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Sample records for rockwell international corporation

  1. Long life technology work at Rockwell International Space Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huzel, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents highlights of long-life technology oriented work performed at the Space Division of Rockwell International Corporation under contract to NASA. This effort included evaluation of Saturn V launch vehicle mechanical and electromechanical components for potential extended life capabilities, endurance tests, and accelerated aging experiments. A major aspect was evaluation of the components at the subassembly level (i.e., at the interface between moving surfaces) through in-depth wear analyses and assessments. Although some of this work is still in progress, preliminary conclusions are drawn and presented, together with the rationale for each. The paper concludes with a summary of the effort still remaining.

  2. Hydraulic model analysis of water distribution system, Rockwell International, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Perstein, J.; Castellano, J.A.

    1989-01-20

    Rockwell International requested an analysis of the existing plant site water supply distribution system at Rocky Flats, Colorado, to determine its adequacy. On September 26--29, 1988, Hughes Associates, Inc., Fire Protection Engineers, accompanied by Rocky Flats Fire Department engineers and suppression personnel, conducted water flow tests at the Rocky Flats plant site. Thirty-seven flows from various points throughout the plant site were taken on the existing domestic supply/fire main installation to assure comprehensive and thorough representation of the Rocky Flats water distribution system capability. The analysis was completed in four phases which are described, together with a summary of general conclusions and recommendations.

  3. Pulling Up the Drawbridge: A Case Study of Rockwell International's Public Response Policy Following the Destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, John A.

    This paper describes the contingent media relations policy employed by Rockwell International, the prime contractor of the United States space shuttle program, following the 1986 destruction of the Challenger, and evaluates that policy in terms of its utility to Rockwell and its impact on public dissemination of information about the shuttle…

  4. Rockwell Fails in Response to Shuttle Disaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the contingent media relations policy employed by Rockwell International, the prime contractor for the United States space shuttle program, following the January 28, 1986, destruction of the Challenger. Analyzes Rockwell's response through a theoretical model of crisis perception and Rockwell's policy in relation to the mass media. (MS)

  5. PHOTOGRAPHER BY KSC ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL TECHNICIANS MOUNT SOME OF THE NEARLY 8,000 CERAMIC-COATED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    PHOTOGRAPHER BY KSC ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL TECHNICIANS MOUNT SOME OF THE NEARLY 8,000 CERAMIC-COATED TILES THAT REMAIN TO BE INSTALLED ON THE EXTERNAL SURFACES OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER COLUMBIA TO COMPLETE THE THERMAL PROTECTION SYSTEM THAT WILL ABSORB THE INTENSE HEAT OF REENTERING THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE AFTER A MISSION IN SPACE. TILE INSTALLATION IS DONE ON AN AROUND-THE-CLOCK BASIS IN THE ORBITER PROCESSING FACILITY WHERE COLUMBIA, THE FIRST IN A NEW BREED OF MANNED, REUSABLE SPACECRAFT, IS BEING READIED FOR THE FIRST LAUNCH OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE LATER THIS YEAR.

  6. Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

    1992-01-01

    As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations

  7. Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

    As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations

  8. A New Way of Doing Business: Reusable Launch Vehicle Advanced Thermal Protection Systems Technology Development: NASA Ames and Rockwell International Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Carol W.; Fleming, Mary; Hogenson, Pete; Green, Michael J.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and Rockwell International are partners in a Cooperative Agreement (CA) for the development of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Technology Program. This Cooperative Agreement is a 30 month effort focused on transferring NASA innovations to Rockwell and working as partners to advance the state-of-the-art in several TPS areas. The use of a Cooperative Agreement is a new way of doing business for NASA and Industry which eliminates the traditional customer/contractor relationship and replaces it with a NASA/Industry partnership.

  9. Evaluation of the Rockwell International flash-hydroliquefaction process. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Sirohi, V.P.

    1980-09-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, UOP/SDC has evaluated the Rockwell Hydroliquefaction Process to determine the adequacy of the existing PDU data base and to assess the practicability and operability of the process. UOP/SDC conducted nine studies. Their findings follow: (1) A complete designed set of experiments must be run on the present PDU to make possible satisfactory analysis of the effects of variables especially the effect of diluents in the H/sub 2/ feed and the possibility of carbon deposition problems. (2) Basic improvements in the equipment and operation of the PDU should first be made (Ten specific recommendations are made). (3) A reactor design concept must be developed that looks feasible for design, fabrication, and operation. (4) A conceptual commercial design and economics should be prepared based on a realistic set of design bases and criteria. (5) If the above are accomplished successfully with attractive results, then and only then: (a) A study should be made of the refining requirements of the product, which are expected to be expensive based on the H/C ratio. (b) The PDU should be modified for continuous runs of up to one month to: Confirm the data correlations, estimate the reliability of the reactor and process, adhere to the requirements stated above, test cryogenic gas separation, study fouling and erosion, study lockhopper feeding, establish initial reliability of the coal injector and precombustion assembly head, collect scale-up and design data, and conduct a materials study and confirm materials choices. (c) Determine particle size of the char and of the solids in the oil product, the degree to which they may be separated, and how the ash should be removed from the product oil.

  10. Thermal protection system gap heating rates of the Rockwell International flat plate heat transfer model (OH2A/OH2B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.; Grifall, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer data for the Rockwell International Flat Plate Thermocouple Model are presented. The model simulated the Space Shuttle Vehicle Thermal Protection System. Data were recorded for locations in and around various size gaps for various gap orientation configurations. The test was conducted at Mach 5.1 for free-stream Reynolds number per foot values from 500,000 to 1,500,000.

  11. Heat transfer phase change paint test (OH-42) of a Rockwell International SSV orbiter in the NASA/LRC Mach 8 variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Creel, T. R., Jr.; Lawing, P.; Quan, M.; Dye, W.; Cummings, J.; Gorowitz, H.; Craig, C.; Rich, G.

    1973-01-01

    Phase change paint tests of a Rockwell International .00593-scale space shuttle orbiter were conducted in the Langley Research Center's Variable Density Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to determine the effects of various wing/underbody configurations on the aerodynamic heating rates and boundary layer transition during simulated entry conditions. Several models were constructed. Each varied from the other in either wing cuff radius, airfoil thickness, or wing-fuselage underbody blending. Two ventral fins were glued to the fuselage underside of one model to test the interference heating effects. Simulated Mach 8 entry data were obtained for each configuration at angles of attack ranging from 25 to 40 deg, and a Reynolds number variation of one million to eight million. Elevon, bodyflap, and rudder flare deflections were tested. Oil flow visualization and Schlieren photographs were obtained to aid in reducing the phase change paint data as well as to observe the flow patterns peculiar to each configuration.

  12. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  13. Data report for tests on the heat transfer effects of the 0.0175 scale Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle model 22-OT in the AEDC 50 inch B wind tunnel (0H4B), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Grifall, W. J.; Martindale, W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel heat transfer tests of 0.0175-scale Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle configurations for orbiter alone, tank alone, and orbiter plus external tank are presented. Body flap shielding of SSME's during simulated entry was investigated. The tests were conducted at Mach 8 for thirteen Reynolds number.

  14. Results of tests in the MSFC 14 x 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel on a .004 scale model of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle 3, (integrated configuration)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C.; Hamiliton, T.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted during mid-July, 1973 on a .004 scale model of the Rockwell International integrated configuration Space Shuttle Vehicle 3. The purpose of the tests was three fold: (1) to determine the static stability characteristics of the integrated vehicle, utilizing the Vehicle 3 orbiter configuration; (2) to determine the effect of interstage structure and tank external fuel lines on the integrated vehicle aerodynamic characteristics; (3) to determine the effects of the aft interstage structure on orbiter aerodynamic loads. Data were recorded on the integrated vehicle (test no. 579) at angles of attack and sideslip ranging from -10 deg to 10 deg over a Mach number schedule from 0.6 to 4.96. Data were obtained on the orbiter alone in the presence of the external tank with SRB attached (test no. 580) at angles of attack from -10 deg to 10 deg over a Mach number range from .6 to 1.96. Plotted data are presented in the body axis system.

  15. Data report for tests on the heat transfer effects of the 0.0175-scale Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle model 22-OT in the AEDC 50-inch B wind tunnel (OH4B), volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Grifall, W. J.; Martindale, W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel heat transfer tests of 0.0175-scale Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle configurations for orbiter alone, tank alone, and orbiter plus external tank are presented. Body flap shielding of SSME's during simulated entry was also investigated. The tests were conducted at Mach 8 for thirteen Reynolds number per foot values ranging from 0.5 million to 3.72 million.

  16. Teaching with a Fictitious International Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greanian, George; Windsor, Duane

    1985-01-01

    How a fictitious international corporation is used to train managers in comparative governmental and legal processes is described. Masters of business and public management students are exposed to the simulated operation of an international firm that integrates the economic, market, legal, and political environments of managerial decision making.…

  17. Technology transfer and Rockwell International

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernand, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Two technology partnership models are presented for consideration. The first model posits a government buyer of technology, and the second model posits that the customer is the consumer of the technology. These two models are concerned with methods of and impediments to technology transfer and information dissemination in government/contractor relationships.

  18. Endeavour, OV-105, forward flight deck controls during Rockwell manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, forward flight deck controls are documented during manufacture, assembly, and checkout at North American Rockwell facilities Building 150, Palmdale, California. Overall view looks from aft flight deck forward showing displays and controls with panel F7 CRT screens lit and window shades in place on W2, W3, W4, W5. OV-105 is undergoing final touches prior to rollout and a scheduled flight for STS-49. View was included as part of Rockwell International (RI) Submittal No. 40 (STS 87-0342-40) with alternate number A901207 R-16/NAS9-17800.

  19. Investigation of space shuttle vehicle 140C configuration orbiter (model 16-0) wheel well pressure loads in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11 foot wind tunnel (OA143)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a sting mounted .0405-scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter configuration in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11.00 foot low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to define the orbiter wheel well pressure loading and its effects on landing gear thermal insulation and to investigate the pressure environment experienced by both the horizontal flight nose probe and air vent door probes. Steady state and dynamic pressure values were recorded in the orbiter nose gear well, left main landing gear well, horizontal flight nose probe, and both left and right air vent door probe. All steady state pressure levels were measured by Statham differential pressure transducers while dynamic pressure levels were recorded by Kulite high frequency response pressure sensors.

  20. International Corporate Responsibility and MBA Programs: Using an Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herremans, Irene M.; Murch, Ron

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an experiential learning situation that can successfully integrate corporate values and international growth in masters in business administration programs. Focuses on a teaching technique that emphasizes the realistic challenges that corporations face when growing an international company built on a strong ethical foundation. (Author/DB)

  1. 75 FR 20388 - International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology..., applicable to workers of International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business..., New York, location of International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services...

