventional seismic design concept, which is based on deliberately underdesigning shallow foundations to promote intense rocking oscillations and thereby to dramatically improve the seismic resilience of structures. Termed rocking isolation, this new seismic design philosophy is investigated through a series of dynamic centrifuge experiments on properly scaled models of a modern reinforced concrete (RC) bridge pier. The experimental method reproduces the nonlinear and inelastic response of both the soil-footing interface and the structure. To this end, a novel scale model RC (1:50 scale) that simulates reasonably well the elastic response and the failure of prototype RC elements is utilized, along with realistic representation of the soil behavior in a geotechnical centrifuge. A variety of seismic ground motions are considered as excitations. They result in consistent demonstrably beneficial performance of the rocking-isolated pier in comparison with the one designed conventionally. Seismic demand is reduced in terms of both inertial load and deck drift. Furthermore, foundation uplifting has a self-centering potential, whereas soil yielding is shown to provide a particularly effective energy dissipation mechanism, exhibiting significant resistance to cumulative damage. Thanks to such mechanisms, the rocking pier survived, with no signs of structural distress, a deleterious sequence of seismic motions that caused collapse of the conventionally designed pier.

  13. Characterizing and modelling 'ghost-rock' weathered limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Caroline; Goderniaux, Pascal; Deceuster, John; Poulain, Angélique; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    'Ghost-rock' karst aquifer has recently been highlighted. In this particular type of aquifer, the karst is not expressed as open conduits but consists in zones where the limestone is weathered. The in-situ weathering of limestone leaves a soft porous material called 'alterite'. The hydro-mechanical properties of this material differs significantly from those of the host rock: the weathering enhances the storage capacity and the conductivity of the rock. This type of weathered karst aquifer has never been studied from a hydrogeological point of view. In this study, we present the hydraulic characterization of such weathered zones. We also present a modelling approach derived from the common Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM) approach, but including the spatial distribution of hydrogeological properties through the weathered features, from the hard rock to the alterite, according to a weathering index. Unlike the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approaches, which enable to take into account a limited number of fractures, this new approach allows creating models including thousands of weathered features. As the properties of the alterite have to be considered at a centimeter scale, it is necessary to upscale these properties to carry out simulations over large areas. Therefore, an upscaling method was developed, taking into account the anisotropy of the weathered features. Synthetic models are built, upscaled and different hydrogeological simulations are run to validate the method. This methodology is finally tested on a real case study: the modelling of the dewatering drainage flow of an exploited quarry in a weathered karst aquifer in Belgium.

  14. Assessment of rock wool as support material for on-site sanitation: hydrodynamic and mechanical characterization.

    PubMed

    Wanko, Adrien; Laurent, Julien; Bois, Paul; Mosé, Robert; Wagner-Kocher, Christiane; Bahlouli, Nadia; Tiffay, Serge; Braun, Bouke; Provo kluit, Pieter-Willem

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes mechanical and hydrodynamic characterization of rock wool used as support material in compact filter. A double-pronged approach, based on experimental simulation of various physical states of this material was done. First of all a scanning electron microscopy observation allows to highlight the fibrous network structure, the fibres sizing distribution and the atomic absorption spectrum. The material was essentially lacunar with 97 ± 2% of void space. Static compression tests on variably saturated rock wool samples provide the fact that the strain/stress behaviours depend on both the sample conditioning and the saturation level. Results showed that water exerts plastifying effect on mechanical behaviour of rock wool. The load-displacement curves and drainage evolution under different water saturation levels allowed exhibiting hydraulic retention capacities under stress. Finally, several tracer experiments on rock wool column considering continuous and batch feeding flow regime allowed: (i) to determine the flow model for each test case and the implications for water dynamic in rock wool medium, (ii) to assess the rock wool double porosity and discuss its advantages for wastewater treatment, (iii) to analyse the benefits effect for water treatment when the high level of rock wool hydric retention was associated with the plug-flow effect, and (iv) to discuss the practical contributions for compact filter conception and management.

  15. Deformation mechanisms in a coal mine roadway in extremely swelling soft rock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Shi, Weiping; Yang, Renshu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of roadway support in swelling soft rock was one of the challenging problems during mining. For most geological conditions, combinations of two or more supporting approaches could meet the requirements of most roadways; however, in extremely swelling soft rock, combined approaches even could not control large deformations. The purpose of this work was to probe the roadway deformation mechanisms in extremely swelling soft rock. Based on the main return air-way in a coal mine, deformation monitoring and geomechanical analysis were conducted, as well as plastic zone mechanical model was analysed. Results indicated that this soft rock was potentially very swelling. When the ground stress acted alone, the support strength needed in situ was not too large and combined supporting approaches could meet this requirement; however, when this potential released, the roadway would undergo permanent deformation. When the loose zone reached 3 m within surrounding rock, remote stress p ∞ and supporting stress P presented a linear relationship. Namely, the greater the swelling stress, the more difficult it would be in roadway supporting. So in this extremely swelling soft rock, a better way to control roadway deformation was to control the releasing of surrounding rock's swelling potential.

  16. Geometric Effect of Asperities on Shear Mechanism of Rock Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Ali; Moradian, Zabihallah; Rivard, Patrice; Ballivy, Gérard; Boyd, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of changes of asperities is one of the most important ways to illustrate shear mechanism of rock joints during testing. In this paper, the changes of the role of asperities during different stages of shearing are described by using a new methodology for the characterization of the asperities. The basis of the proposed method is the examination of the three-dimensional roughness of joint surfaces scanned before and after shear testing. By defining a concept named `tiny window', the geometric model of the joint surfaces is reconstructed. Tiny windows are expressed as a function of the x and y coordinates, the height (z coordinate), and the angle of a small area of the surface. Constant normal load (CNL) direct shear tests were conducted on replica joints and, by using the proposed method, the distribution and size of contact and damaged areas were identified. Image analysis of the surfaces was used to verify the results of the proposed method. The results indicated that the proposed method is suitable for determining the size and distribution of the contact and damaged areas at any shearing stage. The geometric properties of the tiny windows in the pre-peak, peak, post-peak softening, and residual shearing stages were investigated based on their angle and height. It was found that tiny windows that face the shear direction, especially the steepest ones, have a primary role in shearing. However, due to degradation of asperities at higher normal stresses and shear displacements, some of the tiny windows that do not initially face the shear direction also come in contact. It was also observed that tiny windows with different heights participate in the shearing process, not just the highest ones. Total contact area of the joint surfaces was considered as summation of just-in-contact areas and damaged areas. The results of the proposed method indicated that considering differences between just-in-contact areas and damaged areas provide useful

  17. Effect of Rapid Thermal Cooling on Mechanical Rock Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Kemeny, John; Nickerson, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Laboratory tests have been conducted to investigate the effects of rapid thermal cooling on various rock specimens including igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. At first, various types of thermal loading were conducted: heating up to 100, 200, and 300 °C, followed by rapid cooling with a fan. In addition, multiple cyclic thermal cooling (10, 15 and 20 cycles) with a maximum temperature of only 100 °C was conducted. Experiments included edge notched disc (END) tests to determine the Mode I fracture toughness, Brazilian disc tests to determine tensile strength, seismic tests to determine P-wave velocity, and porosity tests leading to meaningful results. Even though only small changes of temperature (rapid cooling from 100 °C to room temperature) were applied, the results showed that crack growth occurred in some rock types (granite, diabase with ore veins, and KVS) while crack healing occurred in other rock types (diabase without ore veins, quartzite, and skarn). To better understand the results, 3D transient thermo-mechanical analysis was conducted using the ANSYS program. The results indicated that there was a thin region near the outside of the specimen where large tensile stresses occur and microcracking would be expected, and that there was a large area in the middle of the specimen where lower magnitude compressive stresses occur and crack closure would be expected. It was found that the more heterogeneous and more coarse-grained rock types are more likely to exhibit crack growth, while less heterogeneous and more fine-grained rocks are more likely to exhibit crack healing.

  18. Panel discussion on rock mechanics issues in repository design

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniawski, Z.T.; Kim, K.S.; Nataraja, M.

    1996-04-01

    The panel discussion was introduced by Mr. Z.T.(Richard) Bieniawski and then continued with five additional speakers. The topics covered in the discussion included rock mechanics pertaining to the design of underground facilities for the disposal of radioactive wastes and the safety of such facilities. The speakers included: Mr. Kun-Soo Kim who is a specialist in the area of rock mechanics testing during the Basalt Waste Isolation Project; Dr. Mysore Nataraja who is the senior project manager with the NRC; Dr. Michael Voegele who is the project manager for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on the Yucca Mountain Project; Dr. Edward Cording who is a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board; and Dr. Hemendra Kalia who is employed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and coordinates various activities of testing programs at the Yucca Mountain Site.

  19. Subcritical crack growth and mechanical weathering: a new consideration of how moisture influences rock erosion rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell; Hancock, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    The contributions of moisture to the mechanical aspects of rock weathering and regolith production are poorly quantified. In particular, geomorphologists have largely overlooked the role of subcritical crack growth processes in physical weathering and the fact that moisture strongly influences the rates of those processes. This influence is irrespective of the function that moisture plays in stress loading mechanisms like freezing or hydration. Here we present a simple numerical model that explores the efficacy of subcritical crack growth in granite rock subaerially exposed under a range of moisture conditions. Because most weathering-related stress loading for rocks found at, or near, Earth's surface (hereafter surface rocks) is cyclic, we modeled crack growth using a novel combination of Paris' Law and Charles' Law. This combination allowed us to apply existing empirically-derived data for the stress corrosion index of Charles' Law to fatigue cracking. For stress, we focused on the relatively straightforward case of intergranular stresses that arise during solar-induced thermal cycling by conductive heat transfer, making the assumption that such stresses represent a universal minimum weathering stress experienced by all surface rocks. Because all other tensile weathering-related stresses would be additive in the context of crack growth, however, our model can be adapted to include other stress loading mechanisms. We validated our calculations using recently published thermal-stress-induced cracking rates. Our results demonstrate that 1) weathering-induced stresses as modeled herein, and as published by others, are sufficient to propagate fractures subcritically over long timescales with or without the presence of water 2) fracture propagation rates increase exponentially with respect to moisture, specifically relative humidity 3) fracture propagation rates driven by thermal cycling are strongly dependent on the magnitude of diurnal temperature ranges and the

  20. Textural remanence - A new model of lunar rock magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, A.

    1976-01-01

    In reexamining the accumulated magnetic data on lunar rocks, several common patterns of magnetic behavior are recognized. Their joint occurrence strongly suggests a new model of lunar rock magnetism, which is based on partial preferred textural alignment of the spontaneous moments of magnetic grains without requiring the existence of ancient lunar magnetic fields. This magnetic fabric, mimetic to locally oriented petrofabric, gives rise to an apparent 'textural remanent magnetization'. In order to account for the observed intensity of 'stable remanence' in lunar rocks, only a minute fraction (0.001 to 0.00001) of the single-domain iron grains present need be preferentially aligned. Several mechanisms operating on the lunar surface, including shock and diurnal thermal cycling, appear adequate for producing the required type and degree of magnetic alignment in all lunar rock classes. The model is supported by a wide variety of direct and indirect evidence, and its predictions (e.g., regarding anisotropic susceptibility and remanence acquisition) can be experimentally tested.

  1. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  2. Discrete fracture hydromechanical model for the disturbed rock zone in a clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, D.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) fracture damage model, TOUGH-RBSN, to investigate the behavior of fracture generation and evolution in rock in the presence of perturbations to THM conditions. This model combines the capabilities of the TOUGH2 simulator to represent thermal-hydrological processes with a rigid-body-spring-network (RBSN) model, a type of discrete modeling, to treat geomechanical and fracture-damage processes. In particular, the development and evolution of fractures in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) of a clay rock, with application to high-level nuclear waste disposal, is a focus for this model development. Previously, the TOUGH-RBSN approach has been used to model fracture damage under tensile conditions as a result of desiccation shrinkage. The next phase of model testing will be application to the HG-A test being conducted at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. This test is being conducted in a 13-m long, 1-m diameter microtunnel in the Opalinus clay rock in which a test section at the far end of the microtunnel is isolated using a packer. The test is specifically targeted to observe how fluids injected into the test section penetrate into the rock, with particular emphasis on the EDZ. The HG-A microtunnel was excavated in 2005 and subsequent mapping of the tunnel surface shows preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts along zones where bedding planes are tangential to the tunnel wall and where faults intercept the tunnel. It appears that the EDZ fracture damage can be attributed to both tensile and shear fracturing mechanisms. A series of injection tests with water and gas have been performed which also show preferential invasion of the fluid pressure along the observed damage zones, as well as fracture self-sealing over time. The TOUGH-RBSN approach has been successfully applied to modeling fracture driven by predominately tensile loading, whereas only

  3. Rock mechanics. Superplastic nanofibrous slip zones control seismogenic fault friction.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Berend A; Plümper, Oliver; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Spiers, Christopher J

    2014-12-12

    Understanding the internal mechanisms controlling fault friction is crucial for understanding seismogenic slip on active faults. Displacement in such fault zones is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirrorlike) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nanogranular fault rock. We show that mirror-slip surfaces developed in experimentally simulated calcite faults consist of aligned nanogranular chains or fibers that are ductile at room conditions. These microstructures and associated frictional data suggest a fault-slip mechanism resembling classical Ashby-Verrall superplasticity, capable of producing unstable fault slip. Diffusive mass transfer in nanocrystalline calcite gouge is shown to be fast enough for this mechanism to control seismogenesis in limestone terrains. With nanogranular fault surfaces becoming increasingly recognized in crustal faults, the proposed mechanism may be generally relevant to crustal seismogenesis.

  4. A probabilistic approach to rock mechanical property characterization for nuclear waste repository design

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kunsoo; Gao, Hang

    1996-04-01

    A probabilistic approach is proposed for the characterization of host rock mechanical properties at the Yucca Mountain site. This approach helps define the probability distribution of rock properties by utilizing extreme value statistics and Monte Carlo simulation. We analyze mechanical property data of tuff obtained by the NNWSI Project to assess the utility of the methodology. The analysis indicates that laboratory measured strength and deformation data of Calico Hills and Bullfrog tuffs follow an extremal. probability distribution (the third type asymptotic distribution of the smallest values). Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to estimate rock mass deformation moduli using a one-dimensional tuff model proposed by Zimmermann and Finley. We suggest that the results of these analyses be incorporated into the repository design.

  5. Evaluation of models for estimating changes in fracture permeability due to thermo-mechanical stresses in host rock surrounding a potential repository

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Blair, S C; Shaffer, R J; Wang, H F

    1997-02-18

    We provide in this report a methodology to estimate bounds on the changes in fracture permeability due to thermal-mechanical processes associated with excavation of drifts and emplacement of waste. This report is the first milestone associated with Task A of the LLNL initiative to evaluate available methods for estimating chamges in fracture permeability surrounding drifts in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the potential repository at Yucca Mountain in response to (1) construction-induced stress changes and (2) subsequent thermal pulse effects due to waste emplacement. These results are needed for modeling changes in repository-level moisture movement and seepage.

  6. Quantifying the impact of lithology upon the mechanical properties of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, Dion

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of rock, its lithology, undoubtedly influences its deformation under natural or engineering loads. Mineral texture, micro-damage, joints, bedding planes, inclusions, unconformities and faults are all postulated to alter the mechanical response of rock on different scales and under different stressing conditions. Whilst laboratory studies have elucidated some aspects of the relationship between lithology and mechanical properties, these small-scale results are difficult to extrapolate to lithospheric scales. To augment laboratory-derived knowledge, physics-based numerical modelling is a promising avenue [3]. Bonded particle models implemented using the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) are a practical numerical laboratory to investigate the interplay between lithology and the mechanical response of rock specimens [4]. Numerical rock specimens are represented as an assembly of indivisible spherical particles connected to nearest neighbours via brittle-elastic beams which impart forces and moments upon one-another as particles move relative to each other. By applying boundary forces and solving Newton's Laws for each particle, elastic deformation and brittle failure may be simulated [2]. Each beam interaction is defined by four model parameters: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, cohesive strength and internal friction angle. Beam interactions in different subvolumes of the specimen are assigned different parameters to model different rock types or mineral assemblages. Micro-cracks, joints, unconformities and faults are geometrically incorporated by fitting particles to either side of triangulated surfaces [5]. The utility of this modelling approach is verified by reproducing analytical results from fracture mechanics (Griffith crack propagation and wing-crack formation) and results of controlled laboratory investigations. To quantify the impact of particular lithologic structures on mechanical response, a range of control experiments are

  7. Statistical Aspects of Microheterogeneous Rock Fracture: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying; Chudnovsky, Alexander; Wong, George; Dudley, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Rocks and other geomaterials are heterogeneous materials, with a well-recognized hierarchy of defects from micro-heterogeneities on the grain level to a large-scale network of cracks and layering structures. Their nature create a challenge for determining macroscopic properties, particularly for properties that are scale dependent, complicating both the property measurement and its appropriate application in modeling. This paper discusses the concept of a "representative volume", which is commonly used in modeling microheterogeneous but statistically homogeneous material by an effective homogeneous continuum. The foundation of this concept is presented, along with its limitations in dealing with properties like strength and fracture toughness that exhibit a scale effect. This limitation is illustrated with a study of brittle fracture of a concrete where it is considered a model for statistically homogeneous rock. The study includes determining a scaling rule for the scale effect in fracture toughness, and shows that the fracture of brittle materials like rocks and concrete appears in the form of highly tortuous, stochastic paths. This reflects a complex interaction between a crack and pre-existing as well as newly formed micro-defects controlled by chance, and results in a large scatter of all fracture-related parameters. This behavior suggests a synthesis of fracture mechanics with probability and statistics, and so a brief exposition of statistical fracture mechanics (SFM) that addresses the statistical aspects of fracture is also presented. SFM is a formalism that combines fracture mechanics methods with probability theory and serves as the basis for an adequate modeling of brittle fracture.

  8. Effects of bioleaching on the mechanical and chemical properties of waste rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Sheng-Hua; Wu, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Shao-Yong; Ai, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Bioleaching processes cause dramatic changes in the mechanical and chemical properties of waste rocks, and play an important role in metal recovery and dump stability. This study focused on the characteristics of waste rocks subjected to bioleaching. A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of rock properties during the bioleaching process. Mechanical behaviors of the leached waste rocks, such as failure patterns, normal stress, shear strength, and cohesion were determined through mechanical tests. The results of SEM imaging show considerable differences in the surface morphology of leached rocks located at different parts of the dump. The mineralogical content of the leached rocks reflects the extent of dissolution and precipitation during bioleaching. The dump porosity and rock size change under the effect of dissolution, precipitation, and clay transportation. The particle size of the leached rocks decreased due to the loss of rock integrity and the conversion of dry precipitation into fine particles.

  9. Modelling of deformation and recrystallisation microstructures in rocks and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Evans, Lynn A.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert; Jessell, Mark W.; Lebensohn, Ricardo; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Peternell, Mark; Piazolo, Sandra; Weikusat, Ilka; Wilson, Chris J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Microstructures both record the deformation history of a rock and strongly control its mechanical properties. As microstructures in natural rocks only show the final "post-mortem" state, geologists have attempted to simulate the development of microstructures with experiments and later numerical models. Especially in-situ experiments have given enormous insight, as time-lapse movies could reveal the full history of a microstructure. Numerical modelling is an alternative approach to simulate and follow the change in microstructure with time, unconstrained by experimental limitations. Numerical models have been applied to a range of microstructural processes, such as grain growth, dynamic recrystallisation, porphyroblast rotation, vein growth, formation of mylonitic fabrics, etc. The numerical platform "Elle" (www.elle.ws) in particular has brought progress in the simulation of microstructural development as it is specifically designed to include the competition between simultaneously operating processes. Three developments significantly improve our capability to simulate microstructural evolution: (1) model input from the mapping of crystallographic orientation with EBSD or the automatic fabric analyser, (2) measurement of grain size and crystallographic preferred orientation evolution using neutron diffraction experiments and (3) the implementation of the full-field Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) solver for modelling anisotropic crystal-plastic deformation. The latter enables the detailed modelling of stress and strain as a function of local crystallographic orientation, which has a strong effect on strain localisation such as, for example, the formation of shear bands. These models can now be compared with the temporal evolution of crystallographic orientation distributions in in-situ experiments. In the last decade, the possibility to combine experiments with numerical simulations has allowed not only verification and refinement of the numerical simulation

  10. Site study plan for routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for Routine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes routine laboratory testing to be conducted on rock samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study plan describes the early laboratory testing. Additional testing may be required and the type and scope of testing will be dependent upon the results of the early testing. This study provides for measurements of index, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical properties with tests which are standardized and used widely in geotechnical investigations. Another Site Study Plan for Nonroutine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes laboratory testing of samples from the site to determine mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermal properties by less widely used methods, many of which have been developed specifically for characterization of the site. Data from laboratory tests will be used for characterization of rock strata, design of shafts and underground facilities, and modeling of repository behavior in support of resolution of both preclosure and postclosure issues. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Modeling transport kinetics in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. R.; Ming, D. W.; Hossner, L. R.; Henninger, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient release in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock (Cp-PR) systems occurs through dissolution and cation-exchange reactions. Investigating the kinetics of these reactions expands our understanding of nutrient release processes. Research was conducted to model transport kinetics of nutrient release in Cp-PR systems. The objectives were to identify empirical models that best describe NH4, K, and P release and define diffusion-controlling processes. Materials included a Texas clinoptilolite (Cp) and North Carolina phosphate rock (PR). A continuous-flow thin-disk technique was used. Models evaluated included zero order, first order, second order, parabolic diffusion, simplified Elovich, Elovich, and power function. The power-function, Elovich, and parabolic-diffusion models adequately described NH4, K, and P release. The power-function model was preferred because of its simplicity. Models indicated nutrient release was diffusion controlled. Primary transport processes controlling nutrient release for the time span observed were probably the result of a combination of several interacting transport mechanisms.

  12. Rock thermal conductivity as key parameter for geothermal numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sipio, Eloisa; Chiesa, Sergio; Destro, Elisa; Galgaro, Antonio; Giaretta, Aurelio; Gola, Gianluca; Manzella, Adele

    2013-04-01

    The geothermal energy applications are undergoing a rapid development. However, there are still several challenges in the successful exploitation of geothermal energy resources. In particular, a special effort is required to characterize the thermal properties of the ground along with the implementation of efficient thermal energy transfer technologies. This paper focuses on understanding the quantitative contribution that geosciences can receive from the characterization of rock thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of materials is one of the main input parameters in geothermal modeling since it directly controls the steady state temperature field. An evaluation of this thermal property is required in several fields, such as Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical multiphysics analysis of frozen soils, designing ground source heat pumps plant, modeling the deep geothermal reservoirs structure, assessing the geothermal potential of subsoil. Aim of this study is to provide original rock thermal conductivity values useful for the evaluation of both low and high enthalpy resources at regional or local scale. To overcome the existing lack of thermal conductivity data of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks, a series of laboratory measurements has been performed on several samples, collected in outcrop, representative of the main lithologies of the regions included in the VIGOR Project (southern Italy). Thermal properties tests were carried out both in dry and wet conditions, using a C-Therm TCi device, operating following the Modified Transient Plane Source method.Measurements were made at standard laboratory conditions on samples both water saturated and dehydrated with a fan-forced drying oven at 70 ° C for 24 hr, for preserving the mineral assemblage and preventing the change of effective porosity. Subsequently, the samples have been stored in an air-conditioned room while bulk density, solid volume and porosity were detected. The measured thermal conductivity

  13. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  14. Analysis on the Rock-Cutter Interaction Mechanism During the TBM Tunneling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haiqing; Wang, He; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    The accurate prediction of rock cutting forces of disc cutters is crucial for tunnel boring machine (TBM) design and construction. Disc cutter wear, which affects TBM penetration performance, has frequently been found at TBM sites. By considering the operating path and wear of the disc cutter, a new model is proposed for evaluating the cutting force and wear of the disc cutter in the tunneling process. The circular path adopted herein, which is the actual running path of the TBM disc cutter, shows that the lateral force of the disc cutter is asymmetric. The lateral forces on the sides of the disc cutter are clearly different. However, traditional solutions are obtained by assuming a linear path, where the later forces are viewed as equal. To simulate the interaction between the rock and disc cutter, a simple brittle damage model for rock mass is introduced here. Based on the explicit dynamic finite element method, the cutting force acting on the rock generated by a single disc cutter is simulated. It is shown that the lateral cutting force of the disc cutter strongly affects the wear extent of disc cutter. The wear mechanism is thus underestimated by the classical model, which was obtained by linear cutting tests. The simulation results are discussed and compared with other models, and these simulation results agree well with the results of present ones.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Jointed Rock Under Compressive Loading Using X-ray Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinglei; Yang, Shengqi; Ranjith, P. G.; Zhu, Wancheng; Yang, Tianhong

    2016-03-01

    As jointed rocks consist of joints embedded within intact rock blocks, the presence and geometrical fabric of joints have a great influence on the mechanical behavior of rock. With consideration of the actual spatial shape of joints, a numerical model is proposed to investigate the fracture evolution mechanism of jointed rocks. In the proposed model, computerized tomography (CT) scanning is first used to capture the microstructure of a jointed sandstone specimen, which is artificially fabricated by loading the intact sample until the residual strength, and then digital image processing (DIP) techniques are applied to characterize the geometrical fabric of joints from the CT images. A simple vectorization method is used to convert the microstructure based on a cross-sectional image into a layer of 3-D vectorized microstructure and the overall 3-D model of the jointed sandstone including the real spatial shape of the joints is established by stacking the layers in a specific sequence. The 3-D model is then integrated into a well-established code [three-dimensional Rock Failure Process Analysis, (RFPA3D)]. Using the proposed model, a uniaxial compression test of the jointed sandstone is simulated. The results show that the presence of joints can produce tensile stress zones surrounding them, which result in the fracture of jointed rocks under a relatively small external load. In addition, the spatial shape of the joints has a great influence on the fracture process of jointed rocks.

  16. Qualitative evaluation of rock weir field performance and failure mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, David M.; Holmquist-Johnson, Christopher L.; Holburn, Elaina

    2007-01-01

    River spanning loose-rock structures provide sufficient head for irrigation diversion, permit fish passage over barriers, protect banks, stabilize degrading channels, activate side channels, reconnect floodplains, and create in-channel habitat. These structures are called by a variety of names including rock weirs, alphabet (U-, A-, V-, W-) weirs, Jhooks, and rock ramps. These structures share the common characteristics of:Loose rock construction materials (individually placed or dumped rocks with little or no concrete);Extents spanning the width of the river channel; andAn abrupt change in the water surface elevation at low flows.

  17. Modeling of the nonlinear resonant response in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Cate, James A; Shankland, Thomas J; Vakhnenko, Vyacheslav O; Vakhnenko, Oleksiy

    2009-04-03

    We suggest a model for describing a wide class of nonlinear and hysteretic effects in sedimentary rocks at longitudinal bar resonance. In particular, we explain: hysteretic behaviour of a resonance curve on both its upward and downward slopes; linear softening of resonant frequency with increase of driving level; gradual (almost logarithmic) recovery of resonant frequency after large dynamical strains; and temporal relaxation of response amplitude at fixed frequency. Starting with a suggested model, we predict the dynamical realization of end-point memory in resonating bar experiments with a cyclic frequency protocol. These theoretical findings were confirmed experimentally at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Sedimentary rocks, particularly sandstones, are distinguished by their grain structure in which each grain is much harder than the intergrain cementation material. The peculiarities of grain and pore structures give rise to a variety of remarkable nonlinear mechanical properties demonstrated by rocks, both at quasistatic and alternating dynamic loading. Thus, the hysteresis earlier established for the stress-strain relation in samples subjected to quasistatic loading-unloading cycles has also been discovered for the relation between acceleration amplitude and driving frequency in bar-shaped samples subjected to an alternating external drive that is frequency-swept through resonance. At strong drive levels there is an unusual, almost linear decrease of resonant frequency with strain amplitude, and there are long-term relaxation phenomena such as nearly logarithmic recovery (increase) of resonant frequency after the large conditioning drive has been removed. In this report we present a short sketch of a model for explaining numerous experimental observations seen in forced longitudinal oscillations of sandstone bars. According to our theory a broad set of experimental data can be understood as various aspects of the same internally consistent pattern. Furthermore

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Dynamic Properties of Intermittent Jointed Rock Models Subjected to Cyclic Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Nu-wen

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent jointed rocks, which exist in a myriad of engineering projects, are extraordinarily susceptible to cyclic loadings. Understanding the dynamic fatigue properties of jointed rocks is necessary for evaluating the stability of rock engineering structures. This study numerically investigated the influences of cyclic loading conditions (i.e., frequency, maximum stress and amplitude) and joint geometric configurations (i.e., dip angle, persistency and interspace) on the dynamic fatigue mechanisms of jointed rock models. A reduction model of stiffness and strength was first proposed, and then, sixteen cyclic uniaxial loading tests with distinct loading parameters and joint geometries were simulated. Our results indicate that the reduction model can effectively reproduce the hysteresis loops and the accumulative plastic deformation of jointed rocks in the cyclic process. Both the loading parameters and the joint geometries significantly affect the dynamic properties, including the irreversible strain, damage evolution, dynamic residual strength and fatigue life. Three failure modes of jointed rocks, which are principally controlled by joint geometries, occur in the simulations: splitting failure through the entire rock sample, sliding failure along joint planes and mixed failure, which are principally controlled by joint geometries. Furthermore, the progressive failure processes of the jointed rock samples are numerically observed, and the different loading stages can be distinguished by the relationship between the number of broken bonds and the axial stress.

  19. Comparison of input parameters regarding rock mass in analytical solution and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasitli, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Characteristics of stress redistribution around a tunnel excavated in rock are of prime importance for an efficient tunnelling operation and maintaining stability. As it is a well known fact that rock mass properties are the most important factors affecting stability together with in-situ stress field and tunnel geometry. Induced stresses and resultant deformation around a tunnel can be approximated by means of analytical solutions and application of numerical modelling. However, success of these methods depends on assumptions and input parameters which must be representative for the rock mass. However, mechanical properties of intact rock can be found by laboratory testing. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of proper representation of rock mass properties as input data for analytical solution and numerical modelling. For this purpose, intact rock data were converted into rock mass data by using the Hoek-Brown failure criterion and empirical relations. Stress-deformation analyses together with yield zone thickness determination have been carried out by using analytical solutions and numerical analyses by using FLAC3D programme. Analyses results have indicated that incomplete and incorrect design causes stability and economic problems in the tunnel. For this reason during the tunnel design analytical data and rock mass data should be used together. In addition, this study was carried out to prove theoretically that numerical modelling results should be applied to the tunnel design for the stability and for the economy of the support.

  20. Mapping the mechanical properties of rocks using automated microindentation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Pride, Steven R.

    2015-10-01

    A microindentation scanner is constructed that measures the spatial fluctuation in the elastic properties of natural rocks. This novel instrument performs automated indentation tests on the surface of a rock slab and outputs 2-D maps of the indentation modulus at submillimeter resolution. Maps obtained for clean, well-consolidated, sandstone are presented and demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument. We observe that the elastic structure of sandstones correlates well with their visual appearance. Further, we show that the probability distribution of the indentation modulus fluctuations across the slab surfaces can be modeled using a lognormal probability density function. To illustrate possible use of the data obtained with the microindentation scanner, we use roughly 10 cm × 10 cm scans with millimeter resolution over four sandstone planar slabs to numerically compute the overall drained elastic moduli for each sandstone sample. We show that such numerically computed moduli are well modeled using the multicomponent form of the Hashin-Shtrikman lower bound that employs the observed lognormal probability distribution for the mesoscopic-scale moduli (the geometric mean works almost the same). We also compute the seismic attenuation versus frequency associated with wave-induced fluid flow between the heterogeneities in the scanned sandstones and observe relatively small values for the inverse quality factor (Q-1<10-2) in the seismic frequency band 102 Hz

  1. A THC Simulator for Modeling Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Sahar; Galvan, Boris; Heinze, Thomas; Miller, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-rock interactions play an essential role in many earth processes, from a likely influence on earthquake nucleation and aftershocks, to enhanced geothermal system, carbon capture and storage (CCS), and underground nuclear waste repositories. In THC models, two-way interactions between different processes (thermal, hydraulic and chemical) are present. Fluid flow influences the permeability of the rock especially if chemical reactions are taken into account. On one hand solute concentration influences fluid properties while, on the other hand, heat can affect further chemical reactions. Estimating heat production from a naturally fractured geothermal systems remains a complex problem. Previous works are typically based on a local thermal equilibrium assumption and rarely consider the salinity. The dissolved salt in fluid affects the hydro- and thermodynamical behavior of the system by changing the hydraulic properties of the circulating fluid. Coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical models (THC) are important for investigating these processes, but what is needed is a coupling to mechanics to result in THMC models. Although similar models currently exist (e.g. PFLOTRAN), our objective here is to develop algorithms for implementation using the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computer architecture to be run on GPU clusters. To that aim, we present a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a fully coupled non-isothermal non-reactive solute flow. The thermal part of the simulation models heat transfer processes for either local thermal equilibrium or nonequilibrium cases, and coupled to a non-reactive mass transfer described by a non-linear diffusion/dispersion model. The flow process of the model includes a non-linear Darcian flow for either saturated or unsaturated scenarios. For the unsaturated case, we use the Richards' approximation for a mixture of liquid and gas phases. Relative permeability and capillary pressure are determined by the van Genuchten relations

  2. The geology and mechanics of formation of the Fort Rock Dome, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, Gary S.

    1996-01-01

    The Fort Rock Dome, a craterlike structure in northern Arizona, is the erosional product of a circular domal uplift associated with a Precambrian shear zone exposed within the crater and with Tertiary volcanism. A section of Precambrian to Quaternary rocks is described, and two Tertiary units, the Crater Pasture Formation and the Fort Rock Creek Rhyodacite, are named. A mathematical model of the doming process is developed that is consistent with the history of the Fort Rock Dome.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Mechanical Parameters of Different Rock Layers to the Stability of Coal Roadway in Soft Rock Strata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeng-hui; Wang, Wei-ming; Gao, Xin; Yan, Ji-xing

    2013-01-01

    According to the geological characteristics of Xinjiang Ili mine in western area of China, a physical model of interstratified strata composed of soft rock and hard coal seam was established. Selecting the tunnel position, deformation modulus, and strength parameters of each layer as influencing factors, the sensitivity coefficient of roadway deformation to each parameter was firstly analyzed based on a Mohr-Columb strain softening model and nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Then the effect laws of influencing factors which showed high sensitivity were further discussed. Finally, a regression model for the relationship between roadway displacements and multifactors was obtained by equivalent linear regression under multiple factors. The results show that the roadway deformation is highly sensitive to the depth of coal seam under the floor which should be considered in the layout of coal roadway; deformation modulus and strength of coal seam and floor have a great influence on the global stability of tunnel; on the contrary, roadway deformation is not sensitive to the mechanical parameters of soft roof; roadway deformation under random combinations of multi-factors can be deduced by the regression model. These conclusions provide theoretical significance to the arrangement and stability maintenance of coal roadway. PMID:24459447

  4. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  5. Modelling karst aquifer evolution in fractured, porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2016-12-01

    The removal of material in soluble rocks by physical and chemical dissolution is an important process enhancing the secondary porosity of soluble rocks. Depending on the history of the soluble rock, dissolution can occur either along fractures and bedding partings of the rock in the case of a telogenetic origin, or within the interconnected pore space in the case of eogenetic origin. In soluble rocks characterised by both fractures and pore space, dissolution in both flow compartments is possible. We investigate the dissolution of calcite both along fractures and within the pore space of a limestone rock by numerical modelling. The limestone rock is treated as fractured, porous aquifer, in which the hydraulic conductivity increases with time both for the fractures and the pore spaces. We show that enlargement of pore space by dissolution will accelerate the development of a classical fracture-dominated telogenetic karst aquifer, breakthrough occurs faster. In the case of a pore-controlled aquifer as in eogenetic rocks, enlargement of pores results in a front of enlarged pore spaces migrating into the karst aquifer, with more homogeneous enlargement around this dissolution front, and later breakthrough.

  6. An aerodynamic model for one and two degree of freedom wing rock of slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic effects due to the separated flow around slender delta wings in motion were analyzed. By combining the unsteady flow field solution with the rigid body Euler equations of motion, self-induced wing rock motion is simulated. The aerodynamic model successfully captures the qualitative characteristics of wing rock observed in experiments. For the one degree of freedom in roll case, the model is used to look into the mechanisms of wing rock and to investigate the effects of various parameters, like angle of attack, yaw angle, displacement of the separation point, and wing inertia. To investigate the roll and yaw coupling for the delta wing, an additional degree of freedom is added. However, no limit cycle was observed in the two degree of freedom case. Nonetheless, the model can be used to apply various control laws to actively control wing rock using, for example, the displacement of the leading edge vortex separation point by inboard span wise blowing.

  7. Geophysical analysis of rock glacier internal structure and implications for deformation mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentine, C. E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Speece, M. A.; Link, C. A.; Locke, W. W.; Carr, C. G.; Shaw, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    invoked to explain either a direct connection between individual transverse ridges to sub-surface structures or a specific structural regime. Our passive roof duplex faulting interpretation of GPR data at the LPRG is consistent with findings from previous studies on the internal composition and structure of rock glaciers and thus provides a testable model for improved understanding of rock glacier deformation mechanics.

  8. Determination of basic physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks from P-wave velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakuş, Askeri; Akatay, Mahmut

    2013-12-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks used as main building material in historical buildings in Diyarbakir show great diversity depending on the place of origin. Especially, earthquake studies as well as restoration jobs and civil engineers and architects who work on building dynamics need to know basic material properties of basaltic rocks that are the main building material. In this study, the basalt samples obtained from 18 different locations of the Diyarbakir area were tested in order to estimate the main material properties of basalts used in historical buildings without collecting samples from them. Subsequently, statistical relationships between the nondestructive P-wave velocity and other properties of basalts were investigated. Consequently, highly correlated models (R2 = 0.717-0.890) were obtained between P-wave velocity and density, porosity, uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio.

  9. Classification of mechanical heterogeneity of petroleum reservoir rocks optimal for radial drilling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Aleksandr; Seitova, Nargiza; Dzhafarov, Tarlan

    2013-04-01

    The radial drilling technology involves drilling lateral horizontal boreholes of small diameter and up to one hundred meters long with the possibility of placing several wells within productive petroleum reservoirs. The usage of the radial drilling involves making small diameter horizontal perforations in the rock formation by using water jet and the jet propulsion which facilitate the penetration along the rock formation. In this study was reviewed the effectiveness of water jet propulsion for different mechanical heterogeneity of rocks. Experiments were carried out to investigate the variation in water jet penetration in different rock types, such as sandstones, carbonates, conglomerates, dolomites, limestone, etc., and their mechanical variations including unconsolidated and cemented members. There were also addressed cases when the pores of the rocks were filled with different minerals including clays and quartz. It was found that the method of penetration differ for mechanical heterogeneity of rocks. The results are shown for the different types of rocks and degree of their porosity variations. The efficiency of the rock penetration obtained by dividing the energy of the jet by the volume of hole created is discussed in relation to rock types and the method of rock failure.

  10. Rock Degradation by Alkali Metals: A Possible Lunar Erosion Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Naughton, J J; Barnes, I L; Hammond, D A

    1965-08-06

    When rocks melt under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, their alkali components volatilize as metals. These metal vapors act to comminute polycrystalline rocks to their component minerals. The resultant powder is porous and loosely packed and its characteristics may be compatible with the lunar surface as revealed by the Ranger photographs. If meteorite impact or lunar volcanism has produced vaporization or areas of molten lava, alkali erosion may have given dust of this character in adjacent solid areas.

  11. An equivalent viscoelastic model for rock mass with parallel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchun; Ma, Guowei; Zhao, Jian

    2010-03-01

    An equivalent viscoelastic medium model is proposed for rock mass with parallel joints. A concept of "virtual wave source (VWS)" is proposed to take into account the wave reflections between the joints. The equivalent model can be effectively applied to analyze longitudinal wave propagation through discontinuous media with parallel joints. Parameters in the equivalent viscoelastic model are derived analytically based on longitudinal wave propagation across a single rock joint. The proposed model is then verified by applying identical incident waves to the discontinuous and equivalent viscoelastic media at one end to compare the output waves at the other end. When the wavelength of the incident wave is sufficiently long compared to the joint spacing, the effect of the VWS on wave propagation in rock mass is prominent. The results from the equivalent viscoelastic medium model are very similar to those determined from the displacement discontinuity method. Frequency dependence and joint spacing effect on the equivalent viscoelastic model and the VWS method are discussed.

  12. A theoretical derivation of the dilatancy equation for brittle rocks based on Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Huang, Houxu; Wang, Mingyang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the micro-cracks in the brittle rocks are assumed to be penny shaped and evenly distributed; the damage and dilatancy of the brittle rocks is attributed to the growth and expansion of numerous micro-cracks under the local tensile stress. A single crack's behaviour under the local tensile stress is generalized to all cracks based on the distributed damage mechanics. The relationship between the local tensile stress and the external loading is derived based on the Maxwell model. The damage factor corresponding to the external loading is represented using the p-alpha (p-α) model. A dilatancy equation that can build up a link between the external loading and the rock dilatancy is established. A test of dilatancy of a brittle rock under triaxial compression is conducted; the comparison between experimental results and our theoretical results shows good consistency.

  13. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  14. Is rock slope instability in high-mountain systems driven by topo-climatic, paraglacial or rock mechanical factors? - A question of scale!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenzehl, Karoline; Dikau, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Due to the emergent and (often non-linear) complex nature of mountain systems the key small-scale system properties responsible for rock slope instability contrast to those being dominant at larger spatial scales. This geomorphic system behaviour has major epistemological consequences for the study of rockfalls and associated form-process-relationships. As each scale requires its own scientific explanation, we cannot simply upscale bedrock-scale findings and, in turn, we cannot downscale the valley-scale knowledge to smaller phenomena. Here, we present a multi-scale study from the Turtmann Valley (Swiss Alps), that addresses rock slope properties at three different geomorphic levels: (i) regional valley scale, (ii) the hillslope scale and (iii) the bedrock scale. Using this hierarchical approach, we aim to understand the key properties of high-mountain systems responsible for rockfall initiation with respect to the resulting form-process-relationship at each scale. (i) At the valley scale (110 km2) rock slope instability was evaluated using a GIS-based modelling approach. Topo-climatic parameters, i.e. the permafrost distribution and the time since deglaciation after LGM were found to be the key variables causative for the regional-scale bedrock erosion and the storage of 62.3 - 65.3 x 106 m3 rockfall sediments in the hanging valleys (Messenzehl et al. 2015). (ii) At the hillslope scale (0.03 km2) geotechnical scanline surveys of 16 rock slopes and one-year rock temperature data of 25 ibuttons reveal that the local rockfall activity and the resulting deposition of individual talus slope landforms is mainly controlled by the specific rock mass strength with respect to the slope aspect, than being a paraglacial reaction. Permafrost might be only of secondary importance for the present-day rock mechanical state as geophysical surveys disprove the existence of frozen bedrock below 2600 m asl. (Messenzehl & Draebing 2015). (iii) At the bedrock scale (0.01 mm - 10 m) the

  15. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-11-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock.

  16. Study on the constitutive model for jointed rock mass.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Chen, Jianyun; Li, Jing; Zhao, Chunfeng; Yuan, Chenyang

    2015-01-01

    A new elasto-plastic constitutive model for jointed rock mass, which can consider the persistence ratio in different visual angle and anisotropic increase of plastic strain, is proposed. The proposed the yield strength criterion, which is anisotropic, is not only related to friction angle and cohesion of jointed rock masses at the visual angle but also related to the intersection angle between the visual angle and the directions of the principal stresses. Some numerical examples are given to analyze and verify the proposed constitutive model. The results show the proposed constitutive model has high precision to calculate displacement, stress and plastic strain and can be applied in engineering analysis.

  17. A two-stage model of fracture of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuksenko, V.; Tomilin, N.; Damaskinskaya, E.; Lockner, D.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we propose a two-stage model of rock fracture. In the first stage, cracks or local regions of failure are uncorrelated occur randomly throughout the rock in response to loading of pre-existing flaws. As damage accumulates in the rock, there is a gradual increase in the probability that large clusters of closely spaced cracks or local failure sites will develop. Based on statistical arguments, a critical density of damage will occur where clusters of flaws become large enough to lead to larger-scale failure of the rock (stage two). While crack interaction and cooperative failure is expected to occur within clusters of closely spaced cracks, the initial development of clusters is predicted based on the random variation in pre-existing Saw populations. Thus the onset of the unstable second stage in the model can be computed from the generation of random, uncorrelated damage. The proposed model incorporates notions of the kinetic (and therefore time-dependent) nature of the strength of solids as well as the discrete hierarchic structure of rocks and the flaw populations that lead to damage accumulation. The advantage offered by this model is that its salient features are valid for fracture processes occurring over a wide range of scales including earthquake processes. A notion of the rank of fracture (fracture size) is introduced, and criteria are presented for both fracture nucleation and the transition of the failure process from one scale to another.

