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Sample records for rock salt structure

  1. Structure Function of Excess Charge in Rock Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Chiba, Masami; Yasuda, Osamu; Kamijo, Toshio; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Amano, Akio; Takeoka, Yosito; Mori, Satoshi; Ninomiya, Sousuke

    Ultra high-energy (UHE) neutrino (1015 eV <) detection in natural huge rock salt formation has been studied. Radio wave is generated by Askar'yan effect in rock salt. That is caused by the number asymmetry of electrons and positrons (excess charge) in electromagnetic shower from an UHE neutrino. An Electromagnetic shower in rock salt is generated by a computer code of Geant4.5. A modified Greisen parameterization in longitudinal distribution of the shower and a modified Nishimura, Kamata, and Greisen function in lateral distribution of the shower (structure function) are fitted to a space distribution of the excess electrons. The structure function would assist to calculate radio wave emission without using an electromagnetic shower simulation.

  2. Magnetic coupling at perovskite and rock-salt structured interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Matvejeff, M.; Ahvenniemi, E.; Takahashi, R.; Lippmaa, M.

    2015-10-05

    We study magnetic coupling between hole-doped manganite layers separated by either a perovskite or a rock-salt barrier of variable thickness. Both the type and the quality of the interface have a strong impact on the minimum critical barrier thickness where the manganite layers become magnetically decoupled. A rock-salt barrier layer only 1 unit cell (0.5 nm) thick remains insulating and is able to magnetically de-couple the electrode layers. The technique can therefore be used for developing high-performance planar oxide electronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions and quantum well structures that depend on magnetically and electronically sharp heterointerfaces.

  3. Maximum probability domains in crystals: the rock-salt structure.

    PubMed

    Causà, Mauro; Savin, Andreas

    2011-11-17

    The present paper studies MX crystals in rock-salt structure (M: Li, Na, K; X: F, Cl, Br, I). They are often described as being formed by ions. Pictures based on quantum mechanical calculations sustain and quantify it. The tools used are (i) the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, (ii) the Electron Localization Function, and (iii) the maximization of the probability to find in a spatial domain a number of electrons equal to that of the ion under consideration. The present paper shows that the images provided by these three different tools to analyze the quantum mechanical calculations yield, for these systems, very similar results, in the sense that the spatial domains and probability distributions are close. While results for the first two methods are already present in the literature, the last of the methods is applied for the first time to these systems, and details about the method of calculation and program are also given.

  4. Influences of salt structures on reservoir rocks in block L-2, Dutch continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Dronkert, H. ); Remmelts, G. )

    1993-09-01

    In the subsurface of the Netherlands Continental Shelf, thick layers of Zechstein salt have developed into salt domes and ridges that pierce through the overlying formations. To measure the range of lateral influence of the salt in these structures on the sandstone reservoir rocks of the Mesozoic sequence, a cementation model was developed. The target area, Block L-2, was chosen for the presence of salt domes, wells, and reservoir rocks. The L-2 case study has been performed on two Triassic sandstone intervals. The lower, Volpriehausen, sandstone showed halite cementation in one well, located within several 100 m from a salt dome. Four other wells, located more than 1.5 km from a salt structure, did not show any signs of halite cementation. Therefore, the lateral influence of salt domes on the surrounding reservoir rock is, in this case, limited to less than 1.5 km at 3-4 km depth. A slightly shallower Triassic sandstone (Detfurth) shows more frequent halite cementation. This cementation can be attributed to early seepage from overlying Rot salt brines.Triassic Rot salt is present above depletion areas of the Zechstein salt structures, and in such a way the seepage can be seen as an indirect influence of the salt structures.

  5. Vacancy Structures and Melting Behavior in Rock-Salt GeSbTe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xue-Peng; Shen, Zhen-Ju; Li, Xian-Bin; Wang, Chuan-Shou; Chen, Yong-Jin; Li, Ji-Xue; Zhang, Jin-Xing; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Sheng-Bai; Han, Xiao-Dong

    2016-05-03

    Ge-Sb-Te alloys have been widely used in optical/electrical memory storage. Because of the extremely fast crystalline-amorphous transition, they are also expected to play a vital role in next generation nonvolatile microelectronic memory devices. However, the distribution and structural properties of vacancies have been one of the key issues in determining the speed of melting (or amorphization), phase-stability, and heat-dissipation of rock-salt GeSbTe, which is crucial for its technological breakthrough in memory devices. Using spherical aberration-aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic scale energy-dispersive X-ray mapping, we observe a new rock-salt structure with high-degree vacancy ordering (or layered-like ordering) at an elevated temperature, which is a result of phase transition from the rock-salt phase with randomly distributed vacancies. First-principles calculations reveal that the phase transition is an energetically favored process. Moreover, molecular dynamics studies suggest that the melting of the cubic rock-salt phases is initiated at the vacancies, which propagate to nearby regions. The observation of multi-rock-salt phases suggests another route for multi-level data storage using GeSbTe.

  6. Vacancy structures and melting behavior in rock-salt GeSbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xue -Peng; Shen, Zhen -Ju; Li, Xian -Bin; Wang, Chuan -Shou; Chen, Yong -Jin; Li, Ji -Xue; Zhang, Jin -Xing; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Sheng -Bai; Han, Xiao -Dong

    2016-05-03

    Ge-Sb-Te alloys have been widely used in optical/electrical memory storage. Because of the extremely fast crystalline-amorphous transition, they are also expected to play a vital role in next generation nonvolatile microelectronic memory devices. However, the distribution and structural properties of vacancies have been one of the key issues in determining the speed of melting (or amorphization), phase-stability, and heat-dissipation of rock-salt GeSbTe, which is crucial for its technological breakthrough in memory devices. Using spherical aberration-aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic scale energy-dispersive X-ray mapping, we observe a new rock-salt structure with high-degree vacancy ordering (or layered-like ordering) at an elevated temperature, which is a result of phase transition from the rock-salt phase with randomly distributed vacancies. First-principles calculations reveal that the phase transition is an energetically favored process. Furthermore, molecular dynamics studies suggest that the melting of the cubic rock-salt phases is initiated at the vacancies, which propagate to nearby regions. The observation of multi-rock-salt phases suggests another route for multi-level data storage using GeSbTe.

  7. Vacancy structures and melting behavior in rock-salt GeSbTe

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xue -Peng; Shen, Zhen -Ju; ...

    2016-05-03

    Ge-Sb-Te alloys have been widely used in optical/electrical memory storage. Because of the extremely fast crystalline-amorphous transition, they are also expected to play a vital role in next generation nonvolatile microelectronic memory devices. However, the distribution and structural properties of vacancies have been one of the key issues in determining the speed of melting (or amorphization), phase-stability, and heat-dissipation of rock-salt GeSbTe, which is crucial for its technological breakthrough in memory devices. Using spherical aberration-aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic scale energy-dispersive X-ray mapping, we observe a new rock-salt structure with high-degree vacancy ordering (or layered-like ordering) atmore » an elevated temperature, which is a result of phase transition from the rock-salt phase with randomly distributed vacancies. First-principles calculations reveal that the phase transition is an energetically favored process. Furthermore, molecular dynamics studies suggest that the melting of the cubic rock-salt phases is initiated at the vacancies, which propagate to nearby regions. The observation of multi-rock-salt phases suggests another route for multi-level data storage using GeSbTe.« less

  8. Vacancy Structures and Melting Behavior in Rock-Salt GeSbTe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xue-Peng; Shen, Zhen-Ju; Li, Xian-Bin; Wang, Chuan-Shou; Chen, Yong-Jin; Li, Ji-Xue; Zhang, Jin-Xing; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Sheng-Bai; Han, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ge-Sb-Te alloys have been widely used in optical/electrical memory storage. Because of the extremely fast crystalline-amorphous transition, they are also expected to play a vital role in next generation nonvolatile microelectronic memory devices. However, the distribution and structural properties of vacancies have been one of the key issues in determining the speed of melting (or amorphization), phase-stability, and heat-dissipation of rock-salt GeSbTe, which is crucial for its technological breakthrough in memory devices. Using spherical aberration-aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic scale energy-dispersive X-ray mapping, we observe a new rock-salt structure with high-degree vacancy ordering (or layered-like ordering) at an elevated temperature, which is a result of phase transition from the rock-salt phase with randomly distributed vacancies. First-principles calculations reveal that the phase transition is an energetically favored process. Moreover, molecular dynamics studies suggest that the melting of the cubic rock-salt phases is initiated at the vacancies, which propagate to nearby regions. The observation of multi-rock-salt phases suggests another route for multi-level data storage using GeSbTe. PMID:27140674

  9. Prediction of rock salt structure of (InN)32 nanoparticles from first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhsharan; Sekhon, S S; Kumar, Vijay

    2013-03-21

    From first principles calculations, we show that (InN)32 nanoparticles favor rock salt structure compared with wurtzite structure in bulk. A phase transition from wurtzite to rock salt structure is known to occur in bulk InN at 12.1 GPa and higher values of pressure for AlN and GaN. However, at the nanoscale we show that this structural transition takes place in (InN)32 without applying pressure. The charge asymmetry value "g" and cation/anion size ratio in InN describe very well this behavior. Similar studies on nanoparticles of AlN and GaN as well as a few other binary compounds such as MgS, AgI, ZnO, and CdSe, however, do not show such a transition. Our results suggest (InN)32 to be a unique candidate as further calculations on a few larger size (InN)n nanoparticles show that a filled cage (two shells) (InN)12@(InN)48 structure of (InN)60 has higher binding energy compared with a rock salt structure of (InN)64 leading to the conclusion that other 3D structures are likely to become favorable over rock salt structure for larger sizes.

  10. B1-to-B2 structural transitions in rock salt intergrowth structures.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Okada, Taku; Yagi, Takehiko; Kawakami, Takateru; Tassel, Cédric; Kawasaki, Shota; Abe, Naoyuki; Niwa, Ken; Kikegawa, Takumi; Hirao, Naohisa; Takano, Mikio; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2011-11-21

    The rock salt (B1) structure of binary oxides or chalcogenides transforms to the CsCl (B2) structure under high pressure, with critical pressures P(s) depending on the cation to anion size ratio (R(c)/R(a)). We investigated structural changes of A(2)MO(3) (A = Sr, Ca; M = Cu, Pd) comprising alternate 7-fold B1 AO blocks and corner-shared MO(2) square-planar chains under pressure. All of the examined compounds exhibit a structural transition at P(s) = 29-41 GPa involving a change in the A-site geometry to an 8-fold B2 coordination. This observation demonstrates, together with the high pressure study on the structurally related Sr(3)Fe(2)O(5), that the B1-to-B2 transition generally occurs in these intergrowth structures. An empirical relation of P(s) and the R(c)/R(a) ratio for the binary system holds well for the intergrowth structure also, which means that P(s) is predominantly determined by the rock salt blocks. However, a large deviation from the relation is found in LaSrNiO(3.4), where oxygen atoms partially occupy the apical site of the MO(4) square plane. We predict furthermore the occurrence of the same structural transition for Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite oxides (AO)(AMO(3))(n), under higher pressures. For investigating the effect on the physical properties, an electrical resistivity of Sr(2)CuO(3) is studied.

  11. Salt rock of the Alpine Haselgebirge Formation - ages, temperatures and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, C.; Neubauer, F.; Urai, J.; Genser, J.; Borojevic-Sostaric, B.; Schoenherr, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Upper Permian salt bearing Haselgebirge Formation (257-251 Ma) of the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) shows unusual features different from other evaporite successions: (1) extreme tectonic deformation, (2) a large proportion of mudrock and anhydrite rock, and (3) the absence of K-bearing evaporite minerals other than polyhalite. Intact mudrock and anhydrite rocks allow the reconstruction of early diagenetic events. Migrating mineralized hydrous fluids, released from mudrock and gypsum, led to the extensive growth of polyhalite, which forms massive rocks with various fabrics. This growth happened during the ongoing opening of the Meliata Ocean. Polyhalite age dating shows a maximum of measured ages ca. 233-234 Ma (40Ar/39Ar age). The investigated rock salt deposits (Altaussee, Berchtesgaden-Bad Dürrnberg) show a thermal overprint during Alpine orogeny. Polyhalite age data scatter broadly with maxima during Jurassic (closure of Meliata Ocean) and Cretaceous (eo-Alpine thrusting event). Our fluid inclusions and vitrinite reflexion measurements yield a peak temperature of 180°C for Berchtesgaden and >240°C for Altaussee. Rock salt and mudrock form a two-component tectonite ("haselgebirge", Schauberger, 1986). Halite deformed and recrystallized, and also crystallized in veins within mudrocks. We interpret high overpressure of the pore fluid to have significantly contributed to fracturing of the mudrock. By use of the temperature-independent subgrain-size piezometer for halite, the paleo-differential stress was calculated at ca. 2.5 MPa in Altaussee and ca. 4.5 MPa in Berchtesgaden. These paleo-stresses allow estimate temperatures at ca. 150°C and ca. 110°C, also implying very high strain rates (10-9 to 10-10 s-1; Leitner et al., 2011). The orientation of the foliation, the halite mineral lineation and other structures of rock salt are consistent within each deposit. The mapped mesoscale structures relate to the surroundings of the salt bodies. White fibers

  12. Structures of late transition metal monoxides from Jahn-Teller instabilities in the rock salt lattice.

    PubMed

    Derzsi, Mariana; Piekarz, Przemysław; Grochala, Wojciech

    2014-07-11

    Most late transition metal (LTM) monoxides crystallize in other than a rock salt structure, which is so common in the earlier transition metal monoxides. Here we present theoretical evidence based on density functional theory that an electron-phonon coupling involving a single soft mode in the cubic cell is responsible for the onset of the experimentally observed structures of the late transition metal monoxides.

  13. Bonding preference of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in niobium-based rock-salt structures.

    PubMed

    Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Wada, Satoshi; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-03

    Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are essential components in solid-state materials. However, understanding their preference on the bonding to metals has not been straightforward. Here, niobium carbide, nitride, and oxide with simple rock-salt-based structures were analyzed by first-principles calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We found that an increase in the atomic number from carbon to oxygen formed fewer and shorter bonds to metals with better hybridization of atomic orbitals. This can provide a simple guiding principle for understanding the bonding and designing carbides, nitrides, oxides, and mixed-anion compounds.

  14. High temperature thermoelectric properties of rock-salt structure PbS

    DOE PAGES

    Parker, David S.; Singh, David J.

    2013-12-18

    We present an analysis of the high temperature transport properties of rock-salt structure PbS, a sister compound to the better studied lead chalcogenides PbSe and PbTe. In this study, we find thermopower magnitudes exceeding 200 V/K in a wide doping range for temperatures of 800 K and above. Based on these calculations, and an analysis of recent experimental work we find that this material has a potential for high thermoelectric performance. Also, we find favorable mechanical properties, based on an analysis of published data.

  15. High temperature thermoelectric properties of rock-salt structure PbS

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, David S.; Singh, David J.

    2013-12-18

    We present an analysis of the high temperature transport properties of rock-salt structure PbS, a sister compound to the better studied lead chalcogenides PbSe and PbTe. In this study, we find thermopower magnitudes exceeding 200 V/K in a wide doping range for temperatures of 800 K and above. Based on these calculations, and an analysis of recent experimental work we find that this material has a potential for high thermoelectric performance. Also, we find favorable mechanical properties, based on an analysis of published data.

  16. Observation of laser-induced stress waves and mechanism of structural changes inside rock-salt crystals.

    PubMed

    Sakakura, Masaaki; Tochio, Takaya; Eida, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Kanehira, Shingo; Nishi, Masayuki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2011-08-29

    The structural changes inside rock-salt crystals after femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation are investigated using a microscopic pump-probe technique and an elastic simulation. The pump-probe imaging shows that a squircle-shaped stress wave is generated after the fs laser irradiation as a result of the relaxation of thermal stress in the photoexcited region. Pump-probe crossed-Nicols imaging and elastic simulation elucidate that shear stresses and tensile stresses are concentrated in specific regions during the propagation of the stress wave. The shear stresses and tensile stresses observed in this study can explain the characteristic laser-induced structural changes inside rock-salt crystals.

  17. The application of high resolution X-ray computed tomography on naturally deformed rock salt: Multi-scale investigations of the structural inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Habersetzer, Jörg; Peinl, Mark; Zulauf, Gernold; Hammer, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) represents a useful technique providing new perspectives and insights for the structural investigation of naturally-deformed rock salt. Several samples of Permian rock salt from Gorleben, Asse and Teutschenthal (Germany) were investigated by exploiting the non-destructive nature of μCT and nCT techniques particularly for salt rocks. CT imaging enabled the visualization and quantification of anhydrite impurities, pore space and fluid phases located along grain-boundaries or trapped as intracrystalline inclusions. Disseminated grains and aggregates of anhydrite in rock salt of the Gorleben salt dome have been visualized and quantified by μCT for the first time in order to portray their spatial occurrence. The visualization of anhydrite aggregates and pore space shows no correlation between their spatial distributions. This independence excludes the anhydrite to be responsible for elevated porosity (0.87 ± 0.07 vol.-%). High-resolution nCT scans (≤1 μm voxel size) of single intracrystalline and grain-boundary fluid inclusions from Gorleben and Asse rock salt allowed the visualization and quantification of their various phase components. A major achievement is the detailed description of the morphology and shape of the fluid inclusions and of their phase components, which has not been conducted in rock salt research by high-resolution X-ray CT imaging before.

  18. Half metallicity and magnetic stability of sp-electron superlattices in rock-salt structure: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Baozeng; Dong, Shengjie; Chen, Shanxing; Zhang, Zidan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Density functional calculations were performed to study the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of sp-electron half-metallic superlattices (KS)1/(CaS)1, (RbS)1/(SrS)1, and (CsS)1/(BaS)1 (001) in rock-salt structure. All the superlattices are found to be spin polarized, and the calculated band structure suggests a 100% polarization of the conduction carriers. The p-p hybridization is shown to be essential for the formations of localized orbitals and spin-splitting. The half-metallic electronic structure will be destroyed upon an excessive lattice compression, accompanying with a metallic transition. Moreover, the analysis of the orbital-decomposed partial density of states and spin density reveal that S atoms in different layers of the superlattice show distinct polarization directions. Discussion of volume-conserving deformations further demonstrates the stability of half metallicity in sp-electron superlattices.

  19. Zinc-blende to rock-salt structural phase transition of BP and BAs under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwan, Madhu; Bhardwaj, Purvee; Singh, Sadhna

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper, we have investigated the pressure induced phase transition and thermophysical properties of BP and BAs by means of modified interaction potential model (MIPM). The MIPM consists of Coulomb interaction, three-body interaction (TBI) modified by taking covalency effect, van-der Waal interaction (vdW), short range overlap repulsive interaction and zero point energy effect. These compounds crystallize in zinc-blende (ZB) structure at ambient condition and transform to rock-salt (RS) structure at pressures 111 and 93 GPa and their equation of state show volume collapse of 14% and 4% respectively for BP and BAs. The second order elastic constants have also been computed at zero and high pressures. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The mechanical and thermophysical properties in ZB structure are also predicted.

  20. Se EXAFS study of the elevated wurtzite to rock salt structural phase transition in CdSe nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, S.H.; Alivisatos, A.P. |

    1993-09-01

    High pressure Se EXAFS data has been obtained on 2.7 nm radius CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals. This system is observed to undergo a solid-solid phase transition at 6.5 GPa which is approximately twice the reported value for bulk CdSe. In combination with high pressure optical absorption experiments, EXAFS data can be used to identify the high-pressure phase structure as rock salt. EXAFS data can be fit with equations of state to yield pressure volume curves. Resultant values of bulk modulus and its derivative with respect to pressure are B{sub o} = 37 {plus_minus} 5 GPa and B{sub o}{prime} = 11 {plus_minus} 3. A thermodynamic model for the data is presented in which the internal energy in each phase is modified by a surface energy term. Differences in surface energy are used to explain the elevation in phase transition pressure. The model can be used to estimate a value for the surface energy in the rock salt phase; 1.9 {plus_minus} 0.3 N/m is obtained in comparison to 0.9 {plus_minus} 0. 1 N/m for the wurtzite phase.

  1. Compact non-rock-salt structures in sodium fluoride cluster ions at specific sizes revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Takahashi, Tohru; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2014-10-30

    Structures of small sodium fluoride cluster cations, Na(n)F(n-1)(+), have been determined for n = 5-23 by ion mobility mass spectrometry. In the mass spectrum of Na(n)F(n-1)(+) cluster ions measured after collisions in the ion-drift cell, cuboid ions with near-regular hexahedron such as n = 14 (3 × 3 × 3), 23 (3 × 3 × 5), 38 (3 × 5 × 5), 63 (5 × 5 × 5), and 88 (5 × 5 × 7) were predominantly observed as magic numbers. By comparison of the collision cross sections obtained from the ion mobility measurements with theoretical ones, we have experimentally shown that the ions of n = 7 and 10 have stable non-rock-salt type structures in which one sodium atom is encapsulated into the sodium fluoride cuboid lattice. The collision cross sections of n = 12 and 13 are almost equal to that of the n = 14 cuboid. A similar feature was also observed in collision cross sections of n = 21 and 22, which are equal to that of the n = 23 cuboid. These features indicate that the cluster ions of n = 12, 13, 21, and 22 have near-cuboid structures with some surface defects.

  2. Physical Properties Data for Rock Salt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    PHOTOGRAPH THIS SHEET ADLEE INVENTORY Physical Properties Data for Rock salt N DOCUMENT IDENTIFICATION DJsbTRIuT10IN STATEMENT A DISTRIUTION...Physical Properties Data for Rock Salt )ata Book (see block 18) 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(&) S. 167RCORGRN NUMBER(n) SH. H. Li, R. A...Chemical properties -Electrical properties --- : Mechanical properties --Optical properties --Magnetic properties -- .1Theruophysical properties -Geological

  3. Percolation and Physical Properties of Rock Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, S.; Hesse, M. A.; Prodanovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Textural equilibrium controls the distribution of the liquid phase in many naturally occurring porous materials such as partially molten rocks and alloys, salt-brine and ice-water systems. In these materials, pore geometry evolves to minimize the solid-liquid interfacial energy while maintaining a constant dihedral angle, θ, at solid-liquid contact lines. A characteristic of texturally equilibrated porous media, in the absence of deformation, is that the pore network percolates at any porosity for θ<60° while a percolation threshold exists for θ>60°. However, in ductile polycrystalline materials including rock salt, the balance between surface tension and ductile deformation controls the percolation of fluid pockets along grain corners and edges. Here we show sufficiently rapid deformation can overcome this threshold by elongating and connecting isolated pores by examining a large number of accessible salt samples from deep water Gulf of Mexico. We first confirm the percolation threshold in static laboratory experiments on synthetic salt samples with X-ray microtomography. We then provide field evidence on existence of interconnected pore space in rock salt in extremely low porosities, significantly below the static percolation threshold. Scaling arguments suggest that strain rates in salt are sufficient to overcome surface tension and may allow percolation. We also present the first level-set computations of three-dimensional texturally equilibrated melt networks in realistic rock fabrics. The resulting pore space is used to obtain the effective physical properties of rock, effective electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, with a novel numerical model.

  4. Structural and electronic properties of TiX (X=N, As) in rock salt and zinc blende phase: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, U. P.; Nayak, V.

    2016-05-23

    Quantum mechanical first principle calculations have been performed to study the electronic and structural properties of TiN and TiAs in zinc blende (ZB) and rock salt (RS) structures. The full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method has been used within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The exchange correlation functional has been solved employing generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Our predicted results for lattice constants are in good agreement with the earlier findings. The electronic band structures of TiX are metallic in both the phases.

  5. Tightness of Salt Rocks and Fluid Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdeling, C.; Minkley, W.; Brückner, D.

    2016-12-01

    Salt formations are used for storage of oil and gas and as waste repositiories because of their excellent barrier properties. We summarise the current knowledge regarding fluid tightness of saliferous rocks, in particular rock salt. Laboratory results, in-situ observations and natural analogues, as well as theoretical and numerical investigations, indicate that pressure-driven percolation is the most important mechanism for fluid transport: If the fluid pressure exceeds the percolation threshold, i.e. the minor principal stress, the fluid can open up grain boundaries, create connected flow paths and initiate directed migration in the direction of major principal stress. Hence, this mechanism provides the main failure mode for rock salt barriers, where integrity can be lost if the minor principal stress is lowered, e.g. due to excavations or thermomechanical uplift. We present new laboratory experiments showing that there is no fluid permeation below the percolation threshold also at high temperatures and pressures, contrary to recent claims in the literature.

  6. Density functional study of the optical response of FeN and CoN nitrides with zinc-blend and rock-salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheballah, Y.; Ziane, A.; Bouarab, S.; Vega, A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of iron and cobalt mono-nitrides in rock-salt and zinc-blende crystal structures. Density functional theoretic calculations were performed using the linear muffin tin orbital method in the generalized gradient approximation for exchange and correlation. The optical response was characterized by means of the dielectric function, calculated for each structural phase in the different magnetic arrangements found experimentally and theoretically. The origin of the main absorption peaks was traced back to particular interband transitions after a careful analysis of the band structures and orbital- and atom- projected electronic densities of states. The optical response of both nitrides with this structure in the nomagnetic state is very similar at photon frequencies below 2 eV, but differ at high frequencies. In zinc-blende structure, both compounds are nomagnetic and present an optical gap of about 0.5 eV for interband transitions in their optical response.

  7. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  8. Understanding the Effects of Salt Precipitation on Rock Microstructure by Using Digital Rock Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzikalla, F.; Vanorio, T.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic monitoring technology uses time-lapse signatures to track fluid flow and saturation changes in geological reservoirs. The rock physical interpretation of this time-lapse data is usually based on Gassmann fluid substitution and common rock physics models assume that the pore space and mineralogy is unaltered by the replacement of one fluid with another. This assumption is, however, violated if the fluid interacts physically or chemically with the solid rock matrix. In particular, during the sequestration of CO2-saturated brines the seismic properties can be significantly affected by salt precipitation. A clear understanding of the effects of changes in rock microstructure is therefore important for the interpretation of time-lapse signals and for reservoir monitoring. A new research tool that can help to better understand these effects is the Digital Rock Physics technology (DRP). It is based on 3-D x-ray computer tomography of the rock pore structure and the estimation of physical properties by using direct computer simulations. In the context of salt mineral precipitation in the pore space, DRP allows us to accurately control the amount of added solid material as well as the salt distribution patterns. If material is precipitated close to grain contact points, the rock behaves effectively stiffer, while the permeability may not be significantly affected. If, on the other hand, precipitation occurs at internal surfaces of large pores and cracks, the elastic stiffening is less pronounced, since the effective elastic properties are mainly controlled by the deformation at the grain contacts. However, the permeability may be strongly affected due to partial closure of the cracks. Recent laboratory experiments and 4D SEM imaging in Fontainebleau sandstone suggest that salt precipitation induces changes in both the elastic and hydraulic properties and also that these changes follow observed natural diagenetic trends where the additional material in the pore space

  9. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-12-17

    Because of lithium's possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. Here, we predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiD$_{\\beta}$ , $\\beta =0.25$ , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid–solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. Finally, we observed the formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  10. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Because of lithium's possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. Here, we predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDmore » $$_{\\beta}$$ , $$\\beta =0.25$$ , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid–solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. Finally, we observed the formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.« less

  11. Dilation-induced permeability changes in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C.; Fuenkajorn, K.

    1993-11-01

    A model of permeability changes in rock salt is developed and implemented in a time-dependent finite element code. Model parameters are developed from laboratory tests. The model is used to predict permeability changes adjacent to excavations in rock salt.

  12. Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2008-07-01

    Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

  13. Salt-induced rock fragmentation on Mars: The role of salt in the weathering of Martian rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, Emil

    2006-01-01

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos (except: Meridiani landing side, which formed by different processes, and is therefore not considered in this paper). Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently, it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases, transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the in situ fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in deserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape

  14. Numerical model of halite precipitation in porous sedimentary rocks adjacent to salt diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyuan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Pengyun

    2017-10-01

    Salt diapirs are commonly seen in the North Sea. Below the Zechstein Group exist possibly overpressured salt-anhydrite formations. One explanation as to the salt precipitation in areas with salt diapirs is that salt cementation is thermally driven and occurs strongly in places adjacent to salt diapirs. This paper assumes that the sealing effect of the cap rock above the salt formations is compromised and overpressured fluids, carrying dissolved minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4) and salt mineral components (NaCl of halite), flow into the porous sedimentary layers above the salt formations. Additionally, a salt-diapir-like structure is assumed to be at one side of the model. The numerical flow and heat transport simulator SHEMAT-Suite was developed and applied to calculating the concentrations of species, and dissolution and precipitation amounts. Results show that the overpressured salt-anhydrite formations have higher pressure heads and the species elements sodium and chlorite are transported into porous sediment rocks through water influx (saturated brine). Halite can precipitate as brine with sodium and chlorite ions flows to the cooler environment. Salt cementation of reservoir rocks leads to decreasing porosity and permeability near salt domes, and cementation of reservoir formations decreases with growing distance to the salt diapir. The proposed approach in this paper can also be used to evaluate precipitation relevant to scaling problems in geothermal engineering.

  15. Constitutive Modeling of the Thermomechanical Behavior of Rock Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, A.

    2016-12-01

    For the safe disposal of heat-generating high-level radioactive waste in rock salt formations, highly reliable numerical simulations of the thermomechanical and hydraulic behavior of the host rock have to be performed. Today, the huge progress in computer technology has enabled experts to calculate large and detailed computer models of underground repositories. However, the big ad­van­ces in computer technology are only beneficial when the applied material models and modeling procedures also meet very high demands. They result from the fact that the evaluation of the long-term integrity of the geological barrier requires an extra­polation of a highly nonlinear deforma­tion behavior to up to 1 million years, while the underlying experimental investigations in the laboratory or in situ have a duration of only days, weeks or at most some years. Several advanced constitutive models were developed and continuously improved to describe the dependences of various deformation phenomena in rock salt on in-situ relevant boundary conditions: transient and steady-state creep, evolution of damage and dilatancy in the DRZ, failure, post-failure behavior, residual strength, damage and dilatancy reduction, and healing. In a joint project series between 2004 and 2016, fundamental features of the advanced models were investigated and compared in detail with benchmark calculations. The study included procedures for the determination of characteristic salt-type-specific model parameter values and for the performance of numerical calculations of underground structures. Based on the results of this work and on specific laboratory investigations, the rock mechanical modeling is currently developed further in a common research project of experts from Germany and the United States. In this presentation, an overview about the work and results of the project series is given and the current joint research project WEIMOS is introduced.

  16. Rheological stratification of the Hormuz Salt Formation in Iran - microstructural study of the dirty and pure rock salts from the Kuh-e-Namak (Dashti) salt diapir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos; Schulmann, Karel; Rahmati, Mahmoud; Lexa, Ondrej; Wollenberg, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Significant viscosity contrasts displayed in flow structures of a mountain namakier (Kuh-e-Namak - Dashti), between 'weak' terrestrial debris bearing rock salt types and 'strong' pure rock salt types are questioned for deformation mechanisms using detailed quantitative microstructural study including crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) mapping of halite grains. While the solid impurity rich ("dirty") rock salts contain disaggregated siltstone and dolomite interlayers, "clean" salts (debris free) reveal microscopic hematite and remnants of abundant fluid inclusions in non-recrystallized cores of porphyroclasts. Although flow in both, the recrystallized dirty and clean salt types is accommodated by combined mechanisms of pressure-solution creep (PS), grain boundary sliding (GBS) and dislocation creep accommodated grain boundary migration (GBM), their viscosity contrasts are explained by significantly slower rates of intergranular diffusion and piling up of dislocations at hematite inclusions in clean salt types. Porphyroclasts of clean salts deform by semi-brittle and plastic mechanisms with intra-crystalline damage being induced also by fluid inclusions that explode in the crystals at high fluid pressures. Boudins of clean salt types with coarse grained and original sedimentary microstructure suggest that clean rock salts are associated with dislocation creep dominated power law flow in the source layer and the diapiric stem. Rheological contrasts between both rock salt classes apply in general for the variegated and terrestrial debris rich ("dirty") Lower Hormuz and the "clean" rock salt forming the Upper Hormuz, respectively, and suggest that large strain rate gradients likely exist along horizons of mobilized salt types of different composition and microstructure.

  17. Deformation-assisted fluid percolation in rock salt.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, Soheil; Hesse, Marc A; Prodanović, Maša; Gardner, James E

    2015-11-27

    Deep geological storage sites for nuclear waste are commonly located in rock salt to ensure hydrological isolation from groundwater. The low permeability of static rock salt is due to a percolation threshold. However, deformation may be able to overcome this threshold and allow fluid flow. We confirm the percolation threshold in static experiments on synthetic salt samples with x-ray microtomography. We then analyze wells penetrating salt deposits in the Gulf of Mexico. The observed hydrocarbon distributions in rock salt require that percolation occurred at porosities considerably below the static threshold due to deformation-assisted percolation. Therefore, the design of nuclear waste repositories in salt should guard against deformation-driven fluid percolation. In general, static percolation thresholds may not always limit fluid flow in deforming environments. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Deformation-assisted fluid percolation in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Soheil; Hesse, Marc A.; Prodanović, Maša; Gardner, James E.

    2015-11-01

    Deep geological storage sites for nuclear waste are commonly located in rock salt to ensure hydrological isolation from groundwater. The low permeability of static rock salt is due to a percolation threshold. However, deformation may be able to overcome this threshold and allow fluid flow. We confirm the percolation threshold in static experiments on synthetic salt samples with x-ray microtomography. We then analyze wells penetrating salt deposits in the Gulf of Mexico. The observed hydrocarbon distributions in rock salt require that percolation occurred at porosities considerably below the static threshold due to deformation-assisted percolation. Therefore, the design of nuclear waste repositories in salt should guard against deformation-driven fluid percolation. In general, static percolation thresholds may not always limit fluid flow in deforming environments.

  19. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  20. Delithation, Exfoliation, and Transformation of Rock-Salt-Structured Li2TiO3 to Highly Exposed {010}-Faceted Anatase.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-en; Du, Dejian; Feng, Qi; Yang, Xiaojing

    2015-04-22

    {010}-Facet-exposed anatase TiO2 crystals exhibit the highest photoreactivity among the exposed facets. To obtain a higher exposure rate of this facet, the work investigated the transformation of the nanosheets with cavities within the layers derived from a rock-salt-structured Li2TiO3 precursor. All the lithium ions were extracted from the precursor by H+/Li+ ion exchange in HCl aqueous solutions, and after tetramethylammonium ions were intercalated, the precursor can delaminated into the nanosheets. The [TiO3]2- nanosheets were hydrothermally treated under different temperatures and pH values. The results showed that the anatase phase was formed in a wider range of pH and temperature, compared with using nanoribbons of [Ti4O9]2- and nanosheets of [Ti1.73O4]1.07-. At low pH, [111]-faceted nanorod-shaped anatase nanocrystals were formed preferentially, and the nanocrystals preferentially grow along the [001] direction with the increase of solution pH, leading to a large percentage of {010} facets on their surface. The photocatalytic activity increases with the increase of exposure rate of {010} facets.

  1. Unprecedented Al supersaturation in single-phase rock salt structure VAlN films by Al+ subplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Hans, M.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    Modern applications of refractory ceramic thin films, predominantly as wear-protective coatings on cutting tools and on components utilized in automotive engines, require a combination of excellent mechanical properties, thermal stability, and oxidation resistance. Conventional design approaches for transition metal nitride coatings with improved thermal and chemical stability are based on alloying with Al. It is well known that the solubility of Al in NaCl-structure transition metal nitrides is limited. Hence, the great challenge is to increase the Al concentration substantially while avoiding precipitation of the thermodynamically favored wurtzite-AlN phase, which is detrimental to mechanical properties. Here, we use VAlN as a model system to illustrate a new concept for the synthesis of metastable single-phase NaCl-structure thin films with the Al content far beyond solubility limits obtained with conventional plasma processes. This supersaturation is achieved by separating the film-forming species in time and energy domains through synchronization of the 70-μs-long pulsed substrate bias with intense periodic fluxes of energetic Al+ metal ions during reactive hybrid high power impulse magnetron sputtering of the Al target and direct current magnetron sputtering of the V target in the Ar/N2 gas mixture. Hereby, Al is subplanted into the cubic VN grains formed by the continuous flux of low-energy V neutrals. We show that Al subplantation enables an unprecedented 42% increase in metastable Al solubility limit in V1-xAlxN, from x = 0.52 obtained with the conventional method to 0.75. The elastic modulus is 325 ± 5 GPa, in excellent agreement with density functional theory calculations, and approximately 50% higher than for corresponding films grown by dc magnetron sputtering. The extension of the presented strategy to other Al-ion-assisted vapor deposition methods or materials systems is straightforward, which opens up the way for producing supersaturated single

  2. Microbial biodiversity in Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radax, C.; Wieland, H.; Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Leuko, S.; Rittmann, S.; Weidler, G.; Gruber, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt (age 200-250 million years) was shown several times to contain living extremely halophilic Archaea. These organisms might stem from ancient populations that became entrapped and persisted in the rock salt since then. For this reason, rock salt is considered a promising model system for the search for bacterial extraterrestrial life. In our studies on biodiversity in Alpine rock salt, we employed both culture-dependent and culture-independent, PCR-based methods. The latter approach indicated the presence of at least 12 distinct sequence types (phylotypes) in our samples, all of which belonged to the extremely halophilic Archaea. None of the recovered sequences was identical to sequences from databases, suggesting the avoidance of contaminants during experimental procedures. Two phylotypes could be assigned to taxonomically described members of this family; the remaining ten phylotypes appeared only remotely related to known genera of the extremely halophilic Archaea. In contrast, attempts to isolate organisms from the same sample on 15 different growth media so far yielded only two groups of isolates that could be differentiated based on their 16S rRNA genes. One group was very similar to Halococcus strains that we frequently isolated from Alpine rock salt; the other group was closely correlated to one of our novel phylotypes. Analyses of whole cell protein patterns allowed to further differentiate the latter group into two different subgroups that could not be distinguished at the molecular level. These results show that both culture-dependent and culture-independent strategies have to be applied in order to obtain a more complete view of microbial biodiversity in Permo-Triassic rock salt: culture-independent methods yield information on the gross microbial diversity in rock salt, whereas subtle differences can currently only be registered between cultivated strains.

  3. Textural evidence for origin of salt dome anhydrite cap rocks, Winnfield Dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, M.R.; Kyle, J.R.; Price, P.E.

    1985-02-01

    Textures within anhydrite cap rock are products of repeated cycles of halie dissolution and residual anhydrite accretion at tops of salt stocks. Quarrying operations at Winnfield dome have exposed extensive portions of the anhydrite cap rock zone. This zone is composed primarily of unoriented, xenoblastic anhydrite crystals in laminae less than 1 mm to several centimeters thick. Laminations are defined by thin, dark sulfide accumulations and pressure solution of anhydrite. Deformed, banded anhydrite clasts are contained locally within laminae. Multiple-laminated, concave downward anhydrite mounds occur along some horizons. They may contain anhydrite breccia fragments or sulfides. Coarsely crystalline salt mounds, containing disseminated idioblastic anhydrite also occur along horizons. Mound morphologies vary from tall and thin to broad and squat; maximum dimensions range from less than 0.5 to about 2.0 m. These moundlike structures are related spatially and genetically. Moundlike structures are believed to form from salt spines along the salt-anhydrite contact. As the spine dissolves through several cycles of dissolution and accretion, a laminated anhydrite mound is preserved; if the spine becomes isolated from dissolution, then a salt inclusion is preserved. Anhydrite beds within the Louann Salt, deformed during diapirism, are preserved as deformed anhydrite clasts. Steeply dipping, bedded anhydrite zones within the salt stock may produce brecciated anhydrite mounds when incorporated into the cap rock. Sulfides record the movement of metalliferous fluids through the salt-anhydrite contact.

  4. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  5. Waste disposal in a German rock-salt mine

    SciTech Connect

    Wegener, W. )

    1993-04-01

    A worked-out area of the operating Helibronn rock-salt mine is being used as a repository for fly-ash waste from incineration plants. The waste is packed in large bags, handled by fork-lifts, trucks, and cranes, and stacked 11-m-high. In addition insolubles from the re-saturation of brine for electrolysis using rock salt are stowed in bulk. Special care is taken to isolate waste-disposal activities from the salt mining and hoisting operations. Considerable interest is being shown in the underground disposal of waste in Germany, particularly as existing landfill sites are approaching the end of their lives and the establishment of new sites is meeting strong opposition from local populations. The problems encountered in the disposal of fly ash in salt mines are discussed.

  6. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  7. Impact of solid second phases on deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed salt rocks (Kuh-e-Namak, Dashti, Iran) and rheological stratification of the Hormuz Salt Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, P.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Schulmann, K.; Rahmati, M.; Lexa, O.; Wollenberg, U.

    2015-05-01

    Viscosity contrasts displayed in flow structures of a mountain namakier (Kuh-e-Namak - Dashti), between 'weak' second phase bearing rock salt and 'strong' pure rock salt types are studied for deformation mechanisms using detailed quantitative microstructural study. While the solid inclusions rich ("dirty") rock salts contain disaggregated siltstone and dolomite interlayers, "clean" salts reveal microscopic hematite and remnants of abundant fluid inclusions in non-recrystallized cores of porphyroclasts. Although the flow in both, the recrystallized "dirty" and "clean" salt types is accommodated by combined mechanisms of pressure-solution creep (PS), grain boundary sliding (GBS), transgranular microcracking and dislocation creep accommodated grain boundary migration (GBM), their viscosity contrasts observed in the field outcrops are explained by: 1) enhanced ductility of "dirty" salts due to increased diffusion rates along the solid inclusion-halite contacts than along halite-halite contacts, and 2) slow rates of intergranular diffusion due to dissolved iron and inhibited dislocation creep due to hematite inclusions for "clean" salt types Rheological contrasts inferred by microstructural analysis between both salt rock classes apply in general for the "dirty" salt forming Lower Hormuz and the "clean" salt forming the Upper Hormuz of the Hormuz Formation and imply strain rate gradients or decoupling along horizons of mobilized salt types of different composition and microstructure.

  8. Evidence for episodic basin dewatering in salt-dome cap rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hallager, W.S. ); Ulrich, M.R. ); Kyle, J.R.; Gose, W.A. ); Price, P.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A detailed record of episodic basin-dewatering events is preserved in the anhydrite cap rocks to two Gulf Coast salt domes. Metal rich brines were intermittently expelled geopressured zones deep in the stratigraphic section and were channeled upward along escape structures bounding the salt diapirs. Overhanging anhydrite cap rock helped to focus some escaping fluid into the zone of dissolution between the top of salt and overlying residual anhydrite cap rock. Iron, lead, and zinc sulfide solubilities were exceeded in this zone, possibly in response to dissolution and reduction of cap-rock sulfates. Because the metalliferous brines entered the dissolution zone intermittently, they were recorded as relatively thin horizontal bands of sulfide sandwiched between thicker accumulations of anhydrite. Continued dissolution of salt and underplating of residual anhydrite caused the sulfide bands to be displaced upward relative to the base of the cap, leading to an inverted stratigraphic record of basin-dewatering events. Paleomagnetic data from the Winnfield salt dome suggest the sulfide-producing basin-dewatering events and anhydrite cap-rock accumulation occurred between 157 and 145 Ma.

  9. Astrobiology with haloarchaea from Permo-Triassic rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Radax, C.; Gruber, C.; Legat, A.; Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Wieland, H.; Leuko, S.; Weidler, G.; Kömle, N.; Kargl, G.

    2002-10-01

    Several viable halophilic archaebacteria were isolated previously from rock salt of Permo-Triassic age in an Austrian salt mine; one of these strains was the first to be recognized as a novel species from subterranean halite and was designated Halococcus salifodinae. The halophilic microorganisms have apparently survived in the salt sediments over extremely long periods of time. Halobacteria could therefore be suitable model organisms for exploring the possibility of long-term survival of microbes on other planets, in particular, since extraterrestrial halite has been detected in meteorites and is assumed to be present in the subsurface ocean on Europa. Our efforts are directed at the identification of the microbial content of ancient rock salt and the development of procedures for the investigation of the halobacterial response to extreme environmental conditions. Using modified culture media, further halophilic strains were isolated from freshly blasted rock salt and bore cores; in addition, growth of several haloarchaea was substantially improved. Molecular methods indicated the presence of at least 12 different 16S rRNA gene species in a sample of Alpine rock salt, but these strains have not been cultured yet. The exploration of Mars is a target of space missions in the 21st century; therefore, testing the survival of haloarchaea under conditions comparable to present-day Mars, using a simulation chamber, was begun. Preliminary results with Halococcus and Halobacterium species suggested at least tenfold higher survival rates when cells were kept in liquid brines than under dry conditions; staining of cells with the LIVE DEAD kit, which discriminates between damaged and intact membranes, corroborated these data.

  10. Capillary controls on brine percolation in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M. A.; Prodanovic, M.; Ghanbarzadeh, S.

    2016-12-01

    The ability the microstructure in rock salt to evolve to minimize the surface energy of the pore-space exerts an important control on brine percolation. The behavior is especially interesting under conditions when brine is wetting the grain boundaries and the pore network percolates at very low porosities, below the transport threshold in typical porous media. We present pore-scale simulations of texturally equilibrated pore spaces in real polycrystalline materials. This allows us to probe the basic physical properties of these materials, such as percolation and trapping thresholds as well as permeability-porosity relationships. Laboratory experiments in NaCl-H2O system are consistent with the computed percolation thresholds. Field data from hydrocarbon exploration wells in rock salt show that fluid commonly invades the lower section of the salt domes. This is consistent with laboratory measurements that show that brine begins to wet the salt grain boundaries with increasing pressure and temperature and theoretical arguments suggesting this would lead to fluid invasion. In several salt domes, however, fluid have percolated to shallower depths, apparently overcoming a substantial percolation threshold. This is likely due to the shear deformation in salt domes, which is not accounted for in theory and experiments.

  11. The effect of hydrocarbons on the microstructural evolution in rock salt: a case study on hydrocarbon bearing Ara salt from the South Oman Salt Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, Joyce; Urai, Janos L.; Wübbeler, Franziska M. M.; Sadler, Marc

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that dilatant deformation promotes the incorporation of hydrocarbons into typically low permeable rock salt (Schoenherr et al., 2007). However, there is not much knowledge on subsequent mechanisms related to recrystallization processes, which cause morphological and chemical changes of the carbonic inclusions. This work aims to contribute to an increased understanding of fluid inclusion dynamics related to grain boundary migration recrystallization and hence to facilitate the interpretation of complex microstructures in recrystallized, multiphase salt rocks. In this case study we investigate hydrocarbon-impregnated salt from the Cambrian Ara Group in the South Oman Salt Basin. The samples were cored from cm-m thick anhydrite-salt sequences overlying hydrocarbon bearing carbonate stringers in 3300 m depth. The anhydrite layers consist mainly of fine-grained anhydrite, which contains calcite, dolomite, and olivine inclusions. Solid bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon phases are observed in between the anhydrite grains and along cracks. Anhydrite layers host salt veins, which contain fragments of anhydrite. These fragments do not differ in composition or structure from the host material and the related vein microstructures indicate crack-seal mechanisms. Halite in the salt layers is almost entirely recrystallized with solid inclusions consisting of anhydrite, calcite, dolomite and olivine with hydrocarbon-coatings present inside grains and along grain boundaries. Solid inclusions cause pinning indicated by a decreased recrystallized grain size and by the presence of grains with preserved substructures representing earlier deformation phases. We observe two types of carbonic inclusions: I) solid bitumen coatings along grain boundaries and microcracks, interpreted to be incorporated into the salt in an overpressure state that allowed dilatancy of the salt, and II) less degraded, liquid hydrocarbons along grain boundaries in the vicinity of the anhydrite

  12. Folding and fracturing of rock adjacent to salt diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Mark G.

    2017-04-01

    When John Ramsay wrote his groundbreaking book in 1967, deformation around salt diapirs was not something he covered. At the time, most geologists considered diapirs to form due to density inversion, rising through thick overlying strata due to buoyancy. In doing so, salt was thought to shove aside the younger rocks, shearing and fracturing them in drag folds and supposedly producing "salt gouge". Even after it was realized that the majority of diapirs spend most of their history growing at or just beneath the surface, the relative rise of salt and sinking of minibasins were (and are) still thought by many to be accommodated in part by shear and fracturing of rocks in a collar zone around the salt. There are two arguments against this model. The first is mechanical: whereas halite behaves as a viscous fluid, even young sediment deforms as a brittle material with layer anisotropy. Thus, the salt-sediment interface is the outer margin of an intrasalt shear zone caused by viscous drag against the diapir margin. The velocity of salt flow decreases dramatically toward the edge of the diapir, so that the outermost salt effectively doesn't move. Hence, no shear or fracturing is expected in surrounding strata. The second and more important argument is that empirical field data do not support the idea of drag folds and associated deformation. Certainly, strata are typically folded and thinned adjacent to diapirs. However, stratal upturn is generated by monoclinal drape folding of the diapir roof over the edge of the rising salt, and thinning is caused by deposition onto the bathymetric highs formed by the diapirs, often supplemented by roof erosion and slumping. Halokinetic sequences observed in numerous salt basins (e.g., Paradox Basin, La Popa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees, Sivas Basin, Zagros Mountains, Kuqa Basin) contain no diapir-parallel shear zones and minimal thinning and fracturing caused by diapir rise. Even megaflaps, in which strata extend for kilometers up the sides

  13. Numerical simulation of salt cementation in the porous rocks adjacent to salt diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allstadt, Raphael; Li, Shiyuan; Marquart, Gabriele; Reuning, Lars; Niederau, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Porosity and permeability are among the most important petrophysical properties of reservoirs rocks in oil systems. Observations during exploration indicate that in the vicinity of salt domes the porosity of reservoir rocks is often reduced by halite cementation. In this study we present results of simulating the process of salt precipitation near salt diapirs by using a schematic model of a Zechstein diapir in the North Sea basin. The numerical simulation is based on solving the transport equations for heat, porous flow and dispersive and reactive chemical species. Chemical reaction and equilibrium is based on the PHREEQC computer code. In our model over-pressured brine is entering from below and is deflected towards the diapir due to an intermediate layer of low permeability. The high thermal conductivity of salt yields a lateral temperature gradient starting from the diapir. Due to this effect the simulated temperature profile shows lower temperatures close to the salt dome than in comparable depths further away. Caused by the temperature-controlled solubility of NaCl in the brine and supplied ions by the diapir, halite first precipitates near the salt diapir by cementing the pore spaces and thus reducing the porosity. Salt-precipitation in the simulation starts after 840 000 years and reduces the porosity from 10 % to 5.5 % after 19 Mill. years. The permanent influx of brine causes growth of the cementation area and the related reduction of porosity in the reservoir.

  14. Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

    2004-06-20

    The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

  15. Spinel-rock salt transformation in LiCoMnO4-δ.

    PubMed

    Reeves-McLaren, Nik; Sharp, Joanne; Beltrán-Mir, Héctor; Rainforth, W Mark; West, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    The transformation on heating LiCoMnO4, with a spinel structure, to LiCoMnO3, with a cation-disordered rock salt structure, accompanied by loss of 25% of the oxygen, has been followed using a combination of diffraction, microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The transformation does not proceed by a topotactic mechanism, even though the spinel and rock salt phases have a similar, cubic close-packed oxygen sublattice. Instead, the transformation passes through two stages involving, first, precipitation of Li2MnO3, leaving behind a Li-deficient, Co-rich non-stoichiometric spinel and, second, rehomogenization of the two-phase assemblage, accompanied by additional oxygen loss, to give the homogeneous rock salt final product; a combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure analyses showed oxidation states of Co(2+) and Mn(3+) in LiCoMnO3. Subsolidus phase diagram determination of the Li2O-CoO x -MnO y system has established the compositional extent of spinel solid solutions at approximately 500°C.

  16. Spinel–rock salt transformation in LiCoMnO4−δ

    PubMed Central

    Reeves-McLaren, Nik; Sharp, Joanne; Beltrán-Mir, Héctor; Rainforth, W. Mark; West, Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    The transformation on heating LiCoMnO4, with a spinel structure, to LiCoMnO3, with a cation-disordered rock salt structure, accompanied by loss of 25% of the oxygen, has been followed using a combination of diffraction, microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The transformation does not proceed by a topotactic mechanism, even though the spinel and rock salt phases have a similar, cubic close-packed oxygen sublattice. Instead, the transformation passes through two stages involving, first, precipitation of Li2MnO3, leaving behind a Li-deficient, Co-rich non-stoichiometric spinel and, second, rehomogenization of the two-phase assemblage, accompanied by additional oxygen loss, to give the homogeneous rock salt final product; a combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure analyses showed oxidation states of Co2+ and Mn3+ in LiCoMnO3. Subsolidus phase diagram determination of the Li2O-CoOx-MnOy system has established the compositional extent of spinel solid solutions at approximately 500°C. PMID:26997883

  17. Thermoelastic properties of rock-salt NaCl at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M. L. M.; Shukla, G.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rock-salt NaCl is an important mineral in our daily lives, in high pressure science/technology, and in the oil/gas industry. The latter has come to prominence since the discovery of deep water pre-salt structures containing great hydrocarbon reserves out of the SE coast of Brazil. The unique aspects of these regions, such as deep water (greater than 2 km below sea level) and deep hydrocarbon reserves (more than 5 km deep) are challenging for oil/gas explorations. Oil/gas field imaging algorithms require good velocity models for seismic wave-propagation within the salt layer. Despite its importance, there is still insufficient information on the elasticity of and sound velocities in NaCl at relevant P,T conditions. Here we report such properties in rock-salt NaCl at relevant P,T conditions as obtained by first principles (DFT) quasiharmonic calculations. We compare intermediate and final results with available experimental data on thermodynamics and thermoelastic properties and combine them for optimum accuracy. These results should be useful for and facilitate imaging pre-salt hydrocarbon reserves. Research supported by CAPES from Brazil, NSF/DMR, and NSF/EAR.

  18. Model for transient creep of southeastern New Mexico rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W; Wawersik, W R; Lauson, H S

    1980-11-01

    In a previous analysis, existing experimental data pertaining to creep tests on rock salt from the Salado formation of S.E. New Mexico were fitted to an exponential transient creep law. While very early time portions of creep strain histories were not fitted very well for tests at low temperatures and stresses, initial creep rates in particular generally being underestimated, the exponential creep law has the property that the transient creep strain approaches a finite limit with time, and is therefore desirable from a creep modelling point of view. In this report, an analysis of transient creep is made. It is found that exponential transient creep can be related to steady-state creep through a universal creep curve. The resultant description is convenient for creep analyses where very early time behavior is not important.

  19. Disordered lithium niobate rock-salt materials prepared by hydrothermal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Modeshia, Deena R; Walton, Richard I; Mitchell, Martin R; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2010-07-14

    An investigation of the one-step hydrothermal crystallisation of lithium niobates reveals that reaction between Nb(2)O(5) and aqueous LiOH at 240 degrees C yields materials with a disordered rock-salt structure where the metals are statistically distributed over the cation sites. This contrasts with the well-studied reaction between Nb(2)O(5) and NaOH or KOH that produces ANbO(3) (A = Na, K) perovskites. Powder neutron diffraction shows that materials prepared at short reaction times and lower LiOH concentration (2.5 M) are lithium deficient and have a slight excess of niobium, but that at longer periods of reaction in 5 M LiOH, close to the ideal, stoichiometric Li(0.75)Nb(0.25)O composition is produced. Upon annealing this phase cleanly transforms into the known ordered rock-salt material Li(3)NbO(4), a process we have followed using thermodiffractometry, which indicates that transformation begins at approximately 700 degrees C. Solid-state (93)Nb and (7)Li NMR of the disordered and ordered rock-salt phases shows that both contain single metal sites but there is clear evidence for local disorder in the disordered samples. For the ordered material, NMR parameters derived from experiment are also compared to those calculated using density functional theory and are shown to be in good agreement.

  20. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite. However, rock as any other material if exposed to exogenous processes starts to deteriorate. Especially mechanical weathering can be very intensive if rock with unsuitable rock properties is used. For long it had been believed that repeated freezing and thawing in relation to high absorption is the main reason of the rock deterioration. In Slovakia for many years the high water absorption was set as exclusion criterion for use of rocks and stones in building industry. Only after 1989 the absorption was accepted as merely informational rock property and not exclusion. The reason of the change was not the understanding of the relationship between the porosity and rock deterioration, but more or less good experiences with some high porous rocks used in constructions exposed to severe weather conditions and proving a lack of relationship between rock freeze-thaw resistivity and water absorption. Results of the recent worldwide research suggest that understanding a resistivity of rocks against deterioration is hidden not in the absorption but in the structure of rock pores in relation to thermodynamic properties of pore water and tensile strength of rocks and rock minerals. Also this article presents some results of research on rock deterioration and pore structure performed on 88 rock samples. The results divide the rocks tested into two groups - group N in which the pore water does not freeze

  1. Mineralogical and microstructural investigations of fractures in Permian z2 potash seam and surrounding salt rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertineit, Michael; Grewe, Wiebke; Schramm, Michael; Hammer, Jörg; Blanke, Hartmut; Patzschke, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Fractures occur locally in the z2 potash seam (Kaliflöz Staßfurt). Most of them extend several centimeter to meter into the surrounding salt rocks. The fractures are distributed on all levels in an extremely deformed area of the Morsleben salt mine, Northern Germany. The sampling site is located within a NW-SE trending synclinal structure, which was reverse folded (Behlau & Mingerzahn 2001). The samples were taken between the -195 m and - 305 m level at the field of Marie shaft. In this area, more than 200 healed fractures were mapped. Most of them show opening widths of only a few millimeters to rarely 10 cm. The fractures in rock salt are filled with basically polyhalite, halite and carnallite. In the potash seam, the fractures are filled with kainite, halite and minor amounts of carnallite and polyhalite. In some cases the fracture infill changes depending on the type of surrounding rocks. There are two dominant orientations of the fractures, which can be interpreted as a conjugated system. The main orientation is NE-SW trending, the dip angles are steep (ca. 70°, dip direction NW and SE, respectively). Subsequent deformation of the filled fractures is documented by a strong grain shape fabric of kainite, undulatory extinction and subgrain formation in kainite, and several mineral transformations. Subgrain formation in halite occurred in both, the fracture infill and the surrounding salt rocks. The results correlate in parts with investigations which were carried out at the close-by rock salt mine Braunschweig-Lüneburg (Horn et al. 2016). The development of the fractures occurred during compression of clayey salt rocks. However, the results are only partly comparable due to different properties (composition, impurities) of the investigated stratigraphic units. Further investigations will focus on detailed microstructural and geochemical analyses of the fracture infill and surrounding salt rocks. Age dating of suitable minerals, e.g. polyhalite (Leitner et al

  2. Determination of natural radioactivity in rock salt and radiation doses due to its ingestion.

    PubMed

    Tahir, S N A; Alaamer, A S

    2008-06-01

    The Khewera Mines located in Pakistan contain the world's second largest reserves of rock salt. Rock salt is used in Pakistan in food recipes. It was decided to investigate the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in rock salt from the Khewera Mines. Samples of rock salt were collected from 10 different locations and analysed by gamma spectrometry. The mean activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were 790 +/- 262, 640 +/- 162 and 23 000 +/- 6000 mBq kg(-1), respectively. The mean annual effective dose due to the intake of natural radionuclides from rock salt for adults was estimated to be 0.0638 +/- 0.015 mSv, which is lower than the average annual effective dose of 0.29 mSv received per caput worldwide due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides, as reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000.