  2. Wind tunnel test of the 0.015-scale Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the Ames 6 by 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel. [to determine longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Dziubala, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental investigations were performed in a 6- by 6-Foot Supersonic wind tunnel on a 0.015-scale model of the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle (SSV) 2A orbiter. The purpose of the test was to investigate the longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of the vehicle. In addition, hinge moments were measured on the rudder and elevons. Buffet onset was investigated using wing trailing edge pressures and a strain gauge instrumented panel mounted in the wing. The model was tested through a Mach range from 0.6 to 2.0 at a constant unit Reynolds number of 2.5 million. Pitch runs were made at angles of attack from minus 2 deg to +26 deg with beta = 0 deg and 5 deg; yaw runs were made in the range from minus 5 deg to 10 deg of sideslip at angles of attack of 0 deg and 10 deg. Static pressures were measured at the fuselage base and the trailing edges of the wing and rudder. Boundary layer transition was fixed for some runs using distributed roughness strips.

  3. Results of investigations of an 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration (model 72-OTS) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/Langley Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Langley unitary plan wind tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of the 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle. The primary test objectives were to obtain: (1) six component force and moment data for the mated vehicle at subsonic and transonic conditions, (2) effects of configuration build-up, (3) effects of protuberances, ET/orbiter fairings and attach structures, and (4) elevon deflection effects on wing bending moment. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.86, 3.9, and 4.63 at a nominal Reynolds number of 20 to the 6th power per foot. Selected configurations were tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbiter, wing bending, and torsion coefficients were measured on the right wing.

  4. Investigation of space shuttle orbiter subsonic stability and control characteristics and determination of control surface hinge moments in the Rockwell International low speed wind tunnel (OA37)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a string-mounted 0.030 scale representation of the 140A/B space shuttle orbiter in the 7.75- by 11-foot low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to establish basic longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control characteristics for the basic configuration plus control surface hinge moments. Aerodynamic force and moment data were measured in the body axis system by an internally mounted, six-component strain gage balance. Additional configurations investigated were sealed rudder hingeline gaps, sealed elevon gaps and compartmentized speedbrakes.

  5. Results of tests of a Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (-139 configuration) 0.0175-scale model (no. 29-0) in AEDC tunnel F to determine hypersonic heating effects (OH11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, M.

    1975-01-01

    Results from wind tunnel tests to determine hypersonic aerodynamic heating rates on a NASA/Rockwell Space Shuttle Orbiter are reported. The tests were to determine Mach number effects, if any, and to obtain overall heating rate data at high Mach numbers from 10.5 to 16. The model used was a 0.0175-scale model built to Rockwell Orbiter lines VL70-000139. The model identity number is 29-0. These tests, designated OH11, were conducted in the AEDC Tunnel F.

  6. American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Norman Rockwell was the quintessential painter of American life. His images reflect the history of America as told through the eyes of this idealistic and patriotic artist who sought to show America at its best, and to present the lives, hopes and dreams of the average American in the middle-20th century. Few artists have produced so many images…

  7. 75 FR 15739 - International Business Machines Corporation: Armonk, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines Corporation: Armonk, NY; Notice of... Business Machines Corporation, Armonk, New York. The petitioning group of workers is covered by...

  8. ASTP symbolic painting by Bert Winthrop of Rockwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) symbolic painting by artist Bert Winthrop of Rockwell International Space Division, Downey, California. The artwork is composed of the ASTP mission insignia, the docked Apollo-Soyuz spacecraft, and portraits of the five ASTP prime crewmen, all superimposed against the Earth's sphere in the center of the picture. The launches of both the American ASTP space vehicle (on left) and the Soviet ASTP space vehicle are depicted in the lower right corner. The five crewmen are, clockwise from the ASTP emblem, Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander of the American crew; Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot of the American crew; Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American crew; Cosmonaut Valeriy N. Kubasov, engineer on the Soviet crew; and Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, commander of the Soviet crew.

  9. 75 FR 26794 - Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena Park, CA; Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC, and... 12, 2010, applicable to workers of Alticor, Inc., including Access Business Group International...

  10. 76 FR 45878 - Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena Park, CA; Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and..., Ada, MI; Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway...

  11. 75 FR 32221 - Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International, LLC, and Amway Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International, LLC, and..., applicable to workers of Alticor, Inc., including Access Business Group International, LLC and Amway... location of Alticor, Inc., including Access Business Group International, LLC and Amway Corporation....

  12. Piezoelectric Actuator/Sensor Technology at Rockwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, Ratnakar R.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the state-of-the art of piezoelectric materials based on perovskite and tungsten bronze families for sensor, actuator and smart structure applications. The microstructural defects in these materials have been eliminated to a large extent and the resulting materials exhibit exceedingly high performance for various applications. The performance of Rockwell actuators/sensors is at least 3 times better than commercially available products. These high performance actuators are being incorporated into various applications including, DOD, NASA and commercial. The multilayer actuator stacks fabricated from our piezoceramics are advantageous for sensing and high capacitance applications. In this presentation, we will describe the use of our high performance piezo-ceramics for actuators and sensors, including multilayer stacks and composite structures.

  13. 76 FR 46853 - International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Federal Register on May 28, 2010 (75 FR 30067). At the request of workers, the Department reviewed the... Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit... States Reporting to Armonk, NY; International Business Machines Corporation, Web Strategy and...

  14. The International Finance Corporation and financing of sustainable energy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest multilateral source of loan and equity financing for private sector projects in the developing world. IFC participates in an investment only when it can make a special contribution that complements the role of market operators. Since its founding 40 years ago, IFC has provided more than $18.8 billion in financing for 1,706 companies in developing countries. Its share capital is provided by its 170 member countries, which collectively determine its policies and activities. Strong shareholder support and a substantial paid-in capital base have allowed IFC to raise funds for its lending activities through its triple-A rated bond issues in international financial markets. IFC created an Infrastructure Department in 1992 in response to the growing demand for its services in this area. During fiscal 1996 IFC approved 33 projects for new investments of $715 million of which 27% were in the power sector. In recognition of the continuing demand growth for private power investments an expanded Power Department has been formed to handle IFC`s investments in electric power generation projects using renewable resources such as: run-of-the-river hydro, geothermal, biomass cogeneration, wind energy, and solar (photovoltaic, solar thermal, etc.), as well as conventional thermal generation projects, transmission and distribution projects, and energy efficiency investments.

  15. Corporate Imaging: Teaching Communication Strategies for Reaching Internal and External Publics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaulard, Joan Marie

    A corporation's image is a powerful persuasive tool for reaching external publics such as competitors, regulators, and prospective employees. Corporations should avoid disparities between the actual and the desired image, as well as disparities between the external perception and the internal perception of employees. A course was developed at…

  16. 77 FR 38802 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Standex International Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Standex International Corporation AGENCY... a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning the Trinity... hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning...

  17. 75 FR 78238 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... Its Identified Subcontractors AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has authorized its contractor, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of San Diego, CA, and Its Identified Subcontractors, to access information which has been submitted to EPA...

  18. Norman Rockwell's "Man's First Step On The Moon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy

    2011-05-01

    Rockwell's painting, which appeared in the January 10, 1967 issue of Look magazine, is perhaps the most famous ever done of an astronaut's first step on the Moon. But it has a number of astronomical misconceptions, many of which are apparent to sharp-eyed introductory astronomy students: the size of the Earth in the lunar sky is too large compared to the Big Dipper, the orbiting Command Service Module is illuminated from a different direction than the Earth is, and the lighting on the lunar surface is also inconsistent, among other errors. This raises the question: How could Rockwell, a notoriously meticulous illustrator, have apparently been so careless? It turns out that Rockwell was anything but careless, but rather was typically obsessive about every detail in the painting. He was in constant communication with experts, even traveling to Huston to meet with NASA officials. He went so far as to enlist the help of space artist Pierre Mion, who ended up doing part of the painting, one of only two known collaborations between Rockwell and another artist. When the Look article was published, readers responded with praise but also criticism about the technical errors that still slipped through, to Rockwell's great frustration. The most important part of the painting, however, is accurate and compelling: the astronaut is shown stepping off the LM exactly as Neil Armstrong would do over two years later. The astronaut's boot covers part of the shadow that it casts. Does the shadow run all the way to the heel, or is the boot poised just above the lunar surface? Has the artist captured the instant after, or, perhaps, the instant before, humanity's first contact with another world? I am grateful to the curators at the Norman Rockwell Museum Archives for their assistance.

  19. Creative Associates International: Corporate Education and "Democracy Promotion" in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how global corporate education initiatives, though profit-motivated, sometimes function both as an instrument of foreign policy and as a manifestation of a broader imperial project. According to neoconservative scholars, as well as their critics, the events of September 11, 2001, allowed the implementation of pre-made…

  20. STS-65 Payload Specialist Mukai in LES with Rockwell's Scott Gill at WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, outfitted in a launch and entry suit (LES) and clamshell helmet, is assisted by Rockwell's Charles S. Gill prior to a launch emergency egress training (bailout) exercise at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Mukai was joined by six NASA astronauts for the training session. Mukai, representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA), along with the STS-65 crew will spend approximately two weeks aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year in support of the second International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission.

  1. Results of an investigation elevon hinge moments and dual panel elevon effectiveness using an .0405-scale model (16-0) of the configuration 140C space shuttle orbiter in the Rockwell International NAAL low speed wind tunnel (OA119B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a sting mounted .0405-scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter in a 7.75 x 11.00 foot low speed wind tunnel during the time period from August 22, 1974 to September 6, 1974. The primary test objectives were to define dual panel elevon/aileron effectiveness and to investigate elevon hinge-moments for the 140C orbiter configuration with wing/elevon upper hingeline sealing flapper doors. The elevon parametric variations, consisting of the basic elevons with 6 inch gaps and flapper doors, elevons with no flapper doors and completely open upper hingeline gap, and an entirely sealed solid elevon, were tested with elevon deflections from +20 to -35 deg at various aileron deflections. Aerodynamic force and moment data were measured in the body axis system by a 2.5 inch task type internal strain gage balance.

  2. 78 FR 28625 - American Airlines, a Subsidiary of AMR Corporation, Tulsa International Airport, Fleet Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... the Federal Register on March 26, 2013 (78 FR 18370). Pursuant to 29 CFR 90.18(c) reconsideration may... International Airport, Fleet Services Clerks, Tulsa, Oklahoma; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding... workers of American Airlines, a subsidiary of AMR Corporation, Tulsa International Airport, Fleet...

  3. Landing pressure loads of the 140A/B space shuttle orbiter (model 43-0) determined in the Rockwell International low speed wind tunnel (OA69), volume 1. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soard, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 0.0405 scale model of the -1404A/B configuration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Orbiter are presented. Pressure loads data were obtained from the orbiter in the landing configuration in the presence of the ground for structural strength analysis. This was accomplished by locating as many as 30 static pressure bugs at various locations on external model surfaces as each configuration was tested. A complete pressure loads survey was generated for each configuration by combining data from all bug locations, and these loads are described for the fuselage, wing, vertical tail, and landing gear doors. Aerodynamic force data was measured by a six component internal strain gage balance. This data was recorded to correct model angles of attack and sideslip for sting and balance deflections and to determine the aerodynamic effects of landing gear extension. All testing was conducted at a Mach number of 0.165 and a Reynolds number of 1.2 million per foot. Photographs of test configurations are shown.

  4. 76 FR 5834 - International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... York. The Department's notice was published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21355... 19, 2010 (75 FR 20388-20389). At the request of a company official, the Department reviewed the... Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines Corporation, Global...