  18. Modelling Technique for Demonstrating Gravity Collapse Structures in Jointed Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimpson, B.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a base-friction modeling technique for studying the development of collapse structures in jointed rocks. A moving belt beneath weak material is designed to simulate gravity. A description is given of the model frame construction. (Author/SA)

  19. Pore Type Classification on Carbonate Reservoir in Offshore Sarawak using Rock Physics Model and Rock Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, L. A.; Harith, Z. Z. T.

    2014-03-01

    It has been recognized that carbonate reservoirs are one of the biggest sources of hydrocarbon. Clearly, the evaluation of these reservoirs is important and critical. For rigorous reservoir characterization and performance prediction from geophysical measurements, the exact interpretation of geophysical response of different carbonate pore types is crucial. Yet, the characterization of carbonate reservoir rocks is difficult due to their complex pore systems. The significant diagenesis process and complex depositional environment makes pore systems in carbonates far more complicated than in clastics. Therefore, it is difficult to establish rock physics model for carbonate rock type. In this paper, we evaluate the possible rock physics model of 20 core plugs of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia, Sarawak. The published laboratory data of this area were used as an input to create the carbonate rock physics models. The elastic properties were analyzed to examine the validity of an existing analytical carbonate rock physics model. We integrate the Xu-Payne Differential Effective Medium (DEM) Model and the elastic modulus which was simulated from a digital carbonate rock image using Finite Element Modeling. The results of this integration matched well for the separation of carbonate pore types and sonic P-wave velocity obtained from laboratory measurement. Thus, the results of this study show that the integration of rock digital image and theoretical rock physics might improve the elastic properties prediction and useful for more advance geophysical techniques (e.g. Seismic Inversion) of carbonate reservoir in Sarawak.

  20. Digital Rock Physics: Mechanical Properties of Carbonate Core Plug at Different Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, T. F.; Jouini, M. S.; Islam, A.; Chevalier, S.; Jouiad, M.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Digital Rock Physics (DRP) is a novel technology that could be used to generate accurate, fast and cost effective special core analysis (SCAL) properties to support reservoir characterization and simulation tools. For this work, Micro-CT images at different resolutions have been used to run simulations to determine elastic properties like bulk, shear, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio of a dry carbonate core plug from Abu Dhabi reservoirs. Pre processing and segmentation of raw images is performed in FEI 3D visualization and analysis tool Avizo. Carbonates are characterized by a very complex pore-space structure and so a high degree of heterogeneity. Abaqus that is based on Finite Element Method is used to run 2D and 3D elastic simulations. Results will be compared by simulating the same core-plug in an alternative segmentation and FEM modeling environment used previously by Jouini & Vega et al. 2012 [1]. Acoustic wave propagation experiments at different confining pressures are performed in the laboratory Triaxial machine to determine the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for the same core plug. Expeirmental results are compared with numerical results. [1] Jouini, M.S. and Vega, S. 2012. Simulation of carbonate rocks elastic properties using 3D X-Ray computed tomography images based on Discrete Element Method and Finite Element Method. 46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium, Chicago, Il, USA, 24-27 June 2012.

  1. Discrete element thermomechanical modelling of rock cutting with valuation of tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a thermomechanical discrete element model of rock cutting process. The thermomechanical formulation of the discrete element method considers mechanical and thermal phenomena and their reciprocal influence. The thermal model developed for transient heat conduction problems takes into account conductive heat transfer at the contact between particles and convection on the free surface. The thermal and mechanical problems are coupled by consideration of: (1) heat generated due to friction which is calculated in the mechanical problem and passed to the thermal solution, (2) influence of thermal expansion on mechanical interaction between particles. Estimation of temperature dependent wear has been included into the contact model. The coupled problem is solved using the staggered scheme.The thermomechanical algorithm has been implemented in a discrete element program and applied to simulation of rock cutting with single pick of a dredge cutter head. Numerical results confirm good performance of the developed algorithm.

  2. Rock fracture by ice segregation: linking laboratory modelling and rock slope erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, J.

    2009-04-01

    It has been unclear until recently if ice can fracture intact bedrock subject to natural freezing regimes, or whether it simply enlarges existing fractures or does both. This question is important, because if ice segregation in bedrock permafrost is widespread, then there may be considerable potential for significantly increased rock slope instability as ice-cemented discontinuities warm and active layers thicken. Laboratory modelling has now begun to elucidate the process of ice segregation in bedrock. Laboratory experiments indicate that moist, porous rock behaves remarkably like moist, frost-susceptible soil, with both substrates experiencing ice enrichment and fracture / fissuring of near-surface permafrost. It appears that significant concentrations of segregated ice are most likely in the transition zone between the active layer and the permafrost, as a result of downward migration of water in summer and upward advance of freezing at the beginning of the winter. Laboratory modelling indicates that given adequate water supply, ice segregation produces a zone of ice-bonded fractured bedrock immediately below the permafrost table. In general, the importance of ice segregation relative to in situ volume expansion increases with decreasing thermal gradients and increasing duration of freezing. Recent theoretical developments suggest that the maximum possible disjointing pressure is governed by the temperature depression below the bulk-melting point, even in the absence of large temperature gradients, and therefore slow ice segregation in bedrock may be possible at greater depths where the frozen permeability of rock limits the actual amount of heave produced. Thus, over long timescales, ice segregation may be highly significant in frozen steep bedrock slopes where the presence of ice-rich fractured bedrock may be critically important in releasing rock falls and rock slides during climate-induced warming and permafrost degradation. With recent climate warming

  3. A New Rock Strength Criterion from Microcracking Mechanisms Which Provides Theoretical Evidence of Hybrid Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi

    2017-02-01

    A proper criterion describing when material fails is essential for deep understanding and constitutive modeling of rock damage and failure by microcracking. Physically, such a criterion should be the global effect of local mechanical response and microstructure evolution inside the material. This paper aims at deriving a new mechanisms-based failure criterion for brittle rocks, based on micromechanical unilateral damage-friction coupling analyses rather than on the basic results from the classical linear elastic fracture mechanics. The failure functions respectively describing three failure modes (purely tensile mode, tensile-shear mode as well as compressive-shear mode) are achieved in a unified upscaling framework and illustrated in the Mohr plane and also in the plane of principal stresses. The strength envelope is proved to be continuous and smooth with a compressive to tensile strength ratio dependent on material properties. Comparisons with experimental data are finally carried out. By this work, we also provide a theoretical evidence on the hybrid failure and the smooth transition from tensile failure to compressive-shear failure.

  4. Mechanical Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad M.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-01-09

    This report is being prepared under the FY14 activity FT-14LA0818069, Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-Field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations, and fulfills the Los Alamos National Laboratory deliverable M4FT-14LA08180610, which in PICS:NE is titled “Draft report, Test Plan for Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations.” Since the report is an intermediate deliverable intended as input to the eventual test plan for this test, rather than being an actual test plan, the activity title is used as the title of this document to avoid confusion as to the contents in the report. This report summarizes efforts to simulate mechanical processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report summarizes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt “, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013).

  5. Role of rock/fluid characteristics in carbon (CO2) storage and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2005-01-01

    The presentation ? Role of Rock/Fluid Characteristics in Carbon (CO2) Storage and Modeling ? was prepared for the meeting of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Houston, Tex., on April 6?7, 2005. It provides an overview of greenhouse gases, particularly CO2, and a summary of their effects on the Earth?s atmosphere. It presents methods of mitigating the effects of greenhouse gases, and the role of rock and fluid properties on CO2 storage mechanisms. It also lists factors that must be considered to adequately model CO2 storage.

  6. Modeling rock specimens through 3D printing: Tentative experiments and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Feng, Xiating; Song, Lvbo; Gong, Yahua; Zheng, Hong; Cui, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Current developments in 3D printing (3DP) technology provide the opportunity to produce rock-like specimens and geotechnical models through additive manufacturing, that is, from a file viewed with a computer to a real object. This study investigated the serviceability of 3DP products as substitutes for rock specimens and rock-type materials in experimental analysis of deformation and failure in the laboratory. These experiments were performed on two types of materials as follows: (1) compressive experiments on printed sand-powder specimens in different shapes and structures, including intact cylinders, cylinders with small holes, and cuboids with pre-existing cracks, and (2) compressive and shearing experiments on printed polylactic acid cylinders and molded shearing blocks. These tentative tests for 3DP technology have exposed its advantages in producing complicated specimens with special external forms and internal structures, the mechanical similarity of its product to rock-type material in terms of deformation and failure, and its precision in mapping shapes from the original body to the trial sample (such as a natural rock joint). These experiments and analyses also successfully demonstrate the potential and prospects of 3DP technology to assist in the deformation and failure analysis of rock-type materials, as well as in the simulation of similar material modeling experiments.

  7. Coupling photogrammetric data with DFN-DEM model for rock slope hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donze, Frederic; Scholtes, Luc; Bonilla-Sierra, Viviana; Elmouttie, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Structural and mechanical analyses of rock mass are key components for rock slope stability assessment. The complementary use of photogrammetric techniques [Poropat, 2001] and coupled DFN-DEM models [Harthong et al., 2012] provides a methodology that can be applied to complex 3D configurations. DFN-DEM formulation [Scholtès & Donzé, 2012a,b] has been chosen for modeling since it can explicitly take into account the fracture sets. Analyses conducted in 3D can produce very complex and unintuitive failure mechanisms. Therefore, a modeling strategy must be established in order to identify the key features which control the stability. For this purpose, a realistic case is presented to show the overall methodology from the photogrammetry acquisition to the mechanical modeling. By combining Sirovision and YADE Open DEM [Kozicki & Donzé, 2008, 2009], it can be shown that even for large camera to rock slope ranges (tested about one kilometer), the accuracy of the data are sufficient to assess the role of the structures on the stability of a jointed rock slope. In this case, on site stereo pairs of 2D images were taken to create 3D surface models. Then, digital identification of structural features on the unstable block zone was processed with Sirojoint software [Sirovision, 2010]. After acquiring the numerical topography, the 3D digitalized and meshed surface was imported into the YADE Open DEM platform to define the studied rock mass as a closed (manifold) volume to define the bounding volume for numerical modeling. The discontinuities were then imported as meshed planar elliptic surfaces into the model. The model was then submitted to gravity loading. During this step, high values of cohesion were assigned to the discontinuities in order to avoid failure or block displacements triggered by inertial effects. To assess the respective role of the pre-existing discontinuities in the block stability, different configurations have been tested as well as different degree of

  8. Geotechnical modeling of high-level nuclear waste disposal by rock melting

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-12-01

    A new strategy has been developed for the geotechnical modeling of nuclear waste disposal by rock melting (DRM). Three seeparate tasks were performed to reach this objective: a review of the four scenarios which have been proposed for DRM, to date; an evaluation of computer-based numerical models which could be used to analyze the mechanical, thermal, and hydraulic processes involved in DRM; and a critical review of rock mass properties which are relevant to the design and safety of waste disposal by rock melting. It is concluded that several geotechnical aspects of DRM can be studied realistically with current state-of-the-art model capabilities and knowledge of material properties. The next step in the feasibility study of DRM should be a best-estimate calculation of the four cavity-melt and canister-burial concepts. These new analyses will indicate the most critical areas for subsequent research.

  9. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory upgrades and revisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes updates and revisions to the data acquisition computer program DATAVG which has served as the basic data collection system for the Sandia National Laboratories Geomechanics Department, Rock Mechanics Laboratory since late 1992. DATAVG was first described in Event Triggered Data Acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory, [Hardy, 1993]. DATAVG has been modified to incorporate numerous user-requested enhancements and a few bug fixes. In this paper these changes to DATAVG are described.

  10. Correlating P-wave Velocity with the Physico-Mechanical Properties of Different Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2013-04-01

    In mining and civil engineering projects, physico-mechanical properties of the rock affect both the project design and the construction operation. Determination of various physico-mechanical properties of rocks is expensive and time consuming, and sometimes it is very difficult to get cores to perform direct tests to evaluate the rock mass. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relationships between the different physico-mechanical properties of the various rock types with the P-wave velocity. Measurement of P-wave velocity is relatively cheap, non-destructive and easy to carry out. In this study, representative rock mass samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks were collected from the different locations of India to obtain an empirical relation between P-wave velocity and uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength, punch shear, density, slake durability index, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, impact strength index and Schmidt hammer rebound number. A very strong correlation was found between the P-wave velocity and different physico-mechanical properties of various rock types with very high coefficients of determination. To check the sensitivity of the empirical equations, Students t test was also performed, which confirmed the validity of the proposed correlations.

  11. Systematic study of the effects of mass and time scaling techniques applied in numerical rock mechanics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Jansen, Gunnar; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling is a well established tool in rock mechanics studies investigating a wide range of problems. Implicit methods for solving linear equations have the advantage of being unconditionally stable, while explicit methods, although limited by the time step, are often used because of their limited memory demand, their scalability in parallel computing, and simple implementation of complex boundary conditions. In numerical modeling of explicit elastoplastic dynamics where the time step is limited by the material density, mass scaling techniques can be used to overcome this limit and significantly reduce computation time. While often used, the effect of mass and time scaling and how it may influence the numerical results is rarely-mentioned in publications, and choosing the right scaling technique is typically performed by trial and error. To our knowledge, no systematic studies have addressed how mass scaling might affect the numerical results. In this paper, we present results from an extensive and systematic study of the influence of mass and time scaling on the behavior of a variety of rock-mechanical models. We employ a finite difference scheme to model uniaxial and biaxial compression experiments using different mass and time scaling factors, and with physical models of increasing complexity up to a cohesion-weakening frictional-strengthening model (CWFS). We also introduce a normalized energy ratio to assist analyzing mass scaling effects. We find the tested models to be less sensitive to time scaling than to mass scaling, so mass scaling has higher potential for decreasing computational costs. However, we also demonstrate that mass scaling may lead to quantitatively wrong results, so care must be taken in interpreting stress values when mass scaling is used in complicated rock mechanics simulations. Mass scaling significantly influences the stress-strain response of numerical rocks because mass scaling acts as an artificial hardening agent on rock

  12. Rock glaciers on the run - understanding rock glacier landform evolution and recent changes from numerical flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Johann; Vieli, Andreas; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle

    2016-11-01

    Rock glaciers are landforms that form as a result of creeping mountain permafrost which have received considerable attention concerning their dynamical and thermal changes. Observed changes in rock glacier motion on seasonal to decadal timescales have been linked to ground temperature variations and related changes in landform geometries interpreted as signs of degradation due to climate warming. Despite the extensive kinematic and thermal monitoring of these creeping permafrost landforms, our understanding of the controlling factors remains limited and lacks robust quantitative models of rock glacier evolution in relation to their environmental setting. Here, we use a holistic approach to analyze the current and long-term dynamical development of two rock glaciers in the Swiss Alps. Site-specific sedimentation and ice generation rates are linked with an adapted numerical flow model for rock glaciers that couples the process chain from material deposition to rock glacier flow in order to reproduce observed rock glacier geometries and their general dynamics. Modeling experiments exploring the impact of variations in rock glacier temperature and sediment-ice supply show that these forcing processes are not sufficient to explain the currently observed short-term geometrical changes derived from multitemporal digital terrain models at the two different rock glaciers. The modeling also shows that rock glacier thickness is dominantly controlled by slope and rheology while the advance rates are mostly constrained by rates of sediment-ice supply. Furthermore, timescales of dynamical adjustment are found to be strongly linked to creep velocity. Overall, we provide a useful modeling framework for a better understanding of the dynamical response and morphological changes of rock glaciers to changes in external forcing.

  13. A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

  14. Effective stress model for partially and fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    An effective stress model which calculates the pressure-volume (P-V) and deviatoric stress response of partially and fully saturated rocks is described here. The model includes pore pressure effects on pore crushing and shear strength as well as effects of shear enhanced void collapse and shear caused dilatancy. The model can directly use tabular data for the P-V behavior of the rock solids and the water, and for the drained pore crushing behavior and shear strength, which simplifies model fitting. Phase transitions in the solids and vaporization of the water are also allowed. Use of the model is illustrated by an example of wave propagation in limestone. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Multiphysics processes in partially saturated fractured rock: Experiments and models from Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2012-09-01

    The site investigations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have provided us with an outstanding data set, one that has significantly advanced our knowledge of multiphysics processes in partially saturated fractured geological media. Such advancement was made possible, foremost, by substantial investments in multiyear field experiments that enabled the study of thermally driven multiphysics and testing of numerical models at a large spatial scale. The development of coupled-process models within the project have resulted in a number of new, advanced multiphysics numerical models that are today applied over a wide range of geoscientific research and geoengineering applications. Using such models, the potential impact of thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) multiphysics processes over the long-term (e.g., 10,000 years) could be predicted and bounded with some degree of confidence. The fact that the rock mass at Yucca Mountain is intensively fractured enabled continuum models to be used, although discontinuum models were also applied and are better suited for analyzing some issues, especially those related to predictions of rockfall within open excavations. The work showed that in situ tests (rather than small-scale laboratory experiments alone) are essential for determining appropriate input parameters for multiphysics models of fractured rocks, especially related to parameters defining how permeability might evolve under changing stress and temperature. A significant laboratory test program at Yucca Mountain also made important contributions to the field of rock mechanics, showing a unique relation between porosity and mechanical properties, a time dependency of strength that is significant for long-term excavation stability, a decreasing rock strength with sample size using very large core experiments, and a strong temperature dependency of the thermal expansion coefficient for temperatures up to 200°C. The analysis of in situ heater experiments showed that fracture

  16. Numerical investigation of the hydro-mechanical contribution to seismic attenuation in damaged rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Nele; Jänicke, Ralf; Renner, Jörg; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The investigation of hydro-mechanical processes, in particular the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media, is essential for the physical interpretation of data obtained from seismic exploration. Here, we specifically investigate attenuation processes in fluid-saturated porous rock containing fracture networks to identify effective hydro-mechanical properties by numerical simulation. The main purpose of this work is the characterization of the overall hydro-mechanical properties by computational homogenization. We determine an effective Skempton coefficient by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Fracture networks are stochastically generated to mimic geological in-situ situations. The fractures are approximated as ellipses with aspect ratios up to 1/100, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits with high permeabilities. Simulations are designed on the material scale with and without conservation of fluid mass in the control volume. Using computational homogenization approaches, we define an effective Skempton coefficient. A range of fracture networks with different characteristic properties is studied for different varieties of fractures. On the material scale we find strongly heterogeneous pressure propagation in the fracture network and the surrounding rock, respectively. The pressure diffusion is much faster in the fracture network than in the matrix, rendering the macroscopic hydro-mechanical behavior strongly time dependent. The effective Skempton coefficient converges to an ensemble-specific instantaneous value and to 1 for long-time studies. The ultimate objective of our study is to evaluate whether constraints on the structure of fracture networks can be deduced from observations of attenuation and its frequency dependence.

  17. Plant- and microbial-based mechanisms to improve the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rock: a review.

    PubMed

    Arcand, Melissa M; Schneider, Kim D

    2006-12-01

    Deficiency in plant-available phosphorus is considered to be a major limiting factor to food production in many agricultural soils. Mineral resources are necessary to restore soil phosphorus content. In regions where conventional fertilizers are not used due to cost limitations or to mitigate adverse environmental effects, local sources of phosphate rock are being increasingly recognized for potential use as alternative phosphorus fertilizers. The main obstacle associated with using directly applied ground phosphate rock is that the phosphate released is often unable to supply sufficient plant-available phosphorus for crop uptake. Plantand microbial-based mechanisms are low-cost, appropriate technologies to enhance the solubilization and increase the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rock. Common mechanisms of phosphate rock dissolution including proton and organic acid production will be reviewed for both plants and microorganisms. This review will also address possibilities for future research directions and applications to agriculture, as well as highlight ongoing research at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.

  18. Discrete/Finite Element Modelling of Rock Cutting with a TBM Disc Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labra, Carlos; Rojek, Jerzy; Oñate, Eugenio

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents advanced computer simulation of rock cutting process typical for excavation works in civil engineering. Theoretical formulation of the hybrid discrete/finite element model has been presented. The discrete and finite element methods have been used in different subdomains of a rock sample according to expected material behaviour, the part which is fractured and damaged during cutting is discretized with the discrete elements while the other part is treated as a continuous body and it is modelled using the finite element method. In this way, an optimum model is created, enabling a proper representation of the physical phenomena during cutting and efficient numerical computation. The model has been applied to simulation of the laboratory test of rock cutting with a single TBM (tunnel boring machine) disc cutter. The micromechanical parameters have been determined using the dimensionless relationships between micro- and macroscopic parameters. A number of numerical simulations of the LCM test in the unrelieved and relieved cutting modes have been performed. Numerical results have been compared with available data from in-situ measurements in a real TBM as well as with the theoretical predictions showing quite a good agreement. The numerical model has provided a new insight into the cutting mechanism enabling us to investigate the stress and pressure distribution at the tool-rock interaction. Sensitivity analysis of rock cutting performed for different parameters including disc geometry, cutting velocity, disc penetration and spacing has shown that the presented numerical model is a suitable tool for the design and optimization of rock cutting process.

  19. A rock physics model for analysis of anisotropic parameters in a shale reservoir in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Keran; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Shuangquan; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    A rock physics model is a very effective tool to describe the anisotropy and mechanical properties of rock from a seismology perspective. Compared to a conventional reservoir, modelling a shale reservoir requires us to face two main challenges in modelling: the existence of organic matter and strong anisotropy. We construct an anisotropic rock physics workflow for a typical shale reservoir in Southwest China, in which the organic matter is treated separately from other minerals by using a combination of anisotropic self-consistent approximation and the differential effective medium method. The standard deviation of the distribution function is used to model the degree of lamination of clay and kerogen. A double scan workflow is introduced to invert the probability of pore aspect ratio and lamination simultaneously, which can give us a better understanding of the shale formation. The anisotropic properties of target formation have been analysed based on the proposed model. Inverted Thomsen parameters, especially the sign of delta, are analysed in terms of the physical properties of rock physics modelling.

  20. Preliminary design and definition of field experiments for welded tuff rock mechanics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. M.

    1982-06-01

    G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site intersects the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, that has similar thermal and mechanical properties to welded tuff strata in nearby Yucca Mountain, which is considered as a site for a nuclear waste repository. A rock mechanics testing program is developed. Field data used for site characterization and repository conceptual design is investigated. This preliminary design is prepared to provide a control document for definition, implementation, operation, and evaluation activities for five rock mechanics experiments that can be placed in this geologic unit.

  1. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  2. Nonlinear creep damage constitutive model for soft rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Z.; Xie, H. Q.; He, J. D.; Xiao, M. L.; Zhuo, L.

    2017-02-01

    In some existing nonlinear creep damage models, it may be less rigorous to directly introduce a damage variable into the creep equation when the damage variable of the viscous component is a function of time or strain. In this paper, we adopt the Kachanov creep damage rate and introduce a damage variable into a rheological differential constitutive equation to derive an analytical integral solution for the creep damage equation of the Bingham model. We also propose a new nonlinear viscous component which reflects nonlinear properties related to the axial stress of soft rock in the steady-state creep stage. Furthermore, we build an improved Nishihara model by using this new component in series with the correctional Nishihara damage model that describes the accelerating creep, and deduce the rheological constitutive relation of the improved model. Based on superposition principle, we obtain the damage creep equation for conditions of both uniaxial and triaxial compression stress, and study the method for determining the model parameters. Finally, this paper presents the laboratory test results performed on mica-quartz schist in parallel with, or vertical to the schistosity direction, and applies the improved Nishihara model to the parameter identification of mica-quartz schist. Using a comparative analysis with test data, results show that the improved model has a superior ability to reflect the creep properties of soft rock in the decelerating creep stage, the steady-state creep stage, and particularly within the accelerating creep stage, in comparison with the traditional Nishihara model.

  3. Cyclic Fatigue Testing for Application for paraglacial rock slope stability modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grämiger, Lorenz; Perras, Matthew A.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Loew, Simon

    2015-04-01

    In glacial environments, rock mass damage is influenced by stress redistribution caused by glaciation and deglaciation cycles. The intact rock strength, discontinuities, stress regime and environmental factors all contribute to the mechanical behavior of the rock slope. Critically-stressed rock walls are exposed to changing boundary conditions. The effect of stress changes during deglaciation of a major glacial period is not well constrained, neither the influence of smaller stress magnitudes of repeat glacier cycles during an interglacial. In an effort to constrain numerical rock slope model input values, a laboratory testing program has been conducted to address the role of fatigue on the intact rock strength. Baseline unconfined compression and Brazilian tensile testing has been conducted on gneissic rocks from the Aletsch valley in Switzerland. The baseline testing results are used to determine load levels for cyclic fatigue compression and tension testing. In the cyclic tests the intact rock samples are taken to the load levels determined from the baseline tests and cyclic loading and unloading is conducted around the nominal load level. The stress fluctuation chosen is between 2-10 MPa, which is equivalent to a glacial loading and unloading of 200-1000m of ice. Such ice thickness change are typical for the Grosser Aletsch glacier during the Lateglacial and Holocene. During cyclic loading and unloading the amount of damage is estimated by recording the number of acoustic emission events with time. Once the acoustic emission events per cycle decrease well below initial cycling levels the load level is increased and cyclic loading is continued at the new load level. This was done for both cyclic compression and cyclic Brazilian tensile tests. The aim of the cyclic tests is to understand what degree of pre-existing damage is required such that 2-10 MPa stress fluctuations could cause crack propagation and failure of laboratory samples in long-term cyclic fatigue

  4. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  5. Effect of chemical environment and rock composition on fracture mechanics properties of reservoir lithologies in context of CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Callahan, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled chemical and mechanical response of reservoir and seal rocks to injection of CO2 have major implications on the short and long term security of sequestered carbon. Many current numerical models evaluating behavior of reservoirs and seals during and after CO2 injection in the subsurface consider chemistry and mechanics separately and use only simple mechanical stability criteria while ignoring time-dependent failure parameters. CO2 injection irreversibly alters the subsurface chemical environment which can then affect geomechanical properties on a range of time scales by altering rock mineralogy and cements through dissolution, remobilization, and precipitation. It has also been documented that geomechanical parameters such as fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical index (SCI) are sensitive to chemical environment. Double torsion fracture mechanics testing of reservoir lithologies under controlled environmental conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration show that chemical environment can measurably affect KIC and SCI. This coupled chemical-mechanical behavior is also influenced by rock composition, grains, amount and types of cement, and fabric. Fracture mechanics testing of the Aztec Sandstone, a largely silica-cemented, subarkose sandstone demonstrate it is less sensitive to chemical environment than Entrada Sandstone, a silty, clay-rich sandstone. The presence of de-ionized water lowers KIC by approximately 20% and SCI 30% in the Aztec Sandstone relative to tests performed in air, whereas the Entrada Sandstone shows reductions on the order of 70% and 90%, respectively. These results indicate that rock composition influences the chemical-mechanical response to deformation, and that the relative chemical reactivity of target reservoirs should be recognized in context of CO2 sequestration. In general, inert grains and cements such as quartz will be less sensitive to the changing subsurface environment than carbonates and clays.

  6. Earthquake-induced collapse mechanism of two types of dangerous rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Qizhi; Xue, Kang

    2016-06-01

    As the economy of China develops, an increasing number of key traffic projects have been undertaken in the west of China, where there are high, steep rock slopes. The collapse of dangerous rock masses, especially following a strong earthquake, is one of common geological disasters known in rock slope engineering. Therefore, it is important to study the collapse mechanism of dangerous rock masses induced by an earthquake and the analysis approach of its stability. This study provides a simple and convenient method to determine the collapse mechanisms of two types of dangerous rock masses (i.e. cantilever and upright) associated with the definition and calculation of the safety factor, which is based on the flexure theory of a constant-section beam by combining with the maximum tensile-stress criterion to depict the process of crack propagation caused by seismic waves. The calculation results show that there are critical crack depths in each form of the dangerous rock masses. Once the accumulated depth of the crack growth during an earthquake exceeds the critical depth, the collapse will occur. It is also demonstrated that the crack extension amount of each step is not a constant value, and is closely associated with the current accumulated crack depth. The greater the cumulative crack depth, the more easily the crack propagates. Finally, the validity and applicability of the proposed method are verified through two actual engineering examples.

  7. Integrating rock mechanics issues with repository design through design process principles and methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1996-04-01

    A good designer needs not only knowledge for designing (technical know-how that is used to generate alternative design solutions) but also must have knowledge about designing (appropriate principles and systematic methodology to follow). Concepts such as {open_quotes}design for manufacture{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}concurrent engineering{close_quotes} are widely used in the industry. In the field of rock engineering, only limited attention has been paid to the design process because design of structures in rock masses presents unique challenges to the designers as a result of the uncertainties inherent in characterization of geologic media. However, a stage has now been reached where we are be able to sufficiently characterize rock masses for engineering purposes and identify the rock mechanics issues involved but are still lacking engineering design principles and methodology to maximize our design performance. This paper discusses the principles and methodology of the engineering design process directed to integrating site characterization activities with design, construction and performance of an underground repository. Using the latest information from the Yucca Mountain Project on geology, rock mechanics and starter tunnel design, the current lack of integration is pointed out and it is shown how rock mechanics issues can be effectively interwoven with repository design through a systematic design process methodology leading to improved repository performance. In essence, the design process is seen as the use of design principles within an integrating design methodology, leading to innovative problem solving. In particular, a new concept of {open_quotes}Design for Constructibility and Performance{close_quotes} is introduced. This is discussed with respect to ten rock mechanics issues identified for repository design and performance.

  8. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    1989-03-21

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

  9. Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  10. The Effect of Scale on the Mechanical Properties of Jointed Rock Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E

    2004-05-24

    These notes were prepared for presentation at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's (DTRA) Hard Target Research and Analysis Center (HTRAC), at the occasion of a short course held on June 14-15, 2004. The material is intended for analysts who must evaluate the geo-mechanical characteristics of sites of interest, in order to provide appropriate input to calculations of ground shock effects on underground facilities in rock masses. These analysts are associated with the Interagency Geotechnical Assessment Team (IGAT). Because geological discontinuities introduce scale effects on the mechanical properties of rock formations, these large-scale properties cannot be estimated on the basis of tests on small cores.

  11. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-01-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock. In order to learn more about the response of hard rock to underground nuclear explosions, we have attempted to model the PILEDRIVER event. PILEDRIVER was fired on June 2, 1966 in the granite stock of Area 15 at the Nevada Test Site. The working point was at a depth of 462.7 m and the yield was determined to be 61 kt. Numerous surface, sub-surface and free-field measurements were made and analyzed by SRI. An attempt was made to determine the contribution of spall to the teleseismic signal, but proved unsuccessful because most of the data from below-shot-level gauges was lost. Nonetheless, there is quite a bit of good quality data from a variety of locations. We have been able to obtain relatively good agreement with the experimental PILEDRIVER waveforms. In order to do so, we had to model the granodiorite as being considerably weaker than good quality'' granite, and it had to undergo considerable weakening due to shock damage as well. In addition, the near-surface layers had to be modeled as being weak and compressible and as have a much lower sound speed than the material at depth. The is consistent with a fractured and jointed material at depth, and a weathered material near the surface.

  12. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-05-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock. In order to learn more about the response of hard rock to underground nuclear explosions, we have attempted to model the PILEDRIVER event. PILEDRIVER was fired on June 2, 1966 in the granite stock of Area 15 at the Nevada Test Site. The working point was at a depth of 462.7 m and the yield was determined to be 61 kt. Numerous surface, sub-surface and free-field measurements were made and analyzed by SRI. An attempt was made to determine the contribution of spall to the teleseismic signal, but proved unsuccessful because most of the data from below-shot-level gauges was lost. Nonetheless, there is quite a bit of good quality data from a variety of locations. We have been able to obtain relatively good agreement with the experimental PILEDRIVER waveforms. In order to do so, we had to model the granodiorite as being considerably weaker than ``good quality`` granite, and it had to undergo considerable weakening due to shock damage as well. In addition, the near-surface layers had to be modeled as being weak and compressible and as have a much lower sound speed than the material at depth. The is consistent with a fractured and jointed material at depth, and a weathered material near the surface.

  13. Influence of Water Content on Mechanical Properties of Rock in Both Saturation and Drying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zilong; Cai, Xin; Cao, Wenzhuo; Li, Xibing; Xiong, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Water content has a pronounced influence on the properties of rock materials, which is responsible for many rock engineering hazards, such as landslides and karst collapse. Meanwhile, water injection is also used for the prevention of some engineering disasters like rock-bursts. To comprehensively investigate the effect of water content on mechanical properties of rocks, laboratory tests were carried out on sandstone specimens with different water contents in both saturation and drying processes. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique was applied to study the water distribution in specimens with variation of water contents. The servo-controlled rock mechanics testing machine and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique were used to conduct both compressive and tensile tests on sandstone specimens with different water contents. From the laboratory tests, reductions of the compressive and tensile strength of sandstone under static and dynamic states in different saturation processes were observed. In the drying process, all of the saturated specimens could basically regain their mechanical properties and recover its strength as in the dry state. However, for partially saturated specimens in the saturation and drying processes, the tensile strength of specimens with the same water content was different, which could be related to different water distributions in specimens.

  14. Modelling fault surface roughness and fault rocks thickness evolution with slip: calibration based on field and laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Tisato, N.; Spagnuolo, E.; Nielsen, S. B.; Di Toro, G.

    2012-12-01

    deformation processes (e.g. frictional melting vs. cataclasis) and experimental conditions (unconfined vs. confined). Since the model is based on geometrical and volume-conservation considerations (and not on a particular deformation mechanism), we conclude that the surface roughness and fault-rock thickness after some slip is mostly determined by the initial roughness (measured over several orders of magnitude in wavelength), rather than the particular deformation process (cataclasis, melting, etc.) activated during faulting. Conveniently, since the model can be applied (under certain conditions) to surfaces which depart from self-affine roughness, the model parameters can be calibrated with laboratory experiments. If this conclusion will be confirmed by a larger dataset, the forward model proposed here will provide realistic fault roughness and fault rock thickness predictions to be used in the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting, oil and water exploration, and underground engineering projects.

  15. Effect of Different Rock Models on Hydrocode Simulations of Asteroid Airburst and Impact Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, D. K.; Mathias, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ground damage estimates from airburst or ground impact of asteroids depend on the shock waves and blast winds emitted. While semi-analytic models exist and hydrocode simulations of cratering are well studied, there is very little literature on the blast waves from asteroids hitting the Earth. The blast waves depend strongly on the energy deposition rate, which in turn depends on the break-up mechanics of the asteroid either during atmospheric entry or on the ground. This presentation will examine the effect of different rock models on the break-up and energy deposition. The simplest models can assign a single rock strength, chosen to match the burst altitude of previously observed airbursts. Such simple models can provide energy deposition curves that match observations reasonably well, but are not representative of the behaviour of real rock masses. We will compare the failure mechanisms and energy deposition of more sophisticated models including effects such as more realistic yield surfaces that account for tensile, shear, and compressive failure strengths, and size dependent features such as cracks, strength distributions, porosity, and variations in internal composition.

  16. VNIR spectral modeling of Mars analogue rocks: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, L.; Roush, T.; Pedrazzi, G.; Sgavetti, M.

    Knowledge regarding the surface composition of Mars and other bodies of the inner solar system is fundamental to understanding of their origin, evolution, and internal structures. Technological improvements of remote sensors and associated implications for planetary studies have encouraged increased laboratory and field spectroscopy research to model the spectral behavior of terrestrial analogues for planetary surfaces. This approach has proven useful during Martian surface and orbital missions, and petrologic studies of Martian SNC meteorites. Thermal emission data were used to suggest two lithologies occurring on Mars surface: basalt with abundant plagioclase and clinopyroxene and andesite, dominated by plagioclase and volcanic glass [1,2]. Weathered basalt has been suggested as an alternative to the andesite interpretation [3,4]. Orbital VNIR spectral imaging data also suggest the crust is dominantly basaltic, chiefly feldspar and pyroxene [5,6]. A few outcrops of ancient crust have higher concentrations of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene, and have been interpreted as cumulates [6]. Based upon these orbital observations future lander/rover missions can be expected to encounter particulate soils, rocks, and rock outcrops. Approaches to qualitative and quantitative analysis of remotely-acquired spectra have been successfully used to infer the presence and abundance of minerals and to discover compositionally associated spectral trends [7-9]. Both empirical [10] and mathematical [e.g. 11-13] methods have been applied, typically with full compositional knowledge, to chiefly particulate samples and as a result cannot be considered as objective techniques for predicting the compositional information, especially for understanding the spectral behavior of rocks. Extending the compositional modeling efforts to include more rocks and developing objective criteria in the modeling are the next required steps. This is the focus of the present investigation. We present results of

  17. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  18. Mechanics of materials model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    The Mechanics of Materials Model (MOMM) is a three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis code for use as an early design stage tool for hot section components. MOMM is a stiffness method finite element code that uses a network of beams to characterize component behavior. The MOMM contains three material models to account for inelastic material behavior. These include the simplified material model, which assumes a bilinear stress-strain response; the state-of-the-art model, which utilizes the classical elastic-plastic-creep strain decomposition; and Walker's viscoplastic model, which accounts for the interaction between creep and plasticity that occurs under cyclic loading conditions.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior of Bedded Rocks and Its Implication for High Sidewall Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang-Yi; Feng, Xia-Ting; Xu, Ding-Ping; Fan, Qi-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The stability of high sidewalls of large-span underground powerhouses will be a major issue when the cavern axis forms a small angle to the steeply inclined rock strata. A synthetic test scheme composed of four experiments was performed on two rocks with clear bedding features, aiming at better understanding the otherwise confusing deformation behavior and failure patterns of bedded rocks. Bedding orientations with respect to stress direction impose significant effect on the mechanical behavior of bedded rocks. Excessive tensile strain is observed in the direction perpendicular to bedding or across material interface in uniaxial test. Under low confinement in true triaxial test, the σ 2 angle mainly influences the deformation and fracture propagation but not strength. Deformation dependence of bedded rocks on two stress paths is thoroughly investigated. Confining pressure unloading leads to pronounced volumetric dilation accompanied by moduli drop. Samples with large bedding angle exhibit more obvious lateral dilation. Post-peak degradation of deformation parameters is confirmed by cyclic test. Fractures entirely or partly along bedding occurred under different stress states depend not only on the bonding strength between beds but on the anisotropic deformation field. Based on these observations, it is deduced that the possible reasons for the failure of steeply dipping rock mass after excavation are a combination of (1) the pervasive bedding planes, (2) the more pronounced deformation normal to bedding, and (3) the excavation-induced unloading of confinement.

  20. Dielectric relaxation behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock: A hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Bore, Thierry; Robinet, Jean-Charles; Coelho, Daniel; Taillade, Frederic; Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Water content is a key parameter to monitor in nuclear waste repositories such as the planed underground repository in Bure, France, in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay formation. High-frequency electromagnetic (HF-EM) measurement techniques, i.e., time or frequency domain reflectometry, offer useful tools for quantitative estimation of water content in porous media. However, despite the efficiency of HF-EM methods, the relationship between water content and dielectric material properties needs to be characterized. Moreover, the high amount of swelling clay in the COx clay leads to dielectric relaxation effects which induce strong dispersion coupled with high absorption of EM waves. Against this background, the dielectric relaxation behavior of the clay rock was studied at frequencies from 1 MHz to 10 GHz with network analyzer technique in combination with coaxial transmission line cells. For this purpose, undisturbed and disturbed clay rock samples were conditioned to achieve a water saturation range from 0.16 to nearly saturation. The relaxation behavior was quantified based on a generalized fractional relaxation model under consideration of an apparent direct current conductivity assuming three relaxation processes: a high-frequency water process and two interface processes which are related to interactions between the aqueous pore solution and mineral particles (adsorbed/hydrated water relaxation, counter ion relaxation and Maxwell-Wagner effects). The frequency-dependent HF-EM properties were further modeled based on a novel hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach developed for soils. The results show the potential of HF-EM techniques for quantitative monitoring of the hydraulic state in underground repositories in clay formations.

  1. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  2. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  3. REDBACK: an Open-Source Highly Scalable Simulation Tool for Rock Mechanics with Dissipative Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Veveakis, M.; Paesold, M.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    Multiphysics modelling has become an indispensable tool for geoscientists to simulate the complex behaviours observed in their various fields of study where multiple processes are involved, including thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) laws. This modelling activity involves simulations that are computationally expensive and its soaring uptake is tightly linked to the increasing availability of supercomputing power and easy access to powerful nonlinear solvers such as PETSc (http://www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc/). The Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is a finite-element, multiphysics framework (http://mooseframework.org) that can harness such computational power and allow scientists to develop easily some tightly-coupled fully implicit multiphysics simulations that run automatically in parallel on large clusters. This open-source framework provides a powerful tool to collaborate on numerical modelling activities and we are contributing to its development with REDBACK (https://github.com/pou036/redback), a module for Rock mEchanics with Dissipative feedBACKs. REDBACK builds on the tensor mechanics finite strain implementation available in MOOSE to provide a THMC simulator where the energetic formulation highlights the importance of all dissipative terms in the coupled system of equations. We show first applications of fully coupled dehydration reactions triggering episodic fluid transfer through shear zones (Alevizos et al, 2014). The dimensionless approach used allows focusing on the critical underlying variables which are driving the resulting behaviours observed and this tool is specifically designed to study material instabilities underpinning geological features like faulting, folding, boudinage, shearing, fracturing, etc. REDBACK provides a collaborative and educational tool which captures the physical and mathematical understanding of such material instabilities and provides an easy way to apply this knowledge to realistic

  4. Stress-dependent voltage offsets from polymer insulators used in rock mechanics and material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, G. G.; Dahlgren, R.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Johnston, M. J.; Dunson, C.; Gray, A.; Freund, F.

    2013-12-01

    Dielectric insulators are used in a variety of laboratory settings when performing experiments in rock mechanics, petrology, and electromagnetic studies of rocks in the fields of geophysics, material science, and civil engineering. These components may be used to electrically isolate geological samples from the experimental equipment, to perform a mechanical compliance function between brittle samples and the loading equipment, to match ultrasonic transducers, or perform other functions. In many experimental configurations the insulators bear the full brunt of force applied to the sample but do not need to withstand high voltages, therefore the insulators are often thin sheets of mechanically tough polymers. From an instrument perspective, transduction from various types of mechanical perturbation has been qualitatively compared for a number of polymers [1, 2] and these error sources are readily apparent during high-impedance measurements if not mitigated. However even when following best practices, a force-dependent voltage signal still remains and its behavior is explored in this presentation. In this experiment two thin sheets (0.25 mm) of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) were set up in a stack, held alternately between three aluminum bars; this stack was placed on the platen of a 60T capacity hydraulic testing machine. The surface area, A, over which the force is applied to the PE sheets in this sandwich is roughly 40 square cm, each sheet forming a parallel-plate capacitor having roughly 320 pF [3], assuming the relative dielectric permittivity of PE is ~2.3. The outer two aluminum bars were connected to the LO input of the electrometer and the central aluminum bar was connected to the HI input of a Keithley model 617 electrometer. Once the stack is mechanically well-seated with no air gaps, the voltage offset is observed to be a linear function of the baseline voltage for a given change in applied force. For a periodically applied force of 66.7 kN the voltage

  5. Rock physics models for constraining quantitative interpretation of ultrasonic data for biofilm growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhadhrami, Fathiya Mohammed

    This study examines the use of rock physics modeling for quantitative interpretation of seismic data in the context of microbial growth and biofilm formation in unconsolidated sediment. The impetus for this research comes from geophysical experiments by Davis et al. (2010) and Kwon and Ajo-Franklin et al. (2012). These studies observed that microbial growth has a small effect on P-wave velocities (VP) but a large effect on seismic amplitudes. Davis et al. (2010) and Kwon and Ajo-Franklin et al. (2012) speculated that the amplitude variations were due to a combination of rock mechanical changes from accumulation of microbial growth related features such as biofilms. A more definite conclusion can be drawn by developing rock physics models that connect rock properties to seismic amplitudes. The primary objective of this work is to provide an explanation for high amplitude attenuation due to biofilm growth. The results suggest that biofilm formation in the Davis et al. (2010) experiment exhibit two growth styles: a loadbearing style where biofilm behaves like an additional mineral grain and a non-loadbearing mode where the biofilm grows into the pore spaces. In the loadbearing mode, the biofilms contribute to the stiffness of the sediments. We refer to this style as "filler." In the non-loadbearing mode, the biofilms contribute only to change in density of sediments without affecting their strength. We refer to this style of microbial growth as "mushroom." Both growth styles appear to be changing permeability more than the moduli or the density. As the result, while the VP velocity remains relatively unchanged, the amplitudes can change significantly depending on biofilm saturation. Interpreting seismic data from biofilm growths in term of rock physics models provide a greater insight into the sediment-fluid interaction. The models in turn can be used to understand microbial enhanced oil recovery and in assisting in solving environmental issues such as creating bio

  6. Modeling the Fracturing of Rock by Fluid Injection - Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions are mechanically fundamental to many earth processes, including fault zones and hydrothermal/volcanic systems, and to future green energy solutions such as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Modeling these processes is challenging because of the strong coupling between rock fracture evolution and the consequent large changes in the hydraulic properties of the system. In this talk, we present results of a numerical model that includes poro-elastic plastic rheology (with hardening, softening, and damage), and coupled to a non-linear diffusion model for fluid pressure propagation and two-phase fluid flow. Our plane strain model is based on the poro- elastic plastic behavior of porous rock and is advanced with hardening, softening and damage using the Mohr- Coulomb failure criteria. The effective stress model of Biot (1944) is used for coupling the pore pressure and the rock behavior. Frictional hardening and cohesion softening are introduced following Vermeer and de Borst (1984) with the angle of internal friction and the cohesion as functions of the principal strain rates. The scalar damage coefficient is assumed to be a linear function of the hardening parameter. Fluid injection is modeled as a two phase mixture of water and air using the Richards equation. The theoretical model is solved using finite differences on a staggered grid. The model is benchmarked with experiments on the laboratory scale in which fluid is injected from below in a critically-stressed, dry sandstone (Stanchits et al. 2011). We simulate three experiments, a) the failure a dry specimen due to biaxial compressive loading, b) the propagation a of low pressure fluid front induced from the bottom in a critically stressed specimen, and c) the failure of a critically stressed specimen due to a high pressure fluid intrusion. Comparison of model results with the fluid injection experiments shows that the model captures most of the experimental

  7. Leaching of boron, arsenic and selenium from sedimentary rocks: II. pH dependence, speciation and mechanisms of release.