  3. Metallic sulfide deposits in Winnefield salt dome, Louisiana: evidence for episodic introduction of metalliferous brines during cap rock formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, M.R.

    1984-09-01

    Winnfield dome is a shallow piercement salt structure that penetrates Late Jurassic through early Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata of the North Louisiana basin. Quarrying operations in the calcite and anhydrite portions of the cap rock have exposed zones of metallic sulfides and barite. A roughly laminated massive sulfide lens is exposed at the calcite to anhydrite transition zone. These sulfide concentrations are believed to have originated from the interaction of metalliferous basinal brines with reduced sulfur trapped within the cap rock. Textural relationships and variations in chemical compositions between the sulfide layers in the anhydrite portion of the cap rock suggest that distinct pulses of metalliferous brines were responsible for the sulfide concentrations. Anhydrite grains outside the mineralized areas are deformed and tightly intergrown. These textures suggest that mineralizing fluids were introduced episodically along the salt and anhydrite interface at the zone of salt dissolution before that portion of the anhydrite zone was compressed and accreted to overlying anhydrite cap rock. Therefore, the earliest formed sulfides originating by this mechanism occur at the top of the anhydrite cap rock zone, whereas the last sulfides to form are found at the base. Extensive sulfide concentrations along the anhydrite-calcite contact suggest that this contact also acted as a permeable zone allowing metalliferous brines into the cap rock. Textural and compositional relationships suggest that sulfides that formed along the anhydrite-calcite contact are locally superimposed on sulfides that formed at the salt-anhydrite contact.

  4. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

    1985-07-01

    Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Magnetic and mineralogical properties of salt rocks from the Zechstein of the Northern German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Frances C.; Schmidt, Volkmar; Schramm, Michael; Mertineit, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic properties of rocks are often studied to characterize composition and fabric of rocks. For salt rocks, the basic relationships between their magnetic properties and composition, which are necessary to interpret rock magnetic data, are not yet established. Therefore, we studied different types of natural salt rock and pure salt minerals. We measured their magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility, IRM acquisition curves, FORC diagrams, temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility) and used analytical methods such as microscopy, XRD and ICP-OES to understand the relationship between magnetic properties and mineralogy. Salt rocks mainly consist of the diamagnetic minerals halite, carnallite, sylvine and anhydrite with negative magnetic susceptibilities. The magnetic susceptibilities of pure synthetic NaCl and KCl single crystals, show values of -14.5 × 10-6 SI and -13.5 × 10-6 SI, respectively. In contrast, in natural salt rocks higher magnetic susceptibility values were measured. The magnetic susceptibility of the samples investigated in this study shows a general increase from light rock salt (max. -10 × 10-6 SI) over carnallitite (max. 134 × 10-6 SI) to red sylvinite (max. 270 × 10-6 SI). Whole rock analyses suggests that increased magnetic susceptibility can be attributed to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic minerals that are contained within the insoluble residue. The magnetic susceptibility is mainly controlled by magnetite and phyllosilicates. Its measurement can therefore be used to detect subtle changes in the content of these minerals.

  6. Effect of Dihedral Angle and Porosity on Percolating-Sealing Capacity of Texturally Equilibrated Rock Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, S.; Hesse, M. A.; Prodanovic, M.; Gardner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    capillary entry pressure. This expanded knowledge of the salt textural behavior vs. depth could also improve drilling operations in salt. Second, a series of experiments in different P-T conditions was carried out to investigate the actual shape of equilibrated channels in salt. The synthetic salt samples were scanned at the High Resolution X-ray CT Facility at the Department of Geological Science, the University of Texas at Austin with resolution in 1-6 micron range. The experimental results show both equilibrated (tubular pores) and non-equilibrated (planar features) in salt structure. Image processing was carried out by two open source software programs: ImageJ, which is a public domain Java image processing program, and 3DMA-Rock, which is a software package for quantitative analyzing of the pore space in three-dimensional X-ray computed microtomographic images of rock. We obtain medial axis and medial surface of the pore space, as well as find and characterize the corresponding pore-throat network. We also report permeability of the pore space computed using Palabos software.

  7. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  8. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  9. Growth stimulation and proteomic studies of halococci from Permo-Triassic rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legat, A.; Gruber, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Viable extremely halophilic archaebacteria were isolated from Austrian Permo-Triassic rock salt and identified as Halococcus species. Growth of these isolates was greatly stimulated by addition of sea salts, Alpine rock salt and rock salt from a Permian deposit in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland (IS). One-dimensional whole cell protein patterns of strains Hcc. salifodinae and Hcc. dombrowskii were different whether cells were grown in the presence or absence of IS, which suggested influences by unknown components in the rock salt on halobacterial metabolism. Studies of the halococcal proteomes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gele electrophoresis) were begun and revealed differences in the fractions of higher and lower molecular weight components.

  10. Electronic band structure of zinc blende CdSe and rock salt PbSe semiconductors with silicene-type honeycomb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delerue, Christophe; Vanmaekelbergh, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the electronic band structure of 2D CdSe and PbSe semiconductors that have a silicene-type honeycomb geometry. Atomistic tight-binding calculations are performed on several model systems that bear a strong resemblance to the silicene-type honeycomb structures that were recently obtained by nanocrystal self-assembly. The calculated band structures are compared both to those of 2D quantum wells and graphene-type honeycomb structures. It is found that in silicene type CdSe honeycomb structures, the lowest electron conduction bands (derived from S-type nanocrystal wave functions) form a Dirac-type dispersion, very similar as in graphene. The P-type bands are usually more complex. However, when the hybridization between S- and P-type bands increases, a second Dirac cone and a genuine non-trivial flat band is observed, similar as in the case of graphene-type honeycomb structures of CdSe. There is a strong non-trivial gap between the first and second valence band, hosting the quantum spin Hall effect. Silicene-type PbSe structures show Dirac features in their bands, which however can be clouded due to the multi-valley character of PbSe.

  11. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  12. Forensic Analysis of the May 2014 West Salt Creek Rock Avalanche in Western Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, J. A.; Baum, R. L.; Allstadt, K.; Kochevar, B. F.; Schmitt, R. G.; Morgan, M. L.; White, J. L.; Stratton, B. T.; Hayashi, T. A.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rain-on-snow induced West Salt Creek rock avalanche occurred on May 25, 2014 on the northern flank of Grand Mesa. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous U.S. because of its large size (59 M m3) and high mobility (Length/Height=7.2). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) imagery as a base for our field mapping and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances <656 km) and one short-period network. We inverted broadband data to derive a time series of forces that the avalanche exerted on the earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with a landslide/debris flow that started about 10 hours before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted just over 3 minutes and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich, strike-slip bound core continued to move slowly. Following movement of the core, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls created new structures and modified topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core were likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional strength. These results indicate that the West Salt Creek avalanche, and probably other long-traveled avalanches, could be modeled as two layers: a liquefied basal layer; and a thicker and stronger overriding layer.

  13. Numerical simulation on open wellbore shrinkage and casing equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Linzhi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  14. Numerical Simulation on Open Wellbore Shrinkage and Casing Equivalent Stress in Bedded Salt Rock Stratum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength. PMID:24198726

  15. Self-Healing Characteristics of Damaged Rock Salt under Different Healing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Ren, Song; Yang, Chunhe; Jiang, Deyi; Li, Lin

    2013-08-12

    Salt deposits are commonly regarded as ideal hosts for geologic energy reservoirs. Underground cavern construction-induced damage in salt is reduced by self-healing. Thus, studying the influencing factors on such healing processes is important. This research uses ultrasonic technology to monitor the longitudinal wave velocity variations of stress-damaged rock salts during self-recovery experiments under different recovery conditions. The influences of stress-induced initial damage, temperature, humidity, and oil on the self-recovery of damaged rock salts are analyzed. The wave velocity values of the damaged rock salts increase rapidly during the first 200 h of recovery, and the values gradually increase toward stabilization after 600 h. The recovery of damaged rock salts is subjected to higher initial damage stress. Water is important in damage recovery. The increase in temperature improves damage recovery when water is abundant, but hinders recovery when water evaporates. The presence of residual hydraulic oil blocks the inter-granular role of water and restrains the recovery under triaxial compression. The results indicate that rock salt damage recovery is related to the damage degree, pore pressure, temperature, humidity, and presence of oil due to the sealing integrity of the jacket material.

  16. Self-Healing Characteristics of Damaged Rock Salt under Different Healing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Ren, Song; Yang, Chunhe; Jiang, Deyi; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Salt deposits are commonly regarded as ideal hosts for geologic energy reservoirs. Underground cavern construction-induced damage in salt is reduced by self-healing. Thus, studying the influencing factors on such healing processes is important. This research uses ultrasonic technology to monitor the longitudinal wave velocity variations of stress-damaged rock salts during self-recovery experiments under different recovery conditions. The influences of stress-induced initial damage, temperature, humidity, and oil on the self-recovery of damaged rock salts are analyzed. The wave velocity values of the damaged rock salts increase rapidly during the first 200 h of recovery, and the values gradually increase toward stabilization after 600 h. The recovery of damaged rock salts is subjected to higher initial damage stress. Water is important in damage recovery. The increase in temperature improves damage recovery when water is abundant, but hinders recovery when water evaporates. The presence of residual hydraulic oil blocks the inter-granular role of water and restrains the recovery under triaxial compression. The results indicate that rock salt damage recovery is related to the damage degree, pore pressure, temperature, humidity, and presence of oil due to the sealing integrity of the jacket material. PMID:28811444

  17. Magnetic and mineralogical properties of salt rocks from the Zechstein of the Northern German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Frances C.; Schmidt, Volkmar; Schramm, Michael; Mertineit, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic properties of rocks are often studied to characterize composition and fabric of rocks. For salt rocks, the basic relationships between their magnetic properties and composition, which are necessary to interpret rock magnetic data, are not yet established. Therefore, we studied different types of natural salt rock and pure salt minerals. We measured their magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves, first-order reversal curve diagrams and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility) and used analytical methods such as microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy to understand the relationship between magnetic properties and mineralogy. Salt rocks mainly consist of the diamagnetic minerals halite, carnallite, sylvine and anhydrite with negative magnetic susceptibilities. The magnetic susceptibilities of pure synthetic NaCl and KCl single crystals, show values of -14.5 × 10-6 and -13.5 × 10-6 SI, respectively. In contrast, in natural salt rocks higher magnetic susceptibility values were measured. The magnetic susceptibility of the samples investigated in this study shows a general increase from light rock salt (maximum -10 × 10-6 SI) over carnallitite (maximum 134 × 10-6 SI) to red sylvinite (maximum 270 × 10-6 SI). Whole rock analyses suggest that increased magnetic susceptibility can be attributed to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic minerals that are contained within the insoluble residue. The magnetic susceptibility is mainly controlled by magnetite and phyllosilicates. Its measurement can therefore be used to detect subtle changes in the content of these minerals.

  18. A New Improved Failure Criterion for Salt Rock Based on Energy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, T. S.; Liang, W. G.

    2016-05-01

    A non-linear triple shear energy yield criterion for salt rock is presented in this paper. It is the development of the triple shear energy yield criterion, of which the Mohr-Coulomb criterion can be seen as a special case. The main factors affecting the primary strength of salt rock, such as the mean stress and the Lode angle, are considered in the non-linear triple shear energy yield criterion. The non-linear new criterion provides the non-linear change trend of salt strength both in the I 1- J 2 stress space and in the deviatoric plane. Comparative study between the non-linear criterion predictions and experimental results of salt rock shows that the non-linear triple shear energy yield criterion fits quite well with both conventional triaxial test data and the true triaxial test data. For Maha Sarakham salt, the predictive capability of the non-linear triple shear energy yield criterion is clearly better than that of some other criteria used by Sriapai, such as modified Lade criterion, 3-D Hoek, and Brown criterion, Drucker-Prager criterion et al. The availability of the non-linear triple shear energy yield criterion can also be confirmed by comparative analysis between theoretical values and experimental values for non-salt rocks. So the non-linear triple shear energy yield criterion is a general failure criterion for rocks fractured by shear stress.

  19. Sulfate-dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane as a Generation Mechanism for Calcite Cap Rock in Gulf Coast Salt Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesar, K. H.; Kyle, R.; Lyons, T. W.; Loyd, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gulf Coast salt domes, specifically their calcite cap rocks, have been widely recognized for their association with significant reserves of crude oil and natural gas. However, the specific microbial reactions that facilitate the precipitation of these cap rocks are still largely unknown. Insight into the mineralization mechanism(s) can be obtained from the specific geochemical signatures recorded in these structures. Gulf Coast cap rocks contain carbonate and sulfur minerals that exhibit variable carbon (d13C) and sulfur isotope (δ34S) signatures. Calcite d13C values are isotopically depleted and show a large range of values from -1 to -52‰, reflecting a mixture of various carbon sources including a substantial methane component. These depleted carbon isotope compositions combined with the presence of abundant sulfide minerals in cap rocks have led to interpretations that invoke microbial sulfate reduction as an important carbonate mineral-yielding process in salt dome environments. Sulfur isotope data from carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS: trace sulfate incorporated within the carbonate mineral crystal lattice) provide a more direct proxy for aqueous sulfate in salt dome systems and may provide a means to directly fingerprint ancient sulfate reduction. We find CAS sulfur isotope compositions (δ34SCAS) significantly greater than those of the precursor Jurassic sulfate-salt deposits (which exhibit δ34S values of ~ +15‰). This implies that cap rock carbonate generation occurred via microbial sulfate reduction under closed-system conditions. The co-occurrence of depleted carbonate d13C values (< ~30‰) and the enriched δ34SCAS values are evidence for sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). AOM, which has been shown to yield extensive seafloor carbonate authigenesis, is also potentially partly responsible for the carbonate minerals of the Gulf Coast calcite cap rocks through concomitant production of alkalinity. Collectively, these data shed

  20. Dissolution of bedded rock salt: A seismic profile across the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member, central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, N.L.; Hopkins, J.; Martinez, A.; Knapp, R.W.; Macfarlane, P.A.; Watney, W.L.; Black, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since late Tertiary, bedded rock salt of the Permian Hutchinson Salt Member has been dissolved more-or-less continuously along its active eastern margin in central Kansas as a result of sustained contact with unconfined, undersaturated groundwater. The associated westward migration of the eastern margin has resulted in surface subsidence and the contemporaneous sedimentation of predominantly valley-filling Quarternary alluvium. In places, these alluvium deposits extend more than 25 km to the east of the present-day edge of the main body of contiguous rock salt. The margin could have receded this distance during the past several million years. From an environmental perspective, the continued leaching of the Hutchinson Salt is a major concern. This predominantly natural dissolution occurs in a broad zone across the central part of the State and adversely affects groundwater and surface-water quality as nonpoint source pollution. Significant surface subsidence occurs as well. Most of these subsidence features have formed gradually; others developed in a more catastrophic manner. The latter in particular pose real threats to roadways, railways, and buried oil and gas pipelines. In an effort to further clarify the process of natural salt dissolution in central Kansas and with the long-term goal of mitigating the adverse environmental affects of such leaching, the Kansas Geological Survey acquired a 4-km seismic profile across the eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt in the Punkin Center area of central Kansas. The interpretation of these seismic data (and supporting surficial and borehole geologic control) is consistent with several hypotheses regarding the process and mechanisms of dissolution. More specifically these data support the theses that: 1. (1) Dissolution along the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member was initiated during late Tertiary. Leaching has resulted in the steady westward migration of the eastern margin, surface subsidence, and the

  1. Experimental investigation of two-phase flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  2. The Influence of the De-Icing Salt on the Deterioration of Rock Materials Used in Monumental Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłopotowska, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Łukaszewski, Paweł

    2013-09-01

    The de-icing salt has been used for decades to increase safety on the roads and sidewalks. In Poland, mainly the sodium chloride is used in order to maintain the roads in good condition during winter. Like other salts used for surface de-icing, it depresses the freezing point to lower temperatures and has an additional thermal effect by an exothermic reaction. However, this salt causes the accumulation of chlorides in the walls and stone buildings contributing to the deterioration of these facilities. The paper addresses the issue of the influence of salt solutions on the structure and geomechanical properties of rocks at negative temperatures. The study was conducted on the basis of cyclic tests which simulate complex action of both the negative temperature and the salty environment. The conditions for the tests were chosen so as to reflect the actual conditions of the winter in Poland. During the tests, the longitudinal wave propagation velocity, changes in weights of the samples as well as visual changes were recorded which allowed continuous tracking of occurring changes. At the end of the tests, the rock samples were subjected to uniaxial compressive tests. For this purpose, four lithological types were chosen, representing the sedimentary rocks: clastic and carbonate, widely used in stone constructions.

  3. Microstructures in naturally deformed Upper Rotliegend salt rocks from Northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberg, Mareike; Hammer, Jörg; Mertineit, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Permian and Meso-/Cenozoic salt formations are represented in wide parts of the German geologic underground (Reinhold & Hammer 2016). They are of interest for cavern storage of oil and gas as well as of renewable energies (in form of compressed air or hydrogen). For industrial exploration purposes, more detailed data about the composition, barrier properties, as well as the genesis and deformation of the rocks is needed. In central Northern Germany, salt rocks from the Upper Rotliegend are implemented in diapir structures together with salt formations from the Zechstein. Rotliegend salt rocks are characterized by halite that contains patches of detrital material which account for 5 to 60 vol.% of the rock. They show a characteristic red to purple color. Drill cores containing Rotliegend halite rocks from different locations were investigated in this study by using petrographical and microstructural methods. The halite shows different fabric types: (i) euhedral to hypidiomorphic grains with grain sizes up to several millimeters, (ii) polygonal grains with smaller grain sizes between 0.1 and 3 mm, and (iii) fibrous halite. Halite grain boundaries are decorated with fluid inclusions, especially around the contact to detrital material. Subgrains in halite are abundant in all investigated samples and show average sizes between 140 µm and 217 µm. These correspond to average differential stresses of 1 MPa to 1.45 MPa (Carter et al. 1993, Schléder & Urai 2005). The detrital material consists of clasts of quartz, feldspar, mica, carbonates and metal oxides with grain sizes of clay to silt fraction. In some samples, the detrital components show internal deformation by folding and fracturing. Depending on the location, different quantities of authigenic evaporite minerals, like carbonate and anhydrite, formed. Fractures are filled with halite, anhydrite and celestine. The different types of halite fabric are an indication of locally different deformational behavior of the

  4. Influence of heat stable factors from ancient rock salt on the growth behaviour of haloarchaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Gruber, C.; Radax, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Haloarchaeal strains have been isolated repeatedly from ancient rock salt. Halococcus salifodinae BIp and Halococcus dombrowskii H4 were isolated from different rock salt samples obtained from the salt mine near Bad Ischl, Austria. Based on the geological age of the horizon the salt has been deposited during the Permian period (225 to 280 million years ago). The medium which is commonly used for the cultivation of neutrophilic haloarchaea is called M2 medium. Especially halococci grow very slowly and yield only low densities when cultured in this medium. It was presumed that these microorganisms might grow better using a culture medium with the chemical components of their natural environment. Addition of dissolved and sterile-filtered rock salt to standard M2 medium proved indeed successful. The modified medium (M2S) showed a growth stimulating effect on all tested halococcal strains. Cultures of Halococcus morrhuae DSM 1307, Halococcus salifodinae DSM 8989, Halococcus saccharolyticus DSM 5750 and Halococcus dombrowskii DSM 14522 grown in M2S medium had lower doubling times and reached a greater turbidity compared to cultures grown in M2 medium. In addition representatives of the genera Haloferax, Haloarcula, Halorubrum and Halobacterium, including Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 whose complete genome sequence is known, were cultivated on these media. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula hispanica DSM 4426 showed also an increase in growth whereas Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757 and Halorubrum saccharovorum DSM 1137 grew better when cultivated on standard M2 medium. The stimulating effect of the heat stable factors in rock salt on haloarchaea appears correlated with certain proteins that are altered or may be exclusively produced when cells were grown in presence of rock salt as well as changes in morphology and ultrastructure of cells. The establishment of optimized media for haloarchaea is important for further studies concerning insights how haloarchaea are able to

  5. The Triple Salt Sr14[Ta4N13][TaN4]O-A Nitridotantalate Oxide with 19-fold Rock Salt Superstructure.

    PubMed

    Wörsching, Matthias; Daiger, Martin; Hoch, Constantin

    2017-03-06

    A new structure motif in nitridometalate chemistry is the tetracatena-nitridotantalate anion [Ta4N13](19-). It occurs in the crystal structure of the triple salt Sr14[Ta4N13][TaN4]O (monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 15.062(2) Å, b = 7.2484(6) Å, c = 24.266(3) Å, and β = 97.280(10)(o)) together with ortho-tantalate and isolated oxide anions. Synthesis followed a new approach with employment of Sr surplus and reductive conditions aimed at the preparation of subvalent compounds. The new structure type was established on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and also Rietveld refinement. It is a complex superstructure of the rock salt structure type with Ta and Sr atoms forming the face-centered cubic packing and N and O atoms occupying 18/19 of the octahedral voids. We discuss structure and stability of the triple salt with respect to other known nitridometalates and the use of this triple salt for preparative access toward new metal-rich compounds in this field.

  6. Three dimensional finite element simulations of room and pillar mines in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1996-05-01

    3-D quasistatic finite element codes are being used at Sandia to simulate large room and pillar mines in rock salt. The two examples presented in this paper are of mines supported by US DOE, under the auspices of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve program. One of the mines is presently used as an oil storage facility. These simulations, validated by field measurements and observations, have provided valuable insight into the failure mechanisms of room and pillar mines in rock salt. The calculations provided the basis for further investigation and the ultimate decision to decommission the DOE oil storage facility.

  7. Halophilic archaea cultivated from surface sterilized middle-late eocene rock salt are polyploid.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Salla T; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38-41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11-14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6-8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment.

  8. Ultrasonic wave velocities, gas permeability and porosity in natural and granular rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; Kern, H.

    Gas-permeability and P- and S-wave velocities were measured simultaneously as a function of pressure in core samples of rock salt from the Gorleben borehole Go 1002. In addition, compaction experiments were carried out on granular salt in order to establish velocity-porosity systematics. The initial permeabilities of the Gorleben rock salt vary between 10 -16 and 2∗10 -20 m 2 and are found to be controlled by the grain size of the halite matrix minerals and the amount and distribution of “impurities” (anhydrite, polyhalite) on grain boundaries. Increase of effective pressure to 30 MPa gives rise to a marked decrease of permeability and a significant increase of P- and S-wave velocities due to the closure of grain boundary cracks. Our results are in agreement with literature data reported for in situ permeability and acoustic properties of single crystals, respectively. Compaction of granular rock salt gives rise to a reduction of porosity from about 40% to 2% exhibiting linear relationships between porosity and P- and S-wave velocities for porosities <25%. The combined measurements of gas permeability and ultrasonic wave velocities are found to provide powerful tools for the investigation of dilatancy in rock salt.

  9. Halophilic Archaea Cultivated from Surface Sterilized Middle-Late Eocene Rock Salt Are Polyploid

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Salla T.; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H.; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38–41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11–14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6–8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment. PMID:25338080

  10. Tests of US rock salt for long-term stability of CAES reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gehle, R.M.; Thoms, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report on laboratory tests to assess the effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) on rock salt within the US. The project included a conventional laboratory test phase, with triaxial test machines, and a bench-scale test phase performed in salt mines in southern Louisiana. Limited numerical modeling also was performed to serve as a guide in selecting test layouts and for interpreting test data.

  11. Radiation defects and energy storage in natural polycrystalline rock salt. Results of an in-situ test in the Permian rock salt of the Asse

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, H.; Rothfuchs, T.; Celma, A.G.; Haas, J.B.M. de; Pederson, L.

    1994-12-31

    Radiation damage development and the corresponding energy storage in pure undeformed single crystals have frequently been studied in laboratory experiments, however little is known of irradiation experiments on natural rock salt (polycrystalline, deformed and impure) under geological conditions. The relevance of these parameters to the defect formation was revealed by a joint United States/Federal Republic of Germany in-situ test in the Asse Mine. Natural rock salt was heated and irradiated using Co-60 sources. Calculations of the amount of halite expected to be decomposed by radiolysis during the experiment were performed using the 1985 version of the Jain-Lidiard model. Qualitative agreement between theory and analyses was found for all the performed analyses. Quantitative and qualitative deviations of the natural samples behaviour from that of single undeformed crystals were observed and attributed to the influence of sulfatic admixtures, polycrystallinity and strain on radiation damage development and anneal. Special chemical methods, such as iodometric titration and uv-visible spectroscopy were applied in order to measure the hypochlorite ion, which forms in irradiated salt. Composite samples located closet to the Co-60 source averaged 0,4 micromoles neutral chlorine atoms per gram salt, a factor of two more than from other positions. Uv-vis analyses revealed more than a factor of ten greater neutral chlorine concentrations in coloured halite. Similarly, optical absorption measurements indicated a factor of ten difference in sodium metal colloid concentrations.

  12. Estimating Rheological Parameters of Anhydrite from Folded Evaporite sequences: Implications for Internal Dynamics of Salt Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Urai, Janos L.; Raith, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Salt structures have been identified as a potential target for hydrocarbon, CO2, or radioactive waste storage. The most suitable locations for magazines are considered in the thick and relatively homogeneous rock salt layers. However, salt structures often consist of the evaporite sequence including rock salt intercalated with other rock types e.g.: anhydrite, gypsum, potassium and magnesium salt, calcite, dolomite, or shale. The presence of such heterogeneities causes a serious disturbance in the structure management. Detailed analysis of the internal architecture and internal dynamics of the salt structure are crucial for evaluating them as suitable repositories and also their long-term stability. The goal of this study is to analyse the influence of the presence of anhydrite layers on the internal dynamics of salt structures. Anhydrite is a common rock in evaporite sequences. Its physical and mechanical properties strongly differ from the properties of rock salt. The density of anhydrite is much higher than the density of salt, thus anhydrite is likely to sink in salt causing the disturbance of the surrounding structures. This suggestion was the starting point to the discussion about the long-term stability of the magazines in salt structures [1]. However, the other important parameter that has to be taken into account is the viscosity of anhydrite. The high viscosity ratio between salt and anhydrite can restrain the layer from sinking. The rheological behaviour of anhydrite has been studied in laboratory experiments [2], but the results only provide information about the short-term behaviour. The long-term behaviour can be best predicted using indirect methods e.g. based on the analysis of natural structures that developed over geological time scale. One of the most promising are fold structures, the shape of which is very sensitive to the rheological parameters of the deforming materials. Folds can develop in mechanically stratified materials during layer

  13. Layered-to-Rock-Salt Transformation in Desodiated NaxCrO2 (x 0.4)

    DOE PAGES

    Bo, Shou-Hang; Li, Xin; Toumar, Alexandra J.; ...

    2016-02-01

    O3 layered sodium transition metal oxides (i.e., NaMO2, M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) are a promising class of cathode materials for Na-ion battery applications. These materials, however, all suffer from severe capacity decay when the extraction of Na exceeds certain capacity limits. Understanding the causes of this capacity decay is critical to unlocking the potential of these materials for battery applications. In this work, we investigate the structural origins of capacity decay for one of the compounds in this class, NaCrO2. The (de)sodiation processes of NaCrO2 were studied both in situ and ex situ through X-raymore » and electron diffraction measurements. We demonstrate that NaxCrO2 (0 < x < 1) remains in the layered structural framework without Cr migration up to a composition of Na0.4CrO2. Further removal of Na beyond this composition triggers a layered-to-rock-salt transformation, which converts P'3-Na0.4CrO2 into the rock-salt CrO2 phase. This structural transformation proceeds via the formation of an intermediate O3 NaδCrO2 phase that contains Cr in both Na and Cr slabs and shares very similar lattice dimensions with those of rock-salt CrO2. It is intriguing to note that intercalation of alkaline ions (i.e., Na+ and Li+ ) into the rock-salt CrO2 and O3 NaδCrO 2 structures is actually possible, albeit in a limited amount (~0.2 per formula unit). When these results were analyzed under the context of electrochemistry data, it was apparent that preventing the layered-to-rock-salt transformation is crucial to improve the cyclability of NaCrO2. Possible strategies for mitigating this detrimental phase transition are proposed.« less

  14. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  15. Evolution of salt-related structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Several types of structures (piercements, turtles, and nonpiercements) are caused by salt movement. Reconstructions show that the emplacement process is basically the same for many geometrically dissimilar structures, but that the great differences of shape originated from different patterns of sediment loading, salt thickness, and basin evolution. The reconstructions are generalizations derived from numerous real examples to show timing, evolution of dip, origin of thickness changes and overchanges, how the salt-sediment volume exchange occurs, and diagnostic criteria to interpret these events. Such reconstructions help to discriminate between turtles and nonpiercements, to interpret lithofacies, and to unravel the role of sedimentary events on the structural evolution. In addition, they illustrate the mechanism of diapirism, using criteria to help distinguish diapirism in an overburden having strength (the mechanism assumed here) from diapirism in a viscous overburden (the classical buoyancy theory). In general, many piercements may start quite early (even before a density inversion exists) and move primarily by extrusion or may alternate between extrusion and intrusion beneath a thin overburden. The pattern of sedimentation largely determines the pattern of diapirism. In contrast, nonpiercements and turtle structures are passive features and may form whenever salt migrates away from them to an adjacent ''escape hatch.'' For example, nonpiercements may not form by salt rising vertically, but rather by salt moving away horizontally to some point of escape. In other words, the dome remains static while the overburden collapses into the rim syncline.

  16. Probabilistic Analysis of a Rock Salt Cavern with Application to Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; Miro, Shorash; König, Diethard; Schanz, Tom

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the failure probability of storing renewable energy in the form of hydrogen or compressed air in rock salt caverns. The validation of the short- and long-term integrity and stability of rock salt cavern is a prerequisite in their design process. The present paper provides a reliability-based analysis of a typical renewable energy storage cavern in rock salt. An elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is implemented into a numerical model of rock salt cavern to assess its behavior under different operation conditions. Sensitivity measures of different variables involved in the mechanical response of cavern are computed by elementary effect global sensitivity method. Subset simulation methodology is conducted to measure the failure probability of the system with a low computational cost. This methodology is further validated by a comparison with a Monte Carlo-based probabilistic analysis. The propagation of parameter uncertainties and the failure probability against different failure criteria are evaluated by utilizing a Monte Carlo-based analysis. In this stage, the original finite element model is substituted by a surrogate model to further reduce the computational effort. Finally, a reliability analysis approach is employed to obtain the minimum admissible internal pressure in a cavern.

  17. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Govers, R.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically on the role of creep of rock salt caprocks in response to production-induced differential stresses. We start by discussing available rock salt creep flow laws. We then present the subsidence evolution above an axisymmetric finite element representation of a generic reservoir that extends over a few kilometers and explore the effects of rock salt flow law choice on the subsidence response. We find that if rock salt creep is linear, as appropriate for steady state flow by pressure solution, the subsidence response to any pressure reduction history contains two distinct components, one that leads to the subsidence bowl becoming narrower and deeper and one that leads to subsidence rebound and becomes dominant at later stages. This subsidence rebound becomes inhibited if rock salt deforms purely through steady state power law creep at low stresses. We also show that an approximate representation of transient creep leads to relatively small differences in subsidence predictions. Most importantly, the results confirm that rock salt flow must be modeled accurately if good subsidence predictions are required. However, in practice, large uncertainties exist in the creep behavior of rock salt, especially at low stresses. These are a consequence of the spatial variability of rock salt physical properties, which is practically impossible to constrain. A conclusion therefore is that modelers can only resort to calculating bounds for the subsidence evolution above producing rock salt-capped reservoirs.

  18. Microfabrics and deformation mechanisms of rheologically stratified salt rocks: Constraints from EBSD-analyses of anhydrite and halite of Upper Permian salt rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertineit, Michael; Schramm, Michael; Hammer, Jörg; Zulauf, Gernold; Thiemeyer, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Salt rocks of the Leine Unit (z3), Upper Permian German Zechstein, are characterized by locally changing amounts of anhydrite. The interbeds of the more competent anhydrite layers may be affected by folding or boudinage. The present study is focusing on the texture of deformed halite and anhydrite. The samples for EBSD studies were collected from Anhydritmittelsalz (z3AM) of the Morsleben salt mine, which is affected by folding and boudinage of anhydrite in rock-salt matrix due to diapiric emplacement and subsequent horizontal shortening (Behlau & Mingerzahn 2001). Anhydrite is characterized by small grain size (≤ 50 µm) and high amounts of opaque and less soluble components (magnesite, quartz, phyllosilicates). Small fractures are filled with halite. For EBSD, line scans were performed with a step size of 50 µm. The results do not show any crystallographic preferred orientation of anhydrite. The grain size of halite ranges from 1-3 mm, grain boundaries are lobate and decorated with both fluid inclusions and small anhydrite crystals. Halite subgrains have a size of 70-90 µm. For EBSD analyses, map scans were performed with different size and step size, dependent on the magnification. The misorientation angles between single subgrains are very low (1°-2°), only subordinate misorientation angles of 5°-7° occur. Bending of some halite crystals is documented by misorientation angles of max. 3° within a single grain. The misorientation index M (Skemer et al. 2005) for whole rock analyses yielded values < 0.09, which represents a random misorientation distribution in halite rocks. The small grain size of anhydrite, the lack of a preferred orientation and the development of opaque seams suggest solution-precipitation creep is the most important deformation mechanism in fine grained anhydrite rocks. Brittle deformation is documented by subsequent developed fractures, which are filled with halite. For halite, subgrain formation and solution-precipitation creep are

  19. Evolution of rheologically heterogeneous salt structures: a case study from the northeast of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, A. F.; Strozyk, F.; Visser, J.; Urai, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    At the first order salt structures are controlled by the low flow strength of evaporites and by the tectonic boundary conditions. Rheological contrasts within an evaporite body have an important effect on the evolution of the internal structure of salt, but how this mechanical layering affects salt deformation at different scales is not well known. The potassium-magnesium salts (K-Mg salts) carnallite and bischofite are prime examples of layers with much lower effective viscosity than rock salt: their low viscosity presents serious drilling hazards but also allows squeeze solution mining. In contrast, anhydrite and carbonate layers (stringers) in salt are much stronger than halite. In this study, we used high-resolution 3-D seismic and well data to study the evolution of the Veendam and Slochteren salt pillows at the southern boundary of the Groningen High, northern Netherlands. Here the rock salt layers contain both the mechanically stronger Zechstein III Anhydrite-Carbonate stringer and the weaker K-Mg salts, providing an example of extreme rheological heterogeneities in salt structures. The internal structure of the two salt pillows shows areas in which the K-Mg salt-rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, in combination with a complexly ruptured and folded ZIII Anhydrite-Carbonate stringer. Thickness maps of supra-salt sediments and well data are used to infer the initial depositional architecture of the K-Mg salts and their deformation history. Results suggest that active faulting and the resulting depressions of the Zechstein surface above a Rotliegend graben caused the local accumulation of bittern brines and precipitation of the thick K-Mg salts. During the first phase of salt flow and withdrawal from the Veendam area, under differential loading by Buntsandstein sediments, the ZIII stringer was boudinaged while the lens of Mg salts remained relatively undeformed. This was followed by a convergence stage, when the K-Mg salt-rich layers were

  20. Mechanical Behavior and Microcrack Development in Nominally Dry Synthetic Salt-rock During Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.; Zhu, C.; Shen, X.; Arson, C. F.

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic salt-rock is produced through uniaxial consolidation of sieved granular salt (0.3-0.355 mm grain diam.) at 75-107 MPa pressure and 100-200 0 C for 15 min duration, to produce low porosity (3%-6%) aggregates. Based on microstructural observations, consolidation mechanisms are grain rearrangement, intragranular plastic flow, and minor microfracture and recrystallization. Following consolidation, the salt-rock is deformed by cyclic, triaxial loading at room temperature and 4 MPa confining pressure to investigate microfracture development, closure and healing effects on elastic properties and flow strength. Load cycles are performed within the elastic regime, up to yielding, and during steady ductile flow. The mechanical properties are determined using an internal load cell and strain gages bonded to the samples. Elastic properties vary systematically during deformation reflecting cracking and pore and grain shape changes. Between triaxial load cycles, samples are held at isostatic loads for durations up to one day to determine healing rates and strength recovery; a change in mechanical behavior is observed when significant healing is induced. The microstructures of all samples are characterized before and after cyclic loading using optical microscopy. The consolidation and cyclic triaxial tests, and optical microscopy investigations, are conducted in a controlled low-humidity environment to ensure nominally dry conditions. The microstructures of samples from different stages of cyclic triaxial deformation indicate that intracrystalline plasticity, accompanied by minor recovery by recrystallization, is dominant; but, grain-boundary crack opening also becomes significant. Grain-boundary microcracks have preferred orientations that are sub-parallel to the load axis. The stress-strain behavior correlates with microcrack fabrics and densities during cyclic loading. These experiments are used to both inform and test continuum damage mechanics models of salt-rock

  1. Sphalerite-rock salt phase transition in ZnMnSe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinov, D.; Gerthsen, D.; Rosenauer, A.; Daniel, B.; Hetterich, M.

    2004-08-02

    We report on the investigation of epitaxial MnSe layers grown on ZnSe by transmission electron microscopy. MnSe/ZnSe superlattices (SLs) with different nominal MnSe thicknesses t{sub MnSe} between 2 and 20 monolayers (MLs) were investigated, which were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) substrates. Composition profiles of the SLs were evaluated by the measurement of local (002) lattice parameters in growth direction. A MnSe deposition between 2 and 4 MLs on ZnSe leads to the formation of intermixed Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Se layers with sphalerite structure and a Mn concentration x increasing from 50% to 90%. For MnSe layers with a thickness between 6 and 20 ML, we observe 5-10 nm small MnSe inclusions with a rock salt structure embedded in sphalerite Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Se with approximately 90%Mn.

  2. A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

  3. Micromechanics and homogenization techniques for analyzing the continuum damage of rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, K.L.; Hurtado, L.D.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a model for evaluating microcrack development and dilatant behavior of crystalline rocks. The model is developed within the concepts of continuum mechanics, with special emphasis on the development of internal boundaries in the continuum by utilizing fracture mechanics based cohesive zone models. The model is capable of describing the evolution from initial debonding through complete separation and subsequent void growth of an interface. An example problem of a rock salt specimen subjected to a high deviatoric load and low confinement is presented that predicts preferential opening of fractures oriented parallel with the maximum compressive stress axis.

  4. Rock-salt-type crystal of thermally contracted C60 with encapsulated lithium cation.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Sado, Yuki; Nishibori, Eiji; Sawa, Hiroshi; Okada, Hiroshi; Tobita, Hiromi; Kasama, Yasuhiko; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2012-04-02

    Rock solid: fullerene-encapsulated Li(+) (Li(+)@C(60)) is an alkaline cation owing to the spherical shape and positive charge. Li(+)@C(60) crystallizes as a rock-salt-type crystal in the presence of PF(6)(-). The orientations of C(60) and PF(6)(-) (orange) are perfectly ordered below 370 K, and Li(+) (purple) hops within the cage. At temperatures below 100 K two Li(+) units are localized at two polar positions within each C(60) . Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Pure water injection into porous rock with superheated steam and salt in a solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montegrossi, G.; Tsypkin, G.; Calore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Most of geothermal fields require injection of fluid into the hot rock to maintain pressure and productivity. The presence of solid salt in porous space may cause an unexpected change in the characteristics of the reservoir and produced fluids, and dramatically affect the profitability of the project. We consider an injection problem of pure water into high temperature geothermal reservoir, saturated with superheated vapour and solid salt. Pure water moves away from injection point and dissolves solid salt. When salty water reaches the low-pressure hot domain, water evaporation occurs and, consequently, salt precipitates. We develop a simplified analytical model of the process and derive the similarity solutions for a 1-D semi-infinite reservoir. These solutions are multi-valued and describe the reduction in permeability and porosity due to salt precipitation at the leading boiling front. If the parameters of the system exceed critical values, then similarity solution ceases to exist. We identify this mathematical behaviour with reservoir sealing in the physical system. The TOUGH2-EWASG code has been used to verify this hypothesis and investigate the precipitate formation for an idealized bounded 1-D geothermal system of a length of 500 m with water injection at one extreme and fluid extraction at the other one. Both boundaries are kept at constant pressure and temperature. The result for the semi-infinite numerical model show that the monotonic grow of the solid salt saturation to reach asymptotic similarity solution generally occurs over a very large length starting from the injection point. Reservoir sealing occurs if solid salt at the initial state occupies a considerable part of the porous space. Numerical experiments for the bounded 500 m system demonstrate that a small amount of salt is enough to get reservoir sealing. Generally, salt tend to accumulate near the production well, and salt plug forms at the elements adjacent to the extraction point. This type

  6. Trace elements in rock salt and their bioavailability estimated from solubility in acid.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg; Sterba, Johannes H; Poljanc, Karin; Bichler, Max; Buchtela, Karl

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 18 partly commercially available samples of rock salt from Austria, Germany, Pakistan, Poland, Switzerland, and Ukraine were investigated with respect to their content of trace elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Elements detected were Al, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, and Zn, some of them only in individual cases. An estimation of the bioavailability of these trace elements was performed by dissolving an equivalent of the sodium chloride samples in diluted hydrochloric acid (simulating stomach acid), filtering off the insoluble components, and analyzing the evaporated filtrate. It could be shown that in most cases bioactive trace elements like Fe can be found in rock salt in the form of almost insoluble compounds and are therefore not significantly bioavailable, whereas thorium, for example, was partly bioavailable in two cases. A significant contribution to the recommended daily intake of metal trace elements by using rock salt for nutrition can be excluded.

  7. Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Roger A.; Buschman, Nancy

    2012-07-01

    A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years

  8. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  9. Lead, zinc, and strontium in limestone cap rock from Tatum salt dome, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    Limestone cap rock at Tatum salt dome, Mississippi, contains disseminated pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, and disseminated to massive amounts of strontianite (SrCO/sub 3/) and celestite (SrSO/sub 4/). Sulfide minerals are locally present in bitumen-rich areas of the upper, massive portion of the limestone cap rock, whereas strontium minerals are disseminated throughout this zone. However, sulfide and strontium minerals are most abundant in the lower banded portion of the limestone cap rock, which consists of alternating subhorizontal light and dark-colored bands. The dark bands are composed of calcite of variable grain size, sulfides, quartz, dolomite, albite, and up to 1% bitumen that apparently formed by the biodegradation of crude oil. Lighter bands are composed of variable amounts of coarsely crystalline, euhedral calcite, strontianite, and celestite resulting in strontium (Sr) contents of up to 30% locally. Banded limestone cap rock at Tatum dome formed at the top of the actively dissolving anhydrite zone by a combination of sulfate reduction and oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons by bacteria to cause the precipitation of calcite and sulfide minerals and the accumulation of insoluble residue from the anhydrite (quartz, albite, dolomite). Lead and zinc in the sulfide minerals could have been derived from the dissolving anhydrite, but the abundance of Sr minerals present requires an external source. Present-day oil field brines in central Mississippi contain up to 3000 ppm Sr, and basin brines of similar composition apparently contributed Sr to the cap-rock environment during formation.

  10. Early evolution of salt structures in north Louisiana salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lobao, J.J.; Pilger, R.H. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Several salt diapirs and pillows in southern and central north Louisiana have been studied using approximately 355 mi (570 km) of seismic reflection data and information from 57 deep well holes. Using seismic profiles with deep well-hole data is the most advantageous method to document regional salt tectonism through time. The following conclusions were reached on diapirism in the North Louisiana Salt basin. (1) The diapiric event began early (early Coahuilan) in the southern and central part of the basin, and later (late Coahuilan to Comanchean) in the northern part. (2) The initial diapiric event is much more abrupt and intense in the southern and central diapirs when compared with the later diapiric event in the northern diapirs. (3) Regional depocenter shifting, relative sea level, local erosion with salt extrusion, and rapid depositional loading of sediments are the major controls on diapirism in the basin.

  11. Creep Behaviour of Bischofite, Carnallite and Mixed Bischofite-Carnallite Salt Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bresser, J. H. P.; Muhammad, N.; Spiers, C. J.; Peach, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Some salt deposits contain the valuable magnesium and potassium salts bischofite and carnallite, as well as halite, in the form of pure and mixed layers. During extraction of such salts from the subsurface by solution mining, the material in the undissolved walls will flow into the caverns. In order to accurately predict the flow of wall rock material, feasible production rates and related subsidence, a good understanding of the creep behaviour of bischofite, carnallite and mixed salt rocks under in situ conditions is required. We have conducted conventional triaxial compression tests on polycrystalline bischofite, carnallite and mixed bischofite-carnallite-halite rock samples machined from natural cores. The experiments were carried out at true in situ P-T conditions of 70°C and 40 MPa confining pressure. All experiments consisted of strain rate stepping runs, applying strain rates in the range 10-5 to 10-8 s-1, reaching 2-4% axial strain per step, with individual steps being followed by stress relaxation down to strain rates ~10-9 s-1. Both bischofite and carnallite reached near steady state creep behaviour within each constant strain rate step. Carnallite was found to be 4-5 times stronger than bischofite. For bischofite as well as carnallite, we observed that during stress relaxation, the conventional power law stress exponent n changed from ~5 at 10-5 to ~1 at 10-9 s-1. The absolute strength of both materials remained higher if the relaxation started at a higher stress, i.e. at a faster rate. We interpret this as indicating a difference in microstructure at the initiation of the relaxation, notably a smaller grain size related to dynamical recrystallization during the constant strain rate step. The data thus suggest that there is gradual change in mechanism with decreasing strain rate, from grain size insensitive dislocation creep to grain size sensitive (pressure solution) creep. The mixed bischofite-carnallite-halite salt rock did not approach steady state

  12. Ln-Co-based rock-salt-type porous coordination polymers: vapor response controlled by changing the lanthanide ion.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yui; Ohba, Tadashi; Noro, Shin-ichiro; Chang, Ho-Chol; Kato, Masako

    2011-03-21

    We synthesized new porous coordination polymers (PCPs) {Ln(III)[Co(III)(dcbpy)(3)]·nH(2)O} (Ln = La(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+); H(2)dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine) and characterized them by X-ray diffraction and vapor-adsorption measurements. These three Ln-Co-based PCPs have similar rock-salt types and highly symmetrical porous structure and show a reversible structural collapse-regeneration accompanied by water-vapor desorption-adsorption. Similar structural regeneration was also observed for the Gd-Co PCP upon exposure to MeOH and CH(3)CN vapors, whereas the remaining two PCPs barely responded to organic vapors.

  13. Emergent nanoscale fluctuations in high rock-salt PbTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinge, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Lead Telluride is one of the most promising thermoelectric materials in the temperature range just above room temperature. It is a narrow band gap semiconductor with a high Seebeck coefficient and a low thermal conductivity. It is structurally much simpler than many other leading candidates for high performance thermoelectrics being a binary rock-salt, isostructural to NaCl. The thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, can be markedly improved by alloying with various other elements by forming quenched nanostructures. The undoped endmember, PbTe, does not have any such quenched nanostructure, yet has a rather low intrinsic thermal conductivity. There are also a number of interesting and non-canonical behaviors that it exhibits, such as an increasing measured band-gap with increasing temperature, exactly opposite to what is normally seen due to Fermi smearing of the band edge, and an unexpected non-monotonicity of the band gap in the series PbTe - PbSe - PbS. The material is on the surface simple, but hides some interesting complexity. We have investigated in detail the PbTe endmember using x-ray and neutron diffraction and neutron inelastic scattering. To our surprise, using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron powder diffraction data we found that an interesting and non-trivial local structure that appears on warming. with the Pb atoms moving off the high-symmetry rock-salt positions towards neighboring Te ions. No evidence for the off-centering of the Pb atoms is seen at low temperature. The crossover from the locally undistorted to the locally distorted state occurs on warming between 100 K and 250 K. This unexpected emergence of local symmetry broken distortions from an undistorted ground-state we have called emphanisis, from the Greek for appearing from nothing. We have also investigated the lattice dynamics of the system to search for a dynamical signature of this behavior and extended the studies to doped systems and I will also

  14. Evolution of rheologically heterogeneous salt structures: a case study from the NE Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, A. F.; Strozyk, F.; Visser, J.; Urai, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of salt structures is controlled by the low flow strength of evaporites and by the tectonic boundary conditions. The potassium-magnesium salts (K-Mg salts) carnallite and bischofite are prime examples of layers with much lower effective viscosity than halite: their low viscosity presents serious drilling hazards but also allows squeeze solution mining. In contrast, intrasalt anhydrite and carbonate layers (stringers) are much stronger than halite. These rheological contrasts within an evaporite body have an important control on the evolution of the internal structure of salt, but how this mechanical layering affects salt deformation at different scales is not well known. In this study, we use high-resolution 3-D seismic and well data to study the evolution of the Veendam and Slochteren salt pillows at the southern boundary of the Groningen High, northern Netherlands. Here the rock salt layers contain both the mechanically stronger Zechstein III Anhydrite-Carbonate stringer and the weaker K-Mg salts, thus we are able to assess the role of extreme rheological heterogeneities on salt structure growth. The internal structure of the two salt pillows shows areas in which the K-Mg salt-rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, in combination with a complexly ruptured and folded ZIII Anhydrite-Carbonate stringer. Thickness maps of supra-salt sediments and well data are used to infer the initial depositional architecture of the K-Mg salts and their deformation history. Results suggest that faulting and the generation of depressions on the top Zechstein surface above a Rotliegend graben caused the local accumulation of bittern brines and precipitation of thick K-Mg salts. During the first phase of salt flow and withdrawal from the Veendam area, under the influence of differential loading by Buntsandstein sediments, the ZIII stringer was boudinaged while the lens of Mg salts remained relatively undeformed. This was followed by a convergence stage, when the

  15. Accelerator Measurments of the Askaryan Effect in Rock Salt: A Roadmap Toward Teraton Underground Neutrino Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.

    2004-12-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of cubic km of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt-dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  16. Cyclic Loading Effects on the Creep and Dilation of Salt Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lance A.; Buchholz, Stuart A.; Mellegard, Kirby D.; Düsterloh, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    The Solution Mining Research Institute (SMRI) has embarked on inquiries into the effect cyclic loading might have on salt. This interest stems from the concept of using salt caverns as a storage medium for renewable energy projects such as compressed air energy storage where daily pressure cycles in the cavern are conceivable as opposed to the seasonal cycles that are typical for natural gas storage projects. RESPEC and the Institut für Aufbereitung und Deponietechnik at Clausthal University of Technology jointly executed a rock mechanics laboratory study using both facilities for performing triaxial cyclic loading creep tests on rock salt recovered from the Avery Island Mine in Louisiana, USA. The cyclic triaxial creep tests were performed under various load paths including compression, extension, and compression/extension. The tests were performed under both dilative and nondilative stress regimes. The cyclic compression creep data were compared to static creep tests performed under similar conditions to assess the effect of cycling of the applied stress. Furthermore, the cyclic compression tests were compared to a numerically simulated static creep test at the same stress and temperature conditions to determine if the creep behavior was similar under cyclic loading.

  17. Accelerator measurements of the Askaryan effect in rock salt: A roadmap toward teraton underground neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Guillian, E.; Milincic, R.; Miocinovic, P.; Saltzberg, D.; Williams, D.; Field, R.C.; Walz, D.

    2005-07-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large-scale ultra-high-energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of km{sup 3} of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over 2 orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed a detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  18. Steady-State Creep of Rock Salt: Improved Approaches for Lab Determination and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, R.-M.; Salzer, K.; Popp, T.; Lüdeling, C.

    2015-11-01

    Actual problems in geotechnical design, e.g., of underground openings for radioactive waste repositories or high-pressure gas storages, require sophisticated constitutive models and consistent parameters for rock salt that facilitate reliable prognosis of stress-dependent deformation and associated damage. Predictions have to comprise the active mining phase with open excavations as well as the long-term development of the backfilled mine or repository. While convergence-induced damage occurs mostly in the vicinity of openings, the long-term behaviour of the backfilled system is dominated by the damage-free steady-state creep. However, because in experiments the time necessary to reach truly stationary creep rates can range from few days to years, depending mainly on temperature and stress, an innovative but simple creep testing approach is suggested to obtain more reliable results: A series of multi-step tests with loading and unloading cycles allows a more reliable estimate of stationary creep rate in a reasonable time. For modelling, we use the advanced strain-hardening approach of Günther-Salzer, which comprehensively describes all relevant deformation properties of rock salt such as creep and damage-induced rock failure within the scope of an unified creep ansatz. The capability of the combination of improved creep testing procedures and accompanied modelling is demonstrated by recalculating multi-step creep tests at different loading and temperature conditions. Thus reliable extrapolations relevant to in-situ creep rates (10^{-9} to 10^{-13} s^{-1}) become possible.

  19. Map data and Unmanned Aircraft System imagery from the May 25, 2014 West Salt Creek rock avalanche in western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Rex L.; Allstadt, Kate; Kochevar, Bernard; Schmitt, Robert G.; Morgan, Matthew L.; White, Jonathan L.; Stratton, Benjamin T.; Hayashi, Timothy A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    On May 25, 2014, a rain-on-snow induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek Valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado. The avalanche traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing 3 people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous U.S. because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and long travel distance. To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we mapped landslide structures, geology, and ponds at 1:1000-scale. We used high-resolution, Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) imagery from July 2014 as a base for our field mapping. Here we present the map data and UAS imagery. The data accompany an interpretive paper published in the journal Geosphere. The full citation for this interpretive journal paper is: Coe, J.A., Baum, R.L., Allstadt, K.E., Kochevar, B.F., Schmitt, R.G., Morgan, M.L., White, J.L., Stratton, B.T., Hayashi, T.A., and Kean, J.W., 2016, Rock avalanche dynamics revealed by large-scale field mapping and seismic signals at a highly mobile avalanche in the West Salt Creek Valley, western Colorado: Geosphere, v. 12, no. 2, p. 607-631,  doi:10.1130/GES01265.1. 

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of Li3Mg2OsO6, a geometrically frustrated osmium(V) oxide with an ordered rock salt structure: comparison with isostructural Li3Mg2RuO6.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong-Hieu T; Ramezanipour, Farshid; Greedan, John E; Cranswick, Lachlan M D; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2012-11-05

    The novel osmium-based oxide Li(3)Mg(2)OsO(6) was synthesized in polycrystalline form by reducing Li(5)OsO(6) by osmium metal and osmium(IV) oxide in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of magnesium oxide. The crystal structure was refined using powder X-ray diffraction data in the orthorhombic Fddd space group with a = 5.88982(5) Å, b = 8.46873(6) Å, and c = 17.6825(2) Å. This compound is isostructural and isoelectronic with the ruthenium-based system Li(3)Mg(2)RuO(6). The magnetic ion sublattice Os(5+) (S = 3/2) consists of chains of interconnected corner- and edge-shared triangles, which brings about the potential for geometric magnetic frustration. The Curie-Weiss law holds over the range 80-300 K with C = 1.42(3) emu·K/mol [μ(eff) = 3.37(2) μ(B)] and θ(C) = -105.8(2) K. Below 80 K, there are three anomalies at 75, 30, and 8 K. Those at 75 and 30 K are suggestive of short-range antiferromagnetic correlations, while that at 8 K is a somewhat sharper maximum showing a zero-field-cooled/field-cooled divergence suggestive of perhaps spin freezing. The absence of magnetic Bragg peaks at 3.9 K in the neutron diffraction pattern supports this characterization, as does the absence of a sharp peak in the heat capacity, which instead shows only a very broad maximum at ∼12 K. A frustration index of f = 106/8 = 13 indicates a high degree of frustration. The magnetic properties of the osmium phase differ markedly from those of the isostructural ruthenium material, which shows long-range antiferromagnetic order below 17 K, f = 6, and no unusual features at higher temperatures. Estimates of the magnetic exchange interactions at the level of spin-dimer analysis for both the ruthenium and osmium materials support a more frustrated picture for the latter. Errors in the calculation and assignment of the exchange pathways in the previous report on Li(3)Mg(2)RuO(6) are identified and corrected.

  1. [Clinical effect of rock salt aerosol therapy in treatment of occupational allergic contact dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Sun, M L; Song, L; Yang, H M; Shi, D M; Bi, Y L

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the clinical effect and safety of rock salt aerosol therapy in the treatment of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Methods: A total of 65 patients with acute exacerbation of occupational allergic contact dermatitis who were treated in the Outpatient Service and Inpatient Department of our hospital from March 2013 to December 2015 were enrolled and randomly divided into observation group and control group using a random number table. Both groups were givensymptomatic treatment including desensitization, and the patients in the observation group were given rock salt aerosol therapy for 2 courses in addition to the symptomatic treatment. The changes in symptoms, signs, blood eosinophil count, and IgE were observed. Results: There were significant changes in symptom score at the first and second courses of the treatment (P<0.05) , and there was an interaction between time of therapy and grouping (P<0.05) . There was no significant difference in symptom score before treatment between the two groups (P>0.05) , while there were differences at the first and second courses of the treatment (P<0.05) . After the second course of treatment, the observation group had a significantly higher overall response rate than the control group (P<0.05) ; both groups had significant reductions in blood eosinophil count and the observation group had a significantly greater reduction than the control group (P<0.05) . After two courses of treatment, both groups had significant increases in the number of patients with normal IgE (both P<0.05) , and after the second course of treatment, the observation group had a significantly higher number than the control group (P<0.05) . Both groups had mild adverse events, which did not affect the treatment. Conclusion: In the treatment of occupational allergic contact dermatitis, rock salt aerosol therapy has a certain effect on the recovery of symptoms, signs, blood eosinophil count, and IgE.

  2. Fluid-evaporation records preserved in salt assemblages in Meridiani rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Sutton, S. R.; Dreibus, G.; Garrison, D. H.; Herrin, J.