  5. Self-Similarity Simplification Approaches for the Modeling and Analysis of Rockwell Hardness Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Zhou, Jack; Lau, Alan; Low, Samuel; deWit, Roland

    2002-01-01

    The indentation process of pressing a Rockwell diamond indenter into inelastic material has been studied to provide a means for the analysis, simulation and prediction of Rockwell hardness tests. The geometrical characteristics of the spheroconical-shaped Rockwell indenter are discussed and fit to a general function in a self-similar way. The complicated moving boundary problem in Rockwell hardness tests is simplified to an intermediate stationary one for a flat die indenter using principle of similarity and cumulative superposition approach. This method is applied to both strain hardening and strain rate dependent materials. The effects of different material properties and indenter geometries on the indentation depth are discussed. PMID:27446740

  6. 1985 NASA-Rockwell Space Station Crew Safety Study: results from Mir.

    PubMed

    Dudley-Rowley, M; Cohen, M M; Flores, P

    2004-01-01

    In 1985, Rockwell International (now Boeing--North American) completed the Space Station Crew Safety Alternatives Study for NASA. This five-volume study identified a wide range of potential safety threats and hazards that the crew might encounter on the future International Space Station. These threats included fire, explosion, collision, decompression, contamination, and radiation, among many others. One volume focused on the human factors aspects of safety, featuring the Crew Safety-Human Factors Interaction Model. In this model, a stressor (such as one of the threats) can lead to degraded performance, which can contribute to human error, unless appropriate and effective countermeasures are available to the crew. In 1986, the Soviet Union launched the Mir Space Station, the "second generation" that followed the Salyut series of space stations. The Mir was designed for a five-year life on orbit. It remained in use for fourteen years. During the first ten years, it performed well, with few safety issues. However, during the last four years, the aging station--operating at more than two times beyond its design lifetime--encountered a variety of safety hazards and human factors issues. Despite these often serious problems, the Mir crews always found a way to save the station, and no crew member was seriously injured or killed. This paper evaluates the safety record on Mir, and compares it to the NASA-Rockwell study, that was contemporaneous with the construction and launch of Mir. This comparison and analysis can provide a foundation for future space crew safety and related human factors support.

  7. The Bright Side of Corporate Diversification: Evidence from Internal Labor Markets

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    We document differences in human-capital deployment between diversified and focused firms. We find that diversified firms have higher labor productivity and that they redeploy labor to industries with better prospects in response to changing opportunities. The opportunities and incentives provided in internal labor markets in turn affect the development of workers' human capital. We find that workers more frequently transition to other industries in which their diversified firms operate and with smaller wage losses compared with workers in the open market, even when they leave their original firms. Overall, internal labor markets provide a bright side to corporate diversification. PMID:26924889

  8. Removal of Arsenic, Iron, Manganese, and Ammonia in Drinking Water: Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series Water Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series system was tested to verify its performance for the reduction of multiple contaminants including: arsenic, ammonia, iron, and manganese. The objectives of this verification, as operated under the conditions at the test si...

  9. Rockwell Hanford Operations effluents and solid waste burials during CY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    McNair, V.M.; Aldrich, R.C.; Cox, G.R.; Litzinger, M.H.; Meade, G.G.; Sliger, G.J.

    1983-06-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) activities generate solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes that must be discharged to the environment or stored or disposed of onsite. The quantities of solid, liquid, or gaseous wastes buried or discharged during CY 1982 are tabulated. No liquid or solid wastes are discharged offsite.

  10. Rockwell experience applications to Ames space station mockup habitability/productivity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebuck, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Rockwell experiences to assist NASA/Ames with planning for space station mockup studies is outlined. Mockup lessons from Rockwell spacecraft studies are reviewed. Typical and unique mockup technology applications are illustrated. Potential uses for space station mockups are given along with the areas of concern. Workstation design requirements are given.

  11. Unhappy with internal corporate search? : learn tips and tricks for building a controlled vocabulary ontology.

    SciTech Connect

    Arpin, Bettina Karin Schimanski; Jones, Brian S.; Bemesderfer, Joy; Ralph, Mark E.; Miller, Jennifer L

    2010-06-01

    Are your employees unhappy with internal corporate search? Frequent complaints include: too many results to sift through; results are unrelated/outdated; employees aren't sure which terms to search for. One way to improve intranet search is to implement a controlled vocabulary ontology. Employing this takes the guess work out of searching, makes search efficient and precise, educates employees about the lingo used within the corporation, and allows employees to contribute to the corpus of terms. It promotes internal corporate search to rival its superior sibling, internet search. We will cover our experiences, lessons learned, and conclusions from implementing a controlled vocabulary ontology at Sandia National Laboratories. The work focuses on construction of this ontology from the content perspective and the technical perspective. We'll discuss the following: (1) The tool we used to build a polyhierarchical taxonomy; (2) Examples of two methods of indexing the content: traditional 'back of the book' and folksonomy word-mapping; (3) Tips on how to build future search capabilities while building the basic controlled vocabulary; (4) How to implement the controlled vocabulary as an ontology that mimics Google's search suggestions; (5) Making the user experience more interactive and intuitive; and (6) Sorting suggestions based on preferred, alternate and related terms using SPARQL queries. In summary, future improvements will be presented, including permitting end-users to add, edit and remove terms, and filtering on different subject domains.

  12. A 4-node Bilinear Isoparametric Element in Rockwell NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, C.; Allison, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and evaluation of the Rockwell NASTRAN four node quadrilateral (QUAD4) element is presented. The element derivation utilizes bilinear isoparametric techniques both for membrane and bending characteristics. The QUAD4 element coordinate system, membrane properties, lumped mass matrix, and treatment of warping are based upon the COSMIC/NASTRAN QDMEMI element while the bending characteristics are based on a paper by T. J. R. Hughes. The effects of warping on the bending stiffness, consistent mass, and geometric stiffness are based upon a paper by R. H. MacNeal. Numerical integration is accomplished by Gaussian quadrature on a 2 x 2 grid. Practical user support features include variable element thickness, thermal analysis and layered composite material definitions.

  13. Corporate Characteristics and Internal Control Information Disclosure- Evidence from Annual Reports in 2009 of Listed Companies in Shenzhen Stock Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaowen, Song

    Under the research framework of internal control disclosure and combined the current economic situation, the paper empirically analyzes the relationship between corporate characteristics and internal control information disclosure. The paper selects 647 A share companies listed in Shenzhen Stock Exchanges in 2009 as a sample. The results show: (1) the companies with excellent performance and high liquidity tend to disclose more internal control information; (2) the companies with the high leverage and also issued B shares are not willing to disclosure internal control information; (3) the companies sizes and companies which have hired Four-big accounting firms have no significant effects on internal control disclosure.

  14. Patentability of Parthenogenic Stem Cells: International Stem Cell Corporation v. Comptroller General of Patents.

    PubMed

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-06-01

    The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has recently issued a ruling in Case C-364/13 International Stem Cell Corporation v. Comptroller General of Patents Designs and Tademarks (Case) that aims at harmonising the patenting practices regarding interpretation of Article 6.2.c of Directive 98/44/EC (Biotech Patent Directive) in respect of patentability of human parthenogenic stem cells (hpSCs). The Case alters the patenting regime for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) applications, by stating that moral restrictions against hESC-patents are only applicable to such cells derived from embryos that had the potential to develop into a human being. Consequently, hpSC-based inventions may be patentable in Europe. This Case represents a leap forward to striking a balance between protecting human dignity and integrity whilst granting patent incentives for biomedical research.

  15. 76 FR 20731 - RINO International Corporation; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... financial fraud at the company resigned on or about March 31, 2011, after reporting the results of their... materially different sets of corporate books and accounts. RINO is a Nevada corporation with its...

  16. 26 CFR 1.991-1 - Taxation of a domestic international sales corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... withholding of tax on nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and tax-free covenant bonds. See § 1.992-1... taxable year. For purposes of § 1.6012-2(a), such corporation is treated as not coming into...

  17. 26 CFR 1.991-1 - Taxation of a domestic international sales corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... withholding of tax on nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and tax-free covenant bonds. See § 1.992-1... taxable year. For purposes of § 1.6012-2(a), such corporation is treated as not coming into...

  18. 26 CFR 1.991-1 - Taxation of a domestic international sales corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... withholding of tax on nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and tax-free covenant bonds. See § 1.992-1... taxable year. For purposes of § 1.6012-2(a), such corporation is treated as not coming into...

  19. Sex Differences in the Reciprocal Relationships between Mild and Severe Corporal Punishment and Children's Internalizing Problem Behavior in a Chinese Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Xiaopei; Wang, Meifang

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the sex differences in the reciprocal relations between parental corporal punishment and child internalizing problem behavior in China. Four hundred fifty-four Chinese elementary school-age children completed measures of their parental corporal punishment toward them and their own internalizing problem behavior at…

  20. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-380-1957, York International Corporation, Madisonville, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, M.S.; Albrecht, W.N.; Blade, L.M.

    1989-04-01

    An investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at a facility of the York International Corporation in Madisonville, Kentucky. Workers were apparently exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) used to degrease parts which are assembled into tube and fin heat-exchange units for commercial and residential heat pumps. The coil department used 40 workers per shift, with three shifts working each day. Solvent degreasing was the commonly used cleaning method at this site. TCE concentrations in the breathing zones of workers in the coil department ranged from 31 to 38 parts per million (ppm) and averaged 34 ppm during the first day of the survey. The workers monitored included brazers, pushers, and coil handlers. One short-term potential exposure to greater than 100 ppm TCE was noted. All of the full shift exposures measured, except one, exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit of 25 ppm. Workers experienced headache, dizziness, nausea, sleepiness, and irritation of the eye, nose, and throat. During the evaluation, two of the workers were escorted from the site by the NIOSH medical officer because of severe, acute symptoms. The report recommends measures to bring the operation into agreement with the published guidelines for worker exposure to TCE.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-437-1818, Champion International Corporation, Hamilton, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Tubbs, R.L.

    1987-07-01

    In response to a request from employees at the Champion International Corporation paper mill located in Hamilton, Ohio, a study was made of possible excessive noise hazards arising in the small cutter area of the facility. One paper cutter, considered by workers to be louder than the others, was scheduled to have an enclosure installed for the rotary knife blade. Noise surveys were conducted in July before the installation and in November after the installation of the enclosure. Data gathered in July indicated noise levels of 108 decibels-A (dB-A), while the octave-band analysis demonstrated the majority of the sound energy to be in the midfrequency range from 250 to 4000 hertz (Hz). In November, tests showed the level to be 95dB-A with a corresponding decrease in the midfrequency sound intensities. Enclosing the rotary knife blade did reduce the potential for noise exposure, but noise measurements in excess of the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit of 85dB-A for an 8-hour day were common. The author concludes that a noise hazard existed in the small cutter area. The author recommends that engineering controls be continuously sought to further reduce the noise level from this particular machine. The use of nonmetallic drive gears should be considered, along with filling of the hollow knife blade cylinder with a lightweight acoustical material. An effective hearing-conservation program should be implemented and employees trained in the proper use of hearing protective devices.