    PubMed

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Hashimoto, Ayaka; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Yoneda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    Sedimentary rocks excavated in Japan from road- and railway-tunnel projects contain relatively low concentrations of hazardous trace elements like boron (B), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). However, these seemingly harmless waste rocks often produced leachates with concentrations of hazardous trace elements that exceeded the environmental standards. In this study, the leaching behaviors and release mechanisms of B, As and Se were evaluated using batch leaching experiments, sequential extraction and geochemical modeling calculations. The results showed that B was mostly partitioned with the residual/crystalline phase that is relatively stable under normal environmental conditions. In contrast, the majority of As and Se were associated with the exchangeable and organics/sulfides phases that are unstable under oxidizing conditions. Dissolution of water-soluble phases controlled the leaching of B, As and Se from these rocks in the short term, but pyrite oxidation, calcite dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions became more important in the long term. The mobilities of these trace elements were also strongly influenced by the pH of the rock-water system. Although the leaching of Se only increased in the acidic region, those of B and As were enhanced under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Under strongly acidic conditions, the primarily release mechanism of B, As and Se was the dissolution of mineral phases that incorporated and/or adsorbed these elements. Lower concentrations of these trace elements in the circumneutral pH range could be attributed to their strong adsorption onto minerals like Al-/Fe-oxyhydroxides and clays, which are inherently present and/or precipitated in the rock-water system. The leaching of As and B increased under strongly alkaline conditions because of enhanced desorption and pyrite oxidation while that of Se remained minimal due to its adsorption onto Fe-oxyhydroxides and co-precipitation with calcite.

  8. Wear-mechanism modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, M.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Goals of the program are to calculate the surface temperatures in dry sliding, develop a soft wear tester for ceramics, survey the wear mechanisms in brittle solids, and couple the temperature calculations with models to give wear maps for brittle solids. (DLC)

  9. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  10. Stress-Dependent Voltage Offsets From Polymer Insulators Used in Rock Mechanics and Material Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, G. G.; Dahlgren, Robert; Gray, Amber; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Freund, F.; Johnston, M. J.; Dunson, C.

    2013-01-01

    Dielectric insulators are used in a variety of laboratory settings when performing experiments in rock mechanics, petrology, and electromagnetic studies of rocks in the fields of geophysics,material science, and civil engineering. These components may be used to electrically isolate geological samples from the experimental equipment, to perform a mechanical compliance function between brittle samples and the loading equipment, to match ultrasonic transducers, or perform other functions. In manyexperimental configurations the insulators bear the full brunt of force applied to the sample but do not need to withstand high voltages, therefore the insulators are often thin sheets of mechanically tough polymers. From an instrument perspective, transduction from various types of mechanical perturbation has beenqualitatively compared for a number of polymers [1, 2] and these error sources are readily apparent duringhigh-impedance measurements if not mitigated. However even when following best practices, a force dependent voltage signal still remains and its behavior is explored in this presentation. In this experimenttwo thin sheets (0.25 mm) of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) were set up in a stack, held alternatelybetween three aluminum bars; this stack was placed on the platen of a 60T capacity hydraulic testingmachine. The surface area, A, over which the force is applied to the PE sheets in this sandwich is roughly 40 square cm, each sheet forming a parallel-plate capacitor having roughly 320 pF [3], assuming therelative dielectric permittivity of PE is approximately 2.3. The outer two aluminum bars were connected to the LO input ofthe electrometer and the central aluminum bar was connected to the HI input of a Keithley model 617 electrometer. Once the stack is mechanically well-seated with no air gaps, the voltage offset is observed tobe a linear function of the baseline voltage for a given change in applied force. For a periodically appliedforce of 66.7 kN the

  11. Hydromechanical coupling in fractured rock masses: mechanisms and processes of selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, Christian

    2015-04-01

    in the range of millimetres to a very few centimetres and can be linked to annual groundwater fluctuations. Due to pore pressure variations HM coupling can influence seepage forces and effective stresses in the rock mass. Effective stress changes can adversely affect the stability and deformation behaviour of deep-seated rock slides by influencing the shear strength or the time dependent (viscous) material behaviour of the basal shear zone. The shear strength of active shear zones is often reasonably well described by Coulomb's law. In Coulomb's law the operative normal stresses to the shear surface/zone are effective stresses and hence pore pressures which should be taken into account reduces the shear strength. According to the time dependent material behaviour a few effective stress based viscous models exists which are able to consider pore pressures. For slowly moving rock slides HM coupling could be highly relevant when low-permeability clayey-silty shear zones (fault gouges) are existing. An important parameters therefore is the hydraulic diffusivity, which is controlled by the permeability and fluid-pore compressibility of the shear zone, and by fluid viscosity. Thus time dependent pore pressure diffusion in the shear zone can either control the stability condition or the viscous behaviour (creep) of the rock slide. Numerous cases studies show that HM coupling can effect deformability, shear strength and time dependent behaviour of fractured rock masses. A process-based consideration can be important to avoid unexpected impacts on infrastructures and to understand complex rock mass as well rock slide behaviour.

  12. Modeling magmatic accumulations in the upper crust: Metamorphic implications for the country rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Madison M.; Geyer, Adelina; Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Martí, Joan

    2016-06-01

    Field exposures of magma chambers tend to reveal contact metamorphic aureoles in the surrounding crust, which width varies from few centimeters to kilometers. The igneous accumulation not only increases the temperature around it, but also weakens its surrounding country rock beyond the brittle-ductile transition temperature. The formation of a ductile halo around the magmatic reservoir may significantly impact into the stability and growth of the magma chamber, as well as into potential dyke injections and processes of ground deformation. In this paper, we examine how a magmatic accumulation affects the country rock through the combination of petrologic and thermal perspectives. For this, we numerically modeled (i) the conductive cooling of an instantaneously emplaced magma chamber within compositionally representative pelitic and carbonate upper crusts, and (ii) the corresponding changes in the viscosity of the host rock potentially leading to ductile regimes. We consider basaltic to rhyolitic magma chambers at different depths with oblate, prolate and spherical geometries. The resulting temperature field distribution at different time steps is integrated with crustal metamorphic effects through phase diagram modeling. Our results indicate that the geometry of the magma accumulations plays a dominant role in controlling the local metamorphic and thermal effects on the country rocks. They conclude that (i) the combination of relatively simple geothermal models with petrologic datasets can generate first order predictions for the maximum metamorphic grade and geometry of magma chamber aureoles; (ii) the possible changes in the mechanical properties of the country rock are not necessarily linked to the petrological changes in contact aureoles; and (iii) the present rheologic outcomes may be used in further studies of magma chamber stability and integrity, which may favor the understanding of the melt transfer throughout the crust.

  13. Nondestructive Methods to Characterize Rock Mechanical Properties at Low-Temperature: Applications for Asteroid Capture Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Kara A.

    Recent government initiatives and commercial activities have targeted asteroids for in situ material characterization, manipulation, and possible resource extraction. Most of these activities and missions have proposed significant robotic components, given the risks and costs associated with manned missions. To successfully execute these robotic activities, detailed mechanical characteristics of the target space bodies must be known prior to contact, in order to appropriately plan and direct the autonomous robotic protocols. Unfortunately, current estimates of asteroid mechanical properties are based on limited direct information, and significant uncertainty remains specifically concerning internal structures, strengths, and elastic properties of asteroids. One proposed method to elucidate this information is through in situ, nondestructive testing of asteroid material immediately after contact, but prior to any manipulation or resource extraction activities. While numerous nondestructive rock characterization techniques have been widely deployed for terrestrial applications, these methods must be adapted to account for unique properties of asteroid material and environmental conditions of space. For example, asteroid surface temperatures may range from -100°C to 30°C due to diurnal cycling, and these low temperatures are especially noteworthy due to their deleterious influence on non-destructive testing. As a result, this thesis investigates the effect of low temperature on the mechanical characteristics and nondestructive technique responses of rock material. Initially, a novel method to produce low temperature rock samples was developed. Dry ice and methanol cooling baths of specific formulations were used to decrease rock to temperatures ranging from -60°C to 0°C. At these temperatures, shale, chalk, and limestone rock samples were exposed to several nondestructive and conventional mechanical tests, including Schmidt hammer, ultrasonic pulse velocity, point

  14. A prediction model for uniaxial compressive strength of deteriorated pyroclastic rocks due to freeze-thaw cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnce, İsmail; Fener, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Either directly or indirectly, building stone is exposed to diverse atmospheric interactions depending on the seasonal conditions. Due to those interactions, objects of historic and cultural heritage, as well as modern buildings, partially or completely deteriorate. Among processes involved in rock deterioration, the freeze-thaw (F-T) cycle is one of the most important. Even though pyroclastic rocks have been used as building stone worldwide due to their easy workability, they are the building stone most affected by the F-T cycle. A historical region in Central Anatolia, Turkey, Cappadoia encompasses exceptional natural wonders characterized by fairy chimneys and unique historical and cultural heritage. Human-created caves, places of worship and houses have been dug into the pyroclastic rocks, which have in turn been used in architectural construction as building stone. Using 10 pyroclastic rock samples collected from Cappadocia, we determined the rock's index-mechanical properties to develop a statistical model for estimating percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strength a critical parameter of F-T cycle's important value. We used dry density (ρd), ultrasonic velocity (Vp), point load strengths (IS(50)), and slake-durability test indexes (Id4) values of unweathered rocks in our model, which is highly reliable (R2 = 0.84) for predetermination of percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strengths of pyroclastic rocks without requiring any F-T tests.

  15. Insights into pulverized rock formation from dynamic rupture models of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2017-02-01

    Pulverized rocks (PR) are extremely incohesive and highly fractured rocks found within the damage zones of several large strike-slip faults around the world. They maintain their crystal structure, show little evidence of shearing or chemical alteration, and are believed to be produced by strong tensile forces. Several mechanisms for pulverization have been proposed based on simple qualitative analyses or laboratory experiments under simplified loading conditions. Numerical modelling, however, can offer new insights into what is needed to produce PR and likely conditions of formation. We perform dynamic rupture simulations of different earthquakes, varying the magnitude, the slip distribution, and the rupture speed (supershear and subshear), while measuring the stresses produced away from the fault. To contextualize our results, a basic threshold of 10 MPa is set as the tensile strength of the rock mass and recordings are made of where, when, and by how much this threshold is exceeded for each earthquake type. Guided by field observations, we discern that a large (>Mw 7.1) subshear earthquake along a bimaterial fault produces a pulverized rock distribution most consistent with observations. The damage is asymmetric with the majority on the stiffer side of the fault extending out for several hundred metres. Within this zone there is a large and sudden volumetric expansion in all directions as the rupture passes. We propose that such an extreme tensile stress state, repeated for every earthquake, eventually produces the PR seen in the field.

  16. Insights into Pulverized Rock Formation from Dynamic Rupture Models of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2016-11-01

    Pulverized rocks (PR) are extremely incohesive and highly fractured rocks found within the damage zones of several large strike-slip faults around the world. They maintain their crystal structure, show little evidence of shearing or chemical alteration, and are believed to be produced by strong tensile forces. Several mechanisms for pulverization have been proposed based on simple qualitative analyses or laboratory experiments under simplified loading conditions. Numerical modeling, however, can offer new insights into what is needed to produce PR and likely conditions of formation. We perform dynamic rupture simulations of different earthquakes, varying the magnitude, the slip distribution, and the rupture speed (supershear and subshear), while measuring the stresses produced away from the fault. To contextualize our results, a basic threshold of 10 MPa is set as the tensile strength of the rock mass and recordings are made of where, when, and by how much this threshold is exceeded for each earthquake type. Guided by field observations, we discern that a large (> Mw 7.1) subshear earthquake along a bimaterial fault produces a pulverized rock distribution most consistent with observations. The damage is asymmetric with the majority on the stiffer side of the fault extending out for several hundred meters. Within this zone there is a large and sudden volumetric expansion in all directions as the rupture passes. We propose that such an extreme tensile stress state, repeated for every earthquake, eventually produces the PR seen in the field.

  17. Stochastic and Centrifuge Modelling of Jointed Rock. Volume 2. Centrifuge Modelling of Jointed Rock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-31

    Luscher and H6eg (1964) suggest arching as a "thrust ring action" in the soil surrounding an opening, and show the ring to be cylindrical. Handy (1985...1-15. [35] Leontovich, V. (1959), Frames and Arches: Condensed Solutions for Structural Anal- ysis, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc. I [36] Luscher , U...pp. 57-78. [61] Whitman, R. V. and Luscher , U. (1962), "Basic Experiment into Soil-Structure Interaction," Journal of the Soil Mechanics and

  18. Combining water-rock interaction experiments with reaction path and reactive transport modelling to predict reservoir rock evolution in an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Tim; Mueller, Thomas; Renner, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Reliably predicting the evolution of mechanical and chemical properties of reservoir rocks is crucial for efficient exploitation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, dissolution and precipitation of individual rock forming minerals often result in significant volume changes, affecting the hydraulic rock properties and chemical composition of fluid and solid phases. Reactive transport models are typically used to evaluate and predict the effect of the internal feedback of these processes. However, a quantitative evaluation of chemo-mechanical interaction in polycrystalline environments is elusive due to poorly constrained kinetic data of complex mineral reactions. In addition, experimentally derived reaction rates are generally faster than reaction rates determined from natural systems, likely a consequence of the experimental design: a) determining the rate of a single process only, e.g. the dissolution of a mineral, and b) using powdered sample materials and thus providing an unrealistically high reaction surface and at the same time eliminating the restrictions on element transport faced in-situ for fairly dense rocks. In reality, multiple reactions are coupled during the alteration of a polymineralic rocks in the presence of a fluid and the rate determining process of the overall reactions is often difficult to identify. We present results of bulk rock-water interaction experiments quantifying alteration reactions between pure water and a granodiorite sample. The rock sample was chosen for its homogenous texture, small and uniform grain size (˜0.5 mm in diameter), and absence of pre-existing alteration features. The primary minerals are plagioclase (plg - 58 vol.%), quartz (qtz - 21 vol.%), K-feldspar (Kfs - 17 vol.%), biotite (bio - 3 vol.%) and white mica (wm - 1 vol.%). Three sets of batch experiments were conducted at 200 ° C to evaluate the effect of reactive surface area and different fluid path ways using (I) powders of the bulk rock with

  19. A non-Linear transport model for determining shale rock characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Iftikhar; Malik, Nadeem

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs consist of tight porous rocks which are characterised by nano-scale size porous networks with ultra-low permeability [1,2]. Transport of gas through them is not well understood at the present time, and realistic transport models are needed in order to determine rock properties and for estimating future gas pressure distribution in the reservoirs. Here, we consider a recently developed non-linear gas transport equation [3], ∂p-+ U ∂p- = D ∂2p-, t > 0, (1) ∂t ∂x ∂x2 complimented with suitable initial and boundary conditions, in order to determine shale rock properties such as the permeability K, the porosity φ and the tortuosity, τ. In our new model, the apparent convection velocity, U = U(p,px), and the apparent diffusivity D = D(p), are both highly non-linear functions of the pressure. The model incorporate various flow regimes (slip, surface diffusion, transition, continuum) based upon the Knudsen number Kn, and also includes Forchchiemers turbulence correction terms. In application, the model parameters and associated compressibility factors are fully pressure dependent, giving the model more realism than previous models. See [4]. Rock properties are determined by solving an inverse problem, with model parameters adjustment to minimise the error between the model simulation and available data. It is has been found that the proposed model performs better than previous models. Results and details of the model will be presented at the conference. Corresponding author: namalik@kfupm.edu.sa and nadeem_malik@cantab.net References [1] Cui, X., Bustin, A.M. and Bustin, R., "Measurements of gas permeability and diffusivity of tight reservoir rocks: different approaches and their applications", Geofluids 9, 208-223 (2009). [2] Chiba R., Fomin S., Chugunov V., Niibori Y. and Hashida T., "Numerical Simulation of Non Fickian Diffusion and Advection in a Fractured Porous Aquifer", AIP Conference Proceedings 898, 75 (2007

  20. Model Test of Anchoring Effect on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Masses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration. PMID:23997683

  1. Model test of anchoring effect on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock masses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  2. Applicability of failure criteria and empirical relations of mechanical rock properties from outcrop analogue samples for wellbore stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, D.; Philipp, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    samples from larger depths shows that it is possible to apply the obtained principal stress failure criteria on clastic and volcanic rocks, but less so for carbonates. Carbonate core samples have higher strengths and develop larger angles between fault normal and main principal stress than quarry samples. This considerably reduces the residuals between quarry failure criteria and core test results. Therefore, it is advised to use failure criteria, expressed in shear and normal stresses, for prediction of core sample failure conditions. We conclude that it is possible to apply failure criteria on samples from depth if the comparability, especially textural comparability and similar porosities, of chosen outcrop analogues samples is ensured. Applicability of empirical relations of UCS with Young's modulus and tensile strength to rocks at depths is expected. Presented results may help predict mechanical properties for in situ rocks, and thus develop suitable geomechanical models for the adaptation of the drilling strategy on rock mechanical conditions. The authors appreciate the support of 'Niedersächsisches Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kultur' and 'Baker Hughes' within the gebo research project (http: www.gebo-nds.de).

  3. Modelling Cochlear Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Teal, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The cochlea plays a crucial role in mammal hearing. The basic function of the cochlea is to map sounds of different frequencies onto corresponding characteristic positions on the basilar membrane (BM). Sounds enter the fluid-filled cochlea and cause deflection of the BM due to pressure differences between the cochlear fluid chambers. These deflections travel along the cochlea, increasing in amplitude, until a frequency-dependent characteristic position and then decay away rapidly. The hair cells can detect these deflections and encode them as neural signals. Modelling the mechanics of the cochlea is of help in interpreting experimental observations and also can provide predictions of the results of experiments that cannot currently be performed due to technical limitations. This paper focuses on reviewing the numerical modelling of the mechanical and electrical processes in the cochlea, which include fluid coupling, micromechanics, the cochlear amplifier, nonlinearity, and electrical coupling. PMID:25136555

  4. Modelling long term damage in rock slopes and impact of deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, D.; Lacroix, P.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term observations of large active rockslides show accelerating deformation over many thousands of years since the last deglaciation. The effect of deglaciation on slope stability is however poorly understood due to (1) limited long-term observations and (2) a complex interaction between glacier retreat and hydrogeological, mechanical, and morphological processes. To assess the sensitivity of rockslide dynamics to these different processes, a model of progressive damage through intact rock mass is developed in this study, based on the finite element method. This model uses time-to-failure laws based on rock laboratory creep experiments. It is able to reproduce progressive damage localization along shear bands associated with strain rate acceleration as observed during tertiary creep. The model reproduces the different phases of deformation associated with morphologies typical of large rockslides. This model is thus suitable for simulating the dynamics of large rockslides and the transition from initiation to rapid sliding. The sensitivity of rockslide kinematics and morphology to different mechanical properties is analyzed. This analysis shows that the time evolution of the rockslide can be inferred with the knowledge of only one time parameter, independent of the knowledge of the mechanical properties of the rock mass. This parameter is here chosen as the time when the summit slope displacement has reached 10 m, a parameter that can be estimated with cosmogenic dating. The model is then used to study the effects of deglaciation on the valley flank stability and the formation of large rockslides. This study shows that the deglaciation velocity can affect the morphology of the rockslide, with the shear band of the rockslide emerging at higher elevation as the velocity decreases.We also show that the response to the deglaciation can last several thousands of years after the glacier retreat.

  5. Assessing geotechnical centrifuge modelling in addressing variably saturated flow in soil and fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brendon R; Brouwers, Luke B; Van Tonder, Warren D; Dippenaar, Matthys A

    2017-01-05

    The vadose zone typically comprises soil underlain by fractured rock. Often, surface water and groundwater parameters are readily available, but variably saturated flow through soil and rock are oversimplified or estimated as input for hydrological models. In this paper, a series of geotechnical centrifuge experiments are conducted to contribute to the knowledge gaps in: (i) variably saturated flow and dispersion in soil and (ii) variably saturated flow in discrete vertical and horizontal fractures. Findings from the research show that the hydraulic gradient, and not the hydraulic conductivity, is scaled for seepage flow in the geotechnical centrifuge. Furthermore, geotechnical centrifuge modelling has been proven as a viable experimental tool for the modelling of hydrodynamic dispersion as well as the replication of similar flow mechanisms for unsaturated fracture flow, as previously observed in literature. Despite the imminent challenges of modelling variable saturation in the vadose zone, the geotechnical centrifuge offers a powerful experimental tool to physically model and observe variably saturated flow. This can be used to give valuable insight into mechanisms associated with solid-fluid interaction problems under these conditions. Findings from future research can be used to validate current numerical modelling techniques and address the subsequent influence on aquifer recharge and vulnerability, contaminant transport, waste disposal, dam construction, slope stability and seepage into subsurface excavations.

  6. Possible mechanism for seismic attenuation in rocks containing small amounts of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Clark, V. A.; Richardson, J. M.; Spencer, T. W.

    1980-10-01

    Measurements were made of the specific dissipation factor of rocks with small contents of volatiles. The factor was measured for shear waves as a function of relative partial pressure for benzene, hexane, ethanol, methanol and water at 10 kHz with the vibrating bar method in a chamber with relative partial pressures between zero and 0.9. The one- or two-monolayer coverage of absorbed volatiles increased the shear wave dissipation factor with exposure to alcohols and water, but only slightly when exposed to hexane and benzene. Direct ellipsometry data and absorption isotherm results are given for thin films or adsorbed volatiles at low partial pressures; the measurements are analyzed in terms of a model relating the dissipation factor to the relative mass of the adsorbed volatiles, the surface area of the rock, and the rock temperature.

  7. Modelling rock-avalanche induced impact waves: Sensitivity of the model chains to model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Yvonne; Huggel, Christian

    2014-05-01

    New lakes are forming in high-mountain areas all over the world due to glacier recession. Often they will be located below steep, destabilized flanks and are therefore exposed to impacts from rock-/ice-avalanches. Several events worldwide are known, where an outburst flood has been triggered by such an impact. In regions such as in the European Alps or in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, where valley bottoms are densely populated, these far-travelling, high-magnitude events can result in major disasters. Usually natural hazards are assessed as single hazardous processes, for the above mentioned reasons, however, development of assessment and reproduction methods of the hazardous process chain for the purpose of hazard map generation have to be brought forward. A combination of physical process models have already been suggested and illustrated by means of lake outburst in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, where on April 11th 2010 an ice-avalanche of approx. 300'000m3 triggered an impact wave, which overtopped the 22m freeboard of the rock-dam for 5 meters and caused and outburst flood which travelled 23 km to the city of Carhuaz. We here present a study, where we assessed the sensitivity of the model chain from ice-avalanche and impact wave to single parameters considering rock-/ice-avalanche modeling by RAMMS and impact wave modeling by IBER. Assumptions on the initial rock-/ice-avalanche volume, calibration of the friction parameters in RAMMS and assumptions on erosion considered in RAMMS were parameters tested regarding their influence on overtopping parameters that are crucial for outburst flood modeling. Further the transformation of the RAMMS-output (flow height and flow velocities on the shoreline of the lake) into an inflow-hydrograph for IBER was also considered a possible source of uncertainties. Overtopping time, volume, and wave height as much as mean and maximum discharge were considered decisive parameters for the outburst flood modeling and were therewith

  8. Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

    2003-10-01

    This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those

  9. 3-D Numerical Simulation of Hydrostatic Tests of Porous Rocks Using Adapted Constitutive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemenda, A. I.; Daniel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The high complexity and poor knowledge of the constitutive properties of porous rocks are principal obstacles for the modeling of their deformation. Normally, the constitutive lows are to be derived from the experimental data (nominal strains and stresses). They are known, however, to be sensitive to the mechanical instabilities within the rock specimen and the boundary (notably friction) conditions at its ends. To elucidate the impact of these conditions on the measured mechanical response we use 3-D finite-difference simulations of experimental tests. Modeling of hydrostatic tests was chosen because it does not typically involve deformation instabilities. The ends of the cylindrical 'rock sample' are in contact with the 'steel' elastic platens through the frictional interfaces. The whole system is subjected to a normal stress Pc applied to the external model surface. A new constitutive model of porous rocks with the cap-type yield function is used. This function is quadratic in the mean stress σm and depends on the inelastic strain γp in a way to generate strain softening at small σm and strain-hardening at high σm. The corresponding material parameters are defined from the experimental data and have clear interpretation in terms of the geometry of the yield surface. The constitutive model with this yield function and the Drucker-Prager plastic potential has been implemented in 3-D dynamic explicit code Flac3D. The results of an extensive set of numerical simulations at different model parameters will be presented. They show, in particular, that the shape of the 'numerical' hydrostats is very similar to that obtained from the experimental tests and that it is practically insensitive to the interface friction. On the other hand, the stress and strain fields within the specimen dramatically depend on this parameter. The inelastic deformation at the specimen's ends starts well before reaching the grain crushing pressure P* and evolves heterogeneously with Pc

  10. Evolution of stress-induced borehole breakout in inherently anisotropic rock: Insights from discrete element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, K.; Kwok, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms controlling the initiation, propagation, and ultimate pattern of borehole breakouts in shale formation when drilled parallel with and perpendicular to beddings. A two-dimensional discrete element model is constructed to explicitly represent the microstructure of inherently anisotropic rocks by inserting a series of individual smooth joints into an assembly of bonded rigid discs. Both isotropic and anisotropic hollow square-shaped samples are generated to represent the wellbores drilled perpendicular to and parallel with beddings at reduced scale. The isotropic model is validated by comparing the stress distribution around borehole wall and along X axis direction with analytical solutions. Effects of different factors including the particle size distribution, borehole diameter, far-field stress anisotropy, and rock anisotropy are systematically evaluated on the stress distribution and borehole breakout propagation. Simulation results reveal that wider particle size distribution results in the local stress perturbations which cause localization of cracks. Reduction of borehole diameter significantly alters the crack failure from tensile to shear and raises the critical pressure. Rock anisotropy plays an important role on the stress state around wellbore which lead to the formation of preferred cracks under hydrostatic stress. Far-field stress anisotropy plays a dominant role in the shape of borehole breakout when drilled perpendicular to beddings while a secondary role when drilled parallel with beddings. Results from this study can provide fundamental insights on the underlying particle-scale mechanisms for previous findings in laboratory and field on borehole stability in anisotropic rock.

  11. Mechanical properties of carboniferous rocks in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin under uniaxial and triaxial compression tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bukowska, M.

    2005-04-01

    Many years' studies of geological properties of rocks from the Upper Silesian Coal Basin have resulted in acquisition of a substantial data base of mechanical parameters of rocks over the total strain range. It is found that the post-peak rock properties are closely related with the peak strength and the pre-peak properties. The relationship between the uniaxial ultimate strength, elastic modulus, and drop modulus are determined.

  12. From minerals to rocks: Toward modeling lithologies with remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Pieters, Carle M.; Hoppin, Andrew; Pratt, Stephan F.

    1993-01-01

    High spectral resolution imaging spectroscopy will play an important role in future planetary missions. Sophisticated approaches will be needed to unravel subtle, super-imposed spectral features typically of natural systems, and to maximize the science return of these instruments. Carefully controlled laboratory investigations using homogeneous mineral separates have demonstrated that variations due to solid solution, changes in modal abundances, and the effects of particle size are well understood from a physical basis. In many cases, these variations can be modeled quantitatively using photometric models, mixing approaches, and deconvolution procedures. However, relative to the spectra of individual mineral components, reflectance spectra of rocks and natural surfaces exhibit a reduced spectral contrast. In addition, soils or regolith, which are likely to dominate any natural planetary surface, exhibit spectral properties that have some similarities to the parent materials, but due to weathering and alteration, differences remain that cannot yet be fully recreated in the laboratory or through mixture modeling. A significant challenge is therefore to integrate modeling approaches to derive both lithologic determinations and include the effects of alteration. We are currently conducting laboratory investigations in lithologic modeling to expand upon the basic results of previous analyses with our initial goal to more closely match physical state of natural systems. The effects of alteration are to be considered separately.

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing

  14. The global rock art database: developing a rock art reference model for the RADB system using the CIDOC CRM and Australian heritage examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubt, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The Rock Art Database (RADB) is a virtual organisation that aims to build a global rock art community. It brings together rock art enthusiasts and professionals from around the world in one centralized location through the deployed publicly available RADB Management System. This online platform allows users to share, manage and discuss rock art information and offers a new look at rock art data through the use of new technologies in rich media formats. Full access to the growing platform is currently only available for a selected group of users but it already links over 200 rock art projects around the globe. This paper forms a part of the larger Rock Art Database (RADB) project. It discusses the design stage of the RADB System and the development of a conceptual RADB Reference Model (RARM) that is used to inform the design of the Rock Art Database Management System. It examines the success and failure of international and national systems and uses the Australian heritage sector and Australian rock art as a test model to develop a method for the RADB System design. The system aims to help improve rock art management by introducing the CIDOC CRM in conjunction with a rock art specific domain model. It seeks to improve data compatibility and data sharing to help with the integration of a variety of resources to create the global Rock Art Database Management System.

  15. Workshop on rock mechanics issues in repository design and performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses organized and hosted a workshop on ``Rock Mechanics Issues in Repository Design and Performance Assessment`` on behalf its sponsor the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop was held on September 19- 20, 1994 at the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza, Rockville, Maryland. The objectives of the workshop were to stimulate exchange of technical information among parties actively investigating rock mechanics issues relevant to the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain and identify/confirm rock mechanics issues important to repository design and performance assessment The workshop contained three technical sessions and two panel discussions. The participants included technical and research staffs representing the NRC and the Department of Energy and their contractors, as well as researchers from the academic, commercial, and international technical communities. These proceedings include most of the technical papers presented in the technical sessions and the transcripts for the two panel discussions. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Modelling kinetically controlled water-rock interactions during geothermal stimulation in typical poly-mineralic reservoir rocks from the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Tim; Mueller, Thomas; Renner, Joerg

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative understanding of geochemically controlled reaction rates and their operating reaction mechanisms is crucial for the efficient exploration and exploitation of geothermal reservoirs. For example, the volume changes associated with dissolution and precipitation reactions potentially may affect the hydraulic properties of a reservoir during the production phase. The reactivity depends on a complex interaction of various parameters such as temperature, fluid flux and chemistry, mineral composition, reactive surface areas, etc. Most shallow geothermal reservoirs are constituted by highly permeable sedimentary rocks saturated by a fluid phase. The abundance of impermeable crystalline basement rocks (magmatic and metamorphic) increases with depth. Typically, hydraulic stimulation is necessary to create fluid pathways, i.e. the permeability of the rock is increased by the generation of new fractures and the reactivation of old fractures (Enhanced Geothermal Systems, EGS). Fresh, high energy surfaces are created by this treatment, constituting potential sites for intensive water-rock interactions. An increasing number of reactive transport models using equilibrium thermodynamic data shed considerable light on water-rock interactions. However, most models simplify the involved rocks to mono-mineralic phases and/or use rate data based on powder experiments with unnatural high reactive surface areas. In this study we present a new numerical model approach to quantify the geochemical evolution and its mechanical feedback during geothermal stimulation of typical poly-mineralic reservoir rocks at elevated temperatures (150-200 °C). Rock samples representative for geothermal energy producing sites (limestone, sandstone, volcanic tuff and granite) were collected at the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) in southern Germany, i.e. one of the high potential locations for geothermal energy production in Germany. Samples have been characterized petrographically with regard to phase

  17. COTHERM: Modelling fluid-rock interactions in Icelandic geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, Bruno; Kosakowski, Georg; Kulik, Dmitrii

    2014-05-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced geothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. We model the mineralogical and porosity evolution of Icelandic geothermal systems with 1D and 2D reactive transport models. These geothermal systems are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. The shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. We investigate two contrasting geothermal systems: Krafla, for which the water recharge consists of meteoritic water; and Reykjanes, for which the water recharge mainly consists of seawater. The initial rock composition is a fresh basalt. We use the GEM-Selektor geochemical modeling package [1] for calculation of kinetically controlled mineral equilibria between the rock and the ingression water. We consider basalt minerals dissolution kinetics according to Palandri & Kharaka [2]. Reactive surface areas are assumed to be geometric surface areas, and are corrected using a spherical-particle surface/mass relationship. For secondary minerals, we consider the partial equilibrium assuming that the primary mineral dissolution is slow, and the secondary mineral precipitation is fast. Comparison of our modeling results with the mineralogical assemblages observed in the

  18. A chemical model for lunar non-mare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Nearly all rocks returned from the moon are readily divided into three broad categories on the basis of their chemical compositions: (1) mare basalts, (2) non-mare rocks of basaltic composition (KREEP, VHA), and (3) anorthositic rocks. Only mare basalts may unambiguously be considered to have original igneous textures and are widely understood to have an igneous origin. Nearly all other lunar rocks have lost their original textures during metamorphic and impact processes. It is shown that for these rocks one must work primarily with chemical data in order to recognize and define rock groups and their possible modes of origin. Non-mare rocks of basaltic composition have chemical compositions consistent with an origin by partial melting of the lunar interior. The simplest origin for rocks of anorthositic chemical composition is the crystallization and removal of ferromagnesian minerals. It is proposed that the rock groups of anorthositic and non-mare basaltic chemical composition could have been generated from a single series of original but not necessarily primitive lunar materials.

  19. A chemical model for lunar non-mare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Nearly all rocks returned from the moon are readily divided into three broad categories on the basis of their chemical compositions: (1) mare basalts, (2) non-mare rocks of basaltic composition (KREEP, VHA), and (3) anorthositic rocks. Only mare basalts may unambiguously be considered to have original igneous textures and are widely understood to have an igneous origin. Nearly all other lunar rocks have lost their original textures during metamorphic and impact processes. For these rocks one must work primarily with chemical data in order to recognize and define rock groups and their possible modes of origin. Non-mare rocks of basaltic composition have chemical compositions consistent with an origin by partial melting of the lunar interior. The simplest origin for rocks of anorthositic chemical composition is the crystallization and removal of ferromagnesian minerals. It is proposed that the rock groups of anorthositic and non-mare basaltic chemical composition could have been generated from a single series of original, but not necessarily primitive, lunar materials.

  20. Computational method for thermoviscoelasticity with application to rock mechanics. [Ph. D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Large-scale numerical computations associated with rock mechanics problems have required efficient and economical models for predicting temperature, stress, failure, and deformed structural configuration under various loading conditions. To meet this requirement, the complex dependence of the properties of geological materials on the time and temperature is modified to yield a reduced time scale as a function of time and temperature under the thermorheologically simple material (TSM) postulate. The thermorheologically linear concept is adopted in the finite element formulation by uncoupling thermal and mechanical responses. The thermal responses, based on transient heat conduction or convective-diffusion, are formulated by using the two-point recurrence scheme and the upwinding scheme, respectively. An incremental solution procedure with the implicit time stepping scheme is proposed for the solution of the thermoviscoelastic response. The proposed thermoviscoelastic solution algorithm is based on the uniaxial creep experimental data and the corresponding temperature shift functions, and is intended to minimize computational efforts by allowing large time step size with stable solutions. A thermoelastic fracture formulation is also presented by introducing the degenerate quadratic isoparametric singular element for the thermally-induced line crack problems. The stress intensity factors are computed by use of the displacement method. Efficiency of the presented formulation and solution algorithm is initially demonstrated by comparison with other available solutions for a variety of problems. Subsequent field applications are made to simulate the post-burn and post-repose phases of an underground coal conversion (UCC) experiment and in-situ nuclear waste disposal management problems. 137 references, 48 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  2. Investigation of steady and fluctuating pressures associated with the transonic buffeting and wing rock of a one-seventh scale model of the F-5A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.; Pi, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of a 1/7 scale F-5A model is described. The pressure, force, and dynamic response measurements during buffet and wing rock are evaluated. Effects of Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip angle, and control surface settings were investigated. The mean and fluctuating static pressure data are presented and correlated with some corresponding flight test data of a F-5A aircraft. Details of the instrumentation and the specially designed support system which allowed the model to oscillate in roll to simulate wing rock are also described. A limit cycle mechanism causing wing rock was identified from this study, and this mechanism is presented.

  3. Rock Goes to School on Screen: A Model for Teaching Non-"Learned" Musics Derived from the Films "School of Rock" (2003) and "Rock School" (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Michael

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from two films with "rock" and "school" in their titles, about rock in school and about music and schooling more broadly? "School of Rock" (2003), a "family comedy," and "Rock School" (2005), a documentary, provoke a range of questions, ideological and otherwise, surrounding the inclusion of rock in formal instructional…

  4. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the seven quarter of the project the research team analyzed some of the acoustic velocity data and rock deformation data. The goal is to create a series of ''deformation-velocity maps'' which can outline the types of rock deformational mechanisms which can occur at high pressures and then associate those with specific compressional or shear wave velocity signatures. During this quarter, we began to analyze both the acoustical and deformational properties of the various rock types. Some of the preliminary velocity data from the Danian chalk will be presented in this report. This rock type was selected for the initial efforts as it will be used in the tomographic imaging study outlined in Task 10. This is one of the more important rock types in the study as the Danian chalk is thought to represent an excellent analog to the Ekofisk chalk that has caused so many problems in the North Sea. Some of the preliminary acoustic velocity data obtained during this phase of the project indicates that during pore collapse and compaction of this chalk, the acoustic velocities can change by as much as 200 m/s. Theoretically, this significant velocity change should be detectable during repeated successive 3-D seismic images. In addition, research continues with an analysis of the unconsolidated sand samples at high confining pressures obtained in Task 9. The analysis of the results indicate that sands with 10% volume of fines can undergo liquefaction at lower stress conditions than sand samples which do not have fines added. This liquefaction and/or sand flow is similar to ''shallow water'' flows observed during drilling in the offshore Gulf of Mexico.

  5. The Rho GTPase effector ROCK regulates cyclin A, cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 levels by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel R; Olson, Michael F

    2006-06-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. However, the mechanisms by which ROCK signaling promotes cell cycle progression have not been thoroughly characterized. Using a conditionally activated ROCK-estrogen receptor fusion protein, we found that ROCK activation is sufficient to stimulate G1/S cell cycle progression in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Further analysis revealed that ROCK acts via independent pathways to alter the levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins: cyclin D1 and p21(Cip1) elevation via Ras and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, increased cyclin A via LIM kinase 2, and reduction of p27(Kip1) protein levels. Therefore, the influence of ROCK on cell cycle regulatory proteins occurs by multiple independent mechanisms.

  6. Feldspathic Rock Spectral Detections on Mars: Geologic Context, Possible Formation Mechanisms, and the TES/Themis Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D.; Nekvasil, H.

    2014-12-01

    Spectral detections from VNIR imaging spectrometers OMEGA and CRISM suggest feldspar-bearing rocks with <5% mafic minerals in restricted locations on Mars. The detections have been interpreted as anorthositic, or alternatively, felsic lithologies such as granite. The detections occur in a variety of contexts, including crater central peaks, walls, and floors, intercrater plains of Noachis Terra, and the Nili patera caldera floor. Here we focus on the Noachis Terra feldspathic rock detections, and present constraints from geologic context and complementary thermal infrared measurements. We also examine mechanisms for forming feldspar-rich lavas from crystal fractionation at the base of thick Martian crust. Noachis Terra exposures exhibit high thermal inertias and deep spectral contrast, consistent with competent, non-porous rock. They commonly overlie olivine basaltic bedrock and are ~20-25 m thick. THEMIS spectra from these units are inconsistent with quartz abundances > 5%, ruling out felsic compositions. THEMIS spectra are consistent with both anorthositic and basaltic lithologies; laboratory spectra of these lithologies are indistinguishable at THEMIS resolution. TES spectra do not match library anorthosites, with ~20-30% modeled pyroxene and ~5-10% olivine. Strong contribution from basaltic sediment to the TES spectra is unlikely given the deeper spectral contrast associated with the feldspathic units than underlying olivine basaltic bedrock. Future work will include spectral comparison with other low silica, feldspathic rocks to determine if there is an analog material that is consistent with both the VNIR and TIR observations. The geologic context of the Noachis units suggests volcanic, rather than plutonic origins, although shallow sills or subglacial eruptive units are possible. Previous experimental and modeling work by Nekvasil showed that feldspar-rich (up to 75 wt%), low-silica lavas may be produced from known Martian basalt by shallow crystallization

  7. Characterizing Fractured Rock with Geo-structural and Micro-structural Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dershowitz, William

    2015-04-01

    Fracture spatial structure and hydro-mechanical properties are key to the understanding of fractured rock geomechanical stability, hydrodynamics, and solute transport. This paper presents a quantitative approach to fracture characterization to provide information useful for stability and flow analysis, and for coupled flow/geomechanics. The approach presented is based on the concept of geo-structural, hydro-mechanical, and microstructural models. This approach is applicable for data collected from exposed surfaces (mapping, LiDAR, aero-magnetics), boreholes (core, optical images, and images based on resistivity and geophysical methods), and three dimensional imaging (seismic attributes and microseismics). Examples are presented comparing the results of conventional fracture characterization procedures and the recommended procedure. Fracture characterization for geo-structural fracture models is based on the idea that the geologically based fracture spatial pattern is the key, rather than individual fracture statistics. For example, while fracture intensity statistics can useful, the three dimensional fracture pattern for a bedded sedimentary rock can be better reproduced from the combination of a mechanical bedding model and a correlation between fracture spacing and bed height. In a fracture geo-structural model, the fracture spatial pattern, orientation, and intensity should be characterized in a combination of global and local coordinate systems. While some fracture sets may be oriented relative to the regional tectonics (the global coordinate system), other fracture sets are oriented relative to bedding (a local coordinate system). Fracture hydro-mechanical models define the combination of (a) conductive fractures, (b) flow-barrier fractures, (c) fractures which provide storage porosity, (d) fractures of significance for kinematic stability, and (e) fractures of significance for rock mass strength and deformability. The hydromechanical fractures are a subset of

  8. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the sixth quarter of this research project the research team developed a method and the experimental procedures for acquiring the data needed for ultrasonic tomography of rock core samples under triaxial stress conditions as outlined in Task 10. Traditional triaxial compression experiments, where compressional and shear wave velocities are measured, provide little or no information about the internal spatial distribution of mechanical damage within the sample. The velocities measured between platen-to-platen or sensor-to-sensor reflects an averaging of all the velocities occurring along that particular raypath across the boundaries of the rock. The research team is attempting to develop and refine a laboratory equivalent of seismic tomography for use on rock samples deformed under triaxial stress conditions. Seismic tomography, utilized for example in crosswell tomography, allows an imaging of the velocities within a discrete zone within the rock. Ultrasonic or acoustic tomography is essentially the extension of that field technology applied to rock samples deforming in the laboratory at high pressures. This report outlines the technical steps and procedures for developing this technology for use on weak, soft chalk samples. Laboratory tests indicate that the chalk samples exhibit major changes in compressional and shear wave velocities during compaction. Since chalk is the rock type responsible for the severe subsidence and compaction in the North Sea it was selected for the first efforts at tomographic imaging of soft rocks. Field evidence from the North Sea suggests that compaction, which has resulted in over 30 feet of subsidence to date, is heterogeneously distributed within the reservoir. The research team will attempt to image this very process in chalk samples. The initial tomographic studies (Scott et al., 1994a,b; 1998) were accomplished on well cemented, competent rocks such as Berea sandstone. The extension of the technology to weaker samples is

  9. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand

  10. The ability of rock physics models to infer marine in situ pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Manga, Michael

    2014-12-01

    fluid pressure is an important parameter defining the mechanical strength of marine sediments. Obtaining high spatial resolution in situ pore pressure measurements in marine sediments, however, is a challenge, and as a result, only a handful of in situ pore pressure measurements exist at scientific drill sites. Integrating rock physics models with standard IODP/ODP measurements provides a potentially widely applicable approach for calculating in situ pore pressure. Here we use a rock physics approach to estimate in situ pore pressure at two Scientific Ocean Drill Sites where in situ pressure is well constrained: ODP Site 1173, used as reference for normal (hydrostatic) fluid pressures, and ODP Site 948, where previous studies infer high fluid pressures (λ* ˜ 0.45-0.95, where the pore pressure ratio λ* is defined as the pore pressure above hydrostatic divided by the difference between the largest principal stress and hydrostatic stress). Our analysis indicates that the rock physics method provides an accurate, low-precision method for estimating in situ pore pressure at these drill sites, and sensitivity analysis indicates this method can detect modestly high (λ* > 0.6) pore pressure at the 95% confidence level. This approach has broad applicability because it provides an inexpensive, high-resolution (meter-scale) method for retrospectively detecting and quantifying high pore pressure at any drill site where quality wireline logs and ocean drilling data exist.