    2009-09-01

    We studied the inter-relationships between the major anions (SO 3, Cl, and Br) and cations (FeO, CaO and MgO) using elemental abundances determined by APXS in salt assemblages of RATted (abraded) rocks at Meridiani to characterize the behavior of fluids that infiltrated into this region on Mars. A plot of SO 3 versus Cl for the abraded rocks yielded an unusual pattern, whereas the SO 3/Cl ratios versus Cl for the same rocks showed a monotonically decreasing trend represented by a hyperbola. The systematic behavior of the SO 3 and Cl data in the documented rocks at Meridiani suggests that these anions behaved conservatively during fluid-rock interactions. These results further indicate that two kinds of fluids, referred to as SOL-I and SOL-II, infiltrated into Endurance/Eagle/Fram craters, where they underwent progressive evaporative concentration. SOL-I is a low pH fluid consisting of high SO 3 and low Cl and high Br, (this fluid infiltrated all the way to the crater-top region), whereas SOL-II fluid of high pH with low SO 3 and high Cl and low Br reached only an intermediary level known as the Whatanga contact at Endurance. Based on the FeO/MgO as well as CaO/MgO versus SO 3/Cl diagram for rocks above the Whatanga contact, the cation and anion relationships in this system suggest that the Fe 2+/SO 4 and Ca 2+/SO 4 ratios in SOL-I fluids at Meridiani were > 1 before the onset of evaporation based on the "chemical divide" considerations. Below the Whatanga contact, relatively dilute SOL-II fluids seem to have infiltrated and dissolved/flushed away the easily soluble Mg-sulfate/chloride phases (along with Br) without significantly altering the SO 3/Cl ratios in the residual salt assemblages. Further, Cl/Br versus Br in rocks above the Whatanga contact show a hyperbolic trend suggesting that Cl and Br behaved conservatively similar to SO 3 and Cl in the SOL-1 fluids at Meridiani. Our results are consistent with a scenario involving two episodes (SOL-I and SOL-II) of

  3. Fluid-evaporation records preserved in salt assemblages in Meridiani rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Sutton, S.R.; Dreibus, G.; Garrison, D.H.; Herrin, J.

    2009-09-25

    We studied the inter-relationships between the major anions (SO{sub 3}, Cl, and Br) and cations (FeO, CaO and MgO) using elemental abundances determined by APXS in salt assemblages of RATted (abraded) rocks at Meridiani to characterize the behavior of fluids that infiltrated into this region on Mars. A plot of SO{sub 3} versus Cl for the abraded rocks yielded an unusual pattern, whereas the SO{sub 3}/Cl ratios versus Cl for the same rocks showed a monotonically decreasing trend represented by a hyperbola. The systematic behavior of the SO{sub 3} and Cl data in the documented rocks at Meridiani suggests that these anions behaved conservatively during fluid-rock interactions. These results further indicate that two kinds of fluids, referred to as SOL-I and SOL-II, infiltrated into Endurance/Eagle/Fram craters, where they underwent progressive evaporative concentration. SOL-I is a low pH fluid consisting of high SO{sub 3} and low Cl and high Br, (this fluid infiltrated all the way to the crater-top region), whereas SOL-II fluid of high pH with low SO{sub 3} and high Cl and low Br reached only an intermediary level known as the Whatanga contact at Endurance. Based on the FeO/MgO as well as CaO/MgO versus SO{sub 3}/Cl diagram for rocks above the Whatanga contact, the cation and anion relationships in this system suggest that the Fe{sup 2+}/SO{sub 4} and Ca{sup 2+}/SO{sub 4} ratios in SOL-I fluids at Meridiani were > 1 before the onset of evaporation based on the 'chemical divide' considerations. Below the Whatanga contact, relatively dilute SOL-II fluids seem to have infiltrated and dissolved/flushed away the easily soluble Mg-sulfate/chloride phases (along with Br) without significantly altering the SO{sub 3}/Cl ratios in the residual salt assemblages. Further, Cl/Br versus Br in rocks above the Whatanga contact show a hyperbolic trend suggesting that Cl and Br behaved conservatively similar to SO{sub 3} and Cl in the SOL-1 fluids at Meridiani. Our results are

  4. On the structure of luminol sodium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, V. B.; Chernyshev, V. V.; Paseshnichenko, K. A.; Sheludyakov, V. D.; Belyakov, N. G.; Boziev, R. S.; Mochalov, V. N.; Storozhenko, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    The structures of Tamerit® ( A) and Galavit® ( B) pharmaceutical preparations have been solved by X-Ray single crystal and powder diffraction. These are luminol sodium salts possessing immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. It is shown that Tamerit® ( A) is a hydrated salt, while Galavit® ( B) is a mixture of two polymorphic modifications ( B1 and B2) of anhydrous salt. Compound A is crystallized in a monoclinic system: a = 8.3429(4) Å, b = 22.0562(11) Å, c = 5.2825(2) Å, β = 99.893(3)°, V = 957.59(8) Å3, and Z = 4; sp. gr. P21/ c. Compound B1 is crystallized in a monoclinic system: a = 14.7157(18), b = 3.7029(19), c = 16.0233(15) Å, β = 116.682(13)°, V = 780.1(4) Å3, and Z = 4; sp. gr. P21/ c. Compound B2 is crystallized in an orthorhombic system: a = 27.7765(15) Å, b = 3.3980(19) Å, c = 8.1692(19) Å, V = 771.0(5) Å3, and Z = 4; sp. gr. Pna21. The absence of phase transitions between the B1 and B2 polymorphs has been established by differential scanning calorimetry.

  5. Evolution of dilatancy and permeability in rock salt during hydrostatic compaction and triaxial deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Till; Kern, Hartmut; Schulze, Otto

    2001-01-01

    Combined gas permeability and P and S wave velocity measurements were carried out on rock salt samples from the Gorleben salt dome and the Morsleben salt mine under hydrostatic and triaxial loading condions, mostly at room temperature. Permeabilities in the as-received samples vary between 10-16 and 2×10-20 m2. The initial permeability is primarily due to decompaction induced by drilling, core retrieval and sample preparation. Hydrostatic loading gives rise to a marked decrease of permeability and a coeval significant increase of P and S wave velocities due to progressive closure of grain boundary cracks, tending to approach the in situ matrix permeability (<10-20 m2). The pore space sensitivity of P and S wave velocities is used to monitor the in situ state of the microstructure. Their reversals define the boundary in the state of stresses between dilatant and compactive domains (dilatancy boundary). Dilatancy during triaxial deformation of the compacted rock salt samples is found to evolve stress dependent in various stages. The crack initiation stress increases from ˜18 MPa differential stress at 10 MPa confining pressure to ˜30 MPa at confining pressures above ˜70 MPa. Dilatancy is due to the opening of grain boundary and (100) cleavage cracks and depends on the applied confining pressure. The orientation of the open cracks is primarily controlled by the loading geometry system (compression, extension). As a consequence, permeability increases dramatically with progressive dilatancy, followed by a period of plus/minus constant permeability during strain hardening up to 10% axial strain or even more. This suggests that the evolution of permeability is not only a function of dilatancy but also of microcrack linkage. Importantly, the anisotropic crack array within the samples causes a strong directional dependence of permeability.

  6. Assessment of Rock Mass Stability in the Historic Area of Levels IV-V of the "Wieliczka" Salt Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Obyrn, Kajetan; Hydzik-Wiśniewska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    As a result, of more than 700 years of exploitation in the Wieliczka Salt Mine, a network of underground workings spreading over eleven levels was created. All mine workings of significant historic and natural qualities and the majority of functional mine workings designated to be preserved are located on levels I to V. The most precious of them, available to tourists, are located in the central part of the Mine on levels I-III. The Mine is not anticipating to make levels IV, Kołobrzeg and V available for a wider range of visitors, even though there are historically and naturally precious workings in those areas as well. The most valuable of the mine workings come from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and were exploited mainly in a bed of fore-shaft salt, Spiza salt and the oldest ones. The characteristic feature of these excavations, distinguish them from the chambers located on the levels I-III, is the room-and-pillar system that had been used there. Mine workings exploited in this system measure up to 100 metres in length, and the unsupported pillars standing between the chambers measuring 4-10 metres in width were remained. The described above levels, including levels of VI-IX are to provide a stable support for the workings located higher up. The remaining part of the mine, with the exception of the function workings, is designated for liquidation by backfilling. The article presents an assessment of stability of the mine workings, located on levels IV-V, and their impact on the surrounding rock mass and the land surface. The analysis was based on geodetic measurements and numerical calculations for strain state of rock mass surrounding the mine workings, in actual conditions and after partial backfilling, and forecast of the rock stability factor after the end of backfilling. The assessment stability factor in the vicinity of excavations at levels IV-V was based on the results of spatial numerical analysis covering the entire central area of the mine

  7. Sulfidation of rock-salt-type transition metal oxide nanoparticles as an example of a solid state reaction in colloidal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang

    2011-01-28

    The sulfidation of colloidal rock-salt-type MO (M = Fe, Mn and Co) nanocrystals was performed in organic solvents using dissolved elemental sulfur at moderate temperatures. The vacancy defects in these rock-salt-type structures clearly promote complete oxide-sulfide conversion. The conversion products were hollow metal sulfide (pyrrhotite (Fe(1-x)S), Co(1-x)S and α-MnS) nanoparticles. These conversions by sulfidation proceed rapidly, making difficult the isolation of intermediates. The sulfidation intermediates, when the supply of sulfur was insufficient, had interesting structures, in which the metal oxide cores were surrounded by metal sulfide shells or had surfaces that were decorated with metal sulfide islands. Based on the above results, a mechanism of surface nucleation, shell formation, and void formation by diffusion processes is proposed.

  8. An ultra-high-energy-neutrino detector using rock salt and ice as detection media for radar method

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2012-11-12

    We had found radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for detection of an ultra-high energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) which is generated in GZK processes in the universe. When an UHE{nu} interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, the energy converts to a thermal energy. Consequently, a temperature gives rise along an UHE{nu} shower at the interaction location. The permittivity arises with respect to the temperature at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower which is composed of hadronic and electromagnetic multiplication processes. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium for radio wave rises to a reflection. The reflection effect with a long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE{nu}. They could be used for detection media in which the UHE{nu} interacts with. We could find a huge amount of rock salt or ice over 50 Gt in a natural rock salt formation or Antarctic ice sheet. Radio wave transmitted into the medium generated by a radar system could be reflected by the irregularity of the refractive index at the shower. Receiving the reflected radio wave yields information about the UHE{nu}.

  9. Ordered rock-salt related nanoclusters in CaMnO2.

    PubMed

    Varela, Aurea; de Dios, Susana; Parras, Marina; Hernando, María; Fernández-Díaz, M Teresa; Landa-Cánovas, Angel R; González-Calbet, José M

    2009-06-24

    Oxygen engineering techniques performed under adequate controlled atmosphere show that the CaMnO(3)-CaMnO(2) topotactic reduction-oxidation process proceeds via oxygen diffusion while the cationic sublattice remains almost unaltered. Extra superlattice reflections in selected area electron diffraction patterns indicate doubling of the CaMnO(2) rock-salt cell along the cubic directions of a distorted rhombohedral cell originated by ordering of Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) ions distributed in nanoclusters into a NaCl-type matrix, as evidenced by dark field electron microscope images. The local nature of the information provided by the transmission electron microscopy techniques used to characterize the rock-salt type Ca(1-x)Mn(x)O(2) solid solution clearly hints at the existence of subtle extra ordering in other upper oxides of the Ca-Mn-O system. The combination of local characterization techniques like electron microscopy with more average ones like powder X-ray and neutron diffraction allows a very complete characterization of the system.

  10. The complete genome of a viable archaeum isolated from 123-million-year-old rock salt.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Salla T; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Ravantti, Janne J; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiangdong; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Oksanen, Hanna M; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-02-01

    Live microbes have been isolated from rock salt up to Permian age. Only obligatory cellular functions can be performed in halite-buried cells. Consequently, their genomic sequences are likely to remain virtually unchanged. However, the available sequence information from these organisms is scarce and consists of mainly ribosomal 16S sequences. Here, live archaea were isolated from early Cretaceous (∼ 123 million years old) halite from the depth of 2000 m in Qianjiang Depression, Hubei Province, China. The sample was radiologically dated and subjected to rigorous surface sterilization before microbe isolation. The isolates represented a single novel species of Halobacterium, for which we suggest the name Halobacterium hubeiense, type strain Hbt. hubeiense JI20-1. The species was closely related to a Permian (225-280 million years old) isolate, Halobacterium noricense, originating from Alpine rock salt. This study is the first one to publish the complete genome of an organism originating from surface-sterilized ancient halite. In the future, genomic data from halite-buried microbes can become a key factor in understanding the mechanisms by which these organisms are able to survive in harsh conditions deep underground or possibly on other celestial bodies. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Energy-polarization behaviors of AA'BB'O6 perovskites with double rock-salt order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anindya; Vanderbilt, David

    2010-03-01

    Using first-principles methods, we study the energy-polarization relation of double perovskites AA'BB'O6 where atoms in both A and B sites are arranged in rock-salt order. The high-symmetry structure in this case is the tetrahedral F43m space group. If a ferroelectric instability occurs, the energy-vs.-polarization landscape E(P) will tend to have minima for P along tetrahedral directions leading to a rhombohedral space group R3m, with two different values of spontaneous polarization and associated energy along opposite body-diagonal directions; or along Cartesian directions, leading to orthorhombic space group Imm2. We search for polar soft modes at the γ point of the high-symmetry F43m structure and analyze its eigenvectors to identify ferroelectric instabilities, which we find in CaBaTiZrO6, KCaZrNbO6 and PbSnTiZrO6. The results of the first-principle calculations are modeled with a Landau-Devonshire expansion that is truncated at either 4th or 5th order in P, and its predictions are found to agree favorably with our calculation. The 5th-order calculation improves the agreement further except in PSTZ. Recently, synthesis of SrCaTiMnO6 in rock-salt order has been reported.footnotetextJ.L Blok, G. Rijnders and D.H.A. Blank, private communication. Unfortunately, preliminary results do not seem to indicate any polarized structure.

  12. Style and evolution of salt pillows and related structures in the northern part of the Northeast German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossow, Dirk; Krawczyk, Charlotte; McCann, Tommy; Strecker, Manfred; Negendank, Jörg F. W.

    2000-08-01

    The northern part of the Northeast German Basin contains a large number of Late Permian (Zechstein) salt pillows, whereas diapiric structures are almost completely absent. This lack of diapirs facilitated the study of early stages of salt movement in the basin. Salt pillows and related structures were investigated in terms of distribution, geometry and time of initiation of salt flow within the regional geological context. The primary Zechstein thickness in the study area was reconstructed to gain more insight into the relationship between the geometry of the salt layer and the style of the salt-related structures. In this study, no clear spatial relationship between the salt structures and basement faults has been found and the location of the salt structures in this area appears to be highly independent of the underlying structural grain. The overburden is affected by minor faulting. We propose that buckling of the overburden due to regional compression significantly contributed to the initiation of the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous salt structures in the basin. Reverse faulting of the Gardelegen and Haldensleben Faults is related to inversion tectonics and exerted a compression on the basin fill. During the deformation, the Late Permian salt layer acted as an efficient detachment and led to a marked decoupling of the Mesozoic overburden from the underlying pre-Zechstein rocks.

  13. Comparison and Tensorial Formulation of Inelastic Constitutive Models of Salt Rock Behaviour and Efficient Numerical Implementatio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, T.; Böttcher, N.; Görke, U. J.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    The design process of geotechnical installations includes the application of numerical simulation tools for safety assessment, dimensioning and long term effectiveness estimations. Underground salt caverns can be used for the storage of natural gas, hydrogen, oil, waste or compressed air. For their design one has to take into account fluctuating internal pressures due to different levels of filling, the stresses imposed by the surrounding rock mass, irregular geometries and possibly heterogeneous material properties [3] in order to estimate long term cavern convergence as well as locally critical wall stresses. Constitutive models applied to rock salt are usually viscoplastic in nature and most often based on a Burgers-type rheological model extended by non-linear viscosity functions and/or plastic friction elements. Besides plastic dilatation, healing and damage are sometimes accounted for as well [2]. The scales of the geotechnical system to be simulated and the laboratory tests from which material parameters are determined are vastly different. The most common material testing modalities to determine material parameters in geoengineering are the uniaxial and the triaxial compression tests. Some constitutive formulations in widespread use are formulated based on equivalent rather than tensorial quantities valid under these specific test conditions and are subsequently applied to heterogeneous underground systems and complex 3D load cases. We show here that this procedure is inappropriate and can lead to erroneous results. We further propose alternative formulations of the constitutive models in question that restore their validity under arbitrary loading conditions. For an efficient numerical simulation, the discussed constitutive models are integrated locally with a Newton-Raphson algorithm that directly provides the algorithmically consistent tangent matrix for the global Newton iteration of the displacement based finite element formulation. Finally, the finite

  14. Unravelling the structure of Magnus' pink salt.

    PubMed

    Lucier, Bryan E G; Johnston, Karen E; Xu, Wenqian; Hanson, Jonathan C; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Yao, Siyu; Bourassa, Megan W; Srebro, Monika; Autschbach, Jochen; Schurko, Robert W

    2014-01-29

    A combination of multinuclear ultra-wideline solid-state NMR, powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), X-ray absorption fine structure experiments, and first principles calculations of platinum magnetic shielding tensors has been employed to reveal the previously unknown crystal structure of Magnus' pink salt (MPS), [Pt(NH3)4][PtCl4], study the isomeric Magnus' green salt (MGS), [Pt(NH3)4][PtCl4], and examine their synthetic precursors K2PtCl4 and Pt(NH3)4Cl2·H2O. A simple synthesis of MPS is detailed which produces relatively pure product in good yield. Broad (195)Pt, (14)N, and (35)Cl SSNMR powder patterns have been acquired using the WURST-CPMG and BRAIN-CP/WURST-CPMG pulse sequences. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated platinum magnetic shielding tensors are shown to be very sensitive to the types and arrangements of coordinating ligands as well as intermolecular Pt-Pt metallophilic interactions. High-resolution (195)Pt NMR spectra of select regions of the broad (195)Pt powder patterns, in conjunction with an array of (14)N and (35)Cl spectra, reveal clear structural differences between all compounds. Rietveld refinements of synchrotron pXRD patterns, guided by first principles geometry optimization calculations, yield the space group, unit cell parameters, and atomic positions of MPS. The crystal structure has P-1 symmetry and resides in a pseudotetragonal unit cell with a distance of >5.5 Å between Pt sites in the square-planar Pt units. The long Pt-Pt distances and nonparallel orientation of Pt square planes prohibit metallophilic interactions within MPS. The combination of ultra-wideline NMR, pXRD, and computational methods offers much promise for future investigation and characterization of Pt-containing systems.

  15. Direct disposal of spent fuel in rock salt: Geomechanical effects and gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Gommlich, G.; Jockwer, N.; Schneefuss, J.; Heusermann, S.

    1995-12-31

    At the Asse salt mine in Germany a test field has been operating since September 1990 for the purpose of demonstrating the practicability of the direct disposal of spent fuel elements in drifts. According to the concept for direct disposal of spent fuel, disposal casks called Pollux will be emplaced on the floor of the drifts backfilled with salt afterwards. The main objectives of this test are studies on the thermal and thermomechanical effects in the backfilled drifts and in the surrounding rock due to the power output of the spent fuel in the casks. The temperatures at the surface of the electrically heated mock-ups of the Pollux-casks increased up to 210 C after five months and then gradually decrease. Determinations of the initial stress state in the test field were carried out by overcoming and slot cutting techniques before the test drifts were opened. After the beginning of heating the casks, the rock stresses increased rapidly related to the temperature at the specific location and later on decreased slowly. Deformation measurements are performed in the host rock using multi-point extensometers and closure gauges for measuring the closure of the test drifts in the heated as well as in the unheated areas. Specially designed equipment was used to observe the settling of the backfill. In the period of about 4 years, the convergence of the backfilled drifts accelerated enormously and caused backfill pressures up to 1.8 MPa. The concentrations of the main components carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane in the pore volume of the backfill were analyzed.

  16. (Li/Ag)CoO2: a new intergrowth cobalt oxide composed of rock salt and delafossite layers.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, R; Pollet, M; Doumerc, J-P; Delmas, C

    2011-07-18

    A new ordered (Li/Ag)CoO(2) layered compound with an unusual oxygen packing combining rock salt and delafossite layers is obtained during the (Li(+), Na(+))/Ag(+) ionic exchange from the OP4-(Li/Na)CoO(2) precursor. This compound is actually an intermediate step to the final D4-AgCoO(2) delafossite and can be isolated thanks to the kinetics difference between the Li(+)/Ag(+) and Na(+)/Ag(+) exchange processes. It crystallizes in the P6(3)/mmc space group with cell parameters a(hex.) = 2.848(3) Å and c(hex.) = 21.607(7) Å. The details of the structure as well as its thermal stability and transport properties are presented and discussed.

  17. Authigenic K-feldspar in salt rock (Haselgebirge Formation, Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The crystallisation of authigenic quartz under low temperature, saline conditions is well known (Grimm, 1962). Also the growth of low temperature authigenic feldspar in sediments is a long known phenomenon (Kastner & Siever, 1979; Sandler et al., 2004). In this study we intend to show that halite (NaCl) is a major catalyser for authigenic mineral growth. During late Permian (c. 255-250 Ma), when the later Eastern Alps were located around north of the equator, the evaporites of the Haselgebirge Formation were deposited (Piller et al., 2004). The Haselgebirge Fm. consists in salt mines of a two-component tectonite of c. 50 % halite and 50 % sedimentary clastic and other evaporite rocks (Spötl 1998). Most of the clastic rocks are mud- to siltstones ("mudrock"). During this study, we investigated rare sandstones embedded in salt rock form four Alpine salt mines. Around 40 polished thin sections were prepared by dry grinding for thin section analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The sandstones consist mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, rock fragments, micas, accessory minerals and halite in the pore space. They are fine grained and well sorted. Mudrock clasts in sandstone were observed locally, and also coal was observed repeatedly. Asymmetric ripples were found only in the dimension of millimeters to centimeters. Euhedral halite crystals in pores indicate an early presence of halite. During early diagenesis, authigenic minerals crystallized in the following chronological order. (1) Where carbonate (mainly magnesite) occurred, it first filled the pore space. Plant remains were impregnated with carbonate. (2) Halite precipitated between the detritic sandstone grains. Carbonate grains can be completely embedded in halite. (3) K-feldspar and quartz grains usually expose a detritic core and a later grown euhedral inclusion free rim. Euhedral rims of K-feldspar often also enclose a halite core. K-feldspar replaced the pre-existing halite along former grain boundaries of

  18. Deformation above mobile substrates, salt rheology and spatial distribution of salt structures: A 3D seismic study of the Permian southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Karina; Mitchell, Neil; Huuse, Mads

    2016-04-01

    At ~255 Ma, cycles of evaporation of seawater led to deposition of evaporites including halite (rock salt) in the North Sea Basin. After later burial by denser sediments, the salt beds rose as pillows and diapirs. Assuming mobilization is due to Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability of heavy fluid (sediments) overlying light fluid (salts), theory suggests that the spacing between diapirs should be proportional to the original thickness of the salt layer. For example, a description of the theory in Turcotte and Schubert (1982) predicts structure wavelength to be 2.6 times the salt thickness. Previous research has explored mobilization of salt deposits assuming they have uniform rheology. However, this is not justified as halite rheology varies with temperature, grain size and pore brine content. Furthermore, evaporitic sequences contain various minerals besides halite (e.g., anhydrite, gypsum), which have different rheological properties. 3D seismic and well data reveal the internal structure of salt beds. The data have allowed characterization of structure wavelengths and salt thickness, so that the impact of internal composition and other properties on halokinetic behaviour can be assessed.

  19. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  20. Geometric rules of section balancing for salt structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hossack, J.

    1996-12-31

    Restored sections provide not only a measure of the viability of structural interpretations but also have the ability to recreate the geometry of the structures through geologic time. Geologists have known for a long time that section balancing is more difficult in salt structures because of the ability of the salt to flow in and out of the plane of section and also to dissolve and thereby violate constant volume considerations. However, the surrounding sediments generally deform by brittle-plastic processes and are less able to flow out of the plane of a properly chosen section. The pragmatic approach is to restore sections by assuming constant-area conditions for the sediment structures alone and to leave the salt area as gaps that may change in area through time. Most restorations of salt structures suggest that throughout long periods of geologic time, salt remains at or close to the depositional surface and that volume reductions of up to 50% are possible in nature. Salt structures usually involve regional displacements of the salt and its surrounding sediments so that extension in one place has to be balanced by basement extension or cover contraction in another. A key aid to the recognition of contraction and extension is the regional elevation of reference horizons. Generally, salt withdrawal and extensional faulting drop reference beds below regional elevation, whereas salt pillowing, salt sheet formation, and contraction will raise beds above regional elevation. In the Gulf of Mexico, the updip extensional growth faulting and salt withdrawal are balanced by the formation of downdip allochthonous salt sheets and fold and thrust belts, so that the total linear strain across the sediment cover is zero. The extension and contraction are linked by a series of salt and fault welds that lie at several structural levels.

  1. Thermal properties of rock salt and quartz monzonite to 573{sup 0}K and 50-MPa confining pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-03-18

    Measurements of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal linear expansion have been made on two rock types, a rock salt and a quartz monzonite, at temperatures from 300 to 573{sup 0}K and confining pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. The samples were taken from deep rock formations under consideration as possible sites for a nuclear waste repository - the rock salt from a domal salt formation at Avery Island, Louisiana, and the quartz monzonite from the Climax Stock, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The testing temperature and pressures are meant to bracket conditions expected in the repository. In both rock types, the thermal properties show a strong dependence upon temperature and a weak or non-dependence upon confining pressure. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity both decrease with increasing temperature in approximately linear fashion for samples which have not been previously heated. At 50 MPa in both rocks this decrease closely matches the measured or expected intrinsic (crack-free) behavior of the material. Preliminary indications from the quartz monzonite suggest that conductivity and diffusivity at low pressure and temperature may decrease as a result of heat treatment above 400{sup 0}K.

  2. The structure of the Zechstein 3 stringer in the northern Netherlands, and its implications for salt kinematics and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozyk, Frank; Urai, Janos; Li, Shiyuan; Schmatz, Joyce; Biehl, Bianca; Reuning, Lars; Raith, Alexander; Abe, Steffen; van Gent, Heijn; de Keijzer, Martin; Kukla, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The thick, late Permian Zechstein evaporites in the northern Netherlands are exceptionally well imaged in extensive 3D seismic and well datasets. The prominent seismic reflections of the thick, anhydrite-rich Zechstein 3 stringer, which is encased in thick layers of rock salt, provide a basin-scale view of the 3D internal structure of the Zechstein salt. The interpretation of the Z3 stringer was used as a strain marker for the different intra-salt deformation styles and salt flows. Furthermore, models of competing rheologies (pressure solution vs. dislocation creep, Newtonian vs. Power law) were tested in numerical simulations of the gravitational sinking of Z3 stringer fragments through the salt over geologic time in the Tertiary. The results show that several structural stringer styles can be linked to regional variation in salt kinematics. These mainly comprise local early syn-depositional gravitational movement, passive salt diapirism by differential loading in the Triassic, and reactive diapirism during contractions starting in the Cretaceous. The thickness and deformation degree of the individual salt layers thereby played a major role in the development of regionally distinctive styles of intra-salt structures, which can be linked to breaking and fold patterns in the stringer. When differential stresses in the salt relaxed across large parts of the northern Netherlands in the Tertiary, stringer fragments physically isolated in the salt did not significantly sink through the salt. The salt surrounding the fragments can not have deformed by Newtonian solution-precipitation creep, because the fragments would have sunk to base salt. Considering also results from geomechanical modelling and analysis of Zechstein salt samples, we conclude that this behaviour can only be explained by strong changes in salt rheology to non-Newtonian.

  3. Experimental deformation of coarse-grained rock salt to high strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linckens, J.; Zulauf, G.; Hammer, J.

    2016-08-01

    The processes and deformation mechanisms (e.g., dislocation creep, pressure solution, grain boundary sliding, and recrystallization) of rock salt are still a matter of debate. In order to fill this gap, high strain constriction experiments at 345°C, atmospheric pressure and a strain rate of 10-7 s-1 have been conducted on natural halite cuboids (60 × 60 × 45 mm) from the Morsleben mine of Northern Germany. Most samples were almost single crystals and contain a small amount of smaller grains (10-26%). The grain boundaries are decorated with fluid inclusions. The experiments were stopped at different final strains (ɛy = z of 10, 20, 30, and 40%) corresponding to a maximum strain (ɛx) range of 20-170%. The halite is deformed by dislocation creep, and the size of developed subgrains corresponds to the applied stress. The combined Schmid factor and subgrain boundary analysis indicate that slip was largely accommodated by the {110} < 110 > slip systems, with possible minor contribution by slip on the {100} < 110 > slip systems. Some of the deformed samples show evidence of grain boundary migration. In addition, subgrains with small misorientations form that result in large cumulative misorientations within a single grain (>40°). However, no subgrain rotation recrystallization is observed (i.e., misorientation angles are <10°). All the experiments show strain hardening, suggesting that recrystallization by grain boundary migration was not extensive and did not reset the microstructure. The experiments show that high finite strain in coarse-grained relatively dry rock salt can be accommodated by dislocation creep, without extensive dynamic recrystallization.

  4. Stress corrosion of ASTM Grade-2 and Grade-12 titanium in simulated rock salt brines at 83/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, H.; Ahn, T.M.; Soo, P.

    1983-01-01

    Slow-strain-rate tests have been conducted on Grade-2 and Grade-12 titanium in simulated rock salt brines at 83/sup 0/C. Although neither metal shows stress corrosion cracking, total elongation and reduction in area show some decrease. Optical and SEM results are discussed to elucidate the fracture mechanism.

  5. Building the 3D Geological Model of Wall Rock of Salt Caverns Based on Integration Method of Multi-source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongzhi, WANG; hui, WANG; Lixia, LIAO; Dongsen, LI

    2017-02-01

    In order to analyse the geological characteristics of salt rock and stability of salt caverns, rough three-dimensional (3D) models of salt rock stratum and the 3D models of salt caverns on study areas are built by 3D GIS spatial modeling technique. During implementing, multi-source data, such as basic geographic data, DEM, geological plane map, geological section map, engineering geological data, and sonar data are used. In this study, the 3D spatial analyzing and calculation methods, such as 3D GIS intersection detection method in three-dimensional space, Boolean operations between three-dimensional space entities, three-dimensional space grid discretization, are used to build 3D models on wall rock of salt caverns. Our methods can provide effective calculation models for numerical simulation and analysis of the creep characteristics of wall rock in salt caverns.

  6. A1 and A2, two novel haloarchaeal isolates from bore cores of ancient Alpine rock salt deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, C.; Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Weidler, G.; Radax, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Previously several novel halophilic archaea, for instance Haloccocus salifodinae BIp and Halococcus dombrowskii, were isolated from Permo-Triassic rock salt (age 200 - 250 million years) in our laboratory. By using molecular methods we found evidence for the presence of numerous additional haloarchaeal taxa. We investigated freshly drilled salt cores from a depth of about 600 m below surface in the salt mine of Altaussee, Austria, which were dissolved immediately in sterile water. After plating the dissolved salts on high salt nutrient agar, we were able to isolate, following incubation for 3 months, two red pigmented colonies, which were designated A1 and A2 and cultivated for further investigation. A1 and A2 showed the same antibiotic susceptibility as Halobacterium salinarum DSM 3754 and Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, which were cultivated from surface waters. Additionally, the cell morphology of the new isolates was highly similar to both reference strains. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, whole cell protein patterns following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and restriction digestion patterns of their DNA following pulsed field gel electrophoresis, the isolates A1 and A2 could not be distinguished. 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the closest relative of strains A1 and A2 was Halobacterium salinarum DSM 3754 (sequence similarity 97,1%). Our results suggest that the isolates A1 and A2 might constitute a new haloarchaeal species, entrapped in ancient rock salt.

  7. Optical and electron transport properties of rock-salt Sc1-xAlxN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ruopeng; Zheng, P. Y.; Gall, D.

    2015-07-01

    Epitaxial single-crystal Sc1-xAlxN ternary alloy layers deposited by magnetron co-sputtering on MgO(001) substrates at 950 °C exhibit a solid solution rock-salt phase for x = 0-0.2 without decomposition. Optical absorption indicates a linear increase in the optical gap from 2.51 eV for ScN to 3.05 eV for Sc0.8Al0.2N and, after correction due to the Moss-Burstein shift, a direct X point interband transition energy Eg(X) = 2.15 + 2.75 x (eV). Correspondingly, the direct transition at the zone center increases with Al concentration according to Eg(Γ) = 3.80 + 1.45 x (eV), as determined from a feature in the reflection spectra. All layers are degenerate n-type semiconductors with a room temperature mobility that decreases from 22 to 6.7 to 0.83 cm2/V s as x increases from 0 to 0.11 to 0.20. The corresponding carrier densities are 9.2 × 1020, 7.9 × 1020, and 0.95 × 1020 cm-3 as determined from Hall measurements and consistent with optical free carrier absorption below photon energies of 1 eV. Temperature dependent transport measurements indicate metallic conduction for ScN, but weak localization that leads to a resistivity minimum at 85 and 210 K for x = 0.051 and 0.15, respectively, and a negative temperature coefficient over the entire measured 4-300 K range for Sc0.8Al0.2N. The decreasing mobility is attributed to alloy scattering at randomly distributed Al atoms on cation sites, which also cause the weak localization. The carrier density is primarily due to unintentional F doping from the Sc target and decreases strongly for x > 0.15, which is attributed to trapping in defect states due to the deterioration of the crystalline quality, as evidenced by the x-ray diffraction peak width that exhibits a minimum of 0.14° for x = 0.11 but increases to 0.49° for x = 0.20. This is consistent with asymmetric x-ray diffraction analyses, indicating a relaxed lattice constant that decreases from 4.511 ± 0.005 to 4.411 ± 0.004 Å for x = 0-0.2, and a biaxial in

  8. High salt medium activates RhoA/ROCK and downregulates eNOS expression via the upregulation of ADMA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Fang, Yuan; Mu, Jianjun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has an important role in the development and progression of salt-sensitive hypertension. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), which is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathophysiological processes of endothelial dysfunction and salt‑sensitive hypertension. However, it is currently unclear how high salt intake may induce these processes. The present study investigated the effects of high salt medium on ADMA, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and the Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway in the EA.hy926 umbilical vein cell line. The results demonstrated that high salt medium significantly increased the concentration of ADMA, the expression of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT‑1) and RhoA, and the activity of ROCK, and downregulated the expression of eNOS. Knockdown of PRMT-1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly abrogated the aforementioned effects. These results indicated that ADMA has a key role in high salt‑mediated activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and inhibition of eNOS biosynthesis. siRNA‑PRMT‑1 may be considered a novel remedy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Halorubrum pallidum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a subterranean rock salt.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoxing; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain PJ61T, was isolated from a subterranean rock salt of Yuanyongjing Salt Mine, Yunnan, China. Colonies were pale, smooth, convex, and round (1.0-2.0 mm in diameter) on nutrient agar plates. Cells of strain PJ61T were spherical or oval , stained Gram-negative, and were non-motile. Optimal growth was observed with 3.4 M NaCl and at 38 °C in aerobic conditions. Mg2+ was required for growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities showed that strain PJ61T belonged to the genus Halorubrum and was closely related to Halorubrum laminariae R60T (98.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Halorubrum salinum GX71T (98.2 %) and other species of the genus Halorubrum (<98 %). Sequence similarities of rpoB' gene and ef-2 gene between strain PJ61T and the species of the genus Halorubrum also showed that strain PJ61T was closely related to strain Halorubrum salinum GX71T (93.4 % for rpoB'and 94.8 % for ef-2). The DNA-DNA relatedness between strains PJ61T and Halorubrum laminariae R60T was 33±0.5 %, while it was 37±0.4 % for Halorubrum salinum GX71T. The DNA G+C content of strain PJ61T was 65.1 mol%. The major polar lipids of strain PJ61T consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strain PJ61T represents a novel species of the genus Halorubrum, for which the name Halorubrum pallidum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PJ61T (=CGMCC 1.15212T =JCM 30955T).

  10. In situ measurements of rock salt permeability changes due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C. ); Howard, C.L. ); Daemen, J.J.K. . Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-07-01

    The Small-Scale Mine-By was an in situ experiment to measure changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation. A series of small-volume pressurized brine- and gas-filled test intervals were established 8 m beneath the floor of Room L1 in the WIPP underground. The test intervals were isolated in the bottom of the 4.8-cm diameter monitoring boreholes with inflatable rubber packers, and are initially pressurized to about 2 MPa. Both brine- and gas-filled test intervals were located 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 r from the center of a planned large-diameter hole, where r is the radius of the large-diameter hole. Prior to the drilling of the large-diameter borehole, the responses of both the brine- and gas-filled test intervals were consistent with the formation modeled as a very low permeability, low porosity porous medium with a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The drilling of the mine-by borehole created a zone of dilated, partially saturated rock out to about 1.5 r. The formation pressure increases from near zero at 1.5 r to the pre-excavation value at 4 r. Injection tests reveal a gradient of brine permeabilities from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} at 1.25 r to about the pre-excavation value (10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}) by 3 r. Gas-injection tests reveal measurable gas permeability is limited to within 1.5 r. 17 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Attainable high capacity in Li-excess Li-Ni-Ru-O rock-salt cathode for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingbo; Huang, Weifeng; Tao, Shi; Xie, Hui; Wu, Chuanqiang; Yu, Zhen; Su, Xiaozhi; Qi, Jiaxin; Rehman, Zia ur; Song, Li; Zhang, Guobin; Chu, Wangsheng; Wei, Shiqiang

    2017-08-01

    Peroxide structure O2n- has proven to appear after electrochemical process in many lithium-excess precious metal oxides, representing extra reversible capacity. We hereby report construction of a Li-excess rock-salt oxide Li1+xNi1/2-3x/2Ru1/2+x/2O2 electrode, with cost effective and eco-friendly 3d transition metal Ni partially substituting precious 4d transition metal Ru. It can be seen that O2n- is formed in pristine Li1.23Ni0.155Ru0.615O2, and stably exists in subsequent cycles, enabling discharge capacities to 295.3 and 198 mAh g-1 at the 1st/50th cycle, respectively. Combing ex-situ X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and electrochemical characterization, we demonstrate that the excellent electrochemical performance comes from both percolation network with disordered structure and cation/anion redox couples occurring in charge-discharge process. Li-excess and substitution of common element have been demonstrated to be a breakthrough for designing novel high performance commercial cathodes in rechargeable lithium ion battery field.

  12. Halostagnicola alkaliphila sp. nov., an alkaliphilic haloarchaeon from commercial rock salt.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Shuhei; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Echigo, Akinobu; Shimane, Yasuhiro; Kamekura, Masahiro; Usami, Ron

    2011-05-01

    A Gram-negative, pleomorphic, aerobic, haloalkaliphilic archaeon, strain 167-74(T), was isolated from commercial rock salt imported into Japan from China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities showed that strain 167-74(T) is closely related to Halostagnicola larsenii XH-48(T) (98.3 %) and Halostagnicola kamekurae 194-10(T) (97.2 %). The major polar lipids of the isolate were C(20)C(20) and C(20)C(25) derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. A glycolipid was not detected, in contrast to the two existing, neutrophilic species of the genus Halostagnicola. The DNA G+C content of strain 167-74(T) was 60.7 mol%. and it gave DNA-DNA reassociation values of 19.5 and 18.8 %, respectively, with Hst. larsenii JCM 13463(T) and Hst. kamekurae 194-10(T). Therefore, strain 167-74(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Halostagnicola alkaliphila sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 167-74(T) ( = JCM 16592(T)  = CECT 7631(T)).

  13. Consolidation of crushed-salt backfill under conditions appropriate to the WIPP facility. [Granulated rock salt; function of time, temperature, and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.; Hannum, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Mechanical properties of granulated rock salt are of interest to the WIPP project because native salt from the excavations will probably be used as backfill around the waste packages and as void filler in storage rooms, shafts and other openings. Backfill properties will be an important factor in controlling room closure rates and local permeability. To fill the need for data on time dependent compaction of crushed salt, we have done a series of tests to measure the compaction as a function of time, temperature and pressure. Tests were done for a range of temperatures from 21 to 100/sup 0/C and pressures from 1.72 MPa to 21 MPa, under quasistatic and creep conditions. All tests were done under pure hydrostatic conditions. A rock crusher was used to produce crushed salt with a maximum particle size of 1 cm. All tests were done under nominally dry conditions which means the only water present was about 0.5% water content of the salt. The major conclusions are: (1) Creep consolidation under hydrostatic stresses proceeds at a rate of approximately 0.01/t, where t is the time in seconds. Total creep consolidation in a function of log(t) and is very slow. (2) Consolidation is not very temperature dependent in the range 21/sup 0/C to 100/sup 0/C. These conclusions are tested only for times up to 3 x 10/sup 5/ seconds. The major question is whether the creep consolidation rate will continue to decelerate rapidly. If rapid deceleration continues, then for the time periods of interest creep consolidation will be small compared to the consolidation produced by quasistatic pressurization.

  14. Magnetostructural transitions and metamagnetism induced by Ising spins in spinel-rock salt intergrowth Co10Ge3O16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Phillip; Seshadri, Ram

    2013-03-01

    Co10Ge3O16 crystallizes in an intergrowth structure featuring alternating layers of spinel and rock salt, making it related to GeCo2O4. Variable-temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, magnetometry, and heat capacity experiments reveal a magnetostructural transition at antiferromagnetic TN = 205 K. This rhombohedral-to-monoclinic transition involves a slight elongation of the CoO6 octahedra. Curie-Weiss analysis suggests that the Co2+, with S = 3/2 and L = 3, acts as a Kramer's doublet due to spin-orbit coupling. Below TN, the Ising-like Co2+ causes spin reorientation at high applied magnetic field that is first seen as an upward kink in M- H near HC = 3.9 T. A ``butterfly'' loop emerges when T < 150 K, with the transition causing hysteresis at high fields while linear and reversible behavior persists at low fields. HC decreases as temperature is lowered and the loops at positive and negative fields merge beneath T = 20 K. The low-temperature behavior is complicated by a field-induced first-order transition that is observed in temperature-dependent measurements for H > 1000 Oe. We discuss the H- T phase diagram with reference to other measurements including neutron powder diffraction and high-field magnetometry.

  15. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  16. Myth or nightmare: Safety consequences of the release of radiation-induced stored energy in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Prij, J.

    1996-01-01

    The disposal of HLW in a salt formation will result in the deposit of gamma energy in the rock salt. Most of this energy will be converted into heat while a small part will create defects in the salt crystals. It has been shown that energy is stored in the defected crystals. Because of uncertainties in the models and differences in the disposal concepts, the estimated values for the stored energy range from 10 to 1,000 J/g in the most heavily defected crystals close to the waste containers. Given the uncertainties in the model predictions and in the possible release mechanism, this paper concludes that at this moment, an instantaneous release of stored energy cannot be completely excluded. Therefore, the thermomechanical consequences of a postulated instantaneous release of an extremely high amount of radiation-induced stored energy have been estimated. These estimations are based on the quasi-static solutions for line and point sources. An amplification factor has been derived from mining experience with explosives to account for the dynamic effects and the occurrence of fractures. A validation of this amplification factor has been given using post experimental observations of two nuclear explosions in a salt formation. For some typical disposal concepts in rock salt, the extent of the fractured zone has been estimated. It appears that the radial extent of the fractured zone is limited to 5 m. Given the much larger distance between the individual boreholes and the distance between the boreholes and the boundary of the salt formation (> 100 m), one can conclude that the probability of a release of radiation-induced stored energy creating a pathway for the nuclides from the containers to the groundwater is negligible.

  17. Heavy Metal Contamination and Salt Efflorescence Associated With Decorative Landscaping Rocks, Las Vegas, Nevada: The Need for Regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, S. A.; Buck, B. J.; Brock, A. L.

    2004-12-01

    Las Vegas, Nevada is one of the fastest growing cities in the United States. Faced with water restrictions, decorative rock xeroscaping has become a very popular form of landscaping. Currently, there are no regulations controlling the geochemistry of the decorative rocks that can be used for these purposes. In this study, we examined three sites containing two different decorative rock products. The landscaping rocks, underlying soil, and surface salt crusts were analyzed to determine their mineralogy and chemistry. Methods of analysis include scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), thin section analysis, and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). Preliminary results indicate the presence of halite (NaCl), bloedite (Na2Mg(SO4)2 4H2O), a hydrated magnesium sulfate, and possibly copper sulfate and copper chloride mineral phases in the surface salt crusts. Both copper minerals are regarded as hazardous substances by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); these agencies have established minimum exposure limits for human contact with these substances. Copper sulfate and copper chloride are not naturally occurring minerals in the soils of the Las Vegas Valley, and analyses indicate that their formation may be attributed to the mineralogy of the decorative landscaping rocks. Further testing is needed to characterize this potential health hazard; however the preliminary results of this study demonstrate the need for regulations controlling the geochemistry of decorative rocks used for urban landscaping.

  18. Modeling of the T S D E Heater Test to Investigate Crushed Salt Reconsolidation and Rock Salt Creep for the Underground Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Martin, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Wolters, R.; Lux, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Rock salt is a potential medium for the underground disposal of nuclear waste because it has several assets, in particular its water and gas tightness in the undisturbed state, its ability to heal induced fractures and its high thermal conductivity as compared to other shallow-crustal rocks. In addition, the run-of-mine, granular salt, may be used to backfill the mined open spaces. We present simulation results associated with coupled thermal, hydraulic and mechanical processes in the TSDE (Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement) experiment, conducted in the Asse salt mine in Germany [1]. During this unique test, conceived to simulate reference repository conditions for spent nuclear fuel, a significant amount of data (temperature, stress changes and displacements, among others) was measured at 20 cross-sections, distributed in two drifts in which a total of six electrical heaters were emplaced. The drifts were subsequently backfilled with crushed salt. This test has been modeled in three-dimensions, using two sequential simulators for flow (mass and heat) and geomechanics, TOUGH-FLAC and FLAC-TOUGH [2]. These simulators have recently been updated to accommodate large strains and time-dependent rheology. The numerical predictions obtained by the two simulators are compared within the framework of an international benchmark exercise, and also with experimental data. Subsequently, a re-calibration of some parameters has been performed. Modeling coupled processes in saliniferous media for nuclear waste disposal is a novel approach, and in this study it has led to the determination of some creep parameters that are very difficult to assess at the laboratory-scale because they require extremely low strain rates. Moreover, the results from the benchmark are very satisfactory and validate the capabilities of the two simulators used to study coupled thermal, mechanical and hydraulic (multi-component, multi-phase) processes relative to the underground disposal of high

  19. Halorubrum gandharaense sp. nov., an alkaliphilic haloarchaeon from commercial rock salt.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yusuke; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Echigo, Akinobu; Shimane, Yasuhiro; Kamekura, Masahiro; Itoh, Takashi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Takahashi-Ando, Naoko; Fukushima, Yasumasa; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Usami, Ron

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, pleomorphic rod-shaped, orange-red-pigmented, facultatively aerobic and haloalkaliphilic archaeon, strain MK13-1T, was isolated from commercial rock salt imported from Pakistan. The NaCl, pH and temperature ranges for growth of strain MK13-1T were 3.0-5.2 M NaCl, pH 8.0-11.0 and 15-50 °C, respectively. Optimal growth occurred at 3.2-3.4 M NaCl, pH 9.0-9.5 and 45 °C. Addition of Mg2+ was not required for growth. The major polar lipids of the isolate were C20C20 and C20C25 archaeol derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. Glycolipids were not detected. The DNA G+C content was 64.1 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MK13-1T was most closely related to those of the species of the genus Halorubrum, Halorubrum luteum CECT 7303T (95.9% similarity), Halorubrum alkaliphilum JCM 12358T (95.3%), Halorubrum kocurii JCM 14978T (95.3%) and Halorubrum lipolyticum JCM 13559T (95.3%). The rpoB' gene sequence of strain MK13-1T had < 90% sequence similarity to those of other members of the genus Halorubrum. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characterization, strain MK13-1T may represent a novel species of the genus Halorubrum, for which the name Halorubrum gandharaense sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain MK13-1T ( = JCM 17823T = CECT 7963T).

  20. Ion chromatography to detect salts in stone structures and to assess salt removal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Stone - and in general all materials- from built heritage is very often damaged by salt crystallisation processes. Such processes usually derive into a loss of material compactness, as salts - given specific conditions and parameters- crystallize inside the material pores, exerting a pressure against the material pore walls higher than what they can resist - similar to the effect of liquid water when converts to solid water or ice-, thus breaking and disrupting the material by generating fissures and increasing the pore volume ratio, loosing its initial cohesion. When these deterioration processes take place inside a structure, salts - from different sources: material itself, restoration materials, from the ground, etc.- may come up to the stone surface - either temporarily or in permanently-, from beneath it, as efflorescences, depending mainly on the microclimatic conditions of the environment and the salts source. Efflorescences can be analysed and their nature identified (e.g. by means of X ray diffraction, in which the mineralogical composition of the salt is obtained), which can be, general, of aid not only for restoration but for preventive conservation measures. But what we do not know a priori when only characterising salt compounds- is the extent of the damage due to the presence of salts inside a structure (sub- and cryptoefflorescences). In this work we present a procedure in which the depth of the salt content can be measured, and its nature identified, based on the use of the ion chromatography technique. This technique allows identifying the existing ions in a specific sample, both anions and cations. The procedure consists of drilling (with a drilling core ranging from 5 to 8 mm in diameter, therefore causing the minimum damage to the material) in a same point at different depths from the surface and several depths from the bottom. The samples obtained are analysed and the ion content determined, qualitative and quantitatively. By means of a

  1. Caffeine dimerization: effects of sugar, salts, and water structure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Seishi

    2015-10-01

    Sugars and salts strongly affect the dimerization of caffeine in water. Such a change of dimerization, considered to be crucial for bitter taste suppression, has long been rationalized by the change of "water structure" induced by the additives; "kosmotropic" (water structure enhancing) salts and sugars promote dimerization, whereas "chaotropic" (water structure breaking) salts suppress dimerization. Based on statistical thermodynamics, here we challenge this consensus; we combine the rigorous Kirkwood-Buff theory of solution with the classical isodesmic model of caffeine association. Instead of the change of water structure, we show that the enhancement of caffeine dimerization is due to the exclusion of additives from caffeine, and that the weakening of dimerization is due to the binding of additives on caffeine.

  2. Structural evolution of the Namakdan salt diapir in the Zagros fold-thrust belt: The Persian Gulf, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpasandzadeh, Majid; Hashemifar, Ghasem; Shafiei Bafti, Amir

    2016-04-01

    Intersalt and host roch structures of the the Namakdan diapir were studied and compared with available 14C and OSL dated sediments to determine the structural evolution and uplift pattern of the diapir. The Namakdan salt diapir is situated on Qeshm Island in the east of the Zagros fold-thrust belt of Iran, north of the Persian Gulf. This nearly circular diapir with ~ 7 km diameter penetrates the crest of Salkh anticline and is embedded by steep-dip bedding of the Miocene Mishan and Aghajari Formations, which demonstrates the concentric internal structure of the diapir. The intraformational unconformities of country rocks were developed due to the Zagros shortening and salt diapirism, which demonstrate their syn-tectonic sedimentation. In addition, the dip of these unconfromities and also bedding of the country rocks decrease upward. The Namakdan diapir is partly covered by gypsum/anhydrite residuals, dolomite, marine limestone, and tilted marine terraces. The salt belong to the Hormuz Complex, consisted of predominantly halite, gypsum, anhydrite, dolomite, shale, sandstone, and volcanic-volanoclastic blocks, which was deposited in the Late Proterozoic-Middle Cambrian evaporitic rift basins. The Hormuz Complex is not only the cause of many salt diapir oil/gas fields but is also considered to have been a major source rock for generation of younger reservoirs. Thus, the salt diapirs of the Zagros play an important role in generation of the oil/gas reservoirs in this strategic area, so determination of structural style and evolution of the salt diapirs are vital in oil/gas exploration and development. The upright folds are developed in the salt beds due to upward movement and minor extrusion of the salt rocks due to its low viscosity. The dip of country rock beds increase toward to the diapir rim, so that the beds shows a vertical and even overturned attitude in vicinity of the diapir. Differential uplift pattern of the diapir was deduced in rim-to-center profiles by

  3. Rock-avalanche dynamics revealed by large-scale field mapping and seismic signals at a highly mobile avalanche in the West Salt Creek valley, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Rex L.; Allstadt, Kate; Kochevar, Bernard; Schmitt, Robert G.; Morgan, Matthew L.; White, Jonathan L.; Stratton, Benjamin T.; Hayashi, Timothy A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    On 25 May 2014, a rain-on-snow–induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado (United States). The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide in the Green River Formation and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing three people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous United States because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and high mobility (height/length = 0.14). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, unmanned aircraft system imagery as a base for field mapping, and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances < 656 km from the rock-slide source area) and one short-period network. We inverted broadband data to derive a time series of forces that the avalanche exerted on the earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with an early morning landslide/debris flow that started ∼10 h before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted ∼3.5 min and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich core continued to move slowly. Since 25 May 2014, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls have created new structures and modified avalanche topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core was likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional

  4. Mechanical modeling of the growth of salt structures

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, Ruben Alberto Mazariegos

    1993-05-01

    A 2D numerical model for studying the morphology and history of salt structures by way of computer simulations is presented. The model is based on conservation laws for physical systems, a fluid marker equation to keep track of the salt/sediments interface, and two constitutive laws for rocksalt. When buoyancy alone is considered, the fluid-assisted diffusion model predicts evolution of salt structures 2.5 times faster than the power-law creep model. Both rheological laws predict strain rates of the order of 4.0 x 10-15 s-1 for similar structural maturity level of salt structures. Equivalent stresses and viscosities predicted by the fluid-assisted diffusion law are 102 times smaller than those predicted by the power-law creep rheology. Use of East Texas Basin sedimentation rates and power-law creep rheology indicate that differential loading is an effective mechanism to induce perturbations that amplify and evolve to mature salt structures, similar to those observed under natural geological conditions.

  5. Framboidal Structures in Earth Rocks and in Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafieva, M. M.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Framboidal structures are common both in Earth rocks and in meteorites - carbonaceous chondrites. The main methods of formation of these structures are discussed. The role of biologic factors in formation of framboids is evaluated. Comparison of crystal forms comprising framboids formed in laboratory conditions and in nature is provided. On the basis of investigations of framboidal structures the proposition that pyritoidal form of crystals is typical for the formation of biogenic framboidal structures.

  6. A petrographical and geochemical study of quartzose nodules, country rocks, and dike rocks from the Upheaval Dome structure, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeberl, C.; Plescia, J.B.; Hayward, C.L.; Reimold, W.U.

    1999-01-01

    Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA, is a unique structure on the Colorado Plateau. It has earlier been interpreted as an impact structure or as a pinched-off salt diapir. Some subrounded quartzose fragments were found in a ring depression near the eastern margin of the structure and, based on vesicularity and apparent flow structure, the fragments were interpreted by early researchers as 'impactites.' Our petrographic studies show no indication of a high-temperature history and are in agreement with a slow, low-temperature formation of the quartz nodules. Compositionally, the lag deposit samples are almost pure SiO2. They show no chemical similarity to any of the possible target rocks (e.g., Navajo Sandstone), from which they should have formed by melting if they were impactites. Instead, the samples have relatively high contents of elements that indicate fluid interaction (e.g., hydrothermal growth), such as As, Sb, Ba, and U, and show positive Ce anomalies. Thus, we interpret the 'lag deposit samples' as normal low-temperature (hydrothermally-grown?) quartz that show no indication of being impact-derived. In addition, a petrographic and geochemical analysis of a series of dike samples yielded no evidence for shock metamorphism or a meteoritic component.

  7. Microfabrics and 3D grain shape of Gorleben rock salt: Constraints on deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Zulauf, Gernold; Mertineit, Michael; Linckens, Jolien; Pusch, Maximilian; Hammer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Knäuel- and Streifensalz formations (z2HS1 and z2HS2) are main constituents of the Gorleben salt dome (Northern Germany) and show different amounts and distributions of anhydrite. The reconstruction of 3D halite grain shape ellipsoids reveals small grain size (3.4 ± 0.6 mm) and heterogeneous grain shapes in both formations, the latter attributed to the polyphase deformation of the rock salt during diapirism. The halite microfabrics of both formations indicate that strain-induced grain boundary migration was active during deformation. Crystal plastic deformation of halite is further documented by lattice bending, subgrain formation and minor subgrain rotation. Evidence for pressure solution of halite has not been found, but cannot be excluded because of the small grain size, the lack of LPO and the low differential stress (1.1-1.3 MPa) as deduced from subgrain-size piezometry. Anhydrite has been deformed in the brittle-ductile regime by solution precipitation creep, minor dislocation creep and brittle boudinage. No continuous anhydrite layers are preserved, and halite has acted as a sealing matrix embedding the disrupted anhydrite fragments prohibiting any potential migration pathways for fluids. Thus, anhydrite should not have a negative effect on the barrier properties of the Gorleben rock salts investigated in this study.

  8. Sterically active electron pairs in lead sulfide? An investigation of the electronic and vibrational properties of PbS in the transition region between the rock salt and the α-GeTe-type modifications.

    PubMed

    Zagorac, Dejan; Doll, Klaus; Schön, J Christian; Jansen, Martin

    2012-08-27

    Recently, we have investigated the energy landscape of PbS for many different pressures on the ab initio level by using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory to globally search for possible thermodynamically stable and metastable structures. The perhaps most fascinating observation was that besides the experimentally known modification exhibiting the rock salt structure a second minimum exists close-by on the landscape showing the low-temperature α-GeTe-type structure. In the present study, we investigate the possible reasons for the existence of this metastable modification; in particular we address the question, whether the α-GeTe-type modification might be stabilized (and conversely the rock salt modification destabilized) by steric effects of the non-bonding electron pair. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Using three dimensional structural simulations to study the interactions of multiple excavations in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1998-02-01

    Three-dimensional quasistatic finite element codes are being used at Sandia National Laboratories to simulate the interactions of multiple large room and pillar mines in rock salt. The calculations presented in this paper are of a salt dome which contains multiple closely-spaced room and pillar mines. One of the mines was used as an oil storage facility, supported by the US DOE under the auspices of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program. The facility has recently been decommissioned due to the discovery of geotechnical instabilities. The model, validated by field observations, has resulted in a better understanding of the mechanisms which can threaten the stability of an underground excavation, as well as the structural interactions of multiple excavations. Although these calculations were performed in the specific interest of the SPR, the results should be of interest to mine designers concerned with the interactions of multiple mines excavated in a common formation.