  2. Norman Rockwell's "The Problem We All Live With:" Teaching "Bush v. Orleans Parish School Board"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    "The Problem We All Live With" is one of Norman Rockwell's most famous, and provocative, images. First printed in the January 14, 1964, issue of "Look" magazine, the image features an approximately six-year-old African American girl walking. She is wearing a white dress, white socks and white shoes. Her hair is parted in neat braids and she is…

  3. Visibility and Rhetoric: The Power of Visual Images in Norman Rockwell's Depictions of Civil Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Victoria; Zagacki, Kenneth S.

    2005-01-01

    This essay demonstrates how visual works of art may operate rhetorically to articulate public knowledge, to illustrate the moral challenges facing citizens, and to shape commemorative practices, through an analysis of Norman Rockwell's civil rights paintings of the 1960s. By examining the rhetorical aspects of these paintings, including their form…

  4. 26 CFR 1.991-1 - Taxation of a domestic international sales corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and tax-free covenant bonds. See § 1.992-1 for the definition of... as not coming into existence until the beginning of such first taxable year. (c) Effective date....

  5. 11 CFR 100.134 - Internal communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... administer the organization, pursuant to the organization's articles, bylaws, constitution or other formal... organizations, and membership organizations. 100.134 Section 100.134 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION... communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations. (a) General provision....

  6. 77 FR 76028 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Corporation (SAIC) of McLean, VA and its identified subcontractor, Impact Innovations Systems, Inc. (IIS), to...-35F-4461G, Order Number 1531, contractors SAIC of 1710 SAIC Drive, McLean, VA and IIS of 9720...

  7. 75 FR 26643 - Special Conditions: Rockwell Collins, Inc., Boeing Model 737-700/-700C/-800/-900 and -900ER...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... and -900ER Series Airplanes Equipped With Rockwell HGS- 4000 Head-Up Guidance System With Enhanced.../-700C/-800/-900 and -900ER series airplanes equipped with the Rockwell HGS-4000 Head-Up Guidance System... Guidance Systems modified by Rockwell Collins to add EVS functionality: 0 1. EVS imagery on the HUD...

  8. A Road-Map for Creating Efficient Corporate Internal Labor Markets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotorov, Rado; Hsu, Emily

    2002-01-01

    Free internal labor markets allowing internal mobility aid in retaining employees. To design effective internal markets requires understanding potential conflicts of interest, designing processes to resolve them, communicating with employees, and alleviating their concerns. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  9. The Impact of Corporate External and Internal Message Congruency upon the Acceptance of Employee Unethical Acts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Johnny I.; Leipzig, John S.

    A study examined public perceptions of unethical employee acts as a function of variations in a corporation's cultural image, with emphasis upon the effect of congruent and incongruent organizational messages upon the perception of the degree of unethicality. Subjects, 200 adults approached at public locations, were asked to: (1) read one of three…

  10. Innovation, Corporate Strategy, and Cultural Context: What Is the Mission for International Business Communication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulijn, Jan; O'Hair, Dan; Weggeman, Mathieu; Ledlow, Gerald; Hall, H. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Reviews relevant literature in the areas of communication and innovation and explores how efforts toward innovative practices are directly related to globalism and business strategy. Focuses on issues associated with national culture, corporate culture, and professional culture that are relevant to strategies for researching business communication…

  11. 11 CFR 100.134 - Internal communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 541, may serve as a guideline in determining whether individuals have policymaking... reported to the Commission on FEC Form 7 in accordance with 11 CFR 104.6. (b) Definition of labor... CFR 31.3401(c)-(1), of the corporation for the purpose of the collection of, and liability...

  12. 11 CFR 100.134 - Internal communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR part 541, may serve as a guideline in determining whether individuals have policymaking... reported to the Commission on FEC Form 7 in accordance with 11 CFR 104.6. (b) Definition of labor... CFR 31.3401(c)-(1), of the corporation for the purpose of the collection of, and liability...

  13. 11 CFR 100.134 - Internal communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CFR part 541, may serve as a guideline in determining whether individuals have policymaking... reported to the Commission on FEC Form 7 in accordance with 11 CFR 104.6. (b) Definition of labor... CFR 31.3401(c)-(1), of the corporation for the purpose of the collection of, and liability...

  14. 11 CFR 100.134 - Internal communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 541, may serve as a guideline in determining whether individuals have policymaking... reported to the Commission on FEC Form 7 in accordance with 11 CFR 104.6. (b) Definition of labor... CFR 31.3401(c)-(1), of the corporation for the purpose of the collection of, and liability...

  15. The 300-kV international submarine transmission line: Erie, Pennsylvania to Nanticoke, Ontario, Canada, General Public Utilities Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-05-01

    This final environmental impact statement (FEIS) was prepared by the Office of Energy Emergency Operations. The proposed action by the Department of Energy is the granting of a Presidential Permit for the construction, connection, operation, and maintenance of 69.6 kilometers (44 miles) of a +250 to +325 and -250 to -325 kilovolt (250 to 325 kV) transmission facility from the Erie West Substation to the international border. The proposed project will connect the General Public Utilities Corporation System with the Ontario Hydro System for the purpose of economic exchanges of power and increased reliability. Environmental impacts expected from construction and operation of the proposed Lake Erie Interconnection appear to be mainly transitory effects on aquatic life due to construction.

  16. EVALUATION REPORT SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION S-CAD CHEMICAL AGENT DETECTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC)Technology Testing and Evaluation Program (TTEP) is carrying out performance tests on homeland security technologies. Under TTEP, Battelle recently evaluated the performance of the Science Applications International Co...

  17. [Certification of internal medicine specialists in Chile by the autonomous corporation for certification of medical specialties].

    PubMed

    López M, José M

    2013-05-01

    Since 1984, 12.294 different medical specialists have been certified in Chile by the Autonomous Corporation for Certification of Medical Specialties (whose Spanish acronym is CONACEM). Infernal Medicine certification started in 1985, approving 1364 candidates thus far. Certification can be obtained in three ways. Sixty one percent of applicants were approved by a reputable university specialization program. Thirty five percent of applicants fulfilled the requirements of a five years practical training program and less than 5% were approved in a training program from another country which was validated in Chile. There are 13 university training programs for medical specialties, lasting three years each. These programs can receive a total of 110 students per year. Half of these programs are not carried out in Santiago. Applicants, who have not completed a certified university training program, must go through a five days practical examination. Since 2002 a written test was added, whose approval is a requisite to gain access to the practical examination. Sixty one percent of applicants have approved the theoretical test. Certifications last 10 years initially and seven years, there after. When certifications expire, a recertification mechanism is required, whose requirements are informed. According to the current legislation, certifications must be done by recognized accrediting agencies. CONACEM has been accepted by the authority and its definitive legal recognition should be a reality soon.

  18. Design and evaluation of Cities Service/Rockwell hydrogasification commercial plant

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, P.D.; Butt, N.M.; Sarma, K.R.

    1980-08-01

    This report covers a preliminary conceptual design and economic evaluation of a commercial scale plant capable of converting high-sulfur bituminous caking coal to a high-Btu pipeline quality SNG. The plant, which has a rated capacity of 250 Billion Btu per day SNG, is based on Cities Service/Rockwell hydrogasification technology. Two cases of plant design were examined to produce cost estimates accurate to +-25% in 1979 dollars. The base case, designed for moderate production of liquids (5.8% conversion of carbon to liquid product), has a cost of SNG of $4.43/MMBtu using the utility financing method (UFM) and $6.42/MMBtu using the discounted cash flow method (DCFM) of financing. The alternate case, zero liquids production, has gas costs of $5.00 (UFM) and $6.96 (DCFM). Further tests by Rockwell have indicated that 11.4% carbon conversion to liquid products (99% benzene) is possible. If the plant is scaled up to produce the same amoung of SNG with this increased yield of liquid, and if the value of the benzene produced is estimated to be $0.90 per gallon, the costs of gas for this case are $4.38/MMBtu (UFM) and $6,48/MMBtu (DCFM). If the value of benzene is taken as $2.00 per gallon, these costs become $3.14/MMBtu (UFM) and $5.23/MMBtu (DCFM). The economic assumptions involved in these calculations are detailed.

  19. Diode Characterization of Rockwell LWIR HgCdTe Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Candice; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Garnett, James D.

    2003-03-01

    Future infrared space missions will undoubtedly employ passively cooled focal planes (T ~ 30K), as well as passively cooled telescopes. Most long-wave detector arrays (e.g. Si:As IBC) require cooling to temperatures of ~ 6-8K. We have been working with Rockwell to produce 10μm cutoff HgCdTe detector arrays that, at temperatures of ~ 30K, exhibit sufficiently low dark current and sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency to be interesting for astronomy. In pursuit of these goals, Rockwell Scientific Company has delivered twelve 256 x 256 arrays (several of them engineering arrays), with cutoff wavelengths at 30K between 7.4 and 11μm for characterization at Rochester. Seven of these arrays utilize advanced structure diodes with differing capacitances arranged in rows (banded arrays), and the materials properties of the HgCdTe also vary significantly from array to array. Of ultimate interest to astronomy is the fraction of pixels with dark current below the target value of ~ 100e-/s with 10-60mV of actual reverse bias across the diodes at T ~ 30K. These arrays were developed for the purpose of selecting diode architecture: we use this fraction as one criterion for selection. We have determined from these experiments the optimal diode architecture for future array development. Measurement of the dark current as a function of reverse bias and temperature allows us to ascertain the extent to which trap-to-band tunneling dominates the dark current at this temperature. We present the results for one representative array, UR008.

  20. Effects of Internal Rhetoric on Management Response to External Issues: How Corporate Culture Failed the Asbestos Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates how corporate culture stifled adaptive efforts of strategic planners, operations managers, industrial hygienists, and issue monitors in the asbestos industry thereby leading it to the brink of bankruptcy. (MG)

  1. Rockwell Automation PLC-5 Lands Stennis Space Center with a Reliable, Flexible Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperson, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Ever since the first rocket was launched, people have been infatuated with the vast and unchartered frontier of space. Whether it's visiting a space center or watching a shuttle launch, people are waiting to see what will be discovered next. And even though orbiting the Earth or taking soil samples form the Moon now seems effortless, decades worth of behind-the-scenes work have helped the U.S. space program get to this point. Even today, NASA must take every precaution to ensure equipment is up to the endeavor of setting foot on the moon. As part of the initial push to put the first man on the moon, NASA established the John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi in 1961 for space engine propulsion system development. Today, Stennis has three major test complexes where engine and component testing is carried out and integrated into full motion systems for space shuttles and vehicles as well as secondary testing facilities. With different products being tested throughout the facilities, Stennis was in need of an automation system that could link the operations. By integrating a control system based on a Rockwell Automation's flexible and reliable PLC-5 controller, Stennis was able to implement projects more efficiently and focus its efforts on getting the next generation of products ready for space.