  11. Mechanism of Mesozoic Volcanism in Northeastern China: Evidence from New Distribution Maps of Volcanic Rock and Petrogenesis of Acid Rock in Deep Songliao Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanchao; Liu, Jiaqi; Rasskazov, Sergei; Gao, Jinliang; Zhang, Yutao

    2014-05-01

    Northeastern China is located in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic belt, which is characterized by widespread Mesozoic volcanic rocks. At present, there are two different opinions concerning the mechanism of volcanism: one proposal is that volcanism was associated with the closure of Mongolia-Okhotsk (MO) Bay, but another suggestion is that the Mesozoic volcanism is controlled by the subduction of Paleo-Pacific plate. However, most studies have mainly focused on the Mesozoic volcanic rocks in Great Xing'an Range(GXR), lack of evidence from Songliao Basin. In order to exactly reveal the mechanism of volcanic rocks in Northeastern China, five new distribution maps of volcanic rocks in Northeast China are drawn and petrogenesis of Mesozoic volcanic rocks in Songliao Basin are obtained. Based on 1: 50000 geological maps, five distribution maps of volcanic rocks (1:2000000) in Northeastern China are recompiled: Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. The Early Jurassic volcanic rocks predominantly occur in the eastern Heilongjiang-Jilin province, with minor in Manzhouli in the western. The Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks are mainly founded in the western Liaoning provinces. The Early-Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks(170-146Ma) belong chemically to sub-alkaline series, implying an active continental margin setting. The Late Jurassic volcanic rocks(146-122Ma) mainly occur in the western GXR area, and the magma derived from enriched lithospheric mantle which is closely associated with the subduction of MO plate. The Early Cretaceous volcanic rocks(122-102Ma), widespread in GXR and Songliao basin, are mainly acid and erupt in extensional setting, probably associated with the lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric mantle upwelling caused by subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath eastern China. Constraints on the timing of MO Bay closure and the motion direction of Paleo-Pacific plate, we infer that:(1) In

  12. Mechanical heterogeneities along carbonate-bearing faults constrained from field and rock deformation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Carpenter, Brett; Tesei, Telemaco; Viti, Cecilia; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mollo, Silvio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2014-05-01

    Recent high-resolution GPS and seismological data have revealed that tectonic faults exhibit complex, multi-mode slip behavior. One way to improve our understanding of processes controlling the mode of slip is to study fault rock microstructures, collected from ancient faults exposed at Earth's surface or in deep boreholes and to characterize friction of the collected fault rocks. In several seismically active regions, like Italy, Greece, Iran, and China, a significant number of earthquakes nucleate and/or propagate through carbonates. For these reasons, we have been working to improve the characterization of carbonate bearing faults by integrating field and microstructural studies with mechanical data. Along some portions of carbonate fault zones: 1) the localization of deformation along sharp principal slipping zones (0.1-1 mm) made of fine-grained (0.1-10 μm) ultracataclasite and 2) the velocity weakening behavior of this material suggest a fast and seismic mechanism. Microstructural evidence indicates that seismic mechanisms are associated with thermally activated processes (i.e. dehydration and decarbonation). In other portions of these fault zones: 1) the distribution of deformation over thick (< 200 m) shear zones affected by pressure solution of carbonates and frictional sliding along foliated and clay-rich (illite-smectite) horizons, and 2) the velocity strengthening behavior of these foliated rocks indicate a slow and aseismic slip behavior. Sharp principal slipping zones that show high friction and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, indicate a fault patch capable of unstable slip with the ability to regain elastic strain energy. Conversely, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones showing low friction with no frictional healing suggest fault patches that can slip slowly and continuously with time. We are currently using a new biaxial apparatus with a pressure vessel to work on a large, 20x20 cm, experimental fault. In this fault we are reproducing

  13. A reactive transport model of CO2-water-rock interaction in a push-pull test in basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, J. J.; de Dieuleveult, C.; Agrinier, P.; Lagneau, V.

    2010-12-01

    Basaltic rock formations have been proposed as suitable hosts for CO2 storage. Basalts have a high content in silicate minerals, Ca and Mg, which neutralize the acidic CO2 injected solution. Moreover, under such conditions the formation of stable carbonate minerals, which is the safest way to store CO2, is favored. A series of CO2 injection tests were carried out at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory site (Palisades, New York, USA) in 2005 to assess the basalt neutralization capacity [1, 3]. The tests were conducted in the contact zone between the Palisades sill and the underlying Newark Basin sediments. The Palisades sill consists of dolerite rich in plagioclase and pyroxene [2]. The contact zone between the dolerite and the underlying sediments is characterized by chilled dolerite and contact-metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The essays consisted of single-well push-pull tests in which an CO2-rich solution was injected in the aquifer and pumped after an incubation period. NaCl was added as a inert tracer. In this work, we focus on one of those push-pull tests. HYTEC code [4] was used to make a reactive transport model. Hydraulic and transport parameters were adjusted by fitting the chloride breakthrough curve. The model shows that the chloride arrival is mainly controlled by the product of the porosity times the longitudinal dispersion. Chemistry results show that the composition of the system (total dissolved inorganic carbon, Ca, Na, and Mg) is governed by the dissolution rate of the minerals. In addition, ion exchange is suggested by Na data. As a future work, modeling of isotopic data to better quantify the dissolution rates is considered. References [1] Assayag, N., J. Matter, M. Ader, D. Goldberg, and P. Agrinier (2009),Water-rock interactions during a CO2 injection field-test: Implications on host rock dissolution and alteration effects, Chemical Geology,265(1-2), 227--235. [2] Goldberg, D., and K. Burgdorff (2005), Natural fracturing and petrophysical

  14. Fracture Mechanics Modelling of an In Situ Concrete Spalling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siren, Topias; Uotinen, Lauri; Rinne, Mikael; Shen, Baotang

    2015-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear waste disposal facilities, some sprayed concrete reinforced underground spaces will be in use for approximately 100 years. During this time of use, the local stress regime will be altered by the radioactive decay heat. The change in the stress state will impose high demands on sprayed concrete, as it may suffer stress damage or lose its adhesion to the rock surface. It is also unclear what kind of support pressure the sprayed concrete layer will apply to the rock. To investigate this, an in situ experiment is planned in the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility at Olkiluoto, Finland. A vertical experimental hole will be concreted, and the surrounding rock mass will be instrumented with heat sources, in order to simulate an increase in the surrounding stress field. The experiment is instrumented with an acoustic emission system for the observation of rock failure and temperature, as well as strain gauges to observe the thermo-mechanical interactive behaviour of the concrete and rock at several levels, in both rock and concrete. A thermo-mechanical fracture mechanics study is necessary for the prediction of the damage before the experiment, in order to plan the experiment and instrumentation, and for generating a proper prediction/outcome study due to the special nature of the in situ experiment. The prediction of acoustic emission patterns is made by Fracod 2D and the model later compared to the actual observed acoustic emissions. The fracture mechanics model will be compared to a COMSOL Multiphysics 3D model to study the geometrical effects along the hole axis.

  15. Water and abrasive jetting, and mechanical techniques expedite hard rock drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Kolle, J.J.

    1998-04-20

    Construction activities that require the placement of gas, electrical, or communication utilities in hard rock will benefit from lightweight systems capable of precisely drilling short, constant-radius arcs. Existing mechanical drilling systems are capable of drilling shallow directional holes, but the equipment is heavy, drilling rates are low, and costs are high. A comparison of approaches for rapidly drilling small-diameter (25--50 mm) and near-surface holes along a short-radius (30 m) arc, in a variety of hard rock types, is describes. Four approaches are considered: (1) rotary diamond drilling with a downhole motor; (2) ultra-high pressure (UHP) water jet drilling; (3) mechanically assisted UHP water jet drilling; and (4) abrasive jet drilling -- abrasive water jet and abrasive slurry jet. Data relating mechanical and hydraulic drilling parameters for each approach were compiled from literature and drilling tests for all four techniques. The drilling data are summarized in a common format to provide direct drilling efficiency comparisons for: jet pressure and hydraulic power, and thrust and torque requirements and abrasive feed.

  16. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  17. Field and in-situ rock-mechanics testing manual. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Shuri, F S; Feves, M L; Peterson, G L; Foster, K M; Kienle, Jr, C F

    1981-10-01

    Standardized field and in situ rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state of the art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

  18. Analytical, Experimental, and Modelling Studies of Lunar and Terrestrial Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of our research has been to understand the paths and the processes of planetary evolution that produced planetary surface materials as we find them. Most of our work has been on lunar materials and processes. We have done studies that obtain geological knowledge from detailed examination of regolith materials and we have reported implications for future sample-collecting and on-surface robotic sensing missions. Our approach has been to study a suite of materials that we have chosen in order to answer specific geologic questions. We continue this work under NAG5-4172. The foundation of our work has been the study of materials with precise chemical and petrographic analyses, emphasizing analysis for trace chemical elements. We have used quantitative models as tests to account for the chemical compositions and mineralogical properties of the materials in terms of regolith processes and igneous processes. We have done experiments as needed to provide values for geochemical parameters used in the models. Our models take explicitly into account the physical as well as the chemical processes that produced or modified the materials. Our approach to planetary geoscience owes much to our experience in terrestrial geoscience, where samples can be collected in field context and sampling sites revisited if necessary. Through studies of terrestrial analog materials, we have tested our ideas about the origins of lunar materials. We have been mainly concerned with the materials of the lunar highland regolith, their properties, their modes of origin, their provenance, and how to extrapolate from their characteristics to learn about the origin and evolution of the Moon's early igneous crust. From this work a modified model for the Moon's structure and evolution is emerging, one of globally asymmetric differentiation of the crust and mantle to produce a crust consisting mainly of ferroan and magnesian igneous rocks containing on average 70-80% plagioclase, with a large

  19. Combined thermodynamic-geochemical modeling in metamorphic geology: Boron as tracer of fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Halama, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative geochemical modeling is today applied in a variety of geological environments from the petrogenesis of igneous rocks to radioactive waste disposal. In addition, the development of thermodynamic databases and computer programs to calculate equilibrium phase diagrams has greatly advanced our ability to model geodynamic processes. Combined with experimental data on elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation, thermodynamic forward modeling unfolds enormous capacities that are far from exhausted. In metamorphic petrology the combination of thermodynamic and trace element forward modeling can be used to study and to quantify processes at spatial scales from μm to km. The thermodynamic forward models utilize Gibbs energy minimization to quantify mineralogical changes along a reaction path of a chemically open fluid/rock system. These results are combined with mass balanced trace element calculations to determine the trace element distribution between rock and melt/fluid during the metamorphic evolution. Thus, effects of mineral reactions, fluid-rock interaction and element transport in metamorphic rocks on the trace element and isotopic composition of minerals, rocks and percolating fluids or melts can be predicted. Here we illustrate the capacities of combined thermodynamic-geochemical modeling based on two examples relevant to mass transfer during metamorphism. The first example focuses on fluid-rock interaction in and around a blueschist-facies shear zone in felsic gneisses, where fluid-induced mineral reactions and their effects on boron (B) concentrations and isotopic compositions in white mica are modeled. In the second example, fluid release from a subducted slab, the associated transport of B as well as variations in B concentrations and isotopic compositions in liberated fluids and residual rocks are modeled. We compare the modeled results of both examples to geochemical data of natural minerals and rocks and demonstrate that the combination

  20. Performance Evaluation Test of the Orbit Screen Model 68A and the Komplet Model 48-25 Rock Crusher

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    screen and on a Komplet Italia , s.r.l., Model 48-25 rock crusher. The test was conducted during August 2008 at a U.S. Army test site in central... Italia , s.r.l., Model 48-25 Rock Crusher.......................................................... 2 2.3 ASV SR-80 Rubber-Tracked Skid-Steer Loader... Italia , s.r.l., Rock Crusher Testing ......................................................................... 16 5.1 Crushing Performance Test

  1. Glassy fragmental rocks of Macquarie Island (Southern Ocean): Mechanism of formation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, J. A.; Harb, N.; Portner, R. A.; Daczko, N. R.

    2009-04-01

    Glassy fragmental rocks are interlayered with pillow basalt and tabular basalt on Macquarie Island (54°30' S, 158°54' E). These facies formed along the Proto-Macquarie Spreading Ridge between 6 and 12 Ma and have since been uplifted and exposed on the apex of the Macquarie Ridge Complex. Through a combination of field and microscopic analyses, we investigate the submarine production, transportation, deposition and lithification of basalt and sideromelane clasts within a spreading-ridge environment. The findings of this study indicate that these glassy grains form predominantly by cooling-contraction granulation of pillow lava rinds while crystalline basalt clasts are derived from the fragmentation of pillows along concentric and radial cooling joints. Hyaloclastite breccias consist of crystalline volcanic clasts in a matrix of glassy fragments, and are termed pillow-fragment breccias when clasts identifiable as pillows account for > 25% of the cobble-sized fraction. This glassy fragmental sediment was transported predominantly by short-lived grain flows and deposited as a result of syn-eruptive talus accumulation. The above interpretations culminate in the production of a depositional model: these glassy fragmental rocks formed on the slopes of pillow cones following gravitational collapse of a destabilised cone flank along the Proto-Macquarie Spreading Ridge. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that palagonite alteration rims on glassy grains lithify the sediment. The findings may be used as an analogue for the formation of glassy fragmental rocks along past and present mid-oceanic ridges.

  2. Testing seismic hazard models with Be-10 exposure ages for precariously balanced rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, D. H.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Balco, G.; Biasi, G. P.; Brune, J. N.; Brune, R.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Kendrick, K. J.; Purvance, M.; Saleeby, I.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, the only empirical tool available to test maximum earthquake ground motions spanning timescales of 10 ky-1 My is the use of fragile geologic features, including precariously balanced rocks (PBRs). The ages of PBRs together with their areal distribution and mechanical stability ("fragility") constrain probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) over long timescales; pertinent applications include the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM) and tests for ground motion models (e.g., Cybershake). Until recently, age constraints for PBRs were limited to varnish microlamination (VML) dating techniques and sparse cosmogenic nuclide data; however, VML methods yield minimum limiting ages for individual rock surfaces, and the interpretations of cosmogenic nuclide data were ambiguous because they did not account for the exhumation history of the PBRs or the complex shielding of cosmic rays. We have recently published a robust method for the exposure dating of PBRs combining Be-10 profiles, a numerical model, and a three-dimensional shape model for each PBR constructed using photogrammetry (Balco et al., 2011, Quaternary Geochronology). Here, we use our published method to calculate new exposure ages for PBRs at 6 sites in southern California near the San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore faults, including: Lovejoy Buttes (9 +/- 1 ka), Round Top (35 +/- 1 ka), Pacifico (19 +/- 1 ka, but with a poor fit to data), Beaumont South (17 +/- 2 ka), Perris (24 +/- 2 ka), and Benton Road (40 +/- 1 ka), in addition to the recently published age of 18.5 +/- 2.0 ka for a PBR at the Grass Valley site. We combine our ages and fragilities for each PBR, and use these data to test the USGS 2008 NSHM PGA with 2% in 50 year probability, USGS 2008 PSHA deaggregations, and basic hazard curves from USGS 2002 NSHM data. Precariously balanced rock in southern California

  3. Mechanical study of the Chartreuse Fold-and-Thrust Belt: relationships between fluids overpressure and decollement within the Toarcian source-rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelon, Josselin; Sassi, William; Burov, Evgueni

    2016-04-01

    Many source-rocks are shale and constitute potential detachment levels in Fold-and-Thrust Belts (FTB): the toarcian Schistes-Cartons in the French Chartreuse FTB for example. Their mechanical properties can change during their burial and thermal maturation, as for example when large amount of hydrocarbon fluids are generated. A structural reconstruction of the Chartreuse FTB geo-history places the Toarcian Formation as the major decollement horizon. In this work, a mechanical analysis integrating the fluids overpressuring development is proposed to discuss on the validity of the structural interpretation. At first, an analogue of the Chartreuse Toarcian Fm, the albanian Posidonia Schist, is documented as it can provide insights on its initial properties and composition of its kerogen content. Laboratory characterisation documents the vertical evolution of the mineralogical, geochemical and mechanical parameters of this potential decollement layer. These physical parameters (i.e. Total Organic Carbon (TOC), porosity/permeability relationship, friction coefficient) are used to address overpressure buildup in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB with TEMISFlow Arctem Basin modelling approach (Faille et al, 2014) and the structural emplacement of the Chartreuse thrust units using the FLAMAR thermo-mechanical model (Burov et al, 2014). The hydro-mechanical modeling results highlight the calendar, distribution and magnitude of the overpressure that developed within the source-rock in the footwall of a simple fault-bend fold structure localized in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB. Several key geological conditions are required to create an overpressure able to fracture the shale-rocks and induce a significant change in the rheological behaviour: high TOC, low permeability, favourable structural evolution. These models highlight the importance of modeling the impact of a diffuse natural hydraulic fracturing to explain fluids propagation toward the foreland within

  4. A coupled thermo-poro-mechanical finite element analysis of fractured porous rocks using a cohesive interface element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Regueiro, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The coupling between multiphase flow, heat transfer, and poromechanics in fractured geomaterials has aroused great interest in the areas of geomechanics, geoenvironmental engineering, and petroleum engineering. Relevant applications include nuclear waste repositories, geological sequestration of CO2, geothermal systems, and exploitation of shale gas reservoirs. The paper presents a fully coupled thermo-poro-mechanical (TPM) cohesive interface element (CIE) model, which can represent fluid and heat flow along and across the fracture, and shear/normal deformation of the fracture surfaces. The proposed model is then applied to analyze two popular geological engineering problems using the finite element method (FEM) with a small strain formulation. The first application is the fracturing process in organic-rich shale due to heating. In the finite element analysis, multiple horizontal microcracks parallel to the bedding plane are assumed to preexist in the porous source rock, and are represented by coupled TPM cohesive interface elements. The porous bulk rock is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic (for the time being, with transverse isotropy a natural extension), and linearly elastic. The excess pore fluid pressure, which mainly causes the development of the fractures, is actually induced by the rapid decomposition of organic matter during heating according to the literature. However, the involved complex chemical reaction process is beyond the scope of the paper, and is therefore substituted by a fluid injection process within the cracks under room temperature (25C) and high temperature (400C) in the paper. We investigate the fracture propagation due to pore fluid pressure increase and the development of fracture-induced permeability. The second application is a nuclear waste repository in a partially saturated fractured rock. Multiphase transport of moisture and heat, thermally-induced stress, as well as the change of fracture apertures are investigated due to short

  5. Surface Complexation Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption in the Saturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Kelkar, S.; Fabryka-Martin, J. T.; Caporuscio, F. A.; Meijer, A.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. DOE is preparing to submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to create a geologic repository at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. In the event of a radionuclide release, the ground water beneath the Yucca Mountain is the primary medium through which most radionuclides might move from the geologic repository to the accessible environment. Sorption of radionuclides onto rock surfaces is one of the important processes affecting the transport in the saturated zone of Yucca Mountain (SZ). For this reason, a considerable experimental effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the measurements of sorption distribution coefficients (Kd) for various radionuclides in rock samples from the vicinity of the repository site at the Yucca Mountain. Despite the quantity and quality of the data, they are strictly valid only under the experimental conditions at which they were measured, whereas the Kd distributions used as inputs in performance assessment calculations need to represent the range of geochemical conditions and rock types expected to occur along the transport pathways. Hence geochemical modeling was used to calculate and predict chemical speciation of elements of interest in solid and solution under a variety of different conditions. The computer code PHREEQC v2.3 and the thermodynamic database PHREEQCDATA025.DAT were used for this geochemical modeling. The modeling provides a basis for extrapolating the experimentally derived Kd's, and provides improved understanding of the underlying sorption mechanisms, thus justifying and defending the Kd's selected for further radionuclide transport modeling development. This presentation focuses on the elements Am, U, Np and Pu which sorb in the SZ primarily via surface complexation reactions. We discuss quantitatively the influence of groundwater compositions, rock surface area, binding constants, and

  6. Surface Complexation Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption in the Saturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Kelkar, S.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Caporuscio, F.; Meijer, A.

    2007-12-01

    The U.S. DOE is preparing to submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to create a geologic repository at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. In the event of a radionuclide release, the ground water beneath the Yucca Mountain is the primary medium through which most radionuclides might move from the geologic repository to the accessible environment. Sorption of radionuclides onto rock surfaces in the saturated zone of Yucca Mountain (SZ) is one of the most important processes retarding their release to the accessible environment. For this reason, a considerable experimental effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the measurements of sorption distribution coefficients (Kd) for various radionuclides in rock samples from the vicinity of the repository site at the Yucca Mountain. Despite the quantity and quality of the data, they are strictly valid only under the experimental conditions at which they were measured, whereas the Kd distributions used as inputs in performance assessment calculations need to represent the range of geochemical conditions and rock types expected to occur along the transport pathways. Hence geochemical modeling was used to calculate and predict chemical speciation of elements of interest in solid and solution under a variety of different conditions. The computer code PHREEQC v2.3 and the thermodynamic database PHREEQCDATA025.DAT were used for this geochemical modeling. The modeling provides a basis for extrapolating the experimentally derived Kd's, and provides improved understanding of the underlying sorption mechanisms, thus justifying and defending the Kd's selected for further radionuclide transport modeling development. This presentation focuses on the elements Am, U, Np and Pu which sorb in the SZ primarily via surface complexation reactions. We discuss quantitatively the influence of groundwater compositions, rock surface area

  7. Fractal characteristics of seismic process in rock mass surrounding the excavation at mining. Mathematical modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, M. O.; Makarov, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown in the paper that the system of equations of solid mechanics, which has a mixed type, demonstrate the most common features of evolution of nonlinear dynamic systems. Previous investigations of seismic process were carried out on the base of simplified (sand-pile, land-slide) models which gave a graph of recurrence of seismic events and information about the state of self-organized criticality (SOC). However, these simplified models do not contain the information about the stress-strain state of the loaded geomedia and its proximity to the critical state. In the proposed paper the model of rock mass with excavation is constructed and general step of roof caving is modelled. On the base of these modelling the formation of critical state in loaded geomedia is studied. The fluctuations of stress-strain state at different points of geomedia are studied as the reflection of fracture process occurring in the main elements of rock mass: roof and floor, when the coal face is advanced. It is shown that the PDF dependencies, amplitude-frequency characteristics reflect the state of the rock mass and might be considered as the fractal characteristics of fracture process within. The evolution of these dependencies shows the dramatic change when the critical state is formed in the rock mass surrounding the underground opening.

  8. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  9. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  10. Assessment of rock mechanical properties and seismic slope stability in variably weathered layered basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, William; Clark, Marin; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Von Voigtlander, Jennifer; Bateman, Julie; Lowe, Katherine; Hirose, Mitsuhito; Anderson, Suzanne; Anderson, Robert; Lynch, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    A field and laboratory experimental study was conducted to assess the influence of weathering on the mechanical properties of basalts in the region of the Kohala volcano on the island of Hawaii. Through the systematic characterization of the weathering profiles developed in different precipitation regimes, we aim to explain the regional pattern of stability of slopes in layered basalts that were observed during the 2006 Mw 6.7 Kiholo Bay earthquake. While deeper weathering profiles on the wet side of the island might be expected to promote more and larger landslides, the distribution of landslides during the Kiholo Bay earthquake did not follow this anticipated trend. Landslide frequency (defined as number of landslides divided by total area) was similar on the steepest slopes (> 50-60) for both the dry and the wet side of the study area suggesting relatively strong ground materials irrespective of weathering. The study location is ideally suited to investigate the role of precipitation, and more broadly of climate, on the mechanical properties of the local rock units because the presence of the Kohala volcano produces a significant precipitation gradient on what are essentially identical basaltic flows. Mean annual precipitation (MAP) varies by more than an order of magnitude, from 200 mm/year on the western side of the volcano to 4000 mm/year in the eastern side. We will present results of measured shear wave velocities using a seismic surface wave methodology. These results were paired with laboratory testing on selected basalt specimens that document the sample-scale shear wave velocity and unconfined compressive strength of the basaltic rocks. Shear wave velocity and unconfined strength of the rocks are correlated and are both significantly lower in weathered rocks near the ground surface than at depth. This weathering-related reduction in shear wave velocity extends to greater depths in areas of high precipitation compared to areas of lower precipitation

  11. Shrinkage Cracking: A mechanism for self-sustaining carbon mineralization reactions in olivine rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xing, T.; Xiao, X.; De Andrade, V. J. D.; Karato, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The hydration and carbonation of olivine results in an up to ~44% increase in solid molar volume, which may choke off of fluid supply and passivate reactive surfaces, thus preventing further carbonation reactions. The carbonation of olivine has ben studied extensively in the laboratory. To date, observations from these experimental studies indicate that carbonation reaction rates generally decrease with time and the extent of carbonation is limited in olivine rocks. Field studies, however, show that 100% hydration and carbonation occur naturally in ultramafic rocks. The disagreement between the laboratory results under controlled conditions and the field observations underlines the lack of understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the self-sustaining carbonation interaction in nature. We developed a state-of-the-art pressurized hydrothermal cell that is transparent to X-rays to characterize the real-time evolution of pore geometry during fluid-rock interaction using in-situ synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography. Through a time series of high-resolution 3-dimensional images, we document the microstructural evolution of a porous olivine aggregate reacting with a sodium bicarbonate solution at elevated pressure and temperature conditions. We observed porosity increases, near constant rate of crystal growth, and pervasive reaction-induced fractures. Based on the nanometer scale tomography data, we propose that shrinkage cracking is the mechanism responsible for producing new reactive surface and keep the carbonation reaction self-sustaining in our experiment. Shrinkage cracks are commonly observed in drying mud ponds, cooling lava flows and ice wedge fields. Stretching of a contracting surface bonded to a substrate of nearly constant dimensions leads to a stress buildup in the surface layer. When the stress exceeds the tensile strength, polygonal cracks develop in the surface layer. In our experiments, the stretching mismatch between the surface and interior of

  12. Surface Morphology of Active Normal Faults in Hard Rock: Implications for the Mechanics of the Asal Rift, Djibouti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzuti, P.; Mignan, A.; King, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanical stretching models have been previously proposed to explain the process of continental break-up through the example of the Asal Rift, Djibouti, one of the few places where the early stages of seafloor spreading can be observed. In these models, deformation is distributed starting at the base of a shallow seismogenic zone, in which sub-vertical normal faults are responsible for subsidence whereas cracks accommodate extension. Alternative models suggest that extension results from localized magma injection, with normal faults accommodating extension and subsidence above the maximum reach of the magma column. In these magmatic intrusion models, normal faults have dips of 45-55° and root into dikes. Using mechanical and kinematics concepts and vertical profiles of normal fault scarps from an Asal Rift campaign, where normal faults are sub-vertical on surface level, we discuss the creation and evolution of normal faults in massive fractured rocks (basalt). We suggest that the observed fault scarps correspond to sub-vertical en echelon structures and that at greater depth, these scarps combine and give birth to dipping normal faults. Finally, the geometry of faulting between the Fieale volcano and Lake Asal in the Asal Rift can be simply related to the depth of diking, which in turn can be related to magma supply. This new view supports the magmatic intrusion model of early stages of continental breaking.

  13. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  14. Winter Ice and Snow as Models of Igneous Rock Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romey, William D.

    1983-01-01

    Examines some features of ice and snow that offer teachers and researchers help in understanding many aspects of igneous processes and configurations. Careful observation of such processes as melting, decay, evolution, and snow accumulation provide important clues to understanding processes by which many kinds of rocks form. (Author/JN)

  15. A visco-poroelastic damage model for modelling compaction and brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells is often used to increase heat extraction from deep geothermal reservoirs. Initiation and propagation of fractures due to pore pressure build-up increase the effective permeability of the porous medium. Understanding the processes controlling the initiation of fractures, the evolution of their geometries and the hydro-mechanical impact on transport properties of the porous medium is therefore of great interest for geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes occurring during deformation of a porous rock. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To validate and illustrate the model, simulations of the deformation behaviour of cylindrical porous Bentheimer sandstone samples under different confining pressures are compared to experiments. The first experiment under low confining pressure leads to shear failure, the second for high confining pressure leads to cataclastic compaction and the third one with intermediate confining pressure correspond to a transitional regime between the two firsts. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field

  16. Nanoscale Properties of Rocks and Subduction Zone Rheology: Inferences for the Mechanisms of Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    Grain boundaries are the key for the understanding of mineral reaction kinetics. More generally, nanometer scale processes involved in breaking and establishing bonds at reaction sites determine how and at which rate bulk rock properties change in response to external tectonic forcing and possibly feed back into various geodynamic processes. A particular problem is the effects of grain-boundary energy on the kinetics of the olivine-spinel phase transformation in subducting slabs. Slab rheology is affected in many ways by this (metastable) mineral phase change. Sluggish kinetics due to metastable hindrance is likely to cause particular difficulties, because of possible strong non-linear feedback loops between strain-rate and change of creep properties during transformation. In order to get these nanoscale properties included into thermo-mechanical models, reliable kinetic data is required. The measurement of grain-boundary energies is, however, a rather difficult problem. Conventional methods of grain boundary surface tension measurement include (a) equilibrium angles at triple junction (b) rotating ball method (c) thermal groove method, and others (Gottstein & Shvindlerman, 1999). Here I suggest a new method that allows for the derivation of grain-boundary energies for an isochemical phase transformation based on experimental (in-situ) kinetic data in combination with a corresponding dynamic scaling law (Riedel and Karato, 1997). The application of this method to the olivine-spinel phase transformation in subducting slabs provides a solution to the extrapolation problem of measured kinetic data: Any kinetic phase boundary measured at the laboratory time scale can be "scaled" to the correct critical isotherm at subduction zones, under experimentelly "forbidden" conditions (Liou et al., 2000). Consequences for the metastability hypothesis that relates deep seismicity with olivine metastability are derived and discussed. References: Gottstein G, Shvindlerman LS (1999

  17. Computational Modeling of Ductile Folding in Sedimentary Rocks of the Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, R. I.; Sanz, P. F.; Fiore, P. E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Folding of sedimentary rocks occurs at depths in Earth's crust where some layers respond by brittle deformation while others respond by ductile deformation. Folding results from a number of mechanisms including buckling due to lateral tectonic compression and/or slip on thrust faults in the underlying strata. Movements experienced by folded strata are typically very large (tens to hundreds of meters or more) and may include significant rigid body translation and rotation, in addition to the straining of the folded layers. More specific types of straining could include any one or a combination of the following: plate-like bending, in-plane extension, in-plane contraction, and either in-plane or out-of-plane shearing. The stress state resulting from the overburden load, slip on underlying faults, and the associated folding could induce strain localization even as the layer continues to deform plastically. In this paper we present a mathematical model for capturing isothermal ductile folding processes and the accompanying strain localization in sedimentary rocks using nonlinear continuum mechanics and finite element modeling. We use a fully Lagrangian approach along with multiplicative plasticity theory for finite deformations, considering the effects of all three invariants of the stress tensor in the constitutive description. We also simulate the rigid body translation, finite rotation, and subsequent rupturing of preexisting faults using finite deformation kinematics and stick-slip contact mechanics. We apply the technique to simulate the three-dimensional folding of selected Paleozoic and Mesozoic formations located above the Madison limestone in the Sheep Mountain anticline, formed during the Laramide orogeny in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER15454, and U.S. National Science Foundation, Grant No. CMG-0417521.

  18. Fold-Related Fractures and Postfolding Fracturing, Rock Mass Condition Analyses and Geological Modelling in Turtle Mountain (Alberta Canada).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, Florian; Epard, Jean-Luc; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Pedrazzini, Andrea; Froese, Corey

    2010-05-01

    Turtle Mountain is located in the Foothills in southwest Alberta and is formed by highly fractured Paleozoic carbonates rocks and Mesozoic clastic rocks. This area is mainly affected by two major geological structures that are the Turtle Mountain anticline and the Turtle Mountain thrust. This site has become famous after a 30 M m3 rock avalanche of massive limestone and dolostone affecting the eastern mountainside of Turtle Mountain on April 1903. This resulted in more than 70 casualties and buried part of the Frank village. A detailed analysis of predisposing factors leading to failure has been performed using a structural and rock mass condition field analysis (geological and geotechnical mapping, rock mass classification, Schmidt hammer). In addition remote sensing analyses have been provided (High Resolution Digital Elevation Model, Coltop 3D software). The local variations of discontinuity sets and rock mass conditions has been estimated in order to separate the study zone into homogenous structural domains and to correlate them with unstable areas (volumes and failure mechanisms). The aim of this study is to build a theoretical model that shows the relationship between the anticline geometry and the fracturating density. It should be able to determine the origin and the chronology of the discontinuity sets in relation to the tectonic phases (mainly the folding one). A 3D geological model based on several geological profiles performed perpendicular to the Turtle Mountain anticline is necessary to make a detailed analysis. The preliminary results indicate the role of discontinuity sets in the failure mechanisms of the mountain. Moreover if some sets only appear in one limb of the anticline, some others are present in both limbs indicating their posteriority compared with the first ones. Furthermore, a relation between the distance to the fold axis and the quality of the rock mass (Geological Strength Index) has been statistically pointed out, illustrating the

  19. Mechanical Assessment of the Drep Shield Subject to Vibratory Motion and Dynamic and Static Rock Loading

    SciTech Connect

    R.C. Quittmeyer

    2005-11-16

    The purpose of the drip shield (DS) is to divert water that may seep into emplacement drifts from contacting the waste packages, and to protect the waste packages from impact or static loading from rockfall. The objective of this document is to summarize, into one location, the results of a series of supporting engineering calculations that were developed to study the effect of static and dynamic loads on the mechanical performance of the DS. The potential DS loads are a result of: (1) Potential earthquake vibratory ground motion, and resulting interaction of the DS, waste package and pallet, and drift invert; (2) Dynamic impacts of rockfall resulting from emplacement drift damage as a result of earthquake vibratory motion; and (3) Static load of the caved rock rubble that may come to rest on the DS as a result of vibratory motion or from time-dependent yielding of the rock mass surrounding the emplacement drift. The potential mechanical failure mechanisms that may result from these loads include: (1) Overturning and/or separation of the interlocking DS segments; (2) Loss of structural integrity and stability of the DS, including excessive deformation or buckling; and (3) Localized damage to the top and side-wall plates of the DS. The scope of this document is limited to summarizing results presented in the supporting calculations in the areas of analysis of the potential for DS collapse, and determination of the damaged surface area of the DS plates. New calculations are presented to determine whether or not separation of DSs occur under vibratory motion.

  20. Geo-structural modelling for potential large rock slide in Machu Picchu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spizzichino, D.; Delmonaco, G.; Margottini, C.; Mazzoli, S.

    2009-04-01

    The monumental complex of the Historical Sanctuary of Machu Picchu, declared as World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983, is located in the Andean chain at approx. 80 km from Cuzco (Peru) and at an elevation of 2430 m a.s.l. along the Urubamba River Valley. From a geological point of view, the Machu Picchu granitoid pluton, forming part of the larger "Quillabamba granite", is one of a series of plutons intruded along the axial zone of the high Eastern Cordillera Permo-Liassic rift system including a variety of rock types, dominantly granites and granodiorites. The most evident structures at the outcrop scale consist of planar joint sets that may be variably reactivated and exhibiting 4 main orientations. At present, the site is affected by geological risk due to frequent landslides that threaten security and tourist exploitation. In the last years, the international landslide scientific community has promoted a multi-discipline joint programme mainly finalised to slope deformation monitoring and analysis after the warning, launched in 2001, of a potential collapse of the citadel, caused by a huge rock slide. The contribute of the Italian research team was devoted to implement a landslide risk analysis and an innovative remote sensing techniques. The main scope of this work is to present the implementation of a geo-structural modelling aimed at defining present and potential slope stability conditions of the Machu Picchu Citadel. Data have been collected by geological, structural and geomechanical field surveys and laboratory tests in order to reconstruct the geomorphological evolution of the area. Landslide types and evolution are strictly controlled by regional tectonic uplift and structural setting. Several slope instability phenomena have been identified and classified according to mechanism, material involved and state of activity. Rock falls, debris flows, rock slides and debris slides are the main surveyed landslide types. Rock slides and rock falls may produce

  1. Alteration of Fractured Rocks Due to Coupled Chemical and Mechanical Processes: High-Resolution Simulations and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Pasha

    Engineering activities such as enhanced geothermal energy production and improved oil recovery techniques are heavily dependent on the permeability of the subsurface, while others such as CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste disposal rely on the efficiency of rock formations as transport barriers. In either case fractures provide the main pathways for fluid flow and transport, especially in rocks with lower matrix porosity. Laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying the chemo-mechanical responses of fractures have shown a range of results, some of which contradict simple conceptual models. For example, under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, where one would expect an overall increase in permeability, experiments show that permeability increases under some conditions and decreases under others. Recent experiments have attempted to link these core-scale observations to the relevant small-scale processes occurring within fractures. Results suggest that the loss of mechanical strength in asperities due to chemical alteration may cause non-uniform deformation and alteration of fracture apertures. However, due to the lack of direct micro-scale measurements of the coupled chemical and mechanical processes that lead to alteration of contacting fracture surfaces, our ability to predict the long-term evolution of fractures is still limited. To explore the processes that control permeability evolution, I developed a computational model that uses micro-scale surface roughness and explicitly couples dissolution and elastic deformation to calculate local alterations in fracture aperture under chemical and mechanical stresses. A depth-averaged algorithm of fracture flow is used to model reactive transport and chemical alteration of the fracture surfaces. Then, I deform the resulting altered fracture-surfaces using an algorithm that calculates the elastic deformation. The results of the model are compared with flow-through experiments conducted on fractured limestone. The

  2. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  3. Analysis of propagation mechanisms of stimulation-induced fractures in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael; Renner, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Effectivity of geothermal energy production depends crucially on the heat exchange between the penetrated hot rock and the circulating water. Hydraulic stimulation of rocks at depth intends to create a network of fractures that constitutes a large area for exchange. Two endmembers of stimulation products are typically considered, tensile hydro-fractures that propagate in direction of the largest principal stress and pre-existing faults that are sheared when fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress acting on them. The understanding of the propagation mechanisms of fractures under in-situ conditions is still incomplete despite intensive research over the last decades. Wing-cracking has been suggested as a mechanism of fracture extension from pre-existent faults with finite length that are induced to shear. The initiation and extension of the wings is believed to be in tensile mode. Open questions concern the variability of the nominal material property controlling tensile fracture initiation and extension, the mode I facture toughness KIC, with in-situ conditions, e.g., its mean-stress dependence. We investigated the fracture-propagation mechanism in different rocks (sandstones and granites) under varying conditions mimicking those representative for geothermal systems. To determine KIC-values we performed 3-point bending experiments. We varied the confining pressure, the piston velocity, and the position of the chevron notch relative to the loading configuration. Additional triaxial experiments at a range of confining pressures were performed to study wing crack propagation from artificial flaws whose geometrical characteristics, i.e., length, width, and orientation relative to the axial load are varied. We monitored acoustic emissions to constrain the spacio-temporal evolution of the fracturing. We found a significant effect of the length of the artificial flaw and the confining pressure on wing-crack initiation but did not observe a systematic dependence

  4. Model for Understanding Flow Processes and Distribution in Rock Rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. T.; Manepally, C.; Fedors, R.; Gwo, J.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, suggest that degradation of emplacement drifts may be caused by either persistent stresses induced by thermal decay of the spent nuclear fuel disposed in the drifts or seismic ground motion. Of significant interest to the performance of the repository is how seepage of water onto the engineered barriers in degraded emplacement drifts would be altered by rubble. Difficulty arises because of the uncertainty associated with the heterogeneity of the natural system complicated by the unknown fragment size and distribution of the rock rubble. A prototype experiment was designed to understand the processes that govern the convergence and divergence of flow in the rubble. This effort is expected to provide additional realism in the corresponding process models and performance assessment of the repository, and to help evaluate the chemistry of water contacting the waste as well as conditions affecting waste package corrosion in the presence of rubble. The rubble sample for the experiment was collected from the lower lithophysal unit of the Topopah Spring (Tptpll) unit in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift and is used as an approximate analog. Most of the potential repository is planned to be built in the Tptpll unit. Sample fragment size varied from 1.0 mm [0.04 in] to 15 cm [6 in]. Ongoing experiments use either a single or multiple sources of infiltration at the top to simulate conditions that could exist in a degraded drift. Seepage is evaluated for variable infiltration rates, rubble particle size distribution, and rubble layering. Comparison of test results with previous bench-scale tests performed on smaller-sized fragments and different geological media will be presented. This paper is an independent product of CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the view or regulatory position of NRC. The NRC staff views expressed herein are preliminary

  5. On the location of microseismic sources in instable rock slope areas: heterogeneous vs. homogenous 3D velocity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coviello, Velio; Manconi, Andrea; Occhiena, Cristina; Arattano, Massimo; Scavia, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Rock-falls are one of the most common and hazardous phenomena occurring in mountainous areas. The formation of cracks in rocks is often accompanied by a sudden release of energy, which propagates in form of elastic waves and can be detected by a suitable transducer array. Therefore, geophones are among the most effective monitoring devices to investigate eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. However, the identification of an efficient procedure to forecast rock-fall occurrence in space and time is still an open challenge. In this study, we aim at developing an efficient procedure to locate microseismic sources relevant to cracking mechanisms, and thus gather indications on eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. Common seismic location tools usually implement homogeneous or multilayered velocity models but, in case of high slope gradients and heavily fractured rock masses, these simplifications may lead to errors on the correct estimation of the source location. Thus, we analyzed how the consideration of 3D material properties on the propagation medium may influence the location. In the framework of the Alcotra 2007-2013 Project MASSA (Medium And Small Size rock-fall hazard Assessment), a monitoring system composed by 8 triaxial geophones was installed in 2010 at the J.A. Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Italian Alps) and during the first year of operation the network recorded more than 600 natural events that exceeded a fixed threshold [1]. Despite the harsh environmental conditions of the study area, eighteen points distributed as uniformly as possible in space were selected for hammering. The artificial source dataset of known coordinates was used to constrain a 3D heterogeneous velocity model through a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique. In order to mitigate the intrinsic uncertainties of the inversion procedure, bootstrapping was performed to extend the dataset and a statistical analysis was issued to improve the model

  6. Dyke propagation and tensile fracturing at high temperature and pressure, insights from experimental rock mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Benson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that magma ascends trough the crust by the process of dyking. To enable dyke emplacement, basement rocks typically fail in a mode 1 fracture, which acts as conduits for magma transport. An overpressure of the ascending magma will further open/widen the fracture and permit the fracture to propagate. In order to further understand the emplacement and arrest of dykes in the subsurface, analogue and numerical studies have been conducted. However, a number of assumptions regarding rock mechanical behaviour frequently has to be made as such data are very hard to directly measure at the pressure/temperature conditions of interest: high temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Such data are key to simulating the magma intrusion dynamics through the lithologies that underlie the volcanic edifice. Here we present a new laboratory setup, which allows us to investigate the tensile fracturing properties under both temperature and confining pressure, and the emplacement of molten material within the newly formed fracture. We have modified a traditional tri-axial test assembly setup to be able to use a Paterson type High Pressure, High Temperature deformation apparatus. Sample setup consists of cylindrical rock samples with a 22 mm diameter and a 8 mm bore at their centre, filled with a material chosen as such that it's in a liquid state at the experimental temperature and solid at room temperature to enable post-experiment analysis. The top and lower parts of the rock sample are fitted with plugs, sealing in the melt. The assembly is then placed between ceramic pistons to ensure there are no thermal gradients across the sample. The assembly is jacketed to ensure the confining medium (Ar) cannot enter the assembly. A piston is driven into the sample such that the inner conduit materials pressure is slowly increased. At some point a sufficient pressure difference between the inner and outer surfaces causes the sample to deform and fail in the tensile regime

  7. Quantitative 3D model of light transmittance through translucent rocks applied to the hypolithic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Jolitz, Rebecca D; McKay, Christopher P

    2013-07-01

    In extreme desert environments, photosynthetic microorganisms often live on the buried undersides of translucent rocks. Computing the light level reaching these locations requires 3D modeling of a finite rock. We report on Monte Carlo calculations of skylight and sunlight transmission through a partially buried flat cylindrical rock using one billion photons per simulation. Transmitted light level drops inversely with increasing rock opacity, as expected for purely scattering media. For a half-buried rock with an extinction coefficient of 0.1 cm(-1) (opacity of 0.2), transmission at the bottom is 64 % for sunlight at a solar zenith angle of 60° and 82 % for skylight. Transmitted light level increases slowly with increasing scattering asymmetry factor of the rock independent of illumination or depth buried. Transmitted sunlight at zenith through a thick half-buried rock (opacity of 0.6) is six times brighter at the bottom than the subsurface sides. Skylight transmits equally to the subsurface sides and bottom. When the sun is not straight overhead, the sunward side of the rock is brighter than the underside of the rock. Compared to the sunlight transmitted to the bottom, transmitted sunlight inclined at 60° is 24 times brighter at the subsurface side towards the sun and 14 times brighter at the subsurface side 70° away from the sun. Transmitted sunlight emitted from zenith and skylight is uniformly bright at the bottom regardless of how deeply the rock is buried. Sunlight not at zenith transmits preferentially to the sunward bottom edge depending on the depth the rock is buried.