  10. Internal structure of mushroom-shaped salt diapirs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on the dynamics and kinematics of salt diapirs with crestal bulbs shaped like a mushroom, one of the most complex types of diapirs, as interpreted by experimental modeling and from naturally occurring examples. Direct, practical applications of this research include use in the evaluation of salt domes as repositories for radioactive waste, in the exploration and production of salt, potash, and sulfur, and in the search for subtle hydrocarbon traps. The authors conducted 8 centrifuge experiments, which produced more than 100 model diapirs. These experiments were dynamically scaled to U.S. Gulf Coast salt domes, but the qualitative results are also relevant to salt diapirs in other provinces and to granitoid diapirs penetrating metamorphic crust. The centrifuged domes grew under overburdens of constant thickness or under aggrading and prograding overburdens, a new experimental approach. Results indicate that external mushroom structure results from toroidal circulation of buoyant source and immediate cover having similar effective viscosities, whereas internal structure is produced by toroidal circulation confined within the diapir. The internal diapir structure elucidates the mechanics of emplacement and indicates whether an external mushroom shape can be expected and sought by further exploration.

  11. Structural analysis of Precambrian rocks at the Hot Dry Rock Site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    The subcrop of basement rock at Fenton HIll comprises Precambrian gneiss, schist, amphibolite, pegmatite, and granitoids with affinities in metamorphic and structural history to surface outcrops in the Tusas and Picuris Ranges. Televiewer measurements of structures were analyzed by taking advantage of the spatial continuity of foliations. Folds in the foliation are predominantly conical forms due to interference between structures formed in F2 and F3 tectonic events. Field observations of outcrops in the Picuris Range show that the fractures are predominantly an X-T network controlled by the lithological layering, and statistical evidence indicates that this layer-controlled network persists to depth at Fenton Hill.

  12. Structural and thermal development of the Atlantic margin offshore Essaouira (Morocco) - evidence of salt extrusion and implications for hydrocarbon exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Martin; Littke, Raf; Kleine, Adrian; Schnabel, Michael; Reichert, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Along the east-west regional seismic line BGR11-202 (MIRROR campaign, 2011), several distinct salt diapirs and related structures can be identified close to the present day coast line. The subsalt structure is only very poorly imaged. Further offshore, rotated fault blocks are overlain by Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments. Towards the west, the evidence for past volcanic activity is increasing (necks, dykes, and sills). The magnetic anomaly S1 is roughly situated west of the most western identifiable salt structure. The aim of our study is to describe and verify possible salt tectonic and related thermal models and the evolution of the petroleum systems. One salt structure in particular shows clear evidence of salt extrusion in the past. We explain the potential scenario of the salt diapir development and extrusion in a series of structurally restored sections: After deposition, probably within the syn-rift Liassic half grabens (not imaged), the salt quickly became instable due to differential loading, assisted by growing density contrast with the overburden. It forced its way up using weak zones—which could have been the active normal faults—while the overburden collapsed into the previously occupied space (salt withdrawal). Even though the salt was constantly rising, it did not reach the surface due to constant burial. Only once the sedimentation rate decreased—during the late Cretaceous and early Paleogene—the salt extruded and crept down the continental slope onto the hiatus unconformity. With the extrusion, the salt partly dissolved in contact with the ocean water, and a cap rock formed. The related paleorelief was buried by the detritical sediments provided by the Atlas orogenesis. At present day, these paleoreliefs still have a bathymetric expression, as they are providing an unstable underground and trigger normal faulting and local resedimentation. Also remobilization of the salt, even though strengthened by the cap rock, might be possible locally

  13. Depleted δ13C Values in Salt Dome Cap Rock Organic Matter and Implications for Microbial Metabolism and Fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.; Lu, L.; Caesar, K. H.; Kyle, R.

    2015-12-01

    Salt domes occur throughout the Gulf Coast Region USA and are often associated with trapped hydrocarbons. These salt domes can be capped by sulfate and carbonate minerals that result from complex digenetic interactions in the subsurface. The specific natures of these interactions are poorly understood, in particular the role of microbes in facilitating mineralization and element cycling. Carbon isotope compositions of cap rock calcites (δ13Ccarb) are highly variable and range from near neutral to less than -40‰ (VPDB) indicative of methane-sourced carbon. These low values and the common coexistence of elemental sulfur and metal sulfides have spurred hypotheses invoking microbial sulfate reduction as driving carbonate mineral authigenesis. Here, we present new organic carbon isotope (δ13Corg) data that, similar to δ13Ccarb, exhibit depletions below -30 to -25‰. These δ13Corg values are lower than local liquid hydrocarbons and "normal" marine organic matter reflecting either microbial fixation of methane-sourced carbon or microbial fractionation from liquid hydrocarbon sources. The combined carbon isotope data (δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg) indicate that methane likely plays an important role in microbial cycling in salt domes. The δ13Corg values are similar to those of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) related communities from methane-sulfate controlled marine sediments. Ultimately, salt dome environments may share some important characteristics with AOM systems.

  14. Convoluted accommodation structures in folded rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodwell, T. J.; Hunt, G. W.

    2012-10-01

    A simplified variational model for the formation of convoluted accommodation structures, as seen in the hinge zones of larger-scale geological folds, is presented. The model encapsulates some important and intriguing nonlinear features, notably: infinite critical loads, formation of plastic hinges, and buckling on different length-scales. An inextensible elastic beam is forced by uniform overburden pressure and axial load into a V-shaped geometry dictated by formation of a plastic hinge. Using variational methods developed by Dodwell et al., upon which this paper leans heavily, energy minimisation leads to representation as a fourth-order nonlinear differential equation with free boundary conditions. Equilibrium solutions are found using numerical shooting techniques. Under the Maxwell stability criterion, it is recognised that global energy minimisers can exist with convoluted physical shapes. For such solutions, parallels can be drawn with some of the accommodation structures seen in exposed escarpments of real geological folds.

  15. Using Aluminum Foil to Record Structures in Sedimentary Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Aluminum foil can be used to make impressions of structures preserved in sedimentary rock. The impressions can be projected onto a screen, photographed, or a Plaster of Paris model can be made from them. Impressions of ripple marks, mudcracks, and raindrop impressions are provided in photographs illustrating the technique. (Author/JN)

  16. Modelling Technique for Demonstrating Gravity Collapse Structures in Jointed Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimpson, B.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a base-friction modeling technique for studying the development of collapse structures in jointed rocks. A moving belt beneath weak material is designed to simulate gravity. A description is given of the model frame construction. (Author/SA)

  17. Using Aluminum Foil to Record Structures in Sedimentary Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Aluminum foil can be used to make impressions of structures preserved in sedimentary rock. The impressions can be projected onto a screen, photographed, or a Plaster of Paris model can be made from them. Impressions of ripple marks, mudcracks, and raindrop impressions are provided in photographs illustrating the technique. (Author/JN)

  18. Observations regarding the stability of bentonite backfill in a high-level waste (HLW) repository in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration of bentonite as a component of the engineered barrier system surrounding high-level nuclear waste (HLW) canisters in rock salt raised several questions regarding the stability of this clay. Dehydration studies pertinent to the period immediately following waste emplacement showed a partial loss in swelling ability, the extent of which depended on the composition of the rehydrating brine and increased with temperature from 150/sup 0/ to 320/sup 0/C. At a later date, hydrothermal reactions between brine and bentonite may occur as pressure in the repository rises and the backfill saturates with brine. In pure sodium chloride brines little change in the bentonite was observed after two months at 250/sup 0/C. In the same amount of time, brines rich in potassium formed mixed-layer, illite-smectite clays. Adding magnesium to the brine arrested mixed-layer clay formation; instead, a magnesium-enriched montmorillonite formed and the brine pH dropped. Radiation stability studies to 10/sup 10/ rads were conducted in both wet and dry environments, but caused no detectable alteration of the clay. In contrast, fluid-phase compositions changed significantly. Gamma irradiation of dry bentonite produced an oxygen-depleted atmosphere which was enriched in both hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Mixed bentonite-brine slurries produced copious amounts of both hydrogen and oxygen gas when irradiated. These irradiated slurries generally had posttest pH values between 4 and 6. Solutions made by exposing preirradiated salt and bentonite to unirradiated water, or brine, had pH values between 6 and 8.5 and, in the case of salt solutions, were highly oxidizing. Although more research is needed for a complete performance assessment, it appears that such backfills may prove useful in a variety of rock-salt environments.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis of a lithium-rich rock-salt-type oxide Li5W2O7 with reversible deintercalation properties.

    PubMed

    Pralong, Valerie; Venkatesh, Gopal; Malo, Sylvie; Caignaert, Vincent; Baies, Radu; Raveau, Bernard

    2014-01-06

    Starting from the ribbon structure Li2W2O7, the lithium-rich phase Li5W2O7 with an ordered rock-salt-type structure has been synthesized, through a topotactic irreversible reaction, using both electrochemistry and soft chemistry. In contrast to Li2W2O7, the lithium-rich oxide Li5W2O7 shows reversible deintercalation properties of two lithium molecules per formula unit: a stable reversible capacity of 110 mAh/g at 1.70 V is maintained after 10 cycles. The exploration of the lithium mobility in this system shows that Li2W2O7 is a cationic conductor with σ = 4.10(-4) S/cm at 400 °C and Ea = 0.5 eV.

  20. Supramolecular structures and physicochemical properties of norfloxacin salts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun; Jiang, Linglei; Mei, Xuefeng

    2014-08-01

    Seven new molecular salts of norfloxacin (1-ethyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-7-piperazin-1-yl-1H-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid; abbreviated as NF) with various organic acids (adipic acid, mucic acid, o-OH-benzoic acid, m-OH-benzoic acid, p-OH-benzoic acid, naphthalene-1, 5-disulfonic acid and naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid) were synthesized and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray crystallography. Supramolecular structures and reccurring packing patterns are discussed to understand the influence of non-covalent interactions in determination of the crystal packing and hydrate inclusion. The formation of hydrates was commonly observed among various NF salts, except for the adipate salt which exists as an anhydrous form. The physicochemical properties of salts were fully characterized with a variety of analytical techniques, including powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform IR (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), hot-stage microscopy (HSM) and dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) etc. The synthesized norfloxacin salts were found to have different physicochemical properties, superior solubility and hygroscopicity. Particularly, NF adipate was found to be a desirable candidate for further development.

  1. Making Plants Break a Sweat: the Structure, Function, and Evolution of Plant Salt Glands

    PubMed Central

    Dassanayake, Maheshi; Larkin, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress is a complex trait that poses a grand challenge in developing new crops better adapted to saline environments. Some plants, called recretohalophytes, that have naturally evolved to secrete excess salts through salt glands, offer an underexplored genetic resource for examining how plant development, anatomy, and physiology integrate to prevent excess salt from building up to toxic levels in plant tissue. In this review we examine the structure and evolution of salt glands, salt gland-specific gene expression, and the possibility that all salt glands have originated via evolutionary modifications of trichomes. Salt secretion via salt glands is found in more than 50 species in 14 angiosperm families distributed in caryophyllales, asterids, rosids, and grasses. The salt glands of these distantly related clades can be grouped into four structural classes. Although salt glands appear to have originated independently at least 12 times, they share convergently evolved features that facilitate salt compartmentalization and excretion. We review the structural diversity and evolution of salt glands, major transporters and proteins associated with salt transport and secretion in halophytes, salt gland relevant gene expression regulation, and the prospect for using new genomic and transcriptomic tools in combination with information from model organisms to better understand how salt glands contribute to salt tolerance. Finally, we consider the prospects for using this knowledge to engineer salt glands to increase salt tolerance in model species, and ultimately in crops. PMID:28400779

  2. Problems in determination of the water content of rock-salt samples and its significance in nuclear-waste storage siting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedder, Edwin; Bassett, R. L.

    1981-11-01

    The in situ water content of rock salt in beds or domes and the exact nature of its occurrence are of considerable importance for the safe design and operation of nuclear-waste storage facilities in salt deposits. Most published determinations of the “water content” of salt are not comparable. Many determinations contain serious, and in part systematic, errors. The multiplicity of water sources in salt samples, the methods of sample selection and preparation, and the analytical methods used are such that some of these results may be low by as much as an order of magnitude. There is no panacea, but most of the sources of error can be minimized.

  3. Use of nanotomographic images for structure analysis of carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Rodrigo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2014-11-11

    Carbonate rocks store more than 50% of world's petroleum. These rocks' structures are highly complex and vary depending on many factors regarding their formation, e.g., lithification and diagenesis. In order to perform an effective extraction of petroleum it is necessary to know petrophysical parameters, such as total porosity, pore size and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Carbonate rocks usually have a range of pore sizes that goes from nanometers to meters or even dozen of meters. The nanopores and micropores might play an important role in the pores connectivity of carbonate rocks. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used to analyze petrophysical parameters in recent years. This technique has the capability to generate 2D images of the samples' inner structure and also allows the 3D reconstruction of the actual analyzed volume. CT is a powerful technique, but its results depend on the spatial resolution of the generated image. Spatial resolution is a measurement parameter that indicates the smallest object that can be detected. There are great difficulties to generate images with nanoscale resolution (nanotomographic images). In this work three carbonate rocks, one dolomite and two limestones (that will be called limestone A and limestone B) were analyzed by nanotomography. The measurements were performed with the SkyScan2011 nanotomograph, operated at 60 kV and 200 μA to measure the dolomite sample and 40 kV and 200 μA to measure the limestone samples. Each sample was measured with a given spatial resolution (270 nm for the dolomite sample, 360 nm for limestone A and 450 nm for limestone B). The achieved results for total porosity were: 3.09 % for dolomite, 0.65% for limestone A and 3.74% for limestone B. This paper reports the difficulties to acquire nanotomographic images and further analysis about the samples' pore sizes.

  4. Efficacy of nanolime in restoration procedures of salt weathered limestone rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, Silvestro A.; La Russa, Mauro F.; Aloise, Piergiorgio; Belfiore, Cristina M.; Macchia, Andrea; Pezzino, Antonino; Crisci, Gino M.

    2014-03-01

    Salt crystallisation process is one of the most powerful weathering agents in stone materials, especially in the coastal areas, where sea-spray transports large amount of salts on the stone surface. The consolidation of such degraded stone material represents a critical issue in the field of restoration of cultural heritage. In this paper, the nanolime consolidation behaviour in limestone degraded by salt crystallization has been assessed. For this purpose, a stone material taken from a Sicilian historical quarry and widely used in the eastern Sicilian Baroque architecture has been artificially degraded by the salt crystallization test. Then degraded samples have been treated with NanoRestore®, a suspension of nanolime in isopropyl alcohol. To evaluate the consolidating effectiveness, the peeling test and point load test were performed. Moreover, mercury intrusion porosimetry has been executed to evaluate the variations induced by treatment, while colorimetric measurements have been aimed to assess aesthetical issues.

  5. Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2012-11-12

    An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHE{nu} detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

  6. Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2012-11-01

    An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHEν) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHEν shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHEν detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

  7. Measurements of radio propagation in rock salt for the detection of high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Amy; Goodhue, Abigail; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Saltzberg, David

    2009-02-01

    We present measurements of the transmission of radio/microwave pulses through salt in the Cote Blanche salt mine operated by the North American Salt Company in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. These results are from data taken in the southwestern region of the 1500 ft (457 m) deep level of the mine on our third and most recent visit to the mine. We transmitted and received a fast, high-power, broadband pulse from within three vertical boreholes that were drilled to depths of 100 ft (30 m) and 200 ft below the 1500 ft level using three different pairs of dipole antennas whose bandwidths span 125-900 MHz. By measuring the relative strength of the received pulses between boreholes with separations of 50 and 169 m, we deduce the attenuation of the signal attributed to the salt medium. We fit the frequency dependence of the attenuation to a power law and find the best fit field attenuation lengths to be 93±7m at 150 MHz, 63±3m at 300 MHz, and 36±2m at 800 MHz. This is the most precise measurement of radio attenuation in a natural salt formation to date. We assess the implications of this measurement for a future neutrino detector in salt.

  8. Effects of salt bridges on protein structure and design.

    PubMed Central

    Sindelar, C. V.; Hendsch, Z. S.; Tidor, B.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical calculations (Hendsch ZS & Tidor B, 1994, Protein Sci 3:211-226) and experiments (Waldburger CD et al., 1995, Nat Struct Biol 2:122-128; Wimley WC et al., 1996, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 93:2985-2990) suggest that hydrophobic interactions are more stabilizing than salt bridges in protein folding. The lack of apparent stability benefit for many salt bridges requires an alternative explanation for their occurrence within proteins. To examine the effect of salt bridges on protein structure and stability in more detail, we have developed an energy function for simple cubic lattice polymers based on continuum electrostatic calculations of a representative selection of salt bridges found in known protein crystal structures. There are only three types of residues in the model, with charges of -1, 0, or + 1. We have exhaustively enumerated conformational space and significant regions of sequence space for three-dimensional cubic lattice polymers of length 16. The results demonstrate that, while the more highly charged sequences are less stable, the loss of stability is accompanied by a substantial reduction in the degeneracy of the lowest-energy state. Moreover, the reduction in degeneracy is greater due to charges that pair than for lone charges that remain relatively exposed to solvent. We have also explored and illustrated the use of ion-pairing strategies for rational structural design using model lattice studies. PMID:9761471

  9. Kinetics of the wurtzite-to-rock-salt phase transformation in ZnO at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O; Sokolov, Petr S; Baranov, Andrey N

    2011-05-05

    Kinetics of the wurtzite-to-rock-salt transformation in ZnO has been studied in the 5-7 GPa pressure range at temperatures below the activation of diffusion processes. The detailed analysis of non-isothermal experimental data using the general evolution equation describing the kinetics of direct phase transformations in solids allowed us to study the kinetic particularities of both nucleation and growth of the rock-salt phase in parent wurtzite ZnO. The main rate-limiting processes are thermally activated nucleation (E(N) = 383 kJ mol(-1) at 6.9 GPa) and thermally nonactivated (most probably quasi-martensitic) growth (k(G) = 0.833 min(-1) at 6.9 GPa). The high impact of thermal deactivation of nucleation places has been evidenced in the case of slow heating, which indirectly indicates that the rs-ZnO nucleation places are mainly produced by pressure-induced stresses in the parent phase.

  10. Half-metallicity and stability of the rock salt BaC and SrC (111) surfaces: A density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabaeifar, A. H.; Davatolhagh, S. Foroughpour, M.

    2013-12-07

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of relaxed (111) surfaces of the alkaline-earth monocarbides BaC and SrC in the stable rock salt structure, are calculated on the basis of first principle density functional theory within the framework of self-consistent field plane wave pseudo-potential method, using the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. The results of this study reveal that the C-terminated (111) surfaces retain the bulk half-metallic property in both BaC and SrC. The half-metallicity of the C-terminated BaC surface is found to be more robust compared to the bulk BaC due to the larger half-metallic energy gap. In contrast, the half-metallic energy gap of the C-terminated SrC surface is found to be smaller than that of the bulk. The Ba-terminated surface of BaC and the Sr-terminated surface of SrC, however, lose their bulk half-metallicity due to the formation of surface states in the majority spin band gap. The calculations also show that the atomic magnetic moments at the half-metallic C-terminated surfaces in both BaC and SrC increase considerably with respect to the corresponding bulk values, which is explained in terms of an increase in the number of unpaired 2p electrons of the carbon atom at the surface. We also discuss the stability of the surfaces via the calculated bulk formation energies. The bulk formation energies for both BaC and SrC in the rock salt structure are found to be positive, which indicate that the surfaces are not stable at normal pressure and temperature conditions, and non-equilibrium growth techniques may be required for the realization of BaC and SrC thin films.

  11. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  12. Uniaxial creep as a control on mercury intrusion capillary pressure in consolidating rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two - phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in oth er realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Mo dels for waste release scenarios in salt back - fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and vali date. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potent ial usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mech anics, using sieved run - of - mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (%7E900 psi) and temperatures to 90 o C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone "FY:15 Transport Properties of Run - of - Mine Salt Backfill - Unconsolidated to Consolidated". Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time - dependent consolidation, or creep, to various deg rees. Creep volume strain - time relations obey simple log - time behavior through the range of porosities (%7E50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as

  13. Structural, spectroscopic and theoretical study of novel ephedrinum salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, B.; Kolev, T.; Lamshöft, M.; Mayer-Figge, H.; Seidel, R.; Sheldrick, W. S.; Spiteller, M.

    2010-05-01

    Ephedrinum violurate dihydrate was synthesized, spectroscopically and structural elucidated. The data are compared with those of the free-base ephedrine hemihydrate. Discussion on the stable conformer of the ephedrinum cation is carried out. Quantum chemical calculations were performed for the theoretical elucidation of the conformational preference of the ephedrinum cation and its vibrational properties. The model systems neutral ephedrine hemihydrate ( 1) and violurate salt dihydrate ( 2) are elucidated.

  14. Engineering and Design: Stability Criteria for Existing Concrete Navigation Structures on Rock Foundations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineering and Design STABILITY CRITERIA FOR EXISTING CONCRETE NAVIGATION STRUCTURES ON ROCK FOUNDATIONS Distribution Restriction Statement Approved...Title and Subtitle Engineering and Design: Stability Criteria for Existing Concrete Navigation Structures on Rock Foundations Contract Number Grant... CONCRETE NAVIGATION STRUCTURES ON ROCK FOUNDATIONS 1. Purpose. The purpose of this letter is to provide interim criteria and procedures for analyzing

  15. The Distinct Element Method - Application to Structures in Jointed Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.P.; Glen, L.; Blair, S.; Heuze, F.

    2001-11-30

    The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is a meshfree method with applications to rock mechanics, mining sciences, simulations of nuclear repositories, and the stability of underground structures. Continuum mesh-based methods have been applied successfully to many problems in geophysics. Even if the geology includes fractures and faults, when sufficiently large length scales are considered a continuum approximation may be sufficient. However, a large class of problems exist where individual rock joints must be taken into account. This includes problems where the structures of interest have sizes comparable with the block size. In addition, it is possible that while the structure may experience loads which do no measurable damage to individual blocks, some joints may fail. This may launch smaller blocks as dangerous projectiles or even cause total failure of a tunnel. Traditional grid-based continuum approaches are wholly unsuited to this class of problem. It is possible to introduce discontinuities or slide lines into existing grid-based methods, however, such limited approaches can break down when new contacts form between blocks. The distinct element method (DEM) is an alternative, meshfree approach. The DEM can directly approximate the block structure of the jointed rock using arbitrary polyhedra. Using this approach, preexisting joints are readily incorporated into the DEM model. In addition, the method detects all new contacts between blocks resulting from relative block motion. We will describe the background of the DEM and review previous application of the DEM to geophysical problems. Finally we present preliminary results from a investigation into the stability of underground structures subjected to dynamic loading.

  16. Ae2Sb2X4F2 (Ae = Sr, Ba): new members of the homologous series Ae2M(1+n)X(3+n)F2 designed from rock salt and fluorite 2D building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kabbour, Houria; Cario, Laurent

    2006-03-20

    We have designed new compounds within the homologous series Ae2F2M(1+n)X(3+n) (Ae = Sr, Ba; M = main group metal; n = integer) built up from the stacking of 2D building blocks of rock salt and fluorite types. By incrementally increasing the size of the rock salt 2D building blocks, we have obtained two new n = 1 members of this homologous series, namely, Sr2F2Sb2Se4 and Ba2F2Sb2Se4. We then succeeded in synthesizing these compounds using a high-temperature ceramic method. The structure refinements from the powder or single-crystal X-ray diffraction data confirmed presence of the expected alternating stacking of fluorite [Ae2F2] (Ae = Sr, Ba) and rock salt [Sb2Se4] 2D building blocks. However the Ba derivative shows a strong distortion of the [Sb2Se4] block and a concomitant change of the Sb atom coordination likely related to the lone-pair activity.

  17. Study on the deterioration mechanism of layered rock-salt electrodes using epitaxial thin films - Li(Ni, Co, Mn)O2 and their Zr-O surface modified electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Machiko; Iba, Hideaki; Suzuki, Kota; Minamishima, Hiroaki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Tamura, Kazuhisa; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Saito, Tomohiro; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kanno, Ryoji

    2017-03-01

    Deterioration mechanism of Li(Ni, Co, Mn)O2 and Zr-O surface modified electrodes has been elucidated using epitaxial thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition. The electrodes comprise a mixture of layered rock-salt and spinel phases. The deterioration mechanism is analyzed using cyclic voltammetry, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements, and in situ neutron reflectometry. The spinel phase in the electrodes has low electrochemical activity and is not involved in Li insertion/extraction. The amount of Li participating in the charge-discharge reactions in the layered rock-salt phase increases with cycling, inducing a phase change at the electrode surface, lowering the reversibility. In contrast, in the Zr-O surface modified electrode, the spinel phase does not increase on charging/discharging. Thus, the Zr-O modification stabilizes the surface of layered rock-salt structure, thereby improving the cycling characteristics. Also, after the Zr-O modification, the Li concentration in the liquid electrolyte near the electrode/electrolyte interface increases during charging/discharging. The Zr-O surface modification not only stabilizes the electrode surface but also causes changes on the electrolyte side. Using the mixed model electrodes, we elucidate the mechanism of electrode deterioration and the origin of the improvement in cycling characteristics occurring on surface modification.

  18. AMS fabric and structural record along a strain gradient in an extrusive salt diapir (Kuh-e-Namak, Dashti, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavada, Prokop; Schulmann, Karel; Lexa, Ondrej; Machek, Matej; Roxerova, Zuzana; Kusbach, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The AMS record and the halite fabrics on meso- and micro-scale were studied in detail on a well exposed salt extrusive body in Iran. In the Kuh-e-Namak (Dashti) mountain salt diapir, the deformation structures in colored salt are displayed along longitudinal profiles across the dome and two glaciers that extend from the NE and SW edge of the dome. The profiles from the dome to the frontal parts of the glaciers reveal a continuous strain gradient associated with transposition of the domal salt fabrics by axial fold cleavage development during flow of rock salt over the ridges in the channel. The extruded salt belongs to the Hormuz sequence of Neo-Proterozoic to Early Cambrian age. From central dome towards especially the northern namakier, structural record revealed zonation from; 1) gravitational collapse related recumbent isoclinal folds in the dome, 2) flat normal shears at the edge of the dome, 3) collapsed vertical layering into flat lying transpositional fabric at the toe of the dome, 4) penetrative fold cleavage transposition of earlier fabrics above the topographical ridge in the base of the flow, locally displaying strong transversal constrictional fabrics, 5) banded mylonites with isoclinal rootless folds in subhorizontally banded frontal and marginal domain of the glacier. The AMS fabric in the rock salt is generated primarily by hematite dispersed in the recrystallized halite. The AMS exhibits three main types of fabric symmetry from clustered all directions (K1,K2,K3, orthogonal fabric) to clustered K1 directions with girdle forming K2,K3 axes and clustered K3 directions with girdle of K1 and K2 directions. The AMS fabric clearly reflects the macroscopic fabric transpositions along the entire investigated strain gradient in the rock salt. Magnetic fabrics reveal continuous trends from bimodal to semi-girdle distribution of foliations in folded and cleavage present regions, to magnetic lineation clustering perpendicular to flow in completely refolded

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of some AgF + Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteel, William J.; Lucier, George; Hagiwara, Rika; Borrmann, Horst; Bartlett, Neil

    1992-01-01

    New salts of the one-dimensional chain-cation (Ag-F) n n+ have been prepared, the structural and magnetic properties of which indicate that they are metallic. A single-crystal X-ray structure analysis of AgFBF 4 has established a linear cationic chain, the two Ag-F interatomic distances, at 296 K, being 2.002(3) and 2.009(3) Å. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on the poweder from 6 to 280 K show an approximately temperature-independent paramagnetism (χ M˜180×10 -6 emu mole -1) with no evidence of a Peierls transition in that range. Although the previously known salt, AgFAsF 6, has a kinked cationic chain (with, at 166 K, Ag-F-Ag=143.1(1) o, F-Ag-F=175.8(1) o, Ag-F=1.994(2) and 2.001(2) Å), it also exhibits temperature-independent paramagnetism from 280 down to 63 K, but a sharp drop in susceptibility below that temperature may signify a Peierls transition. AgFAuF 6, which is probably isostructural with AgFAsF 6, is similar to it magnetically. The salt AgFAuF 4 probably contains a linear cationic chain, since it is isostructural with CuFAuF 4, but the salt Ag(AuF 4) 2, like its relative Ag(AgF 4) 2, is a magnetically dilute paramagnet, the magnetic susceptibility of which departs very little from the Curie law between 6 and 280 K.

  20. A Variable-Parameter Creep Damage Model Incorporating the Effects of Loading Frequency for Rock Salt and Its Application in a Bedded Storage Cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Linjian; Wang, Mingyang; Zhang, Ning; Fan, Pengxian; Li, Jie

    2017-09-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the effects of the loading frequency on the time-dependent behavior and damage properties of rock salt under confining stress states. Axial two-stage irreversible deformation based on the loci of the minimum load of each cycle was observed, and this observation was similar to the result of conventional creep tests under static loads. The unloading modulus decreased exponentially with respect to time, and the damage variable was represented in terms of the decay of the material stiffness. To account for the effects of the loading frequency on the time-dependent degradation of rock salt, a unified damage evolution equation was formulated based on the experimental results. A creep damage model of rock salt was proposed by introducing non-stationary modular components into the Burgers viscoelastic model. Numerical simulation was performed using the newly developed model to evaluate the stability and serviceability of a storage cavern in a bedded salt formation under various loading scenarios. The simulated results indicate that a lower injection-withdrawal frequency results in a greater volume convergence rate and a wider dilatancy region of the storage cavern. Additionally, the stress concentration and dilatancy of the surrounding rock mass extend much deeper into the mudstone interbeds than into other regions of the cavern.

  1. Preparation of Al-Si Master Alloy by Electrochemical Reduction of Volcanic Rock in Cryolite Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aimin; Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Hu, Xianwei; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rock found in the Longgang Volcano Group in Jilin Province of China has properties essentially similar to Apollo lunar soils and previously prepared lunar soil simulants, such as Johnson Space Center Lunar simulant and Minnesota Lunar simulant. In this study, an electrochemical method of preparation of Al-Si master alloy was investigated in 52.7 wt.%NaF-47.3 wt.%AlF3 melt adding 5 wt.% volcanic rock at 1233 K. The cathodic electrochemical process was studied by cyclic voltammetry, and the results showed that the cathodic reduction of Si(IV) is a two-step reversible diffusion-controlled reaction. Si(IV) is reduced to Si(II) by two electron transfers at -1.05 V versus platinum quasi-reference electrode in 52.7 wt.%NaF-47.3 wt.%AlF3 molten salt adding 5 wt.% volcanic rock, while the reduction peak at -1.18 V was the co-deposition of aluminum and silicon. In addition, the cathodic product obtained by galvanostatic electrolysis for 4 h was analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The results showed that the phase compositions of the products are Al, Si, Al5FeSi, and Al3.21Si0.47, while the components are 90.5 wt.% aluminum, 4.4 wt.% silicon, 1.9 wt.% iron, and 0.2 wt.% titanium.

  2. A coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs: Predicting 3D structure, stability and salt effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Feng-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2014-09-14

    To bridge the gap between the sequences and 3-dimensional (3D) structures of RNAs, some computational models have been proposed for predicting RNA 3D structures. However, the existed models seldom consider the conditions departing from the room/body temperature and high salt (1M NaCl), and thus generally hardly predict the thermodynamics and salt effect. In this study, we propose a coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs to predict 3D structures, stability, and salt effect. Combined with Monte Carlo simulated annealing algorithm and a coarse-grained force field, the model folds 46 tested RNAs (≤45 nt) including pseudoknots into their native-like structures from their sequences, with an overall mean RMSD of 3.5 Å and an overall minimum RMSD of 1.9 Å from the experimental structures. For 30 RNA hairpins, the present model also gives the reliable predictions for the stability and salt effect with the mean deviation ∼ 1.0 °C of melting temperatures, as compared with the extensive experimental data. In addition, the model could provide the ensemble of possible 3D structures for a short RNA at a given temperature/salt condition.

  3. Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK): structure, regulation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Julian, Linda; Olson, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK) were originally identified as effectors of the RhoA small GTPase. (1)(-) (5) They belong to the AGC family of serine/threonine kinases (6) and play vital roles in facilitating actomyosin cytoskeleton contractility downstream of RhoA and RhoC activation. Since their discovery, ROCK kinases have been extensively studied, unveiling their manifold functions in processes including cell contraction, migration, apoptosis, survival, and proliferation. Two mammalian ROCK homologs have been identified, ROCK1 (also called ROCK I, ROKβ, Rho-kinase β, or p160ROCK) and ROCK2 (also known as ROCK II, ROKα, or Rho kinase), hereafter collectively referred to as ROCK. In this review, we will focus on the structure, regulation, and functions of ROCK.

  4. Composite grain size sensitive and grain size insensitive creep of bischofite, carnallite and mixed bischofite-carnallite-halite salt rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Nawaz; de Bresser, Hans; Peach, Colin; Spiers, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Deformation experiments have been conducted on rock samples of the valuable magnesium and potassium salts bischofite and carnallite, and on mixed bischofite-carnallite-halite rocks. The samples have been machined from a natural core from the northern part of the Netherlands. Main aim was to produce constitutive flow laws that can be applied at the in situ conditions that hold in the undissolved wall rock of caverns resulting from solution mining. The experiments were triaxial compression tests carried out at true in situ conditions of 70° C temperature and 40 MPa confining pressure. A typical experiment consisted of a few steps at constant strain rate, in the range 10-5 to 10-8 s-1, interrupted by periods of stress relaxation. During the constant strain rate part of the test, the sample was deformed until a steady (or near steady) state of stress was reached. This usually required about 2-4% of shortening. Then the piston was arrested and the stress on the sample was allowed to relax until the diminishing force on the sample reached the limits of the load cell resolution, usually at a strain rate in the order of 10-9 s-1. The duration of each relaxation step was a few days. Carnallite was found to be 4-5 times stronger than bischofite. The bischofite-carnallite-halite mixtures, at their turn, were stronger than carnallite, and hence substantially stronger than pure bischofite. For bischofite as well as carnallite, we observed that during stress relaxation, the stress exponent nof a conventional power law changed from ˜5 at strain rate 10-5 s-1 to ˜1 at 10-9 s-1. The absolute strength of both materials remained higher if relaxation started at a higher stress, i.e. at a faster strain rate. We interpret this as indicating a difference in microstructure at the initiation of the relaxation, notably a smaller grain size related to dynamical recrystallization during the constant strain rate step. The data thus suggest that there is a gradual change in deformation

  5. Crystallographic, Electronic, and Magnetic Properties of Rock Salt Superstructure Sulfide Lu2CrS4 with Jahn-Teller Distortion.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Keitaro; Wakeshima, Makoto; Nozawa, Masataka; Oshikane, Keita; Ohoyama, Kenji; Shan, Yue Jin; Imoto, Hideo; Hinatsu, Yukio

    2015-10-19

    A new chromium(II) sulfide, Lu2CrS4, with a novel structure was prepared by a solid-state reaction. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern could be indexed as a tetragonal system, with a = 7.46373(2) Å, c = 22.6338(2) Å, and space group I4̅2d (No. 122). Rietveld analysis of the pattern provided the crystal structure consisting of CrS6 and LuS6 octahedra sharing edges and apexes and revealed a rock salt superstructure with new cation (vacancy) arrangements. The electrical resistivity indicates semiconducting behavior. The magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements showed that the Cr ions are in the high-spin d(4) configuration and that their magnetic moments ordered antiferromagnetically at 55 K. The basic antiferromagnetic structure was determined using powder neutron diffraction data at 10 K. The band structure calculations demonstrate that the densities of states of Cr 3d electrons split into two spin-up eg bands because of Jahn-Teller distortion.

  6. 105. Catalog OPark Structure/Construction & Maintenance, 23 Marys Rock Tunnel, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. Catalog O-Park Structure/Construction & Maintenance, 23 Marys Rock Tunnel, Negative No. 6306 ca. late 1930s MARYS ROCK TUNNEL, SOUTH PORTAL. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  7. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates. Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  8. Fluid distribution in grain boundaries of natural fine-grained rock salt deformed at low shear stress: implications for rheology and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; De Bresser, J. H. P.

    2012-04-01

    healing criterion of Van Noort et al. (2008). This suggests that PS creep is not active in our samples. Therefore, there is a disagreement with previous microstructural studies (Schléder and Urai, 2007; Desbois et al., 2010) of similar samples, which have shown active PS creep (and dislocation creep) in of salt glaciers. We discuss different explanations for this, which imply that both healing and reactivation of grain boundaries is important in salt glaciers, leading to heterogeneous distribution of deformation mechanisms and strain rates in both space and time. Desbois G., Zavada P., Schléder Z., Urai J.L., 2010. Deformation and recrystallization mechanisms in naturally deformed salt fountain: microstructural evidence for a switch in deformation mechanisms with increased availability of meteoric water and decreased grain size (Qum Kuh, central Iran). Journal of Structural Geology, 32 (4), 580-594. Schléder Z. and Urai J.L. (2007). Deformation and recrystallization mechanisms in mylonitic shear zones in naturally deformed extrusive Eocene-Oligocene rock salt from Eyvanekey plateau and Garmsar hills (central Iran). Journal of structural geology, 29: 241-255. Van Noort, R., Visser, H.J.M., Spiers, C.J., 2008. Influence of grain boundary structure on dissolution controlled pressure solution and retarding effects of grain boundary healing. J. Geophys. Res. 113.

  9. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    The ability to predict the permeability of fine-grained soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks is a fundamental challenge in the geosciences with potentially transformative implications in subsurface hydrology. In particular, fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) constitute about two-thirds of the sedimentary rock mass and play important roles in three energy technologies: petroleum geology, geologic carbon sequestration, and radioactive waste management. The problem is a challenging one that requires understanding the properties of complex natural porous media on several length scales. One inherent length scale, referred to hereafter as the mesoscale, is associated with the assemblages of large grains of quartz, feldspar, and carbonates over distances of tens of micrometers. Its importance is highlighted by the existence of a threshold in the core scale mechanical properties and regional scale energy uses of shale formations at a clay content Xclay ≈ 1/3, as predicted by an ideal packing model where a fine-grained clay matrix fills the gaps between the larger grains. A second important length scale, referred to hereafter as the nanoscale, is associated with the aggregation and swelling of clay particles (in particular, smectite clay minerals) over distances of tens of nanometers. Mesoscale phenomena that influence permeability are primarily mechanical and include, for example, the ability of contacts between large grains to prevent the compaction of the clay matrix. Nanoscale phenomena that influence permeability tend to be chemomechanical in nature, because they involve strong impacts of aqueous chemistry on clay swelling. The second length scale remains much less well characterized than the first, because of the inherent challenges associated with the study of strongly coupled nanoscale phenomena. Advanced models of the nanoscale properties of fine-grained media rely predominantly on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, a mean field

  10. Geographic variation in salt marsh structure and function.

    PubMed

    McCall, Brittany D; Pennings, Steven C

    2012-11-01

    We examined geographic variation in the structure and function of salt marsh communities along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. Focusing on the arthropod community in the dominant salt marsh plant Spartina alterniflora, we tested two hypotheses: first, that marsh community structure varies geographically, and second, that two aspects of marsh function (response to eutrophication and addition of dead plant material) also vary geographically. We worked at eleven sites on the Gulf Coast and eleven sites on the Atlantic Coast, dividing each coast up into two geographic areas. Abiotic conditions (tidal range, soil organic content, and water content, but not soil salinity), plant variables (Spartina nitrogen content, height, cover of dead plant material, but not live Spartina percent cover or light interception), and arthropod variables (proportional abundances of predators, sucking herbivores, stem-boring herbivores, parasitoids, and detritivores, but not total arthropod numbers) varied among the four geographic regions. Latitude and mean tidal range explained much of this geographic variation. Nutrient enrichment increased all arthropod functional groups in the community, consistent with previous experimental results, and had similar effects in all geographic regions, contrary to our hypothesis, suggesting widespread consistency in this aspect of ecosystem function. The addition of dead plant material had surprisingly little effect on the arthropod community. Our results caution against the uncritical extrapolation of work done in one geographic region to another, but indicate that some aspects of marsh function may operate in similar ways in different geographic regions, despite spatial variation in community structure.

  11. Structural and physicochemical characterization of pyridine derivative salts of anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipadappu, Sunil Kumar; Trivedi, Darshak R.

    2017-08-01

    Salts of common anti-inflammatory drugs mefenamic acid (MFA), tolfenamic acid (TFA) and naproxen (NPX) with various pyridine derivatives (4-amino pyridine (4AP), 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 2-amino pyridine (2AP)) were synthesized by crystal engineering approach based on the pKa values of API's and the salt former. All the salts were characterized systematically by various spectroscopic methods including FT-IR and 1H NMR and the crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques (SCXRD). DMAP salt of NPX and 2AP salts of MFA and TFA were not obtained in the salt screening experiments. All the molecular salts exhibited 1:1 molecular stoichiometry in the asymmetric unit and except NPX-2AP salt, all the molecular salts included a water molecule in the crystal lattice. Physicochemical and structural properties between drug-drug molecular salts of MFA-4AP, TFA-4AP and NPX-4AP have been evaluated and it was found that these molecular salts were found to be stable for a time period of six months at ambient condition and further hydration of molecular salts were not observed even at accelerated humid conditions (∼75% RH). It was found that 4AP salts of MFA and TFA and DMAP salts of MFA and TFA are isostructural.

  12. In situ AE records in cyclically loaded rock salt - The stress memory effect and spatio-temporal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.; Cailleau, B.; Dahm, T.; Shapiro, S.; Kaiser, D.

    2009-04-01

    We study acoustic emission (AE) activity caused by cyclic thermal loading due to the backfilling of a cavity in an abandoned salt mine to answer questions regarding the stress memory effect of rock (Kaiser effect), the dependence of AE rates and b-value on the stress state as well as the stress rate and the spatio-temporal evolution of the AE activity. Event rates and b-values of the frequency magnitude relation are calculated for a region well covered by a network of piezo-electric receivers from an event catalog corrected for incomplete recording times. Results are compared and correlated with the output of a 2D thermo-elastic stress modelling performed with an FE program. The high quality of the AE dataset as well as the good control of the input parameters of the FE program allows us to study the in situ activity in the mining environment with exceptionally high precision and temporal resolution. The backfilling period can be subdivided into two AE activity regimes. The first one exhibits a clear and pronounced Kaiser effect as well as an upward migration of the AE event front away from the ceiling of the cavity which correlates with the calculated stress field. This observation of the Kaiser effect implies that no healing effect is observed for these first few loading cycles. The maximum event rate observed during a loading cycle scales with the absolute stress increase of this cycle with respect to the former maximum. This behavior is also observed for later loading cycles which show a deteriorated Kaiser effect with an onset of AE activity well before the former maximum stress and a smaller slope of the relation between maximum event rate and absolute stress increase. During later loading cycles also time periods showing a pronounced anti-correlation between event rate and Coulomb stress with event rate maxima during minima of the Coulomb stress are observed. These time periods are generally characterized by a b-value of the frequency magnitude relation much

  13. Marivibrio halodurans gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium in the family Rhodospirillaceae isolated from underground rock salt.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoxing; Xu, Yao; Zheng, Chen; Ke, Li-Xia

    2017-09-18

    Gram-negative, spiral or curved rod-shaped cells of a bacterial strain, designated ZC80T, were isolated from a rock salt sample collected at Yunnan salt mine, China. Analysis of the strain's 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed a clear affiliation of this novel strain within the family Rhodospirillaceae. Strain ZC80T formed a robust cluster with Pelagibius litoralis CL-UU02T at a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity level of 88.1 %. Strain ZC80T shared no more than 91.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of other species in the family Rhodospirillaceae. Strain ZC80T was able to grow in the presence of 2-15 % (w/v) NaCl, and grew at 10-50 °C and pH 6.0-10.0. The major fatty acids were C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c (41.3 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminolipid. The DNA G+C content of strain ZC80T was 60.8 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses and chemotaxonomic and physiological data, strain ZC80T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Rhodospirillaceae, for which the name Marivibrio halodurans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Marivibrio halodurans is ZC80T (=CGMCC 1.15697T=NBRC 112461T).

  14. Structural and Compositional Characteristics of the Rocks of the Nyarovey Series (Polar Urals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyasheva, Natalia; Grakova, Oksana; Pystin, Aleksandr; Pystina, Yulia

    2016-10-01

    Nyarovey series is a poorly studied subject of the Central Ural region of Polar Urals. The aim of this work is to establish the structural changes, primary structure and geodynamic conditions of formation of protolith rocks of the Nyarovey series. As a result of petrographic and petrochemical study of rocks as part of the Nyarovey series highlighted several groups of metamorphic rocks, separated by primary and chemical composition. Among them are the ortho-rocks and para-rocks. Ortho-rocks present metabasalts and metatuffs. Para-rocks are metapealites, metagraywacke, arkose and quartz sandstones. It was found that the rocks have undergone three stages of deformation, the most typical folds associated with the formation of Uralides (Hercynian orogeny). Overall, it can be assumed the formation of volcanogenicsedimentary material in Nyarovey time in oceanic-margin or margin-sea environment.

  15. Design of a new family of inorganic compounds Ae2F2SnX3 (Ae = Sr, Ba; X = S, Se) using rock salt and fluorite 2D building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kabbour, Houria; Cario, Laurent; Danot, Michel; Meerschaut, Alain

    2006-01-23

    We could predict the structure of a new family of compounds Ae(2)F(2)SnX(3) (Ae = Sr, Ba; X = S, Se) from the stacking of known 2D building blocks of the rock salt and fluorite types. With a high-temperature ceramic method we have then succeeded to synthesize the four compounds Ba(2)F(2)SnS(3), Ba(2)F(2)SnSe(3), Sr(2)F(2)SnS(3), and Sr(2)F(2)SnSe(3). The structure refinements from X-ray powder diffraction patterns have confirmed the structure predictions and showed their good accuracy. The structure of the four compounds results from the alternated stacking of fluorite [Ae(2)F(2)] (Ae = Sr, Ba) and distorted rock salt [SnX(3)] (X = S, Se) 2D building blocks. As shown by band structure calculations, these blocks behave as a charge reservoir and a charge acceptor, respectively. Sr(2)F(2)SnS(3) and Ba(2)F(2)SnS(3) are transparent with optical gaps of 3.06 and 3.21 eV, respectively. However, an attempt to obtain a transparent conductor by substituting Ba per La in Ba(2)F(2)SnS(3) was unsuccessful.

  16. Selected Aspects of Numerical Modelling of the Salt Rock Mass: The Case of the "Wieliczka" Salt Mine / Wybrane aspekty modelowania numerycznego masywu solnego na przykładzie kopalni soli "wieliczka"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Obyrn, Kajetan; Hydzik-Wiśniewska, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Each excavation or excavation complex intended to be backfilled or secured requires an individual approach, and conducting a detailed geomechanical analysis which will allow the selection of the appropriate manner of securing or backfilling or liquidation, and the order of performing mining works. The numerical model of the selected chamber or group of chambers must accurately reflect the reality and have an appropriately selected calculation model. The paper presents the selected aspects of numerical modelling of the "Wieliczka" salt rock mass. There are method of selection of geotechnical and rheological parameters of salt, the geometrization of the excavations continues and selection calculation model.

  17. Polar and magnetic layered A-site and rock salt B-site-ordered NaLnFeWO6 (Ln = La, Nd) perovskites.

    PubMed

    Retuerto, M; Li, M R; Ignatov, A; Croft, M; Ramanujachary, K V; Chi, S; Hodges, J P; Dachraoui, W; Hadermann, J; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Grams, C P; Hemberger, J; Greenblatt, M

    2013-11-04

    We have expanded the double perovskite family of materials with the unusual combination of layered order in the A sublattice and rock salt order over the B sublattice to compounds NaLaFeWO6 and NaNdFeWO6. The materials have been synthesized and studied by powder X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, electron diffraction, magnetic measurements, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, dielectric measurements, and second harmonic generation. At room temperature, the crystal structures of both compounds can be defined in the noncentrosymmetric monoclinic P2(1) space group resulting from the combination of ordering both in the A and B sublattices, the distortion of the cell due to tilting of the octahedra, and the displacement of certain cations. The magnetic studies show that both compounds are ordered antiferromagnetically below T(N) ≈ 25 K for NaLaFeWO6 and at ∼21 K for NaNdFeWO6. The magnetic structure of NaNdFeWO6 has been solved with a propagation vector k = ((1/2) 0 (1/2)) as an antiferromagnetic arrangement of Fe and Nd moments. Although the samples are potential multiferroics, the dielectric measurements do not show a ferroelectric response.

  18. The absence of ferroelectric polarization in layered and rock-salt ordered NaLnMnWO6 (Ln = La, Nd, Tb) perovskites.

    PubMed

    De, Chandan; Kim, Tai Hoon; Kim, Kee Hoon; Sundaresan, A

    2014-03-21

    The ordered perovskites, NaLnMnWO6 (Ln = La, Nd, Tb), are reported to exhibit simultaneous ordering of A-site cations (Na and Ln) in layered arrangement and B-site cations (Mn and W) in rock salt structure. They have been shown to crystallize in a monoclinic structure with the polar space group P21. Based on density functional calculations and group theoretical analysis, it has recently been proposed that NaLaMnWO6 should be ferroelectric with a relatively large polarization (16 μC cm(-2)). Contrary to this prediction, our electrical measurements such as conventional P-E loop, Positive-Up and Negative-Down (PUND), piezoelectric response and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) reveal the absence of ferroelectric polarization in NaLnMnWO6 (Ln = La, Nd, Tb). A dielectric anomaly is observed just below room temperature (∼270 K) for all the three compounds, which is related to the change in conductivity as revealed by temperature dependent ac and dc resistivity. A pyrocurrent peak is also observed at the same temperature. However, its origin cannot be attributed to a ferroelectric transition.

  19. Resistance of halobacterial isolates from Permian rock salt to physico-chemical extremes, including heat and a simulated Martian atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuko, S.; Weidler, G.; Radax, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Extremely halophilic archaebacteria (halobacteria) are found today in hypersaline surface waters, such as the brines in solar salterns, or the Dead Sea. However, from Alpine rock salt of Permo-Triassic age several species of halobacteria were isolated during the last years (1, 2). Halobacteria are not known to produce spores or dormant forms; thus it remains enigmatic how they survived in the salt sediments. Extraterrestrial halite has been detected in meteorites from Mars and from the asteroids; in addition, the Jovian moon Europa is thought to contain a salty ocean. Therefore halobacteria would be useful model organisms when considering the search for extraterrestrial life. We are developing experimental protocols to evaluate the effects of physico-chemical stress factors on halobacteria, in particular present-day Martian conditions. But the effect of higher temperatures is also of interest, since Mars may have been warmer in the past, and the Alpine salt sediments are known to have experienced local temperature peaks. Cells of Halococcus dombrowskii (2) and, for comparison, of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were grown in complex medium, containing up to 4 M NaCl (2). Aliquots of cultures were kept at minus 70oC for several days, or freeze-dried in a lyophilizer, or incubated at temperatures of 50 to 80oC for 24 hours, respectively. In addition, exposure experiments of halobacterial cells in a liquid nitrogen cooled Martian simulation chamber were begun. Survival of cells was evaluated by determining colony-forming units and by examination of cellular morphology by fluorescence microscopy, following staining with the LIVE-DEAD kit. Results indicated that the LIVE-DEAD kit can be successfully used in the presence of 4 M NaCl, although it was developed for tests at low ionic strength. Data will be presented which show that Hc. dombrowskii survived deep freezing, temperatures of up to 80 oC and Martian atmospheric conditions generally better than Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

  20. Can Structural Optimization Explain Slow Dynamics of Rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Vistisen, O.; Tencate, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Slow dynamics is a recovery process that describes the return to an equilibrium state after some external energy input is applied and then removed. Experimental studies on many rocks have shown that a modest acoustic energy input results in slow dynamics. The recovery process of the stiffness has consistently been found to be linear to log(time) for a wide range of geomaterials and the time constants appear to be unique to the material [TenCate JA, Shankland TJ (1996), Geophys Res Lett 23, 3019-3022]. Measurements of this nonequilibrium effect in rocks (e.g. sandstones and limestones) have been linked directly to the cement holding the individual grains together [Darling TW, TenCate JA, Brown DW, Clausen B, Vogel SC (2004), Geophys Res Lett 31, L16604], also suggesting a potential link to porosity and permeability. Noting that slow dynamics consistently returns the overall stiffness of rocks to its maximum (original) state, it is hypothesized that the original state represents the global minimum strain energy state. Consequently the slow dynamics process represents the global minimization or optimization process. Structural optimization, which has been developed for engineering design, minimises the total strain energy by rearranging the material distribution [Kim H, Querin OM, Steven GP, Xie YM (2002), Struct Multidiscip Optim 24, 441-448]. The optimization process effectively rearranges the way the material is cemented. One of the established global optimization methods is simulated annealing (SA). Derived from cooling of metal to a thermal equilibrium, SA finds an optimum solution by iteratively moving the system towards the minimum energy state with a probability of 'uphill' moves. It has been established that the global optimum can be guaranteed by applying a log(time) linear cooling schedule [Hajek B (1988, Math Ops Res, 15, 311-329]. This work presents the original study of applying SA to the maximum stiffness optimization problem. Preliminary results

  1. The structure of performance of a sport rock climber.

    PubMed

    Magiera, Artur; Roczniok, Robert; Maszczyk, Adam; Czuba, Miłosz; Kantyka, Joanna; Kurek, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    This study is a contribution to the discussion about the structure of performance of sport rock climbers. Because of the complex and multifaceted nature of this sport, multivariate statistics were applied in the study. The subjects included thirty experienced sport climbers. Forty three variables were scrutinised, namely somatic characteristics, specific physical fitness, coordination abilities, aerobic and anaerobic power, technical and tactical skills, mental characteristics, as well as 2 variables describing the climber's performance in the OS (Max OS) and RP style (Max RP). The results show that for training effectiveness of advanced climbers to be thoroughly analysed and examined, tests assessing their physical, technical and mental characteristics are necessary. The three sets of variables used in this study explained the structure of performance similarly, but not identically (in 38, 33 and 25%, respectively). They were also complementary to around 30% of the variance. The overall performance capacity of a sport rock climber (Max OS and Max RP) was also evaluated in the study. The canonical weights of the dominant first canonical root were 0.554 and 0.512 for Max OS and Max RP, respectively. Despite the differences between the two styles of climbing, seven variables - the maximal relative strength of the fingers (canonical weight = 0.490), mental endurance (one of scales : The Formal Characteristics of Behaviour-Temperament Inventory (FCB-TI; Strelau and Zawadzki, 1995)) (-0.410), climbing technique (0.370), isometric endurance of the fingers (0.340), the number of errors in the complex reaction time test (-0.319), the ape index (-0.319) and oxygen uptake during arm work at the anaerobic threshold (0.254) were found to explain 77% of performance capacity common to the two styles.

  2. The Structure of Performance of a Sport Rock Climber

    PubMed Central

    Magiera, Artur; Roczniok, Robert; Maszczyk, Adam; Czuba, Miłosz; Kantyka, Joanna; Kurek, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    This study is a contribution to the discussion about the structure of performance of sport rock climbers. Because of the complex and multifaceted nature of this sport, multivariate statistics were applied in the study. The subjects included thirty experienced sport climbers. Forty three variables were scrutinised, namely somatic characteristics, specific physical fitness, coordination abilities, aerobic and anaerobic power, technical and tactical skills, mental characteristics, as well as 2 variables describing the climber’s performance in the OS (Max OS) and RP style (Max RP). The results show that for training effectiveness of advanced climbers to be thoroughly analysed and examined, tests assessing their physical, technical and mental characteristics are necessary. The three sets of variables used in this study explained the structure of performance similarly, but not identically (in 38, 33 and 25%, respectively). They were also complementary to around 30% of the variance. The overall performance capacity of a sport rock climber (Max OS and Max RP) was also evaluated in the study. The canonical weights of the dominant first canonical root were 0.554 and 0.512 for Max OS and Max RP, respectively. Despite the differences between the two styles of climbing, seven variables – the maximal relative strength of the fingers (canonical weight = 0.490), mental endurance (one of scales : The Formal Characteristics of Behaviour–Temperament Inventory (FCB–TI; Strelau and Zawadzki, 1995)) (−0.410), climbing technique (0.370), isometric endurance of the fingers (0.340), the number of errors in the complex reaction time test (−0.319), the ape index (−0.319) and oxygen uptake during arm work at the anaerobic threshold (0.254) were found to explain 77% of performance capacity common to the two styles. PMID:23717360

  3. Size-controlled synthesis of bifunctional magnetic and ultraviolet optical rock-salt MnS nanocube superlattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Sui, Yongming; Huang, Xiaoli; Cui, Tian; Wang, Chunzhong; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-12-21

    Wide-band-gap rock-salt (RS) MnS nanocubes were synthesized by the one-pot solvent thermal approach. The edge length of the nanocubes can be easily controlled by prolonging the reaction time (or aging time). We systematically explored the formation of RS-MnS nanocubes and found that the present synthetic method is virtually a combination of oriented aggregation and intraparticle ripening processes. Furthermore, these RS-MnS nanocubes could spontaneously assemble into ordered superlattices via the natural cooling process. The optical and magnetic properties were investigated using measured by UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence spectra, and a magnetometer. The obtained RS-MnS nanocubes exhibit good ultraviolet optical properties depending on the size of the samples. The magnetic measurements suggest that RS-MnS nanocubes consist of an antiferromagnetic core and a ferromagnetic shell below the blocking temperatures. Furthermore, the hysteresis measurements indicate these RS-MnS nanocubes have large coercive fields (e.g., 1265 Oe for 40 nm nanocubes), which is attributed to the size and self-assembly of the samples.

  4. The Distribution of Rock Salt and Gypsum in Sequence Stratigraphic Framework—A Case in Jialingjiang Formation in Chongqing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caixa, Gao; Jun, Yi; Junjiang, Su; Yongqin, Zhang; Bo, Li

    2017-05-01

    The Jialingjiang Formation of the Lower Triassic in the eastern Sichuan Basin is subdivided into four members. The first and third members are featured with limestone, while the second and forth members which are clipped with gypsum and halite are characterized by dolomite and limy dolomite. At the same time, the second and forth members are the main geothermal reservoir in Chongqing area. Two sequence boundaries represented by regional unconformities and the lithology-lithofacies transition surface are recognized in the Jialingjiang formation based on outcrop and borehole data analysis. A total of two third-order sequences are subdivided in the Jialingjiang formation, and they are subcorrelated to the intervals of Member 1 to Member 2, Member 3 to Member 4, respectively. Each sequence is further subdivided into lacustrine transgresive system tract (TST) and highstand system tract (HST) according to variation in lithology and lithofacies. The sea level change is the main factor to control the sequence development. With the sea level change, the middle and late periods of HST in sequence are the favorable periods of the development of rock salt and gypsum.