  2. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  3. Study of International Mentoring and Coaching Practices and Their Constructive Application in the Russian System of Corporate Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Shaidullina, Almira R.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research stems from dissimilarities between domestic and foreign experiences of mentoring and coaching in corporate education and training related to the methods and techniques aimed not only at transmitting mentor's professional experience to young professionals but also at identifying and developing mentees' potential, and…

  4. Tests of the Rockwell Si:As Back-Illuminated Blocked-Impurity Band (BIBIB) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, J.; Groezinger, U.; Burgdorf, M.; Salama, A.

    1989-01-01

    Two arrays of Rockwell's Si:As back-illuminated blocked-impurity-band detectors were tested at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) at low background and low temperature for possible use in the astronomical space experiment ISOPHOT. For these measurements special test equipment was put together. A cryostat was mechanically modified to accommodate the arrays and special peripheral electronics was added to a microprocessor system to drive the cold multiplexer and to acquire the output data. The first device, a 16x50 element array on a fan-out board was used to test individual pixels with a trans-impedance-amplifier at a photon background of 10(exp 8) Ph s(-1)cm(-2) and at temperatures of 2.7 to 4.4 K. The noise-equivalent-power NEP is in the range 5 - 7 x 10(exp -18) WHz(exp -1/2), the responsivity is less than or equal to 100 AW(exp -1)(f = 10 Hz). The second device was a 10x50 array including a cold readout electronics of switched FETs (SWIFET). Measurements of this array were done in a background range of 5 x 10(exp 5) to 5 x 10(exp 11) Ph s(exp-1)cm(exp-2) and at operating temperatures between 3.0 and 4.8 K. The NEP ranges from less than 10(exp -18) at the lowest background to 2 x 10(exp -16) WHz(exp -1/2) at the highest flux.

  5. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  6. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum. PMID:10179655

  7. Annealing of Co-Cr dental alloy: effects on nanostructure and Rockwell hardness

    PubMed Central

    Soylu, Elif Hilal; İde, Semra; Kılıç, Selim; Sipahi, Cumhur; Pişkin, Bulent; Gökçe, Hasan Suat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of annealing on the nanostructure and hardness of Co-Cr metal ceramic samples that were fabricated with a direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five groups of Co-Cr dental alloy samples were manufactured in a rectangular form measuring 4 × 2 × 2 mm. Samples fabricated by a conventional casting technique (Group I) and prefabricated milling blanks (Group II) were examined as conventional technique groups. The DMLS samples were randomly divided into three groups as not annealed (Group III), annealed in argon atmosphere (Group IV), or annealed in oxygen atmosphere (Group V). The nanostructure was examined with the small-angle X-ray scattering method. The Rockwell hardness test was used to measure the hardness changes in each group, and the means and standard deviations were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA for comparison of continuous variables and Tukey's HSD test was used for post hoc analysis. P values of <.05 were accepted as statistically significant. RESULTS The general nanostructures of the samples were composed of small spherical entities stacked atop one another in dendritic form. All groups also displayed different hardness values depending on the manufacturing technique. The annealing procedure and environment directly affected both the nanostructure and hardness of the Co-Cr alloy. Group III exhibited a non-homogeneous structure and increased hardness (48.16 ± 3.02 HRC) because the annealing process was incomplete and the inner stress was not relieved. Annealing in argon atmosphere of Group IV not only relieved the inner stresses but also decreased the hardness (27.40 ± 3.98 HRC). The results of fitting function presented that Group IV was the most homogeneous product as the minimum bilayer thickness was measured (7.11 Å). CONCLUSION After the manufacturing with DMLS technique, annealing in argon atmosphere is an essential process for Co-Cr metal ceramic

  8. The Secret Lives of Undergraduate International Business Students: An Analysis of Cross-Cultural Experience in Multinational Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson de Castaneda, Viann

    This study involved students majoring in business/economics and foreign language in an international business program. The students were participants in a semester-long international experience where students were integrated into a host university to learn about management, economics, and marketing from professors abroad, and in an internship in a…

  9. Solving large-scale dynamic systems using band Lanczos method in Rockwell NASTRAN on CRAY X-MP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V. K.; Zillmer, S. D.; Allison, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    The improved cost effectiveness using better models, more accurate and faster algorithms and large scale computing offers more representative dynamic analyses. The band Lanczos eigen-solution method was implemented in Rockwell's version of 1984 COSMIC-released NASTRAN finite element structural analysis computer program to effectively solve for structural vibration modes including those of large complex systems exceeding 10,000 degrees of freedom. The Lanczos vectors were re-orthogonalized locally using the Lanczos Method and globally using the modified Gram-Schmidt method for sweeping rigid-body modes and previously generated modes and Lanczos vectors. The truncated band matrix was solved for vibration frequencies and mode shapes using Givens rotations. Numerical examples are included to demonstrate the cost effectiveness and accuracy of the method as implemented in ROCKWELL NASTRAN. The CRAY version is based on RPK's COSMIC/NASTRAN. The band Lanczos method was more reliable and accurate and converged faster than the single vector Lanczos Method. The band Lanczos method was comparable to the subspace iteration method which was a block version of the inverse power method. However, the subspace matrix tended to be fully populated in the case of subspace iteration and not as sparse as a band matrix.

  10. Effect of external tank nose shape on the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle 3, integrated configuration (IA37B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Tests of several tank nose shapes were conducted as a part of the investigation of configuration changes to reduce drag for the integrated vehicle. The effect on the integrated vehicle aerodynamic characteristics of several tank nose shapes was investigated. The tank nose shapes investigated were the 600 inch (baseline) and 1204 inch radius ogives, and the 600 inch ogive plus a spike 360 inches long and 12.0 inches in diameter. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.6 through 4.96 and for angles-of-attack and sideslip from -10 through +10 degrees. The model used was the 0.004-scale integrated vehicle model number 34-OTS.

  11. 26 CFR 1.331-1 - Corporate liquidations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate liquidations. 1.331-1 Section 1.331-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporate Liquidations § 1.331-1 Corporate liquidations. (a) In general. Section 331 contains rules governing the...

  12. Corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Zolotor, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Corporal punishment is used for discipline in most homes in the United States. It is also associated with a long list of adverse developmental, behavioral, and health-related consequences. Primary care providers, as trusted sources for parenting information, have an opportunity to engage parents in discussions about discipline as early as infancy. These discussions should focus on building parents' skills in the use of other behavioral techniques, limiting (or eliminating) the use of corporal punishment and identifying additional resources as needed.

  13. 26 CFR 1.48-5 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.48-5... business corporations. (a) In general. (1) In the case of an electing small business corporation (as... business corporation. The bases of all new section 38 properties which have a useful life falling within...

  14. 26 CFR 1.47-4 - Electing small business corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporation. 1.47-4... business corporation. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of corporation. If an electing small business corporation (as defined in section 1371(b)) or a former electing small...

  15. 26 CFR 1.58-4 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.58-4... TAXES Tax Preference Regulations § 1.58-4 Electing small business corporations. (a) In general. Section... business corporation among the shareholders of such corporation. Section 58(d)(2) provides rules for...

  16. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3 Business of the corporation. (a) The business of a corporation is not merely that which it has...

  17. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3 Business of the corporation. (a) The business of a corporation is not merely that which it has...

  18. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a...)(2)(iii) (26 CFR revised as of April 1, 2006). The reduction in foreign income taxes paid or accrued... earnings to Corporation M, which Corporation M receives on January 20, 1992. Corporation M uses a...

  19. 77 FR 24380 - Treatment of Gain Recognized With Respect to Stock in Certain Foreign Corporations Upon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... Certain Foreign Corporations Upon Distributions AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... corporations upon distributions. The regulations finalize proposed regulations and remove temporary regulations that characterize gain recognized with respect to stock in foreign corporations upon distributions as...

  20. 26 CFR 1.1244(c)-2 - Small business corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Small business corporation defined. 1.1244(c)-2... § 1.1244(c)-2 Small business corporation defined. (a) In general. A corporation is treated as a small business corporation if it is a domestic corporation that satisfies the requirements described in...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1244(c)-2 - Small business corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Small business corporation defined. 1.1244(c)-2... § 1.1244(c)-2 Small business corporation defined. (a) In general. A corporation is treated as a small business corporation if it is a domestic corporation that satisfies the requirements described in...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1244(c)-2 - Small business corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Small business corporation defined. 1.1244(c)-2... § 1.1244(c)-2 Small business corporation defined. (a) In general. A corporation is treated as a small business corporation if it is a domestic corporation that satisfies the requirements described in...

  3. The Promotion of Bottle Feeding by Multinational Corporations: How Advertising and the Health Professions Have Contributed. Cornell International Nutritioon Monograph Series, Number 2 (1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Ted; Latham, Michael C., Ed.

    This report investigates the ways bottle feeding of infants is promoted by multinational corporations. Data were obtained from the following: (1) a survey of available infant food advertising in newspapers and magazines from developing countries; (2) a study of some interrelationships between the health professions and infant food companies,…

  4. Genetic stratigraphy and depositional systems of the upper Devonian-lower Mississippian Price-Rockwell deltaic complex in the central Appalachians, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerstedt, Thomas W.; Kammer, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    Rocks of the Price and Rockwell formations comprise the uppermost Devonian-Lower Mississippian deltaic complex in the central Appalachians. The Price Formation is dominantly marine and refers to all uppermost Devonian-Lower Mississippian rocks above either Hampshire Group red beds or the marine Greenland Gap Formation and below either the Greenbrier Limestone Group or Maccrady Formation red beds in the central Appalachians. The Rockwell Formation is dominantly non-marine and refers to equivalent rocks in south-central Pennsylvania and the Maryland-West Virginia panhandle region. Members of the Price Formation are generally equivalent to discrete genetic events. Price deposition was initiated in latest Devonian time when a regional transgression covered delta and alluvial plain facies of the Catskill deltaic complex with protected-bay and strandline facies of the Oswayo Member in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and western Maryland. Farther south, these transgressive facies overlie the Cloyd Conglomerate Member, a thin regressive-transgressive sedimentary wedge, and occur in the lower part of the Sunbury Shale Member. Subsurface Berea Sandstone deposition corresponded to regional exposure and erosion in the outcrop belt. This unconformable surface was overstepped in earliest Mississippian time by a major transgression that deposited a variably thick but persistent basal transgressive sandstone during shoreface retreat. Sandstones that have been referred to the "Cussewago Sandstone" in northern West Virginia and southwest Pennsylvania are part of this basal sandstone. Eastward, these sandstones thicken, coarsen and interbed with a polymictic diamictite at the base of the Rockwell Formation. Shaly facies of the earliest Mississippian transgression overlie the basal sandstone. The Riddlesburg Shale preserves offshore and open-bay facies in West Virginia that grade eastward to estuarine and restricted, back-bar lagoon and marsh facies of a barred-bay complex in south

  5. 26 CFR 1.471-9 - Inventories of acquiring corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventories of acquiring corporations. 1.471-9 Section 1.471-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Inventories § 1.471-9 Inventories of acquiring corporations....

  6. 26 CFR 1.472-7 - Inventories of acquiring corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventories of acquiring corporations. 1.472-7 Section 1.472-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Inventories § 1.472-7 Inventories of acquiring corporations....