  8. Resonant Column Apparatus Tests on Intact and Jointed Rock Specimens with Numerical Modelling Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perino, A.; Barla, G.

    2015-01-01

    The determination of rock mass dynamic parameters including the influence of joints/discontinuities on wave propagation is of interest for solving problems in geophysics, rock protective engineering, rock dynamics and earthquake engineering. This topic is covered in this paper by means of laboratory tests on intact and jointed rock specimens performed with the resonant column apparatus (RCA). Attention is dedicated to the determination, with this equipment, generally used for testing soils, of the shear modulus at small strain and the damping ratio of intact and jointed rock specimens. A correction procedure based on the RCA tests performed on aluminium specimens is described. The results of the tests performed are analysed in detail. Three-dimensional distinct element method modelling is used to evaluate the applicability of the RCA and the correctness of the laboratory tests performed. A comparison with the results obtained using the scattering matrix method is also presented.

  9. Characterizing and Modelling Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Aquifer: A Case Study at Shuangliou Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shih-Meng; Ke, Chien-Chung; Lo, Hung-Chieh; Lin, Yen-Tsu; Huang, Chi-Chao

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of a relatively sparse data set, fractured aquifers are difficult to be characterized and modelled. The three-dimensional configuration of transmissive fractures and fracture zones is needed to be understood flow heterogeneity in the aquifer. Innovative technologies for the improved interpretation are necessary to facilitate the development of accurate predictive models of ground-water flow and solute transport or to precisely estimate groundwater potential. To this end, this paper presents a procedure for characterizing and modelling preferential flow path in the fractured rock aquifer carried out at Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site in Shuangliou Forest Recreation Area, Pingtung County, Southern Taiwan. The Shuangliou well field is a 40 by 30-meter area consisting of 6 wells (one geological well, one pumping well and four hydrogeological testing wells). The bedrock at the site is mainly composed of slate and intercalated by meta-sandstone. The overburden consists of about 5.6 m of gravel deposits. Based on results of 100 m geological borehole with borehole televiewer logging, vertical flow logging and full-wave sonic logging, high transmissivity zones in the bedrock underlying the well field were identified. One of transmissivity zone (at the depths of 30~32 m) and its fracture orientation(N56/54) selected for devising a multiple well system with 4 boreholes (borehole depths :45m, 35m, 35m and 25m, respectively), which were utilized to perform cross-borehole flow velocity data under the ambient flow and pumped flow conditions to identify preferential flow paths. Results from the cross-borehole test show the preferential flow pathways are corresponding to the predicted ones. Subsequently, a 3-D discrete fracture network model based on outcrop data was generated by the FracMan code. A validation between observed and simulated data has proved that the present model can accurately predict the hydrogeological properties (e.g., number of fractures

  10. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  11. (Relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of trace elements during contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of major, minor, and trace elements during the contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks. The large contrasts in chemical potentials of SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and CaO across a granitic pluton-limestone contact may induce metasomatism. In addition, rare earth and transition metal elements may act as tracers, and their redistribution during metamorphism may record convective cooling processes. The results of this study may have an application toward the problem of radioactive waste disposal and the degree to which radioactive nuclides may be expected to migrate during geologically significant periods of time.

  12. An experimental study of the mechanism of failure of rocks under borehole jack loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van, T. K.; Goodman, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests with an experimental jack and an NX-borehole jack are reported. The following conclusions were made: Under borehole jack loading, a circular opening in a brittle solid fails by tensile fracturing when the bearing plate width is not too small. Two proposed contact stress distributions can explain the mechanism of tensile fracturing. The contact stress distribution factor is a material property which can be determined experimentally. The borehole tensile strength is larger than the rupture flexural strength. Knowing the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stress field, borehole jack test results can be used to determine the borehole tensile strength. Knowing the orientation of the in situ stress field and the flexural strength of the rock substance, the magnitude of the in situ stress components can be calculated. The detection of very small cracks is essential for the accurate determination of the failure loads which are used in the calculation of strengths and stress components.

  13. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of natural fractures in low-permeability rock

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrack-Nolte, L.J.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive laboratory study of the mechanical displacement, permeability, and void geometry of single rock fractures in a quartz monzonite are summarized and analyzed. A metal-injection technique was developed that provided quantitative data on the precise geometry of the void spaces between the fracture surfaces and the areas of contact at different stresses. At effective stresses of less than 20 MPa fluid flow was proportional to the mean fracture aperture raised to a power greater than 3. As stress was increased, contact area was increased and void spaces become interconnected by small tortuous channels that constitute the principal impediment to fluid flow. At effective stresses higher than 20 MPa, the mean fracture aperture continued to diminish with increasing stress, but this had little effect on flow because the small tortuous flow channels deformed little with increasing stress.

  14. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and

  15. Deformation mechanism of basic rock during long-term compression: Area of HLW repository design, Chelyabinsk District, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, V.A.; Zviagintsev, L.I.; Poluektov, V.V.

    1996-08-01

    A combination of ultrasound, mechanical and petrographic results for long-term experimental compression of greenschist facies porphyritic andesite tuffs indicate a deformation mechanism that depends upon the mineral composition, textural-structural features of the rocks and the orientation of compression relative to the rock textures. Three dry samples of rock were investigated. Coaxial compression of a massive sample for 816 hours and a foliated sample for 1,176 hours (pressure orthogonal to foliation) is characterized by solidification when the rocks are temporarily metastable. Compressive strength of the first sample is 850 kg/cm{sup 2} and of the second one, 800 kg/cm{sup 2}. Experimentally, the rock behavior changes from a plastic to a brittle regime of deformation. In contrast, compression of the foliated sample parallel to foliation causes disintegration along the foliation within 480 hours without solidification. The rock is liable to brittle deformation and its compressive strength is 500 kg/cm{sup 2}. These results may have implications for characterization of near-field processes in connection with numerous subhorizontal zones of schistosity within the strata that are targeted for underground disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) in the Mayak radiochemical complex area.

  16. Interpretation of K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks aided by modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Srodon, J.; Clauer, Norbert; Eberl, D.D.D.

    2002-01-01

    K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks may contain "mixed ages," i.e., may have ages that are intermediate between the ages of end-member events. Two phenomena that may cause mixed ages are: (1) long-lasting reaction during the burial illitization of smectite: and (2) physical mixing of detrital and diagenetic components. The first phenomenon was investigated by simulation of illitization reactions using a nucleation and growth mechanism. These calculations indicate that values for mixed ages are related to burial history: for an equivalent length of reaction time, fast burial followed by slow burial produces much older mixed ages than slow burial followed by fast. The type of reaction that occured in a rock can be determined from the distribution of ages with respect to the thickness of illite crystals. Dating of artificial mixtures confirms a non-linear relation between mixed ages and the proportions of the components. Vertical variation of K-Ar age dates from Gulf Coast shales can be modeled by assuming diagenetic illitization that overprints a subtle vertical trend (presumably of sedimentary origin) in detrital mineral content.

  17. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  18. Fluid Transport in Porous Rocks. II. Hydrodynamic Model of Flow and Intervoxel Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, P.; Issa, B.

    In a preceding paper [P. Mansfield and B. Issa, J. Magn. Reson. A122, 137-148 (1996)], a stochastic model of fluid flow in porous rocks based upon the experimental observation of water flow through a Bentheimer sandstone core was proposed. The flow maps were measured by NMR-imaging techniques. The stochastic theory led to a Gaussian velocity distribution with a mean value in accord with Darcy's law. Also predicted was a linear relationship between flow variance and mean fluid flow through rock, the Mansfield-Issa equation, originally proposed as an empirical relationship. In the present work a flow coupling mechanism between voxels is proposed. Examination of the flow coupling between isolated voxel pairs leads to a complementary explanation of the Gaussian velocity distribution, and also gives further details of the Mansfield-Issa equation. These details lead to a new expression for the connectivity, < C>, between voxels with an experimental value of < C> = 5.64 × 10 -9for Bentheimer sandstone.

  19. Real-time Observations of Rock Cracking and Weather Provide Insights into Thermal Stress-Related Processes of Mechanical Weathering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, M. C.; Magi, B. I.; Keanini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental conditions (weather and/or climate) that limit or drive mechanical weathering via thermal stress are poorly understood. Here we examine acoustic emission (AE) records of rock cracking in boulders sitting on the ground in humid-temperate (~1 year of data) and semi-arid (~3 years) locations. We compare on-site average ambient daily temperature for days in which cracking occurs to the average temperatures for those dates derived from local climate records. The temperatures characterizing days on which cracking occurs is similar for both stations (range = -10 C to +30 C); where 21% and 73% of cracking occurs on hot days (> 20C) in the humid and semi-arid climates respectively while 17% and 0.1% occurs on very cold days (-8C to -3C). When days during which cracking occurs are compared to climate averages, 81% (NC) and 51% (NM) of all cracking occurs on days with absolute temperature anomalies >1, regardless of the temperature. The proportion of cracking that occurs on anomalously hot or cold days rises to 92% and 77% when the data is normalized to account for uneven sampling of the days with extreme temperatures. In order to determine to what extent this trend holds true in a more complex setting, we examined an existing 100+ year record of rock falls from Yosemite Valley. Preliminary results, although more equivocal, are consistent with the boulder cracking AE data. We examine the AE datasets in the context of our previous numerical modeling of insolation-driven thermal stress in rock and hypothesize that there is an increased potential for fracture on days with extreme temperatures because 1) thermal-stress is dependent on temperature variance from far-field and/or average rock temperatures and 2) that days with climatologically extreme air temperatures result in maximums in such variance. An implication of our results is that environments with extreme weather variability may have higher thermal breakdown rates, including certain locations today and

  20. Phase-field modeling of fracture propagation under hydraulic stimulation in pre-fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khisamitov, Ildar; Mohseni, Seyed Ali; Meschke, Guenther

    2016-04-01

    The presentation presents the numerical analysis of hydraulic fracturing within Griffith theory of brittle damage. The phase-field method [1] is employed to model brittle fracture propagation driven by pressurized fluids within fully saturated porous rocks. The phase-field equation is coupled with the Biot-theory using the effective stress concept. The porous rock is assumed as fully saturated with incompressible fluid and deforms within elasticity theory. The hydraulic fracturing propagates under mode I crack opening in quasi-static regime with slow fluid flow in porous matrix and fracture. The phase-field approach for the modelling of brittle fracture [2] coincides with the maximum energy release rate criterion in fracture mechanics theory. The phase-field equation is approximated over entire the domain and introduces new degree of freedom (damage variable). Crack surface is represented by a smooth regularized damage distribution over the fractured area. The presented numerical investigations are characterized by different scenarios of hydraulic stimulation and the interaction of a new fracture emanating from the bore hole with pre-existing cracks. The scenarios include predefined fractures with different oriented to specific angle and spatial distribution over the entire domain. The undamaged rock matrix is modeled as an isotropic elastic material with initial porosity and isotropic matrix permeability. The flow within the undamaged region is governed by Darcy's law while the fluid flow in fractures is approximated by cubic law with the crack opening computed from the displacement solution and the damage variable distribution [3]. Initial fractures are modeled by an initial distribution of the damage variable and by special zero-thickness interface finite elements. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with appropriately chosen refinement criteria are utilized to reduce the computational costs. References [1] M.J. Borden "A phase-field description of dynamic

  1. Numerical built-in method for the nonlinear JRC/JCS model in rock joint.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunyi; Xing, Wanli; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The joint surface is widely distributed in the rock, thus leading to the nonlinear characteristics of rock mass strength and limiting the effectiveness of the linear model in reflecting characteristics. The JRC/JCS model is the nonlinear failure criterion and generally believed to describe the characteristics of joints better than other models. In order to develop the numerical program for JRC/JCS model, this paper established the relationship between the parameters of the JRC/JCS and Mohr-Coulomb models. Thereafter, the numerical implement method and implementation process of the JRC/JCS model were discussed and the reliability of the numerical method was verified by the shear tests of jointed rock mass. Finally, the effect of the JRC/JCS model parameters on the shear strength of the joint was analyzed.

  2. Acid-fog deposition at Kilauea volcano: A possible mechanism for the formation of siliceous-sulfate rock coatings on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, Peter; Zierenberg, Robert; Marks, Naomi; Bishop, Janice L.; Darby Dyar, M.

    2006-11-01

    On the summit of Kilauea volcano, sulfur dioxide, which is continuously emitted from Halemaumau crater and rapidly sequestered into sulfuric-acid rich aerosol entrained in the prevailing trade winds, is subsequently precipitated as acid fog immediately downwind from Kilauea caldera in the Kau Desert. The characteristic pH of surface tephra deposits is <4.0 in Sand Wash, a region of nearly continuous, acidic aerosol fallout immediately southwest of the caldera. Vertical exposures of unconsolidated tephras of the Keanakakoi Ash found within fissures and small, dry gullies are coated with thin rock coatings of amorphous silica and jarosite. These rock coatings are formed via an evaporative mechanism whereby acidic pore fluids, circulating in the upper few meters within the highly porous tephra, are wicked toward the walls of the gullies. Geochemical modeling of the rock coating formation process implies that the sulfate formation via evaporation occurs subsequent to minimal interaction of acidic pore fluids with the basaltic tephra. This also suggests that the cycle from acid-fog fallout to precipitation of the siliceous-sulfate rock coatings must occur quite rapidly. Acid-fog deposition of sulfate and silica at Kilauea may provide one mechanism for the origin of jarosite-bearing outcrops on Mars.

  3. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  4. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  5. Quasistatic Shock Waves: A Mechanism for Nonuniform Compaction in Porous Rock

    SciTech Connect

    OLSSON,WILLIAM A.

    2000-09-08

    Recent studies have observed compaction zones pass through porous rock under axisymmetric compression. An initially thin, compacted layer appears at the yield point of the stress-strain curve and then grows by thickening in the direction of maximum compression at constant stress. Strain localization theory has been applied to compaction to explain the formation of these features. This paper describes the growth of the compaction zones, that is, the propagation of their boundaries, in terms of shock wave analysis. The ratio of the applied shortening rate to the velocity of the boundary is related to the porosity change across the boundary. Certain features of the stress-strain curve are explained by the model.

  6. Testing seismic hazard models with Be-10 exposure ages for precariously balanced rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, D. H.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Balco, G.; Brune, J.; Brune, R.; Ludwig, L. Grant; Kendrick, K.; Purvance, M.; Saleeby, I.

    2012-04-01

    Currently, the only empirical tool available to test maximum earthquake ground motions spanning timescales of 10 ky-1 My is the use of fragile geologic features, including precariously balanced rocks (PBRs). The ages of PBRs together with their areal distribution and mechanical stability ("fragility") constrain probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) over long timescales; pertinent applications include the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM) and tests for ground motion models (e.g., Cybershake). Until recently, age constraints for PBRs were limited to varnish microlamination (VML) dating techniques and sparse cosmogenic nuclide data; however, VML methods yield minimum limiting ages for individual rock surfaces, and the interpretations of cosmogenic nuclide data were ambiguous because they did not account for the exhumation history of the PBRs or the complex shielding of cosmic rays. We have recently published a robust method for the exposure dating of PBRs combining Be-10 profiles, a numerical model, and a three-dimensional model for each PBR constructed using photogrammetry (Balco et al., 2011, Quaternary Geochronology). Here, we use this method to calculate new exposure ages and fragilities for 6 PBRs in southern California (USA) near the San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore faults at the Lovejoy Buttes, Round Top, Pacifico, Beaumont South, Perris, and Benton Road sites (in addition to the recently published age of 18.7 +/- 2.8 ka for a PBR at the Grass Valley site). We combine our ages and fragilities for each PBR, and use these data to test the USGS 2008 NSHM PGA with 2% in 50 year probability, USGS 2008 PSHA deaggregations, and basic hazard curves from USGS 2002 NSHM data.

  7. Site study plan for non-routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan describes the non-routine rock mechanics and thermal properties laboratory testing program planned for the characterization of site-specific geologic materials for the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The study design provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermomechanical, thermal and special properties for the host salt, and where appropriate, for nonhost lithologies. The types of tests which will be conducted are constant stress (creep) tests, constant strain (stress relaxation) tests, constant strain-rate tests, constant stress-rate tests, cyclic loading tests, hollow cylinder tests, uniaxial and triaxial compression tests, direct tension tests, indirect (triaxial) shear tests, thermal property determinations (conductivity, specific heat, expansivity, and diffusivity), fracture healing tests, thermal decrepitation tests, moisture content determinations, and petrographic and micromechanics analyses. Tests will be conducted at confining pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 300/degree/C. These data are used to construct mathematical models for the phenomenology of salt deformation. The models are then used in finite-element codes to predict repository response. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. The duration of the testing program is expected to be approximately 5 years. 44 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Fractured rock hydrogeology (excluding modeling). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the nature and occurrence of groundwater in fractured crystalline and sedimentary rocks. Techniques for determining connectivity and hydraulic conductivity, pollutant distribution in fractures, and site studies in specific geologic environments are among the topics discussed. Citations pertaining to modeling studies of fractured rock hydrogeology are addressed in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 54 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Fractured rock hydrogeology (excluding modeling). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the nature and occurrence of groundwater in fractured crystalline and sedimentary rocks. Techniques for determining connectivity and hydraulic conductivity, pollutant distribution in fractures, and site studies in specific geologic environments are among the topics discussed. Citations pertaining to modeling studies of fractured rock hydrogeology are addressed in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 62 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. The mechanisms and characteristics of a complex rock-debris avalanche at the Nigeria-Cameroon border, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igwe, Ogbonnaya; Mode, Ayonma Wilfred; Nnebedum, Okechukwu; Okonkwo, Ikenna; Oha, Ifeanyi

    2015-04-01

    We describe a rock-debris avalanche which occurred on steep, symmetrical ridges resulting from fracture-controlled erosion in the valley. The fractures were partially filled with clayey materials, probably derived from the weathering of feldspar. Major fault lines trending N-S were located less than 7 km from the landslide location. Exposed sections revealed that the basal rock units were migmatites and gneisses, while the upper section consisted of porphyritic granites. A failure of the residual clay-rich soil, composed of visible crystals of feldspar and mica, is thought to have triggered a long chain of events that led to the development of a rock-debris avalanche, which diverted the course of the rivers in the valley. The area was characterised by a shallow water table in the dry season (2 to 3 m) and this might have facilitated the formation of a slip surface at the regolith-rock interface. Field observations and laboratory analysis showed that the regolith probably failed first because of high pore pressure build-up and rapid reduction in shear resistance; this then triggered the failure of the fractured rock units. The slope movement was perpendicular to the foliation of the gneissic rocks, which probably contributed to landslide mobility. Of interest was that changing saturation level at constant relative density of about 32% resulted in either complete or limited liquefaction, indicating that the mechanism of failure depended on the moisture content of the regolith.

  11. Semi-automatic mapping of fault rocks on a Digital Outcrop Model, Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vho, Alice; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative analysis of fault-rock distribution is of paramount importance for studies of fault zone architecture, fault and earthquake mechanics, and fluid circulation along faults at depth. Here we present a semi-automatic workflow for fault-rock mapping on a Digital Outcrop Model (DOM). This workflow has been developed on a real case of study: the strike-slip Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ). It consists of a fault zone exhumed from ca. 10 km depth, hosted in granitoid rocks of Adamello batholith (Italian Southern Alps). Individual seismogenic slip surfaces generally show green cataclasites (cemented by the precipitation of epidote and K-feldspar from hydrothermal fluids) and more or less well preserved pseudotachylytes (black when well preserved, greenish to white when altered). First of all, a digital model for the outcrop is reconstructed with photogrammetric techniques, using a large number of high resolution digital photographs, processed with VisualSFM software. By using high resolution photographs the DOM can have a much higher resolution than with LIDAR surveys, up to 0.2 mm/pixel. Then, image processing is performed to map the fault-rock distribution with the ImageJ-Fiji package. Green cataclasites and epidote/K-feldspar veins can be quite easily separated from the host rock (tonalite) using spectral analysis. Particularly, band ratio and principal component analysis have been tested successfully. The mapping of black pseudotachylyte veins is more tricky because the differences between the pseudotachylyte and biotite spectral signature are not appreciable. For this reason we have tested different morphological processing tools aimed at identifying (and subtracting) the tiny biotite grains. We propose a solution based on binary images involving a combination of size and circularity thresholds. Comparing the results with manually segmented images, we noticed that major problems occur only when pseudotachylyte veins are very thin and discontinuous. After

  12. Subcritical crack propagation due to chemical rock weakening: macroscale chemo-plasticity and chemo-elasticity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueckel, T.; Hu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crack propagation in a subcritically stressed rock subject to chemically aggressive environment is analyzed and numerically simulated. Chemically induced weakening is often encountered in hydraulic fracturing of low-permeability oil/gas reservoirs and heat reservoirs, during storage of CO2 and nuclear waste corroding canisters, and other circumstances when rock matrix acidizing is involved. Upon acidizing, mineral mass dissolution is substantially enhanced weakening the rock and causing crack propagation and eventually permeability changes in the medium. The crack process zone is modeled mathematically via a chemo-plastic coupling and chemo-elastic coupling model. In plasticity a two-way coupling is postulated between mineral dissolution and a yield limit of rock matrix. The rate of dissolution is described by a rate law, but the mineral mass removal per unit volume is also a function of a variable internal specific surface area, which is in turn affected by the micro-cracking (treated as a plastic strain). The behavior of the rock matrix is modeled as rigid-plastic adding a chemical softening capacity to Cam-Clay model. Adopting the Extended Johnson's approximation of processes around the crack tip, the evolution of the stress field and deformation as a function of the chemically enhanced rock damage is modeled in a simplified way. In addition, chemical reactive transport is made dependent on plastic strain representing micro-cracking. Depending on mechanical and chemical boundary conditions, the area of enhanced chemical softening is near or somewhat away from the crack tip.In elasticity, chemo-mechanical effect is postulated via a chemical volumetric shrinkage strain proportional to mass removal variable, conceived analogously to thermal expansion. Two versions are considered: of constant coefficient of shrinkage and a variable one, coupled to deviatoric strain. Airy Potential approach used for linear elasticity is extended considering an extra term, which is

  13. Thermal, Mechanical and Thermo-Mechanical Assessment of the Rock Mass Surrounding SKB's Prototype Repository at Äspö HRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lönnqvist, Margareta; Hökmark, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The Prototype Repository (PR) was a field test of six, electrically heated, full-scale waste containers resembling the key component of a KBS-3 nuclear waste repository. The design and heat load was similar to the proposed repository at Forsmark, Sweden. In this paper, the thermal, mechanical and thermo-mechanical response of the PR host rock to excavation and to the subsequent heating is assessed. The assessment is carried out using three-dimensional models (numerical and analytical) in combination with monitoring data and visual observations from the excavations. Certain measurements and observations agree well with results from the models. These include temperature measurements during the heating phase. Additional measurements include patterns of low-magnitude acoustic emission events around the deposition holes tracked during the excavation. The spatial distribution of these events coincide with regions of modelled high compressive stresses. Models with a simple fracture network, consisting of planar disks with laboratory-scale properties, appear to give upper bound estimates of the stress disturbances caused by a real fracture network. The magnitude of the modelled stresses around the deposition hole is typically below the spalling strength. The lack of any significant or systematic occurrence of spalling in the deposition hole walls supports the modelling results. Several instruments installed at different positions to monitor stress change, strain and deformation malfunctioned during the nearly 8-year-long monitoring period. Despite this, there is ample evidence to support the overall conclusion that the modelling results and observations are in sufficient agreement to strengthen the confidence in the modelling approach.

  14. Acoustic response of cemented granular sedimentary rocks: molecular dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    García, Xavier; Medina, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    The effect of cementation processes on the acoustical properties of sands is studied via molecular dynamics simulation methods. We propose numerical methods where the initial uncemented sand is built by simulating the settling process of sediments. Uncemented samples of different porosity are considered by emulating natural mechanical compaction of sediments due to overburden. Cementation is considered through a particle-based model that captures the underlying physics behind the process. In our simulations, we consider samples with different degrees of compaction and cementing materials with distinct elastic properties. The microstructure of cemented sands is taken into account while adding cement at specific locations within the pores, such as grain-to-grain contacts. Results show that the acoustical properties of cemented sands are strongly dependent on the amount of cement, its stiffness relative to the hosting medium, and its location within the pores. Simulation results are in good correspondence with available experimental data and compare favorably with some theoretical predictions for the sound velocity within a range of cement saturation, porosity, and confining pressure.

  15. Surface morphology of active normal faults in hard rock: Implications for the mechanics of the Asal Rift, Djibouti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzuti, Paul; Mignan, Arnaud; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2010-10-01

    Tectonic-stretching models have been previously proposed to explain the process of continental break-up through the example of the Asal Rift, Djibouti, one of the few places where the early stages of seafloor spreading can be observed. In these models, deformation is distributed starting at the base of a shallow seismogenic zone, in which sub-vertical normal faults are responsible for subsidence whereas cracks accommodate extension. Alternative models suggest that extension results from localised magma intrusion, with normal faults accommodating extension and subsidence only above the maximum reach of the magma column. In these magmatic rifting models, or so-called magmatic intrusion models, normal faults have dips of 45-55° and root into dikes. Vertical profiles of normal fault scarps from levelling campaign in the Asal Rift, where normal faults seem sub-vertical at surface level, have been analysed to discuss the creation and evolution of normal faults in massive fractured rocks (basalt lava flows), using mechanical and kinematics concepts. We show that the studied normal fault planes actually have an average dip ranging between 45° and 65° and are characterised by an irregular stepped form. We suggest that these normal fault scarps correspond to sub-vertical en echelon structures, and that, at greater depth, these scarps combine and give birth to dipping normal faults. The results of our analysis are compatible with the magmatic intrusion models instead of tectonic-stretching models. The geometry of faulting between the Fieale volcano and Lake Asal in the Asal Rift can be simply related to the depth of diking, which in turn can be related to magma supply. This new view supports the magmatic intrusion model of early stages of continental breaking.

  16. Foraging westward for pristine nonmare rocks - Complications for petrogenetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; Marshall, C.; Wasson, J. T.

    New advances are reported concerning an investigation which is being conducted to find and characterize more 'pristine' (compositionally endogenous) lunar rocks. Eleven nonmare samples are characterized petrographically and (except for two clasts that were prohibitively small) by chemical composition. The samples are assessed whether they are pristine on the basis of diagnostic features discussed by Warren and Wasson (1977). Five samples are found to be almost certainly pristine. They include the alkali-rich anorthosite 12073c, the troctolite 14179c, the anorthositic troctolite 14321c1, the troctolitic anorthosite 14321c2, and the anorthositic norite 15565c. Correlations between petrochemistry and longitude are also investigated, taking into account Eu fractionations, Sc-Ti-Sm fractionations, and Ca/Na-Mg/Fe fractionations.

  17. Foraging westward for pristine nonmare rocks - Complications for petrogenetic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; Marshall, C.; Wasson, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    New advances are reported concerning an investigation which is being conducted to find and characterize more 'pristine' (compositionally endogenous) lunar rocks. Eleven nonmare samples are characterized petrographically and (except for two clasts that were prohibitively small) by chemical composition. The samples are assessed whether they are pristine on the basis of diagnostic features discussed by Warren and Wasson (1977). Five samples are found to be almost certainly pristine. They include the alkali-rich anorthosite 12073c, the troctolite 14179c, the anorthositic troctolite 14321c1, the troctolitic anorthosite 14321c2, and the anorthositic norite 15565c. Correlations between petrochemistry and longitude are also investigated, taking into account Eu fractionations, Sc-Ti-Sm fractionations, and Ca/Na-Mg/Fe fractionations.

  18. Biologically-initiated rock crust on sandstone: Mechanical and hydraulic properties and resistance to erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavík, Martin; Bruthans, Jiří; Filippi, Michal; Schweigstillová, Jana; Falteisek, Lukáš; Řihošek, Jaroslav

    2017-02-01

    Biocolonization on sandstone surfaces is known to play an important role in rock disintegration, yet it sometimes also aids in the protection of the underlying materials from rapid erosion. There have been few studies comparing the mechanical and/or hydraulic properties of the BIRC (Biologically-Initiated Rock Crust) with its subsurface. As a result, the overall effects of the BIRC are not yet well understood. The objective of the present study was to briefly characterize the BIRC from both the mineralogical and biological points of view, and especially to quantify the effect of the BIRC upon the mechanical and hydraulic properties of friable sandstone. The mineralogical investigation of a well-developed BIRC showed that its surface is enriched in kaolinite and clay- to silt-sized quartz particles. Total organic carbon increases with the age of the BIRC. Based on DNA sequencing and microscopy, the BIRC is formed by various fungi, including components of lichens and green algae. Using the method of drilling resistance, by measuring tensile strength, and based on water jet testing, it was determined that a BIRC is up to 12 times less erodible and has 3-35 times higher tensile strength than the subsurface friable sandstone. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of the studied BIRC is 15-300 times lower than the subsurface, and was measured to also decrease in capillary water absorption (2-33 times). Water-vapor diffusion is not significantly influenced by the presence of the BIRC. The BIRC thus forms a hardened surface which protects the underlying material from rain and flowing water erosion, and considerably modifies the sandstone's hydraulic properties. Exposing the material to calcination (550 °C), and experiments with the enzyme zymolyase indicated that a major contribution to the surface hardening is provided by organic matter. In firmer sandstones, the BIRC may still considerably decrease the rate of weathering, as it is capable of providing cohesion to strongly

  19. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

    2002-09-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  20. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: an evaluation of the continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B; Ahlers, C Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S; Flint, Alan L; Guertal, William B

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  1. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, H.-H.; Haukwa, C.B.; Ahlers, C.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Guertal, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A fault runs through it: Modeling the influence of rock strength and grain-size distribution in a fault-damaged landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. G.; Tucker, G. E.; Koons, P. O.; Smith, S. M.; Upton, P.

    2016-10-01

    We explore two ways in which the mechanical properties of rock potentially influence fluvial incision and sediment transport within a watershed: rock erodibility is inversely proportional to rock cohesion, and fracture spacing influences the initial grain sizes produced upon erosion. Fault-weakened zones show these effects well because of the sharp strength gradients associated with localized shear abrasion. A natural example of fault erosion is used to motivate our calibration of a generalized landscape evolution model. Numerical experiments are used to study the sensitivity of river erosion and transport processes to variable degrees of rock weakening. In the experiments, rapid erosion and transport of fault gouge steers surface runoff, causing high-order channels to become confined within the structure of weak zones when the relative degree of rock weakening exceeds 1 order of magnitude. Erosion of adjacent, intact bedrock produces relatively coarser grained gravels that accumulate in the low relief of the eroded weak zone. The thickness and residence time of sediments stored there depends on the relief of the valley, which in these models depends on the degree of rock weakening. The frequency with which the weak zone is armored by bed load increases with greater weakening, causing the bed load to control local channel slope. Conversely, small tributaries feeding into the weak zone are predominantly detachment limited. Our results indicate that mechanical heterogeneity can exert strong controls on rates and patterns of erosion and should be considered in future landscape evolution studies to better understand the role of heterogeneity in structuring landscapes.

  3. Application of a New Rheological Model to Rock Avalanches: An SPH Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanal, D.; Drempetic, V.; Haddad, B.; Pastor, M.; Martin Stickle, M.; Mira, P.

    2016-06-01

    Rock avalanches move large volumes of material causing a highly destructive power over large areas. In these events, it is possible to monitor the evolution of slopes but failure cannot be always prevented. For this reason, modelling of the propagation phase provides engineers with fundamental information regarding speed, track, runout and depth. From these data, it is possible to perform a better risk assessment and propose mitigation measures to reduce the potential hazard of specific area. The purpose of this paper is to present a depth integrated, SPH model, which can be used to simulate real rock avalanches and to assess the influence of the rheology on the avalanche properties. The paper compares the performance of different rheological models to reproduce the track, runout and depth of the final deposit for both, scale test and real events such as Frank and Thurwiesier rock avalanches. These sets of benchmarks provide information on the proposed model accuracy and limitations.

  4. Modelling the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints with Asperity Damage Under Constant Normal Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indraratna, Buddhima; Thirukumaran, Sivanathan; Brown, E. T.; Zhu, Song-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The shear behaviour of a rough rock joint depends largely on the surface properties of the joint, as well as the boundary conditions applied across the joint interface. This paper proposes a new analytical model to describe the complete shear behaviour of rough joints under constant normal stiffness (CNS) boundary conditions by incorporating the effect of damage to asperities. In particular, the effects of initial normal stress levels and joint surface roughness on the shear behaviour of joints under CNS conditions were studied, and the analytical model was validated through experimental results. Finally, the practical application of the model to a jointed rock slope stability analysis is presented.

  5. Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Langkopf, B.S.; Eshom, E.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes site exploration work completed in support of planned rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Ruff at Nevada Test Site`s, G-Tunnel. As part of this work, the Rock Mechanics Drift (RMD) and the Rock Mass Property Alcove (RMPA) were mined and three coreholes drilled. The results of mapping and corehole logging are displayed, described, and analyzed.

  6. Constitutive Modelling of Concrete and Rocks Under Multiaxial Compressive Loadings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-04

    constitutive model for geologic materials such as concrete...determine the material constants associated with the proposed constitutive model . The model is then verified by back-predicting the stress-strain curves... constitutive model based on the theory of plas- ticity. Although such a model can be used for a wide range of materials , in this dissertation its

  7. Development of a parallel FE simulator for modeling the whole trans-scale failure process of rock from meso- to engineering-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gen; Tang, Chun-An; Liang, Zheng-Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Multi-scale high-resolution modeling of rock failure process is a powerful means in modern rock mechanics studies to reveal the complex failure mechanism and to evaluate engineering risks. However, multi-scale continuous modeling of rock, from deformation, damage to failure, has raised high requirements on the design, implementation scheme and computation capacity of the numerical software system. This study is aimed at developing the parallel finite element procedure, a parallel rock failure process analysis (RFPA) simulator that is capable of modeling the whole trans-scale failure process of rock. Based on the statistical meso-damage mechanical method, the RFPA simulator is able to construct heterogeneous rock models with multiple mechanical properties, deal with and represent the trans-scale propagation of cracks, in which the stress and strain fields are solved for the damage evolution analysis of representative volume element by the parallel finite element method (FEM) solver. This paper describes the theoretical basis of the approach and provides the details of the parallel implementation on a Windows - Linux interactive platform. A numerical model is built to test the parallel performance of FEM solver. Numerical simulations are then carried out on a laboratory-scale uniaxial compression test, and field-scale net fracture spacing and engineering-scale rock slope examples, respectively. The simulation results indicate that relatively high speedup and computation efficiency can be achieved by the parallel FEM solver with a reasonable boot process. In laboratory-scale simulation, the well-known physical phenomena, such as the macroscopic fracture pattern and stress-strain responses, can be reproduced. In field-scale simulation, the formation process of net fracture spacing from initiation, propagation to saturation can be revealed completely. In engineering-scale simulation, the whole progressive failure process of the rock slope can be well modeled. It is

  8. From rock to magma and back again: The evolution of temperature and deformation mechanism in conduit margin zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Violay, Marie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie

    2017-04-01

    Explosive silicic volcanism is driven by gas overpressure in systems that are inefficient at outgassing. The zone at the margin of a volcanic conduit-thought to play an important role in the outgassing of magma and therefore pore pressure changes and explosivity-is the boundary through which heat is exchanged from the hot magma to the colder country rock. Using a simple heat transfer model, we first show that the isotherm for the glass transition temperature (whereat the glass within the groundmass transitions from a glass to an undercooled liquid) moves into the country rock when the magma within the conduit can stay hot, or into the conduit when the magma is quasi-stagnant and cools (on the centimetric scale over days to months). We then explore the influence of a migrating viscous boundary on compactive deformation micromechanisms in the conduit margin zone using high-pressure (effective pressure of 40 MPa), high-temperature (up to 800 °C) triaxial deformation experiments on porous andesite. Our experiments show that the micromechanism facilitating compaction in andesite is localised cataclastic pore collapse at all temperatures below the glass transition of the amorphous groundmass glass Tg (i.e., rock). In this regime, porosity is only reduced within the bands of crushed pores; the porosity outside the bands remains unchanged. Further, the strength of andesite is a positive function of temperature below the threshold Tg due to thermal expansion driven microcrack closure. The micromechanism driving compaction above Tg (i.e., magma) is the distributed viscous flow of the melt phase. In this regime, porosity loss is distributed and is accommodated by the widespread flattening and closure of pores. We find that viscous flow is much more efficient at reducing porosity than cataclastic pore collapse, and that it requires stresses much lower than those required to form bands of crushed pores. Our study therefore highlights that temperature excursions can result in a

  9. The Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer deployment mechanism: An anthropomorphic approach to sensor placement on Martian rocks and soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    On July 4,1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft lands on Mars and starts conducting technological and scientific experiments. One experiment, the Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer, uses a sensor head placed against rocks and soil to determine their composition. To guarantee proper placement, a deployment mechanism mounted on the Mars Rover aligns the sensor head to within 20 deg of the rock and soil surfaces. In carrying out its task, the mechanism mimics the action of a human hand and arm. Consisting of a flexible wrist, a parallel link arm, a brush dc motor actuator, and a revolutionary non-pyrotechnic fail-safe release device, the mechanism correctly positions the sensor head on rocks as high as 0.29 m and on targets whose surfaces are tilted as much as 45 deg from the nominal orientation of the sensor head face. The mechanism weighs less than 0.5 kg, can withstand 100 g's, and requires less than 2.8 N x m of actuation torque. The fail-safe coupler utilizes Cerrobend, a metal alloy that melts at 60 C, to fuse the actuator and the rest of the mechanism together. A film heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal, and Negator springs drive the mechanism into its stowed position. The fail-safe actuates using 6.75 Watts for 5 minutes in the event of an actuator failure.

  10. The Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer deployment mechanism: an anthropomorphic approach to sensor placement on Martian rocks and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-05-01

    On July 4,1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft lands on Mars and starts conducting technological and scientific experiments. One experiment, the Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer, uses a sensor head placed against rocks and soil to determine their composition. To guarantee proper placement, a deployment mechanism mounted on the Mars Rover aligns the sensor head to within 20 deg of the rock and soil surfaces. In carrying out its task, the mechanism mimics the action of a human hand and arm. Consisting of a flexible wrist, a parallel link arm, a brush dc motor actuator, and a revolutionary non-pyrotechnic fail-safe release device, the mechanism correctly positions the sensor head on rocks as high as 0.29 m and on targets whose surfaces are tilted as much as 45 deg from the nominal orientation of the sensor head face. The mechanism weighs less than 0.5 kg, can withstand 100 g's, and requires less than 2.8 N x m of actuation torque. The fail-safe coupler utilizes Cerrobend, a metal alloy that melts at 60 C, to fuse the actuator and the rest of the mechanism together. A film heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal, and Negator springs drive the mechanism into its stowed position. The fail-safe actuates using 6.75 Watts for 5 minutes in the event of an actuator failure.

  11. Statistical Characterization of the Mechanical Parameters of Intact Rock Under Triaxial Compression: An Experimental Proof of the Jinping Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhong, Shan; Cui, Jie; Feng, Xia-Ting; Song, Leibo

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the statistical characteristics and probability distribution of the mechanical parameters of natural rock using triaxial compression tests. Twenty cores of Jinping marble were tested under each different levels of confining stress (i.e., 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 MPa). From these full stress-strain data, we summarized the numerical characteristics and determined the probability distribution form of several important mechanical parameters, including deformational parameters, characteristic strength, characteristic strains, and failure angle. The statistical proofs relating to the mechanical parameters of rock presented new information about the marble's probabilistic distribution characteristics. The normal and log-normal distributions were appropriate for describing random strengths of rock; the coefficients of variation of the peak strengths had no relationship to the confining stress; the only acceptable random distribution for both Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio was the log-normal function; and the cohesive strength had a different probability distribution pattern than the frictional angle. The triaxial tests and statistical analysis also provided experimental evidence for deciding the minimum reliable number of experimental sample and for picking appropriate parameter distributions to use in reliability calculations for rock engineering.

  12. The migration law of overlay rock and coal in deeply inclined coal seam with fully mechanized top coal caving.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Chen, Shan-Le; Wang, Hua-Jun; Li, Yu-Cheng; Geng, Xiaowei

    2015-07-01

    In a mine area, some environment geotechnics problems always occure, induced by mined-out region such as the subsidence and cracks at ground level, deformation and destruction of buildings, landslides destruction of water resources and the ecological environment. In order to research the migration of surrounding rock and coal in steeply inclined super high seams which used fully mechanized top coal caving, a working face of a certain mine was made as an example, analyzed the migration law of the overlay rock and coal under different caving ratio of fully mechanized top coal caving with numerical simulation analysis. The results suggest that the laws of overlay rock deformation caused by deeply inclined coal seam were different from horizontal coal seam. On the inclined direction, with an increase of dip angle and caving ratio, the vertical displacement of overlay rock and coal became greater, the asymmetric phenomenon of vertical displacement became obvious. On the trend direction, active region and transition region in goaf became smaller along with the increase of mining and caving ratio. On the contrary, the stable region area became greater. Therefore, there was an essential difference between the mechanism of surface movement deformation with deeply inclined coal seam and that with horizontal coal seam.

  13. How ocean waves rock the Earth: Two mechanisms explain microseisms with periods 3 to 300 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Gualtieri, Lucia; Stutzmann, Eléonore

    2015-02-01

    Microseismic activity, recorded everywhere on Earth, is largely due to ocean waves. Recent progress has clearly identified sources of microseisms in the most energetic band, with periods from 3 to 10 s. In contrast, the generation of longer-period microseisms has been strongly debated. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain seismic wave generation: a primary mechanism, by which ocean waves propagating over bottom slopes generate seismic waves, and a secondary mechanism which relies on the nonlinear interaction of ocean waves. Here we show that the primary mechanism explains the average power, frequency distribution, and most of the variability in signals recorded by vertical seismometers, for seismic periods ranging from 13 to 300 s. The secondary mechanism only explains seismic motions with periods shorter than 13 s. Our results build on a quantitative numerical model that gives access to time-varying maps of seismic noise sources.

  14. Warm Eocene climate enhanced petroleum generation from Cretaceous source rocks: A potential climate feedback mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    Earth surface temperatures, including in the deep sea increased by 5-10°C from the late Paleocene ca. 58 Myr ago to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) centered at about 51 Myr ago. A large (˜2.5‰) drop in δ13C of carbonate spans much of this interval. This suggests a long-term increase in the net flux of 13C-depleted carbon to the ocean and atmosphere that is difficult to explain by changes in surficial carbon cycling alone. We reveal a relationship between surface temperature increase and increased petroleum generation in sedimentary basins operating on 100 kyr to Myr time scales. We propose that early Eocene warming has led to a synchronization of periods of maximum petroleum generation and enhanced generation in otherwise unproductive basins through extension of the volume of source rock within the oil and gas window across hundreds of sedimentary basins globally. Modelling the thermal evolution of four sedimentary basins in the southwest Pacific predicted an up to 50% increase in petroleum generation that would have significantly increased leakage of light hydrocarbons and oil degeneration products into the atmosphere. Extrapolating our modelling results to hundreds of sedimentary basins worldwide suggests that globally increased leakage could have caused a climate feedback effect, driving or enhancing early Eocene climate warming.