  5. Structures and stability of salt-bridge in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sagarik, Kritsana; Chaiyapongs, Supaporn

    2005-09-01

    Structures and stability of salt-bridges in aqueous solutions were investigated using a complex formed from the guanidinium (Gdm+) and formate (FmO-) ions as a model system. The Test-particle model (T-model) potentials to describe the interactions in the Gdm+-H2O, FmO(-)-H2O and Gdm+-FmO- complexes were constructed, tested and applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the aqueous solutions at 298 K. The three-dimensional structures and energetic of the hydrogen bond (H-bond) networks of water in the first hydration shells of the Gdm+ and FmO- ions, as well as the Gdm+-FmO- complex, were visualized and analyzed using various probability distribution (PD) maps. The structures of the average potential energy landscapes at the H-bond networks were employed to characterize the stability and dynamic behavior of water molecules in the first hydration shells of the solutes. It was observed that water molecules in the first hydration shell of the close-contact Gdm+-FmO- complex form associated H-bond networks, which introduce a net stabilization effect to the ion-pair, whereas those in the interstitial H-bond network destabilize and break the solvent-separated Gdm+-FmO- complex. The present results showed that, in order to provide complete insights into the structures and stability of ion-pairs in aqueous solutions, explicit water molecules have to be included in the model calculations.

  6. High-Salt Intake Augments the Activity of the RhoA/ROCK Pathway and Reduces Intracellular Calcium in Arteries From Rats.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Sandra; Webb, Robert Clinton; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the influence of salt overconsumption on the functionality of the RhoA/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway and calcium regulation in arteries. The aorta and small mesenteric arteries from rats fed a chow containing 2%, 4%, or 8% NaCl were evaluated in organ baths for the activity of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and intracellular calcium mobilization. Components of these pathways and intracellular calcium levels were also assessed in samples from 4% NaCl group. In arteries from animals fed regular chow, the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 reduced the responses to phenylephrine, even when the smallest concentrations (1 and 3 μM) were tested. However, only higher concentrations of Y-27632 (10 and 50 μM) reduced phenylephrine-induced contraction in vessels from high-salt groups. Immunoblotting revealed augmented phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and increased amounts of RhoA in the membrane fraction of aorta homogenates from the 4% NaCl group. Under calcium-free solution, vessels from NaCl groups presented reduced contractile responses to phenylephrine and caffeine, compared with the regular chow group. Moreover, decreased intracellular calcium at rest and after stimulation with ATP were found in aortic smooth muscle cells from 4% NaCl-fed rats, which also showed diminished levels of SERCA2 and SERCA3, but not of IP3 and ryanodine receptors, or STIM1 and Orai1 proteins. Arteries from rats subjected to high-salt intake are unable to properly regulate intracellular calcium levels and present augmented activity of the calcium sensitization pathway RhoA/ROCK. These changes may precede the development of vascular diseases induced by high-salt intake.

  7. Radiation damage measurements on rock salt and other minerals for waste disposal applications. Quarterly report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Swyler, K J; Loman, J M; Teutonico, L J; Elgort, G E; Levy, P W

    1980-04-10

    Different aspects of radiation damage in both synthetic NaCl crystals and various natural rock salt samples as well as granite, basalt and other minerals which will be important for radioactive waste disposal applications are being investigated. The principal means of measuring radiation damage is the determination of F-center concentrations, and the concentration and size of sodium metal colloid particles. Formation of these and other defects during irradiation and the annealing of defects and characterization of other processes occurring after irradiation are being studied as a function of dose rate, total dose, sample temperature during irradiation, strain applied prior to and during irradiation, etc. Measurements are being made on synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt samples from different geological locations, including some potential repository sites. It will be necessary to determine if radiation damage in the minerals from different localities is similar. If non-negligible differences are observed a detailed study must be made for each locality under consideration. Almost all current studies are being made on rock salt but other minerals particularly granite and basalt are being phased into the program. It is now established that radiation damage formation in both natural and synthetic rock salt is strongly dependent on strain. The strain related effects strongly indicate that the damage formation processes and in particular the colloid nucleation processes are related to the strain induced disolcations. A temporary theoretical effort has been started to determine which dislocation related effects are important for radiation damage processes and, most importantly, what dislocation interactions are most likely to create nucleation sites for colloid particles. If these preliminary studies indicate that additional theoretical studies will be useful an effort will be made to have them extended.

  8. A new structural model of the Pachitea Basin, Peru: Interaction of thick-skinned tectonics and salt detached thrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, J.; Rebaza, J.; Westlund, D.; Stratton, M.; Alegria, C.

    2015-11-01

    We present four new structural transects, a new seismo-stratigraphic correlation, a refined structural model and new shortening rates for the Pachitea Basin (=PB), Peru. Our results are based on the integration and detailed interpretation of newly acquired industry seismic (2D, 2005 vintage), existing well data, existing and proprietary surface geology data and newly acquired aero magnetic data (2007 vintage). Our assessment confirms the presence of at least four distinct structural styles in the area, thick-skinned structures, thin-skinned detachment thrusting, salt-tectonics and localized strike-slip tectonics. Based on seismo-stratigraphic correlations we conclude that the oldest rocks carried to outcrop by the San Matias (=SM) thrust are of Jurassic age. We interpret the thin-skinned master detachment to be located in varying positions, directly below or above, autochtonous salt pillows. Timing assessment of the SM thrust sheet reveals that it has been active from at least ∼5 Ma to post-2 Ma, supporting regionally published timing data for this latitude. Positive topographic surface expressions indicate ongoing contraction along the mountain front of the Peruvian Eastern Cordillera (=EC). Across the PB we calculate between 2.6% and 5.5% for thick-skinned shortening and at least 25.5% for the thin-skinned shortening. For the SM thrust sheet we calculate a slip-rate of ∼1-1.6 mm/yr, which is in line with published slip rates on individual thrusts from around the world. Observations along the SM thrust system indicate that thin- and thick-skinned systems interact mechanically, and that they have been active intermittently. We conclude that the location of salt pillows as well as pre-existing or growing basement-involved structures helped trigger the SM thrust. Different types of salt bodies are present in the PB, autochtonous pillows, slightly thrusted pillows and allochtonous diapirs. Our results provide new insight into the structural interplay, particularly

  9. Simulation of the pressure-driven wurtzite to rock salt phase transition in nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Benjamin J; Madden, Paul A

    2006-07-28

    Nanocrystals in the size range 12-21 nm of a model binary ionic material in the wurtzite (B4) structure were constructed with morphologies which minimize the surface energy. These were then embedded in a pressurization medium, consisting of a binary Lennard-Jones-type fluid and progressively pressurized in "constant pressure" molecular dynamics simulation runs. Phase transitions to the rocksalt (B1) phase were confirmed by examining calculated powder diffraction patterns, which show the same changes in features as seen for experimental systems. By directly observing the atomic trajectories throughout the duration of the transition the local mechanism has been identified. The transition proceeds via a trigonal bipyramidal intermediate, denoted as the h-MgO structure. It is initiated by a single nucleation event at a [1120]B4 surface with subsequent growth of the B1 region throughout the remainder of the nanocrystal. The consequences of this mechanism for the particle shape of the product phase are detailed and contrasted with those previously found for initially zincblende (B3) structured nanoparticles, using the same interaction potential. The observed transition pressures are elevated relative to the thermodynamically predicted pressure for the bulk, but there is no observable system size effect on the transition pressure across the size range of nanocrystals investigated.

  10. Healing and Shear Stress Reduction on Single Fracture of Rock Salt and Limestone under Slide-Hold-Slide Direct Shear Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, K.; Yano, T.; Yasuhara, H.

    2012-12-01

    In order to clarify the influence of the holding state on the shear strength in the shear process of a single rock fracture, slide-hold-slide (SHS) direct shear-flow coupling tests were carried out on single rock fractures at several confining stresses and under saturated/unsaturated conditions (Kishida, et al., 2011). Consequently, the mortar specimen could be confirmed as the significant shear strength recovery on the SHS process. In this research, the SHS direct shear tests are carried out on the halite (rock salt) and the limestone. In the case of rock salt, a single tensile fracture is artificially created by cutting away. On the other hand, the limestone has a natural rock joint. The experiments are carried out under various normal confining stress conditions and are employed various holding period at the residual state. Figure 1 shows the shear stress - shear displacement of the SHS direct shear experiments on the rock salt. From all cases, the shear stress increases at the initial phase of the experiments, and then, the shear stress reaches at the peak shear strength. After that, the shear stress slightly decreases such as strain softening. Finally, the shear stress reaches to the residual stress state. In every SHS processes, the shear stress is reducing in various hold period. And then, the shear stress is increasing in the process of re-sliding. The shear stress in the process of re-sliding takes over the value at the start time of the holding process. The shear stress reaches at the peak, and then, it reaches the residual stress state. In all cases, as the holding period becomes longer, it is confirmed that the decrement of the shear stress in the holding process is increasing and the increment of the shear stress at the re-sliding process is increasing. Therefore, it is confirmed that the time dependence of shear strength recovery can be observed. In addition, Dieterich's A constant value for the regression lines (Dieterich, 1972, 1994) is plotted

  11. Synthesis, single crystal structure and energy optimization of a multicomponent salt of imidazole and tetrabromoterepthalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, S.; Kumar, S.; Dey, S. K.

    2015-06-24

    Single crystal of a multicomponent salt (IMTBTP) of imidazole with tetrabromoterepthalic acid has been synthesized by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The crystal structure of the salt has been determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction technique. The supramolecular structure analysis reveals that the multicomponent salt is formed by noncovalent hydrogen bonding interaction and Br···π interaction. The energy optimization and HOMO-LUMO energy gap calculation have been carried out by Density Functional Theory.

  12. Synthesis, single crystal structure and energy optimization of a multicomponent salt of imidazole and tetrabromoterepthalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, S.; Dey, S. K.; Kumar, S.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystal of a multicomponent salt (IMTBTP) of imidazole with tetrabromoterepthalic acid has been synthesized by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The crystal structure of the salt has been determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction technique. The supramolecular structure analysis reveals that the multicomponent salt is formed by noncovalent hydrogen bonding interaction and Br...π interaction. The energy optimization and HOMO-LUMO energy gap calculation have been carried out by Density Functional Theory.

  13. Salt Contribution to RNA Tertiary Structure Folding Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Accurate quantification of the ionic contribution to RNA folding stability could greatly enhance our ability to understand and predict RNA functions. Recently, motivated by the potential importance of ion correlation and fluctuation in RNA folding, we developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model. Extensive experimental tests showed that the TBI model can lead to better treatment of multivalent ions than the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In this study, we use the model to quantify the contribution of salt (Na+ and Mg2+) to the RNA tertiary structure folding free energy. Folding of the RNA tertiary structure often involves intermediates. We focus on the folding transition from an intermediate state to the native state, and compute the electrostatic folding free energy of the RNA. Based on systematic calculations for a variety of RNA molecules, we derive a set of formulas for the electrostatic free energy for tertiary structural folding as a function of the sequence length and compactness of the RNA and the Na+ and Mg2+ concentrations. Extensive comparisons with experimental data suggest that our model and the extracted empirical formulas are quite reliable. PMID:21723828

  14. Shape-controlled colloidal synthesis of rock-salt lead selenide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Ali M; Asunskis, Daniel J; Snee, Preston T

    2011-08-23

    Developing simple synthetic methods to control the size and morphology of nanocrystals is an active area of research as these parameters control the material's electronic and optical properties. For a semiconductor with a symmetrical crystal structure such as lead selenide, anisotropic colloidal growth has been previously accomplished via the use of templates, seeds, or by block assembly of smaller, symmetrical subunits. Here, we present a simple method to create monodisperse lead selenide nanorods and multipods at low temperatures. The size distribution and the observed morphologies are consistent with a continuous, anisotropic growth of material. The syntheses of these anisotropic shapes are due to the nature of the nuclei that form upon injection of precursors into partially oxidized alkene solvents that may contain lactone and carbonate-functional derivatives.

  15. Salt efflorescence due to water-rock interaction on the surface of tuff cave in the Yoshimi-Hyakuana Historic Site, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Chiaki T.; Kodama, Shogo; Mohammad, Rajib; Tharanga Udagedara, Dashan

    2016-04-01

    Artificial cave walls in Yoshimi Hyakuana Historic Site have been suffering from salt weathering since 1945 when the caves were made. To consider the processes of weathering and subsequent crystallization of secondary minerals, water-rock experiment using tuff from this area was performed. Rocks, surface altered materials, groundwater and rainwater were collected, and chemical and mineralogical characteristics of those samples were investigated. The XRD and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out for the solid samples and ICP-OES analysis was performed for the solution generated from the experiment, groundwater and rainwater. Gypsum is detected in original tuff, and on grey and whiter coloured altered materials. General chemical changes were observed on this rock. However, it is found that purple and black altered materials were mainly made due to microbiological processes.

  16. Leaf Physiological and Proteomic Analysis to Elucidate Silicon Induced Adaptive Response under Salt Stress in Rosa hybrida 'Rock Fire'.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Manivannan, Abinaya; Ko, Chung Ho; Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2017-08-14

    Beneficial effects of silicon (Si) on growth and development have been witnessed in several plants. Nevertheless, studies on roses are merely reported. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to illustrate the impact of Si on photosynthesis, antioxidant defense and leaf proteome of rose under salinity stress. In vitro-grown, acclimatized Rosa hybrida 'Rock Fire' were hydroponically treated with four treatments, such as control, Si (1.8 mM), NaCl (50 mM), and Si+NaCl. After 15 days, the consequences of salinity stress and the response of Si addition were analyzed. Scorching of leaf edges and stomatal damages occurred due to salt stress was ameliorated under Si supplementation. Similarly, reduction of gas exchange, photosynthetic pigments, higher lipid peroxidation rate, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species under salinity stress were mitigated in Si treatment. Lesser oxidative stress observed was correlated with the enhanced activity and expression of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase in Si+NaCl treatment. Importantly, sodium transportation was synergistically restricted with the stimulated counter-uptake of potassium in Si+NaCl treatment. Furthermore, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) results showed that out of 40 identified proteins, on comparison with control 34 proteins were down-accumulated and six proteins were up-accumulated due to salinity stress. Meanwhile, addition of Si with NaCl treatment enhanced the abundance of 30 proteins and downregulated five proteins. Differentially-expressed proteins were functionally classified into six groups, such as photosynthesis (22%), carbohydrate/energy metabolism (20%), transcription/translation (20%), stress/redox homeostasis (12%), ion binding (13%), and ubiquitination (8%). Hence, the findings reported in this work could facilitate a deeper

  17. The structural evolution of soft K-Mg salts in the Veendam Pillow, northern Netherlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Alexander; Strozyk, Frank; Urai, Janos

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the structural evolution and the role of soft K-Mg salts imbedded in rocksalt, and to study the mechanical effects of this high mechanical heterogeneity on salt deformation. The complex, internal geometries of salt structures in the Dutch Zechstein are related to long-term creep and complex folding of layered evaporites. To understand the interaction of mechanically strong anhydrite and rocksalt layers with the much weaker K-Mg salts, with a viscosity contrast of up to five orders of magnitude, thereby is of high interest. Our study area is the Veendam Pillow, a large Zechstein salt structure on the southern Groning High. The salt structure is used for Mg-rich bischofite (MgCl*6H2O) squeeze and solution mining. For our structural study we use high resolution interpretations of industrial 3D seismic data and well logs as well as core data for chemical and microstructural analysis of the Z3 and Z4 sequences. The 3D seismic interpretation reveals a good overview of the internal salt structure due to the sonic contrast between anhydrite, halite and K-Mg salts. Thickening of the soft Z3 salts in the crest of the saltdome and strong folding of the Z3 anhydrite is visible. On basis of our results, we designed numerical simulations using the finite element package ABAQUS to estimate the displacement field of K-Mg salts during tectonic movement. First results revealed that brittle, mechanically strong anhydrite layers have a high impact on the surrounding softer salts by folding with amplitudes of several hundred meters, and that the K-Mg salts are easily squeezed and fold on a much smaller scale.

  18. Miocene salt structures as exploration indicators in the offshore B-Trend, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Saoudi, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The B-Trend is a structural horst block extending in a northwest-southeast direction for about 40 km in the southern offshore area of the Gulf of Suez. It contains six individual sub-structures (six oil fields) oriented along strike and dipping toward the southwest. Subsurface geologic data from 60 wells together with the available seismic data in the area were integrated to explain the development of salt structures along this belt and their influence on oil exploration. These salt structures are restricted to the Belayim and South Gharib formations of middle and upper Miocene age, respectively. Moreover, they are arranged as linear features along the trend. Thickening in the Belayim salt is due in some cases to injection and in others to deposition. The apexes of the Belayim injected salt bodies are located down-dip from the crest of the underlying structures and are shifted westward from the apexes of the overlying larger South Gharib salt bulges. The highset corner of the pre-Miocene structures is located to the east of the injected Belayim salt pillows. Thick Belayim salt of depositional origin usually exists on the downthrown side of the leading edge fault to the east. The thickness ratios between the different members of the Belayim Formation help to differentiate between the injected and deposited salt bodies. These ratios can be used to orient well tracks to the optimum structural target while drilling.

  19. Neogene structural characteristics of Louisiana shelf with emphasis on growth-fault interplay with salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fangjian, Xi, Jiebo

    1996-12-31

    Growth faulting and salt tectonics are the most pronounced structural features in the offshore Louisiana. Regional examination of seismic data(4 mile x 4 mile grid) of OCS area Suggests that polyphase halokinesis happened along the whole shelf area during the Neogene sedimentation but with different type of salt movement and faulting in time and space. The sublinear and regularly basinward-dipping lower and middle Miocene faults predominate beneath the present inner shelf region with scarcity of shallow salt features. These fault trends detached on bottom Miocene decollement related ductile shale and salt welds. The shorter and more arcuate-shaped upper Miocene and Pliocene faults complicated by abundant near-surface salt bodies characterize the farther offshore beneath the outer-shelf region. Most of these fault root into or related to salt diapirs, but at the West Cameron and at the South Timberlier, families of growth-faults were developed on the upper Miocene allochthonous salt sheet detachment and played an important role in segmenting salt sheet in this salt raft regime. The more irregularly oriented Pleistocene faults with combination of shallow basinward-dipping and counter-basinward-dipping detachment on top of large and thick upper Pliocene allochthonous salt mass occurred in the present shelf edge and slope region. This study suggest at least three episodes of salt movement occurred at early Miocene, late Miocene-early Pliocene and early Pleistocene and the existence and possible position of large right-slip transfer faults.

  20. Neogene structural characteristics of Louisiana shelf with emphasis on growth-fault interplay with salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fangjian, Xi, Jiebo )

    1996-01-01

    Growth faulting and salt tectonics are the most pronounced structural features in the offshore Louisiana. Regional examination of seismic data(4 mile x 4 mile grid) of OCS area Suggests that polyphase halokinesis happened along the whole shelf area during the Neogene sedimentation but with different type of salt movement and faulting in time and space. The sublinear and regularly basinward-dipping lower and middle Miocene faults predominate beneath the present inner shelf region with scarcity of shallow salt features. These fault trends detached on bottom Miocene decollement related ductile shale and salt welds. The shorter and more arcuate-shaped upper Miocene and Pliocene faults complicated by abundant near-surface salt bodies characterize the farther offshore beneath the outer-shelf region. Most of these fault root into or related to salt diapirs, but at the West Cameron and at the South Timberlier, families of growth-faults were developed on the upper Miocene allochthonous salt sheet detachment and played an important role in segmenting salt sheet in this salt raft regime. The more irregularly oriented Pleistocene faults with combination of shallow basinward-dipping and counter-basinward-dipping detachment on top of large and thick upper Pliocene allochthonous salt mass occurred in the present shelf edge and slope region. This study suggest at least three episodes of salt movement occurred at early Miocene, late Miocene-early Pliocene and early Pleistocene and the existence and possible position of large right-slip transfer faults.

  1. Submarine allochthonous salt sheets: Gravity-driven deformation of North African Cretaceous passive margin in Tunisia - Bled Dogra case study and nearby salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrouhi, Amara; Bellier, Olivier; Ben Youssef, Mohamed; Koyi, Hemin

    2014-09-01

    We used structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, together with a comparison of nearby structures and a Bouguer gravity map, to evaluate the evolution of the Bled Dogra salt structure (northern Tunisia) during the Cretaceous. Triassic salt sheets are recognized in the northwestern region of the Tunisian Atlas. These salt sheets are the result of Cretaceous thick and/or thin-skinned extension along the south Tethyan margin. The Bled Dogra salt structure is one of these submarine allochthonous salt sheets, which was emplaced during the Early Cretaceous. The geologic framework, during this period, produces conditions for a predominantly gravity-driven deformation: extension has produced space for the salt to rise; vigorous differential sedimentation created differential loading that resulted in the emplacement and extrusion of a large volume of Triassic salt and formation of large submarine salt sheets. Geologic field data suggest an interlayered Triassic salt sheet within Albian sequences. Salt was extruded at the sea floor during the Early-Middle Albian and was initially buried by Middle-Late Albian strata. The Coniacian corresponds to a second transgressive cover onto the salt sheet after the gliding of the first salt cover (Late Albian-Turonian). In addition, this northwest Tunisian area exposes evidences for salt flow and abundant slump features at the base of a northward facing submarine slope, which was probably dominant from the Early Cretaceous to Santonian. Two gravity deformation processes are recognized: gravity gliding and gravity spreading. Acting concurrently, these two processes appear indistinguishable in this geologic context. Like the present-day salt-involved passive margins - such as the northern Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic margin of Morocco, the Brazilian Santos basin, the Angola margin, Cadiz in western Iberia, and the Red Sea - the North African Cretaceous passive margin in Tunisia provides evidences that deformation in a passive

  2. Field Observation of Joint Structures in Various Types of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2006-05-01

    In this study, field observations of natural fracture network systems in some intrusive and extrusive rocks were undertaken, to clarify the fracturing mechanism in the rocks. Shallow intrusives, whose depth of emplacement was less than several hundred metres, include the Momo-iwa Dacite dome on Rebun Island (Hokkaido), and Jodogahama Rhyolite in Iwate prefecture. Extrusive complexes studied include the Tojinbo Andesite and Ojima Rhyodacite in Fukui prefecture. Rocks of `granitic' composition were collected from the Takidani (Japan Alps) and Hijiori (Yamagata prefecture) plutons. The joint structure in Hijiori Granite was evaluated by analysis of core samples extracted from the HDR-3 geothermal production well. Based on detailed field observation, joint structures related to thermal contraction of a rock mass could be classified according to their inferred depth of formation. Joints from a near surface setting, such as shallow intrusive rocks and extrusives, tend to form pentagonal — hexagonal columnar structures (for a variety of rock types), whilst granitic rocks (from a deeper setting) typically exhibit a parallelepiped structure. The apparent differences in joint form are inferred to be dependent on the confining pressure, which acts on joint generation and propagation. In cases of non-confining pressure, such as the near-surface (shallow intrusive/extrusive) setting, joint networks typically form a columnar structure. On the contrary, confining pressure is considerably greater for deeper rock masses, and these form a parallelepiped joint structure.

  3. Structural lineaments in the basement rocks of the central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, A. F.

    The Egyptian basement rocks outcrop in Eastern Desert, southern Sinai and southwestern Desert. The rocks belong to Precambrian and consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks which are characterized by crystalline character. Not much work has been done on the tectonics and structure of the basement rocks in Eastern Desert. The present work is a photogeological interpretation of the structural lineaments representing dykes, faults and joints in central Eastern Desert to differentiate between igneous and metamorphic rocks. The photogeological interpretation was carried out using normal aerial photographs scale 1:40 000 and photomosaics scale 50 000. The main trends of lineaments in the studied area are: E-W, ENE-WSW and WNW-ESE, constituting 58.4% of the total length and 54.5% of the total number. Correlating the structural lineaments in igneous rocks of Gebel El Bakriya locality with those in the metamorphic rocks of Gebel Abu Mireiwa shows that there is a marked difference between the two types. Lineaments in igneous rocks are elongated and widely spaced while those in metamorphic rocks are short and closely spaced. The different trends of joints in igneous rocks can be arranged as follows: WNW>E-W>NW>NNW>ENE>NE>N-S>NNE while the different trends of lineaments in metamorphic rocks can be arranged as follows: E-W>ENE>WNW>NW>NNW>NE>N-S>NNE. Comparison between the structural contour maps constructed for the total length of all lineaments and those representing joints in igneous and metamorphic rocks indicates that igneous rocks have lower density of lineaments than metamorphic rocks. The total length of all lineaments in Gebel El Bakriya amounts to 375 km, while lineaments representing joints have a total length of 150 km. In the metamorphic rocks of Gebel Abu Mireiwa, the total length of all lineaments is 425 km and those representing joints have a total length of 175 km. It was found that there is a relationship between the structural lineaments and radioactivity of

  4. Synthesis and structural analysis of some trinitromethanide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gakh, A. A.; Bryan, J. C.; Burnett, M. N.; Bonnesen, P. V.

    2000-03-01

    Two trinitromethanide (TNM) salts containing weakly coordinating cations (tetrabutylammonium and cesium) were synthesized via incomplete nitration of acetic anhydride followed by cation exchange with tetrabutylammonium bromide and cesium fluoride. Their structural characteristics were determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography [J.C. Bryan, M.N. Burnett, A.A. Gakh, Acta Crystallogr., Sect. C (Cr. Str. Comm.) 54 (1998) 1229] followed by comparative analysis with the literature data. In all cases, the TNM anion was found to be a non-planar system. The sum of dihedral angles between the central (C-N 3) plane of the anion and the planes of the individual nitro groups varies from 60 to 100°. C-N and N-O interatomic distances in TNM anion can be correlated with the dihedral angles of the corresponding nitro groups. The 13C and 14N NMR spectra of the TNM anion are very simple (broad singlets), an indication of the equivalence (on the NMR time scale) of the nitro groups in solution. The distribution ratio between organic phase (tributyl phosphate) and water is 5000 times higher for Cs +C(NO 2) 3- compared to Cs +NO 3-, presumably due to size and/or charge delocalization differences between nitrate and TNM anions.

  5. Salt creep and wicking counteract hydrophobic organic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Juergen

    2017-04-01

    The hydrophobic nature of many biological and edaphic surfaces prevents wetting and water movement. Already small amounts of salts and other hygroscopic material (e.g. by aerosol deposition to leaf surfaces) may change this situation. Salts attract minute amounts of liquid water to the surface and may dynamically expand on the original surface by creeping (evaporation-driven extension of crystals). Creeping is governed by fluctuations of relative humidity and increases with time. Under high, almost saturated concentrations of the salt solutions, ions from the chaotropic side of the Hofmeister series creep most efficiently. Once established, continuous salt connections may act to channel small water flows along the surface. They may act as wicks if water is removed from one side by evaporation. Stomata may in this way become 'leaky' by the leaf surface accumulation of hygroscopic aerosols.

  6. The Rock Elm meteorite impact structure, Wisconsin: Geology and shock-metamorphic effects in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, B.M.; Cordua, W.S.; Plescia, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Rock Elm structure in southwest Wisconsin is an anomalous circular area of highly deformed rocks, ???6.5 km in diameter, located in a region of virtually horizontal undeformed sedimentary rocks. Shock-produced planar microstructures (PMs) have been identified in quartz grains in several lithologies associated with the structure: sandstones, quartzite pebbles, and breccia. Two distinct types of PMs are present: P1 features, which appear identical to planar fractures (PFs or cleavage), and P2 features, which are interpreted as possible incipient planar deformation features (PDFs). The latter are uniquely produced by the shock waves associated with meteorite impact events. Both types of PMs are oriented parallel to specific crystallographic planes in the quartz, most commonly to c(0001), ??112??2, and r/z101??1. The association of unusual, structurally deformed strata with distinct shock-produced microdeformation features in their quartz-bearing rocks establishes Rock Elm as a meteorite impact structure and supports the view that the presence of multiple parallel cleavages in quartz may be used independently as a criterion for meteorite impact. Preliminary paleontological studies indicate a minimum age of Middle Ordovician for the Rock Elm structure. A similar age estimate (450-400 Ma) is obtained independently by combining the results of studies of the general morphology of complex impact structures with estimated rates of sedimentation for the region. Such methods may be applicable to dating other old and deeply eroded impact structures formed in sedimentary target rocks.

  7. Carbonate Melt Rocks from the Haughton Impact Structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Spray, J. G.; Lee, P.

    2002-01-01

    The target rocks at the Haughton impact structure, Canada, are predominantly carbonates. The well preserved allochthonous crater-fill deposits are reinterpreted here as being carbonatitic impact melt rocks. The implications of our findings will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Carbonate Melt Rocks from the Haughton Impact Structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Spray, J. G.; Lee, P.

    2002-01-01

    The target rocks at the Haughton impact structure, Canada, are predominantly carbonates. The well preserved allochthonous crater-fill deposits are reinterpreted here as being carbonatitic impact melt rocks. The implications of our findings will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Aspects of the thermal and transport properties of crystalline salt in designing radioactive waste storages in halogen formations

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. N. Pocheptsova, O. A.; Matthies, S.

    2010-05-15

    Some of the properties of natural rock salt are described. This rock is of great practical interest, because, along with its conventional applications in the chemical and food industries, it is promising for use in engineering underground radioactive waste storages and natural gas reservoirs. The results of structural and texture studies of rock salt by neutron diffraction are discussed. The nature of the salt permeability under temperature and stress gradients is theoretically estimated.

  10. Aspects of the thermal and transport properties of crystalline salt in designing radioactive waste storages in halogen formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. N.; Pocheptsova, O. A.; Matthies, S.

    2010-05-01

    Some of the properties of natural rock salt are described. This rock is of great practical interest, because, along with its conventional applications in the chemical and food industries, it is promising for use in engineering underground radioactive waste storages and natural gas reservoirs. The results of structural and texture studies of rock salt by neutron diffraction are discussed. The nature of the salt permeability under temperature and stress gradients is theoretically estimated.

  11. Ab Initio Random Structure Search for Stoichiometric Water-Salt Structures at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, R.; Shaik, K. M.; Militzer, B.

    2016-12-01

    At ambient conditions, only a limited amount of salt can be dissolved in water. At high pressure, however, the solubility properties of mixtures may change as more tightly packed structures are favored over configurations that have a low internal energy. To investigate this possibility, we apply ab initio random structure search methods to look for stable stoichiometric water-NaCl compounds. The goal of this project is to predict novel structures with density functional theory so that they be made in the laboratory with diamond anvil cell experiments.

  12. Relationships Between Watershed Emergy Flow and Coastal New England Salt Marsh Structure, Function, and Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI. The field-collected data wer...

  13. Relationships Between Watershed Emergy Flow and Coastal New England Salt Marsh Structure, Function, and Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI. The field-collected data wer...

  14. The role of salt in the structural development of central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, Irving J.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple episodes of diapirism, probably salt generated, have determined the structural pattern of central Utah. The causative salt and other evaporites are integral components of the Arapien Shale of Middle Jurassic age, one of the most unusual stratigraphic units in central Utah.

  15. Basin architecture, salt tectonics, and Upper Jurassic structural styles, DeSoto Canyon Salt basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, G.; Watkins, J.S. )

    1993-10-01

    Despite the Gulf of Mexico being a mature hydrocarbon province, the least understood aspects of the basin's geologic history are undoubtedly those concerning pre-Middle Jurassic tectonic events and their implication for the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the region. Despite awareness of the importance of continental extension during rifting, there are few quantitative studies that show the influence of crustal extension on basin architecture, the distribution of salt, and Late Jurassic sedimentation in the DeSoto Canyon Salt basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Application of simplified isostatic principles using a lithospheric buoyancy model allow quantification of total tectonic subsidence, crustal thickness, crustal extension, and crust type. An average crustal thickness of 25 km and crustal extension [beta] values between 1.4 and 1.8 suggest the sedimentary succession is underlain by moderately stretched and attenuated continental crust. The widespread distribution and geometry of dipping subsalt reflectors, particularly in the shelfal areas, provide evidence for a Late Triassic-Early Jurassic phase of rifting prior to deposition of Middle Jurassic salt. Although deposition occurred in a slowly subsiding, stable marginal setting, salt movement and associated growth faulting are the most significant tectonic elements affecting the stratigraphic and structural development of the overlying strata.

  16. Depositional patterns and structural styles-Hackberry Salt Dome, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.A.; Sharpe, C.L.; Gillham, T.H.; Wright, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    The West and East Hackberry fields of north-central Cameron Parish, Louisiana, are associated with a large southeast-plunging salt ridge. Episodes of salt movement influenced the depositional patterns and reservoir trap styles of the Oligocene- and Miocene-age sedimentary section. The Oligocene lower Hackberry channels were influenced by the salt structure, resulting in the Manchester-Holmwood channel system flanking the east and south sides of the salt dome and the Choupique channel system flanking the west side of the salt dome. The depositional patterns and structural bed dips of the younger Oligocene Camerina A to marginulina section demonstrate a major period of salt movement and erosion. The resulting truncation of the Camerian A sandstones, sealed by overlying shales, provides the dominant trap style for the majority of the reservoirs. This same general period of salt movement influenced the orientation of the Oligocene Marginulina to Miogypsinoides expansion fault system to the east. The Sweet Lake salt dome, down through to this expansion system, probably represents a southeast extension of this ancestral salt ridge.

  17. Thermal–hydraulic–mechanical modeling of a large-scale heater test to investigate rock salt and crushed salt behavior under repository conditions for heat-generating nuclear waste

    DOE PAGES

    Blanco-Martín, Laura; Wolters, Ralf; Rutqvist, Jonny; ...

    2016-04-28

    The Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement heater test is modeled with two simulators for coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical processes. Results from the two simulators are in very good agreement. The comparison between measurements and numerical results is also very satisfactory, regarding temperature, drift closure and rock deformation. Concerning backfill compaction, a parameter calibration through inverse modeling was performed due to insufficient data on crushed salt reconsolidation, particularly at high temperatures. We conclude that the two simulators investigated have the capabilities to reproduce the data available, which increases confidence in their use to reliably investigate disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in saliferous geosystems.

  18. Rheological contrasts in salt and their effects on flow in salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    The majority of numerical and analogue models of salt tectonics assume homogeneous rheological models, and consequently produce simple internal structures. This is in contrast to observations in salt mines and 3D seismic, showing complex folding at a wide range of scales, in combination with boudinage and fracturing, which point to large rheological contrasts in salt bodies. The rheology of rock salt during slow deformation can be both Newtonian and Power law. Dislocation creep and dissolution-precipitation processes, such as solution-precipitation creep and dynamic recrystallisation, both play a significant role and grain boundary healing in deforming salt may result in cyclic softening and hardening behaviour. The switch between these processes can cause major changes in rock salt rheology, at time scales both relevant to geologic evolution and subsurface operations. In the dislocation creep field, a compilation of laboratory data show that different rock salts can creep at four orders of magnitude different strain rates under otherwise the same conditions. Potassium - Magnesium salts are in turn much weaker, and Anhydrite much stronger than rock salt. Anhydrite - carbonate inclusions embedded in deforming salt bodies respond to the movements of the salt in a variety of ways including boudinage and folding. New methods of microstructure analysis integrated with paleorheology indicators observed in natural laboratories allows an integration of these data and the development of a unified model for salt creep for both underground cavities and natural deformation, including the effect of high fluid pressures in salt which lead to a dramatic increases in permeability. For example, modeling of anhydrite stringer sinking is an important way to obtain the long term rheology of the halite, indicating that the rheology of Zechstein salt during the Tertiary was dominated by dislocation creep. These form the basis of a new generation of mechanical models to predict the

  19. Rheological stratification in Zechstein rock salt caused by thermodynamically controlled reorganization of grain boundary fluids? A test using gravitationally induced sinking of anhydrite-dolomite stringers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Raith, Alexander F.

    2016-04-01

    The rheology of rock salt during slow deformation in nature is controlled by the dominant deformation mechanism. Newtonian viscous rheology is associated with solution precipitation processes, while power law rheology is associated with dislocation creep. In large strain deformation during salt tectonics these two processes both contribute equally to the total strain rate, and grain boundaries contain mobile brine films. It has been shown that after the end of active salt tectonics, these fluid films neck down into arrays of disconnected brine inclusions, rendering the grain boundaries immobile and thus stopping solution-precipitation creep. This results in very low gravitational sinking rates of isolated anhydrite-dolomite stringers in Zechstein salt in the Tertiary, consistent with power law creep, while in Newtonian salt the stringers would sink to the bottom in geologically short time. In a recent paper Ghanbarzadeh et al., (Science, Nov 2015) provided evidence that below approximately 2 km depth the thermodynamically controlled dihedral angle between solid-liquid and solid-solid grain boundaries decreases to below 60 degrees, so that a connected grain boundary triple junction network of fluid channels is formed and permeability of the salt increases. The same process can be argued to lead to permanently mobile grain boundaries below this critical depth, activating solution-precipitation creep even in the absence of active tectonics. We test this hypothesis by comparing estimated gravitationally induced sinking rates of isolated anhydrite-dolomite stringers in the Zechstein of NE-Netherlands, based on 3D sesmic data, at depths above and below this proposed transition. First results suggest that there is no significant change in stringer sinking rate with depth.

  20. Salt Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, E.

    2006-12-01

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos. Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the insitu fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns, as observed around impact crates on Earth. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in desserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze-thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape in some dry valleys of the Earth but possibly also on Mars. (Malin, 1974

  1. Preliminary projections of the effects of chloride-control structures on the Quaternary aquifer at Great Salt Plains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    About 1,200 tons of chloride per day are added to the salt load of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River at Great Salt Plains Lake from natural sources. The source of this chloride is brine discharge from the rocks of Permian age in the vicinity of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has planned a chloride-control project. The Corps requested that the U.S. Geological Survey use a digital model to project the effects of the chloride-control plan on ground water. Ground-water flow and ground-water transport models were calibrated to represent the Quaternary aquifer that is the near-surface part of the flow system. The models were used to project the effects of planned chloride-control structures. Based on model results, ground-water levels are projected to rise as much as 19 feet. However, these water-level rises will occur only in areas near three reservoirs. Changes in ground-water level caused by the project will be small throughout most of the area. Chloride concentration of ground water is projected to increase by more than 90,000 milligrams per liter at one location. However, significant increases in chloride concentration during the 50-year period simulated are projected to be limited to areas where the ground water already contains excessive chloride concentrations.

  2. Petrographic composition, sedimentary structures and palaeocurrent analysis in Northern Gondwana: The Lower Permian Warchha Sandstone of the Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, Shahid; Mountney, Nigel P.

    2012-10-01

    The Warchha Sandstone is a Lower Permian fluvial succession present in both outcrop and subsurface throughout the Salt Range and the Potwar Basin of Pakistan that originally accumulated in a palaeogeographic setting adjacent to the northern margin of Gondwana. Sandstone beds are feldspatho-quartzose, including dominantly monocrystalline quartz, more K-feldspar than plagioclase, and mainly plutonic and low-grade metamorphic rock fragments. Twenty-eight fining-upward cycles, composed of conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone and claystone are identified. A varied range of sedimentary structures is recognised, including different forms of cross-bedding, ripple marks, flute casts, load casts, desiccation cracks, rain prints, cone-in-cone structures, and a variety of types of concretions and bioturbation. The occurrence and abundance of these structures varies in a systematic manner throughout the vertical thickness of the succession. Sedimentary structures, palaeocurrent data and lithofacies arrangement indicate deposition in a high-sinuosity meandering river system. Detailed palaeocurrent analysis reveals a broad unimodal palaeoflow within each cycle with dominant flow direction having been towards the north-northwest, but with significant changes in local bedform migration direction between each cycle. The northward flowing river transported sediments from the Aravalli and Malani Ranges that lay to the south to the Salt Range, northwards to the Tethyan proto-ocean in the north.

  3. SBION: A Program for Analyses of Salt-Bridges from Multiple Structure Files.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Parth Sarthi Sen; Mondal, Sudipta; Mondal, Buddhadev; Islam, Rifat Nawaz Ul; Banerjee, Shyamashree; Bandyopadhyay, Amal K

    2014-01-01

    Salt-bridge and network salt-bridge are specific electrostatic interactions that contribute to the overall stability of proteins. In hierarchical protein folding model, these interactions play crucial role in nucleation process. The advent and growth of protein structure database and its availability in public domain made an urgent need for context dependent rapid analysis of salt-bridges. While these analyses on single protein is cumbersome and time-consuming, batch analyses need efficient software for rapid topological scan of a large number of protein for extracting details on (i) fraction of salt-bridge residues (acidic and basic). (ii) Chain specific intra-molecular salt-bridges, (iii) inter-molecular salt-bridges (protein-protein interactions) in all possible binary combinations (iv) network salt-bridges and (v) secondary structure distribution of salt-bridge residues. To the best of our knowledge, such efficient software is not available in public domain. At this juncture, we have developed a program i.e. SBION which can perform all the above mentioned computations for any number of protein with any number of chain at any given distance of ion-pair. It is highly efficient, fast, error-free and user friendly. Finally we would say that our SBION indeed possesses potential for applications in the field of structural and comparative bioinformatics studies. SBION is freely available for non-commercial/academic institutions on formal request to the corresponding author (akbanerjee@biotech.buruniv.ac.in).

  4. Salt deposits in Los Medanos area, Eddy and Lea counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, C.L.; with sections on Ground water hydrology, Cooley; and Surficial Geology, Bachman

    1973-01-01

    The salt deposits of Los Medanos area, in Eddy and Lea Counties, southeastern New Mexico, are being considered for possible use as a receptacle for radioactive wastes in a pilot-plant repository. The salt deposits of the area. are in three evaporite formations: the Castile, Salado, and Rustler Formations, in ascending order. The three formations are dominantly anhydrite and rock salt, but some gypsum, potassium ores, carbonate rock, and fine-grained clastic rocks are present. They have combined thicknesses of slightly more than 4,000 feet, of which roughly one-half belongs to the Salado. Both the Castile and the Rustler are-richer in anhydrite-and poorer in rock salt-than the Salado, and they provide this salt-rich formation with considerable Protection from any fluids which might be present in underlying or overlying rocks. The Salado Formation contains many thick seams of rock salt at moderate depths below the surface. The rock salt has a substantial cover of well-consolidated rocks, and it is very little deformed structurally. Certain geological details essential for Waste-storage purposes are unknown or poorly known, and additional study involving drilling is required to identify seams of rock salt suitable for storage purposes and to establish critical details of their chemistry, stratigraphy, and structure.

  5. Systematic study of the structures of potassiated tertiary amino acids: salt bridge structures dominate.

    PubMed

    Drayss, Miriam K; Blunk, Dirk; Oomens, Jos; Gao, Bing; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Bowers, Michael T; Schäfer, Mathias

    2009-08-27

    The gas-phase structures of a series of potassiated tertiary amino acids have been systematically investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and computational modeling. The examined analytes comprise a set of five linear N,N-dimethyl amino acids derived from N,N-dimethyl glycine and three cyclic N-methyl amino acids including N-methyl proline. The number of methylene groups in either the alkyl chain of the linear members or in the ring of the cyclic members of the series is gradually varied. The spectra of the cyclic potassiated molecular ions are similar and well resolved, whereas the clear signals in the respective spectra of the linear analytes increasingly overlap with longer alkyl chains. Measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of theory to identify the structures present in the experimental studies. On the basis of these experiments and calculations, all potassiated molecular ions of this series adopt salt bridge structures in the gas phase, involving bidentate coordination of the potassium cation to the carboxylate moiety. The assigned salt bridge structures are predicted to be the global minima on the potential energy surfaces. IMS cross-section measurements of the potassiated systems show a monotonic increase with growing system size, suggesting that the precursor ions adopt the same type of structure and comparisons between experimental and theoretical cross sections are consistent with salt bridge structures and the IRMPD results.

  6. Influence of structure of the metal salts of phosphinates on the performance of the fire-retardant polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqing; Liu, Jiyan; Guo, Yuanhao; Cakmak, Miko

    2015-05-01

    Dialkylphosphinate salts (I) and amide-containing phosphinate salts(II) with varying metal cation and organic groups were used as flame retardants for epoxy resin(EP), poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) correspondingly. Their flame retardancy, mechanical properties, thermal stability, compatibility between phosphinate salts and polymer, and leaching of the salts from the polymer were investigated with respect to the structure of phosphinate salts.

  7. Depositional patterns and structural styles - Hackberry Salt Dome, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.A.; Sharpe, C.L.; Gillham, T.H.

    1994-09-01

    The west and east Hackberry fields of north-central Cameron Parish, Louisiana, are associated with a large southeast-plunging salt ridge. Episodes of salt movement influenced the depositional patterns and reservoir trap styles of the Oligocene and Miocene age section. The Oligocene lower Hackberry channels were influenced by the salt, resulting in the {open_quotes}Manchester-Holmwood{close_quotes} channel system skirting the east and south flanks of the salt and the {open_quotes}Choupique{close_quotes} channel system skirting the west flank of the salt. The depositional patterns and structural bed dips of the younger Oligocene Camerina (A) to Marginulina section demonstrate a major period of salt movement and erosion. The resulting truncation of the Camerina (A) sands, sealed by overlying shales, provides the dominant trap style for the majority of the fields` reservoirs. This same general period of salt movement influenced the orientation of the Oligocene Camerina (A) - Miogypsinoides expansion fault systems of the prolific Miogypsinoides embayment. The Sweet Lake salt dome, downthrown to this expansion system, probably represents a southeast extension of this ancestral salt ridge.

  8. Salt as a 3D element in structural modelling - example from the Central European Basin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Y. P.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Bayer, U.

    2010-12-01

    The Central European Basin System (CEBS) covers the northern part of Central and Western Europe and contains up to 12 km of Permian to Cenozoic deposits. Initiated in the Early Permian, the Central European Basin System accumulated Lower Permian clastics overlain by significant amount of Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt. Post-Permian differentiation of the basin system was controlled by several phases of tectonic activity. These tectonic phases not only provoked regional shifts in subsidence and erosion but also triggered movements of the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt. Salt rise strongly influenced the Meso-Cenozoic structural evolution in terms of mechanical decoupling of the sedimentary cover from its basement. As a result of several phases of salt tectonics, the CEBS displays a wide variety of salt structures (walls, diapirs and pillows). In order to investigate the interaction of salt movements, deposition and tectonics, the 3D structural model of the CEBS has been constructed covering the entire salt basin (Northern and Southern Permian basins). Seismic interpretation and 3D backstripping have been used to investigate both the present-day structure and the evolution of the CEBS. 3D backstripping includes 3D salt redistribution in response to the changing load conditions in the salt cover. The results of 3D modelling of salt movements and seismic data indicate that the primary initiation of salt movements occurred during the Triassic. The Triassic regional extensional event initiated a phase of salt movements within the coeval depocenters of the CEBS, such as the Glueckstadt Graben, the Horn Graben, the Fjerritslev Trough and the adjacent Himmerland Graben in Denmark, as well as the Polish Basin. The Early Triassic (Buntsandstein) and the Late Triassic (Middle-Late Keuper) extensional events triggered strongest salt movements within the central part of the Glueckstadt Graben. During the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, major erosion regionally truncated the study

  9. Conformation of the umifenovir cation in the molecular and crystal structures of four carboxylic acid salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orola, Liana; Sarcevica, Inese; Kons, Artis; Actins, Andris; Veidis, Mikelis V.

    2014-01-01

    The umifenovir salts of maleic, salicylic, glutaric, and gentisic acid as well as the chloroform solvate of the salicylate were prepared. Single crystals of the five compounds were obtained and their molecular and crystal structures determined by X-ray diffraction. In each structure the conformation of phenyl ring with respect to the indole group of the umifenovir moiety is different. The water solubility and melting points of the studied umifenovir salts have been determined.

  10. Physical modeling of river spanning rock structures: Evaluating interstitial flow, local hydraulics, downstream scour development, and structure stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, K.L.; Thornton, C.I.; Mefford, B.; Holmquist-Johnson, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    Rock weir and ramp structures uniquely serve a necessary role in river management: to meet water deliveries in an ecologically sound manner. Uses include functioning as low head diversion dams, permitting fish passage, creating habitat diversity, and stabilizing stream banks and profiles. Existing information on design and performance of in-stream rock structures does not provide the guidance necessary to implement repeatable and sustainable construction and retrofit techniques. As widespread use of rock structures increases, the need for reliable design methods with a broad range of applicability at individual sites grows as well. Rigorous laboratory testing programs were implemented at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and at Colorado State University (CSU) as part of a multifaceted research project focused on expanding the current knowledge base and developing design methods to improve the success rate of river spanning rock structures in meeting project goals. Physical modeling at Reclamation is being used to measure, predict, and reduce interstitial flow through rock ramps. CSU is using physical testing to quantify and predict scour development downstream of rock weirs and its impact on the stability of rock structures. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  11. Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Geochemistry of impactites and target rocks, and search for a meteoritic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Boamah, Daniel; Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Irvine, Gordon; McDonald, Iain

    2005-10-01

    Major and trace element data, including platinum group element abundances, of representative impactites and target rocks from the crater rim and environs of the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana, have been investigated for the possible presence of a meteoritic component in impact-related rocks. A comparison of chemical data for Bosumtwi target rocks and impactites with those for Ivory Coast tektites and microtektites supports the interpretation that the Bosumtwi structure and Ivory Coast tektites formed during the same impact event. High siderophile element contents (compared to average upper crustal abundances) were determined for target rocks as well as for impactites. Chondrite-normalized (and iron meteorite-normalized) abundances for target rocks and impactites are similar. They do not, however, allow the unambiguous detection of the presence, or identification of the type, of a meteoritic component in the impactites. The indigenous siderophile element contents are high and possibly related to regional gold mineralization, although mineralized samples from the general region show somewhat different platinum-group element abundance patterns compared to the rocks at Bosumtwi. The present data underline the necessity of extensive target rock analyses at Bosumtwi, and at impact structures in general, before making any conclusions regarding the presence of a meteoritic component in impactites.

  12. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM-INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM-PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM-PAM and ACM-CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM-PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM-INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N-H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM-PAM cocrystal, while ACM-CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid-carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM-INA, ACM-PAM and ACM-CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM-PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM-PPZ salt and ACM-nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM-PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine salt of acemetacin exhibits superior

  13. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM–INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM–PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM–PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM–INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N—H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM–PAM cocrystal, while ACM–CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid–carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM–INA, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM–PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM–PPZ salt and ACM–nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM–PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine

  14. Structural style along the salt-front Walker Ridges OCS area, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.R.; Bryant, W.R.; Watkins, J.S. )

    1990-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico continues to be a frontier exploration province as the search for hydrocarbons moves progressively into deeper water. Shallow salt occurs extensively across the middle to lower slope, where structural complexity accentuates difficulties in seismic imaging. Early models portray all salt as deeply rooted whereas recent views rely on predominantly horizontal flow of salt. Observed characteristics along the base of slope through the Walker Ridge OCS area suggest a structural style consisting of a shallow allochthonous salt sheets sourced by deeply rooted stocks toward the updip margins. A typical bathymetric profile exhibits domal areas surrounding the stocks with collapse basins at the crest, relatively flat tops across the sheet, and gentle escarpments marking the basinward extent of each sheet. Basinal stratigraphic sections are deformed locally by adjacent stocks and overriding sheets. These basins contrast with stratigraphic sequences filling the relatively young, rapidly subsiding intraslope basins. Blocky to v-shaped valleys typify coalescence between adjacent salt sheets. Narrow overthrust zones occur where salt sheets override previously emplaced stocks and sheets. Similar characteristics across the middle to lower slope facilitate mapping the geometry and assessing the interaction between salt bodies. Accurate prediction of structural style and resultant geometry has important implications in the search for hydrocarbons and is one of the challenges faced in this deep-water frontier. Diapiric stocks and associated faulting are likely migration pathways, and allochthonous sheets may act as efficient seals to trap migrating hydrocarbons.

  15. Mechanism of multi-site phosphorylation from a ROCK-I:RhoE complex structure

    PubMed Central

    Komander, David; Garg, Ritu; Wan, Paul T C; Ridley, Anne J; Barford, David

    2008-01-01

    The ROCK-I serine/threonine protein kinase mediates the effects of RhoA to promote the formation of actin stress fibres and integrin-based focal adhesions. ROCK-I phosphorylates the unconventional G-protein RhoE on multiple N- and C-terminal sites. These phosphorylation events stabilise RhoE, which functions to antagonise RhoA-induced stress fibre assembly. Here, we provide a molecular explanation for multi-site phosphorylation of RhoE from the crystal structure of RhoE in complex with the ROCK-I kinase domain. RhoE interacts with the C-lobe αG helix of ROCK-I by means of a novel binding site remote from its effector region, positioning its N and C termini proximal to the ROCK-I catalytic site. Disruption of the ROCK-I:RhoE interface abolishes RhoE phosphorylation, but has no effect on the ability of RhoE to disassemble stress fibres. In contrast, mutation of the RhoE effector region attenuates RhoE-mediated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, indicating that RhoE exerts its inhibitory effects on ROCK-I through protein(s) binding to its effector region. We propose that ROCK-I phosphorylation of RhoE forms part of a feedback loop to regulate RhoA signalling. PMID:18946488

  16. Effects of Compositional and Structural Variations on Log Responses in Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechnig, R.; Bartetzko, A.; Delius, H.

    2001-12-01

    Petrophysical in-situ data of several boreholes drilled igneous and metamorphic rocks of continental and oceanic basement were analyzed in order to characterize and classify the occurring rock types. Since physical properties of crystalline rocks are controlled by both, compositional and structural features, one objective of this study was to develop methods to detect and quantify matrix effects. The comparison of mineralogical and geochemical core data with wireline data reveal following systematic observations: (1) Mafic rocks (e.g. oceanic basalts, volcanic island basalts, gabbros and amphibolites) generally have low contents of radioactive minerals. This is in particular valid for mafic rocks from the upper and lower oceanic crust. Slight increases in gamma-ray are related to an enrichment in potassium due to seafloor alteration. In contrast to this uniform, mantle source controlled rocks, extrusives and re-sedimented material from ocean islands and large igneous provinces show a large scatter in gamma-ray responses as a result of their more complex evolution. Mafic rocks recovered from boreholes into continental crust, are characterized by high gamma-ray values, due to enrichment of thorium and uranium during regional metamorphism. In contrast to the mafic plutonic and metamorphic rocks, where the density and p-wave velocity is controlled by the mineralogical composition, the physical parameters of mafic volcanic rocks are strongly affected by fracturing and vesicularity. Density, p-wave velocity and electrical resistivity logs are significantly lowered depending on the degree of vesicularity and fracturing. (2) Acid to intermediate igneous rocks and orthogneisses are distinguishable from paragneisses by their log responses despite showing a similar geochemical composition. The main difference occurs for the relation of the gamma-ray log to the density and neutron porosity log. The gamma-ray in paragneisses is controlled by the amount of phyllosilicates, which

  17. Surface diffusivity of cleaved NaCl crystals as a function of humidity: Impedance spectroscopy measurements and implications for crack healing in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelemeijer, Paula J.; Peach, Colin J.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Rock salt offers an attractive host rock for geological storage applications, because of its naturally low permeability and the ability of excavation-induced cracks to heal by fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer. However, while diffusive transport rates in bulk NaCl solution are rapid and well characterized, such data are not directly applicable to storage conditions where crack walls are coated with thin adsorbed water films. To reliably predict healing times in geological storage applications, data on mass transport rates in adsorbed films are needed. We determined the surface diffusivity in such films for conditions with absolute humidities (AH) ranging from 1 to 18 g/m3 (relative humidities (RH) of 4%-78%) by measuring the surface impedance of single NaCl crystals. We use the impedance results to calculate the effective surface diffusivity S = DδCusing the Nernst-Einstein equation. TheS values obtained lie in the range 1 × 10-27 m3 s-1 at very dry conditions to 1 × 10-19 m3 s-1 for the deliquescence point at 296 K, which is in reasonable agreement with existing values for grain boundary diffusion under wet conditions. Estimates for the diffusivity D made assuming a film thickness δ of 50-90 nm and no major effects of thickness on the solubility C lie in the range of 1 × 10-14 to 8 × 10-12 m2 s-1 for the highest humidities studied (14-18 g/m3 AH, 60%-78% RH). For geological storage systems in rock salt, we predict S values between 1 × 10-22 - 8 × 10-18 m3 s-1. These imply crack healing rates 6 to 7 orders of magnitude lower than expected for brine-filled cracks.

  18. Effects of in-plane magnetization orientation on magnetic and electronic properties in a Bcc Co (001)/rock salt MgO (001)/Bcc Co (001) magnetic tunnel junction system: ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dong Su; Chae, Kisung; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2012-04-01

    Ab initio calculations were performed on a fully epitaxial bcc Co (001)/rock salt MgO (001)/bcc Co (001) magnetic tunnel junction system for two cases where the magnetization is parallel to bcc Co [100] and to bcc Co [110]. Structural optimization reveals that the two cases are equivalent systems and that the Co electrodes contract in the z-direction whereas the MgO insulating barrier expands. The magnetic moments of each monolayer vary slightly in each case; furthermore, only the magnetic moment at the surface of the Co atom shows any enhancement (12%). The layer decomposed density of states profiles reveals that the bonding character of the junction interface is derived mainly from the 2p-3d hybridization of the MgO and Co interfacial atoms.

  19. Differences in the effects of simulated sea aerosol on water relations, salt content, and leaf ultrastructure of rock-rose plants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Blanco, M J; Rodríguez, P; Olmos, E; Morales, M A; Torrecillas, A

    2004-01-01

    White-leaf rock-rose (Cistus albidus L.) and Montpellier rock-rose (C. monspeliensis L.) plants were sprayed 2 to 3 min per day over a 7-d period, in an unheated plastic greenhouse, with different aqueous solutions containing deionized water alone (control); an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate 82.5%, 50 mg L(-1)) (S1); a solution simulating the composition of sea aerosol (S2); and a solution simulating sea aerosol with anionic surfactant (S3). White-leaf rock-rose was more sensitive to sea aerosol, showing greater leaf damage and markedly decreased growth, and the presence of surfactant enhanced the phytotoxic effect leading to greater increases in mortality. Montpellier rock-rose did not appear to be more adversely affected when surfactant was used in combination with sea aerosol, and manifested slight or less severe symptoms than white-leaf rock-rose. There was a significant increase in leaf turgor potential in the plants treated with both sea aerosol treatments by osmotic adjustment effect. The decrease in photosynthesis level seems to be due to both stomatal and nonstomatal factors. The results of microscopical analysis of Montpellier rock-rose plants show that sea aerosol treatment caused alterations in the chloroplast structure, reducing the starch grain and swelling the thylakoid membranes. The results of this study indicated that Montpellier rock-rose was more tolerant to sea aerosol than white-leaf rock-rose, showing a lower reduction in plant growth and less leaf damage, probably because of its ability to compartmentalize the toxic ions at the intracellular level.