  7. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1.537-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6111-2 - Confidential corporate tax shelters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidential corporate tax shelters. 301.6111-2....6111-2 Confidential corporate tax shelters. (a) In general. (1) Under section 6111(d) and this section, a confidential corporate tax shelter is treated as a tax shelter subject to the requirements...

  9. 26 CFR 1.970-1 - Export trade corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paragraph is $310, its export promotion expenses properly allocable to its export trade income which... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Export trade corporations. 1.970-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Export Trade Corporations § 1.970-1 Export trade corporations. (a)...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1368-1 - Distributions by S corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Distributions by S corporations. 1.1368-1... Distributions by S corporations. (a) In general. This section provides rules for distributions made by an S... by the shareholder. (c) S corporation with no earnings and profits. A distribution made by an...

  11. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  12. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section 904(d)(2)(E)(ii) and § 1.904-4(g)(2)(iii) (26 CFR revised as of April 1, 2006). The reduction in... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a... shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid by the foreign corporation. (a)...

  13. 26 CFR 1.312-10 - Allocation of earnings in certain corporate separations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allocation of earnings in certain corporate separations. 1.312-10 Section 1.312-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... certain corporate separations. (a) If one corporation transfers part of its assets constituting an...

  14. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Corporations organized to finance crop operations. A corporation organized by a farmers' cooperative...

  15. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Corporations organized to finance crop operations. A corporation organized by a farmers' cooperative...

  16. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...(c)(16)-1 Corporations organized to finance crop operations. A corporation organized by a...

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...(c)(16)-1 Corporations organized to finance crop operations. A corporation organized by a...

  18. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Corporations organized to finance crop operations. A corporation organized by a farmers' cooperative...

  19. The Lethality of the Corporate Image to the Recovering Corporate Executive Alcoholic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machell, David F.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the emotional impact of the internalized corporate image on the recovering alcoholic corporate executive. Cautions organizations to realize that alcoholics in early recovery may react to their work and career responsibilities excessively and completely. Suggests that supervisors need training workshops in understanding alcoholism and…

  20. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate cultures.…

  1. 26 CFR 1.50A-5 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.50A-5... business corporations. (a) In general—(1) Termination of employment by a corporation. If an electing small business corporation (as defined in section 1371(b)) or a former electing small business...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. (a) Corporate income tax returns required on magnetic media—(1) A corporation required to file...

  3. 26 CFR 301.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. (a) Corporate income tax returns required on magnetic media—(1) A corporation required to file...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. (a) Corporate income tax returns required on magnetic media—(1) A corporation required to file...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. (a) Corporate income tax returns required on magnetic media—(1) A corporation required to file...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. (a) Corporate income tax returns required on magnetic media—(1) A corporation required to file...

  7. 26 CFR 1.50A-5 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.50A-5... business corporations. (a) In general—(1) Termination of employment by a corporation. If an electing small business corporation (as defined in section 1371(b)) or a former electing small business...

  8. 26 CFR 1.943-1 - Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES China Trade Act Corporations § 1.943-1 Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. Dividends paid by a China Trade Act corporation to a nonresident alien...

  9. 26 CFR 1.943-1 - Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.943-1 Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. Dividends paid by a China Trade Act corporation to a nonresident...

  10. 26 CFR 1.943-1 - Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.943-1 Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. Dividends paid by a China Trade Act corporation to a nonresident...

  11. 26 CFR 1.943-1 - Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.943-1 Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. Dividends paid by a China Trade Act corporation to a nonresident...

  12. 26 CFR 1.943-1 - Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.943-1 Withholding by a China Trade Act corporation. Dividends paid by a China Trade Act corporation to a nonresident...

  13. Space shuttle launch vehicle (13 P-OTS) strut support interference effects study in the Rockwell International 7- by 7-foot trisonic wind tunnel (IA68)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogge, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Strut support interference investigations were conducted on an 0.004-(-) scale representation of the space shuttle launch vehicle in order to determine transonic and supersonic model support interference effects for use in a future exhaust plume effects study. Strut configurations were also tested. Orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster pressures were recorded at Mach numbers 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, and 2.0. Angle of attack and angle of sideslip were varied between plus or minus 4 degrees in 2 degree increments. Parametric variations consisted only of the strut configurations.

  14. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynveen, R. A.; Smith, W. H.; Sholeem, C. M.; Mayes, C. B.; Justas, A. L.; Flynn, K. F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment the following conclusions were reached: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides Co(60) and Er(152)Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. Co(60) was also detected in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings.

  15. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides /sup 60/Co and /sup 152/Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. /sup 60/Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings.

  16. Corporations and Library Fundraising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan S.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of corporate donations of cash, products, service, and expertise to libraries highlights industry contributions in 1980; why corporations give; examples of corporate donations to various libraries (Brooklyn Public, New York Public, Altoona Area Public, Boston Public); planning fund-raising compaigns; and seven strategic planning…

  17. Scaling the Corporate Heights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Bebe Moore

    1983-01-01

    Reviews "Black Life in Corporate America" (Davis and Watson), "Women at Work: A Psychologist's Secrets to Getting Ahead in Business" (Senter), and "The Black Manager, Making It in the Corporate World" (Dickens and Dickens). All three books address general issues confronting Black/female managers, and two offer guidance to corporate newcomers. (CMG)

  18. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of corporate communications…

  19. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning".

  20. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning". PMID:15605571

  1. Report from AmSECT’s International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion: American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology Standards and Guidelines for Perfusion Practice: 2013

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Robert A.; Bronson, Shahna L.; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Fitzgerald, David C.; Likosky, Donald S.; Mellas, Nicholas B.; Shann, Kenneth G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: One of the roles of a professional society is to develop standards and guidelines of practice as an instrument to guide safe and effective patient care. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) first published its Essentials for Perfusion Practice, Clinical Function: Conduct of Extracorporeal Circulation in 1993. The International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion (ICEBP), a committee within AmSECT, was tasked with updating this document in 2010. The aim of this report is to describe the method of development and content of AmSECT’s new professional standards and guidelines. The ICEBP committee independently evaluated and provided input regarding the current “Essentials and Guidelines.” Structural changes were made to the entire document, and a draft document was developed, presented, and circulated to the AmSECT Board of Directors and broader membership for comment. Informed by these reviews, a revised document was then presented to the Society for a membership vote. The final document consists of 15 areas of practice covered by 50 Standards and 38 Guidelines (see Appendix 1) with the first standard focusing on the development of institutional protocols to support their implementation and use. A majority of the membership voted to accept the document (81.2% of the voting membership accepting, 18.8% rejecting). After an audit of the balloting process by AmSECT’s Ethics Committee, the results were reported to the membership and the document was officially adopted on July 24, 2013. The Standards and Guidelines will serve as a useful guide for cardiac surgical teams that wish to develop institution-specific standards and guidelines to improve the reliability, safety, and effectiveness of adult cardiopulmonary bypass. The ICEBP recognizes that the development of a Standards and Guidelines statement alone will not change care. Safe, reliable, and effective care will be best served through the development and implementation of

  2. 26 CFR 1.1502-100 - Corporations exempt from tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporations exempt from tax. 1.1502-100...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Administrative Provisions and Other Rules § 1.1502-100 Corporations exempt from tax. (a) In general—(1) Computation of tax liability. The tax liability for...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1502-100 - Corporations exempt from tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporations exempt from tax. 1.1502-100...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Administrative Provisions and Other Rules § 1.1502-100 Corporations exempt from tax. (a) In general—(1) Computation of tax liability. The tax liability for...

  4. 26 CFR 1.902-3 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... by the domestic shareholder prior to January 1, 1965, see § 1.902-5 as contained in the 26 CFR part 1... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a... from Sources Without the United States § 1.902-3 Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6655-1 - Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... by corporation to pay estimated income tax. (a) For regulations under section 6655, see §§ 1.6655-1... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax. 301.6655-1 Section 301.6655-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6655-1 - Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... by corporation to pay estimated income tax. (a) For regulations under section 6655, see §§ 1.6655-1... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax. 301.6655-1 Section 301.6655-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1036-1 - Stock for stock of the same corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stock for stock of the same corporation. 1.1036-1 Section 1.1036-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1036-1 Stock for stock of the same corporation. (a) Section...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6655-1 - Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... by corporation to pay estimated income tax. (a) For regulations under section 6655, see §§ 1.6655-1... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax. 301.6655-1 Section 301.6655-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6655-1 - Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... by corporation to pay estimated income tax. (a) For regulations under section 6655, see §§ 1.6655-1... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax. 301.6655-1 Section 301.6655-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6655-1 - Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... by corporation to pay estimated income tax. (a) For regulations under section 6655, see §§ 1.6655-1... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Failure by corporation to pay estimated income tax. 301.6655-1 Section 301.6655-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6241-1T - Tax treatment determined at corporate level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax treatment determined at corporate level. 301.6241-1T Section 301.6241-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6241-1T Tax treatment determined at corporate...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1361-2 - Definitions relating to S corporation subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Definitions relating to S corporation subsidiaries. 1.1361-2 Section 1.1361-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders §...

  13. Corporate environmentalism and environmental innovation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hsing; Sam, Abdoul G

    2015-04-15

    Several papers have explored the effect of tighter environmental standards on environmental innovation. While mandatory regulation remains the central tenet of US environmental policy, the regulatory landscape has changed since the early 1990s with the increased recourse by federal and state agencies to corporate environmentalism--voluntary pollution prevention (P2) by firms--to achieve environmental improvements. We therefore estimate the effects of voluntary P2 activities on the patenting of environmental technologies by a sample of manufacturing firms. With our panel data of 352 firms over the 1991-2000 period, we adopt an instrumental variable Poisson framework to account for the count nature of patents and the endogeneity of the P2 adoption decision. Our results indicate that the adoption of voluntary P2 activities in the manufacturing sector has led to a statistically and economically significant increase in the number of environmental patents, suggesting that corporate environmentalism can act as a catalyst for investments in cleaner technologies. Our findings are internationally relevant given the increasing ubiquity of corporate environmentalism in both developed and developing economies.

  14. Corporate environmentalism and environmental innovation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hsing; Sam, Abdoul G

    2015-04-15

    Several papers have explored the effect of tighter environmental standards on environmental innovation. While mandatory regulation remains the central tenet of US environmental policy, the regulatory landscape has changed since the early 1990s with the increased recourse by federal and state agencies to corporate environmentalism--voluntary pollution prevention (P2) by firms--to achieve environmental improvements. We therefore estimate the effects of voluntary P2 activities on the patenting of environmental technologies by a sample of manufacturing firms. With our panel data of 352 firms over the 1991-2000 period, we adopt an instrumental variable Poisson framework to account for the count nature of patents and the endogeneity of the P2 adoption decision. Our results indicate that the adoption of voluntary P2 activities in the manufacturing sector has led to a statistically and economically significant increase in the number of environmental patents, suggesting that corporate environmentalism can act as a catalyst for investments in cleaner technologies. Our findings are internationally relevant given the increasing ubiquity of corporate environmentalism in both developed and developing economies. PMID:25687809

  15. 26 CFR 301.9100-19T - Election relating to passive investment income of electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of electing small business corporations. 301.9100-19T Section 301.9100-19T Internal Revenue INTERNAL... investment income of electing small business corporations. (a) In general. Section 3(a) of the Act of April... passive investment income of electing small business corporations). This amendment, which applies...