  15. Fractured rock hydrogeology: Modeling studies. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of mathematical and conceptual models in describing the hydraulic parameters of fluid flow in fractured rock. Topics include the use of tracers, solute and mass transport studies, and slug test analyses. The use of modeling techniques in injection well performance prediction is also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. A Simple Acoustic Scattering Model for Ensembles of Rocks and Seashells Lying on the Ocean Floor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    i.e., rocks and seashells lying on the ocean floor. A simplified modeling approach has been adopted that incorporates basic concepts and principles...over the equivalent frequency range. Seashells are represented by water-filled spherical shells. The model predicts scattering strength values for

  17. Modeling of rock friction 1. Experimental results and constitutive equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Direct shear experiments on ground surfaces of a granodiorite from Raymond, California, at normal stresses of ??6 MPa demonstrate that competing time, displacement, and velocity effects control rock friction. It is proposed that the strength of the population of points of contacts between sliding surfaces determines frictional strength and that the population of contacts changes continuously with displacements. Previous experiments demonstrate that the strength of the contacts increases with the age of the contacts. The present experiments establish that a characteristic displacement, proportional to surface roughness, is required to change the population of contacts. Hence during slip the average age of the points of contact and therefore frictional strength decrease as slip velocity increases. Displacement weakening and consequently the potential for unstable slip occur whenever displacement reduces the average age of the contacts. In addition to this velocity dependency, which arises from displacement dependency and time dependency, the experiments also show a competing but transient increase in friction whenever slip velocity increases. Creep of the sliding surface at stresses below that for steady state slip is also observed. Constitutive relationships are developed that permit quantitative simulation of the friction versus displacement data as a function of surface roughness and for different time and velocity histories. Unstable slip in experiments is controlled by these constitutive effects and by the stiffness of the experimental system. It is argued that analogous properties control earthquake instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. A landscape in three biospheres: biological rock weathering in a model ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presler, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Biological rock weathering is the process by which life breaks down minerals into forms that are readily available for creation of an ecosystem. In order to test how microbes, plants and mycorrhizal communities interact with bedrock to initiate a primary ecosystem that will eventually lead to soil formation, we developed a modular experiment in the desert biome of Biosphere-2. In this presentation we present selected phases in the development of the experimental setup. Briefly, we aimed to replicate a large-scale primordial landscape in a closed, mesocosm system involving six carefully designed, identical chambers, each containing 48 experimental columns, 30cm long. The rocks used, i.e. basalt, rhyolite, granite and schist, represent four prevalent rock types in the natural landscape. The biotic communities are represented by combinations of rock microbial communities, plants and their associated mycorrhizae. Bacterial inoculum was optimized for each rock type. Each model was created to remain completely separated from outside influence. We expect that this experiment will provide crucial knowledge about primary interactions between rock and biota on Earth. Experimental Modules

  19. Rock mechanics observations pertinent to the rheology of the continental lithosphere and the localization of strain along shear zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Emphasized in this paper are the deformation processes and rheologies of rocks at high temperatures and high effective pressures, conditions that are presumably appropriate to the lower crust and upper mantle in continental collision zones. Much recent progress has been made in understanding the flexure of the oceanic lithosphere using rock-mechanics-based yield criteria for the inelastic deformations at the top and base. At mid-plate depths, stresses are likely to be supported elastically because bending strains and elastic stresses are low. The collisional tectonic regime, however, is far more complex because very large permanent strains are sustained at mid-plate depths and this requires us to include the broad transition between brittle and ductile flow. Moreover, important changes in the ductile flow mechanisms occur at the intermediate temperatures found at mid-plate depths. Two specific contributions of laboratory rock rheology research are considered in this paper. First, the high-temperature steady-state flow mechanisms and rheology of mafic and ultramafic rocks are reviewed with special emphasis on olivine and crystalline rocks. Rock strength decreases very markedly with increases in temperature and it is the onset of flow by high temperature ductile mechanisms that defines the base of the lithosphere. The thickness of the continental lithosphere can therefore be defined by the depth to a particular isotherm Tc above which (at geologic strain rates) the high-temperature ductile strength falls below some arbitrary strength isobar (e.g., 100 MPa). For olivine Tc is about 700??-800??C but for other crustal silicates, Tc may be as low as 400??-600??C, suggesting that substantial decoupling may take place within thick continental crust and that strength may increase with depth at the Moho, as suggested by a number of workers on independent grounds. Put another way, the Moho is a rheological discontinuity. A second class of laboratory observations pertains to

  20. How stress and temperature conditions affect rock-fluid chemistry and mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar; Aursjø, Olav; Madland, Merete; Kjørslevik, Trygve Alexander; Østensen, Geir

    2016-02-01

    We report the results from a series of chalk flow-through-compaction experiments performed at three effective stresses (0.5 MPa, 3.5 MPa and 12.3 MPa) and two temperatures (92° and and 130°). The results show that both stress and temperature are important to both chemical alteration and mechanical deformation. The experiments were conducted on cores drilled from the same block of outcrop chalks from the Obourg quarry within the Saint Vast formation (Mons, Belgium). The pore pressure was kept at 0.7 MPa for all experiments with a continuous flow of 0.219 M MgCl2 brine at a constant flow rate; 1 original pore volume (PV) per day. The experiments have been performed in tri-axial cells with independent control of the external stress (hydraulic pressure in the confining oil), pore pressure, temperature, and the injected flow rate. Each experiment consists of two phases; a loading phase where stress-strain dependencies are investigated (approx. 2 days), and a creep phase that lasts for more than 150-160 days. During creep, the axial deformation was logged, and the effluent samples were collected for ion chromatography analyses. Any difference between the injected and produced water chemistry gives insight into the rock-fluid interactions that occur during flow through of the core. The observed effluent concentration shows a reduction in Mg2+, while the Ca2+ concentration is increased. This, together with SEM-EDS analysis, indicates that magnesium-bearing mineral phases are precipitated leading to dissolution of calcite, an observation . This is in-line with other flow-through experiments reported earlier. The observed dissolution and precipitation are sensitive to the effective stress and test temperature. Typically. H, higher stress and temperature lead to increased concentration differences of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration changes.. The observed strain can be partitioned additively into a mechanical and chemical driven component.

  1. Source rock contributions to the Lower Cretaceous heavy oil accumulations in Alberta: a basin modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berbesi, Luiyin Alejandro; di Primio, Rolando; Anka, Zahie; Horsfield, Brian; Higley, Debra K.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the immense oil sand deposits in Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Western Canada sedimentary basin is still a matter of debate, specifically with respect to the original in-place volumes and contributing source rocks. In this study, the contributions from the main source rocks were addressed using a three-dimensional petroleum system model calibrated to well data. A sensitivity analysis of source rock definition was performed in the case of the two main contributors, which are the Lower Jurassic Gordondale Member of the Fernie Group and the Upper Devonian–Lower Mississippian Exshaw Formation. This sensitivity analysis included variations of assigned total organic carbon and hydrogen index for both source intervals, and in the case of the Exshaw Formation, variations of thickness in areas beneath the Rocky Mountains were also considered. All of the modeled source rocks reached the early or main oil generation stages by 60 Ma, before the onset of the Laramide orogeny. Reconstructed oil accumulations were initially modest because of limited trapping efficiency. This was improved by defining lateral stratigraphic seals within the carrier system. An additional sealing effect by biodegraded oil may have hindered the migration of petroleum in the northern areas, but not to the east of Athabasca. In the latter case, the main trapping controls are dominantly stratigraphic and structural. Our model, based on available data, identifies the Gordondale source rock as the contributor of more than 54% of the oil in the Athabasca and Peace River accumulations, followed by minor amounts from Exshaw (15%) and other Devonian to Lower Jurassic source rocks. The proposed strong contribution of petroleum from the Exshaw Formation source rock to the Athabasca oil sands is only reproduced by assuming 25 m (82 ft) of mature Exshaw in the kitchen areas, with original total organic carbon of 9% or more.

  2. Sulfate-dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane as a Generation Mechanism for Calcite Cap Rock in Gulf Coast Salt Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesar, K. H.; Kyle, R.; Lyons, T. W.; Loyd, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gulf Coast salt domes, specifically their calcite cap rocks, have been widely recognized for their association with significant reserves of crude oil and natural gas. However, the specific microbial reactions that facilitate the precipitation of these cap rocks are still largely unknown. Insight into the mineralization mechanism(s) can be obtained from the specific geochemical signatures recorded in these structures. Gulf Coast cap rocks contain carbonate and sulfur minerals that exhibit variable carbon (d13C) and sulfur isotope (δ34S) signatures. Calcite d13C values are isotopically depleted and show a large range of values from -1 to -52‰, reflecting a mixture of various carbon sources including a substantial methane component. These depleted carbon isotope compositions combined with the presence of abundant sulfide minerals in cap rocks have led to interpretations that invoke microbial sulfate reduction as an important carbonate mineral-yielding process in salt dome environments. Sulfur isotope data from carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS: trace sulfate incorporated within the carbonate mineral crystal lattice) provide a more direct proxy for aqueous sulfate in salt dome systems and may provide a means to directly fingerprint ancient sulfate reduction. We find CAS sulfur isotope compositions (δ34SCAS) significantly greater than those of the precursor Jurassic sulfate-salt deposits (which exhibit δ34S values of ~ +15‰). This implies that cap rock carbonate generation occurred via microbial sulfate reduction under closed-system conditions. The co-occurrence of depleted carbonate d13C values (< ~30‰) and the enriched δ34SCAS values are evidence for sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). AOM, which has been shown to yield extensive seafloor carbonate authigenesis, is also potentially partly responsible for the carbonate minerals of the Gulf Coast calcite cap rocks through concomitant production of alkalinity. Collectively, these data shed

  3. Partial reactivation of a huge deep-seated ancient rock slide: recognition, formation mechanism, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Minggao; Xu, Qiang; Li, Yusheng; Huang, Runqiu; Rengers, Niek; Zhu, Xing

    2016-08-01

    About 18 years ago, a large-scale discontinuous layer in properties and colour was found in the new Fengjie town at the shore of the Three Gorges Reservoir area in China. There are many resettled residents and buildings on the sloping area, the safety of which is potentially affected by this layer, so it has become the focus of attention. Before this study started there were two viewpoints regarding the origin of this layer. One was that is was from a huge ancient slide and the other was that is was from a fault graben. In order to find out how it was formed and to be able to carry out a stability analysis of the slope the authors have carried out a research program, including geological field investigations and mapping, a deep drilling hole, a geotechnical centrifuge model test, and a simulation analysis. The results of the research led to the conclusion that the layer is the sliding plane of a huge deep-seated ancient rock slide, which we called the Sanmashan landslide. An important argument for the conclusion is the recognition of a regional compressive tectonic stress field in this area, which cannot lead to the formation of a fault graben because it needs a tensional tectonic stress field. Moreover, numerous unique geological features, sliding marks, and other relics of the ancient slide have been discovered in the field. The formation process of the ancient slide could be repeated in a large geotechnical centrifuge model test. The test shows that a deformation and failure process of "creep-crack-cut" has occurred. The type of the ancient slide can be classified as a "successive rotational rock slide". Finally, the role of seepage in the stability of the Sanmashan landslide has been analysed. Our final conclusions are that, during rainfall and filling-drawdown cycles in the Three Gorges Reservoir, the Sanmashan landslide as a whole is dormant and stable and the secondary landslides in the toe area of the slope are presently stable but can be reactivated. This

  4. Model Predictions of Chemically Controlled Slow Crack Growth with Application to Mechanical Effects in Geothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B E

    2001-04-11

    Representative, simplified geothermal rock-fluid systems are investigated with a modeling approach to estimate how rock water interactions affect coupled properties related to mechanical stability and permeability improvement through fracturing. First, geochemical modeling is used to determine the evolution of fluid chemistry at temperatures up to 300 C when fluids are in contact with representative rocks of continental origin. Then, a kinetic crack growth model for quartz is used to predict growth rate for subcritical cracks in acidic and basic environments. The predicted growth rate is highly sensitive to temperature and pH in the ranges tested. At present, the model is limited to situations in which quartz controls the mechanical process of interest, such as well bore stability in silica cemented rocks and the opening of quartz filled veins to enhance permeability.

  5. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  6. Elastic-plastic model identification for rock surrounding an underground excavation based on immunized genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Dongliang; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    To compute the stability of underground engineering, a constitutive model of surrounding rock must be identified. Many constitutive models for rock mass have been proposed. In this model identification study, a generalized constitutive law for an elastic-plastic constitutive model is applied. Using the generalized constitutive law, the problem of model identification is transformed to a problem of parameter identification, which is a typical and complicated optimization. To improve the efficiency of the traditional optimization method, an immunized genetic algorithm that is proposed by the author is applied in this study. In this new algorithm, the principle of artificial immune algorithm is combined with the genetic algorithm. Therefore, the entire computation efficiency of model identification will be improved. Using this new model identification method, a numerical example and an engineering example are used to verify the computing ability of the algorithm. The results show that this new model identification algorithm can significantly improve the computation efficiency and the computation effect.

  7. Rock glaciers originating from mass movements: A new model based on field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitner, J. M.; Gruber, A.

    2009-04-01

    The morphological and geological conditions for the formation of rock glaciers in Alpine environments seem to be clear according to our present knowledge (BARSCH, 1996; HAEBERLI et al. 2006). All known examples derive from porous more or less coarse grained sedimentary bodies, either from moraines or, in most cases, from talus fans. In the latter case the debris accumulation originates overwhelmingly from physical weathering, rock falls or rock avalanches in proximity to rockwalls. However, in the course of geological mapping in the crystalline areas of Eastern and Northern Tyrol (Schober Gruppe, Tuxer Alpen) we found an additional setting. Some relict rock glaciers occur directly at the bulging toe of bedrock slopes, which had been affected by deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (REITNER, 2003; GRUBER, 2005). Furthermore rock glaciers are also present in ridge-top depressions and similar graben-like features that originated from gravitational processes in jointed bedrock. In all these cases talus fans with debris accumulation are missing in the source area of those rock glaciers. According to our model the disintegration of jointed rocks by creeping mass movements resulted in an increased volume of joint space. This enabled the formation of interstitial ice under permafrost conditions. Increased ice saturation led to the reduction of the angle of internal friction and finally to the initial formation of a rock glacier. Abundant material was provided for the further movement and thus for formation of quite large rock glaciers due to the previous and maybe still ongoing slope deformation. Most rock glaciers of this type originated from mass movements of sagging -type (Sackung sensu ZISCHINSKY, 1966), which illustrates the continuous transition from gravitational to periglacial creep process in high Alpine areas. All studied examples are of Lateglacial age according to the altitude in correspondence to the known amount of permafrost depression compared to

  8. Flat vs. Normal subduction, Central Chile: insights from regional seismic tomography and rock type modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marot, Marianne; Monfret, Tony; Gerbault, Muriel; Nolet, Guust; Ranalli, Giorgio; Pardo, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The Central Chilean subduction zone (27-35°S) is host to a multitude of unexplained phenomena, all likely linked to one another. Here, the 35 Ma oceanic Nazca plate is subducting beneath South America with a well developed, highly seismic flat slab, very well correlated with the subducting Juan Fernandez seamount Ridge (JFR) track, and also with the absence of volcanism at the surface. The upper plate, currently under compression, is composed of a series of accreted terranes of various origins and ages. Although no general consensus on the formation of this flat slab has been yet achieved, there may have been influence of overthickened oceanic crust, delayed eclogitization and consequent fluid retain within the slab, and slab suction due to the high convergence rate with the thick Rio de Plata craton. Therefore, the main questions we address are: Does the slab dehydrate along the flat subducting segment? If so, how hydrated is the slab, at what depth does slab dehydration occur, where are the fluids transported to, and where are they stored? Is magmatism still active beneath the now inactive arc? Are accreted terranes and suture zones important attributes of this subduction zone? Do they possess their own mantle entities? To answer these questions, we analyzed recorded local seismicity and performed regional 3D seismic tomography for Vp and Vs. Combining seismic tomography with 2D instantaneous thermo-mechanical modeling for the regions of flat and normal subduction, we predict rock compositions for these two regions based on published mineral and rock elastic properties. Here, we present a comparison between the normal subduction zone to the south, reflecting typical and expected features, and the flat slab region to the north, exhibiting heterogeneities. Our results agree with other studies for a dry and cold continental mantle above the flat slab. We distinguish the Cuyania terrane with overthickened crust and/or abnormal mantle beneath it. We notice that the

  9. Infiltration flux distributions in unsaturated rock deposits andtheir potential implications for fractured rock formations

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-11-01

    Although water infiltration through unconsolidated rocks and fractured rock formations control flow and transport to groundwater, spatial distributions of flow paths are poorly understood. Infiltration experiments conducted on packs of rocks showed that a well-constrained distribution of fluxes develops despite differences in rock type (angular diabase and sandstone, and subangular serpentinite), rock size (30 to 200mm), and packing (up to 42 rock layers). Fluxes stabilize into a geometric (exponential) distribution that keeps about half of the system depleted of flow, retains a small fraction of high flow regions, and has a characteristic scale determined by the rock size. Modification of a statistical mechanical model shows that gravity-directed, random flowpaths evolve to the observed flux distribution, and that it represents the most probable distribution. Key similarities between infiltration in rock deposits and fractured rock formations indicate that the geometric flow distribution may also apply in the latter systems.

  10. Plugging of a model rock system by using starved bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macleod, F A; Lappin-Scott, H M; Costerton, J W

    1988-06-01

    The effects of starvation on bacterial penetration through artificial rock cores were examined. Klebsiella pneumoniae was starved in a simple salts solution for a duration of up to 4 weeks. These cell suspensions were injected into sintered glass bead cores, and the resulting reductions in core permeabilities were recorded. Vegetative cell cultures of K. pneumoniae grown in a sodium citrate medium were injected into other, similar cores, and the reductions in core permeabilities were recorded. The starved cell suspensions did not completely block the core pores, whereas the vegetative cultures reduced core permeability to less than 1%. Scanning electron microscopy of core sections infiltrated with either vegetative or starved cells showed that the former produced shallow "skin" plugs and copious amounts of glycocalyx at the inlet face, whereas the latter produced very little glycocalyx and the cells were distributed evenly throughout the length of the core. The use of a DNA assay to produce a cell distribution profile showed that, compared with the vegetative cells, starved bacteria were able to penetrate deeper into the cores. This was due to the smaller size of the cells and the reduction in biofilm production. This ability of starved bacteria to penetrate further into cores than the normal-size vegetative cells can be usefully applied to selective plugging for enhanced oil recovery. To further test the suitability of starved cells for use in selective plugging, the activities of starved cells present within cores were monitored before and after nutrient stimulation. Our data indicate that with nutrient stimulation, the starved cells lose their metabolic dormancy and produce reductions in core permeability due to cell growth and polymer production.

  11. Source-rock distribution model of the periadriatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Zappaterra, E. )

    1994-03-01

    The Periadriatic area is a mosaic of geological provinces comprised of spatially and temporally similar tectonic-sedimentary cycles. Tectonic evolution progressed from a Triassic-Early Jurassic (Liassic) continental rifting stage on the northern edge of the African craton, through an Early Jurassic (Middle Liassic)-Late Cretaceous/Eocene oceanic rifting stage and passive margin formation, to a final continental collision and active margin deformation stage in the Late Cretaceous/Eocene to Holocene. Extensive shallow-water carbonate platform deposits covered large parts of the Periadriatic region in the Late Triassic. Platform breakup and development of a platform-to-basin carbonate shelf morphology began in the Late Triassic and extended through the Cretaceous. On the basis of this paleogeographic evolution, the regional geology of the Periadriatic region can be expressed in terms of three main Upper Triassic-Paleogene sedimentary sequences: (A), the platform sequence; (B), the platform to basin sequence; and (C), the basin sequence. These sequences developed during the initial rifting and subsequent passive-margin formation tectonic stages. The principal Triassic source basins and most of the surface hydrocarbon indications and economically important oil fields of the Periadriatic region are associated with sequence B areas. No major hydrocarbon accumulations can be directly attributed to the Jurassic-Cretaceous epioceanic and intraplatform source rock sequences. The third episode of source bed deposition characterizes the final active margin deformation stage and is represented by Upper Tertiary organic-rich terrigenous units, mostly gas-prone. These are essentially associated with turbiditic and flysch sequences of foredeep basins and have generated the greater part of the commercial biogenic gases of the Periadriatic region. 82 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Conceptual model suitability for reproducing preferential flow paths in waste rock piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, S.; Blessent, D.; Aubertin, M.

    2012-12-01

    Waste rocks are typically deposited on mining sites forming waste rock piles (WRP). Acid mine drainage (AMD) or contaminated neutral drainage (CND) with metal leaching from the sulphidic minerals adversely impact soil and water composition on and beyond the mining sites. The deposition method and the highly heterogeneous hydrogeological and geochemical properties of waste rock have a major impact on water and oxygen movement and pore water pressure distribution in the WRP, controlling AMD/CND production. However, the prediction and interpretation of water distribution in WRP is a challenging problem and many attempted numerical investigations of short and long term forecasts were found unreliable. Various forms of unsaturated localized preferential flow processes have been identified, for instance flow in macropores and fractures, heterogeneity-driven and gravity-driven unstable flow, with local hydraulic conductivities reaching several dozen meters per day. Such phenomena have been entirely neglected in numerical WRP modelling and are unattainable with the classical equivalent porous media conceptual approach typically used in this field. An additional complicating circumstance is the unknown location of macropores and fractures a priori. In this study, modeling techniques originally designed for massive fractured rock aquifers are applied. The properties of the waste rock material, found at the Tio mine at Havre Saint-Pierre, Québec (Canada), used in this modelling study were retrieved from laboratory permeability and water retention tests. These column tests were reproduced with the numerical 3D fully-integrated surface/subsurface flow model HydroGeoSphere, where material heterogeneity is represented by means of i) the dual continuum approach, ii) discrete fractures, and iii) a stochastic facies distribution framework using TPROGS. Comparisons with measured pore water pressures, tracer concentrations and exiting water volumes allowed defining limits and

  13. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  14. Origin and accumulation mechanisms of petroleum in the Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the Kebai Fault zone, Western Junggar Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhonghong; Zha, Ming; Liu, Keyu; Zhang, Yueqian; Yang, Disheng; Tang, Yong; Wu, Kongyou; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The Kebai Fault zone of the West Junggar Basin in northwestern China is a unique region to gain insights on the formation of large-scale petroleum reservoirs in volcanic rocks of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Carboniferous volcanic rocks are widespread in the Kebai Fault zone and consist of basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, tuff, volcanic breccia, sandy conglomerate and metamorphic rocks. The volcanic oil reservoirs are characterized by multiple sources and multi-stage charge and filling history, characteristic of a complex petroleum system. Geochemical analysis of the reservoir oil, hydrocarbon inclusions and source rocks associated with these volcanic rocks was conducted to better constrain the oil source, the petroleum filling history, and the dominant mechanisms controlling the petroleum accumulation. Reservoir oil geochemistry indicates that the oil contained in the Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the Kebai Fault zone is a mixture. The oil is primarily derived from the source rock of the Permian Fengcheng Formation (P1f), and secondarily from the Permian Lower Wuerhe Formation (P2w). Compared with the P2w source rock, P1f exhibits lower values of C19 TT/C23 TT, C19+20TT/ΣTT, Ts/(Ts + Tm) and ααα-20R sterane C27/C28 ratios but higher values of TT C23/C21, HHI, gammacerane/αβ C30 hopane, hopane (20S) C34/C33, C29ββ/(ββ + αα), and C29 20S/(20S + 20R) ratios. Three major stages of oil charge occurred in the Carboniferous, in the Middle Triassic, Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, and in the Middle Jurassic to Late Jurassic periods, respectively. Most of the oil charged during the first stage was lost, while moderately and highly mature oils were generated and accumulated during the second and third stages. Oil migration and accumulation in the large-scale stratigraphic reservoir was primarily controlled by the top Carboniferous unconformity with better porosity and high oil enrichment developed near the unconformity. Secondary dissolution

  15. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  16. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-01-31

    During this phase of the project the research team concentrated on acquisition of acoustic emission data from the high porosity rock samples. The initial experiments indicated that the acoustic emission activity from high porosity Danian chalk were of a very low amplitude. Even though the sample underwent yielding and significant plastic deformation the sample did not generate significant AE activity. This was somewhat surprising. These initial results call into question the validity of attempting to locate AE activity in this weak rock type. As a result the testing program was slightly altered to include measuring the acoustic emission activity from many of the rock types listed in the research program. The preliminary experimental results indicate that AE activity in the sandstones is much higher than in the carbonate rocks (i.e., the chalks and limestones). This observation may be particularly important for planning microseismic imaging of reservoir rocks in the field environment. The preliminary results suggest that microseismic imaging of reservoir rock from acoustic emission activity generated from matrix deformation (during compaction and subsidence) would be extremely difficult to accomplish.

  17. Characterising and modelling the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in crystalline rock in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.A.; Backstrom, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Jing, L.; Backers, T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Christiansson, R.; Feng, X.-T.; Kobayashi, A.; Koyama, T.; Lee, H.-S.; Neretnieks, I.; Pan, P.Z.; Rinne, M.; Shen, B.-T.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes current knowledge about the nature of and potential for thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical modelling of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) around the excavations for an underground radioactive waste repository. In the first part of the paper, the disturbances associated with excavation are explained, together with reviews of Workshops that have been held on the subject. In the second part of the paper, the results of a DECOVALEX research programme on modelling the EDZ are presented. Four research teams used four different models to simulate the complete stress-strain curve for Avro granite from the Swedish Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Subsequent research extended the work to computer simulation of the evolution of the repository using a 'wall block model' and a 'near-field model'. This included assessing the evolution of stress, failure and permeability and time dependent effects during repository evolution. As discussed, all the computer models are well suited to sensitivity studies for evaluating the influence of their respective supporting parameters on the complete stress-strain curve for rock and for modelling the EDZ.

  18. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  19. The effect of stagnant water zones on retarding radionuclide stransport in fractured rocks: An extension to the Channel Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahkarami, Pirouz; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-09-01

    An essential task of performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories is to predict radionuclide release into the environment. For such a quantitative assessment, the Channel Network Model and the corresponding computer program, CHAN3D, have been used to simulate radionuclide transport in crystalline bedrocks. Recent studies suggest, however, that the model may tend to underestimate the rock retarding capability, because it ignores the presence of stagnant water zones, STWZs, situated in the fracture plane. Once considered, the STWZ can provide additional surface area over which radionuclides diffuse into the rock matrix and thereby contribute to their retardation. The main objective of this paper is to extend the Channel Network Model and its computer implementation to account for diffusion into STWZs and their adjacent rock matrices. In the first part of the paper, the overall impact of STWZs in retarding radionuclide transport is investigated through a deterministic calculation of far-field releases at Forsmark, Sweden. Over the time-scale of the repository safety assessments, radionuclide breakthrough curves are calculated for increasing STWZ width. It is shown that the presence of STWZs enhances the retardation of most long-lived radionuclides except for 36Cl and 129I. The rest of the paper is devoted to the probabilistic calculation of radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The model that is developed for transport through a single channel is embedded into the Channel Network Model and new computer codes are provided for the CHAN3D. The program is used to (I) simulate the tracer test experiment performed at Äspö HRL, STT-1 and (II) investigate the short- and long-term effect of diffusion into STWZs. The required data for the model are obtained from detailed hydraulic tests in boreholes intersecting the rock mass where the tracer tests were made. The simulation results fairly well predict the release of the sorbing tracer 137Cs. It is found that

  20. Modelling the stress-strain behaviour of saturated rocks undergoing triaxial deformation using complex electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, P. W. J.; Gomez, J. B.; Meredith, P. G.; Boon, S. A.; Sammonds, P. R.; Murrell, S. A. F.

    1996-05-01

    Measurement of complex electrical conductivity as a function of frequency is an extremely sensitive probe for changes in pore and crack volume, crack connectivity, and crack surface topography. Such measurements have been made as a function of pore fluid chemistry, hydrostatic confining pressure, as well as uniaxial and triaxial deformation. This paper will; (1) describe the effects of triaxial deformation on the complex electrical conductivity of saturated porous rocks, (2) use the electrical data to model the mechanical stress-strain behaviour, and (3) compare the modelled behaviour with the stress-strain behaviour measured during the deformation. Experimental conductivity data tracks how the rock undergoes compaction with progressive loss of crack volume, followed by dilatation due to new crack formation, growth of existing cracks, crack interlinkage, and finally failure, as axial strain is increased. We have used the complex electrical data to produce a direction-sensitive (anisotropic) crack damage parameter, and used it to calculate the effective Young's modulus by employing the models of Walsh and Bruner. Comparison of the synthetic stress-strain curves so produced, with the experimentally derived stress-strain curves shows good agreement, particularly for undrained tests. This modelling is an improvement on similar curves produced using isotropic crack damage parameters derived from acoustic emission data. The improvement is likely to be due to the directional sensitivity of the electrical conductivity measurement, and its ability to discriminate between the formation of isolated cracks, and those cracks that contribute to the inter-connected crack space i.e. those cracks upon which transport properties of the rock such as electrical conductivity, and mechanical properties depend most critically during triaxial deformation.

  1. Implementation of an Empirical Joint Constitutive Model into Finite-Discrete Element Analysis of the Geomechanical Behaviour of Fractured Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qinghua; Latham, John-Paul; Xiang, Jiansheng

    2016-12-01

    An empirical joint constitutive model (JCM) that captures the rough wall interaction behaviour of individual fractures associated with roughness characteristics observed in laboratory experiments is combined with the solid mechanical model of the finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM). The combined JCM-FEMDEM formulation gives realistic fracture behaviour with respect to shear strength, normal closure, and shear dilatancy and includes the recognition of fracture length influence as seen in experiments. The validity of the numerical model is demonstrated by a comparison with the experimentally established empirical solutions. A 2D plane strain geomechanical simulation is conducted using an outcrop-based naturally fractured rock model with far-field stresses loaded in two consecutive phases, i.e. take-up of isotropic stresses and imposition of two deviatoric stress conditions. The modelled behaviour of natural fractures in response to various stress conditions illustrates a range of realistic behaviour including closure, opening, shearing, dilatancy, and new crack propagation. With the increase in stress ratio, significant deformation enhancement occurs in the vicinity of fracture tips, intersections, and bends, where large apertures can be generated. The JCM-FEMDEM model is also compared with conventional approaches that neglect the scale dependency of joint properties or the roughness-induced additional frictional resistance. The results of this paper have important implications for understanding the geomechanical behaviour of fractured rocks in various engineering activities.

  2. The influence of rock material models on seismic discrimination of underground nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1995-06-01

    We found that the spectral characteristics of the seismic signal from underground explosions were mainly determined by the rock material strength and the gas porosity. Both the unloading characteristics and the amplitude of the ``elastic toe`` are important parameters in the porous model.

  3. Rethinking the Meaning of "REV" in Modeling Fractured Rock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, T. P.; Poeter, E. P.

    2006-12-01

    Discrete fracture network (DFN) models are often useful in characterizing fracture controlled flow and transport, as evidenced by their application in numerous studies over the last 20 years. Collectively, numerical models of fractured aquifers may be coarsely categorized as DFN, continuum, or mixed approach, the latter method representing major features explicitly with the remainder as volume-averaged continuum. A mixed model is often ideal for large-scale fractured aquifers where large features are known deterministically and structural simplification for remaining fractures is helpful to render models computational feasible. The term "REV" (Representative Elementary Volume) is often associated with this simplification. Generally, the classical "REV" approach identifies a single scale at which regions may be represented as continuum, and where parameter values are considered deterministic and scalar. As an alternative, stochastic continuum methodologies allow for distributions of parameter values in a probabilistic framework, and while the scale of continuum is considered important, the classical "REV" definition is not considered entirely relevant. Also, there may be additional influences on "REV" imposed by a model's governing equations, the model parameter(s) of primary interest, and the scale of analysis. Thus, appropriate "REVs" differ depending on the scale at which model predictions are needed to facilitate decision making. For the purpose of evaluating water resources, we provide estimates of basin-scale continuum suitable for managing regional water resources in Turkey Creek Basin near Denver, Colorado using spatial averaging of hydraulic head observations. We also evaluate the commonly discussed requirements of "REV", such as the need for fracture networks to be dense and well connected, and for features to be much smaller than the scale of interest. While these conditions often meet classical "REV" requirements they are neither universally acceptable

  4. Contact line extraction and length measurements in model sediments and sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Elena; Prodanović, Maša; Bryant, Steven L

    2012-02-15

    The mechanisms that govern the transport of colloids in the unsaturated zone of soils are still poorly understood, because of the complexity of processes that occur at pore scale. These mechanisms are of specific interest in quantifying water quality with respect to pathogen transport (e.g. Escherichia coli, Cryptosporidium) between the source (e.g. farms) and human users. Besides straining in pore throats and constrictions of smaller or equivalent size, the colloids can be retained at the interfaces between air, water, and grains. Theories competing to explain this mechanism claim that retention can be caused by adhesion at the air-water-interface (AWI) between sediment grains or by straining at the air-water-solid (AWS) contact line. Currently, there are no established methods for the estimation of pathogen retention in unsaturated media because of the intricate influence of AWI and AWS on transport and retention. What is known is that the geometric configuration and connectivity of the aqueous phase is an important factor in unsaturated transport. In this work we develop a computational method based on level set functions to identify and quantify the AWS contact line (in general the non-wetting-wetting-solid contact line) in any porous material. This is the first comprehensive report on contact line measurement for fluid configurations from both level-set method based fluid displacement simulation and imaged experiments. The method is applicable to any type of porous system, as long as the detailed pore scale geometry is available. We calculated the contact line length in model sediments (packs of spheres) as well as in real porous media, whose geometry is taken from high-resolution images of glass bead packs and sedimentary rocks. We observed a strong dependence of contact line length on the geometry of the sediment grains and the arrangement of the air and water phases. These measurements can help determine the relative contribution of the AWS line to pathogen

  5. Transient groundwater observations and modelling at a rockslide in fractured rocks adjacent to a hydropower reservoir (Kaunertal valley, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, Thomas; Zangerl, Christian; Loew, Simon; Holzmann, Michael; Perzlmaier, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Positive pore water pressure within the fractured network of a rock slope reduces the effective stresses. This makes the knowledge of transient pore pressure magnitudes essential to evaluate time-dependent hydro-mechanically coupled rock slope processes. Slowly moving, deep-seated rockslides are a common type of gravitational mass movements in fractured metamorphic rocks. The hydrogeological conditions in rockslides adjacent to hydropower reservoirs are of major interest given that several case studies document the hydro-mechanical coupling between seasonal variations in the rockslide deformation behaviour and the filling and drawing down of the reservoir and/or seasonal variations of pore water pressure due to rainfall-events and snowmelt. Groundwater flow and pore pressure distributions in deep-seated rockslides, composed of fractured rocks, are usually only described by simplified conceptual models because of a lack of field measurements and difficulties in transient numerical modelling. The heterogeneous degree of disintegration of the sliding mass, soil-like deformation zones and the anisotropic fractured bedrock complicate the hydrogeological measurement, interpretation and analysis. In this study, detailed hydrogeological analyses of the Klasgarten rockslide at the Gepatsch reservoir (Kaunertal valley, Austria) are presented. A focus is set on the impact of reservoir level fluctuations, groundwater recharge along the slope and drainage by an exploring adit. The effect of various hydrogeological properties of the sliding mass, the deformation zone and the fractured bedrock on the groundwater fluctuations is discussed. Information on the groundwater flow regime, hydraulic relevant material properties and pore water pressure data are gained from borehole based investigations, a subhorizontal exploring adit and laboratory tests. Field observations are interpreted and validated on the basis of two dimensional finite element groundwater modelling. The transient

  6. A spatial estimation model for continuous rock mass characterization from the specific energy of a TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exadaktylos, G.; Stavropoulou, M.; Xiroudakis, G.; de Broissia, M.; Schwarz, H.

    2008-12-01

    Basic principles of the theory of rock cutting with rolling disc cutters are used to appropriately reduce tunnel boring machine (TBM) logged data and compute the specific energy (SE) of rock cutting as a function of geometry of the cutterhead and operational parameters. A computational code written in Fortran 77 is used to perform Kriging predictions in a regular or irregular grid in 1D, 2D or 3D space based on sampled data referring to rock mass classification indices or TBM related parameters. This code is used here for three purposes, namely: (1) to filter raw data in order to establish a good correlation between SE and rock mass rating (RMR) (or tunnelling quality index Q) along the chainage of the tunnel, (2) to make prediction of RMR, Q or SE along the chainage of the tunnel from boreholes at the exploration phase and design stage of the tunnel, and (3) to make predictions of SE and RMR or Q ahead of the tunnel’s face during excavation of the tunnel based on SE estimations during excavation. The above tools are the basic constituents of an algorithm to continuously update the geotechnical model of the rock mass based on logged TBM data. Several cases were considered to illustrate the proposed methodology, namely: (a) data from a system of twin tunnels in Hong Kong, (b) data from three tunnels excavated in Northern Italy, and (c) data from the section Singuerlin-Esglesias of the Metro L9 tunnel in Barcelona.

  7. Characterization of rock hydrologic properties using model verification

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, A.L.; Richards, K.A.; Flint, L.E.

    1993-06-01

    Model simulation of imbibition is proposed as a technique to test the adequacy of moisture characteristic and relative permeability data and the ability of the Brooks and Corey and van Genuchten equations to represent that data. The moisture characteristic data was collected using pressure plate, gas drive and submersible pressure outflow cell techniques. The relative permeability data was collected using centrifuge and gas drive techniques. The various relative permeability and moisture characteristic equations were used in a numerical flow simulator to model a laboratory imbibition experiment under two different initial conditions (5% and 46.6% saturation). For the one core tested, the sorption data from the submersible pressure outflow cell composited with the dry end of the centrifuge moisture characteristic curve and the gas drive relative permeability data using the Brooks and Corey equation proved the best fit for modeling imbibition. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Modeling of Anisotropic Rock Joints Under Cyclic Loading (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    This work describes a constitutive framework for modeling the behavior of rough joints under cyclic loading. Particular attention is paid to the intrinsic links between dilatancy, surface degradation, and mobilized shear strength. The framework also accounts for the important effect of shear-induced anisotropy. Both the governing formulation and an algorithm for implicit numerical integration are presented. While the proposed methods are general, we also postulate a specific model that is compared with experimental data. It employs relatively few free parameters, but shows good agreement with laboratory tests.

  9. Modeling of rock friction 2. Simulation of preseismic slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The constitutive relations developed in the companion paper are used to model detailed observations of preseismic slip and the onset of unstable slip in biaxial laboratory experiments. The simulations employ a deterministic plane strain finite element model to represent the interactions both within the sliding blocks and between the blocks and the loading apparatus. Both experiments and simulations show that preseismic slip is controlled by initial inhomogeneity of shear stress along the sliding surface relative to the frictional strength. As a consequence of the inhomogeneity, stable slip begins at a point on the surface and the area of slip slowly expands as the external loading increases. A previously proposed correlation between accelerating rates of stable slip and growth of the area of slip is supported by the simulations. In the simulations and in the experiments, unstable slip occurs shortly after a propagating slip event traverses the sliding surface and breaks out at the ends of the sample. In the model the breakout of stable slip causes a sudden acceleration of slip rates. Because of velocity dependency of the constitutive relationship for friction, the rapid acceleration of slip causes a decrease in frictional strength. Instability occurs when the frictional strength decreases with displacement at a rate that exceeds the intrinsic unloading characteristics of the sample and test machine. A simple slider-spring model that does not consider preseismic slip appears to approximate the transition adequately from stable sliding to unstable slip as a function of normal stress, machine stiffness, and surface roughness for small samples. However, for large samples and for natural faults the simulations suggest that the simple model may be inaccurate because it does not take into account potentially large preseismic displacements that will alter the friction parameters prior to instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Modeling fluid-rock interaction at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; A progress report, April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1992-08-01

    Volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada aie being assessed for their suitability as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Recent progress in modeling fluid-rock interactions, in particular the mineralogical and chemical changes that may accompany waste disposal at Yucca Mountain, will be reviewed in this publication. In Part 1 of this publication, ``Geochemical Modeling of Clinoptilolite-Water Interactions,`` solid-solution and cation-exchange models for the zeolite clinoptilolite are developed and compared to experimental and field observations. At Yucca Mountain, clinoptilolite which is found lining fractures and as a major component of zeolitized tuffs, is expected to play an important role in sequestering radionuclides that may escape from a potential nuclear waste repository. The solid-solution and ion-exchange models were evaluated by comparing predicted stabilities and exchangeable cation distributions of clinoptilolites with: (1) published binary exchange data; (2) compositions of coexisting clinoptilolites and formation waters at Yucca Mountain; (3) experimental sorption isotherms of Cs and Sr on zeolitized tuff, and (4) high temperature experimental data. Good agreement was found between predictions and expertmental data, especially for binary exchange and Cs and Sr sorption on clinoptilolite. Part 2 of this publication, ``Geochemical Simulation of Fluid-Rock Interactions at Yucca Mountain,`` describes preliminary numerical simulations of fluid-rock interactions at Yucca Mountain. The solid-solution model developed in the first part of the paper is used to evaluate the stability and composition of clinciptilolite and other minerals in the host rock under ambient conditions and after waste emplacement.

  11. Detrimental effect of post Status Epilepticus treatment with ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 in a pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kourdougli, Nazim; Varpula, Saara; Chazal, Genevieve; Rivera, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common type of epilepsy in adults where 20–30% of the patients are refractory to currently available anti-epileptic drugs. The RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway activation has been involved in inflammatory responses, neurite outgrowth and neuronal death under pathological conditions such as epileptic insults. Acute preventive administration of ROCK inhibitor has been reported to have beneficial outcomes in Status Epilepticus (SE) epilepsy. In the present study, we evaluate the effect of chronic post SE treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 in a rat pilocarpine model of TLE. We used chronic i.p. injections of Y-27632 for 5 days in 6 week old control rats or rats subjected to pilocarpine treatment as a model of TLE. Surprisingly, our findings demonstrate that a systemic administration of Y-27632 in pilocarpine-treated rats increases neuronal death in the CA3 region and ectopic recurrent mossy fiber sprouting (rMFS) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Interestingly, we found that chronic treatment with Y-27632 exacerbates the down-regulation and pathological distribution of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2, thus providing a putative mechanism for post SE induced neuronal death. The involvement of astrogliosis in this mechanism appears to be intricate as ROCK inhibition reduces reactive astrogliosis in pilocarpine rats. Conversely, in control rats, chronic Y-27632 treatment increases astrogliosis. Together, our findings suggest that Y-27632 has a detrimental effect when chronically used post SE in a rat pilocarpine model of TLE. PMID:26557054

  12. Generation of continental adakitic rocks: Crystallization modeling with variable bulk partition coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hong-Kun; Zheng, Jianping; Zhou, Xiang; Griffin, W. L.

    2017-02-01

    The geochemical signatures (i.e., high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios) of adakitic rocks in continental settings, which are derived from the continental lower crust rather than from subducted slabs, may reflect high-pressure melting in the lower crust or may be inherited from their sources. The North China Craton (NCC) is an ideal place for investigation of this type of adakites due to its ubiquitous distribution. As an example, we explore the petrogenesis of the Jurassic ( 163 Ma) adakitic rocks in western Liaoning, in the NE part of the NCC, using elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analysis and crystallization modeling based on Rhyolite-MELTS. The modeling demonstrates that adakitic signatures can be generated by fractional crystallization of magmas within crust of normal thickness (i.e., 33 km). Partial-melting modeling based on the composition of the lower continental crust shows that only the adakitic rocks from orogenic belts require a thickened crust (i.e., 45 km). We suggest that continental adakitic rocks are not necessarily linked to high-pressure processes and their use as an indicator of thickened/delaminated continental crust should be regarded with caution.

  13. Optical modeling of agricultural fields and rough-textured rock and mineral surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.; Vincent, R. K.; Horwitz, H. M.; Erickson, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Review was made of past models for describing the reflectance and/or emittance properties of agricultural/forestry and geological targets in an effort to select the best theoretical models. An extension of the six parameter Allen-Gayle-Richardson model was chosen as the agricultural plant canopy model. The model is used to predict the bidirectional reflectance of a field crop from known laboratory spectra of crop components and approximate plant geometry. The selected geological model is based on Mie theory and radiative transfer equations, and will assess the effect of textural variations of the spectral emittance of natural rock surfaces.

  14. Time-dependent evolution of rock slopes by a multi-modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzano, F.; Della Seta, M.; Martino, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a multi-modelling approach that incorporates contributions from morpho-evolutionary modelling, detailed engineering-geological modelling and time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling to analyse the rheological evolution of a river valley slope over approximately 102 kyr. The slope is located in a transient, tectonically active landscape in southwestern Tyrrhenian Calabria (Italy), where gravitational processes drive failures in rock slopes. Constraints on the valley profile development were provided by a morpho-evolutionary model based on the correlation of marine and river strath terraces. Rock mass classes were identified through geomechanical parameters that were derived from engineering-geological surveys and outputs of a multi-sensor slope monitoring system. The rock mass classes were associated to lithotechnical units to obtain a high-resolution engineering-geological model along a cross section of the valley. Time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling reproduced the main morpho-evolutionary stages of the valley slopes. The findings demonstrate that a complex combination of eustatism, uplift and Mass Rock Creep (MRC) deformations can lead to first-time failures of rock slopes when unstable conditions are encountered up to the generation of stress-controlled shear zones. The multi-modelling approach enabled us to determine that such complex combinations may have been sufficient for the first-time failure of the S. Giovanni slope at approximately 140 ka (MIS 7), even without invoking any trigger. Conversely, further reactivations of the landslide must be related to triggers such as earthquakes, rainfall and anthropogenic activities. This failure involved a portion of the slope where a plasticity zone resulted from mass rock creep that evolved with a maximum strain rate of 40% per thousand years, after the formation of a river strath terrace. This study demonstrates that the multi-modelling approach presented herein is a useful

  15. A new 3-D thin-skinned rock glacier model based on helicopter GPR results from the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Kaspar; Green, Alan G.; Buchli, Thomas; Springman, Sarah M.; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2015-06-01

    Mountainous locations and steep rugged surfaces covered by boulders and other loose debris are the main reasons why rock glaciers are among the most challenging geological features to investigate using ground-based geophysical methods. Consequently, geophysical surveys of rock glaciers have only ever involved recording data along sparse lines. To address this issue, we acquired quasi-3-D ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data across a rock glacier in the Swiss Alps using a helicopter-mounted system. Our interpretation of the derived GPR images constrained by borehole information results in a novel "thin-skinned" rock glacier model that explains a concentration of deformation across a principal shear zone (décollement) and faults across which rock glacier lobes are juxtaposed. The new model may be applicable to many rock glaciers worldwide. We suggest that the helicopter GPR method may be useful for 3-D surveying numerous other difficult-to-access mountainous terrains.