  20. The crystal structure of indoleglycerol-phosphate synthase from Thermotoga maritima. Kinetic stabilization by salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Knöchel, Thorsten; Pappenberger, Astrid; Jansonius, Johan N; Kirschner, Kasper

    2002-03-08

    The crystal structure of the thermostable indoleglycerol-phosphate synthase from Thermotoga maritima (tIGPS) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. It was compared with the structures of the thermostable sIGPS from Sulfolobus solfataricus and of the thermolabile eIGPS from Escherichia coli. The main chains of the three (beta alpha)(8)-barrel proteins superimpose closely, and the packing of side chains in the beta-barrel cores, as well as the architecture of surface loops, is very similar. Both thermostable proteins have, however, 17 strong salt bridges, compared with only 10 in eIGPS. The number of additional salt bridges in tIGPS and sIGPS correlates well with their reduced rate of irreversible thermal inactivation at 90 degrees C. Only 3 of 17 salt bridges in tIGPS and sIGPS are topologically conserved. The major difference between the two proteins is the preference for interhelical salt bridges in sIGPS and intrahelical ones in tIGPS. The different implementation of salt bridges in the closely related proteins suggests that the stabilizing effect of salt bridges depends rather on the sum of their individual contributions than on their location. This observation is consistent with a protein unfolding mechanism where the simultaneous breakdown of all salt bridges is the rate-determining step.

  1. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown.

  2. Strains Induced in Urban Structures by Ultra-High Frequency Blasting Rock Motions: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, C. H.; Hamdi, E.; Aimone-Martin, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes measurement and interpretation of strains induced in two, multiple story, older, urban structures by ultra-high frequency rock blast excitation from contiguous excavation. These strains are obtained from relative displacements found by integrating time correlated velocity time histories from multiple positions on the structures and foundation rock. Observations are based on ten instrumented positions on the structures and in the foundation rock during eight blast events, which provided over 70 time histories for analysis. The case study and measurements allowed the following conclusions: despite particle velocities in the rock that greatly exceed regulatory limits, strains in external walls are similar to or lower than those necessary to crack masonry structures and weak wall covering materials. These strains are also lower than those sustained by single story residential structures when excited by low frequency motions with particle velocities below regulatory limits. Expected relative displacements calculated with pseudo velocity single degree of freedom response spectra of excitation motions measured in the rock are similar to those measured.

  3. Shocked rocks and impact glasses from the El'gygytgyn impact structure, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, Eugene P.; Koeberl, Christian

    2004-09-01

    The El'gygytgyn impact structure is about 18 km in diameter and is located in the central part of Chukotka, arctic Russia. The crater was formed in volcanic rock strata of Cretaceous age, which include lava and tuffs of rhyolites, dacites, and andesites. A mid-Pliocene age of the crater was previously determined by fission track (3.45 ± 0.15 Ma) and 40Ar/39Ar dating (3.58 ± 0.04 Ma). The ejecta layer around the crater is completely eroded. Shock-metamorphosed volcanic rocks, impact melt rocks, and bomb-shaped impact glasses occur in lacustrine terraces but have been redeposited after the impact event. Clasts of volcanic rocks, which range in composition from rhyolite to dacite, represent all stages of shock metamorphism, including selective melting and formation of homogeneous impact melt. Four stages of shocked volcanic rocks were identified: stage I (£35 GPa; lava and tuff contain weakly to strongly shocked quartz and feldspar clasts with abundant PFs and PDFs; coesite and stishovite occur as well), stage II (35-45 GPa; quartz and feldspar are converted to diaplectic glass; coesite but no stishovite), stage III (45-55 GPa; partly melted volcanic rocks; common diaplectic quartz glass; feldspar is melted), and stage IV (>55 GPa; melt rocks and glasses). Two main types of impact melt rocks occur in the crater: 1) impact melt rocks and impact melt breccias (containing abundant fragments of shocked volcanic rocks) that were probably derived from (now eroded) impact melt flows on the crater walls, and 2) aerodynamically shaped impact melt glass "bombs" composed of homogeneous glass. The composition of the glasses is almost identical to that of rhyolites from the uppermost part of the target. Cobalt, Ni, and Ir abundances in the impact glasses and melt rocks are not or only slightly enriched compared to the volcanic target rocks; only the Cr abundances show distinct enrichment, which points toward an achondritic projectile. However, the present data do not allow one

  4. The role of basement tectonics in the control of sedimentary facies, structural patterns and salt plug emplacements in the Zagros fold belt of southwest Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuillan, Harry

    Extensive field observations over a large tract of continuous rock outcrops in the Zagros Mountain Range of southwest Iran have yielded a wealth of stratigraphic and structural detail. In the region structural anomalies are frequently associated with similar facies distribution patterns. In the eastern portion of the region emergent salt plugs of infra-Cambrian age exhibit the same alignment patterns. Such trends bear no apparent genetic relationship to the Tertiary folding responsible for the present fold belt grain of the Zagros Range but rather indicate affinity with linear basement features which are readily observable on Landsat imagery and air photographs. Superimposed on the eastern region's mode of facies trends and structure are localized variations which are directly attributed to pulses of salt diapiric activity. Thus stratigraphic data acquired from deep sections associated with salt domes can lead to erroneous overviews of regional facies distributions while anomalous dome-shaped structural features associated with elongate fold, so common to the fold belt, can only be attributed to near surface diapiric structures. The recognition of features related to basement tectonics and the realization of their implication in the control and modification of geological processes is an important adjunct to the search for hydrocarbon accumulations in the region. Indeed it can be shown that renewed movements on basement trends directly affect ooil production patterns as a consequence of the enhancement of fracture porosity and permeability in Tertiary carbonate reservoir structures. These constitute some of the world's largest oil-producing fields.

  5. Reverse modeling of 2D and 3D diapiric salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical forward modeling of salt diapirs formed by two different processes (differential loading and buoyancy driven) has been widely performed with numerical codes in many studies, whereas works focusing on the dynamic retro-deformation of such structures remain scarce. Buoyancy driven diapirs, in which the density difference between salt and overburden induces upward motion of salt, have been successfully retro-deformed in two and three dimensions using simple rheologies for the salt and overburden (e.g., Kaus & Podladchikov 2001). However, retro-deformation of down-building diapirs (syndepositional process in which salt structures grow while sediments are being deposited) using mechanical codes has only been done in two dimensions (e.g., Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001), even though the importance of three-dimensionality in salt diapirism is accepted. We have used the two-dimensional visco-elasto-plastic finite element code MILAMIN_VEP to perform both forward and backward simulations and to check the validity of a reversed time step method (Kaus & Podladchikov 2001 and Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001) for a wide range of parameters, variable sedimentation rates, and for non-linear rheologies. Forward simulations are run until the salt layer is exhausted and then a reverse time step is applied in order to retro-deform the model. Down-building process was mimicked using a fast-erosion condition at the surface, which keeps it flat and redistributes material at every time step. Initially, we have tested our method by retro-deforming salt structures that develop from an interface that is sinusoidally perturbed. More realistic simulations were performed by starting with randomly perturbed salt interface and using different rheological parameters for the salt and the overburden as well as variable sedimentation rates. Once the method has been proved successful for different parameters in two dimensions, the finite differences parallel code LaMEM has also been used to dynamically

  6. Evidence for a meteoritic component in impact melt rock from the Chicxulub structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Shirey, Steven B.; Blum, Joel D.; Marin, Luis E.; Koeberl, Christian

    1994-03-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Yucatan, Mexico, has recently been recognized as a greater than 200-km diameter multi-ring impact crater of K-T boundary age. Crystalline impact melt rocks and breccias from within the crater, which have compositions similar to those of normal continental crustal rocks and which show shock metamorphic effects, have been studied for trace element and Re-Os isotope compositions. A melt rock sample shows elevated iridium concentrations, an osmium concentration of 25 ppb, and a low Os-187/Os-188 ratio of 0.113, which are incompatible with derivation from the continental crust. Even though the Os-187/Os-188 ratio is slightly lower than the range so far measured in meteorites, a mantle origin seems unlikely for mass balance reasons and because the cratering event is unlikely to have excavated mantle material. The data support the hypothesis of a heterogeneously distributed meteoritic component in the Chicxulub melt rock.

  7. The structure of dimeric ROCK I reveals the mechanism for ligand selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Marc; Hayakawa, Koto; Swenson, Lora; Bellon, Steven; Fleming, Mark; Taslimi, Paul; Doran, John

    2006-01-06

    ROCK or Rho-associated kinase, a serine/threonine kinase, is an effector of Rho-dependent signaling and is involved in actin-cytoskeleton assembly and cell motility and contraction. The ROCK protein consists of several domains: an N-terminal region, a kinase catalytic domain, a coiled-coil domain containing a RhoA binding site, and a pleckstrin homology domain. The C-terminal region of ROCK binds to and inhibits the kinase catalytic domains, and this inhibition is reversed by binding RhoA, a small GTPase. Here we present the structure of the N-terminal region and the kinase domain. In our structure, two N-terminal regions interact to form a dimerization domain linking two kinase domains together. This spatial arrangement presents the kinase active sites and regulatory sequences on a common face affording the possibility of both kinases simultaneously interacting with a dimeric inhibitory domain or with a dimeric substrate. The kinase domain adopts a catalytically competent conformation; however, no phosphorylation of active site residues is observed in the structure. We also determined the structures of ROCK bound to four different ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitors (Y-27632, fasudil, hydroxyfasudil, and H-1152P). Each of these compounds binds with reduced affinity to cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA), a highly homologous kinase. Subtle differences exist between the ROCK- and PKA-bound conformations of the inhibitors that suggest that interactions with a single amino acid of the active site (Ala215 in ROCK and Thr183 in PKA) determine the relative selectivity of these compounds. Hydroxyfasudil, a metabolite of fasudil, may be selective for ROCK over PKA through a reversed binding orientation.

  8. Characterizing Fractured Rock with Geo-structural and Micro-structural Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dershowitz, William

    2015-04-01

    Fracture spatial structure and hydro-mechanical properties are key to the understanding of fractured rock geomechanical stability, hydrodynamics, and solute transport. This paper presents a quantitative approach to fracture characterization to provide information useful for stability and flow analysis, and for coupled flow/geomechanics. The approach presented is based on the concept of geo-structural, hydro-mechanical, and microstructural models. This approach is applicable for data collected from exposed surfaces (mapping, LiDAR, aero-magnetics), boreholes (core, optical images, and images based on resistivity and geophysical methods), and three dimensional imaging (seismic attributes and microseismics). Examples are presented comparing the results of conventional fracture characterization procedures and the recommended procedure. Fracture characterization for geo-structural fracture models is based on the idea that the geologically based fracture spatial pattern is the key, rather than individual fracture statistics. For example, while fracture intensity statistics can useful, the three dimensional fracture pattern for a bedded sedimentary rock can be better reproduced from the combination of a mechanical bedding model and a correlation between fracture spacing and bed height. In a fracture geo-structural model, the fracture spatial pattern, orientation, and intensity should be characterized in a combination of global and local coordinate systems. While some fracture sets may be oriented relative to the regional tectonics (the global coordinate system), other fracture sets are oriented relative to bedding (a local coordinate system). Fracture hydro-mechanical models define the combination of (a) conductive fractures, (b) flow-barrier fractures, (c) fractures which provide storage porosity, (d) fractures of significance for kinematic stability, and (e) fractures of significance for rock mass strength and deformability. The hydromechanical fractures are a subset of

  9. Geographic Variation in Plant Community Structure of Salt Marshes: Species, Functional and Phylogenetic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongyu; Chamberlain, Scott A.; Elhaik, Eran; Jalli, Inder; Lynes, Alana-Rose; Marczak, Laurie; Sabath, Niv; Vargas, Amy; Więski, Kazimierz; Zelig, Emily M.; Pennings, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    In general, community similarity is thought to decay with distance; however, this view may be complicated by the relative roles of different ecological processes at different geographical scales, and by the compositional perspective (e.g. species, functional group and phylogenetic lineage) used. Coastal salt marshes are widely distributed worldwide, but no studies have explicitly examined variation in salt marsh plant community composition across geographical scales, and from species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. Based on studies in other ecosystems, we hypothesized that, in coastal salt marshes, community turnover would be more rapid at local versus larger geographical scales; and that community turnover patterns would diverge among compositional perspectives, with a greater distance decay at the species level than at the functional or phylogenetic levels. We tested these hypotheses in salt marshes of two regions: The southern Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. We examined the characteristics of plant community composition at each salt marsh site, how community similarity decayed with distance within individual salt marshes versus among sites in each region, and how community similarity differed among regions, using species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. We found that results from the three compositional perspectives generally showed similar patterns: there was strong variation in community composition within individual salt marsh sites across elevation; in contrast, community similarity decayed with distance four to five orders of magnitude more slowly across sites within each region. Overall, community dissimilarity of salt marshes was lowest on the southern Atlantic Coast, intermediate on the Gulf Coast, and highest between the two regions. Our results indicated that local gradients are relatively more important than regional processes in structuring coastal salt marsh communities. Our results also suggested that in

  10. Geographic variation in plant community structure of salt marshes: species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyu; Chamberlain, Scott A; Elhaik, Eran; Jalli, Inder; Lynes, Alana-Rose; Marczak, Laurie; Sabath, Niv; Vargas, Amy; Więski, Kazimierz; Zelig, Emily M; Pennings, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    In general, community similarity is thought to decay with distance; however, this view may be complicated by the relative roles of different ecological processes at different geographical scales, and by the compositional perspective (e.g. species, functional group and phylogenetic lineage) used. Coastal salt marshes are widely distributed worldwide, but no studies have explicitly examined variation in salt marsh plant community composition across geographical scales, and from species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. Based on studies in other ecosystems, we hypothesized that, in coastal salt marshes, community turnover would be more rapid at local versus larger geographical scales; and that community turnover patterns would diverge among compositional perspectives, with a greater distance decay at the species level than at the functional or phylogenetic levels. We tested these hypotheses in salt marshes of two regions: The southern Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. We examined the characteristics of plant community composition at each salt marsh site, how community similarity decayed with distance within individual salt marshes versus among sites in each region, and how community similarity differed among regions, using species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. We found that results from the three compositional perspectives generally showed similar patterns: there was strong variation in community composition within individual salt marsh sites across elevation; in contrast, community similarity decayed with distance four to five orders of magnitude more slowly across sites within each region. Overall, community dissimilarity of salt marshes was lowest on the southern Atlantic Coast, intermediate on the Gulf Coast, and highest between the two regions. Our results indicated that local gradients are relatively more important than regional processes in structuring coastal salt marsh communities. Our results also suggested that in

  11. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  12. Is dual morphology of rock-salt crystals possible with a single additive? The answer is yes, with barbituric acid.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anik; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2012-11-05

    Crystal face lift: barbituric acid is shown to be a new crystal-habit modifier for sodium chloride crystals. Two morphologies of salt crystals can be prepared separately with this new additive. It is of the few additives able to induce rhombic dodecahedron crystals for NaCl, and is required only a trace of amount, unlike other additives, such as glycine. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structure instability forecasting and analysis of giant rock pillars in steeply dipping thick coal seams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xing-ping; Sun, Huan; Shan, Peng-fei; Cai, Ming; Cao, Jian-tao; Cui, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Structure stability analysis of rock masses is essential for forecasting catastrophic structure failure in coal seam mining. Steeply dipping thick coal seams (SDTCS) are common in the Urumqi coalfield, and some dynamical hazards such as roof collapse and mining- induced seismicity occur frequently in the coal mines. The cause of these events is mainly structure instability in giant rock pillars sandwiched between SDTCS. Developing methods to predict these events is important for safe mining in such a complex environment. This study focuses on understanding the structural mechanics model of a giant rock pillar and presents a viewpoint of the stability of a trend sphenoid fractured beam (TSFB). Some stability index parameters such as failure surface dips were measured, and most dips were observed to be between 46° and 51°. We used a digital panoramic borehole monitoring system to measure the TSFB's height (Δ H), which varied from 56.37 to 60.50 m. Next, FLAC3D was used to model the distribution and evolution of vertical displacement in the giant rock pillars; the results confirmed the existence of a TSFB structure. Finally, we investigated the acoustic emission (AE) energy accumulation rate and observed that the rate commonly ranged from 20 to 40 kJ/min. The AE energy accumulation rate could be used to anticipate impeding seismic events related to structure failure. The results presented provide a useful approach for forecasting catastrophic events related to structure instability and for developing hazard prevention technology for mining in SDTCS.

  14. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  15. DFT analysis of the structure and IR spectrum of potassium salt of diphenylsulfophthalide - A model compound for polydiphenylenesulfophthalide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishlov, N. M.; Akhmetzyanov, Sh S.; Khursan, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Experimental IR spectra of crystalline dried and non-dried potassium diphenylsulfophthalide (TAC-K) as a model compound for polymeric salts are presented. DFT analysis (B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) of the structure and IR spectra of a series of compounds similar in structure to TAC-K as well as their dimers indicates that the sulfonate group environment strongly affects the positions of absorption bands (ABs) of vibrations of Ssbnd O bonds and demonstrates that information on the exact structure of ion clusters is needed for reliable and unambiguous assignment of the ABs in experimental IR spectra of real sulfonate ion containing systems to particular vibrational modes. Various ways of metal ion coordination with sulfonate ion, as well as their reflection in IR spectra of model compounds, are considered and discussed. Using TAC-K as an example, the effect of an intramolecular hydrogen bond on the vibrational modes of sulfonate group and hydroxy group is considered. The effect of ion aggregation on the shape of the IR spectrum of TAC-K is analyzed for an energetically favorable dimer of this salt as an example. Based on a combination of calculated, literature and reference data, a number of ABs in the IR spectra of TAC-K have been tentatively assigned. In particular, the bands in the region of 3230-3180 cm-1 have been assigned to ν(Osbnd H); those at 1240-1160 cm-1, to νas(SO3-); the AB at 1080 cm-1, to νs(SO3-); that at 616 cm-1, to δ(oop)s(SO3-); and that at 570 cm-1, to δ(ip)as(SO3-).

  16. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  17. Production and characterization of a halo-, solvent-, thermo-tolerant alkaline lipase by Staphylococcus arlettae JPBW-1, isolated from rock salt mine.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Mamta; Garlapati, Vijay Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Studies on lipase production and characterization were carried out with a bacterial strain Staphylococcus arlettae JPBW-1 isolated from rock salt mine, Darang, HP, India. Higher lipase activity has been obtained using 10 % inoculum with 5 % of soybean oil as carbon source utilizing a pH 8.0 in 3 h at 35 °C and 100 rpm through submerged fermentation. Partially purified S. arlettae lipase has been found to be active over a broad range of temperature (30-90 °C), pH (7.0-12.0) and NaCl concentration (0-20 %). It has shown extreme stability with solvents such as benzene, xylene, n-hexane, methanol, ethanol and toluene up to 30 % (v/v). The lipase activity has been found to be inhibited by metal ions of K(+), Co(2+) and Fe (2+) and stimulated by Mn(2+), Ca(2+) and Hg(2+). Lipase activity has been diminished with denaturants, but enhanced effect has been observed with surfactants, such as Tween 80, Tween 40 and chelator EDTA. The K m and V max values were found to be 7.05 mM and 2.67 mmol/min, respectively. Thus, the lipase from S. arlettae may have considerable potential for industrial application from the perspectives of its tolerance towards industrial extreme conditions of pH, temperature, salt and solvent.

  18. Geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples, and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children in four municipalities of the department of Huila (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Martignon, Stefania; Opazo-Gutiérrez, Mario Omar; Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Orjuela-Osorio, Iván Rodrigo; Avila, Viviana; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; González-Carrera, María Clara; Ruiz-Carrizosa, Jaime Alberto; Silva-Hermida, Blanca Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride is an element that affects teeth and bone formation in animals and humans. Though the use of systemic fluoride is an evidence-based caries preventive measure, excessive ingestion can impair tooth development, mainly the mineralization of tooth enamel, leading to a condition known as enamel fluorosis. In this study, we investigated the geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples in four endemic enamel fluorosis sentinel municipalities of the department of Huila, Colombia (Pitalito, Altamira, El Agrado and Rivera), and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water, table salt, active sediment, rock, and soil was evaluated by means of an ion selective electrode and the geochemical analyses were performed using X-ray fluorescence. Geochemical analysis revealed fluoride concentrations under 15 mg/kg in active sediment, rock and soil samples, not indicative of a significant delivery to the watersheds studied. The concentration of fluoride in table salt was found to be under the inferior limit (less than 180 μg/g) established by the Colombian regulations. Likewise, exposure doses for fluoride water intake did not exceed the recommended total dose for all ages from 6 months. Although the evidence does not point out at rocks, soils, fluoride-bearing minerals, fluoridated salt and water, the hypothesis of these elements as responsible of the current prevalence of enamel fluorosis cannot be discarded since, aqueducts might have undergone significant changes overtime.

  19. Bis(phosphine)boronium salts. Synthesis, structures and coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Timothy A; Huertos, Miguel A; Pernik, Indrek; Young, Rowan D; Weller, Andrew S

    2013-09-28

    The synthesis of a range of bis(phosphine)boronium salts is reported [(R2HP)2BH2][X] (R = Ph, (t)Bu, Cy) in which the counter anion is also varied (X(-) = Br(-), [OTf](-), [BAr(F)4](-), Ar(F) = 3,5-(CF3)2C6H3). Characterization in the solid-state by X-ray diffraction suggests there are weak hydrogen bonds between the PH units of the boronium cation and the anion (X(-) = Br(-), [OTf](-)), while solution NMR spectroscopy also reveals hydrogen bonding occurs in the order [BAr(F)4](-) < [OTf](-) < Br(-). [(Ph2HP)2BH2][BAr(F)4] reacts with RhH(PPh3)3, by elimination of H2, forming [Rh(κ(1),η-PPh2BH2·PPh2H)(PPh3)2][BAr(F)4] which shows a β-B-agostic interaction from the resulting base stabilised phosphino-borane ligand. Alternatively such ligands can be assembled directly on the metal centre by reaction of in situ generated {Rh(PPh3)3}(+) and Ph2HP·BH3 to afford [Rh(κ(1),η-PPh2BH2·PPh3)(PPh3)2][BAr(F)4], which was characterised by X-ray crystallography. Addition of H3B·PPh2H to the well-defined 16-electron "T-shaped" complex [Rh(P(i)Bu3)2(PPh3)][BAr(F)4] (characterised by X-ray crystallography) formed of a mixture of base-stabilised phosphino borane ligated complexes [Rh(κ(1),η-PR2BH2·PR3)(PR3)2][BAr(F)4] (R = (i)Bu or Ph). These last observations may lend clues to the formation of bis(phosphine)boronium salts in the catalytic dehydrocoupling reaction of phosphine boranes as mediated by Rh(I) compounds.

  20. Geophysical analysis of rock glacier internal structure and implications for deformation mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentine, C. E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Speece, M. A.; Link, C. A.; Locke, W. W.; Carr, C. G.; Shaw, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of the internal composition and structure on the active portion of the Lone Peak Rock Glacier (LPRG), Madison range, southwest Montana revealed links between internal structure and surface topography. Seismic refraction surveys performed along transverse and longitudinal profiles corroborate borehole and excavation data by demonstrating a consistent and distinct transition from unconsolidated (unfrozen) surface debris (2-3 m thick) to a consolidated (frozen) subsurface material. Refraction velocities for the seismic survey transects were relatively consistent along their length with 400 m s-1 for the upper layer detected, and 3500 m s-1 for the lower layer detected at a depth of 2-3 m. This second velocity of 3500 m s-1 is consistent with other observed refraction velocities for ice. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) data along similar longitudinal and transverse profiles identified up-slope dipping structures to a depth of ~10 m, consistent with layering of materials with contrasting radar properties within the ice-rock unit. The GPR data is interpreted as a sequence of alternating debris-poor and debris-rich layers which dip upslope toward the rock-glacier headwall along the longitudinal profile, and which show correspondence with transverse ridges at the surface. The presence of fault bounded blocks (i.e. structural horses) detected in the longitudinal GPR data suggests passive roof duplex thrust faulting, in which the roof sequence - unconsolidated (unfrozen) debris - has not been displaced toward the foreland (down glacier), but has been underthrust by the duplex. Transverse ridges commonly characterize rock glacier surfaces in a range of locations worldwide. Approximately one third of 383 rock glaciers inventoried in southwest Montana demonstrate pronounced transverse ridges. It has previously been suggested that transverse ridges are the product of thrusting, which is caused by compressive flow in rock glaciers. Thrusting however has not been

  1. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  2. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  3. Crystal structures and related to noncentrosymmetricity properties of 4-aminomorpholinium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Miniewicz, Andrzej; Szklarz, Przemysław; Jakubas, Ryszard

    2016-11-01

    The performed analysis of crystal structures deposited in Cambridge Structural Database shows that simple salts of amines with N-attached six-membered aliphatic ring favor an acentric arrangement of molecules in a solid state and, therefore, might be suitable candidates for applications that require piezoelectric, ferroelectric, or second-order nonlinear optical properties. Herein we report that hydrochloride and hydrobromide of 4-aminomorpholine indeed crystallize in polar (Pca21) and non-centrosymmetric (C2221) space groups, respectively-the feature that gives rise to their nonlinear properties. While dielectric spectroscopy confirms piezoelectric nature of the hydrochloride salt, second harmonic generation measurements unequivocally prove nonlinear optical properties of both analyzed compounds.

  4. Use of structured decision making to identify monitoring variables and management priorities for salt marsh ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neckles, Hilary A.; Lyons, James E.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Shriver, W. Gregory; Adamowicz, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Most salt marshes in the USA have been degraded by human activities, and coastal managers are faced with complex choices among possible actions to restore or enhance ecosystem integrity. We applied structured decision making (SDM) to guide selection of monitoring variables and management priorities for salt marshes within the National Wildlife Refuge System in the northeastern USA. In general, SDM is a systematic process for decomposing a decision into its essential elements. We first engaged stakeholders in clarifying regional salt marsh decision problems, defining objectives and attributes to evaluate whether objectives are achieved, and developing a pool of alternative management actions for achieving objectives. Through this process, we identified salt marsh attributes that were applicable to monitoring National Wildlife Refuges on a regional scale and that targeted management needs. We then analyzed management decisions within three salt marsh units at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, coastal Delaware, as a case example of prioritizing management alternatives. Values for salt marsh attributes were estimated from 2 years of baseline monitoring data and expert opinion. We used linear value modeling to aggregate multiple attributes into a single performance score for each alternative, constrained optimization to identify alternatives that maximized total management benefits subject to refuge-wide cost constraints, and used graphical analysis to identify the optimal set of alternatives for the refuge. SDM offers an efficient, transparent approach for integrating monitoring into management practice and improving the quality of management decisions.

  5. Synthesis, structural, solubility and anticancer activity studies of salts using nucleobases and sulfonic acids coformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetu; Singh, Udai P.; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha; Singh, Hariji

    2017-10-01

    The reactions of natural and unnatural nucleobases (cytosine (Cyt), adenine (Ade), 5-aminouracil (AU) and caffeine (Caff)) with sulfonic acids coformer (1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, NDSA; 5-sulfosalicylic acid, SSA) resulted in the formation of salts viz. [NDSA.Cyt] (1), [NDSA.Ade] (2), [NDSA.AU] (3), [NDSA.Caff] (4), [SSA.Cyt] (5), [SSA.Ade] (6), [SSA.AU] (7), and [SSA.Caff] (8). The structural analysis revealed that salts 1, 4, 6 and 7 have intermolecular interactions between adjacent nucleobases which form two different homodimer shown in R22 (8) motif and assembled via complementary Nsbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯N interactions. However, in all other salts an intermediate supramolecular synthon pattern was observed between nucleobases and sulfonic acids. The lattice energy was also calculated by DFT to investigate whether salts were thermodynamically more stable than its coformer. The same was further confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetric (DSC-TG) analysis. The anticancer activity study of individual nucleobases and their NDSA salts were also performed on human breast (MCF-7) and lung (A 549) cancer cell. The salts formation of nucleobases with sulfonic acids improved their solubility, thereby demonstrating up to 8-fold increase in solubility of nucleobases.

  6. Strontium and neodymium isotope systematics of target rocks and impactites from the El'gygytgyn impact structure: Linking impactites and target rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Wencke; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-12-01

    The 3.6 Ma El'gygytgyn structure, located in northeastern Russia on the Chukotka Peninsula, is an 18 km diameter complex impact structure. The bedrock is formed by mostly high-silica volcanic rocks of the 87 Ma old Okhotsk-Chukotka Volcanic Belt (OCVB). Volcanic target rocks and impact glasses collected on the surface, as well as drill core samples of bedrock and impact breccias have been investigated by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to obtain new insights into the relationships between these lithologies in terms of Nd and Sr isotope systematics. Major and trace element data for impact glasses are added to compare with the composition of target rocks and drill core samples. Sr isotope data are useful tracers of alteration processes and Nd isotopes reveal characteristics of the magmatic sources of the target rocks, impact breccias, and impact glasses. There are three types of target rocks mapped on the surface: mafic volcanics, dacitic tuff and lava of the Koekvun' Formation, and dacitic to rhyolitic ignimbrite of the Pykarvaam Formation. The latter represents the main contributor to the impact rocks. The drill core is divided into a suevite and a bedrock section by the Sr isotope data, for which different postimpact alteration regimes have been detected. Impact glasses from the present-day surface did not suffer postimpact hydrothermal alteration and their data indicate a coherent alteration trend in terms of Sr isotopes with the target rocks from the surface. Surprisingly, the target rocks do not show isotopic coherence with the Central Chukotka segment of the OCVB or with the Berlozhya magmatic assemblage (BMA), a late Jurassic felsic volcanic suite that crops out in the eastern part of the central Chukotka segment of the OCVB. However, concordance for these rocks exists with the Okhotsk segment of the OCVB. This finding argues for variable source magmas having contributed to the build-up of the OCVB.

  7. Salt weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, E.

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos. Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the insitu fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns, as observed around impact crates on Earth. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in desserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze-thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape in some dry valleys of the Earth but possibly also on Mars. (Malin, 1974

  8. Bird's-eye structures in carbonate rocks and their environmental significance

    SciTech Connect

    Desheng, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Previous workers have usually considered bird'-eye structures as typical indicators of tidal flats (supratidal to intertidal) environments. However, recently collected data from the Middle Devonian Jipao Formation in Dushan, Guizhou, China, suggest alternative environmental interpretations. The results from the combined analyses of rock texture, sedimentary structure, fossils and paleoecology, and sedimentary sequence, as well as the paleogeographic background of bird's-eye-bearing formations indicate the bird's-eye structures must have formed in a restricted shallow subtidal lagoon environment. Therefore, bird's-eye structures can be distributed not only in tidal flats but also in some confined environments within subtidal zones, such as in a semiclosed lagoon (low-energy environment). Bird's-eye structures are also described from supratidal and intertidal limestones in the Upper Devonian Yaosuo Formation (Feifengjing, Guizhou) and in the Upper Devonian Rongjiang Formation (Buzhai, Guizho). The correlation of bird's-eye structures from tidal flat limestones with those from the subtidal zone demonstrates that bird's-eye structures from different environments can, to some degree, be distinguished on the basis of their form, origin, and rock association. But the writer must emphasize that when bird's-eye structures are used to determine sedimentary environments, all available facies indicators (e.g., other sedimentary structures, rock textures, fossils and their assemblages, mineralogic facies, and especially sedimentary sequences) must be synthesized.

  9. Properties of Halococcus salifodinae, an Isolate from Permian Rock Salt Deposits, Compared with Halococci from Surface Waters.

    PubMed

    Legat, Andrea; Denner, Ewald B M; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Pfeiffer, Peter; Knopf, Burkhard; Claus, Harald; Gruber, Claudia; König, Helmut; Wanner, Gerhard; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2013-02-28

    Halococcus salifodinae BIpT DSM 8989T, an extremely halophilic archaeal isolate from an Austrian salt deposit (Bad Ischl), whose origin was dated to the Permian period, was described in 1994. Subsequently, several strains of the species have been isolated, some from similar but geographically separated salt deposits. Hcc. salifodinae may be regarded as one of the most ancient culturable species which existed already about 250 million years ago. Since its habitat probably did not change during this long period, its properties were presumably not subjected to the needs of mutational adaptation. Hcc. salifodinae and other isolates from ancient deposits would be suitable candidates for testing hypotheses on prokaryotic evolution, such as the molecular clock concept, or the net-like history of genome evolution. A comparison of available taxonomic characteristics from strains of Hcc. salifodinae and other Halococcus species, most of them originating from surface waters, is presented. The cell wall polymer of Hcc. salifodinae was examined and found to be a heteropolysaccharide, similar to that of Hcc. morrhuae. Polyhydroxyalkanoate granules were present in Hcc. salifodinae, suggesting a possible lateral gene transfer before Permian times.

  10. Properties of Halococcus salifodinae, an Isolate from Permian Rock Salt Deposits, Compared with Halococci from Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Legat, Andrea; Denner, Ewald B. M.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Pfeiffer, Peter; Knopf, Burkhard; Claus, Harald; Gruber, Claudia; König, Helmut; Wanner, Gerhard; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Halococcus salifodinae BIpT DSM 8989T, an extremely halophilic archaeal isolate from an Austrian salt deposit (Bad Ischl), whose origin was dated to the Permian period, was described in 1994. Subsequently, several strains of the species have been isolated, some from similar but geographically separated salt deposits. Hcc. salifodinae may be regarded as one of the most ancient culturable species which existed already about 250 million years ago. Since its habitat probably did not change during this long period, its properties were presumably not subjected to the needs of mutational adaptation. Hcc. salifodinae and other isolates from ancient deposits would be suitable candidates for testing hypotheses on prokaryotic evolution, such as the molecular clock concept, or the net-like history of genome evolution. A comparison of available taxonomic characteristics from strains of Hcc. salifodinae and other Halococcus species, most of them originating from surface waters, is presented. The cell wall polymer of Hcc. salifodinae was examined and found to be a heteropolysaccharide, similar to that of Hcc. morrhuae. Polyhydroxyalkanoate granules were present in Hcc. salifodinae, suggesting a possible lateral gene transfer before Permian times. PMID:25371342

  11. Tidal events and salt-marsh structure influence black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) recruitment across an ecotone.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer M; Bell, Susan S

    2012-07-01

    Field experiments were conducted at a black mangrove-salt-marsh ecotone in southwest Florida (U.S.A.) to investigate retention of propagules of the black mangrove, Avicennia germinans, by salt-marsh plants as a mechanism of facilitation operating on recruitment success at landward boundaries. Buoyant A. germinans propagules are dispersed by tides, and stranding is required for establishment; therefore, processes that enable stranding should facilitate mangrove recruitment. We expected the physical structure of salt-marsh vegetation to define propagule retention capacity, and we predicted that salt-marsh plants with distinct growth forms would differentially retain propagules. Experimental monoculture plots (1 m2) of salt-marsh plants with different growth forms (Sporobolus virginicus [grass], Sesuvium portulacastrum [succulent forb], and Batis maritima [succulent scrub]) were created, and A. germinans propagules were emplaced into these plots and monitored over time. For comparison, propagules were also placed into natural polyculture plots (1 m2). Polyculture plots contained at least two of the salt-marsh plant taxa selected for monoculture treatments, and S. virginicus was always present within these polyculture plots. Natural polyculture plots retained 59.3% +/- 11.0% (mean +/- SE) of emplaced propagules. Monocultures varied in their propagule retention capacities with plots of S. virginicus retaining on average 65.7% +/- 11.5% of transplanted propagules compared to 7.2% +/- 1.8% by B. maritima and 5.0% +/- 1.9% by S. portulacastrum. Plots containing S. virginicus retained a significantly greater percentage of emplaced propagules relative to the two succulent salt-marsh taxa. Furthermore, propagule entrapment, across all treatments, was strongly correlated with salt-marsh structure (r2 = 0.6253, P = 0.00001), which was estimated using an indirect quantitative metric (lateral obstruction) calculated from digital images of plots. Overall, our findings imply that

  12. The dynamics of interacting salt structures and associated fluid flow in the western Norwegian-Danish Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Mikkel S.; Clausen, Ole R.; Andresen, Katrine J.; Korstgård, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Minor secondary structures observed along the flanks of major salt structures in the Norwegian-Danish Basin appear to be generated mainly during the early stages of halokinesis. Seismic anomalies in the cover sediments at the flanks of the major salt structures and in relation to one of the secondary structures show several circular patterns. The circular patterns are generally interpreted as faults related to collapsing salt, indicating a subtle and dynamic cannibalization relationship between the secondary structure and the main diapir. High-amplitude reflections interpreted as either entrapped gas along the circular faults or diagenetic changes induced by the fluids originating from the salt-sediment interface generally enhances the seismic appearance of the circular faults, but potentially also disturb the seismic imaging of the faults. Other secondary salt structures, with a similar geometry, do not show sign of collapse, apparently due to a greater distance from the main salt structures and therefore not within the reach of being cannibalized by these. The observations furthermore suggest a trend showing a more advanced development of the main salt structures when the secondary structures are cannibalized. The lateral distribution of the main salt structures thus appears to be controlled not only by the initial thickness of the Zechstein salt, and possible underlying structures, but also by subtle variations in the location and evolution of secondary structures. The secondary structures have a major impact on the drainage of the deep Mesozoic succession as indicated by the fluid flow pattern also observed in the study, which emphasizes that a detailed mapping of salt structures including secondary structures at the flanks is of major importance during evaluation of petroleum systems in areas dominated by halokinesis.

  13. Cool barnacles: Do common biogenic structures enhance or retard rates of deterioration of intertidal rocks and concrete?

    PubMed

    Coombes, Martin A; Viles, Heather A; Naylor, Larissa A; La Marca, Emanuela Claudia

    2017-02-15

    Sedentary and mobile organisms grow profusely on hard substrates within the coastal zone and contribute to the deterioration of coastal engineering structures and the geomorphic evolution of rocky shores by both enhancing and retarding weathering and erosion. There is a lack of quantitative evidence for the direction and magnitude of these effects. This study assesses the influence of globally-abundant intertidal organisms, barnacles, by measuring the response of limestone, granite and marine-grade concrete colonised with varying percentage covers of Chthamalus spp. under simulated, temperate intertidal conditions. Temperature regimes at 5 and 10mm below the surface of each material demonstrated a consistent and statistically significant negative relationship between barnacle abundance and indicators of thermal breakdown. With a 95% cover of barnacles, subsurface peak temperatures were reduced by 1.59°C for limestone, 5.54°C for concrete and 5.97°C for granite in comparison to no barnacle cover. The amplitudes of short-term (15-30min) thermal fluctuations conducive to breakdown via 'fatigue' effects were also buffered by 0.70°C in limestone, 1.50°C in concrete and 1.63°C in granite. Furthermore, concentrations of potentially damaging salt ions were consistently lower under barnacles in limestone and concrete. These results indicate that barnacles do not enhance, but likely reduce rates of mechanical breakdown on rock and concrete by buffering near-surface thermal cycling and reducing salt ion ingress. In these ways, we highlight the potential role of barnacles as agents of bioprotection. These findings support growing international efforts to enhance the ecological value of hard coastal structures by facilitating their colonisation (where appropriate) through design interventions.

  14. 106. Catalog OPark Structure/Construction & Maintenance, 23 Marys Rock Tunnel, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Catalog O-Park Structure/Construction & Maintenance, 23 Marys Rock Tunnel, Negative No. 638 17 E. Ray Schaffner, Photographer, December 5, 1957 ICICLES IN TUNNEL. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  15. The peculiarities of structurizing enclosing rock massif while developing a coal seam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, E. N.; Shinkevich, M. V.

    2017-09-01

    Different concepts of the development of geo-mechanical processes during longwall mining of a seam which are fundamentally different from the conventional ones are introduced in the article. Fundamental principles of the model for structurizing enclosing rock mass while longwall mining along the strike are described. The model was developed on the bases of non-linear geomechanical laws. According to the model, rock mass in the area of mining operation is organized as rock geomechanical layers with shifting arches. And the formation period of shifting arches in disintegrated rock mass is divisible by the length of the stope. Undulate characteristic of a massif as a peculiarity of man-made structurization of a massif is defined. It is shown that structuring the broken massif causes the formation of block-structured system and it can be detected while monitoring the ground pressure in powered support props. The results of the research allow decreasing the negative influence of a ground pressure and can be applied to specify parameters for controlling the roof, defining geometrical dimensions of a mining section and positioning of holing chute (face entry).

  16. Highly Shocked Low Density Sedimentary Rocks from the Haughton Impact Structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Spray, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of a detailed investigation of the shock effects in highly shocked, low density sedimentary rocks from the Haughton impact structure. We suggest that some textural features can be explained by carbonate-silicate immiscibility. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Elements of Regolith Simulant's Cost Structure--Why Rock Is NOT Cheap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of lunar regolith simulants is much higher than many users anticipate. After all, it is nothing more than broken rock. This class will discuss the elements which make up the cost structure for simulants. It will also consider which elements can be avoided under certain circumstances and which elements might be altered by the application of additional research and development.

  18. Quantification of rock heterogeneities by structural geological field studies combined with laboratory analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Afsar, Filiz; Philipp, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous rock properties in terms of layering and complex infrastructure of fault zones are typical in sedimentary successions. The knowledge of in-situ mechanical rock properties is crucial for a better understanding of processes such as fracturing and fluid transport in fractured reservoirs. To estimate in situ rock properties at different depths it is important to understand how rocks from outcrops differ from rocks at depth, for example due to alteration and removal of the overburden load. We aim at quantifying these properties by performing structural geological field studies in outcrop analogues combined with laboratory analyses of outcrop samples and drill-cores. The field studies focus on 1) fault zone infrastructure and 2) host rock fracture systems in two different study areas with different lithologies, the North German and the Bristol Channel Basin. We analyse quantitatively the dimension, geometry, persistence and connectivity of fracture systems. The field studies are complemented by systematic sampling to obtain the parameters Young's modulus, compressive and tensile strengths and elastic strain energy (also referred to as destruction work) from which we estimate rock and fracture toughnesses. The results show that in rocks with distinctive layering fractures are often restricted to individual layers, that is, stratabound. The probability of arrest seems to depend on the stiffness contrast between two single layers as well as on the thickness of the softer layer. The results also show that there are clear differences between fault zones in the different lithologies in terms of damage zone thicknesses and fracture system parameters. The results of laboratory analyses show that the mechanical properties vary considerably and for many samples there are clear directional differences. That is, samples taken perpendicular to layering commonly have higher stiffnesses and strengths than those taken parallel to layering. We combine the results of

  19. Salt tectonics in the southern North Sea, Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Remmelts, G. )

    1993-09-01

    Large parts of the southern North Sea are underlain by Upper Permian Zechstein salt. A vast amount of this sequence, originally more than 1000 m thick, has migrated into salt structures. Many hydrocarbon accumulations are related to these structures. The formation of the salt structures may have created structural traps or (by influencing the sedimentation pattern) stratigraphic traps. Salt generally acts as a seal, but depletion of salt can create migration routes into higher strata for hydrocarbons originating from underlying source rocks. The thermal conductivity of the salt can influence the maturity of source rocks in its direct vicinity. Salt structures are formed almost exclusively by Zechstein salt. Minor movement occurred in Triassic evaporites. The development of salt structures is influenced strongly by regional tectonics. Basement faulting probably triggered the salt movement. The dominant structural grain is reflected in the orientation and location of the salt structures. Periods of increased growth rates coincide with tectonic phases. Long walls of salt formed in the northern area where the Triassic north-south orientated faults (which were rejuvenated in Late Jurassic) predominate. Toward the south, the northwest-southeast direction of the Late Jurassic interferes with the north-south trend and gradually becomes the dominant direction. This is reflected in the shortening of the north-south salt structures and eventually in the change in their orientation. Average vertical growth rates have been calculated to be around 0.005-0.035 mm/yr. When correction for suberosion and erosion processes could be quantified and applied to the growth rates, they were significantly higher.

  20. Lithofacies and palynostratigraphy of some Cretaceous and Paleocene rocks, Surghar and Salt Range coal fields, northern Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, Peter D.; Javed, Shahid; Mashhadi, S. Tahir A.; Shakoor, Tariq; Khan, Asrar M.; Khan, A. Latif

    1995-01-01

    The stratigraphic relation between the Cretaceous generally non-coal-bearing Lumshiwal Formation (64 to 150 m thick) and the Paleocene coal-bearing Hangu Formation (5 to 50 m thick) in the Surghar Range of north-central Pakistan is complex. Both formations contain remarkably similar lithofacies: one or two types of sandstone lithofacies; a combined lithofacies of mudstone, claystone, carbonaceous shale, and coal beds; and a rare carbonate lithofacies. An analysis of pollen data from rock samples collected from various stratigraphic positions indicates that the formations are separated by a disconformity and that the age of the Lumshiwal Formation is Early Cretaceous and the age of the Hangu is Paleocene. Previous workers had suggested that the age of the Lumshiwal is Late Cretaceous. An analysis of sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and paleontologic data indicates that both the Lumshiwal and Hangu Formations probably were deposited in shallow-marine and deltaic environments. The rocks of the Lumshiwal become more terrestrial in origin upward, whereas the rocks of the Hangu become more marine in origin upward. The contact between the two formations is associated with a laterally discontinuous lateritic paleosol (assigned to the Hangu Formation) that is commonly overlain by the economically important Makarwal coal bed. This coal bed averages 1.2 m in thickness. No other coal beds in the Surghar Range are as thick or as laterally continuous as the Makarwal coal bed. Analytical data from the Makarwal and one other Hangu coal bed indicate that Surghar Range coal beds range from high-volatile B to high-volatile C bituminous in apparent rank. Averaged, as-received results of proximate and ultimate analyses of coal samples are (1) moisture content, 5.4 percent; (2) ash yield, 12.5 percent; (3) total sulfur content, 5 percent; and (4) calorific value, 11034 Btu/lb (British thermal units per pound). Minor- and trace-element analyses indicate that these coals contain relatively

  1. Evidence for a Meteoritic Component in Impact Melt Rock from the Chicxulub Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Shirey, Steven B.; Blum, Joel D.; Marin, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Yucatan, Mexico, has recently been recognized as a greater then 200-km-diameter multi-ring impact crater of K-T boundary age. Crystalline impact melt rocks and breccias from within the crater, which have compositions similar to those of normal continental crustal rocks and which show shock metamorphic effects, have been studied for trace element and Re-Os isotope compositions. Re-Os isotope systematics allow the sensitive and selective determination of an extraterrestrial component in impact-derived rocks. A melt rock sample shows elevated iridium concentrations, an osmium concentration of 25 ppb, and a low Os-187/Os-188 ratio of 0.113, which are incompatible with derivation from the continental crust. Even though the Os-187/Os-188 ratio is slightly lower than the range so far measured in meteorites, a mantle origin seems unlikely for mass balance reasons and because the cratering event is unlikely to have excavated mantle material. The data support the hypothesis of a heterogeneously distributed meteoritic component in the Chicxulub melt rock. A sample of impact glass from the Haitian K-T boundary at Beloc yielded about 0.1 ppb osmium and an Os-187/0s-188 ratio of 0.251, indicating the presence of a small meteoritic component in the impact ejecta as well.

  2. Rock mechanics. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Jumikis, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Rock Mechanics, 2nd Edition deals with rock as an engineering construction material-a material with which, upon which, and within which civil engineers build structures. It thus pertains to hydraulic structures engineering; to highway, railway, canal, foundation, and tunnel engineering; and to all kinds of rock earthworks and to substructures in rock. Major changes in this new edition include: rock classification, rock types and description, rock testing equipment, rock properties, stability effects of discontinuity and gouge, grouting, gunite and shotcrete, and Lugeon's water test. This new edition also covers rock bolting and prestressing, pressure-grouted soil anchors, and rock slope stabilization.

  3. Structure and properties of molten oxide-salt clinkers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, T.V.; Osokin, A.P.; Potapova, E.N.; Burygin, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The change in the structure and properties of a eutectic clinker solution is determined in the presence of individual and complexes of alkali and halogen-containing additions. It is shown that the structure of the modified alloys depends upon the acid-base properties of the dissolving ions, whereas the nature of the modifying effect depends upon the displacement of the acid-base equilibrium in the melt. The principles governing the changes in the viscosity and surface tension of the clinker liquid as a function of the nature and concentration of the modifiers can be used for predicting the kinetics of liquid-phase sintering of raw Portland cement mixtures.

  4. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  5. Diagenetic facies controls on pore structure and rock electrical parameters in tight gas sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongping; Zhao, Yanchao; Luo, Yang; Chen, Zhaoyou; He, Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Rock electrical parameters of tight gas sandstone show large variations in the T2 member in Dingbei Block, Ordos Basin, China. Applying the same rock electrical parameters in water saturation calculations would lead to large errors. Based on casting thin sections, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathode luminescence, porosity and permeability, image analysis, and high-pressure mercury intrusion/withdrawal method, identification of the diagenetic facies are first conducted, and then their pore structure and their relationship with rock electrical parameters are investigated. Five diagenetic facies (A-E), which are identified based mainly on pore types and authigenic minerals, have different pore structure and rock electrical parameters. Conceptual models that incorporate the rock properties of each diagenetic facies have been built, before applying the electrical efficiency theory to explain the values of cementation exponent (m) and saturation exponent (n). A conventional network model, a shunt pore model, a netted pore model, and a dotted line model are utilized to mimic the intergranular pores, authigenic kaolinite intercrystal pores, carbonate-cement dissolution pores, and clay-matrix intercrystal pores, respectively. A decrease of the contents of large pores increases electrical efficiency and therefore reduces m. The saturation exponent, which depends on the distribution of water and gas, can be better understood by applying the different pore models. In the shunt and netted pore models, gas displacement starts from the larger pores and smaller pores provide alternative conduction pathways, hence sustaining electrical efficiency and decreasing n. Clay-matrix intercrystal pores are mainly micropores, since the brine in the rocks are isolated after gas displacement, reducing overall electrical efficiency and dramatically increasing the value of n in the diagenetic facies, which is dominated by clay-matrix intercrystal pores.

  6. Petrography, geochemistry, and alteration of country rocks from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karikari, Forson; Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Mader, Dieter

    Samples of the country rocks that likely constituted the target rocks at the 1.07 Myr old Bosumtwi impact structure in Ghana, West Africa, collected outside of the crater rim in the northern and southern parts of the structure, were studied for their petrographic characteristics and analyzed for their major- and trace-element compositions. The country rocks, mainly meta-graywacke, shale, and phyllite of the Early Proterozoic Birimian Supergroup and some granites of similar age, are characterized by two generations of alteration. A pre-impact hydrothermal alteration, often along shear zones, is characterized by new growth of secondary minerals, such as chlorite, sericite, sulfides, and quartz, or replacement of some primary minerals, such as plagioclase and biotite, by secondary sericite and chlorite. A late, argillic alteration, mostly associated with the suevites, is characterized by alteration of the melt/glass clasts in the groundmass of suevites to phyllosilicates. Suevite, which occurs in restricted locations to the north and to the south-southwest of the crater rim, contains melt fragments, diaplectic quartz glass, ballen quartz, and clasts derived from the full variety of target rocks. No planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz were found in the country rock samples, and only a few quartz grains in the suevite samples show PDFs, and in rare cases two sets of PDFs. Based on a total alkali element-silica (TAS) plot, the Bosumtwi granites have tonalitic to quartz-dioritic compositions. The Nb versus Y and Ta versus Yb discrimination plots show that these granites are of volcanic-arc tectonic provenance. Provenance studies of the metasedimentary rocks at the Bosumtwi crater have also indicated that the metasediments are volcanic-arc related. Compared to the average siderophile element contents of the upper continental crust, both country rocks and impact breccias of the Bosumtwi structure show elevated siderophile element contents. This, however, does not

  7. Optical and electron transport properties of rock-salt Sc{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ruopeng; Zheng, P. Y.; Gall, D.

    2015-07-07

    Epitaxial single-crystal Sc{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N ternary alloy layers deposited by magnetron co-sputtering on MgO(001) substrates at 950 °C exhibit a solid solution rock-salt phase for x = 0–0.2 without decomposition. Optical absorption indicates a linear increase in the optical gap from 2.51 eV for ScN to 3.05 eV for Sc{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}N and, after correction due to the Moss-Burstein shift, a direct X point interband transition energy E{sub g}(X) = 2.15 + 2.75 x (eV). Correspondingly, the direct transition at the zone center increases with Al concentration according to E{sub g}(Γ) = 3.80 + 1.45 x (eV), as determined from a feature in the reflection spectra. All layers are degenerate n-type semiconductors with a room temperature mobility that decreases from 22 to 6.7 to 0.83 cm{sup 2}/V s as x increases from 0 to 0.11 to 0.20. The corresponding carrier densities are 9.2 × 10{sup 20}, 7.9 × 10{sup 20}, and 0.95 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} as determined from Hall measurements and consistent with optical free carrier absorption below photon energies of 1 eV. Temperature dependent transport measurements indicate metallic conduction for ScN, but weak localization that leads to a resistivity minimum at 85 and 210 K for x = 0.051 and 0.15, respectively, and a negative temperature coefficient over the entire measured 4–300 K range for Sc{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}N. The decreasing mobility is attributed to alloy scattering at randomly distributed Al atoms on cation sites, which also cause the weak localization. The carrier density is primarily due to unintentional F doping from the Sc target and decreases strongly for x > 0.15, which is attributed to trapping in defect states due to the deterioration of the crystalline quality, as evidenced by the x-ray diffraction peak width that exhibits a minimum of 0.14° for x = 0.11 but increases to 0.49° for x = 0.20. This is consistent with asymmetric x

  8. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, D. M.; Afroz, Taliman; Allen, Joshua L.; Boyle, Paul D.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-11-13

    Only limited information is available regarding the manner in which cyclic carbonate and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine crystalline solvate structures. To this end, eight new solvate structures are reported with ethylene carbonate, γ-butyrolactone and γ-valerolactone: (EC)3:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiBF4, (GBL)4:LiPF6, (GBL)1:LiClO4, (GVL)1:LiClO4, (GBL)1:LiBF4 and (GBL)1:LiCF3SO3. The crystal structure of (EC)1:LiCF3SO3 is also re-reported for comparison. These structures enable the factors which govern the manner in which the ions are coordinated and the ion/solvent packing—in the solid-state—to be scrutinized in detail.

  9. Structure of pectic polysaccharides from sunflower salts-soluble fraction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The manuscript discusses the structural features of pectin polysaccharides extracted from seedless sunflower head residues. The analysis using 1H, 13C and two-dimensional gHSQC NMR showed various numbers of methyl and hydroxyl groups attached to the anomeric carbons in the pectin backbone at differe...

  10. Structural controls on anomalous transport in fractured porous rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edery, Yaniv; Geiger, Sebastian; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in a wide range of disordered systems, notably in fractured porous formations. We quantitatively identify the structural controls on anomalous tracer transport in a model of a real fractured geological formation that was mapped in an outcrop. The transport, determined by a continuum scale mathematical model, is characterized by breakthrough curves (BTCs) that document anomalous (or "non-Fickian") transport, which is accounted for by a power law distribution of local transition times ψ>(t>) within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW). We show that the determination of ψ>(t>) is related to fractures aligned approximately with the macroscopic direction of flow. We establish the dominant role of fracture alignment and assess the statistics of these fractures by determining a concentration-visitation weighted residence time histogram. We then convert the histogram to a probability density function (pdf) that coincides with the CTRW ψ>(t>) and hence anomalous transport. We show that the permeability of the geological formation hosting the fracture network has a limited effect on the anomalous nature of the transport; rather, it is the fractures transverse to the flow direction that play the major role in forming the long BTC tail associated with anomalous transport. This is a remarkable result, given the complexity of the flow field statistics as captured by concentration transitions.

  11. Structural studies of several solvated potassium salts of tenatoprazole crystallizing as conglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauvel, G.; Sanselme, M.; Coste-Leconte, S.; Petit, S.; Coquerel, G.

    2009-11-01

    Despite the weak acidic character of tenatoprazole it is possible to crystallize, in strong alkaline media, different solvated salts of this active pharmaceutical ingredient. Among these solid phases, some potassium salts exhibiting non congruent solubilities, form stable conglomerates in equilibrium with their mother liquors without detectable partial solid solutions between the enantiomers. The crystal structures of the ethanol and the ethylene glycol stoichiometric solvates of potassium salts have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, revealing that the solvent molecules play an important role in the crystal cohesion. They participate to the coordination polyhedra of the potassium cations and also contribute to strong periodic bond chains. Moreover, there is no direct link between the tenatoprazole anions and the potassium cations, so the solvent molecules act as electrostatic relays between ions of opposite charges.

  12. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  13. A structurally novel salt-regulated promoter of duplicated carbonic anhydrase gene 1 from Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Lu, Yumin; Xue, Lexun; Xie, Hua

    2010-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that the duplicated carbonic anhydrase is induced by salt in the Dunaliella salina (D. salina) and duplicated carbonic anhydrase 1 (DCA1) is a member of carbonic anhydrase family. The purpose of this study was to identify whether both the DCA1 gene and its promoter from D. salina are salt-inducible. In this study, the results of real time RT-PCR showed that the transcripts of DCA1 were induced by gradient concentration of sodium chloride. Subsequently, a structurally novel promoter containing highly repeated GT/AC sequences of the DCA1 gene was isolated, which was able to drive a stable expression of the foreign bar gene in transformed cells of D. salina, and the gradient concentrations of sodium chloride in media paralleled regulations in the levels of both proteins and mRNA of the bar gene driven by the DCA1 promoter. Furthermore, analysis of GUS activities revealed that the salt-inducible expression of the external gus gene was regulated by the promoter fragments containing highly repeated GT sequences, but not by the promoter fragments deleting highly repeated GT sequences. The findings above-mentioned suggest that the highly repeated GT sequence in the DCA1 promoter is involved in the salt-inducible regulation in D. salina and may be a novel salt-inducible element.