  16. 26 CFR 1.957-2 - Controlled foreign corporation deriving income from insurance of United States risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from insurance of United States risks. 1.957-2 Section 1.957-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Corporations § 1.957-2 Controlled foreign corporation deriving income from insurance of United States risks. (a... States risks under § 1.953-1, the term “controlled foreign corporation” means any foreign corporation...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1366-2 - Limitations on deduction of passthrough items of an S corporation to its shareholders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... an S corporation to its shareholders. 1.1366-2 Section 1.1366-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1366-2 Limitations on deduction of passthrough items of an S corporation to its shareholders. (a) In general—(1) Limitation on losses and deductions. The aggregate...

  18. Foreign Languages and Corporate Study: A Successful Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Glenn; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Multi-National Corporate Studies Program at Upsala College integrates foreign language study with international business studies. The program, which culminates in domestic and foreign internships, is described. (SW)

  19. 26 CFR 1.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate....6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. The return of a corporation that is required to be filed on magnetic media under § 301.6011-5 of this chapter must be filed...

  20. 26 CFR 1.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate....6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. The return of a corporation that is required to be filed on magnetic media under § 301.6011-5 of this chapter must be filed...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate....6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. The return of a corporation that is required to be filed on magnetic media under § 301.6011-5 of this chapter must be filed...

  2. 26 CFR 1.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate... Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. The return of a corporation that is required to be filed on magnetic media under § 301.6011-5 of this chapter must be filed in accordance...

  3. 26 CFR 1.6011-5 - Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Required use of magnetic media for corporate....6011-5 Required use of magnetic media for corporate income tax returns. The return of a corporation that is required to be filed on magnetic media under § 301.6011-5 of this chapter must be filed...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1378-1 - Taxable year of S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Taxable year of S corporation. 1.1378-1 Section... Taxable year of S corporation. (a) In general. The taxable year of an S corporation must be a permitted year. A permitted year is the required taxable year (i.e., a taxable year ending on December 31),...

  5. 26 CFR 1.881-5 - Exception for certain possessions corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exception for certain possessions corporations... possessions corporations. (a) Scope. Section 881(b) and this section provide special rules for the application of sections 881 and 884 to certain corporations created or organized in possessions of the...

  6. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(9)-1 - Domestic corporation as separate entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Domestic corporation as separate entity. 36... OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Domestic corporation as separate entity. A domestic corporation which enters into an agreement as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1 shall, for purposes of...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1248-5 - Stock ownership requirements for less developed country corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Gains and Losses § 1.1248-5 Stock ownership requirements for less developed country corporations. (a... foreign corporation X, a less developed country corporation. On December 31, 1964, N recognizes gain upon... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stock ownership requirements for less...

  8. 26 CFR 1.164-7 - Taxes of shareholder paid by corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes of shareholder paid by corporation. 1.164....164-7 Taxes of shareholder paid by corporation. Banks and other corporations paying taxes assessed against their shareholders on account of their ownership of the shares of stock issued by...

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SLURRY BIODEGRADATION, International Technology Corporation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology uses a slurry-phase bioreactor in which the soil is mixed with water to form a slurry. Microorganisms and nutrients are added to the slurry to enhance the biodegradation process, which converts organic wastes into relatively harmless byproducts of microbial metabo...

  10. Corporal Punishment Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John

    2002-01-01

    Lists arguments for using corporal punishment in educational institutions and considers some advantages of its use. Asks when it should be used, who should be empowered to administer it, and why there are increasingly strong feelings against corporal punishment in some societies while others continue to use it. (BT)

  11. Making the Corporate Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornforth, Suzanne; Simpson, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    Corporate sponsorship is a marketing strategy by which companies communicate about their products or services by affiliating with events or institutions valued by targeted customer groups. Increasingly, campus communicators are seeking to establish corporate sponsorships but first must resolve legal and ethical concerns. Various types of…

  12. Entering the Corporate Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenshields, Garry W.

    This seminar guide was designed for use with a series of slides in training administrators to market an educational program or service to corporations. The seminar explains the following eight stages in planning entry into the corporate market: identifying appropriate publics; researching the market (analyzing supply and demand, collecting data,…

  13. 26 CFR 1.1502-81T - Alaska Native Corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alaska Native Corporations. 1.1502-81T Section 1.1502-81T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... and before 1992), or any part thereof, against the income and tax liability of a...

  14. The network of global corporate control.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic "super-entity" that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers.

  15. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  16. Corporate Teaching Help Drops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, David E.

    1985-01-01

    Electronics, pharmaceuticals, and other industry programs to loan corporate employees to colleges and universities for short-term teaching assignments are discussed, including the advantages to both industry and the institutions and the conflicts in demand for specialists. (MSE)

  17. 1993 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Some of the companies in this year's Corporate Profiles section you know and use; some may seem familiar; but all of the companies are important to you as healthcare supply managers. This detailed overview of the history, sales and service, product lines, new technology and future plans of each corporation is brought to you as a service from JHMM, to be used as a review, an update and a resource throughout the year. PMID:10130626

  18. 76 FR 45673 - Methods of Accounting Used by Corporations That Acquire the Assets of Other Corporations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Federal Register (72 FR 64545). This notice of proposed rulemaking, while continuing most of the... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BD81 Methods of Accounting Used by Corporations That... regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains final regulations relating to the methods of...

  19. 26 CFR 1.897-9T - Treatment of certain interest in publicly traded corporations, definition of foreign person, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporations, definition of foreign person, and foreign governments and international organizations (temporary... and international organizations (temporary). (a) Purpose and scope. This section provides a temporary... governments and international organizations, see paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Regularly...

  20. 26 CFR 1.897-9T - Treatment of certain interest in publicly traded corporations, definition of foreign person, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporations, definition of foreign person, and foreign governments and international organizations (temporary... and international organizations (temporary). (a) Purpose and scope. This section provides a temporary... governments and international organizations, see paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Regularly...

  1. 26 CFR 1.897-9T - Treatment of certain interest in publicly traded corporations, definition of foreign person, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporations, definition of foreign person, and foreign governments and international organizations (temporary... and international organizations (temporary). (a) Purpose and scope. This section provides a temporary... governments and international organizations, see paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Regularly...

  2. 26 CFR 1.897-9T - Treatment of certain interest in publicly traded corporations, definition of foreign person, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporations, definition of foreign person, and foreign governments and international organizations (temporary... and international organizations (temporary). (a) Purpose and scope. This section provides a temporary... governments and international organizations, see paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Regularly...

  3. Runway Incursion Prevention System ADS-B and DGPS Data Link Analysis Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, J.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas - Ft. Worth International Airport in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. Rockwell Collins provided and supported a prototype Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) system using 1090 MHz and a prototype Differential GPS (DGPS) system onboard the NASA Boeing 757 research aircraft. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS flight test, summarizes the development process, and analyzes both ADS-B and DGPS data collected during the flight test. In addition, results are report on interoperability tests conducted between the NASA Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) ADS-B flight test system and the NASA Boeing 757 ADS-B system.

  4. 26 CFR 1.6081-3 - Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation income tax returns. 1.6081-3 Section 1.6081-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-3 Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns. (a) In...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6074-1 - Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... income tax by corporations. 301.6074-1 Section 301.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6074-1 Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions relating to time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by...

  6. 26 CFR 1.6081-3 - Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporation income tax returns. 1.6081-3 Section 1.6081-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-3 Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns. (a)...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6074-1 - Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... income tax by corporations. 301.6074-1 Section 301.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6074-1 Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions relating to time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by...

  8. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(9)-1 - Domestic corporation as separate entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....3121(l)(9)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Domestic corporation as separate entity. A domestic corporation which enters into an agreement as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1 shall, for purposes of...

  9. 48 CFR 3052.209-70 - Prohibition on contracts with corporate expatriates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contracts with corporate expatriates. As prescribed at (HSAR) 48 CFR 3009.104-75, insert the following... means an affiliated group as defined in section 1504(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (without..., 6 U.S.C. 395, would be, treated as a foreign corporation for purposes of the Internal Revenue...

  10. 26 CFR 1.6081-3 - Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporation income tax returns. 1.6081-3 Section 1.6081-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-3 Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns. (a)...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6074-1 - Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... income tax by corporations. 301.6074-1 Section 301.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6074-1 Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions relating to time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by...

  12. 26 CFR 1.6081-3 - Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporation income tax returns. 1.6081-3 Section 1.6081-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-3 Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns. (a)...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6074-1 - Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... income tax by corporations. 301.6074-1 Section 301.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6074-1 Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions relating to time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6081-3 - Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporation income tax returns. 1.6081-3 Section 1.6081-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-3 Automatic extension of time for filing corporation income tax returns. (a)...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6074-1 - Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... income tax by corporations. 301.6074-1 Section 301.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6074-1 Time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions relating to time for filing declarations of estimated income tax by...

  16. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  17. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  18. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  19. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  20. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(9)-1 - Domestic corporation as separate entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....3121(l)(9)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Domestic corporation as separate entity. A domestic corporation which enters into an agreement as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1 shall, for purposes of...

  1. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(9)-1 - Domestic corporation as separate entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....3121(l)(9)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Domestic corporation as separate entity. A domestic corporation which enters into an agreement as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1 shall, for purposes of...

  2. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(9)-1 - Domestic corporation as separate entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....3121(l)(9)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(9)-1 Domestic corporation as separate entity. A domestic corporation which enters into an agreement as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1 shall, for purposes of...

  3. Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.

    PubMed

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children's mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders.

  4. Parental Use of Corporal Punishment in Europe: Intersection between Public Health and Policy

    PubMed Central

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children’s mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders. PMID:25674788

  5. Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.

    PubMed

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children's mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders. PMID:25674788

  6. 26 CFR 1.955-2 - Amount of a controlled foreign corporation's qualified investments in less developed countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amount of a controlled foreign corporation's qualified investments in less developed countries. 1.955-2 Section 1.955-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations §...

  7. 26 CFR 1.955-2 - Amount of a controlled foreign corporation's qualified investments in less developed countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Amount of a controlled foreign corporation's qualified investments in less developed countries. 1.955-2 Section 1.955-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.955-2...

  8. 26 CFR 1.732-3 - Corresponding adjustment to basis of assets of a distributed corporation controlled by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corresponding adjustment to basis of assets of a distributed corporation controlled by a corporate partner. 1.732-3 Section 1.732-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES...

  9. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-3T - Treatment of transfers of stock or securities to foreign corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of transfers of stock or securities to foreign corporations (temporary). 1.367(a)-3T Section 1.367(a)-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Effects on Corporation § 1.367(a)-3T Treatment...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1563-4 - Franchised corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....1563-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... than 50 percent (determined on the basis of cost) of all the goods held by such member primarily for... bona fide plan designed to eliminate the stock ownership of the parent corporation (as defined...