  16. Modeling the proportion of cut slopes rock on forest roads using artificial neural network and ordinal linear regression.

    PubMed

    Babapour, R; Naghdi, R; Ghajar, I; Ghodsi, R

    2015-07-01

    Rock proportion of subsoil directly influences the cost of embankment in forest road construction. Therefore, developing a reliable framework for rock ratio estimation prior to the road planning could lead to more light excavation and less cost operations. Prediction of rock proportion was subjected to statistical analyses using the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) in MATLAB and five link functions of ordinal logistic regression (OLR) according to the rock type and terrain slope properties. In addition to bed rock and slope maps, more than 100 sample data of rock proportion were collected, observed by geologists, from any available bed rock of every slope class. Four predictive models were developed for rock proportion, employing independent variables and applying both the selected probit link function of OLR and Layer Recurrent and Feed forward back propagation networks of Neural Networks. In ANN, different numbers of neurons are considered for the hidden layer(s). Goodness of the fit measures distinguished that ANN models produced better results than OLR with R (2) = 0.72 and Root Mean Square Error = 0.42. Furthermore, in order to show the applicability of the proposed approach, and to illustrate the variability of rock proportion resulted from the model application, the optimum models were applied to a mountainous forest in where forest road network had been constructed in the past.

  17. Hydrogeologic controls imposed by mechanical stratigraphy in layered rocks of the Chateauguay River Basin, a U.S.-Canada transborder aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Godin, Rejean; Nastev, Miroslav; Rouleau, Alain

    2007-01-01

    [1] The Châteauguay River Basin delineates a transborder watershed with roughly half of its surface area located in northern New York State and half in southern Québec Province, Canada. As part of a multidisciplinary study designed to characterize the hydrogeologic properties of this basin, geophysical logs were obtained in 12 wells strategically located to penetrate the four major sedimentary rock formations that constitute the regional aquifers. The layered rocks were classified according to their elastic properties into three primary units: soft sandstone, hard sandstone, and dolostone. Downhole measurements were analyzed to identify fracture patterns associated with each unit and to evaluate their role in controlling groundwater flow. Fracture networks are composed of orthogonal sets of laterally extensive, subhorizontal bedding plane partings and bed-delimited, subvertical joints with spacings that are consistent with rock mechanics principles and stress models. The vertical distribution of transmissive zones is confined to a few select bedding plane fractures, with soft sandstone having the fewest (one per 70-m depth) and hard sandstone the most (five per 70-m depth). Bed-normal permeability is examined using a probabilistic model that considers the lengths of flow paths winding along joints and bedding plane fractures. Soft sandstone has the smallest bed-normal permeability primarily because of its wide, geomechanically undersaturated joint spacing. Results indicate that the three formations have similar values of bulk transmissivity, within roughly an order of magnitude, but that each rock unit has its own unique system of groundwater flow paths that constitute that transmissivity.

  18. Modelling rock joint behavior from in situ block tests: implications for nuclear waste repository design

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, N.

    1982-09-01

    Simple, inexpensive index tests suitable for application to jointed core or jointed blocks of rock are described. These provide quantitative data on joint roughness, joint wall strength and residual friction angle, suitable for waste repository characterization. These three parameters form the basis of a new constitutive law of rock joint behavior which will enable numerical modellers to simulate the complete shear strength-displacement, dilation and closure of joints, including shear reversal and unloading cycles. Size effects are reviewed in detail and methods are developed for correcting the results of small scale tests to allow for limited sample size. The effects of shear displacement and dilation, normal closure and joint opening on permeability are modelled, so that fully coupled hydromechanical modelling can be achieved. The effects of extremely slow stress perturbations, periods of stick, and thermal loading on joint properties are also evaluated. The numerical modelling techniques are illustrated with numerous examples, and are validated against a large body of experimental data.

  19. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: a diffusion/ion exchange model.

    PubMed

    Wood, Warren W; Kraemer, Thomas F; Shapiro, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion-exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42 degrees 56'N, 71 degrees 43'W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model.

  20. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: A diffusion/ion exchange model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Kraemer, T.F.; Shapiro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion- exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42??56???N, 71??43???W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model.

  1. UDEC - A Generalised Distinct Element Program for Modelling Jointed Rock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    7 AD-AO87 610 CUNDALL (PETER ) ASSOCIATES VIRGINIA WATER (ENGLAND FIG 8/7 MA0 C UNALDJ39C04C ENERALISED DISTINCT ELEMENT PROGR AM FOR MODELLING SOl I...circular linked-list that corresponds to its boundary. Each corner on the boundary is represented by an array of words that stores the coordinates of...come into contact their corner lists are broken at the points of contact and an array of words (corresponding to a contact) is inserted into the break

  2. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-04-30

    } and {alpha}{sub h}, using the equations of Abousleiman et al. (1996). A series of experiments have been conducted, on an initially inherently isotropic Berea sandstone rock sample, to dynamically determine these anisotropic Biot's parameters during deformational pathway experiments. Data acquired during hydrostatic, triaxial, and uniaxial strain pathway experiments indicates that Biot's effective stress parameter changes significantly if the applied stresses are not hydrostatic. Variations, as large as 20% between the axial (vertical) and lateral (horizontal) Biot's effective stress parameters, were observed in some experiments. A series of triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated sand (Oil Creek sand) to determine the pressure/stress conditions which would be favorable for liquefaction. Liquefaction of geopressured sands is thought to be one of the major causative mechanisms of damaging shallow water flows. The experiments were developed to determine if: (1) liquefaction could be made to occur in this particular sand at high confining pressures, and (2) the state of liquefication had the same nature at high pressure conditions typical of shallow water flows as it does in low confining pressure soil mechanics tests. A series of undrained triaxial experiments were successfully used to document that the Oil Creek sand could undergo liquefaction. The nature (i.e., the shape of the deformational pathway in mean pressure/shear stress space) was very similar to those observed in soil mechanics experiments. The undrained triaxial experiments also indicated that this sand would strain soften at relatively high confining pressures--a necessary precursor to liquefaction. These experiments serve as a starting point for a series of acoustic experiments to determine the signature of compressional and shear wave properties as the sand packs approach the state of liquefaction (and shallow water flows).

  3. See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, R. P.; Henningsson, P.; Franklin, S. L.; Chen, D.; Ventikos, Y.; Bomphrey, R. J.; Thompson, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro mechanotransduction studies, uncovering the basic science of the response of cells to mechanical forces, are essential for progress in tissue engineering and its clinical application. Many varying investigations have described a multitude of cell responses; however, as the precise nature and magnitude of the stresses applied are infrequently reported and rarely validated, the experiments are often not comparable, limiting research progress. This paper provides physical and biological validation of a widely available fluid stimulation device, a see-saw rocker, as an in vitro model for cyclic fluid shear stress mechanotransduction. This allows linkage between precisely characterized stimuli and cell monolayer response in a convenient six-well plate format. Models of one well were discretized and analysed extensively using computational fluid dynamics to generate convergent, stable and consistent predictions of the cyclic fluid velocity vectors at a rocking frequency of 0.5 Hz, accounting for the free surface. Validation was provided by comparison with flow velocities measured experimentally using particle image velocimetry. Qualitative flow behaviour was matched and quantitative analysis showed agreement at representative locations and time points. Maximum shear stress of 0.22 Pa was estimated near the well edge, and time-average shear stress ranged between 0.029 and 0.068 Pa. Human tenocytes stimulated using the system showed significant increases in collagen and GAG secretion at 2 and 7 day time points. This in vitro model for mechanotransduction provides a versatile, flexible and inexpensive method for the fluid shear stress impact on biological cells to be studied. PMID:24898022

  4. Modelling of processes of damage accumulation and multiscale fracture in rock mass with excavations at mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, M. O.; Makarov, P. V.; Peryshkin, A. Yu.; Evtushenko, E. P.; Orlov, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    The results of 2D and 3D modelling of damage accumulation in rock mass elements are represented in the paper. The estimations of the initial (general) and set steps of roof caving are obtained for the lava conditions of Alardinskaya mine, OAS "YuzhKuzbassUgol". The results of modelling give a good agreement with empirical estimations of roof caving steps for the flat-dipping coal seams.

  5. Critical Chemical-Mechanical Couplings that Define Permeability Modifications in Pressure-Sensitive Rock Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham Grader; Susan Brantley

    2007-04-25

    This work examined and quantified processes controlling changes in the transport characteristics of natural fractures, subjected to coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical (TMC) effects. Specifically, it examined the effects of mineral dissolution and precipitation mediated by mechanical effects, using laboratory through-flow experiments concurrently imaged by X-ray CT. These were conducted on natural and artificial fractures in cores using water as the permeant. Fluid and mineral mass balances are recorded and are correlated with in-sample saturation, porosity and fracture aperture maps, acquired in real-time by X-ray CT-imaging at a maximum spatial resolution of 15-50 microns per pixel. Post-test, the samples were resin-impregnated, thin-sectioned, and examined by microscopy to define the characteristics of dissolution and precipitation. The test-concurrent X-ray imaging, mass balances, and measurements of permeability, together with the post-test microscopy, were used to define dissolution/precipitation processes, and to constrain process-based models. These models define and quantify key processes of pressure solution, free-face dissolution, and shear-dilation, and the influence of temperature, stress level, and chemistry on the rate of dissolution, its distribution in space and time, and its influence on the mechanical and transport properties of the fracture.

  6. Disclinations and grain boundary migration: evidence for a new deformation mechanism in olivine-rich rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Demouchy, S. A.; Beausir, B.; Taupin, V.; Fressengeas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks remains poorly understood. In particular, the ability of orthorhombic olivine to bear large strains represents an apparent violation of the von Mises criterion due to a lack of slip systems. In this study we show that a more general description of the deformation process including the motion of rotational defects referred to as disclinations can solve the olivine deformation paradox. Disclinations were proposed together with dislocations by Volterra (1907) to account for elastic distorsions (distorzione) in solids. They have recently been experimentally evidenced from orientation maps in several polycrystalline metallic alloys (Beausir & Fressengeas, 2013). Using high-resolution EBSD orientation maps we show that disclinations decorate grain boundaries in olivine samples deformed experimentally and in nature. We present a disclination-based model of a high-angle tilt boundary in olivine, which demonstrates that an applied shear induces grain boundary migration through disclination motion. This new approach allows further understanding of grain boundary-mediated plasticity in polycrystalline aggregates. By providing the missing mechanism for describing plastic flow in olivine, the present work allows multiscale modeling of the rheology of the upper mantle, from the atomic scale to the scale of the flow. Beausir, B. & Fressengeas, C., Disclination densities from EBSD orientation mapping. International Journal of Solids and Structures 50 (1), 137-146 (2013). Volterra, V., Sur l'équilibre des corps élastiques multiplement connexes. Annales scientifiques de l'École Normale Supérieure 24, 401-517 (1907). Acknowledgement for support: ERC grant RheoMan, Marie Curie fellowship PoEM and ANR NanoMec.

  7. A Fractal Model for the Shear Behaviour of Large-Scale Opened Rock Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Oh, J.; Mitra, R.; Canbulat, I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a joint constitutive model that represents the shear behaviour of a large-scale opened rock joint. Evaluation of the degree of opening is made by considering the ratio between the joint wall aperture and the joint amplitude. Scale dependence of the surface roughness is investigated by approximating a natural joint profile to a fractal curve patterned in self-affinity. Developed scaling laws show the slopes of critical waviness and critical unevenness tend to flatten with increased sampling length. Geometrical examination of four 400-mm joint profiles agrees well with the suggested formulations involving multi-order asperities and fractal descriptors. Additionally, a fractal-based formulation is proposed to estimate the peak shear displacements of rock joints at varying scales, which shows a good correlation with experimental data taken from the literature. Parameters involved in the constitutive law can be acquired by inspecting roughness features of sampled rock joints. Thus, the model can be implemented in numerical software for the stability analysis of the rock mass with opened joints.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Exploitation Relics and Faults Influence on Rock Mass Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesołowski, Marek

    2016-12-01

    This article presents numerical modeling results of fault planes and exploitation relics influenced by the size and distribution of rock mass and surface area deformations. Numerical calculations were performed using the finite difference program FLAC. To assess the changes taking place in a rock mass, an anisotropic elasto-plastic ubiquitous joint model was used, into which the Coulomb-Mohr strength (plasticity) condition was implemented. The article takes as an example the actual exploitation of the longwall 225 area in the seam 502wg of the "Pokój" coal mine. Computer simulations have shown that it is possible to determine the influence of fault planes and exploitation relics on the size and distribution of rock mass and its surface deformation. The main factor causing additional deformations of the area surface are the abandoned workings in the seam 502wd. These abandoned workings are the activation factor that caused additional subsidences and also, due to the significant dip, they are a layer on which the rock mass slides down in the direction of the extracted space. These factors are not taken into account by the geometrical and integral theories.

  9. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical properties of DNA are important not only in a wide range of biological processes but also in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology. We review some of the recent developments in modeling these properties, emphasizing the multiscale nature of the problem. Modern atomic resolution, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations have contributed to our understanding of DNA fine structure and conformational polymorphism. These simulations may serve as data sources to parameterize rigid base models which themselves have undergone major development. A consistent buildup of larger entities involving multiple rigid bases enables us to describe DNA at more global scales. Free energy methods to impose large strains on DNA, as well as bead models and other approaches, are also briefly discussed.

  10. Permeability of Partially Molten Rocks from Lattice-Boltzmann Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapic, G.; Faul, U.

    2013-12-01

    Timescales of melt transport at mid-ocean ridges from mantle source to the surface depend on permeability of the partially molten mantle. The permeability is usually predicted indirectly from experimental observations based on porosities that are much higher than the porosities inferred for the partially molten mantle. Low porosities are for example predicted by geochemical models from the onset of melt migration. Since melting starts at the grain scale, permeability of the partially molten mantle will depend on the grain-scale melt distribution. We reconstructed a 3-D view of melt geometry of two experimentally produced samples of partially molten olivine which demonstrates that melt exists in thin layers on two-grain boundaries (Garapić et al.,G3, 2013). The wetted two-grain boundaries have a width about 100 times smaller than the average grain size. Additionally, the pore space consists of a network of triple-junction tubules at all porosities, and large 'melt pools'. Due to the relative size of the wetted two-grain boundaries as well as the size of the triple-junction network compared to the grain size imagining and numerical analyses of partially molten samples require high resolution. Since no direct experimental permeability measurements are possible on partially molten aggregates, we investigate numerically the permeability as a function of porosity for this system. We simulate porous flow through an artificial pore volume using the lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) and Palabos LB code. Flow simulations were done on a computer cluster on three or four 125 GB nodes with 16 processors per node. With the available memory and allowed run time the maximum size of our pore structure was 1100 voxels per edge. In its simplest form the pore structure consists of a network of cylinders within a matrix of cubic grains. To approximate the observed 3-D melt geometry we added randomly distributed sheets on cube faces ('wetted two-grain boundaries') as well as randomly

  11. Mechanical Aqueous Alteration Dominates Textures of Gale Crater Rocks: Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aileen Yingst, R.; Minitti, Michelle; Edgett, Kenneth; McBride, Marie; Stack, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) acquired sub-mm/pixel scale color images of over 70 individual rocks and outcrops during Curiosity's first year on Mars, permitting the study of textures down to the distinction between silt and very fine sand. We group imaged rock textures into classes based on their grain size, sorting, matrix characteristics, and abundance of pores. Because the recent campaign at Pahrump Hills acquired many more MAHLI images than elsewhere along the rover traverse [6], textural analysis there is more detailed and thus types observed there are sub-divided. Mudstones: These rocks contain framework grains smaller than the highest resolution MAHLI images (16 μm/pixel), and thus are interpreted to consist of grains that are silt-sized or smaller. Some rocks contain nodules, sulfate veins, and Mg-enriched erosionally-resistant ridges. The Pahrump Hills region contains mudstones of at least four different sub-textures: recessive massive, recessive parallel-laminated, resistant laminated-to-massive, and resistant cross-stratified. Recessive mudstones are slope-forming; parallel-laminated recessive mudstones display mm-scale parallel (and in some cases rhythmic) lamination that extends laterally for many meters, and are interbedded with recessive massive mudstones. Coarse cm- to mm-scale laminae appear within resistant mudstones though some portions are more massive; laminae tend to be traceable for cm to meters. Well-sorted sandstones: Rocks in this class are made of gray, fine-to-medium sand and exhibit little to no porosity. Two examples of this class show fine lineations with sub-mm spacing. Aillik, a target in the Shaler outcrop, shows abundant cross-lamination. The Pahrump Hills region contains a sub-texture of well-sorted, very fine to fine-grained cross-stratified sandstone at the dune and ripple-scale. Poorly-sorted sandstones. This class is subdivided into two sub-classes: rounded, coarse-to-very coarse sand grains of variable colors and

  12. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  13. Rheology as Master of the Satellite Universe (Geophysical Modeling of Ice-Rock Bodies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.

    2006-12-01

    Without an explicit knowledge of water (and other) ice rheology, attempts to model, much less understand, the geological and geophysical evolution of ice-rock satellites, asteroids, and Kuiper belt objects would simply founder. Careful experimental programs have elucidated the rate laws and mechanisms for the creep of water ice under the stresses and temperatures appropriate to the outer solar system - and these rate laws have been broadly applied (examples will be discussed). But whether these rate laws apply to glacial ice on Earth is strongly questioned by some glaciologists. It is important to put this issue to rest in the literature and reach consensus. For example, the grain-size-sensitive (GSS) creep law proposed for ice should determine the spatial pattern and intensity of tidal heating within Europa's ice shell and within Enceladus. But if GSS creep is actually a modified form of dislocation creep, as the glaciologists above argue, then there is no dependence of tidal heating on grain size, and all efforts to constrain the latter are irrelevant. Rheologies for the higher polymorphs of water ice are also important for the larger icy bodies (Triton through Ganymede, certainly). Recent results have been reported for low-stress GSS creep of ice II. Convective transport in deeper ice is more likely controlled by warmer ice III, however, and despite experimental difficulty, similar knowledge for ice III would be of great value. Finally, the issue of porosity and porosity evolution, while often overlooked, won't go away. Porosity controls the thermal conductivity of icy layers (if not lithospheres on smaller bodies) but is subject to almost no observational or experimental evaluation. It can cause the rock/ice ratio of cold icy bodies to be underestimated. And it is surprisingly difficult to eliminate by pressure (crushing) alone. Rheological data on other ices exist as well, of course, but almost nothing is known about the properties and behavior of the organic

  14. Long-term coupling along the subduction plate interface: insights from exhumed rocks and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Guillot, S.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fragments of subducted oceanic lithosphere returned along the plate interface convey crucial information regarding the thermal and rheological conditions of convergent plate boundaries. Combining evidence from exhumed rocks worldwide and the results of recently published thermo-mechanical models, we herein investigate how long-term mechanical coupling takes place along deep portions of the plate interface (40-80 km depth), for which there is no counterflow (unlike in accretionary prisms) and no other known mechanisms to return eclogites than interplate friction or buoyancy. Geological evidence indicates that, unlike subduction, exhumation is highly discontinuous. Besides, eclogites worldwide are found in essentially two types of tectonic setting, either as large scale (>km) slices with coherent PT estimates (W. Alps) or as isolated fragments (frequently m-hm) in a serpentinite- or sedimentary-rich matrix showing contrasting equilibration depths (with hints of punctuated exhumation and even reburial in some localities; Franciscan, Cuba, Sistan). This latter type tends to show warmer equilibration paths (although minor lawsonite-eclogite blocks can be found), whereas the larger tectonic slices from the former type remain systematically cold. Serpentinites are crucial for both in permitting decoupling and acting as a buoy, and fluid budget is important too in enhancing floatability and allowing large slices to survive. Numerical models implementing free migration of fluids in the subduction zone also show that the plate interface is strongly localized in the absence of fluids: mechanical decoupling efficiently occurs along the sediment veneer and/or at the top of the highly hydrothermalized crust. Whenever fluids are released in greater amounts (depending on initial fluid content and/or thermal structure), deformation becomes much more distributed and affects both the mantle wedge and the top of the downgoing lithosphere (hydrated crust and mantle top), thereby

  15. Numerical simulations of Rock Avalanches with DAN-3D: from real case to analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, Céline; Penna, Ivanna; Sauthier, Claire; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Rock avalanches are rapid events with capacity to develop long and unexpected runouts, which can evolve into catastrophic events difficult to predict. In order to better understand unusual travel distances, analogue and numerical modeling are often used. The comparison between real case, and analogue and dynamics models is key to constrain and understand parameters governing rock avalanches run outs. In the Pampeanas range (Argentina), the Potrero de Leyes rock avalanche involved 0.23 km3 of highly fractured metamorphic rocks that spread in the piedmont area without any topographical constrain, resulting in a runout of 4.8 km. In this study we first attempt to apply analogue models to replicate the rock avalanche deposit. The analogue modeling consists into the release of a granular material (calibrated and angular carborundum sand) along a slope, creating similar landscape conditions that the real case. The material is not constrained laterally and spread freely on a flat deposition surface. For a volume of 50 cm3, the runout is 50 cm, the deposit has as length of 10 cm and a width of 19 cm. For a volume of 100 cm3, the runout is 65 cm, the deposit has as length of 25 cm and a width of 30 cm. In a further step we model both the real case and the result of the analogue models. Dynamics models are carried out with DAN-3D, a dynamic model for the prediction of the run out of rapid landslide (O. Hungr, 1995; O. Hugr & S.G. Evans, 1996). The result of the simulations for both volumes tested with the analogue model give satisfactory results. In fact, for the volume of 50 cm3, the deposit has as length of 10 cm and a width of 20 cm and for the volume of 100 cm3, the deposit has as length of 25 cm and a width of 50 cm. The shape and the thickness of the deposit obtained with DAN-3D are also similar with those got with the analogue models.

  16. A model for classifying and interpreting logs of boreholes that intersect faults in stratified rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mulvany, P.S. )

    1992-06-01

    A model reveals eleven fundamental relationships between the character of well logs and the geometry of borehole-strata-fault (BSF) intersections. Within limits, the model has two important practical applications. First, it provides a convenient way to classify logs of boreholes that intersect faults in stratified rocks. The different kinds of logs are given names, which can be used in informal and formal discourse to succinctly describe faulted logs. Second, the model can be used to interpret the geometry of BSF intersections directly from well logs. Knowledge of BSF geometry can be useful in interpreting faults in structure. Persons involved in highly deviated and horizontal boreholes should find the model particularly helpful.

  17. A Circuit Model for the Measurement of the Streaming Potential in a Rock Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.; Wang, J.; Qiu, A.; Liu, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-04-01

    Streaming potential is usually defined under the assumption that the rock sample under consideration is not connected electrically to any external circuit. In this study we investigate experimentally the effect of the external circuit on the measurement of the streaming potential. Cations usually dominate anions in the diffuse layer in the pore canals in a fluid-saturated porous sandstone sample. When a pressure difference is applied to the sample, fluid flows in the pores and causing a convective current due to the cation-dominate motion. With the separation of opposite ions at the two ends, a streaming potential occurs, and results in a conductive current. Those two current will be opposite and equal in value so that the streaming potential does not change. But in any experimental measurement of the streaming potential, the rock sample is not isolated in the circuit. An external circuit is necessary for the measurement of the potential difference at the ends of the sample. This external circuit will divert the flow of charges. This study investigates the effect of the external circuit on the convective current and conductive current in the pores by experiments, and gives an equivalent circuit model for the two currents. We connect an external resistance Rext to the ends of the fluid-saturated rock sample, and measure the potential difference at the ends of the sample . The impedance of the fluid-saturated rock sample Zrock is definite under a given salinity and can be separately measured. The circuit is governed by the following equations, Urock = ZrockIcond, (1) Urock = RextIext, (2) Iconv + Icond +Iext = 0, (3) where Iconv is the convective current, Icond is the conductive current, Iext is the external current and Urock is the potential difference at the ends of the rock sample. From the above three equations, we get - Urock(Zrock + Rext) Iconv = ---Z--R----- . rock ext (4) We repeated the measurement under different external resistance Rext. The computed

  18. On Discrimination of Thermal Versus Mechanical Effects of Shock on Rock Magnetic Properties of Spherically Shocked up to ˜10-140 GPa Basalt and Diabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L.; Tikoo, S. M.; Kars, M.; Egli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new experimental method of discrimination in shock-recovery experiments between thermal and mechanical effects of shock on rock magnetic properties of spherically shocked (Ti) magnetite-bearing basalt and diabase.

  19. The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction: A lethal mechanism involving anhydrite target rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Chicxulub Crater, Yucatan, Mexico, is a leading contender as the site for the impact event that caused the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinctions. A considerable thickness of anhydrite (CaSO4) forms part of the target rock. High temperatures resulting from impact would drive SO2 off from the anhydrite. Hundreds of billions of tonnes of sulfuric acid aerosol would thus enter the stratosphere and cause considerable cooling of the Earth's surface, decrease photosynthesis by orders of magnitude, deplete the ozone layer, and permit increased UV radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Finally, the aerosol would fall back to Earth as acid rain and devastate land and some lacustrine biota and near-surface marine creatures. The presence of anhydrite in the Chicxulub target rock may thus help explain the many extinctions observed at the K-T boundary. ?? 1992.

  20. Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Reactive Transport of CO2 and Its Impact on Geomechanical Properties of Faulted Reservoir Rocks and Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, B. N.; Hou, Z.; Bacon, D. H.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation develops a multiscale model to analyze CO2 faulted reservoirs using the STOMP-CO2-R code that is interfaced with the ABAQUS® finite element package. The STOMP-CO2-R/ABAQUS® simulator accounts for the reactive transport of CO2 causing mineral composition changes that modify the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals. Rocks' elastic properties that vary during CO2 injection and govern the poroelastic behavior of rocks are modeled by an Eshelby-Mori-Tanka approach implemented in ABAQUS®. A three-dimensional (3D) STOMP-CO2-R model for a reservoir containing an inclined fault is built to analyze a formation containing a reaction network with 5 minerals: albite, anorthite, calcite, kaolinite and quartz. A 3D ABAQUS® finite element mesh that exactly maps the STOMP-CO2-R grid is developed for coupled hydro-geochemical-mechanical analyses. The model contains alternating sandstone and shale layers. The impact of reactive transport of CO2 on the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals are studied in terms of mineral composition changes that affect the rock stiffness, stress and strain distributions, and pressure margin to fracture (PMF). Simulations assuming extensional and compressional stress regimes with and without coupled geochemistry are developed to study the stress regime effect on the risk of hydraulic fracture. The tendency for the fault to slip is examined in terms of stress regime, geomechanical and geochemical-mechanical effects. The results show that the mineralogical changes due to long-term injection of CO2 reduce the permeability and elastic modulus of the reservoir leading to a reduction of the PMF at and beyond the injection location. Hydraulic fracture and fault slip are not predicted to occur. However, accounting for the geomechemical-mechanical effect in the analysis under the extensional stress regime leads to reduction of the PMF at the injection location and at the seal immediately above this location.

  1. Modelling the graphite fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a design criterion for graphite components, it is important to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the graphite fracture, to include them in a more effective modelling. In a first step, a large panel of experiments have been realised in order to build up an important database; results of tensile tests, 3 and 4 point bending tests on smooth and notched specimens have been analysed and have demonstrated an important geometry related effects on the behavior up to fracture. Then, first simulations with an elastic or an elastoplastic bilinear constitutive law have not made it possible to simulate the experimental fracture stress variations with the specimen geometry, the fracture mechanisms of the graphite being at the microstructural scale. That is the reason why a specific F.E. model of the graphite structure has been developed in which every graphite grain has been meshed independently, the crack initiation along the basal plane of the particles as well as the crack propagation and coalescence have been modelled too. This specific model has been used to test two different approaches for fracture initiation: a critical stress criterion and two criteria of fracture mechanic type. They are all based on crystallographic considerations as a global critical stress criterion gave unsatisfactory results. The criteria of fracture mechanic type being extremely unstable and unable to represent the graphite global behaviour up to the final collapse, the critical stress criterion has been preferred to predict the results of the large range of available experiments, on both smooth and notched specimens. In so doing, the experimental observations have been correctly simulated: the geometry related effects on the experimental fracture stress dispersion, the specimen volume effects on the macroscopic fracture stress and the crack propagation at a constant stress intensity factor. In addition, the parameters of the criterion have been related to

  2. Final Report - Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, Michael J.

    2006-07-10

    The Department of Energy Environmental Management Program is faced with two major issues involving two-phase flow in fractured rock; specifically, transport of dissolved contaminants in the Vadose Zone, and the fate of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) below the water table. Conceptual models currently used to address these problems do not correctly include the influence of the fractures, thus leading to erroneous predictions. Recent work has shown that it is crucial to understand the topology, or ''structure'' of the fluid phases (air/water or water/DNAPL) within the subsurface. It has also been shown that even under steady boundary conditions, the influence of fractures can lead to complex and dynamic phase structure that controls system behavior, with or without the presence of a porous rock matrix. Complicated phase structures within the fracture network can facilitate rapid transport, and lead to a sparsely populated and widespread distribution of concentrated contaminants; these qualities are highly difficult to describe with current conceptual models. The focus of our work is to improve predictive modeling through the development of advanced conceptual models for two-phase flow in fractured rock.

  3. A new model for the computation of the formation factor of core rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, A.; Chávez, O.; Zaldivar, J.; Godínez, F. A.; García, A.; Zenit, R.

    2017-04-01

    Among all the rock parameters measured by modern well logging tools, the formation factor is essential because it can be used to calculate the volume of oil- and/or gas in wellsite. A new mathematical model to calculate the formation factor is analytically derived from first principles. Given the electrical properties of both rock and brine (resistivities) and tortuosity (a key parameter of the model), it is possible to calculate the dependence of the formation factor with porosity with good accuracy. When the cementation exponent ceases to remain constant with porosity; the new model is capable of capturing both: the non-linear behavior (for small porosity values) and the typical linear one in log-log plots for the formation factor vs. porosity. Comparisons with experimental data from four different conventional core rock lithologies: sands, sandstone, limestone and volcanic are shown, for all of them a good agreement is observed. This new model is robust, simple and of easy implementation for practical applications. In some cases, it could substitute Archie's law replacing its empirical nature.

  4. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  5. A modeling solution for predicting (a) dry rock bulk modulus, rigidity modulus and (b) seismic velocities and reflection coefficients in porous, fluid-filled rocks with applications to laboratory rock samples and well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Alvin K.; Wu, Jie

    1999-02-01

    The velocity of sound in porous, fluid-saturated rocks can be predicted using the Biot-Geertsma-Gassmann (BGG) and shear-wave velocity equations. However, two of the needed input parameters, the bulk modulus ( Kb) of the empty, porous rock and the shear modulus ( μ) of the rock are very difficult to obtain in situ. In the past, these values were typically chosen a priori and input into the BGG and shear-wave equations in a forward modeling mode. In addition to Kb and μ, it is also essential to input rock-matrix and fluid parameters that reflect in situ conditions. In this paper, the BGG and shear-wave equations are inverted to generate values for Kb and μ, respectively, by using available velocity and porosity data obtained from well logs and/or cores for water/brine-saturated rocks. These values of Kb and μ, along with reasonable in situ estimates of rock-matrix and fluid parameters generated from the Batzle-Wang [Batzle, M., Wang, Z., 1992. Seismic properties of pore fluids. Geophysics 57, 1396-1408.] formulation, are then used to predict compressional and shear-wave velocities, compressional-shear wave ratios, and reflection coefficients at the interfaces between host rocks and fluid-saturated rocks, either fully or partially saturated with hydrocarbons, as a function of depth and/or porosity. Although generally similar to the approach of Murphy et al. [Murphy, W.F., Reischer, A., Hsu, K., 1993. Modulus decomposition of compressional and shear velocities in sand bodies. Geophysics 58, 227-239.], our method of inversion to determine Kb and μ, coupled with our input of in situ estimates of rock-matrix and fluid parameters as a function of depth from the Batzle-Wang formulation, forms a novel solution for predicting in situ velocities. A modeling program has been developed to perform these calculations and plot the velocity and reflection coefficient information as a function of depth, porosity, and water saturation. The resulting relationships between porous

  6. Predicting Folding Sequences Based on the Maximum Rock Strength and Mechanical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.; Maillot, B.; Leroy, Y. M.

    2007-12-01

    The objective is to propose and validate simple procedures, compared to the finite-element method, to select and optimize the dominant mode of folding in fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges, and to determine its stress distribution. Mechanical equilibrium as well as the constraints due to the limited rock strength of the bulk material and of major discontinuities, such as décollements, are accounted for. The first part of the proposed procedure, which is at the core of the external approach of classical limit analysis, consists in estimating the least upper bound on the tectonic force by minimisation of the internal dissipation and part of the external work. The new twist to the method is that the optimization is also done with respect to the geometry of the evolving fold. If several folding events are possible, the dominant mode is the one leading to the least upper bound. The second part of the procedure is based on the Equilibrium Element Method, which is an application of the internal approach of limit analysis. The optimum stress field, obtained by spatial discretisation of the fold, provides the best lower bound on the tectonic force. The difference between the two bounds defines an error estimate of the exact unknown tectonic force. To show the merits of the proposed procedure, its first part is applied to predict the life span of a thrust within an accretionary prism, from its onset, its development with a relief build up and its arrest because of the onset of a more favorable new thrust (Cubas et al., 2007). This life span is sensitive to the friction angles over the ramp and the décollement. It is shown how the normal sequence of thrusting in a supercritical wedge is ended with the first out-of sequence event. The second part of the procedure provides the stress state over each thrust showing that the active back thrust is a narrow fan which dip is sensitive to the friction angle over the ramp and the amount of relief build up (Souloumiac et

  7. Analogue modelling of rock avalanches and structural analysis of the deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, C.; Charrière, M.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    Rock avalanches are catastrophic events in which granular masses of rock debris flow at high speeds, commonly with unusual runout. A great volume of material (>106 m3) is involved and the flowing mass can reach velocities up to ten meters per second. Rock avalanches can travel long distances on the order of kilometres and covering an area over 0.1 km2. These are extremely destructive and uncontrollable events. Due to the rarity of these events, analogue modelling plays a fundamental role in the understanding of the behaviour such events. The main objective of this research is to link the granular physics with the modelling of rock avalanches. Firstly, we attempt to model the debris avalanche and its spreading on a slope with different substratum to understand the relationship between the volume and the reach angle, or Fahrböschung, i.e. angle of the line joining the top of the scar and the end of the deposit. For a better understanding of the sliding mass motion and its spreading, the deposit is scanned with a micro Lidar Minolta. The different datasets are compared in order to see how the grainsize and volume influence a debris avalanche. In a general way, the travel distance is greater with coarse material and varies between 32° for the coarser grainsize and 37° for the finer one. It is interesting to note that the highest Fahrböschung, 41°, is reached for the highest slope angle (60°) and varies between 32 and 34.5° for a slope of 40°. Secondly, a detailed structural analysis of the deposit is performed in order to understand how the sliding mass stops. Several authors (e.g. Shea and van Wyk de Vries (2008)) highlighted that faults and folds are present in rock avalanches deposits and reproduced these features in analogue modelling. Our experiments are recorded by a height speed precision camera to see the development of these structures during the flowing of the mass. The most important impacts of this study is a better understanding of the effects of

  8. Rock Island Arsenal Power Dam: Numerical Hydraulic Model Investigation of Channel Capacity for Power Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    and environmental challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and...and Sylvan Slough, a side channel of the Mississippi River near Rock Island, IL. Water levels in the Moline Pool are regulated primarily by...Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) numerical modeling system to solve the two- dimensional (2D), depth-averaged, shallow water equations describing open channel

  9. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  10. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  11. Steady-State Creep of Rock Salt: Improved Approaches for Lab Determination and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, R.-M.; Salzer, K.; Popp, T.; Lüdeling, C.

    2015-11-01

    Actual problems in geotechnical design, e.g., of underground openings for radioactive waste repositories or high-pressure gas storages, require sophisticated constitutive models and consistent parameters for rock salt that facilitate reliable prognosis of stress-dependent deformation and associated damage. Predictions have to comprise the active mining phase with open excavations as well as the long-term development of the backfilled mine or repository. While convergence-induced damage occurs mostly in the vicinity of openings, the long-term behaviour of the backfilled system is dominated by the damage-free steady-state creep. However, because in experiments the time necessary to reach truly stationary creep rates can range from few days to years, depending mainly on temperature and stress, an innovative but simple creep testing approach is suggested to obtain more reliable results: A series of multi-step tests with loading and unloading cycles allows a more reliable estimate of stationary creep rate in a reasonable time. For modelling, we use the advanced strain-hardening approach of Günther-Salzer, which comprehensively describes all relevant deformation properties of rock salt such as creep and damage-induced rock failure within the scope of an unified creep ansatz. The capability of the combination of improved creep testing procedures and accompanied modelling is demonstrated by recalculating multi-step creep tests at different loading and temperature conditions. Thus reliable extrapolations relevant to in-situ creep rates (10^{-9} to 10^{-13} s^{-1}) become possible.

  12. Research on anisotropy of shale oil reservoir based on rock physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Qi; Liu, Cai; Liu, Xi-Wu; Dong, Ning; Liu, Yu-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Rock physics modeling is implemented for shales in the Luojia area of the Zhanhua topographic depression. In the rock physics model, the clay lamination parameter is introduced into the Backus averaging theory for the description of anisotropy related to the preferred alignment of clay particles, and the Chapman multi-scale fracture theory is used to calculate anisotropy relating to the fracture system. In accordance with geological features of shales in the study area, horizontal fractures are regarded as the dominant factor in the prediction of fracture density and anisotropy parameters for the inversion scheme. Results indicate that the horizontal fracture density obtained has good agreement with horizontal permeability measured from cores, and thus confirms the applicability of the proposed rock physics model and inversion method. Fracture density can thus be regarded as an indicator of reservoir permeability. In addition, the anisotropy parameter of the P-wave is higher than that of the S-wave due to the presence of horizontal fractures. Fracture density has an obvious positive correlation with P-wave anisotropy, and the clay content shows a positive correlation with S-wave anisotropy, which fully shows that fracture density has a negative correlation with clay and quartz contents and a positive relation with carbonate contents.

  13. The microstructural character and evolution of fault rocks from SAFOD and potential weakening mechanisms along the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diggelen, E.; Holdsworth, R. E.; de Bresser, J. H.; Spiers, C.; Smith, S. A.; Walker, R. J.; Bowen, L.

    2010-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) forms the boundary between two geological terranes; the Salinian block (SB, Pacific plate) and the Great Valley block (GVB, North American plate). The SB contains arkosic sandstones, the GVB consists mostly of claystones and siltstones. The SAFOD borehole provides an extensive set of samples across the SAF and permits direct study of fault zone processes at 2-3 km depth. In order to determine the fault rock properties and deformation mechanisms in the SAF, in particular in two actively creeping fault segments, we have visually assessed the SAFOD phase 3 core material and we have performed detailed optical and electron microscopy, including chemical analyses using EDX. We compared the natural microstructures with microstructures developed in simulated fault gouges deformed in laboratory experiments. The rocks in Core interval 1 (SB) are mildly deformed and show evidence of cataclasis, pressure solution and reaction of feldspar to form phyllosilicates. Most of Core interval 3 (GVB) is also only mildly deformed, similar to Core interval 1. Sedimentary features are still visible, together with limited evidence for cataclasis, pressure solution and reaction of feldspar to phyllosilicates. The rocks in Core interval 2 (GVB) show ample evidence for micro-folding, foliation development, development of anastomosing shear bands, gouge formation, veining, and reworking of earlier microstructures. In addition, evidence is widespread for cataclasis, pressure solution and reaction of feldspar to form phyllosilicates. The SB and GVB host rocks are cut by numerous minor faults and small calcite-filled veins. Thin foliated gouges contain fine-grained, Fe-rich smectitic phyllosilicates. The development of interconnected networks of these phyllosilicates following cataclasis is prevalent in the inactive gouges. The actively creeping zones in Core intervals 2 and 3 consist mostly of Mg-rich smectitic phyllosilicates and show a strong, wavy foliation, lens

  14. Results from a discrete fracture network model of a Hot Dry Rock system

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyon, G.W.; Batchelor, A.S.; Ledingham, P.

    1993-01-28

    The work described represents a move towards better representations of the natural fracture system. The discrete fracture network model used during the study was the NAPSAC code (Grindrod et al, 1992). The goals of the work were to investigate the application of discrete fracture network models to Hot Dry Rock systems, increase the understanding of the basic thermal extraction process and more specifically the understanding of the Rosemanowes Phase 2B system. The aim in applying the work to the Rosemanowes site was to use the discrete fracture network approach to integrate a diverse set of field measurements into as simple a model as possible.

  15. Capturing poromechanical coupling effects of the reactive fracturing process in porous rock via a DEM-network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing

    2016-04-01

    Fluid transport in a porous medium has important implications for understanding natural geological processes. At a sufficiently large scale, a fluid-saturated porous medium can be regarded as a two-phase continuum, with the fluid constituent flowing in the Darcian regime. Nevertheless, a fluid mediated chemical reaction can in some cases change the permeability of the rock locally: Mineral dissolution can cause increased permeability, whereas mineral precipitation can reduce the permeability. This might trigger a complicated hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling effect that causes channeling of fluids or clogging of the system. If the fluid is injected or produced at a sufficiently high rate, the pressure might increase enough to cause the onset and propagation of fractures. Fractures in return create preferential flow paths that enhance permeability, localize fluid flow and chemical reaction, prevent build-up of pore pressure and cause anisotropy of the hydro-mechanical responses of the effective medium. This leads to a complex coupled process of solid deformation, chemical reaction and fluid transport enhanced by the fracture formation. In this work, we develop a new coupled numerical model to study the complexities of feedback among fluid pressure evolution, fracture formation and permeability changes due to a chemical process in a 2D system. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) previously used to study a volume expanding process[1, 2] with a new fluid transport model based on poroelasticity[3] and a fluid-mediated chemical reaction that changes the permeability of the medium. This provides new insights into the hydro-chemo-mechanical process of a transforming porous medium. References [1] Ulven, O. I., Storheim, H., Austrheim, H., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A. "Fracture Initiation During Volume Increasing Reactions in Rocks and Applications for CO2 Sequestration", Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 389C, 2014a, pp. 132 - 142, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2013.12.039. [2] Ulven, O. I

  16. Application of real rock pore-threat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Rakibul, M.; Sarker, H.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddiqui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  17. Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, M.R.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddigui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  18. One-Dimensional Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Storage Systems - Change in Cap Rock Porosity Triggered by Pressure and Temperature Dependent CO2-Water-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemme, C.; van Berk, W.

    2015-12-01

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems supercritical CO2 is injected into a reservoir and dissolves in the reservoir brine. Subsequently, CO2(aq) diffuses into the cap rock to regions of lower total pressure and temperature and triggers CO2-water-rock interactions that are coupled with mass transport and result in precipitation and/or dissolution of minerals along the CO2 migration path. Such hydrogeochemical interactions change porosities and are responsible for the improvement or deterioration of the long term integrity of the system. This study presents a semi-generic hydrogeochemical model based on chemical equilibrium thermodynamics, data from several CO2 storage systems, and plausible assumptions regarding non-available data. One-dimensional reactive transport modeling is performed by using the U.S.G.S. PHREEQC code (3.1.4-8929; phreeqc.dat database) to identify and quantify the loss or gain of total porosity affected by hydrogeochemical reactions driven by diffusive mass transport exposed to pressure and temperature gradients. A fine spatial and temporal discretization, the use of non-reactive tracers, and a broad variety of modeling scenarios enable the calculation of the relevant timescale for simulations of long-term storage of CO2 and the consideration of the pressure dependent mass action law constants along the CO2 migration path. Modeling results show that the relevant timescale for simulations of long-term storage of CO2 is in the range of 106 years, and that pressure/temperature conditions, heterogeneities (veins and fractures) and the mineralogical composition of the cap rock have the strongest influence on the increase in cap rock porosity (maximum increase from initial 5 % to 7.5 %). Critical parameter combinations - total pressure effects are crucial - could put long-term integrity at risks. Nevertheless, a wide range of conditions and parameter combinations for safe CO2 storage is identified by other modeling scenarios.

  19. Investigating groundwater flow components in an Alpine relict rock glacier (Austria) using a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauritsch, Marcus; Wagner, Thomas; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Relict rock glaciers are complex hydrogeological systems that might act as relevant groundwater storages; therefore, the discharge behavior of these alpine landforms needs to be better understood. Hydrogeological and geophysical investigations at a relict rock glacier in the Niedere Tauern Range (Austria) reveal a slow and fast flow component that appear to be related to the heterogeneous structure of the aquifer. A numerical groundwater flow model was used to indicate the influence of important internal structures such as layering, preferential flow paths and aquifer-base topography. Discharge dynamics can be reproduced reasonably by both introducing layers of strongly different hydraulic conductivities or by a network of highly conductive channels within a low-conductivity zone. Moreover, the topography of the aquifer base influences the discharge dynamics, which can be observed particularly in simply structured aquifers. Hydraulic conductivity differences of three orders of magnitude are required to account for the observed discharge behavior: a highly conductive layer and/or channel network controlling the fast and flashy spring responses to recharge events, as opposed to less conductive sediment accumulations sustaining the long-term base flow. The results show that the hydraulic behavior of this relict rock glacier and likely that of others can be adequately represented by two aquifer components. However, the attempt to characterize the two components by inverse modeling results in ambiguity of internal structures when solely discharge data are available.