  14. Structure and ionic conductivity of block copolymer electrolytes over a wide salt concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintapalli, Mahati; Le, Thao; Venkatesan, Naveen; Thelen, Jacob; Rojas, Adriana; Balsara, Nitash

    Block copolymer electrolytes are promising materials for safe, long-lasting lithium batteries because of their favorable mechanical and ion transport properties. The morphology, phase behavior, and ionic conductivity of a block copolymer electrolyte, SEO mixed with LiTFSI was studied over a wide, previously unexplored salt concentration range using small angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and ac impedance spectroscopy, respectively. SEO exhibits a maximum in ionic conductivity at twice the salt concentration that PEO, the homopolymer analog of the ion-containing block, does. This finding is contrary to prior studies that examined a more limited range of salt concentrations. In SEO, the phase behavior of the PEO block and LiTFSI closely resembles the phase behavior of homopolymer PEO and LiTFSI. The grain size of the block copolymer morphology was found to decrease with increasing salt concentration, and the ionic conductivity of SEO correlates with decreasing grain size. Structural effects impact the ionic conductivity-salt concentration relationship in block copolymer electrolytes. SEO: polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide); also PS-PEO LiTFSI: lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl imide

  15. Alkali Metal Suboxometalates-Structural Chemistry between Salts and Metals.

    PubMed

    Wörsching, Matthias; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-07-20

    The crystal structures of the new cesium-poor alkali metal suboxometalates Cs10MO5 (M = Al, Ga, Fe) show both metallic and ionic bonding following the formal description (Cs(+))10(MO4(5-))(O(2-))·3e(-). Comparable to the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4 (M = Al, Ga, In, Fe, Sc) with ionic subdivision (Cs(+))9(MO4(5-))·4e(-), they contain an oxometalate anion [M(III)O4](5-) embedded in a metallic matrix of cesium atoms. Columnlike building units form with prevalent ionic bonding inside and metallic bonding on the outer surface. In the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4, additional cesium atoms with no contact to any anion are inserted between columns of the formal composition [Cs8MO4]. In the cesium-poor suboxometalates Cs10MO5, the same columns are extended by face-sharing [Cs6O] units, and no additional cesium atoms are present. The terms "cesium-rich" and "cesium-poor" here refer to the Cs:O ratio. The new suboxometalates Cs10MO5 crystallize in two modifications with new structure types. The orthorhombic modification adopts a structure with four formula units per unit cell in space group Pnnm with a = 11.158(3) Å, b = 23.693(15) Å, and c = 12.229(3) Å for Cs10AlO5. The monoclinic modification crystallizes with eight formula units per unit cell in space group C2/c with a = 21.195(3) Å, b = 12.480(1) Å, c = 24.120(4) Å, and β = 98.06(1)° for Cs10AlO5. Limits to phase formation are given by the restriction that the M atoms must be trivalent and by geometric size restrictions for the insertion of [Cs6O] blocks in Cs10MO5. All of the suboxometalate structures show similar structural details and form mixed crystal series with statistical occupation for the M elements following the patterns Cs9(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O4 and Cs10(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O5. The suboxometalates are a new example of ordered intergrowth of ionic and metallic structure elements, allowing for the combination of properties related to both ionic and metallic materials.

  16. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  17. Salt-regulated reversible fibrillation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isocitrate lyase: Concurrent restoration of structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Harish; Kumar, Ranjeet; Sonkar, Amit; Mitra, Kalyan; Akhtar, Md Sohail; Tripathi, Timir

    2017-11-01

    Protein fibrillation is associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Nevertheless, several proteins not related to disease can also form fibrils in vitro under specific conditions. In the present study, we demonstrate the reversible fibrillation of a globular protein that is modulated by salt under physiological pH. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isocitrate lyase (MtbICL) is a crucial enzyme involved in the glyoxylate shunt and a potential drug target against M. tuberculosis infection. Under physiological pH, the enzyme self-assembles into a fibrillar structure in the absence of salt in vitro. The mature fibrillar structure of MtbICL is dynamic and restores its tetrameric structure as well as activity with the addition of salt. The kinetics of fibril formation was investigated spectroscopically using 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS). Further, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging also confirmed the formation of elongated fibrils in the absence of salt. The results indicate the balance between stabilizing forces and the localized electrostatic repulsions destabilizing the tetrameric MtbICL is adjusted via ion shielding. Our result is in congruence of the hypothesis that amyloid formation is an intrinsic property of most, if not all natural proteins under an appropriate set of conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Osmium-Isotope and Platinum-Group-Element Systematics of Impact-Melt Rocks, Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure, Virginia, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung Ryeol; Wright Horton, J., Jr.; Walker, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Osmium (Os) isotopes and platinum-group elements (PGEs) are useful for geochemically identifying a meteoritic component within impact structures, because meteorites are typically characterized by low (187)Os/(188)Os ratios and high PGE concentrations. In contrast, most types of crustal target rocks have high radiogenic Os and very low PGE concentrations. We have examined Os isotope and PGE systematics of impact-melt rocks and pre-impact target rocks from a 2004 test hole in the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure and from nearby coreholes. Our goal is to determine the proportion of the projectile component in the melt rock Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  20. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na^+, K^+, and Cl^- ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na^+, K^+, and Cl^-, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  1. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-), respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  2. The first BETS radical cation salts with dicyanamide anion: Crystal growth, structure and conductivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Kushch, N.D.; Buravov, L.I.; Chekhlov, A.N.; Spitsina, N.G.; Kushch, P.P.; Yagubskii, E.B.; Herdtweck, E.; Kobayashi, A.

    2011-11-15

    Electrochemical oxidation of bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene (BETS) has been investigated. Simple and complex dicyanamides of transition metals (Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}) were used as electrolytes. The correlation between composition of prepared radical cation salts and metal nature in electrolytes was established. Manganese dicyanamides provide the formation of BETS salts with the {l_brace}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}{r_brace}- and [N(CN){sub 2}]-XH{sub 2}O anions. When Ni- or Fe-containing electrolytes were used only metalless BETS salts, {alpha}''-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O (I) and {theta}-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].3.6H{sub 2}O (II), formed. Structures and conducting properties of these salts were analyzed. Both salts exhibit layered structure. Conducting radical cation layers have {alpha}'' (I)- or {theta}-type (II). Anion sheets appear as two-dimensional polymer networks of different types. These networks are formed by [N(CN)]{sub 2}{sup -} anions and water molecules interlinked by hydrogen bonds. Salt I is a semiconductor and II demonstrates resistance drop down to150 K at normal pressure and down to 72 K at {approx}0.4 kbar pressure. - Graphical abstract: We studied electrochemical oxidation of BETS donor in the presence of simple and/or complex dicyanamides of transition metals (Ni, Fe, Mn) as electrolytes. New conducting salts {alpha}''-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O and {theta}-BETS{sub 2}[N(CN){sub 2}].3.8H{sub 2}O have been synthesized and characterized. Highlights: > We studied electrochemical oxidation of BETS donor. > Dicyanamides of transition metals (Ni, Fe, Mn) were used as electrolytes. > We found a well-reproducible synthesis of magnetic superconductor BETS{sub 2}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}. > Two new metalless BETS salts form when Ni and Fe electrolytes were used. > Their structure and conductivity were investigated.

  3. Research to lessen the amounts of curing agents in processed meat through use of rock salt and carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, R.; Takeda, S.; Kinoshita, Y.; Waga, M.

    2017-09-01

    This study was carried out to examine the reddening of meat products due to the addition of natural yellow salt (YS) and carbon monoxide (CO). Following YS or NaCl addition at 2% to pork subsequent to nitrite (0∼100 ppm) treatment, color development due to this addition was analyzed visually. Heme pigment content in the meat was also determined spectrophotometrically. YS was found to bring about greater reddening than NaCl, indicating residual nitrite and nitrate content to be significantly higher in meat containing YS, through the amount of either was quite small. The amount of nitrite required for a red color to develop was noted to vary significantly from one meat product to another. CO treatment of pork caused the formation of carboxy myoglobin (COMb) with consequent reddening of the meat. COMb was shown to be heat-stable and form stably at pH 5.0 to ∼8.0 and to be extractable with water, but was barely extractable at all with acetone. Nitric oxide was found to have greater affinity toward myoglobin (Mb) than CO. Nitrosyl Mb was noted to be stable in all meat products examined. CO was seen to be capable of controlling the extent of lipid oxidation.

  4. Assessing the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) around a 655 meter vertical shaft in salt using ultrasonic waves: An update

    SciTech Connect

    HARDY,ROBERT D.; HOLCOMB,DAVID J.

    2000-03-14

    An array of ultrasonic transducers was constructed consisting of three identical arrays at various depths in an air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Each array consists of transducers permanently installed in three holes arranged in an L shape. An active array, created by appropriate arrangement of the transducers and selection of transmitter-receiver pairs, allows the measurement of transmitted signal velocities and amplitudes (for attenuation studies) along 216 paths parallel, perpendicular and tangential to the shaft walls. Transducer positions were carefully surveyed, allowing absolute velocity measurements. Installation occurred over a period of about two years beginning in early 1989, with nearly continuous operation since that time, resulting in a rare, if not unique, record of the spatial and temporal variability of damage development around an underground opening. This paper reports results from the last two years of operation, updating the results reported by Holcomb, 1999. Results will be related to the damage, due to microcracking, required to produce the observed changes. It is expected that the results will be useful to other studies of the long-term deformation characteristics of salt.

  5. The influence of salt on the structure and energetics of supercoiled DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, T.; Li, B.; Olson, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    configurations that are predicted by elasticity theory to be stable at low delta Lk. To our knowledge, such three-dimensional structures have not been previously presented in connection with DNA supercoiling. These branched forms have a higher bending energy than the corresponding interwound configurations at the same delta Lk but, especially at low salt, this bending energy difference is relatively small in comparison with the total energy, which is dominated by the electrostatic contributions. Significantly, the electrostatic energies of the three-lobed and (straight) interwound forms are comparable at each salt environment. We show how the three-lobed configurations change slowly with ALk, resulting in branched interwound forms at higher salt. In longer chains, the branched forms are highly interwound, with bent arms. At low salt, the branched supercoils are asymmetric, with a longer interwound stem and two shorter arms. From molecular dynamics simulations we observe differences in the motions of the DNA as a function of salt. At high salt, the supercoiled chain is quite compact but fairly rigid, whereas at low salt the DNA is loosely coiled but more dynamic. Especially notable at low salt are the large-scale opening and closing of the chain as a whole and the rapid "slithering"of individual residues past one another. Toroidal forms are not detected under these conditions. However, the overall features of the open, loose supercoils found at low salt are more similar to those of toroidal than interwound configurations. Indeed,simulated x-ray scattering profiles reveal the same trends observed experimentally and are consistent with a change from closed to open forms as salt is decreased. Like the minimization studies, the dynamics reveal a critical point near 0.1 M associated with the collapse of loose to tight supercoils. Near this physiological concentration, enhanced flexibility of the DNA is noted. The collective observations suggest a potential regulatory role for salt on

  6. Impact melt rocks from the Ries structure, Germany: an origin as impact melt flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.

    2004-10-01

    The production of impact melt rocks and glasses is a characteristic feature of hypervelocity impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. This investigation represents the first detailed study of an unusual series of coherent impact melt rocks intermittently exposed around the periphery of the ~24-km diameter, ~14.5 Ma Ries impact structure, Germany. Optical and analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that the groundmass comprises sanidine, plagioclase, quartz and ilmenite (decreasing order of abundance) with the interstices filled by either fresh or devitrified glassy mesostasis. Primary crystallites display skeletal, dendritic and/or spherulitic textures indicating rapid crystallization from a melt. The mesostasis is characterized by extreme chemical heterogeneity (e.g., FeO and Al 2O 3 contents from ~1 to ~62-80 wt.%). This is likely due to a combination of crystal-liquid fractionation during rapid cooling and crystallization of an originally incompletely homogenized melt. Vapor phase crystallization of sanidine and cristobalite occurred in miarolitic cavities during late-stage cooling of the impact melts. The most likely protolith for the impact melt rocks are granitic rocks present in the crystalline basement target. The high volatile content of the mesostasis suggests that a large volatile component was retained from this protolith. Field observations together with analytical data and micro-textures indicate that the Ries impact melt rocks were molten at the time of, and after, deposition. Field relations with other impactites also suggest that these rocks were emplaced subsequent to the excavation stage of crater formation and that they are not, therefore, ballistic ejecta. Thus, it is proposed that the Ries impact melt rocks were emplaced as ground-hugging impact melt flows that emanated from different regions of the evolving transient cavity during the modification stage of crater formation. This is consistent with, and in fact

  7. Spectroscopic and structural investigation of oxocarbon salts with tetraalkylammonium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, Stéfanos L.; Garcia, Humberto C.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Cappa de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando

    2016-03-01

    In this study the synthesis, vibrational spectra (infrared and Raman) and crystal structures of three oxocarbon compounds with tetra-alkyl ammonium counter cations, namely [N(C3H7)4](HC4O4) (1), [N(C4H9)4]2[(C4O4) (H2C4O4)2] (2) and [N(C2H5)4]2(C5O5)·5H2O (3), have been reported. The supramolecular arrangement for all compounds as shown by x-ray diffraction indicate that strong donor (D)-acceptor (A) hydrogen bonds D-H…A are present in the dimer formation with monohydrogen squarate anion HC4O4- (2.503 Å) and for the trimer with two squaric acid moieties (H2C4O4) and the squarate dianion C4O42- (2.500 Å), for compounds 1 and 2, respectively. In contrast, compound 3 was stabilized through only averagely strong hydrogen bonds (2.735 Å) between all five oxygen atoms of the croconate dianion with different water molecules of crystallization of the supramolecular system. The presence of bands in the Raman spectrum at 1793 and 1670 cm-1 for compounds 1 and 2 have been assigned to the ν(Cdbnd O), ν(Cdbnd C) + ν(Cdbnd O) modes, thus confirming the oxocarbon presence in the solid structure, as well as the bands at 1716 and 1601 cm-1 for compound 3, assigned to the ν(Cdbnd O) and ν(CO) + ν(CC) + δ(CCC) + δ(CO) coupled modes of the associated croconate dianion (C5O52-). An important Raman signal observed for all structures can be seen at ca. 2950 cm-1 which is associated with the ν(CH2) and ν(CH3) stretching modes from the tetraalkylammonium cations.

  8. Accessory and opaque minerals in impact melt rocks of the Boltysh structure, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, E. P.; Shekhunova, S. B.; Permyakov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    Electron microprobe analyses of accessory and opaque minerals from the impact melt rocks of the Boltysh structure, in the central part of the Ukrainian Shield, are presented in this report. Our study establishes a variety of minerals represented by native metals, alloys, oxides, sulfides, phosphates, and silicates, formed during several stages of cooling and solidification of the thick impact melt sheet. Baddeleyite was determined to be the earliest high-temperature mineral to occur in the impact melt rocks. Iron and titanium oxides crystallized earlier or simultaneously with the microliths of orthopyroxene and feldspars. High concentrations of TiO2, Al2O3, and Cr2O3 were identified in some hematite varieties. Cu- and Ni-bearing pyrrhotites occur in impact melt rocks with a glassy matrix. Native metals—copper, platinum, and silver—were likely formed due to the hydrothermal alteration of the upper unit of the impact melt sheet. Zircon is the only accessory mineral found in impact melt rocks that is preserved from the basement granites of the Boltysh structure.

  9. On the similarity in the formation mechanism of the fracture structure of a rock massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasar'yan, A. G.; Sytenkov, V. N.; Fedyanina, L. T.; Shemetov, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Local segments of the Earth's crust reside at the mechanical nonequilibrium and continuously obtain and dissipate mechanical energy. The energy exchange between the structural elements of a geophysical medium determines its state, especially if the medium is fragmented into blocks. The stationary state of a rock differs from its static equilibrium by the fact that the mechanical energy is conserved because the energy input is equal to the energy dissipation. From this point of view, the cracks, the faults, and the block structure are not simply the manifestations of rock destruction, but rather the mode of existence of a medium with large irreversible deformations. Then, the fracture structure, whose formation is actually a response of a rock to large irreversible deformation, becomes, in terms of physics, the characteristic of the state of a geophysical medium; for example, it allows one to assess the parameters of the deformation processes during the period of formation of the fracture structure. The present paper addresses the identification of the features of the fracture structure in geological objects of different scales.

  10. Linking micellar structures to hydrogelation for salt-triggered dipeptide gelators.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Mears, Laura L E; Cattoz, Beatrice N; Griffiths, Peter C; Schweins, Ralf; Adams, Dave J

    2016-04-21

    Some functionalised dipeptides can form hydrogels when salts are added to solutions at high pH. We have used surface tension, conductivity, rheology, optical, confocal and scanning electron microscopy, (1)H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy measurements to characterise fully the phase behaviour of solutions of one specific gelator, 2NapFF, at 25 °C at pH 10.5. We show that this specific naphthalene-dipeptide undergoes structural transformations as the concentration is increased, initially forming spherical micelles, then worm-like micelles, followed by association of these worm-like micelles. On addition of a calcium salt, gels are generally formed as long as worm-like micelles are initially present in solution, although there are structural re-organisations that occur at lower concentrations, allowing gelation at lower than expected concentration. Using IR and SANS, we show the differences between the structures present in the solution and hydrogel phases.

  11. Study on the release of chlorhexidine base and salts from different liquid crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Edit; Kiss, Dorottya; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of two types of chlorhexidine species, chlorhexidine base and its salts, on the physico-chemical features of liquid crystalline systems and on drug transport through lipophilic membranes. A non-ionic surfactant, Synperonic A7 (PEG7-C13-15) was selected for the preparation of the liquid crystalline systems. Mixtures of different ratios of Synperonic A7 and water were prepared. The liquid crystalline systems were characterized using polarizing microscopy and dynamic oscillatory test. Membrane transport was also examined. The addition of chlorhexidine species to the liquid crystalline system modified the structure of the liquid crystalline system. As a result of the changes of liquid crystalline structures, the drug release of various types of chlorhexidine could be also modified. The combination of the base and salt forms of the drug in one dosage form could eliminate the drug release changes from liquid crystalline systems of dynamically changeable structures.

  12. Rebar corrosion monitoring in concrete structure under salt water enviroment using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuheng; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; He, Pan; Yan, Jinlin

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is critical for the durability and safety of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion sensors based on fiber optic have proved to exhibit meaningful benefits compared with the conventional electric ones. In recent years, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been used as a new kind of sensing element in an attempt to directly monitor the corrosion in concrete structure due to its remarkable advantages. In this paper, we present a novel kind of FBG based rebar corrosion monitoring sensor. The rebar corrosion is detected by volume expansion of the corroded rebar by transferring it to the axial strain of FBG when concrete structure is soaked in salt water. An accelerated salt water corrosion test was performed. The experiment results showed the corrosion can be monitored effectively and the corrosion rate is obtained by volume loss rate of rebar.

  13. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and

  14. Crystal structures of seven molecular salts derived from benzylamine and organic acidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xianhong; Jin, Xiunan; Lv, Chengcai; Jin, Shouwen; Zheng, Xiuqing; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids gave a total of seven molecular salts with the compositions: (benzylamine): (p-toluenesulfonic acid) (1) [(HL)+ · (tsa-)], (benzylamine): (o-nitrobenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+) · (onba)-], (benzylamine): (3,4-methylenedioxybenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+) · (mdba-)], (benzylamine): (mandelic acid) (4) [(HL+) · (mda-)], (benzylamine): (5-bromosalicylic acid)2(5) [(HL+) · (bsac-) · (Hbsac)], (benzylamine): (m-phthalic acid) (6) [(HL+) · (Hmpta-)], and (benzylamine)2: (trimesic acid) (7) [(HL+)2 · (Htma2-)]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction technique, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 groups in the benzylamine moieties are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 4-7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CHsbnd π/CH2sbnd π, Osbnd O, and Osbnd Cπ associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional (2D-3D) framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both. Some classical supramolecular synthons, such as R42(8), R43(10) and R44(12), usually observed in organic solids of organic acids with amine, were again shown to be involved in constructing most of these hydrogen bonding networks.

  15. Interconnection of Salt-induced Hydrophobic Compaction and Secondary Structure Formation Depends on Solution Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea. PMID:22303014

  16. Structural characterization of Turtle Mountain anticline (Alberta, Canada) and impact on rock slope failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, Florian; Pedrazzini, Andrea; Epard, Jean-Luc; Froese, Corey R.; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a structural investigation of the Turtle Mountain anticline (Alberta, Canada) to better understand the role of the different tectonic features on the development of both local and large scale rock slope instabilities occurring in Turtle Mountain. The study area is investigated by combining remote methods with detailed field surveys. In particular, the benefit of Terrestrial Laser Scanning for ductile and brittle tectonic structure interpretations is illustrated. The proposed tectonic interpretation allows the characterization of the fracturing pattern, the fold geometry and the role of these tectonic features in rock slope instability development. Ten discontinuity sets are identified in the study area, their local variations permitting the differentiation of the study zone into 20 homogenous structural domains. The anticline is described as an eastern verging fold that displays considerable geometry differences along its axis and developed by both flexural slip and tangential longitudinal strain folding mechanisms. Moreover, the origins of the discontinuity sets are determined according to the tectonic phases affecting the region (pre-folding, folding, post-folding). The localization and interpretation of kinematics of the different instabilities revealed the importance of considering the discrete brittle planes of weakness, which largely control the kinematic release of the local instabilities, and also the rock mass damage induced by large tectonic structures (fold hinge, thrust).

  17. Seismic response of rock slopes: Numerical investigations on the role of internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, L.; Applegate, K.; Gibson, M.; Wartman, J.; Adams, S.; Maclaughlin, M.; Smith, S.; Keefer, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The stability of rock slopes is significantly influenced and often controlled by the internal structure of the slope created by such discontinuities as joints, shear zones, and faults. Under seismic conditions, these discontinuities influence both the resistance of a slope to failure and its response to dynamic loading. The dynamic response, which can be characterized by the slope's natural frequency and amplification of ground motion, governs the loading experienced by the slope in a seismic event and, therefore, influences the slope's stability. In support of the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) project Seismically-Induced Rock Slope Failure: Mechanisms and Prediction (NEESROCK), we conducted a 2D numerical investigation using the discrete element method (DEM) coupled with simple discrete fracture networks (DFNs). The intact rock mass is simulated with a bonded assembly of discrete particles, commonly referred to as the bonded-particle model (BPM) for rock. Discontinuities in the BPM are formed by the insertion of smooth, unbonded contacts along specified planes. The influence of discontinuity spacing, orientation, and stiffness on slope natural frequency and amplification was investigated with the commercially available Particle Flow Code (PFC2D). Numerical results indicate that increased discontinuity spacing has a non-linear effect in decreasing the amplification and increasing the natural frequency of the slope. As discontinuity dip changes from sub-horizontal to sub-vertical, the slope's level of amplification increases while the natural frequency of the slope decreases. Increased joint stiffness decreases amplification and increases natural frequency. The results reveal that internal structure has a strong influence on rock slope dynamics that can significantly change the system's dynamic response and stability during seismic loading. Financial support for this research was provided by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF

  18. The impact of salt tectonics on supra-salt (Lago Mare?) deposits and on the structural evolution of the Cyprus-Eratosthenes collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Sönke; Hübscher, Christian; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Averagely 1.5 km thick Messinian evaporites laterally continue from the Levant Basin, easternmost Mediterranean Sea, into the collision zone between Cyprus and Eratosthenes Seamount where incipient continent-continent-collision is believed to occur. In this study, the impact of Messinian evaporites on the structural evolution of the collision zone is investigated for the first time based on a comprehensive set of seismic reflection profiles. Results show that the collision zone may be subdivided into an eastern and a western domain. In the eastern part, bordered by Eratosthenes Seamount and the Hecataeus Rise, compressionally thickened autochthonous salt is observed. Sub- and supra-salt deposits within this area appear to be in the stage of active accretion. Further west, between Cyprus and Eratosthenes Seamount strongly deformed allochthonous salt has evidently started to advance across sediments of post-Messinian age. In this domain, previously active sediment accretion at the Cyprus margin has now become inactive and shortening is largely accommodated at the leading edge of the allochthonous salt sheet. Such observations bear important implications for the structural interrelation between salt tectonics and the evolution of a young collision zone. On top of highly deformed mobile Messinian evaporites, up to 700 m thick late Messinian supra-salt deposits are mapped within the western part of the Cyprus - Eratosthenes collision zone. Their uppermost 200 m were drilled in the course of ODP Leg 160 (Site 968) and interpreted as Lago Mare sediments, deposited during the final stage of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (Robertson, 1998). These sediments occupy small sub-basins flanked by salt diapirs, indicating a salt-tectonic control on late Messinian sediment deposition. Distribution of these sediments may have further been controlled by sea-level, inferred from rapid eastward thinning and pinchout of Messinian supra-salt deposits towards the Levant Basin

  19. Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of rocks exposed in the underground science and engineering laboratory, Lead SD, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, M. P.; Redden, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The lab provides a unique 3-dimensional view of the crustal structure of the Precambrian core of the Black Hills that lies along the margin of the Wyoming Craton. The Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of these rocks controls the distribution of lithologies and rock fabric and thus the rheologic properties in the lab. These properties have potential to influence later formed structures such as fractures and a range of experiments from in the areas hydrology to rock mechanics. The rock at the lab is composed of metamorphosed volcanic and sedimentary rocks that include, from oldest to youngest, the Yates unit, Poorman Formation, Homestake Formation and Ellison Formation. The Yates unit is a hornblende- plagioclase schist. The Poorman Formation is a sericite-biotite carbonate-bearing phyllite. The Homestake Formation is a grunerite-siderite schist with interbedded chlorite or biotite phyllite. The Ellison Formation is a sericite-biotite phyllite or schist with interbedded impure quartzite (biotite-quartzschist). Compilation of available structural data and analysis indicate a complex evolution of folds and fabrics between 1780 and 1715 Ma. The lab is located on a late upright SE-plunging anticlinorium which is interpreted to deform the earliest folds (NE trending?). The earliest phase resulted in repetition is Homestake Formation and associated units. Overprinting during later deformation events caused tightening and local dismemberment of these early folds that led to the previous interpretation that multiple iron formations existed in the lab. The second phase of folding shallow to moderate upright SE-plunging folds and associated northwest striking, steeply dipping foliation. The third phase of folding overprints the previous phase to varying degrees and produced four structural domains that are recognized by changes in the orientation of structural fabrics. The third phase of folding is best developed in the western part of the lab and is represented by steeply

  20. Characterization of swollen structure of high-density polyelectrolyte brushes in salt solution by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Terayama, Yuki; Hino, Masahiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takahara, Atsushi

    2009-08-01

    Zwitterionic and cationic polyelectrolyte brushes on quartz substrate were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (METAC), respectively. The effects of ionic strength on brush structure and surface properties of densely grafted polyelectrolyte brushes were analysed by neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements. NR at poly(METAC)/D2O and poly(MPC)/D2O interface revealed that the grafted polymer chains were fairly extended from the substrate surface, while the thickness reduction of poly(METAC) brush was observed in 5.6 M NaCl/D2O solution due to the screening of the repulsive interaction between polycations by hydrated salt ions. Interestingly, no structural change was observed in poly(MPC) brush even in a salt solution probably due to the unique interaction properties of phosphorylcholine units.

  1. Structural interpretation of seismic reflection data from eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, E.S.; Lillie, R.J.; Zaman, A.S.H.; Yousaf, M.

    1989-07-01

    Approximately 1600 km of seismic reflection profiles from the eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau (SR/PP) of Pakistan is integrated with available magnetostratigraphic, surface geologic, and well data to classify structural styles, determine the timing of deformation, and estimate the amount of telescoping of the sedimentary cover. The eastern SR/PP are similar to other fold-and-thrust belts underlain by evaporites in that (1) it is part of a zone of overthrusting that extends considerably farther over the Himalayan foreland than adjacent areas not underlain by evaporites, (2) the overall thrust wedge has a narrow cross-sectional taper, (3) structures verge toward the hinterland as well as toward the foreland, and (4) fold trends are long and continuous, consisting of tight salt-cored anticlines separated by broad synclines. 11 figures, 1 table.

  2. Geological and structural characterisation of deformation zones of deep seated rockslides in metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, T.; Zangerl, C.; Fellin, W.; Brandner, R.

    2012-04-01

    Generally, deep-seated slowly moving rockslides, characterised by average slope velocities in the range of some mm to dm per year, are frequently observed in foliated metamorphic rock masses such as gneisses, schists and phyllites. Many case studies show that this activity behaviour results from deformation, i.e. sliding/creeping along one or several discrete deformation zones which originate from initial rockslide formation processes. From a geological and structural point of view such deformation zones are extremely heterogeneous and are composed of uncemented fault breccias and gouges. The material that is newly formed through cataclasis and fragmentation of the rock during shearing processes possesses soil-like mechanical as well as hydraulical properties. Consequently, slope stability and temporal deformation behaviour of rockslides is dominated by hydro-mechanical deformation zone characteristics rather than by the properties of the overall mass movement. In this study preliminary investigation results about the geological structure and mechanical behaviour of deformation zones of deep-seated rock slides are presented. The case studies herein are located in paragneissic rock masses of the polymetamorphic Austroalpine Ötztal-Stubai complex (Tyrol, Austria). In order to focus on the characterisation of the structure of deformation zones the degree of fragmentation, the spatial distribution of clay-gouges and breccias, moisture content and porosity, the distribution of shear planes, the mineralogical composition and grain shapes as well as grain alignment are investigated. Furthermore the shear strength properties (residual friction angles) are determined by ring shear tests. The results obtained are analysed in combination with geological, structural and geometrical observations of the rockslides from detailed field mapping, borehole and investigation adit data as well as slope deformation measurements. Preliminary results show a complex geological and

  3. Raman spectroscopic evaluation of meat batter structural changes induced by thermal treatment and salt addition.

    PubMed

    Herrero, A M; Carmona, P; López-López, I; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2008-08-27

    Raman spectroscopy, texture, proximate composition, and water binding analysis were carried out to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment and/or salt addition to meat batter. For this purpose, different meat batters were elaborated: control meat batter (no salt) and meat batters with low (1.0%) and high (2.5%) NaCl content with and without thermal treatment (70 degrees C/30 min). Increase (P < 0.05) in penetration force and hardness upon heating was observed. Results also showed hardness increasing (P < 0.05) as a function of salt addition in heated meat batter. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in alpha-helix content accompanied by an increase (P < 0.05) in beta-sheets resulting from heating. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between these secondary structural changes in meat proteins and water binding and textural properties of meat batter. In this way, a significant correlation was found between beta-sheets, salt content, hardness, and chewiness in heated samples.

  4. [Changes in the fine structure of microbial cells induced by chaotropic salts].

    PubMed

    Duda, V I; Danilevich, V N; Suzina, N F; Shorokhova, A P; Dmitriev, V V; Mokhova, O N; Akimov, V N

    2004-01-01

    The electron microscopic examination of the thin sections of cells of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris and the gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis showed that cell treatment with the chaotropic salts guanidine hydrochloride (6 M) and guanidine thiocyanate (4 M) at 37 degrees C for 3-5 h or at 100 degrees C for 5-6 min induced degradative processes, which affected almost all cellular structures. The cell wall, however, retained its ultrastructure, integrity, and rigidity, due to which the morphology of cells treated with the chaotropic salts did not change. High-molecular-weight DNA was localized in a new cell compartment, ectoplasm (a peripheral hydrophilic zone). The chaotropic salts destroyed the outer and inner membranes and partially degraded the outer and inner protein coats of Bacillus subtilis spores, leaving their cortex (the murein layer) unchanged. The spore core became accessible to stains and showed the presence of regions with high and low electron densities. The conditions of cell treatment with the chaotropic salts were chosen to provide for efficient in situ PCR analysis of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes with the use of oligonucleotide primers.

  5. 35Cl NQR and Crystal Structure Studies of Salts of Chlorodifluoro- and Dichloroacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, Reha; Dou, Shi-qi; Weiss, Alarich

    1992-02-01

    The 35Cl NQR spectra of several chlorodifluoroacetates were studied as a function of temperature, including the acid ClF2CCOOH. The cations were: Ammonium, guanidinium, paramethylanilinium. Also some acid salts M⊕ClF2CCOO⊖ • n - ClF2CCOOH ( n > l ) were studied by 35Cl NQR. The bleaching temperatures of the NQR signals were determined. In the para-methylanilinium salt and in the guanidinium salt a phase transition has been observed. The crystal structure of guanidinium chlorodifluoroacetate has been determined at room temperature (a = 1089 pm, 6 = 845 pm, c = 832 pm, space group Pnma, Z = 4). For comparison, guanidinium dichloroacetate was studied by 35Cl NQR and by X-ray diffraction, too: P21/c, Z = 4 , a = 804pm, b = 1202 pm, c = 1080 pm, ß = 131.58°. For guanidinium chlorodifluoroacetate and chlorodifluoroacetic acid, the 35Cl spin lattice relaxation time T1 and the line width have been followed up as a function of temperature. Therefrom, the activation energies of the reorientation motion of the group -CF2C1 have been determined to be 14 kJ • mol-1 (from T1) and 12.5 kJ • mol- 1 (from Δv) for the pure acid and 9.2 kJ • mol-1 and 8.8 kJ • mol-1 , respectively, for the guanidinium salt.

  6. Crystal structure and physicochemical characterization of ambazone monohydrate, anhydrous, and acetate salt solvate.

    PubMed

    Muresan-Pop, Marieta; Braga, Dario; Pop, Mihaela M; Borodi, Gheorghe; Kacso, Irina; Maini, Lucia

    2014-11-01

    The crystal structures of the monohydrate and anhydrous forms of ambazone were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD). Ambazone monohydrate is characterized by an infinite three-dimensional network involving the water molecules, whereas anhydrous ambazone forms a two-dimensional network via hydrogen bonds. The reversible transformation between the monohydrate and anhydrous forms of ambazone was evidenced by thermal analysis, temperature-dependent X-ray powder diffraction and accelerated stability at elevated temperature, and relative humidity (RH). Additionally, a novel ambazone acetate salt solvate form was obtained and its nature was elucidated by SC-XRD. Powder dissolution measurements revealed a substantial solubility and dissolution rate improvement of acetate salt solvated form in water and physiological media compared with ambazone forms. Also, the acetate salt solvate displayed good thermal and solution stability but it transformed to the monohydrate on storage at elevated temperature and RH. Our study shows that despite the requirement for controlled storage conditions, the acetate salt solvated form could be an alternative to ambazone when solubility and bioavailability improvement is critical for the clinical efficacy of the drug product. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Reversibly changing a painkiller structure: a hot topic for a cold case--ibuprofen lysine salt.

    PubMed

    Vladiskovic, Chiara; Masciocchi, Norberto

    2015-03-25

    Ibuprofen lysine salt can undergo a fully reversible, thermally induced phase transition into a different enantiotropically related polymorphic form. The structures of both the high and low temperature phases were solved using state-of-the-art X-ray powder diffraction methods, showing many similarities both in the molecular conformation and in the crystal packing. The full structural analysis and comparison of the two crystal structures allowed to understand the mechanism of the phase transition and explain its reversible nature in what appears to be a rare case of isosymmetric temperature-driven phase transformation of an organic solid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spiropyran salts and their neutral precursors: synthesis, crystal structure, photochromic transformations in solutions and solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurieva, E. A.; Aldoshin, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    This review covers investigations of spiropyran iodides with N-substituted indoline fragment, and with the pyran cycle being annelated to N-methylated pyridine ring. The schemes of synthesis of iodides and their neutral precursors, as well as results of X-ray analysis and photochemical study of the crystals of the obtained compounds are presented. Based on our and literature data, the relationship between the structure and photochromic properties has been discussed for a series of salts and neutral pyridospiropyrans.

  9. Effect of salt and surfactant concentration on the structure of polyacrylate gel/surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter; Unga, Johan; Hansson, Per

    2007-09-20

    Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to elucidate the structure of crosslinked polyacrylate gel/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide complexes equilibrated in solutions of varying concentrations of surfactant and sodium bromide (NaBr). Samples were swollen with no ordering (micelle free), or they were collapsed with either several distinct peaks (cubic Pm3n) or one broad correlation peak (disordered micellar). The main factor determining the structure of the collapsed complexes was found to be the NaBr concentration, with the cubic structure existing up to approximately 150 mM NaBr and above which only the disordered micellar structure was found. Increasing the salt concentration decreases the polyion mediated attractive forces holding the micelles together causing swelling of the gel. At sufficiently high salt concentration the micelle-micelle distance in the gel becomes too large for the cubic structure to be retained, and it melts into a disordered micellar structure. As most samples were above the critical micelle concentration, the bulk of the surfactant was in the form of micelles in the solution and the surfactant concentration thereby had only a minor influence on the structure. However, in the region around 150 mM NaBr, increasing the surfactant concentration, at constant NaBr concentration, was found to change the structure from disordered micellar to ordered cubic and back to disordered again.

  10. Collaborative Research: Evolution of Pore Structure and Permeability of Rocks Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenlu; Evans, J. Brian

    2007-04-15

    The physical and transport properties of porous rocks can be altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and tectonic processes, and the changes that result are of critical importance to such industrial applications as resource recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, and waste isolation in geologic formations. These inter-relationships between rocks, pore fluids, and deformation are also the key to understanding many natural processes, including: dynamic metamorphism, fault mechanics, fault stability, and pressure solution deformation. Here, we propose work to investigate the changes of permeability and pore geometry owing to inelastic deformation by solution-transfer, brittle fracturing, and dislocation creep. The work would study the relationship of deformation and permeability reduction in fluid-filled quartz and calcite rocks and investigate the effects of loading configuration on the evolution of porosity and permeability under hydrothermal conditions. We would use a combination of techniques, including laboratory experiments, numerical calculations, and observations of rock microstructure. The laboratory experiments provide mechanical and transport data under conditions that isolate each particular mechanism. Our apparatus are designed to provide simultaneous measurements of pore volume, permeability, axial and volumetric strain rates while being loaded under isostatic or conventional triaxial loading. Temperatures up to 1400 K may be obtained, while confining pressures and pore pressures are maintained independently up to 500 MPa. Observations of the structure will be made with standard optical, scanning electron, and laser confocal scanning optical microscopes. The data obtained will be used to quantify changes in surface roughness, porosity, pore dimensions, and their spatial fluctuations. The results of the experiments and the image data are then used in network, finite-difference and other numerical models to verify the validity of experimentally

  11. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Snodin, Benedict E. K. Mosayebi, Majid; Schreck, John S.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Randisi, Ferdinando; Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-06-21

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na{sup +}] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.

  12. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodin, Benedict E. K.; Randisi, Ferdinando; Mosayebi, Majid; Šulc, Petr; Schreck, John S.; Romano, Flavio; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal; Louis, Ard A.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na+] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.

  13. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA.

    PubMed

    Snodin, Benedict E K; Randisi, Ferdinando; Mosayebi, Majid; Šulc, Petr; Schreck, John S; Romano, Flavio; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2015-06-21

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na(+)] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.

  14. Domal structure in Devonian rocks of Kimberling basin, Bland County, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, R.C.

    1988-08-01

    The Kimberling basin, which is floored with Middle Devonian clastic rocks, is a topographic and structural low in the Narrows fault block of the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province in Bland County, Virginia. The basin is bounded on the northwest and southeast by the southeast-dipping Narrows and Saltville thrust faults, respectively. Two doubly plunging anticlines lie along the strike of the basin. Lower Ordovician rocks are exposed in the Burkes Garden dome to the southwest, and Lower Cambrian rocks are present in the core of the Bane dome to the northeast. Previous workers have postulated continuity between the Burkes Garden and Bane domes through the Kimberling basin, as well as the presence in the basin of an anomalously thick Devonian clastic section, which has been ascribed by some authors to contemporaneous downwarp of a depositional syncline. Recent mapping has shown both of these postulates to be incorrect. The basin contains an anticline-syncline pair that is en echelon with the axes of the Burkes Garden and Bane anticlines and that trends about 20/degree/ more northerly than the regional strike of the bounding thrusts. Rediscovery of small outcrops of Lower and Middle Devonian Huntersville Chert and Rocky Gap Sandstone in the core of the Kimberling basin anticline, which were recorded by M.R. Campbell in 1896 but overlooked by later mappers, shows that the Devonian clastic sequence has a normal thickness and that the Kimberling basin contains a domal structure similar to the Burkes Garden and Bane domes.

  15. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E.; Horton, J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Geo-structural modelling for potential large rock slide in Machu Picchu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spizzichino, D.; Delmonaco, G.; Margottini, C.; Mazzoli, S.

    2009-04-01

    The monumental complex of the Historical Sanctuary of Machu Picchu, declared as World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983, is located in the Andean chain at approx. 80 km from Cuzco (Peru) and at an elevation of 2430 m a.s.l. along the Urubamba River Valley. From a geological point of view, the Machu Picchu granitoid pluton, forming part of the larger "Quillabamba granite", is one of a series of plutons intruded along the axial zone of the high Eastern Cordillera Permo-Liassic rift system including a variety of rock types, dominantly granites and granodiorites. The most evident structures at the outcrop scale consist of planar joint sets that may be variably reactivated and exhibiting 4 main orientations. At present, the site is affected by geological risk due to frequent landslides that threaten security and tourist exploitation. In the last years, the international landslide scientific community has promoted a multi-discipline joint programme mainly finalised to slope deformation monitoring and analysis after the warning, launched in 2001, of a potential collapse of the citadel, caused by a huge rock slide. The contribute of the Italian research team was devoted to implement a landslide risk analysis and an innovative remote sensing techniques. The main scope of this work is to present the implementation of a geo-structural modelling aimed at defining present and potential slope stability conditions of the Machu Picchu Citadel. Data have been collected by geological, structural and geomechanical field surveys and laboratory tests in order to reconstruct the geomorphological evolution of the area. Landslide types and evolution are strictly controlled by regional tectonic uplift and structural setting. Several slope instability phenomena have been identified and classified according to mechanism, material involved and state of activity. Rock falls, debris flows, rock slides and debris slides are the main surveyed landslide types. Rock slides and rock falls may produce

  17. Relationships between watershed emergy flow and coastal New England salt marsh structure, function, and condition.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Williams, Sherry; Wigand, Cathleen; Campbell, Daniel E

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI, USA. The field-collected data were obtained during several years of vegetation, invertebrate, soil, and water quality sampling. The use of emergy as an accounting mechanism allowed disparate factors (e.g., the amount of building construction and the consumption of electricity) to be combined into a single landscape index while retaining a uniform quantitative definition of the intensity of landscape development. It expanded upon typical land use percentage studies by weighting each category for the intensity of development. At the RI salt marsh sites, an impact index (watershed emergy flow normalized for marsh area) showed significant correlations with mudflat infauna species richness, mussel density, plant species richness, the extent and density of dominant plant species, and denitrification potential within the high salt marsh. Over the 4-year period examined, a loading index (watershed emergy flow normalized for watershed area) showed significant correlations with nitrite and nitrate concentrations, as well as with the nitrogen to phosphorus ratios in stream discharge into the marshes. Both the emergy impact and loading indices were significantly correlated with a salt marsh condition index derived from intensive field-based assessments. Comparison of the emergy indices to calculated nitrogen loading estimates for each watershed also produced significant positive correlations. These results suggest that watershed emergy flow is a robust index of human disturbance and a potential tool for rapid assessment of coastal wetland condition.

  18. Response of Soil Fungi Community Structure to Salt Vegetation Succession in the Yellow River Delta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Yun; Guo, Du-Fa

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology was used to reveal the composition and distribution of fungal community structure in the Yellow River Delta under bare land and four kinds of halophyte vegetation (saline seepweed, Angiospermae, Imperata and Apocynum venetum [A. venetum]). The results showed that the soil quality continuously improved with the succession of salt vegetation types. The soil fungi richness of mild-salt communities (Imperata and A. venetum) was relatively higher, with Shannon index values of 5.21 and 5.84, respectively. The soil fungi richness of severe-salt-tolerant communities (saline seepweed, Angiospermae) was relatively lower, with Shannon index values of 4.64 and 4.66, respectively. The UniFrac metric values ranged from 0.48 to 0.67 when the vegetation was in different succession stages. A total of 60,174 valid sequences were obtained for the five vegetation types, and they were classified into Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. Ascomycota had the greatest advantage among plant communities of Imperata and A. venetum, as indicated by relative abundances of 2.69 and 69.97 %, respectively. Basidiomycota had the greatest advantage among mild-salt communities of saline seepweed and Angiospermae, with relative abundances of 9.43 and 6.64 %, respectively. Soil physical and chemical properties were correlated with the distribution of the fungi, and Mucor was significantly correlated with soil moisture (r = 0.985; P < 0.01). Soil quality, salt vegetation and soil fungi were influenced by each other.

  19. Structural relationships of pre-Tertiary rocks in the Nevada Test Site region, southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, James C.; Cashman, Patricia Hughes

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a synthesis and interpretation of structural and stratigraphic data for pre-Tertiary rocks in a large area of southern Nevada within and near the Nevada Test Site. Its presents descriptive and interpretive information from discontinuously exposed localities in the context of a regional model that integrates stratigraphy, sedimentology, crustal structure, and deformational style and timing. Evidence is given for substantial strike-slip faults, for modest excursion on low-angle faults, and for pre-Oligocene formation of the regional oroclinal flexure in neighboring mountain ranges.

  20. Analogue modelling of rock avalanches and structural analysis of the deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, C.; Charrière, M.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    Rock avalanches are catastrophic events in which granular masses of rock debris flow at high speeds, commonly with unusual runout. A great volume of material (>106 m3) is involved and the flowing mass can reach velocities up to ten meters per second. Rock avalanches can travel long distances on the order of kilometres and covering an area over 0.1 km2. These are extremely destructive and uncontrollable events. Due to the rarity of these events, analogue modelling plays a fundamental role in the understanding of the behaviour such events. The main objective of this research is to link the granular physics with the modelling of rock avalanches. Firstly, we attempt to model the debris avalanche and its spreading on a slope with different substratum to understand the relationship between the volume and the reach angle, or Fahrböschung, i.e. angle of the line joining the top of the scar and the end of the deposit. For a better understanding of the sliding mass motion and its spreading, the deposit is scanned with a micro Lidar Minolta. The different datasets are compared in order to see how the grainsize and volume influence a debris avalanche. In a general way, the travel distance is greater with coarse material and varies between 32° for the coarser grainsize and 37° for the finer one. It is interesting to note that the highest Fahrböschung, 41°, is reached for the highest slope angle (60°) and varies between 32 and 34.5° for a slope of 40°. Secondly, a detailed structural analysis of the deposit is performed in order to understand how the sliding mass stops. Several authors (e.g. Shea and van Wyk de Vries (2008)) highlighted that faults and folds are present in rock avalanches deposits and reproduced these features in analogue modelling. Our experiments are recorded by a height speed precision camera to see the development of these structures during the flowing of the mass. The most important impacts of this study is a better understanding of the effects of

  1. Desolvation and dehydrogenation of solvated magnesium salts of dodecahydrododecaborate: relationship between structure and thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuenian; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Alexander, Anne-Marie; Gallucci, Judith C; Hwang, Son-Jong; Lingam, Hima Kumar; Huang, Zhenguo; Wang, Cong; Li, Huizhen; Zhao, Qianyi; Ozkan, Umit S; Shore, Sheldon G; Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2014-06-10

    Attempts to synthesize solvent-free MgB12H12 by heating various solvated forms (H2O, NH3, and CH3OH) of the salt failed because of the competition between desolvation and dehydrogenation. This competition has been studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Products were characterized by IR, solution- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and single-crystal or powder X-ray diffraction analysis. For hydrated salts, thermal decomposition proceeded in three stages, loss of water to form first hexahydrated then trihydrated, and finally loss of water and hydrogen to form polyhydroxylated complexes. For partially ammoniated salts, two stages of thermal decomposition were observed as ammonia and hydrogen were released with weight loss first of 14 % and then 5.5 %. Thermal decomposition of methanolated salts proceeded through a single step with a total weight loss of 32 % with the release of methanol, methane, and hydrogen. All the gaseous products of thermal decomposition were characterized by using mass spectrometry. Residual solid materials were characterized by solid-state (11)B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analysis by which the molecular structures of hexahydrated and trihydrated complexes were solved. Both hydrogen and dihydrogen bonds were observed in structures of [Mg(H2O)6B12H12]⋅6 H2O and [Mg(CH3OH)6B12H12]⋅6 CH3OH, which were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The structural factors influencing thermal decomposition behavior are identified and discussed. The dependence of dehydrogenation on the formation of dihydrogen bonds may be an important consideration in the design of solid-state hydrogen storage materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effect of Salt Concentration on the Structure of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Cryogels Obtained from Aqueous Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Zagorskaya, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The degree of polymer crystallinity and water content on the surfaces and in the bulk of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) cryogels prepared from aqueous salt solutions were determined as functions of KCl concentration using FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. It was found that the degree of PVA crystallinity increased with increasing KCl concentration and was much greater in the cryogel bulk than on its surfaces. Addition of salt at a concentration of 1.3 M increased the degree of polymer crystallinity on the cryogel surfaces by 1.6-2.3 times whereas the crystallinity in the bulk increased by 3.3-4 times. The cryogel water contents on the surfaces and in the bulk were approximately equal and were practically independent of the salt concentration.

  3. Distribution of siderophile and other trace elements in melt rock at the Chicxulub impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Martinez, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.; Marin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recent isotopic and mineralogical studies have demonstrated a temporal and chemical link between the Chicxulub multiring impact basin and ejecta at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. A fundamental problem yet to be resolved, however, is identification of the projectile responsible for this cataclysmic event. Drill core samples of impact melt rock from the Chichxulub structure contain Ir and Os abundances and Re-Os isotopic ratios indicating the presence of up to approx. 3 percent meteoritic material. We have used a technique involving microdrilling and high sensitivity instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in conjunction with electron microprobe analysis to characterize further the distribution of siderophile and other trace elements among phases within the C1-N10 melt rock.

  4. Distribution of siderophile and other trace elements in melt rock at the Chicxulub impact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Martinez, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.; Marin, L. E.

    1994-03-01

    Recent isotopic and mineralogical studies have demonstrated a temporal and chemical link between the Chicxulub multiring impact basin and ejecta at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. A fundamental problem yet to be resolved, however, is identification of the projectile responsible for this cataclysmic event. Drill core samples of impact melt rock from the Chichxulub structure contain Ir and Os abundances and Re-Os isotopic ratios indicating the presence of up to approx. 3 percent meteoritic material. We have used a technique involving microdrilling and high sensitivity instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in conjunction with electron microprobe analysis to characterize further the distribution of siderophile and other trace elements among phases within the C1-N10 melt rock.

  5. Geophysical observations and structural models of shallow caves in gypsum/anhydrite-bearing rocks in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-04-01

    In northern Germany, the evaporitic sequence of Zechstein rocks outcrops at several locations, offering insight into both surface and sub-surface morphology of the soluble rocks. We discuss two field sites, an active shallow gypsum cave in the southern Harz Mountains, and an active shallow anhydrite/gypsum cave close to Bad Segeberg, which both have been explored from the surface by geophysical surveys. The overburden of the caves varies from 5-40 meter, and the caves are characterised by both small passages and larger breakdown chambers. We relate the indirect geophysical measurements to parts of the known cave systems, and present structural models describing both geometry and groundwater flow in these caves with the help of numerical tools.

  6. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-04

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  7. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  8. Orientation Uncertainty of Structures Measured in Cored Boreholes: Methodology and Case Study of Swedish Crystalline Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigsson, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Many engineering applications in fractured crystalline rocks use measured orientations of structures such as rock contact and fractures, and lineated objects such as foliation and rock stress, mapped in boreholes as their foundation. Despite that these measurements are afflicted with uncertainties, very few attempts to quantify their magnitudes and effects on the inferred orientations have been reported. Only relying on the specification of tool imprecision may considerably underestimate the actual uncertainty space. The present work identifies nine sources of uncertainties, develops inference models of their magnitudes, and points out possible implications for the inference on orientation models and thereby effects on downstream models. The uncertainty analysis in this work builds on a unique data set from site investigations, performed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB). During these investigations, more than 70 boreholes with a maximum depth of 1 km were drilled in crystalline rock with a cumulative length of more than 34 km including almost 200,000 single fracture intercepts. The work presented, hence, relies on orientation of fractures. However, the techniques to infer the magnitude of orientation uncertainty may be applied to all types of structures and lineated objects in boreholes. The uncertainties are not solely detrimental, but can be valuable, provided that the reason for their presence is properly understood and the magnitudes correctly inferred. The main findings of this work are as follows: (1) knowledge of the orientation uncertainty is crucial in order to be able to infer correct orientation model and parameters coupled to the fracture sets; (2) it is important to perform multiple measurements to be able to infer the actual uncertainty instead of relying on the theoretical uncertainty provided by the manufacturers; (3) it is important to use the most appropriate tool for the prevailing circumstances; and (4) the single most

  9. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  10. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  11. Development of a rocking R/C shear wall system implementing repairable structural fuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsafar, Saeed; Moghadam, Abdolreza S.

    2017-09-01

    In the last decades, the concept of earthquake resilient structural systems is becoming popular in which the rocking structure is considered as a viable option for buildings in regions of high seismicity. To this end, a novel wall-base connection based on the " repairable structure" approach is proposed and evaluated. The proposed system is made of several steel plates and high strength bolts act as a friction connection. To achieve the desired rocking motion in the proposed system, short-slotted holes are used in vertical directions for connecting the steel plates to the shear wall (SW). The experimental and numerical studies were performed using a series of displacement control quasi-static cyclic tests on a reference model and four different configurations of the proposed connection installed at the wall corners. The seismic response of the proposed system is compared to the conventional SW in terms of energy dissipation and damage accumulation. In terms of energy dissipation, the proposed system depicted better performance with 95% more energy dissipation capability compared to conventional SW. In terms of damage accumulation, the proposed SW system is nearly undamaged compared to the conventional wall system, which was severely damaged at the wall-base region. Overall, the introduced concept presents a feasible solution for R/C structures when a low-damage design is targeted, which can improve the seismic performance of the structural system significantly.

  12. Development of a rocking R/C shear wall system implementing repairable structural fuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsafar, Saeed; Moghadam, Abdolreza S.

    2017-06-01

    In the last decades, the concept of earthquake resilient structural systems is becoming popular in which the rocking structure is considered as a viable option for buildings in regions of high seismicity. To this end, a novel wall-base connection based on the "repairable structure" approach is proposed and evaluated. The proposed system is made of several steel plates and high strength bolts act as a friction connection. To achieve the desired rocking motion in the proposed system, short-slotted holes are used in vertical directions for connecting the steel plates to the shear wall (SW). The experimental and numerical studies were performed using a series of displacement control quasi-static cyclic tests on a reference model and four different configurations of the proposed connection installed at the wall corners. The seismic response of the proposed system is compared to the conventional SW in terms of energy dissipation and damage accumulation. In terms of energy dissipation, the proposed system depicted better performance with 95% more energy dissipation capability compared to conventional SW. In terms of damage accumulation, the proposed SW system is nearly undamaged compared to the conventional wall system, which was severely damaged at the wall-base region. Overall, the introduced concept presents a feasible solution for R/C structures when a low-damage design is targeted, which can improve the seismic performance of the structural system significantly.

  13. Numerical analysis of the performance of rock weirs: Effects of structure configuration on local hydraulics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmquist-Johnson, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    River spanning rock structures are being constructed for water delivery as well as to enable fish passage at barriers and provide or improve the aquatic habitat for endangered fish species. Current design methods are based upon anecdotal information applicable to a narrow range of channel conditions. The complex flow patterns and performance of rock weirs is not well understood. Without accurate understanding of their hydraulics, designers cannot address the failure mechanisms of these structures. Flow characteristics such as jets, near bed velocities, recirculation, eddies, and plunging flow govern scour pool development. These detailed flow patterns can be replicated using a 3D numerical model. Numerical studies inexpensively simulate a large number of cases resulting in an increased range of applicability in order to develop design tools and predictive capability for analysis and design. The analysis and results of the numerical modeling, laboratory modeling, and field data provide a process-based method for understanding how structure geometry affects flow characteristics, scour development, fish passage, water delivery, and overall structure stability. Results of the numerical modeling allow designers to utilize results of the analysis to determine the appropriate geometry for generating desirable flow parameters. The end product of this research will develop tools and guidelines for more robust structure design or retrofits based upon predictable engineering and hydraulic performance criteria. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  14. Spectroscopic and structural studies of allyl urethane derivative of Monensin A sodium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczyński, Adam; Janczak, Jan; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Bartl, Franz

    2013-07-01

    A new derivative of polyether antibiotic Monensin A sodium salt its allyl urethane (MON-UR2-Na) was synthesised and its structure was studied by X-ray, FT-IR, NMR, and ESI-MS methods. The results of these studies demonstrated that the oxygen atom of the Cdbnd O urethane group is not engaged in the coordination of the Na+ as postulated previously. The crystal space group is P21 with a = 12.0378(11), b = 12.4495(11), c = 14.9690(14), β = 94.791(8) and Z = 2. The structure determined in the present study exhibits significant differences with respect to the earlier published structure of phenyl urethane of Monensin. A comparison of these structures clearly shows that not only the functional urethane group but also its substituent strongly influence the structure of this type of derivatives of Monensin A. X-ray data and spectroscopic and spectrometric behaviour of the new derivative of Monensin A are discussed in detail and compared to the structure of phenyl urethane of Monensin A sodium salt.

  15. Salt tectonics and gravity driven deformation: Structural guidelines for exploration in passive margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mauduit, T.; Gwenael G.; Brun, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    The West African Margin, (Gulf of Guinea) presents spectacular examples of gravity driven deformation above a salt decollement (i.e. growth faulting, rafts, diapirs and contractional structures) which have been documented by numerous Oil and Gas investigations. Seismic data demonstrate that the variation of deformation styles in space and time appear to be function of: regional geometry of the margin (i.e. value of basal slope and presence/absence of residual reliefs below the salt layers) and, mode, rate and repartition of sedimentation. The role and effects of the above parameters were analyzed using laboratory modeling investigation based on basic structural patterns identified through seismic data. Models are built with sand and silicone putty, that respectively represent the frictional behavior of upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic cover and the viscous behavior of the upper Aptian salt. They are scaled to fit observed natural configurations. Results are compared with examples from the Gulf of Guinea on the basis of seismic data. This approach allowed to better understand the evolution of the margin and therefore the reservoir distributions and traps geometries.

  16. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  17. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  18. Population structure and marker-trait association of salt tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Elakhdar, Ammar; El-Sattar, Mohamed Abd; Amer, Khairy; Rady, Assma; Kumamaru, Toshihiro

    Association mapping is becoming an important tool for identifying alleles and loci responsible for dissecting highly complex traits in barley. This study describes the population structure and marker-trait association using general linear model (GLM) analysis on a site of 60 barley genotypes, evaluated in six salinity environments. Ninety-eight SSR and SNP alleles were employed for the construction of a framework genetic map. The genetic structure analysis of the collection turned out to consist of two major sub-populations, mainly comprising hulled and naked types. LD significantly varied among the barley chromosomes, suggesting that this factor may affect the resolution of association mapping for QTL located on different chromosomes. Numerous significant marker traits were associated in different regions of the barley genome controlling salt tolerance and related traits; among them, 46 QTLs were detected on 14 associated traits over the two years, with a major QTL controlling salt tolerance on 1H, 2H, 4H and 7H, which are important factors in improving barley's salt tolerance.