  20. Investigating groundwater flow components in an Alpine relict rock glacier (Austria) using a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauritsch, Marcus; Wagner, Thomas; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    Relict rock glaciers are complex hydrogeological systems that might act as relevant groundwater storages; therefore, the discharge behavior of these alpine landforms needs to be better understood. Hydrogeological and geophysical investigations at a relict rock glacier in the Niedere Tauern Range (Austria) reveal a slow and fast flow component that appear to be related to the heterogeneous structure of the aquifer. A numerical groundwater flow model was used to indicate the influence of important internal structures such as layering, preferential flow paths and aquifer-base topography. Discharge dynamics can be reproduced reasonably by both introducing layers of strongly different hydraulic conductivities or by a network of highly conductive channels within a low-conductivity zone. Moreover, the topography of the aquifer base influences the discharge dynamics, which can be observed particularly in simply structured aquifers. Hydraulic conductivity differences of three orders of magnitude are required to account for the observed discharge behavior: a highly conductive layer and/or channel network controlling the fast and flashy spring responses to recharge events, as opposed to less conductive sediment accumulations sustaining the long-term base flow. The results show that the hydraulic behavior of this relict rock glacier and likely that of others can be adequately represented by two aquifer components. However, the attempt to characterize the two components by inverse modeling results in ambiguity of internal structures when solely discharge data are available.

  1. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  2. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: Geochemical modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-07-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  3. Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

    1983-05-01

    Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

  4. 2.5D discrete-dual-porosity model for simulating geoelectrical experiments in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero Sanz, Victor; Roubinet, Delphine; Demirel, Serdar; Irving, James

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that geoelectrical measurements, acquired either along the Earth's surface or in boreholes, can be sensitive to the presence of fractures. However, a lack of numerical approaches that are well suited to modeling electric current flow in fractured media prevents us from systematically exploring the links between geoelectrical measurements and fractured rock properties. To address this issue, we present a highly computationally efficient methodology for the numerical simulation of geoelectrical data in 2.5 dimensions in complex fractured domains. Our approach is based upon a discrete-dual-porosity formulation, whereby the fractures and rock matrix are treated separately and coupled through the exchange of electric current between them. We first validate our methodology against standard analytical and finite-element solutions. Subsequent use of the approach to simulate geoelectrical data for a variety of different fracture configurations demonstrates the sensitivity of these data to important parameters such as the fracture density, depth, and orientation.

  5. Geophysical observations and structural models of shallow caves in gypsum/anhydrite-bearing rocks in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-04-01

    In northern Germany, the evaporitic sequence of Zechstein rocks outcrops at several locations, offering insight into both surface and sub-surface morphology of the soluble rocks. We discuss two field sites, an active shallow gypsum cave in the southern Harz Mountains, and an active shallow anhydrite/gypsum cave close to Bad Segeberg, which both have been explored from the surface by geophysical surveys. The overburden of the caves varies from 5-40 meter, and the caves are characterised by both small passages and larger breakdown chambers. We relate the indirect geophysical measurements to parts of the known cave systems, and present structural models describing both geometry and groundwater flow in these caves with the help of numerical tools.

  6. A study of the depth of weathering and its relationship to the mechanical properties of near-surface rocks in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stierman, D.J.; Healy, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Weathered granite extends 70 m deep at Hi Vista in the arid central Mojave Desert of southern California. The low strength of this granite is due to the alteration of biotite and chlorite montmorillonite. Deep weathering probably occurs in most granites, although we cannot rule out some anomalous mechanisms at Hi Vista. Geophysical instruments set in these slightly altered rocks are limited by the unstable behavior of the rocks. Thus, tectonic signals from instruments placed in shallow boreholes give vague results. Geophysical measurements of these weathered rocks resemble measurements of granitic rocks near major faults. The rheology of the rocks in which instruments are placed limits the useful sensitivity of the instruments. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation on Triaxial Failure Mechanical Behavior of Rock-Like Specimen Containing Two Unparallel Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan-Hua; Yang, Sheng-Qi; Zhao, Jian

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional particle flow code (PFC3D) was used for a systematic numerical simulation of the strength failure and cracking behavior of rock-like material specimens containing two unparallel fissures under conventional triaxial compression. The micro-parameters of the parallel bond model were first calibrated using the laboratory results of intact specimens and then validated from the experimental results of pre-fissured specimens under triaxial compression. Numerically simulated stress-strain curves, strength and deformation parameters and macro-failure modes of pre-fissured specimens were all in good agreement with the experimental results. The relationship between stress and the micro-crack numbers was summarized. Crack initiation, propagation and coalescence process of pre-fissured specimens were analyzed in detail. Finally, horizontal and vertical cross sections of numerical specimens were derived from PFC3D. A detailed analysis to reveal the internal damage behavior of rock under triaxial compression was carried out. The experimental and simulated results are expected to improve the understanding of the strength failure and cracking behavior of fractured rock under triaxial compression.

  8. Hydrocarbon-water-rock interaction: Redox reaction as a mechanism for sandstone reservoir porosity enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Shebl, M.A.; Surdam, R.C.

    1995-06-01

    Experiments evaluated the potential for and extent of oil-water-rock reactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Results indicate not only that significant potential exists for redox reactions between oxidized mineral phases and crude oil, but that such reactions can significantly alter porosity and permeability characteristics of an elastic hydrocarbon reservoir. The red (oxidized) sandstones used in the redox experiment initially contained 10 to 25% carbonate, anhydrite, and intergranular clay cements. Porosity ranged from 6 to 15%. The sandstones were gray or white after experimentation, and porosity increased 12 to 20% over original values, primarily due to carbonate dissolution. It is suggested that during the redox experiments, the iron oxides ({+-} sulphate) were reduced and hydrocarbon was oxidized to produce oxygenated organic compounds (e.g., organic acid anions, CO{sub 2}). These redox reaction products destabilized the carbonate cements and enhanced sandstone porosity. It is concluded that redox reactions involving crude oil and the mineral matrix of these reservoir rocks in the presence of H{sub 2}O do occur and may result in significantly enhanced porosity. Hydrocarbon emplacement and the resultant redox reactions can cause bleaching and changes in porosity and permeability. This relationship is well documented in the Wingate, White Rim, and Tensleep sandstones. The hydrocarbon reservoir units are white to gray and have good porosity and permeability. The adjacent non-reservoir units are red (due to hematite staining), and have good carbonate cementation and poor porosity and permeability, confining hydrocarbon flow to the nearby reservoir units or associated fractures.

  9. Seismic monitoring of heavy oil reservoirs: Rock physics and finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theune, Ulrich

    In the past decades, remote monitoring of subsurface processes has attracted increasing attention in geophysics. With repeated geophysical surveys one attempts to detect changes in the physical properties in the underground without directly accessing the earth. This technique has been proven to be very valuable for monitoring enhanced oil recovery programs. This thesis presents an modelling approach for the feasibility analysis for monitoring of a thermal enhanced oil recovery technique applied to heavy oil reservoirs in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. In order to produce heavy oil from shallow reservoirs thermal oil recovery techniques such as the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are often employed. As these techniques are expensive and technically challenging, early detection of operational problems is without doubt of great value. However, the feasibility of geophysical monitoring depends on many factors such as the changes in the rock physical properties of the target reservoir. In order to access the feasibility of seismic monitoring for heavy oil reservoirs, a fluid-substitutional rock physical study has been carried out to simulate the steam injection. The second modelling approach is based on a modified finite element algorithm to simulate the propagation of elastic waves in the earth, which has been developed independently in the framework of this thesis. The work summarized in this thesis shows a possibility to access the feasibility of seismic monitoring for heavy oil reservoirs through an extensive rock-physical study. Seismic monitoring is a useful tool in reservoir management decision process. However, the work reported here suggests that seismic monitoring of SAGD processes in the heavy oil reservoirs of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin is only feasible in shallow, unconsolidated deposits. For deeper, but otherwise geological similar reservoirs, the SAGD does not create a sufficient change in the rock physical properties to be

  10. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  11. Some influences of rock strength and strain rate on propagation of rock avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Rait, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are extreme and destructive mass movements in which large volumes of rock (typically >1 million cubic metres) travel at high speeds, covering large distances, and the occurrence of which is highly unpredictable. The "size effect" in rock avalanches, whereby those with larger volumes produce greater spreading efficiency (as defined by an increase in normalised runout) or lower farboschung angle (defined as the tangent of the ratio of fall height to runout length), is well known. Studies have shown that rock strength is a controlling factor in the mobility of rock avalanches - that is, mass movements involving lower strength rock are generally found to produce greater mobility as evidenced by the spread of deposits or low farboschung angle. However, there are conflicting ideas as to how and why this influence is manifested. This paper discusses different theories of rock comminution in light of numerical simulations of rock clasts undergoing normal and shear induced loading, experimental work on rock avalanche behaviour, and dynamic fracture mechanics. In doing so, we introduce the idea of thresholds of strain rate for the production of dynamic fragmentation (as opposed to pseudo-static clast crushing) that are based, inter alia, on static rock strength. To do this, we refer to data from physical models using rock analogue materials, field data on chalk cliff collapses, and field statistics from documented rock avalanches. The roles of normal and shear loading and loading rate within a rock avalanche are examined numerically using 3D Discrete Element Method models of rock clasts loaded to failure. Results may help to reconcile the observations that large rock avalanches in stronger materials tend not to fragment as much as those in weaker materials and also possess lower mobility, while small cliff collapses (typically > 1000 cubic metres) in weak chalk can exhibit rock avalanche-like behaviour at much smaller volumes.

  12. Modeling of Viscoelastic Properties of Porous Rocks Saturated with Viscous Fluid at Seismic Frequencies at the Core Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, R.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the moduli and velocities of rocks at seismic frequencies are usually measured by the strain-stress method in lab. However, such measurements require well-designed equipment and skilled technicians, which greatly hinders the experimental investigation on the elastic and visco-elastic properties of rocks at seismic frequencies. We attempt to model the dynamic moduli of porous rocks saturated with viscous fluid at seismic frequencies on core scale using the strain-stress method, aiming to provide a complement to real core measurements in lab. First, we build 2D geometrical models containing the pore structure information of porous rocks based on the digital images (such as thin section, SEM, CT, etc.) of real rocks. Then we assume the rock frames are linearly elastic, and use the standard Maxwell spring-dash pot model to describe the visco-elastic properties of pore fluids. Boundary conditions are set according to the strain-stress method; and the displacement field is calculated using the finite element method (FEM). We numerically test the effects of fluid viscosity, frequency, and pore structure on the visco-elastic properties based on the calculation results. In our modeling, the viscosity of the pore fluid ranges from 103mPas to 109mPas; and the frequency varies from 5Hz to 500Hz. The preliminary results indicate that the saturated rock behaves stiffer and shows larger phase lag between stress and strain when the viscosity of the pore fluid and (or) the frequency increase.

  13. Deriving mechanisms and thresholds for cliff retreat in soft-rock cliffs under changing climates: Rapidly retreating cliffs of the Suffolk coast, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spencer, T.; Boreham, S.

    2012-06-01

    Understanding changing thresholds and mechanisms for retreat in soft rock cliffs is important under changing climates. This can be achieved through combining detailed field observation, long-term process and morphological monitoring and numerical modelling. The cliffs of the Suffolk coast, southern North Sea have exhibited long-term (1883-2010) recession rates of 3.5 m a- 1, rising to 4.7 m a- 1 in the period 1993-2010. Annual to biannual ground survey data, and the application of GIS techniques to digitised records of changing shoreline position from historic maps and aerial photography, reveal considerable decadal-scale variations in cliff recession, within which are nested inter-annual fluctuations in rates of retreat. Archival datasets on significant periods of onshore winds and their interaction with high water levels (including the incidence of storm surges) and rainstorm events are used to determine thresholds for cliff base erosion and its propagation upwards through the cliff profile. In addition, the ‘GEO-Slope' dynamic coupled hydrology-stability model is used to establish thresholds for cliff face failures driven by variations in rainfall inputs. Retreat mechanisms are complex, governed by cliff geology, both as a primary control on suction loss and through its interaction with basal marine conditions. The study allows a general model of cliff retreat for soft rock cliffs to be put forward, whereby a resistant basal platform is overlain by more erodible, weakly and moderately cemented sands and gravels. In this model, the varying balance between marine and terrestrial forcing factors are reflected in low (< 4 m a- 1), intermediate (4-7 m a- 1) and high (> 7 m a- 1) modes of cliff retreat.

  14. The Rock-Water-Ice Topographic Gravity Field Model RWI_TOPO_2015 and Its Comparison to a Conventional Rock-Equivalent Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grombein, Thomas; Seitz, Kurt; Heck, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    RWI_TOPO_2015 is a new high-resolution spherical harmonic representation of the Earth's topographic gravitational potential that is based on a refined Rock-Water-Ice (RWI) approach. This method is characterized by a three-layer decomposition of the Earth's topography with respect to its rock, water, and ice masses. To allow a rigorous separate modeling of these masses with variable density values, gravity forward modeling is performed in the space domain using tesseroid mass bodies arranged on an ellipsoidal reference surface. While the predecessor model RWI_TOPO_2012 was based on the 5'× 5' global topographic database DTM2006.0 (Digital Topographic Model 2006.0), the new RWI model uses updated height information of the 1'× 1' Earth2014 topography suite. Moreover, in the case of RWI_TOPO_2015, the representation in spherical harmonics is extended to degree and order 2190 (formerly 1800). Beside a presentation of the used formalism, the processing for RWI_TOPO_2015 is described in detail, and the characteristics of the resulting spherical harmonic coefficients are analyzed in the space and frequency domain. Furthermore, this paper focuses on a comparison of the RWI approach to the conventionally used rock-equivalent method. For this purpose, a consistent rock-equivalent version REQ_TOPO_2015 is generated, in which the heights of water and ice masses are condensed to the constant rock density. When evaluated on the surface of the GRS80 ellipsoid (Geodetic Reference System 1980), the differences of RWI_TOPO_2015 and REQ_TOPO_2015 reach maximum amplitudes of about 1 m, 50 mGal, and 20 mE in terms of height anomaly, gravity disturbance, and the radial-radial gravity gradient, respectively. Although these differences are attenuated with increasing height above the ellipsoid, significant magnitudes can even be detected in the case of the satellite altitudes of current gravity field missions. In order to assess their performance, RWI_TOPO_2015, REQ_TOPO_2015, and RWI

  15. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  16. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  17. Modeling the cliff retreat response to base-level change in layered rocks, Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Sheehan, C.

    2015-12-01

    The retreat of cliffs is an important mode of erosion in layered rocks of variable strength. For example, the iconic Colorado Plateau landscapes of Grand Canyon, Canyonlands, and Monument Valley owe their unique forms to this process. These landscapes are the end result of incision by trunk streams followed by cliff retreat. Local interactions between stochastic rockfall and first-order channels draining a cliff regulate the cliff retreat response to a base-level fall. However, nonlinear transport dynamics, steep slopes, and variable rock strength challenge the modeling of landscape evolution in these settings. Here, we employ structure-from-motion photogrammetry to generate high-resolution DTMs of a natural experiment site on the Colorado Plateau. The site features a simple, sandstone-over-shale stratigraphy with a continuous gradient in cliffband height and evidence for an ongoing transient response to base level fall. The terrain data inform a high-resolution (dx=5 m), 2D numerical model of cliffband erosion. The model simulates the interaction of three primary processes: fluvial erosion and sediment transport; hillslope transport of regolith, including shallow landsliding; and rockfall from resistant units. Crucially, the model allows us to modify stratigraphy arbitrarily to examine the landscape response to parameters such as thickness, spacing, and dip of resistant units. Results indicate that the contrast in fluvial erodibility sets the pattern of emergence of cliffs as a resistant layer is exhumed, while the difference in weathering rates across rock types sets the rate at which cliffs emerge. Once rockfall begins, erosion rates are modified by the thickness of the resistant layer, which sets the volume of rockfall debris reaching the channels below the cliff. The modeling highlights the need for process-based understanding of the conditions for cliff failure by rockfall and redistribution of the debris in very steep, rapidly-eroding landscapes.

  18. Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2-induced Porosity and Permeability Changes in Heterogeneous Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Smith, M. M.; Mason, H. E.; Carroll, S.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been appreciated that chemical interactions have a major effect on rock porosity and permeability evolution and may alter the behavior or performance of both natural and engineered reservoir systems. Such reaction-induced permeability evolution is of particular importance for geological CO2 sequestration and storage associated with enhanced oil recovery. In this study we used a three-dimensional Darcy scale reactive transport model to simulate CO2 core flood experiments in which the CO2-equilibrated brine was injected into dolostone cores collected from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir, Wellington, Kansas. Heterogeneous distributions of macro pores, fractures, and mineral phases inside the cores were obtained from X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) characterization data, and then used to construct initial model macroscopic properties including porosity, permeability, and mineral compositions. The reactive transport simulations were performed by using the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code, and their results were compared with experimental data. It was observed both experimentally and numerically that the dissolution fronts became unstable in highly heterogeneous and less permeable formations, leading to the development of highly porous flow paths or wormholes. Our model results indicate that the continuum-scale reactive transport models are able to adequately capture the evolution of distinct dissolution fronts as observed in carbonate rocks at a core scale. The impacts of rock heterogeneity, chemical kinetics and porosity-permeability relationships were also examined in this study. The numerical model developed in this study will not only help improve understanding of coupled physical and chemical processes controlling carbonate dissolution, but also provide a useful basis for upscaling transport and reaction properties from core scale to field scale. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy

  19. Discriminating exhumation models of ultra-high-pressure rocks in the Western Alps by structural record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury; Schmalholz, Stefam; Pleuger, Jan; Epard, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    Despite extensive research, the dynamics of tectonic nappes exhibiting high- and ultrahigh-pressure rocks [(U)HP] is still debated. We classify existing models for nappe formation into two types, and refer to them as the thrust and intrusion models. Classical thrust models approximate the orogen as a wedge with a rigid buttress behind and a subducting lithospheric slab beneath. The dominant process of nappe formation is thrusting (brittle and/or ductile) that generates a dominant top-to-the-foreland sense of shear. Thrust models can explain the imbricate nappe stacking and first-order structural observations in the Western Alps. However, in the last decades (U)HP rocks were found in nappes, and it is usually assumed that metamorphic pressure is a good indicator of maximum burial. In intrusion models, (U)HP rocks are subducted to mantle depths (>100 km) and return to crustal depths by buoyancy-driven or tectonically-forced flow. Intrusion models could reproduce the first-order patterns of P-T-t paths of the Western Alps. Nappe formation at such mantle depths cannot be explained by the thrust model; nappe intrusion from large depths into shallower areas seems more appropriate. This argument against thrust models, however, is solely based on the assumption that metamorphic pressure indicates maximum burial (assuming lithostatic pressure). This very assumption is the only argument in favour of the intrusion models. If, however, significant and positive deviations from lithostatic pressure existed during nappe formation, then (U)HP rocks would have been formed at significantly shallower depth, and thrust models could be applicable to the Western Alps reconciling both structural and P-T-t records. Discrimination between the two nappe-forming models can better be achieved by examining the absence of a particular structural record and not by evaluating the existing structural and P-T-t records. A fundamental kinematic (rheology and driving force independent) feature of the

  20. Geothermal alteration of Kamchatka rock physical properties: experimental and pore-scale modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, Violetta; Gerke, Kirill; Bichkov, Andrey; Korost, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    Alternative renewable energy sources research is getting more and more attention due to its importance for future exploitation and low ecological impacts. Geothermal energy is quite abundant and represents a cheap and easily extractable power source for electricity generation or central heating. For these purposes naturally heated geothermal fluids are extracted via drilled wells; after cooling water is usually pumped back to the reservoir to create a circle, or dumped into local streams. In addition to fundamental interest in understanding natural geothermal processes inside the reservoir, in both cases fluids can significantly alter rock properties around the well or stream bed, which is of great practical and ecological importance for the geothermal industry. Detailed knowledge of these transformations is necessary for power plant construction and well design, geophysical modeling and the prediction of geological properties. Under natural conditions such processes occur within geological time frames and are hard to capture. To accelerate geothermal alteration and model deep reservoir high temperature and pressure conditions we use autoclave laboratory experiments. To represent different geothermal conditions, rock samples are autoclaved using a wide range of parameters: temperature (100-450°C), pressure (16-1000 Bars), solution chemistry (from acidic to alkali artificial solutions and natural geothermal fluids sampled in Kamchatka), duration (from weeks to 1 year). Rock samples represent unaltered andesite-dacite tuffs, basalts and andesite collected at the Kamchatka peninsula. Numerous rock properties, e.g., density (bulk and specific), porosity (total and effective), hygroscopicity, P/S wave velocities, geomechanical characteristics (compressive and tensile strength, elastic modulus), etc., were thoroughly analyzed before and after alteration in laboratory autoclave or natural conditions (in situ). To reveal structural changes, some samples were scanned using

  1. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  2. Thermo-mechanical modelling of salt caverns due to fluctuating loading conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work summarizes the development and application of a numerical model for the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. Artificial salt caverns are used for short term energy storage, such as power-to-gas or compressed air energy storage. Those applications are characterized by highly fluctuating operation pressures due to the unsteady power levels of power plants based on renewable energy. Compression and expansion of the storage gases during loading and unloading stages lead to rapidly changing temperatures in the host rock of the caverns. This affects the material behaviour of the host rock within a zone that extends several meters into the rock mass adjacent to the cavern wall, and induces thermo-mechanical stresses and alters the creep response.The proposed model features the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage medium, conductive heat transport in the host rock, as well as temperature dependent material properties of rock salt using different thermo-viscoplastic material models. The utilized constitutive models are well known and state-of-the-art in various salt mechanics applications. The model has been implemented into the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, coupled via a staggered coupling scheme. The simulation results allow the conclusion, that the cavern convergence rate (and thus the efficiency of the cavern) is highly influenced by the loading cycle frequency and the resulting gas temperatures. The model therefore allows to analyse the influence of operation modes on the cavern host rock or on neighbouring facilities.

  3. Bio-Chemo-Mechanical Models of Vascular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsil; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2015-07-01

    Models of vascular mechanics are necessary to predict the response of an artery under a variety of loads, for complex geometries, and in pathological adaptation. Classic constitutive models for arteries are phenomenological and the fitted parameters are not associated with physical components of the wall. Recently, microstructurally-linked models have been developed that associate structural information about the wall components with tissue-level mechanics. Microstructurally-linked models are useful for correlating changes in specific components with pathological outcomes, so that targeted treatments may be developed to prevent or reverse the physical changes. However, most treatments, and many causes, of vascular disease have chemical components. Chemical signaling within cells, between cells, and between cells and matrix constituents affects the biology and mechanics of the arterial wall in the short- and long-term. Hence, bio-chemo-mechanical models that include chemical signaling are critical for robust models of vascular mechanics. This review summarizes bio-mechanical and bio-chemo-mechanical models with a focus on large elastic arteries. We provide applications of these models and challenges for future work.

  4. Feldspathic rocks on Mars: Compositional constraints from infrared spectroscopy and possible formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. Deanne; Nekvasil, Hanna

    2015-04-01

    Rare feldspar-dominated surfaces on Mars were previously reported based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral data and were interpreted to consist of anorthosite or felsic rocks. Using thermal infrared (TIR) data over the feldspar detections with the largest areal extent in Nili Patera and Noachis Terra, we rule out felsic interpretations. Basaltic or anorthositic compositions are consistent with TIR measurements, but the geologic contexts for these regions do not support a plutonic origin. Laboratory NIR spectral measurements demonstrate that large plagioclase crystals (>~840 µm) can be detected in mixtures with as much as 50 vol % mafics, which is higher than the previously stated requirement of no more than 15% mafics. Thus, anorthositic or felsic interpretations need not be invoked for all NIR-based feldspar detections. Plagioclase-enriched basaltic eruptive products can be formed from Martian basalts through partial crystallization at the base of a thick crust, followed by low-pressure crystallization of the residual liquids.

  5. Geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling: Application to orogenic wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Willett, S. D.; Gerya, T.; Ruh, J.

    2015-09-01

    Coupled geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling is presented in a new implementation that combines two established thermo-mechanical and landscape evolution models. A finite-difference marker-in-cell technique is used to solve for the thermo-mechanical problem including complex visco-plastic rheologies in high resolution. Each timestep is synchronously solved with a fluvial landscape evolution model that includes numerical solution of fluvial incision and analytical hillslope processes for both diffusive and slope-limited processes on an adaptive grid. The implementation is successful in modeling large deformation at different scales. We demonstrate high degrees of coupling through processes such as exhumation of rocks with different erodibilities. Sensitivity of the coupled system evolution to surface parameters, and mechanical parameters, is explored for the established case of development of compressive wedges. The evolution of wedge models proves to be primarily sensitive to erodibility and the degree of river network integration. Relief follows deformation in propagating forward with wedge growth. We apply the method to a large-scale model of continental collision, in which a close relationship between deep tectonics, fluvial network evolution, and uplift and erosion can be demonstrated.

  6. Inverse modeling of hydraulic tests in fractured crystalline rock based on a transition probability geostatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessent, Daniela; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of a series of hydraulic interference tests conducted in crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto (Finland), a potential site for the disposal of the Finnish high-level nuclear waste. The tests are in a block of crystalline bedrock of about 0.03 km3 that contains low-transmissivity fractures. Fracture density, orientation, and fracture transmissivity are estimated from Posiva Flow Log (PFL) measurements in boreholes drilled in the rock block. On the basis of those data, a geostatistical approach relying on a transitional probability and Markov chain models is used to define a conceptual model based on stochastic fractured rock facies. Four facies are defined, from sparsely fractured bedrock to highly fractured bedrock. Using this conceptual model, three-dimensional groundwater flow is then simulated to reproduce interference pumping tests in either open or packed-off boreholes. Hydraulic conductivities of the fracture facies are estimated through automatic calibration using either hydraulic heads or both hydraulic heads and PFL flow rates as targets for calibration. The latter option produces a narrower confidence interval for the calibrated hydraulic conductivities, therefore reducing the associated uncertainty and demonstrating the usefulness of the measured PFL flow rates. Furthermore, the stochastic facies conceptual model is a suitable alternative to discrete fracture network models to simulate fluid flow in fractured geological media.

  7. A model for Iapetan rifting of Laurentia based on Neoproterozoic dikes and related rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, William C.; Southworth, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Geologic evidence of the Neoproterozoic rifting of Laurentia during breakup of Rodinia is recorded in basement massifs of the cratonic margin by dike swarms, volcanic and plutonic rocks, and rift-related clastic sedimentary sequences. The spatial and temporal distribution of these geologic features varies both within and between the massifs but preserves evidence concerning the timing and nature of rifting. The most salient features include: (1) a rift-related magmatic event recorded in the French Broad massif and the southern and central Shenandoah massif that is distinctly older than that recorded in the northern Shenandoah massif and northward; (2) felsic volcanic centers at the north ends of both French Broad and Shenandoah massifs accompanied by dike swarms; (3) differences in volume between massifs of cover-sequence volcanic rocks and rift-related clastic rocks; and (4) WNW orientation of the Grenville dike swarm in contrast to the predominately NE orientation of other Neoproterozoic dikes. Previously proposed rifting mechanisms to explain these features include rift-transform and plume–triple-junction systems. The rift-transform system best explains features 1, 2, and 3, listed here, and we propose that it represents the dominant rifting mechanism for most of the Laurentian margin. To explain feature 4, as well as magmatic ages and geochemical trends in the Northern Appalachians, we propose that a plume–triple-junction system evolved into the rift-transform system. A ca. 600 Ma mantle plume centered east of the Sutton Mountains generated the radial dike swarm of the Adirondack massif and the Grenville dike swarm, and a collocated triple junction generated the northern part of the rift-transform system. An eastern branch of this system produced the Long Range dike swarm in Newfoundland, and a subsequent western branch produced the ca. 554 Ma Tibbit Hill volcanics and the ca. 550 Ma rift-related magmatism of Newfoundland.

  8. Porous grain model and equivalent elastic medium approach for predicting effective elastic properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Franklin J.

    This dissertation presents the results of using different inclusion and granular effective medium models and poroelasticity to predict the elastic properties of rocks with complex microstructures. Effective medium models account for the microstructure and texture of rocks, and can be used to predict the type of rock and microstructure from seismic velocities and densities. We introduce the elastic equivalency approach, using the differential effective medium model, to predict the effective elastic moduli of rocks and attenuation. We introduce the porous grain concept and develop rock physics models for rocks with microporosity. We exploit the porous grain concept to describe a variety of arrangements of uncemented and cemented grains with different degrees of hydraulic connectivity in the pore space. We first investigate the accuracy of the differential effective medium and self-consistent estimations of elastic properties of complex rock matrix using composites as analogs. We test whether the differential effective-medium (DEM) and self-consistent (SC) models can accurately estimate the elastic moduli of a complex rock matrix and compare the results with the average of upper and lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. We find that when the material microstructure is consistent with DEM, this model is more accurate than both SC and the bound-average method for a variety of inclusion aspect ratios, concentrations, and modulus contrasts. Based on these results, we next pose a question: can a theoretical inclusion model, specifically, the differential effective-medium model (DEM), be used to match experimental velocity data in rocks that are not necessarily made of inclusions (such as elastics)? We first approach this question by using empirical velocity-porosity equations as proxies for data. By finding a DEM inclusion aspect ratio (AR) to match these equations, we find that the required range of AR is remarkably narrow. Moreover, a constant AR of about 0.13 can be used to

  9. Implementation of an anisotropic mechanical model for shale in Geodyn

    SciTech Connect

    Attaia, A.; Vorobiev, O.; Walsh, S.

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to present the implementation of a shale model in the Geodyn code, based on published rock material models and properties that can help a petroleum engineer in his design of various strategies for oil/gas recovery from shale rock formation.

  10. Solid images for geostructural mapping and key block modeling of rock discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assali, Pierre; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Villemin, Thierry; Pollet, Nicolas; Viguier, Flavien

    2016-04-01

    Rock mass characterization is obviously a key element in rock fall hazard analysis. Managing risk and determining the most adapted reinforcement method require a proper understanding of the considered rock mass. Description of discontinuity sets is therefore a crucial first step in the reinforcement work design process. The on-field survey is then followed by a structural modeling in order to extrapolate the data collected at the rock surface to the inner part of the massif. Traditional compass survey and manual observations can be undoubtedly surpassed by dense 3D data such as LiDAR or photogrammetric point clouds. However, although the acquisition phase is quite fast and highly automated, managing, handling and exploiting such great amount of collected data is an arduous task and especially for non specialist users. In this study, we propose a combined approached using both 3D point clouds (from LiDAR or image matching) and 2D digital images, gathered into the concept of ''solid image''. This product is the connection between the advantages of classical true colors 2D digital images, accessibility and interpretability, and the particular strengths of dense 3D point clouds, i.e. geometrical completeness and accuracy. The solid image can be considered as the information support for carrying-out a digital survey at the surface of the outcrop without being affected by traditional deficiencies (lack of data and sampling difficulties due to inaccessible areas, safety risk in steep sectors, etc.). Computational tools presented in this paper have been implemented into one standalone software through a graphical user interface helping operators with the completion of a digital geostructural survey and analysis. 3D coordinates extraction, 3D distances and area measurement, planar best-fit for discontinuity orientation, directional roughness profiles, block size estimation, and other tools have been experimented on a calcareous quarry in the French Alps.

  11. Basal sliding in ice streams as seen through the lens of rock mechanics: an experimental study of ice-on-rock friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, C.; Savage, H. M.; Nettles, M.

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of the controls on ice stream flow is critical for improved predictions of sea level rise and glacier response to climate change. Basal sliding is one aspect of ice stream motion that has received relatively little attention. Although it is difficult and costly to measure direct motion at the base of a glacier, laboratory experiments can be used to recreate the physics of ice sliding over bedrock. Using a new, custom-built, servo-controlled biaxial loading apparatus, we are measuring the friction of polycrystalline ice samples sliding on rock in a double direct shear configuration. Temperature is maintained with an insulated cryostat that uses liquid cooling blocks and a programmable circulating bath. We will share results from a series of velocity stepping and slide-hold-slide experiments designed to measure key properties of rate- and state-dependent frictional behavior. The experimental conditions for the study are as follows: temperatures ranging from -20ºC to the pressure melting point; normal stresses of 20 - 200 kPa, velocities from 10-6 to 10-3 m s-1; and ambient pressure. Ice sample microstructure (grain size, porosity, purity) and surface roughness are carefully controlled and characterized before and after experiments to identify microstructural sources for macroscopic behavior. Careful monitoring of temperature at the sliding interface will elucidate the role of frictional heating/melting on both sliding behavior and microstructure evolution. By measuring rate-state friction parameters, we will explore the transition between stable sliding and stick-slip motion of glaciers and ice streams. These results can be directly compared to the differing sliding styles observed for ice streams feeding into the Ross Ice Shelf to infer characteristics of the bed interface and the bulk glacier. The values obtained from this study will provide better constraints for next generation modeling of glacier and ice-stream response to external forcing.

  12. Familial Dysautonomia: Mechanisms and Models

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Paula; Dragatsis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies (HSANs) compose a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterized by sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. Familial Dysautonomia (FD), also known as HSAN III, is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects 1/3,600 live births in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The major features of the disease are already present at birth and are attributed to abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous systems. Despite clinical interventions, the disease is inevitably fatal. FD is caused by a point mutation in intron 20 of the IKBKAP gene that results in severe reduction in expression of IKAP, its encoded protein. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that IKAP is involved in multiple intracellular processes, and suggest that failed target innervation and/or impaired neurotrophic retrograde transport are the primary causes of neuronal cell death in FD. However, FD is far more complex, and appears to affect several other organs and systems in addition to the peripheral nervous system. With the recent generation of mouse models that recapitulate the molecular and pathological features of the disease, it is now possible to further investigate the mechanisms underlying different aspects of the disorder, and to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27561110

  13. Threat processing: models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Dorothée; Schiller, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The experience of fear is closely linked to the survival of species. Fear can be conceptualized as a brain state that orchestrates defense reactions to threats. To avoid harm, an organism must be equipped with neural circuits that allow learning, detecting, and rapidly responding to threats. Past experience with threat can transform neutral stimuli present at the time of experience into learned threat-related stimuli via associative learning. Pavlovian threat conditioning is the central experimental paradigm to study associative learning. Once learned, these stimulus-response associations are not always expressed depending on context or new experiences with the conditioned stimuli. Neural circuits mediating threat learning have the inherent plasticity to adapt to changing environmental threats. Encounters devoid of danger pave the way for extinction or reconsolidation to occur. Extinction and reconsolidation can both lead to changes in the expression of threat-induced defense responses, but differ in stability and have a different neural basis. This review presents the behavioral models and the system-level neural mechanisms in animals and humans of threat learning and modulation.

  14. Thermodynamic modeling using BINGO-ANTIDOTE: A new strategy to investigate metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Duesterhoeft, Erik

    2016-04-01

    BINGO-ANTIDOTE is a new program, combing the achievements of the two petrological software packages XMAPTOOLS[1] and THERIAK-DOMINO[2]. XMAPTOOLS affords information about compositional zoning in mineral and local bulk composition of domains at the thin sections scale. THERIAK-DOMINO calculates equilibrium phase assemblages from given bulk rock composition, temperature T and pressure P. Primarily BINGO-ANTIDOTE can be described as an inverse THERIAK-DOMINO, because it uses the information provided by XMAPTOOLS to calculate the probable P-T equilibrium conditions of metamorphic rocks. Consequently, the introduced program combines the strengths of forward Gibbs free energy minimization models with the intuitive output of inverse thermobarometry models. In order to get "best" P-T equilibrium conditions of a metamorphic rock sample and thus estimating the degree of agreement between the observed and calculated mineral assemblage, it is critical to define a reliable scoring strategy. BINGO uses the THERIAKD ADD-ON[3] (Duesterhoeft and de Capitani, 2013) and is a flexible model scorer with 3+1 evaluation criteria. These criteria are the statistical agreement between the observed and calculated mineral-assemblage, -proportions (vol%) and -composition (mol). Additionally, a total likelihood, consisting of the first three criteria, allows the user an evaluation of the most probable equilibrium P-T condition. ANTIDOTE is an interactive user interface, displaying the 3+1 evaluation criteria as probability P-T-maps. It can be used with and without XMAPTOOLS. As a stand-alone program, the user is able to give the program macroscopic observations (i.e., mineral names and proportions), which ANTIDOTE converts to a readable BINGO input. In this manner, the use of BINGO-ANTIDOTE opens up thermodynamics to students and people with only a basic knowledge of phase diagrams and thermodynamic modeling techniques. This presentation introduces BINGO-ANTIDOTE and includes typical examples

  15. Model of a mechanical clock escapement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, David; Wagner, John; Volk, Eugene

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical tower clock originated in Europe during the 14th century to sound hourly bells and later display hands on a dial. An important innovation was the escapement mechanism, which converts stored energy into oscillatory motion for fixed time intervals through the pendulum swing. Previous work has modeled the escapement mechanism in terms of inelastic and elastic collisions. We derive and experimentally verify a theoretical model in terms of impulsive differential equations for the Graham escapement mechanism in a Seth Thomas tower clock. The model offers insight into the clock's mechanical behavior and the functionality of the deadbeat escapement mechanism.

  16. Deformation mechanisms and petrophysical properties of chert and limestone fault rocks within slope-to-basin succession (Gargano Promontory, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Irina; Tondi, Emanuele; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Agosta, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we examine faults that crosscut limestone and chert rocks pertaining to a slope-to-basin succession of the eastern Gargano Promontory (southern Italy). Based on field data, microstructural observations, and quantitative analysis of cataclastic fabric, two stages of faulting are recognized. The first one, the pre-lithification faulting stage, took place within partially lithified sediments prior to their complete lithification. Differently, the second one, the post-lithification faulting stage, occurred within cohesive, well-lithified rocks. The structural properties of pre-lithification faults were likely controlled by the competence contrast between limestone and chert sediments. In fact, due to their different lithification stages, faulting occurred when chert was still not completely lithified, and hence was dragged along the fault planes. As a consequence, the pre-lithification fault cores are mainly composed of chert clasts. On the contrary, post-lithification fault cores are mostly made up of limestone clasts. The results of both microstructural and image analyses show that the carbonate fault rock includes a higher percentage of bigger clasts with lower values of angularity than the chert fault rock. Mercury-intrusion porosimetry indicates that the chert fault rock is characterized by larger pore throats and a lower amount of total porosity with respect to the limestone fault rock. The permeability values obtained for the limestone fault rock are lower than those for the chert fault rock, probably because of the lower amount of pore connectivity within the former fault rock. Results of this multidisciplinary work highlight the role played by cherty layers present within well-layered, slope-to-basin carbonate successions on both microtextural and petrophysical fault rock properties. Furthermore, these results increase our ability to predict how lithological heterogeneities and amount of lithification influence the deformation mechanisms, hence

  17. Geothermal Fluid Interaction with Mafic Rocks in Porous Media - AN Experimental and Reactive Transport Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Reaction and reactive transport modeling is becoming an increasingly popular method to study fluid-rock interaction and fluid transport on small to large scales. In this study, fluid-rock experiments were carried out and the observations compared with the results of reaction and reactive transport models. The systems studied included fluid-rock interaction of olivine on one hand and basaltic glass on the other hand with dilute aqueous solutions containing CO2 at acid to neutral pH and temperatures from ambient to 250 °C. The experiments were conducted using batch type experiments in closed reactors and 1-D plug experiments in flow-through reactors and the solution chemistry, the reaction progress, secondary mineralization and porosity changes analyzed as a function of time. The reaction and 1-D reactive transport simulations were conducted with the aid of the PHREEQC program. For the simulations the thermodynamic database for mineral reactions was largely updated and the kinetics of mineral dissolution as well as mineral nucleation and crystal growth was incorporated. According to the experimental results and the reactive transport simulations, olivine and basaltic glass progressively dissolves forming secondary minerals and solutes that are partially transported out of them column (system). The exact reaction path was found to depend on solution composition and pH and reaction progress (time). The mass movement of the system at a particular steady state as well as porosity changes may be divided into three stages. Stage I is characterized by initial olivine or basaltic glass leaching, stage II is characterized by progressive mineral formation and decrease in porosity and stage III is characterized by remobilization of the previously formed secondary minerals and eventual increase in porosity. The reaction and reactive transport modeling was found to simulate reasonable the reaction path as a function of reaction time. However, exact mass movement and time

  18. A triple-continuum approach for modeling flow and transportprocesses in fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S; Zellmer, K .E.

    2001-08-31

    This paper presents a triple-continuum conceptual model forsimulating flow and transport processes in fractured rock. Field datacollected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, a repository siteof high-level nuclear waste, show a large number of small-scalefractures. The effect of these small fractures has not been considered inprevious modeling investigations within the context of a continuumapproach. A new triple-continuum model (consisting of matrix,small-fracture, and large-fracture continua) has been developed toinvestigate the effect of these small fractures. This paper derives themodel formulation and discusses the basic triple-continuum behavior offlow and transport processes under different conditions, using bothanalytical solutions and numerical approaches. The simulation resultsfrom the site-scale model of the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountainindicate that these small fractures may have an important effect onradionuclide transport within the mountain

  19. The Global Range of Subduction Zone Thermal Structures From Exhumed Blueschists and Eclogites: Rocks are Hotter than Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penniston-Dorland, S.; Kohn, M. J.; Manning, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The maximum-pressure P-T conditions (Pmax-T) and prograde P-Tpaths of exhumed subduction-related metamorphic rocks are compared to predictions of P-Tconditions from computational thermal models of subduction systems. While the range of proposed models encompasses most estimated Pmax-Tconditions, models predict temperatures that are on average colder than those recorded by exhumed rocks. In general, discrepancies are greatest for Pmax< 2 GPa where only a few of the highest-Tmodeled paths overlap typical petrologic observations and model averages are 100-300 °C colder than average conditions recorded by rocks. Prograde P-Tpaths similarly indicate warmer subduction than typical models. Both petrologic estimates and models have inherent biases. Petrologic analysis may overestimate temperatures at Pmaxwhere overprinting occurs during exhumation, although P-Tpaths suggest that relatively warm conditions are experienced by rocks on the prograde subduction path. Models may underestimate temperatures at depth by neglecting shear heating, hydration reactions and fluid and rock advection. Our compilation and comparison suggest that exhumed high-P rocks provide a more accurate constraint on P-Tconditions within subduction zones, and that those conditions may closely represent the subduction geotherm. While exhumation processes in subduction zones require closer petrologic scrutiny, the next generation of models should more comprehensively incorporate all sources of heat. Subduction-zone thermal structures from currently available models appear to be inaccurate, and this mismatch has wide-reaching implications for our understanding of global geochemical cycles, the petrologic structure of subduction zones, and fluid-rock interactions and seismicity within subduction zones.

  20. Reactive Transport Modeling of Cap Rock Integrity During Natural and Engineered CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Morris, J P

    2004-05-26

    Long-term cap rock integrity represents the single most important constraint on the long-term isolation performance of natural and engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites. CO{sub 2} influx that forms natural accumulations and CO{sub 2} injection for EOR/sequestration or saline-aquifer disposal both lead to concomitant geochemical alteration and geomechanical deformation of the cap rock, enhancing or degrading its seal integrity depending on the relative effectiveness of these interdependent processes. Using our reactive transport simulator (NUFT), supporting geochemical databases and software (GEMBOCHS, SUPCRT92), and distinct-element geomechanical model (LDEC), we have shown that influx-triggered mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within typical shale cap rocks continuously reduce microfracture apertures, while pressure and effective-stress evolution first rapidly increase then slowly constrict them. For a given shale composition, the extent of geochemical enhancement is nearly independent of key reservoir properties (permeability and lateral continuity) that distinguish EOR/sequestration and saline-aquifer settings and CO{sub 2} influx parameters (rate, focality, and duration) that distinguish engineered disposal sites and natural accumulations, because these characteristics and parameters have negligible (indirect) impact on mineral dissolution/precipitation rates. In contrast, the extent of geomechanical degradation is highly dependent on these reservoir properties and influx parameters because they effectively dictate magnitude of the pressure perturbation; specifically, initial geomechanical degradation has been shown inversely proportional to reservoir permeability and lateral continuity and proportional to influx rate. Hence, while the extent of geochemical alteration is nearly independent of filling mode, that of geomechanical deformation is significantly more pronounced during engineered injection. This distinction limits the extent to which naturally

  1. Water flow in fractured rock masses: numerical modeling for tunnel inflow assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattinoni, P.; Scesi, L.; Terrana, S.

    2009-04-01

    Water circulation in rocks represents a very important element to solve many problems linked with civil, environmental and mining engineering. In particular, the interaction of tunnelling with groundwater has become a very relevant problem not only due to the need to safeguard water resources from impoverishment and from the pollution risk, but also to guarantee the safety of workers and to assure the efficiency of the tunnel drainage systems. The evaluation of the hydrog