  19. Features of West Hackberry SPR Caverns and Internal Structure Of the Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2006-09-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the internal structure of the West Hackberry salt dome utilizing the information from the geometric configuration of the internal cavern surfaces obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data. In a general sense, the caverns of West Hackberry are remarkable in the symmetry of their shapes. There are only rather moderate deviations from what would be considered an ideal cylindrical solution mining geometry in these caverns. This finding is in marked contrast to the directional solutioning found in the elliptical cross sectioned, sometimes winged, caverns of Big Hill. None of the persistent lineaments prevalent in Big Hill caverns are evident in West Hackberry caverns. Irregularities of the West Hackberry caverns are restricted to preferential solution formed pits and protuberances with moderate dimensions. In fact, the principal characteristic of West Hackberry caverns is the often large sections of smooth and cylindrical cavern wall. Differences in the cavern characteristics between West Hackberry and Big Hill suggest that the former dome is quite homogeneous, while the latter still retains strong remnants of the interbeds of the original bedded Louann salt. One possible explanation is that the source of the two domes, while both from the Louann mother salt, differs. While the source of the Big Hill dome is directly from the mother salt bed, it appears that the West Hackberry arises from a laterally extruded sill of the mother salt. Consequently, the amount of deformation, and hence, mixing of the salt and interbed material in the extruded sill is significantly greater than would be the case for the directly formed diapir. In West Hackberry, remnants of interbeds apparently no longer exist. An important aspect of the construction of the West Hackberry caverns is the evidence of an attempt to use a uniform solutioning construction practice. This uniformity involved the utilization of single well solutioning and

  20. Leaf Physiological and Proteomic Analysis to Elucidate Silicon Induced Adaptive Response under Salt Stress in Rosa hybrida ‘Rock Fire’

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Manivannan, Abinaya; Ko, Chung Ho; Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Beneficial effects of silicon (Si) on growth and development have been witnessed in several plants. Nevertheless, studies on roses are merely reported. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to illustrate the impact of Si on photosynthesis, antioxidant defense and leaf proteome of rose under salinity stress. In vitro-grown, acclimatized Rosa hybrida ‘Rock Fire’ were hydroponically treated with four treatments, such as control, Si (1.8 mM), NaCl (50 mM), and Si+NaCl. After 15 days, the consequences of salinity stress and the response of Si addition were analyzed. Scorching of leaf edges and stomatal damages occurred due to salt stress was ameliorated under Si supplementation. Similarly, reduction of gas exchange, photosynthetic pigments, higher lipid peroxidation rate, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species under salinity stress were mitigated in Si treatment. Lesser oxidative stress observed was correlated with the enhanced activity and expression of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase in Si+NaCl treatment. Importantly, sodium transportation was synergistically restricted with the stimulated counter-uptake of potassium in Si+NaCl treatment. Furthermore, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) results showed that out of 40 identified proteins, on comparison with control 34 proteins were down-accumulated and six proteins were up-accumulated due to salinity stress. Meanwhile, addition of Si with NaCl treatment enhanced the abundance of 30 proteins and downregulated five proteins. Differentially-expressed proteins were functionally classified into six groups, such as photosynthesis (22%), carbohydrate/energy metabolism (20%), transcription/translation (20%), stress/redox homeostasis (12%), ion binding (13%), and ubiquitination (8%). Hence, the findings reported in this work could facilitate a deeper

  1. Long-term cement corrosion in chloride-rich solutions relevant to radioactive waste disposal in rock salt - Leaching experiments and thermodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bube, C.; Metz, V.; Bohnert, E.; Garbev, K.; Schild, D.; Kienzler, B.

    Low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes are frequently solidified in a cement matrix. In a potential repository for nuclear wastes, the cementitious matrix is altered upon contact with solution and the resulting secondary phases may provide for significant retention of the radionuclides incorporated in the wastes. In order to assess the secondary phases formed upon corrosion in chloride-rich solutions, which are relevant for nuclear waste disposal in rock salt, leaching experiments were performed. Conventional laboratory batch experiments using powdered hardened cement paste in MgCl2-rich solutions were left to equilibrate for up to three years and full-scale cemented waste products were exposed to NaCl-rich and MgCl2-rich solutions for more than twenty years, respectively. Solid phase analyses revealed that corrosion of hardened cement in MgCl2-rich solutions advanced faster than in NaCl-rich solutions due to the extensive exchange of Mg from solution against Ca from the cementitious solid. Thermodynamic equilibrium simulations compared well to results at the final stages of the respective experiments indicating that close to equilibrium conditions were reached. At high cement product to brine ratios (>0.65 g mL-1), the solution composition in the laboratory-scale experiments was close to that of the full-scale experiments (cement to brine ratio of 2.5 g mL-1) in the MgCl2 systems. The present study demonstrates the applicability of thermodynamic methods used in this approach to adequately describe full-scale long-term experiments with cemented waste simulates.

  2. Synthesis of rock-salt type lithium borohydride and its peculiar Li{sup +} ion conduction properties

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, R.; Maekawa, H.; Takamura, H.

    2014-05-01

    The high energy density and excellent cycle performance of lithium ion batteries makes them superior to all other secondary batteries and explains why they are widely used in portable devices. However, because organic liquid electrolytes have a higher operating voltage than aqueous solution, they are used in lithium ion batteries. This comes with the risk of fire due to their flammability. Solid electrolytes are being investigated to find an alternative to organic liquid. However, the nature of the solid-solid point contact at the interface between the electrolyte and electrode or between the electrolyte grains is such that high power density has proven difficult to attain. We develop a new method for the fabrication of a solid electrolyte using LiBH{sub 4,} known for its super Li{sup +} ion conduction without any grain boundary contribution. The modifications to the conduction pathway achieved by stabilizing the high pressure form of this material provided a new structure with some LiBH{sub 4}, more suitable to the high rate condition. We synthesized the H.P. form of LiBH{sub 4} under ambient pressure by doping LiBH{sub 4} with the KI lattice by sintering. The formation of a KI - LiBH{sub 4} solid solution was confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically. The obtained sample was shown to be a pure Li{sup +} conductor despite its small Li{sup +} content. This conduction mechanism, where the light doping cation played a major role in ion conduction, was termed the “Parasitic Conduction Mechanism.” This mechanism made it possible to synthesize a new ion conductor and is expected to have enormous potential in the search for new battery materials.

  3. Shallow Structure of the Eagle Rock and Raymond Faults in Arroyo Seco, Los Angeles County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirer, D. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M.; Fuis, G.

    2012-12-01

    To understand the location, dip, and possible structural connection of the Eagle Rock and Raymond faults in Pasadena and South Pasadena, California, we acquired and analyzed high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction data, as well as gravity observations, along the floor of the Arroyo Seco. The studies were conducted to aid in understanding the seismic hazards of these faults in this urban setting. Seismic reflection and refraction data, including both P-wave and S-wave records, were collected along two profiles, a 1.2-km-long northern profile crossing the Eagle Rock fault, and a 450-m-long southern profile crossing the Raymond fault. Seismic sources were Betsy-Seisgun shots, accelerated weight drops, and repeated sledge-hammer impacts, which were recorded on multi-channel seismograph systems connected to vertical- and horizontal-component geophones spaced at a 5-m interval. Gravity data were collected along a single ~3-km-long profile coincident with and extending beyond and between the two seismic profiles, with stations spaced every 25-m near the fault traces and at greater intervals farther from the fault traces. We carefully accounted for the gravity effects of the adjacent concrete drainage channel and of the walls of the arroyo, to generate gravity anomalies that reflect sub-surface density contrasts across the Eagle Rock and Raymond faults. Seismic reflection image quality is compromised by the highly-deformed Miocene strata offset by these faults. However, reflection and especially refraction results indicate that both the Eagle Rock and Raymond faults consist of multiple, steeply-north-dipping fault strands. P- and S-wave seismic tomography results of the uppermost 50-100 m yield velocity variations that can be converted to probable density variations, and thus be included in the gravity anomaly analysis. The gravity anomalies predicted from the velocity variations account for less than one-third of the anomalies observed across the faults

  4. Hydraulic properties and inner structure of a relict rock glacier in the Eastern Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauritsch, Marcus; Winkler, Gerfried; Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Birk, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    Water economic studies in 1990s documented the importance of the springs draining relict rock glaciers for water supply and human consumption as well as for the ecosystem in alpine catchments in the Niederen Tauern Range, Austria. Recent studies confirm the hydrologic importance and show that in the easternmost subunit, the Seckauer Tauern Range, more than 40% of the area above 2000 m a.s.l. and up to 20% of the area above 1500 m a.s.l. drain through relict rock glaciers. Thus, the hydraulic properties of these alpine aquifers are considered to be important controls on the hydrology of these areas. Nevertheless their hydraulic properties and their inner structure are still poorly understood. Our hydrogeological research is carried out at the Schöneben Rock Glacier, located in Seckauer Tauern Range, Austria. This rock glacier is presumably relict although patches of permafrost might exist particularly in the upper part of the landform. The rock glacier covers an area of 0.11 km² and drains a total catchment of 0.76 km² with a maximum elevation of 2282 m a.s.l.. The rock glacier consists predominantly of gneissic sediments (mainly coarse-grained, blocky at the surface) and extends from 1720 to 1905 m a.s.l.. Discharge of the rock glacier spring is recorded since 2002. Electrical conductivity and water temperature used as natural tracers are continuously monitored since 2008. Furthermore, a tracer test with simultaneous injection of the fluorescent dyes naphthionate and fluoresceine at two injection points (one close to the front and one close to the rooting zone of the rock glacier) was performed. Recession analysis of the spring hydrograph reveals similarities to the flow dynamics of karst springs. The results exhibit on the one hand a slow base flow recession indicating a high storage capacity and on the other hand sharp discharge peaks immediately after rainfall events referring to a high hydraulic conductivity. Applying different analytic runoff models, the

  5. The structure of the 1H-imidazol-3-ium lawsonate salt aided by ab initio gas-phase calculations.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcos Antônio; Oliveira, Willian Xerxes Coelho; Stumpf, Humberto Osório; Pinheiro, Carlos Basílio

    2013-04-01

    For the new organic salt 1H-imidazol-3-ium 1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalen-2-olate, C3H5N2(+)·C10H5O3(-), ab initio calculations of the gas-phase structures of the lawsonate and imidazolium ions were performed to help in the interpretation of the structural features observed. Three different types of hydrogen bond are responsible for the three-dimensional packing of the salt.

  6. Geochemical studies of impact breccias and country rocks from the El'gygytgyn impact structure, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, Ulli; Schmitt, Ralf Thomas; McDonald, Iain; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Mader, Dieter; Koeberl, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The complex impact structure El'gygytgyn (age 3.6 Ma, diameter 18 km) in northeastern Russia was formed in ~88 Ma old volcanic target rocks of the Ochotsk-Chukotsky Volcanic Belt (OCVB). In 2009, El'gygytgyn was the target of a drilling project of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), and in summer 2011 it was investigated further by a Russian-German expedition. Drill core material and surface samples, including volcanic target rocks and impactites, have been investigated by various geochemical techniques in order to improve the record of trace element characteristics for these lithologies and to attempt to detect and constrain a possible meteoritic component. The bedrock units of the ICDP drill core reflect the felsic volcanics that are predominant in the crater vicinity. The overlying suevites comprise a mixture of all currently known target lithologies, dominated by felsic rocks but lacking a discernable meteoritic component based on platinum group element abundances. The reworked suevite, directly overlain by lake sediments, is not only comparatively enriched in shocked minerals and impact glass spherules, but also contains the highest concentrations of Os, Ir, Ru, and Rh compared to other El'gygytgyn impactites. This is—to a lesser extent—the result of admixture of a mafic component, but more likely the signature of a chondritic meteoritic component. However, the highly siderophile element contribution from target material akin to the mafic blocks of the ICDP drill core to the impactites remains poorly constrained.

  7. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    Fault zones commonly have great effects on fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. During fault slip all the pores and small fractures that meet with the slip plane become interconnected so that the inner part of the fault, the fault core, consisting of breccia or gouge, may suddenly develop a very high permeability. This is evidenced, for example by networks of mineral veins in deeply eroded fault zones in palaeogeothermal fields. Inactive faults, however, may have low permeabilities and even act as flow barriers. In natural and man-made geothermal reservoirs, the orientation of fault zones in relation to the current stress field and their internal structure needs be known as accurately as possible. One reason is that the activity of the fault zone depends on its angle to the principal stress directions. Another reason is that the outer part of a fault zone, the damage zone, comprises numerous fractures of various sizes. Here we present field examples of faults, and associated joints and mineral veins, in palaeogeothermal fields, and potential host rocks for man-made geothermal reservoirs, respectively. We studied several localities of different stratigraphies, lithologies and tectonic settings: (1) 58 fault zones in 22 outcrops from Upper Carboniferous to Upper Cretaceous in the Northwest German Basin (siliciclastic, carbonate and volcanic rocks); (2) 16 fault zones in 9 outcrops in Lower Permian to Middle Triassic (mainly sandstone, limestone and granite) in the Upper Rhine Graben; and (3) 74 fault zones in two coastal sections of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic age (mudstones and limestone-marl alternations) in the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. (1) and (2) are outcrop analogues of geothermal reservoir horizons, (3) represent palaeogeothermal fields with mineral veins. The field studies in the Northwest German Basin (1) show pronounced differences between normal-fault zones in carbonate and clastic rocks. In carbonate rocks clear damage zones occur that are

  8. The utility of petroleum seismic exploration data in delineating structural features within salt anticlines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockton, S.L.; Balch, Alfred H.

    1978-01-01

    The Salt Valley anticline, in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, is under investigation for use as a location for storage of solid nuclear waste. Delineation of thin, nonsalt interbeds within the upper reaches of the salt body is extremely important because the nature and character of any such fluid- or gas-saturated horizons would be critical to the mode of emplacement of wastes into the structure. Analysis of 50 km of conventional seismic-reflection data, in the vicinity of the anticline, indicates that mapping of thin beds at shallow depths may well be possible using a specially designed adaptation of state-of-the-art seismic oil-exploration procedures. Computer ray-trace modeling of thin beds in salt reveals that the frequency and spatial resolution required to map the details of interbeds at shallow depths (less than 750 m) may be on the order of 500 Hz, with surface-spread lengths of less than 350 m. Consideration should be given to the burial of sources and receivers in order to attenuate surface noise and to record the desired high frequencies. Correlation of the seismic-reflection data with available well data and surface geology reveals the complex, structurally initiated diapir, whose upward flow was maintained by rapid contemporaneous deposition of continental clastic sediments on its flanks. Severe collapse faulting near the crests of these structures has distorted the seismic response. Evidence exists, however, that intrasalt thin beds of anhydrite, dolomite, and black shale are mappable on seismic record sections either as short, discontinuous reflected events or as amplitude anomalies that result from focusing of the reflected seismic energy by the thin beds; computer modeling of the folded interbeds confirms both of these as possible causes of seismic response from within the salt diapir. Prediction of the seismic signatures of the interbeds can be made from computer-model studies. Petroleum seismic-reflection data are unsatisfactory for

  9. Corrosion Behavior Of Potential Structural Materials For Use In Nitrate Salts Based Solar Thermal Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Kodi

    The increasing global demand for electricity is straining current resources of fossil fuels and placing increased pressure on the environment. The implementation of alternative sources of energy is paramount to satisfying global electricity demand while reducing reliance on fossil fuels and lessen the impact on the environment. Concentrated solar power (CSP) plants have the ability to harness solar energy at an efficiency not yet achieved by other technologies designed to convert solar energy to electricity. The problem of intermittency in power production seen with other renewable technologies can be virtually eliminated with the use of molten salt as a heat transfer fluid in CSP plants. Commercial and economic success of CSP plants requires operating at maximum efficiency and capacity which requires high temperature and material reliability. This study investigates the corrosion behavior of structural alloys and electrochemical testing in molten nitrate salts at three temperatures common to CSP plants. Corrosion behavior was evaluated using gravimetric and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analysis. Surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Surface oxide structure and chemistry was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical behavior of candidate structural alloys Alloy 4130, austenitic stainless steel 316, and super-austenitic Incoloy 800H was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization characteristics. It was observed that electrochemical evaluation of these candidate materials correlates well with the corrosion behavior observed from gravimetric and ICP-OES analysis. This study identifies that all three alloys exhibited acceptable corrosion in 300°C molten salt while elevated salt temperatures require the more corrosion resistant alloys, stainless steel 316 and 800H. Characterization of the sample

  10. Structure of a highly conserved domain of Rock1 required for Shroom-mediated regulation of cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Swarna; Das, Debamitra; Bauer, Robert J; Heroux, Annie; Zalewski, Jenna K; Heber, Simone; Dosunmu-Ogunbi, Atinuke M; Trakselis, Michael A; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D; Vandemark, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled coil containing protein kinase (Rho-kinase or Rock) is a well-defined determinant of actin organization and dynamics in most animal cells characterized to date. One of the primary effectors of Rock is non-muscle myosin II. Activation of Rock results in increased contractility of myosin II and subsequent changes in actin architecture and cell morphology. The regulation of Rock is thought to occur via autoinhibition of the kinase domain via intramolecular interactions between the N-terminus and the C-terminus of the kinase. This autoinhibited state can be relieved via proteolytic cleavage, binding of lipids to a Pleckstrin Homology domain near the C-terminus, or binding of GTP-bound RhoA to the central coiled-coil region of Rock. Recent work has identified the Shroom family of proteins as an additional regulator of Rock either at the level of cellular distribution or catalytic activity or both. The Shroom-Rock complex is conserved in most animals and is essential for the formation of the neural tube, eye, and gut in vertebrates. To address the mechanism by which Shroom and Rock interact, we have solved the structure of the coiled-coil region of Rock that binds to Shroom proteins. Consistent with other observations, the Shroom binding domain is a parallel coiled-coil dimer. Using biochemical approaches, we have identified a large patch of residues that contribute to Shrm binding. Their orientation suggests that there may be two independent Shrm binding sites on opposing faces of the coiled-coil region of Rock. Finally, we show that the binding surface is essential for Rock colocalization with Shroom and for Shroom-mediated changes in cell morphology.

  11. Genetic structural provinces and salt tectonics of the Cenozoic offshore US Gulf of Mexico: A preliminary analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peel, F.J.; Travis, C.J.; Hossack, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Structures in the Cenozoic section of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico margin are thin-skinned, gravity-driven, and powered by the deposition of sediment on the shelf and upper slope. Deformation driven by sedimentation takes the form of salt displacement (including diapirism, salt withdrawal, and salt canopy formation), plus seaward gravity spreading and sliding. Lateral flow of salt gives rise to the emplacement of large-scale salt canopies of different ages. Lateral tectonic movement of both sediment and salt results in linked systems on a wide range of scales. We identify four structural provinces that contain distinct groups of structural elements believed to be genetically related: (1) far-eastern Gulf, in which no major Cenozoic deformation is seen; (2) eastern Gulf, defined mainly by a middle-late Miocene linked system of extension and contraction; (3) central Gulf, in which Oligocene updip extension was absorbed within a preexisting giant salt canopy; and (4) western Gulf, defined by several Paleogene-middle Miocene linked systems of extension and contraction. The ages and extents of each linked system match the major foci of sediment input to the shelf.

  12. Structure-activity relationship for hydrophobic salts as viscosity-lowering excipients for concentrated solutions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng; Chen, Alvin; Nassar, Roger A; Helk, Bernhard; Mueller, Claudia; Tang, Yu; Gupta, Kapil; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2012-11-01

    To discover, elucidate the structure-activity relationship (SAR), and explore the mechanism of action of excipients able to drastically lower the viscosities of concentrated aqueous solutions of humanized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Salts prepared from hydrophobic cations and anions were dissolved into humanized MAbs solutions. Viscosities of the resulting solutions were measured as a function of the nature and concentration of the salts and MAbs. Even at moderate concentrations, some of the salts prepared herein were found to reduce over 10-fold the viscosities of concentrated aqueous solutions of several MAbs at room temperature. To be potent viscosity-lowering excipients, the ionic constituents of the salts must be hydrophobic, bulky, and aliphatic. A mechanistic hypothesis explaining the observed salt effects on MAb solutions' viscosities was proposed and verified.

  13. Temperature- and pressure-dependent structural transformation of methane hydrates in salt environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Donghoon; Cha, Minjun; Yang, Youjeong; Choi, Seunghyun; Woo, Yesol; Lee, Jong-Won; Ahn, Docheon; Im, Junhyuck; Lee, Yongjae; Han, Oc Hee; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the stability of volatile species and their compounds under various surface and subsurface conditions is of great importance in gaining insights into the formation and evolution of planetary and satellite bodies. We report the experimental results of the temperature- and pressure-dependent structural transformation of methane hydrates in salt environments using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and Raman spectroscopy. We find that under pressurized and concentrated brine solutions methane hydrate forms a mixture of type I clathrate hydrate, ice, and hydrated salts. Under a low-pressure condition, however, the methane hydrates are decomposed through a rapid sublimation of water molecules from the surface of hydrate crystals, while NaCl · 2H2O undergoes a phase transition into a crystal growth of NaCl via the migration of salt ions. In ambient pressure conditions, the methane hydrate is fully decomposed in brine solutions at temperatures above 252 K, the eutectic point of NaCl · 2H2O.

  14. Solvation structure around the Li(+) ion in succinonitrile-lithium salt plastic crystalline electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuneng; Deng, Gang-Hua; Ge, Chuanqi; Tian, Yuhuan; Wu, Guorong; Yang, Xueming; Zheng, Junrong; Yuan, Kaijun

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we discuss the study of solvation dynamics of lithium-succinonitrile (SN) plastic crystalline electrolytes by ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra indicated that the CN stretch of the Li(+) bound and unbound succinonitrile molecules in a same solution have distinct vibrational frequencies (2276 cm(-1)vs. 2253 cm(-1)). The frequency difference allowed us to measure the rotation decay times of solvent molecules bound and unbound to Li(+) ion. The Li(+) coordination number of the Li(+)-SN complex was found to be 2 in the plastic crystal phase (22 °C) and 2.5-3 in the liquid phase (80 °C), which is independent of the concentration (from 0.05 mol kg(-1) to 2 mol kg(-1)). The solvation structures along with DFT calculations of the Li(+)-SN complex have been discussed. In addition, the dissociation percentage of lithium salt was also determined. In 0.5 mol kg(-1) LiBF4-SN solutions at 80 °C, 60% ± 10% of the salt dissociates into Li(+), which is bound by 2 or 3 solvent molecules. In the 0.5 mol kg(-1) LiClO4-SN solutions at 80 °C, the salt dissociation ratio can be up to 90% ± 10%.

  15. Distribution and origin of igneous rocks from the landward slopes of the Mariana Trench: Implications for its structure and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, S.H.

    1983-09-10

    The landward slope of the Mariana Trench is composed largely of igneous rocks. Serpentinites and serpentinized ultramafic rocks occur at nearly all structural levels on the slope from depths of 8000 to 1200 m. Seamountlike features on the trench slope break are the surface expression of serpentinite diapirs. Cumulate and massive gabbros are found; several varieties of volcanic rocks are common including boninites, altered and metamorphosed basalts, andesites, and dacites. The chemical characteristics of the volcanic rocks indicate that nearly all are products of island arc volcanism. Together with the gabbros, these volcanic rocks represent what is probably a late Eocene arc complex. These rocks were probably the first volcanic products to result from the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Phillippine Sea plate; their exposure on the trench slope today implies a significant amount of tectonic erosion of the landward slope since Eocene time. Most of this removal of material appears to have occurred during the early stages of subduction. There are isolated occurrences on the landward slope of rock assemblages including alkalic basalts, chert, hyaloclastites, upper Cretaceous siliceous sediments, and shallow water limestones. These assemblages are very similar to rocks dredged from seamounts on the offshore flank of the trench, and their presence on the landward slope suggests that since the cessation of vigorous tectonic erosion, there has been episodic accretion of seamount fragments to the landward slope.

  16. Physical analog (centrifuge) model investigation of contrasting structural styles in the Salt Range and Potwar Plateau, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Shah; Dixon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We use scaled physical analog (centrifuge) modeling to investigate along- and across-strike structural variations in the Salt Range and Potwar Plateau of the Himalayan foreland fold-thrust belt of Pakistan. The models, composed of interlayered plasticine and silicone putty laminae, comprise four mechanical units representing the Neoproterozoic Salt Range Formation (basal detachment), Cambrian-Eocene carapace sequence, and Rawalpindi and Siwalik Groups (Neogene molasse), on a rigid base representing the Indian craton. Pre-cut ramps simulate basement faults with various structural geometries. A pre-existing north-dipping basement normal fault under the model foreland induces a frontal ramp and a prominent fault-bend-fold culmination, simulating the Salt Range. The ramp localizes displacement on a frontal thrust that occurs out-of-sequence with respect to other foreland folds and thrusts. With a frontal basement fault terminating to the east against a right-stepping, east-dipping lateral ramp, deformation propagates further south in the east; strata to the east of the lateral ramp are telescoped in ENE-trending detachment folds, fault-propagation folds and pop-up structures above a thick basal detachment (Salt Range Formation), in contrast to translated but less-deformed strata with E-W-trending Salt-Range structures to the west. The models are consistent with Salt Range-Potwar Plateau structural style contrasts being due to basement fault geometry and variation in detachment thickness.

  17. The rock components and structures of Archean greenstone belts: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. R.; Byerly, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the character and evolution of the Earth's early crust is derived from the studies of the rocks and structures in Archean greenstone belts. Ability to resolve the petrologic, sedimentological and structural histories of greenstone belts, however, hinges first on an ability to apply the concepts and procedures of classical stratigraphy. Unfortunately, early Precambrian greenstone terrains present particular problems to stratigraphic analysis. Many current controversies of greenstone belt petrogenesis, sedimentology, tectonics and evolution arise more from an inability to develop a clear stratigraphic picture of the belts than from ambiguities in interpretation. Four particular stratigraphic problems that afflict studies of Archean greenstone belts are considered: determination of facing directions, correlation of lithologic units, identification of primary lithologies and discrimination of stratigraphic versus structural contacts.

  18. Rocks and structure of the Quartz Spring area, northern Panamint Range, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, James Franklin

    1951-01-01

    The Quartz Spring area covers about 50 square miles in the northern part of the Panamint Range, Inyo County, California. It lies near the southwestern border of the Basin and Range Province. The paper describes the stratigraphy, igneous petrology, and the main structures of the area. The formations, as defined by the stratigraphy, and the structure are shown on a large scale topographic map and in structure sections. The stratigraphy, except for Quaternary deposits that cover about one-fourth of the area, consists of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks preponderantly dolomite and limestone, representing each system from Cambrian to Carboniferous, as outlined below. No surface of erosion (unconformity) has been recognized between any of the formations or systems within the area.

  19. Evaluation of ion mobility spectroscopy for determining charge-solvated versus salt-bridge structures of protonated trimers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Richard L; Williams, Evan R; Counterman, Anne E; Clemmer, David E

    2005-07-01

    The cross sections of five different protonated trimers consisting of two base molecules and trifluoroacetic acid were measured by using ion mobility spectrometry. The gas-phase basicities of these five base molecules span an 8-kcal/mol range. These cross sections are compared with those determined from candidate low-energy salt-bridge and charge-solvated structures identified by using molecular mechanics calculations using three different force fields: AMBER*, MMFF, and CHARMm. With AMBER*, the charge-solvated structures are all globular and the salt-bridge structures are all linear, whereas with CHARMm, these two forms of the protonated trimers can adopt either shape. Globular structures have smaller cross sections than linear structures. Conclusions about the structure of these protonated trimers are highly dependent on the force field used to generate low-energy candidate structures. With AMBER*, all of the trimers are consistent with salt-bridge structures, whereas with MMFF the measured cross sections are more consistent with charge-solvated structures, although the assignments are ambiguous for two of the protonated trimers. Conclusions based on structures generated by using CHARMm suggest a change in structure from charge-solvated to salt-bridge structures with increasing gas-phase basicity of the constituent bases, a result that is most consistent with structural conclusions based on blackbody infrared radiative dissociation experiments for these protonated trimers and theoretical calculations on the uncharged base-acid pairs.

  20. Retrogressive harmonic motion as structural and stylistic characteristic of pop-rock music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Paul S.

    The central issue addressed in this dissertation is that of progressive and retrogressive harmonic motion as it is utilized in the repertoire of pop-rock music. I believe that analysis in these terms may prove to be a valuable tool for the understanding of the structure, style and perception of this music. Throughout my study of this music, various patterns of progressive and retrogressive harmonic motions within a piece reveal a kind of musical character about it, a character on which much of a work's style, organization and extramusical nature often depends. Several influential theorists, especially Jean-Phillipe Rameau, Hugo Riemann, and Arnold Schoenberg, have addressed the issues of functional harmony and the nature of the motion between chords of a tonal harmonic space. After assessing these views, I have found that it is possible to differentiate between two fundamental types of harmonic motions. This difference, one that I believe is instrumental in characterizing pop-rock music, is the basis for the analytical perspective I wish to embrace. After establishing a method of evaluating tonal harmonic root motions in these terms, I wish to examine a corpus of this music in order to discover what a characterization of its harmonic motion may reveal about each piece. Determining this harmonic character may help to establish structural and stylistic traits for that piece, its genre, composer, period, or even its sociological purpose. Conclusions may then be drawn regarding the role these patterns play in defining musical style traits of pop-rock. Partly as a tool for serving the study mentioned above I develop a graphical method of accounting for root motion I name the tonal "Space-Plot"; This apparatus allows the analyst to measure several facets about the harmonic motion of the music, and to see a wide scope of relations in and around a diatonic key.

  1. Effects of Crowder Structure and Salt on DNA Mobility and Conformation in Crowded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyca, Stephanie M.; Robertson-Anderson, Rae M.

    Biological cells are crowded environments in which DNA must move through to perform specific functions. We study how the properties of crowded cell-like environments impact DNA dynamics by tracking individual 115 kbp ring and linear DNA in different crowded environments using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We determine the role of crowder structure and salt on DNA diffusion and conformation by measuring the mean-squared center-of-mass displacements, as well as the conformational shape, size, and fluctuations of each molecule. Previously, we used 10 and 500 kDa dextran as crowders and showed that mobility of both ring and linear DNA decreased exponentially with increased crowding, but rings compact while linear DNA elongate. These effects were dependent solely on the reduction in available volume for DNA rather than size or number of crowders. Here we use crowders of similar molecular weight, but different structure to dextran (10 kDa PEG and 400 kDa Ficoll). We find that DNA mobility reduction is independent of crowder structure and that ring and linear DNA undergo more significant compaction. Finally, we characterize the role of salt on DNA mobility and conformation to determine the relative roles of enthalpic versus entropic effects on crowding-induced DNA dynamics. This research was funded by the AFOSR Young Investigator Program, Grant No. FA95550-12-1-0315 and the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Scholarship Foundation.

  2. Discriminating exhumation models of ultra-high-pressure rocks in the Western Alps by structural record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury; Schmalholz, Stefam; Pleuger, Jan; Epard, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    Despite extensive research, the dynamics of tectonic nappes exhibiting high- and ultrahigh-pressure rocks [(U)HP] is still debated. We classify existing models for nappe formation into two types, and refer to them as the thrust and intrusion models. Classical thrust models approximate the orogen as a wedge with a rigid buttress behind and a subducting lithospheric slab beneath. The dominant process of nappe formation is thrusting (brittle and/or ductile) that generates a dominant top-to-the-foreland sense of shear. Thrust models can explain the imbricate nappe stacking and first-order structural observations in the Western Alps. However, in the last decades (U)HP rocks were found in nappes, and it is usually assumed that metamorphic pressure is a good indicator of maximum burial. In intrusion models, (U)HP rocks are subducted to mantle depths (>100 km) and return to crustal depths by buoyancy-driven or tectonically-forced flow. Intrusion models could reproduce the first-order patterns of P-T-t paths of the Western Alps. Nappe formation at such mantle depths cannot be explained by the thrust model; nappe intrusion from large depths into shallower areas seems more appropriate. This argument against thrust models, however, is solely based on the assumption that metamorphic pressure indicates maximum burial (assuming lithostatic pressure). This very assumption is the only argument in favour of the intrusion models. If, however, significant and positive deviations from lithostatic pressure existed during nappe formation, then (U)HP rocks would have been formed at significantly shallower depth, and thrust models could be applicable to the Western Alps reconciling both structural and P-T-t records. Discrimination between the two nappe-forming models can better be achieved by examining the absence of a particular structural record and not by evaluating the existing structural and P-T-t records. A fundamental kinematic (rheology and driving force independent) feature of the

  3. Shocked quartz and impact melt rock at the AMES structure, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.; Powell, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    The Ames structure in northwestern Oklahoma is evident in the form of a relatively circular, concentric, structural depression with a minimum diameter of approximately 15 km, on top of the Upper Ordovician Sylvan shale. The feature is covered by approximately 3000 m of sediments. It is marked by two concentric rims, an outer rim (comprising fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite) that is approximately 1.5-3 km wide, and an inner 'ring' structure that seems to be the collapsed remnant of a structural uplift that consists of brecciated Precambrian granite and Arbuckle dolomite. The crater, which is sealed by Middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale, acts as a structural trap for hydrocarbons and is of local economic importance. We have begun studies of samples from several drill cores. No characteristic shock features were found in basement granite and fragmental breccia samples from the URC Bland #1-33. In these samples, deformation was found only in the form of local cataclasis of quartz or feldspar minerals and localized, possibly shearing-related, annealing. New samples were received from the following drill holes: Gamman 1-34, Dorothy 1-19, James 1-20, Wayne 1-32, Dixon 2-18, and Lloyd 1-17. The samples comprised mainly granitic basement, brecciated granite, and sediments, and were studied by optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence analysis (major-element composition), and neutron activation analysis (trace-element composition). Breccias and melt breccias from the Gamman 1-24, Dixon 2-18, and Dorothy 1-19 drill holes were found to contain shocked quartz and K-feldspar with up to three sets of PDFs. The chemical composition of the fine-grained melt rock from Dorothy 1-19 is very similar to that of average granitic basement. The melt rock shows some differences in alkali contents and possibly some minor ad-mixture of dolomite; other melt rocks have a more pronounced carbonate component. Our findings confirm earlier reports of shocked quartz and provide further

  4. Partial and charge structure fonctions of monodisperse DNA fragments in salt free aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Maarel, J. R. C.; Groot, L. C. A.; Mandel, M.; Jesse, W.; Jannink, G.; Rodriguez, V.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the partial structure functions and the charge structure function are reported for an aqueous solution of monodisperse rodlike DNA fragments, without added simple salt. In the reciprocal space interval qgeqslant 0.075 Å^{-1}, the neutron scattering data can be fitted by the correlation functions derived from the exact solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation in the cell model. The fit is equally good for all partial structure functions as well as the charge structure function. The cell model seems to be appropriate for this kind of solution. On reconstitue la structure d'une solution aqueuse de fragments monodisperse d'ADN à l'aide des fonctions de structure partielles et de la fonction de structure de charge mesurées par diffusion des neutrons aux petits angles. Dans l'intervalle qgeqslant 0,075 Å^{-1}, les fonctions de corrélation calculées à partir de la solution exacte de l'équation de Poisson-Boltzmann et du modèle cellulaire, ajustent les données de l'expérience. Cela est vrai aussi bien pour chacune des fonctions de structure partielles que pour la fonction de structure de charge. Le modèle cellulaire semble donc être un modèle convenable pour ces solutions.

  5. Application of the hard and soft acids and bases concept to explain ligand coordination in double salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balarew, Christo; Duhlev, Rumen

    1984-11-01

    The coordination polyhedra in 43 double salt structures are examined. Each structure is formed by at least two kinds of polyhedra. The differences in the environment around the metal ions are explained using HSAB concept. The values of hardness for 25 cations are calculated according to Klopman. A factor χ = Hacid· Hbase, where H is the hardness value, is introduced. The value of this factor can be used as a criterion for the stability of the complexes. The possibilities which the χ factor gives in explaining ligand coordination in known structures as well as for predicting structures for double salts are illustrated.

  6. Impact-generated endolithic habitat within crystalline rocks of the Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pontefract, Alexandra; Osinski, Gordon R; Cockell, Charles S; Moore, Casey A; Moores, John E; Southam, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    The colonization of rocks by endolithic communities is an advantageous trait, especially in environments such as hot or cold deserts, where large temperature ranges, low water availability, and high-intensity ultraviolet radiation pose a significant challenge to survival and growth. On Mars, similar conditions (albeit more extreme) prevail. In these environments, meteorite impact structures could provide refuge for endolithic organisms. Though initially detrimental to biology, an impact event into a rocky body can favorably change the availability and habitability of a substrate for endolithic organisms, which are then able to (re)colonize microfractures and pore spaces created during the impact. Here, we show how shocked gneisses from the Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canada, offer significant refuge for endolithic communities. A total of 28 gneiss samples representing a range of shock states were analyzed, collected from in situ, stable field locations. For each sample, the top centimeter of rock was examined with confocal scanning laser microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and bright-field microscopy to investigate the relationship of biomass with shock level, which was found to correlate generally with increased shock state and particularly with increased porosity. We found that gneisses, which experienced pressures between 35 and 60 GPa, provide the most ideal habitat for endolithic organisms.

  7. Abating corrosion in highway structures due to sea or deicing salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Rick J.; Powers, Rodney G.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcing bars in concrete bridge structures due to the intrusion of chloride ions from seawater or de-icing salts affects many structures in the nation's highway system. Over the past decade cathodic protection has evolved as a promising technology for arresting corrosion. The development of materials, equipment, and methods for applying cathodic protection is in a dynamic state. Through cooperative efforts with academia, industry, and the engineering community, the Florida Deparment of Transportation has developed several innovative corrosion protection systems which incorporate technologies from a wide variety of specialty areas including telemetry, photovoltaics, polymers, and specialty components developed as part of the national defense program. This paper provides an overview of corrosion and cathodic protection technology and focuses on the potential for adaptation of existing technologies into preservation of highway bridge structures.

  8. Development of magnetic fabric in sedimentary rocks: insights from early compactional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lasanta, Cristina; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Casas, Antonio M.; Pérez-Lorente, Félix

    2013-07-01

    The timing of development of the magnetic fabric is a major issue in the application of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) as a strain marker. Analysis of AMS in unconcealed synsedimentary structures can be a sound approximation to this task. In this work, three types of early compactional structures (ECS) were studied by means of AMS, since they can help to understand the timing of development of the magnetic fabric. All three types of ECS are found in fine-grained detrital rocks (to avoid other influences such as palaeocurrents), claystones and marls of the Enciso Group within the Cameros Basin (NE Spain): dinosaur footprints, load structures due to differential compaction and dish-and-flame structures associated with fluid migration related to seismites. In addition, to determine possible influences of lithology on the magnetic fabric, different rock types (siltstones and limestones) were also sampled. In general, the influence of ECS results in scattering of the three magnetic axes, higher at the margins of the structure than at its centre. This fact suggests that ECS occurs during the development of the magnetic fabric, disturbing the incipient magnetic fabric stages, and strongly conditions its later evolution during diagenesis. The later homogeneous compaction process due to sedimentary load and physicochemical processes reorient the susceptibility carriers to some extent (i.e. the magnetic fabric is still under development), but not totally, since AMS still records the previous scattering due to ECS imprint. For the Enciso Group deposits, the magnetic fabric begins to develop at the earliest stages after deposition and it stops when diagenetic processes have finished.

  9. Rock Valley Source Physics Experiment Preparation: Earthquake Relocation and Attenuation Structure Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Walter, W. R.; Myers, S.; Pasyanos, M. E.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    ensure that we have the best possible locations for the 1993 Rock Valley earthquake sequence, and current ongoing microseismicity in the region, we are using the new Bayesloc multiple-event location algorithm (Myers et al., 2007; 2009) to improve hypocentral locations. Bayesloc formulates the location problem as a hierarchy of the traveltime model with travel time corrections, an arrival time model including picking errors, and a prior model for each parameter. Since these events occur on the NNSS, we have the ability to test and fine-tune regional relocation parameters using known locations of previous nuclear tests. In addition, in order to ensure that any SPE explosion is large enough to be recorded at the same regional stations as the original earthquake sequence over a reasonable frequency range, we are performing a seismic amplitude tomography. The tomography uses NNSS earthquake seismicity to determine local and near regional P and S-wave attenuation structure, allowing us to better predict signal-to-noise values for a variety of possible SPE scenarios. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-571335

  10. Structural and Functional Analysis of Transmembrane Segment IV of the Salt Tolerance Protein Sod2*

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Asad; Kemp, Grant; Lee, Brian; Alves, Claudia; Young, Howard; Sykes, Brian D.; Fliegel, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Sod2 is the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It provides salt tolerance by removing excess intracellular sodium (or lithium) in exchange for protons. We examined the role of amino acid residues of transmembrane segment IV (TM IV) (126FPQINFLGSLLIAGCITSTDPVLSALI152) in activity by using alanine scanning mutagenesis and examining salt tolerance in sod2-deficient S. pombe. Two amino acids were critical for function. Mutations T144A and V147A resulted in defective proteins that did not confer salt tolerance when reintroduced into S. pombe. Sod2 protein with other alanine mutations in TM IV had little or no effect. T144D and T144K mutant proteins were inactive; however, a T144S protein was functional and provided lithium, but not sodium, tolerance and transport. Analysis of sensitivity to trypsin indicated that the mutations caused a conformational change in the Sod2 protein. We expressed and purified TM IV (amino acids 125–154). NMR analysis yielded a model with two helical regions (amino acids 128–142 and 147–154) separated by an unwound region (amino acids 143–146). Molecular modeling of the entire Sod2 protein suggested that TM IV has a structure similar to that deduced by NMR analysis and an overall structure similar to that of Escherichia coli NhaA. TM IV of Sod2 has similarities to TM V of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Na+/H+ exchanger and TM VI of isoform 1 of mammalian Na+/H+ exchanger. TM IV of Sod2 is critical to transport and may be involved in cation binding or conformational changes of the protein. PMID:23836910

  11. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  12. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  13. Sliding and Rocking of Unanchored Components and Structures: Chapter 7.6 ASCE 4 Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Jensen

    2011-04-01

    Chapter 7.6 of ASCE 4-Rev 2, Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures: Standard and Commentary, provides updated guidance for analysis of rocking and sliding of unanchored structures and components subjected to seismic load. This guidance includes provisions both for simplified approximate energy-based approaches, and for detailed probabilistic time history analysis using nonlinear methods. Factors to be applied to the analytical results are also provided with the intent of ensuring achievement of the 80% non-exceedence probability target of the standard. The present paper surveys the published literature supporting these provisions. The results of available testing and analysis are compared to results produced by both simplified and probabilistic approaches. In addition, adequacy of the standard's provisions for analysis methods and factors is assessed. A comparison is made between the achieved level of conservatism and the standard's non-exceedence probability target.

  14. Mixed sodium nickel-manganese sulfates: Crystal structure relationships between hydrates and anhydrous salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Delyana M.; Zhecheva, Ekaterina N.; Kukeva, Rositsa R.; Markov, Pavel V.; Nihtianova, Diana D.; Stoyanova, Radostina K.

    2017-06-01

    The present contribution provides new structural and spectroscopic data on the formation of solid solutions between hydrated and dehydrated sulfate salts of sodium-nickel and sodium-manganese in a whole concentration range: Na2Ni1-xMnx(SO4)2·yH2O, 0≤ x≤1.0. Using powder XRD, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), IR and Raman spectroscopy it has been found that double sodium-nickel and sodium-manganese salts form solid solutions Na2Ni1-xMnx(SO4)2·4H2O with a blödite-type of structure within a broad concentration range of 0≤x≤0.49, while the manganese rich compositions Na2Ni1-xMnx(SO4)2·2H2O (0.97≤x≤1.0) crystallize in the kröhnkite-type of structure. The Ni-based blödites Na2Ni1-xMnx(SO4)2·4H2O dehydrate between 140 and 260 °C into anhydrous salts Na2Ni1-xMnx(SO4)2, 0≤ x≤0.44, with a structure where Ni1-xMnxO6 octahedra are bridged into pairs by edge- and corner sharing SO42- groups. Both TEM and EPR methods show that the Ni2+ and Mn2+ ions are homogenously distributed over three crystallographic positions of the large monoclinic cell. The dehydration of the kröhnkite phase Na2Ni1-xMnx(SO4)2·2H2O yields the alluaudite phase Na2+δMn2-δ/2(SO4)3, where the Na-to-Mn ratio decreases and all Ni2+ dopants are released from the structure. The process of the dehydration is discussed in terms of structural aspects taking into account the distortion degree of the Ni,MnO6 and SO4 polyhedra.

  15. A Trail of Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative abundances of sulfur (in the form of sulfur tri-oxide) and chlorine at three Meridiani Planum sites: soil measured in the small crater where Opportunity landed; the rock dubbed 'McKittrick' in the outcrop lining the inner edge of the crater; and the rock nicknamed 'Guadalupe,' also in the outcrop. The 'McKittrick' data shown here were taken both before and after the rover finished grinding the rock with its rock abrasion tool to expose fresh rock underneath. The 'Guadalupe' data were taken after the rover grounded the rock. After grinding both rocks, the sulfur abundance rose to high levels, nearly five times higher than that of the soil. This very high sulfur concentration reflects the heavy presence of sulfate salts (approximately 30 percent by weight) in the rocks. Chloride and bromide salts are also indicated. Such high levels of salts strongly suggest the rocks contain evaporite deposits, which form when water evaporates or ice sublimes into the atmosphere.

  16. A Trail of Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative abundances of sulfur (in the form of sulfur tri-oxide) and chlorine at three Meridiani Planum sites: soil measured in the small crater where Opportunity landed; the rock dubbed 'McKittrick' in the outcrop lining the inner edge of the crater; and the rock nicknamed 'Guadalupe,' also in the outcrop. The 'McKittrick' data shown here were taken both before and after the rover finished grinding the rock with its rock abrasion tool to expose fresh rock underneath. The 'Guadalupe' data were taken after the rover grounded the rock. After grinding both rocks, the sulfur abundance rose to high levels, nearly five times higher than that of the soil. This very high sulfur concentration reflects the heavy presence of sulfate salts (approximately 30 percent by weight) in the rocks. Chloride and bromide salts are also indicated. Such high levels of salts strongly suggest the rocks contain evaporite deposits, which form when water evaporates or ice sublimes into the atmosphere.

  17. From pre-salt sources to post-salt traps: A specific petroleum system in Congo coastal basin

    SciTech Connect

    Vernet, R.

    1995-08-01

    The Bas Congo basin extends from Gabon to Angola and is a prolific oil province where both pre-salt and post salt sources and reservoirs have been found. In the northern part of the basin referred to as the Congo coastal basin, the proven petroleum system is more specific: mature source rocks are found only in pre-salt series whereas by contrast 99 % proven hydrocarbon reserves am located in post-salt traps. Such a system is controlled by the following factors: Source rocks are mostly organic rich shales deposited in a restricted environment developed in a rift prior to the Atlantic Ocean opening; Migration from pre-salt sources to post-salt traps is finalized by local discontinuities of the regional salt layer acting otherwise as a tight seal; Post-salt reservoirs are either carbonates or sands desposited in the evolutive shelf margin developped during Upper Cretaceous; Geometric traps are linked to salt tectonics (mostly turtle-shaped structures); Regional shaly seals are related to transgressive shales best developped during high rise sea level time interval. Stratigraphically, the age of hydrocarbon fields trends are younger and younger from West to East: lower Albian in Nkossa, Upper Albian and lower Cenomanian in Likouala, Yanga, Sendji, Upper Cenomanian in Tchibouela, Turonian in Tchendo, Turanian and Senonian in Emeraude.

  18. Structure of the Western Gulf of Mexico Salt Canopy Surface Imaged by Regional 2D Multichannel Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, W. W.; Robla, V.; Emmet, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology of the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) shifts going from the smoother offshore Texas (TX) margin to the rugose central Louisiana (LA) offshore. This change is considered a reflection of the structure of mobile Jurassic salt residing within the margin sediment column. To test this hypothesis, the structure of the top of salt across the TX and western LA continental slopes has been imaged and compared to the bathymetry using a regional grid of 2D industry multichannel seismic data. The 2D data, provided by TGS, were analyzed using IHS Kingdom software. Prior studies, regional well data, and satellite gravity data were examined to support and constrain interpretations. Seafloor (SF) and top-of-salt (TOS) time picks from seismic profiles were gridded to make regional time-structure maps of these surfaces. Comparison of SF and TOS contours demonstrates the expected correlation. A closer inspection reveals that the preponderance of SF is coincident with the underlying highs and lows of the TOS and that the study area is characterized by a transition in salt morphology that corresponds to bathymetric expression. The western slope is dominated by large, shallow, circular, isolated salt bodies and the overlying seafloor is smooth with exception of large, circular high relief above nearly all of the interpreted salt structures. The TOS texture gradually changes going eastward where individual salt bodies increase in number and coalesce into large, shallow canopies of increasing rugosity. Again, the outline of the canopies, and many of the crests of the constitute salt bodies, are observable on the SF. Elongate salt structures dominate the north central and northeast study area, while a relatively continuous, highly rugged canopy spans the southern and outer margin of the slope. While some of the northern-most elongate bodies are less correlated with the SF, most are and the undulating relief of the canopy clearly translates to SF

  19. Evolution of the structural fault permeability in argillaceous rocks in a polyphased tectonic context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, J.; Peyaud, J. B.; Vergély, P.; Pagel, M.; Cabrera, J.

    Deep argillaceous formations have petrophysical and hydrodynamic properties favourable to long-term radioactive waste confinement (very low intrinsic permeability, high sorption capacity,…). However, these properties may be modified by the development of discontinuities in the host-rock. The tectonic activity is responsible on the one hand for creating the fractures and on the other hand for reactivating them. Today, the calcite crystallisations in faults give evidence of paleofluid flows during the tectonic deformation. The microstructural study shows that faults were alternately and temporarily impermeable, permeable or “semi-permeable” during the tectonic activity. These “hydraulic states” were controlled by the nature and the architecture of the microstructures and by variations in the petrophysical properties of the rock in the core zone (CZ) and damage zone (DZ) of the faults. Within DZ, the structural fault permeability evolution is associated with (1) microcracking and (2) a probable ductile behaviour of the shales. Within CZ, the structural fault permeability is associated with the development of cavities generated by (1) dilation, (2) shearing and openings in extensional stepover and (3) microcracking in pre-existing calcite fillings. During the tectonic evolution, the development of a new structural porosity both in CZ and DZ gave up the faults permeable. The crystallisation sealing of the total structural porosity gave up the faults impermeable. But, when only the CZ was sealed, the fault was “semi-permeable”. Finally, we show that (1) the fluid transfers occurred principally from the DZ to the CZ, (2) the DZ constituted a “storage zone” in fluids for the CZ, (3) the DZ then remained longer permeable than the CZ and became permeable with weaker stress intensity and (4) the sealed discontinuities constituted zones of weakness (fracture reactivation with or without shearing) in the argillaceous material.

  20. Geology and structure of diamond-bearing rocks of the Kokchetav massif (Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa F.; Braun, Tatjana V.; Sheshkel, Georgy G.; Podkuiko, Yuri A.

    1994-05-01

    Two crustal settings for microdiamond formation have been described from eclogite-bearing metamorphic areas: (1) the economic concentration of microdiamonds in metasedimentary gneisses and calc-silicate rocks (northern Kazakhstan); and (2) microdiamonds recently found in eclogite, garnet-pyroxenite and jadeitite from Dabie Shan Mountain, eastern China. The latter occurrence is interpreted to be the product of ultra-high-pressure metamorphism in a Mesozoic collision zone. There are, however, a number of discrepancies between the geological, structural and geochemical data for Kazakhstan microdiamond deposits and an interpretation in terms of a deep subduction zone model. The geodynamic setting of the Kokchetav massif can be defined as a continental rise prism environment related to a passive continental margin where rifting predominated during early Palaeozoic orogeny. The Kumdikol microdiamond province is closely associated with a tectonic melange zone involved in ductile to semi-ductile shearing abundant in graphite. Microdiamonds of the Kumdikol area have a dual setting in the rocks. They appear to be included not only in refractory garnet and zircon but also in almost all rock-forming minerals as biotite, phlogopite, diopside, quartz and secondary sericite-chlorite and sericite-chlorite-calcite aggregates after garnet, pyroxene and plagioclase (?), and in spite of "softness" of the host phases microdiamonds are well preserved. On the other hand, the ore body extends along the shear zone and high concentrations of the microdiamonds within it are distributed without any lithological control along the local S-C surfaces of the main Kumdikol strike-slip shear zone. This duality of microdiamond settings in absence of practically all ultra-high-pressure minerals except diamond itself, weakens the interpretation of this occurrence in terms of very deep subduction and very fast uplift and exhumation during 15-10 Ma according to recent geochronological data. These

  1. Recent Enhancements to the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    The Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of an anechoic room and a reverberant room, and may act as a transmission loss suite when test articles are mounted in a window connecting the two rooms. In the latter configuration, the reverberant room acts as the noise source side and the anechoic room as the receiver side. The noise generation system used for qualification testing in the reverberant room was previously shown to achieve a maximum overall sound pressure level of 141 dB. This is considered to be marginally adequate for generating sound pressure levels typically required for launch vehicle payload qualification testing. Recent enhancements to the noise generation system increased the maximum overall sound pressure level to 154 dB, through the use of two airstream modulators coupled to 35 Hz and 160 Hz horns. This paper documents the acoustic performance of the enhanced noise generation system for a variety of relevant test spectra. Additionally, it demonstrates the capability of the SALT facility to conduct transmission loss and absorption testing in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards, respectively. A few examples of test capabilities are shown and include transmission loss testing of simple unstiffened and built up structures and measurement of the diffuse field absorption coefficient of a fibrous acoustic blanket.

  2. Relating composition, structural order, entropy and transport in multi-component molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabes, B. Shadrack; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2012-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the LiF-BeF2 molten salt mixture are used to establish relationships between composition, structural order, entropy, and transport properties of multi-component ionic liquids. A sharp rise in tetrahedral order associated with formation of the fluoroberyllate network occurs for compositions with BeF2 concentrations greater than that of the Li2BeF4-BeF2 eutectic. The excess entropy of the liquid in this regime, within the pair correlation approximation, is strongly correlated with the local tetrahedral order. The different degree of participation of beryllium, fluorine, and lithium ions in the cooperative dynamics of the fluoroberyllate network can be related to the degree of deviation from Rosenfeld-type excess entropy scaling, with the lithium ions remaining essentially unaffected by the liquid state network. We demonstrate that the deviations from Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein behaviour emerge only in temperature-composition regimes where tetrahedral order strongly correlates with the pair entropy. Implications for understanding structure-property relationships in other ionic liquids, such as molten salts, oxide melts, and RTILs are considered.

  3. Self-assembly of ordered wurtzite/rock salt heterostructures—A new view on phase separation in Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O

    SciTech Connect

    Gries, K. I.; Vogel, S.; Straubinger, R.; Beyer, A.; Chernikov, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Volz, K.; Wassner, T. A.; Bruckbauer, J.; Häusler, I.; Laumer, B.; Kracht, M.; Heiliger, C.; Eickhoff, M.; Janek, J.

    2015-07-28

    The self-assembled formation of ordered, vertically stacked rocksalt/wurtzite Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O heterostructures by planar phase separation is shown. These heterostructures form quasi “natural” two-dimensional hetero-interfaces between the different phases upon annealing of MgO-oversaturated wurtzite Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on c-plane sapphire substrates. The optical absorption spectra show a red shift simultaneous with the appearance of a cubic phase upon annealing at temperatures between 900 °C and 1000 °C. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that these effects are caused by phase separation leading to the formation of a vertically ordered rock salt/wurtzite heterostructures. To explain these observations, we suggest a phase separation epitaxy model that considers this process being initiated by the formation of a cubic (Mg,Zn)Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel layer at the interface to the sapphire substrate, acting as a planar seed for the epitaxial precipitation of rock salt Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O. The equilibrium fraction x of magnesium in the resulting wurtzite (rock salt) layers is approximately 0.15 (0.85), independent of the MgO content of the as-grown layer and determined by the annealing temperature. This model is confirmed by photoluminescence analysis of the resulting layer systems after different annealing temperatures. In addition, we show that the thermal annealing process results in a significant reduction in the density of edge- and screw-type dislocations, providing the possibility to fabricate high quality templates for quasi-homoepitaxial growth.

  4. Structural evolution of lamprophyric dikes in Lailai, northeastern coast of Taiwan, deduced from mesoscopic structures in dikes and country rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Cian-Siang; Huang, Wen-Jeng; Lo, Wei; Wang, Tzu-Bin; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2015-04-01

    Lamprophyric dikes are standing in right-stepping en echelon up to 2.3 meters high within the Oligocene Tatungshan formation on the Lai-Lai wave-cut platform in the northeastern coast of Taiwan. The marine platform composed mainly of argillite is the extension of Hsuehshan range, which has the tallest peak of 3,886 m high in Taiwan. The dikes formed at depth in the late Miocene of 9±1.1 Ma ago are exposed on the marine platform nowadays due to the exhumation and Penglai orogeny resulting from the collision of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate, which began in Pleistocene of 5-6 Ma ago. In consequence, folds, faults, joints and other structures are associated with them. In this study, the distribution of the dikes and fractures were mapped by conducting accurate surveys with a total station theodolite and orthorectifying aerial images taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle in different elevations. Electrical resistivity exploration was performed to decipher the arrangement of the dikes underground and the characteristics of the faults. The associated mesoscopic structures were delineated by mapping at a scale of 1: 40 in the field. We infer that the dikes was formed at depth of approximately 2.4 kilometers according to the thickness of overlaying sedimentary rocks formed from late Oligocene to late Miocene. Thus, it excludes the possibility that fractures existed before the lamprophyric magma intruded into the country rocks. Our observations help restore the original status of the current 19 dike segments. We conclude that the lamprophyric magma forcedly and vertically intruded into the Oligocene rocks and the direction change of maximum principle stress at depth of 2.4 kilometers resulted in three or more right-stepping en-echelon dikes.

  5. An engineering rock classification to evaluate seismic rock-fall susceptibility and its application to the Wasatch front

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, E.L.; Noble, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The authors examine the characteristics of rock slopes that make them susceptible to failures caused by earthquakes. They discuss these characteristics, namely the fracture and joint properties that define the structural behavior of a rock mass at the surface, and then present an empirical engineering classification or ranking system that rates the relative seismic susceptibility of rock masses. They next apply the engineering classification in a case study of seismically-triggered rock falls in the Mammoth Lakes area. The engineering classification is correlated with the concentration of seismically-triggered rock falls, and the resulting statistical model can be used to predict the probability of a rock fall for a given magnitude earthquake. Finally, they apply the classification and probability analysis to similar slopes in the Wasatch Range near Salt Lake City and evaluate the relative susceptibility of slopes in this area to seismically-induced failure.

  6. Progress in validation of structural codes for radioactive waste repository applications in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E. ); DeVries, K.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Over the last nine years, coordinated activities in laboratory database generation, constitutive model formulation, and numerical code capability development have led to an