  11. 75 FR 56858 - Exclusions From Gross Income of Foreign Corporations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... foreign corporations from the international operation of ships or aircraft. The final regulations adopt... determine if it is eligible to exclude its income from the international operation of ships or aircraft from... regulations) under section 883(a) and (c) were published in the Federal Register (72 FR 34600) revising...

  12. A better gauge of corporate performance.

    PubMed

    Weber, D O

    2001-01-01

    Traditional methods of measuring organizational value aren't working very well. Instead, an organization's viability should be gauged from four perspectives, according to Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton, co-creators of the Balanced Scorecard. These perspectives--financial strength, customer service and satisfaction, internal operating efficiency, and learning and growth--become the underpinnings of a "balanced" tool with which leaders can assess corporate performance in the knowledge-based marketplace. PMID:11372276

  13. A better gauge of corporate performance.

    PubMed

    Weber, D O

    2001-01-01

    Traditional methods of measuring organizational value aren't working very well. Instead, an organization's viability should be gauged from four perspectives, according to Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton, co-creators of the Balanced Scorecard. These perspectives--financial strength, customer service and satisfaction, internal operating efficiency, and learning and growth--become the underpinnings of a "balanced" tool with which leaders can assess corporate performance in the knowledge-based marketplace.

  14. Corporate dentistry in 2032?

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been considerable growth in the number of dental practices owned by corporate bodies. At present, well over 800 practices are owned by such bodies and they employ over 3000 dentists. This paper describes the factors that have led to this growth and explores the advantages and disadvantages of 'corporate' dentistry for patients, dentists, and the dental team. It then considers how and why dental practice may change over the next 20 years and concludes that by 2032 the small one-dentist practice may well be in the past. It is likely that smaller practices will have to work in some form of association if they are to survive. Although their current model is unstable, corporates are likely to adapt to a changing environment. By 2032, in some cases, dentistry may well be taken out of its conventional setting, into supermarkets or a school environment. PMID:23073159

  15. 26 CFR 1.1366-4 - Special rules limiting the passthrough of certain items of an S corporation to its shareholders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certain items of an S corporation to its shareholders. 1.1366-4 Section 1.1366-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1366-4 Special rules limiting the passthrough of certain items of an S corporation to its shareholders. (a) Passthrough inapplicable to section 34 credit. Section 1.1366-1(a)...

  16. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation and... compliance with the corporation laws thereof. (b) Whenever deemed advisable the Superintendent may require...

  17. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    PubMed

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race.

  18. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    PubMed

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race. PMID:3957511

  19. 77 FR 22515 - Allocation of Earnings and Profits in Tax-Free Transfers From One Corporation to Another

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Transfers From One Corporation to Another AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice... the allocation of earnings and profits in tax-free transfers from one corporation to another. The... allocation of earnings and profits in tax-free transfers from one corporation to another. The IRS...

  20. 26 CFR 25.2701-1 - Special valuation rules in the case of transfers of certain interests in corporations and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of certain interests in corporations and partnerships. 25.2701-1 Section 25.2701-1 Internal Revenue... transfers of certain interests in corporations and partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Scope of section 2701... transfers an equity interest in a corporation or partnership to a member of the individual's family....

  1. 26 CFR 25.2701-1 - Special valuation rules in the case of transfers of certain interests in corporations and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... transfers of certain interests in corporations and partnerships. 25.2701-1 Section 25.2701-1 Internal... case of transfers of certain interests in corporations and partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Scope of... individual transfers an equity interest in a corporation or partnership to a member of the...

  2. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporation and corporate information. 226.8 Section 226.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation...

  3. Of Corporate Bondage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, James

    1975-01-01

    "While it is entirely possible that the university will continue to function as an essential arm of the giant agribusiness and energy corporations, there are, nevertheless, a wealth of opportunities for it to direct its energies to more useful purposes." The author traces universities' past involvement noting alternatives in energy and agriculture…

  4. The corporate trustee evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, B.A.; Ross, M.D.

    1994-03-01

    Trustees have an increasing role in the public debt market for project finance. With the responsibility comes the need for clearly defined guidelines. This article examines the need for public financing of power projects, and the role and responsibilities of corporate trustees in this environment.

  5. Lessons from Enlightened Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankstein, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    The formula for improving U.S. schools can be found in the philosophy that helped transform Japanese industry and in Deming's 14 principles, emulated by many corporations. Deming's arguments against appraising individual performance through quotas or numerical goals call into question schools' current grading and merit pay practices. (12…

  6. Corporate Boss, College President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Vernon R.

    1978-01-01

    Differences between the roles of a corporate administrator and a college president are reviewed and related to the role of an effective trustee. It is noted that accountability demands affect institutional autonomy and that trustees must become more involved in policy-making to protect the academic freedom of colleges and universities in the…

  7. Corporate Training in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  8. Corporate information management guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

  9. A corporate supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Randall; Seebass, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This talk address the market and technology for a corporate supersonic transport. It describes a candidate configuration. There seems to be a sufficient market for such an aircraft, even if restricted to supersonic operation over water. The candidate configuration's sonic boom overpressure may be small enough to allow overland operation as well.

  10. 1991 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    We feel a very important part of the career development of any healthcare supply manager is knowing the companies you do business with. The following Corporate Profiles, which contain information about the mission, structure, background and products of leading companies in the healthcare field, are an excellent way to achieve this knowledge.

  11. The Corporate Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    In many states, schools use programs developed by industry to teach about environmental issues. Corporate-sponsored curricula appear to expose children to knowledge about nature, energy use, solid waste, and recycling, but they often actually display an incomplete and self-serving picture that is raising concern among environmentalists and…

  12. Corporal Punishment and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Gordon B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand and evaluate the continued prevalence of corporal punishment in school systems, this article reviews the following topics: (1) historical issues; (2) current demographics and correlates; (3) the effectiveness of corporal punishment in school settings; (4) myths; (5) alternatives to corporal punishment; and (6) social policy.…

  13. Constructive Engagement with the Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the gravest concerns that critics of corporate culture have about the consequences of academic-corporate relationships are built on little more than ill-informed speculation, fueled by a lack of direct engagement with corporations. The solution to knowledge gap--and the key to liberation from fears of "creeping corporatization"--may…

  14. Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations.

    PubMed

    Castleman, Barry; Allen, Barbara; Barca, Stefania; Bohme, Susanna Rankin; Henry, Emmanuel; Kaur, Amarjit; Massard-Guilbaud, Genvieve; Melling, Joseph; Menendez-Navarro, Alfredo; Renfrew, Daniel; Santiago, Myrna; Sellers, Christopher; Tweedale, Geoffrey; Zalik, Anna; Zavestoski, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    At a conference held at Stony Brook University in December 2007, "Dangerous Trade: Histories of Industrial Hazard across a Globalizing World," participants endorsed a Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations. The Code outlines practices that would ensure corporations enact the highest health and environmentally protective measures in all the locations in which they operate. Corporations should observe international guidelines on occupational exposure to air contaminants, plant safety, air and water pollutant releases, hazardous waste disposal practices, remediation of polluted sites, public disclosure of toxic releases, product hazard labeling, sale of products for specific uses, storage and transport of toxic intermediates and products, corporate safety and health auditing, and corporate environmental auditing. Protective measures in all locations should be consonant with the most protective measures applied anywhere in the world, and should apply to the corporations' subsidiaries, contractors, suppliers, distributors, and licensees of technology. Key words: corporations, sustainability, environmental protection, occupational health, code of practice. PMID:18686726

  15. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  17. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  18. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  19. Overview of selected infectious disease risks for the corporate traveler.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T Warner; Fortuna, Joseph

    2008-08-01

    International business travel to under-developed and developing countries has increased considerably over the past two decades. Most of these destinations are endemic to a variety of infectious diseases, many of which are associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, or both and the nonimmune, unprepared corporate traveler is at risk. Comprehensive pretravel consultation is essential to prevent travel-related illness. This review addresses some of the infectious diseases that can be acquired during international travel, including regions of endemicity, assessment of risk, and available means of prevention. In addition, we discuss data concerning current practices and attitudes of travelers, along with some of the issues surrounding the counseling of corporate travelers.

  20. The Role of Corporations in Ensuring Biodiversity

    PubMed

    KELLY; HODGE

    1996-11-01

    / Corporations own approximately 25% of all private land in the United States and, therefore, play an essential role in protecting biodiversity and maintaining natural habitats. The Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) is a unique joint venture between conservation organizations and corporations to utilize corporate lands for ensuring biodiversity. The following case studies demonstrate how corporations have helped ensure healthy ecosystems and provided critical leadership in regional efforts. Amoco Chemical Company's Cooper River Plant has been instrumental in developing a cooperative project that involves numerous corporations, plantation owners, private citizens, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and community groups to develop a comprehensive, ecosystem-based management plan for part of the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The second case focuses on the Morie Company, a national sand quarry operator headquartered in southern New Jersey, USA. Morie Company is working with WHC, community groups, the Pinelands Commission, and other state regulatory agencies to explore sustainable development opportunities for companies within the Pinelands regulations. The third case takes us to DuPont Company's Asturias, Spain, site. A win-win success story of improved habitat and cost savings is the result of DuPont's concern for the environment, ability to work with a variety of groups, and willingness to consider innovative restoration techniques. The fourth case discusses Consumers Power Company's Campbell Plant in West Olive, Michigan, USA. In addition to implementing projects that contribute to biodiversity, Consumers Power has developed an environmental education field station to teach others about the importance of natural habitats. The final case highlights Baltimore Gas & Electric Company's efforts to maintain habitat for endangered species at their Calvert Cliffs site in Maryland.KEY WORDS: Partnerships; Stewardship; International; Habitats

  1. The Role of Corporations in Ensuring Biodiversity

    PubMed

    KELLY; HODGE

    1996-11-01

    / Corporations own approximately 25% of all private land in the United States and, therefore, play an essential role in protecting biodiversity and maintaining natural habitats. The Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) is a unique joint venture between conservation organizations and corporations to utilize corporate lands for ensuring biodiversity. The following case studies demonstrate how corporations have helped ensure healthy ecosystems and provided critical leadership in regional efforts. Amoco Chemical Company's Cooper River Plant has been instrumental in developing a cooperative project that involves numerous corporations, plantation owners, private citizens, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and community groups to develop a comprehensive, ecosystem-based management plan for part of the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The second case focuses on the Morie Company, a national sand quarry operator headquartered in southern New Jersey, USA. Morie Company is working with WHC, community groups, the Pinelands Commission, and other state regulatory agencies to explore sustainable development opportunities for companies within the Pinelands regulations. The third case takes us to DuPont Company's Asturias, Spain, site. A win-win success story of improved habitat and cost savings is the result of DuPont's concern for the environment, ability to work with a variety of groups, and willingness to consider innovative restoration techniques. The fourth case discusses Consumers Power Company's Campbell Plant in West Olive, Michigan, USA. In addition to implementing projects that contribute to biodiversity, Consumers Power has developed an environmental education field station to teach others about the importance of natural habitats. The final case highlights Baltimore Gas & Electric Company's efforts to maintain habitat for endangered species at their Calvert Cliffs site in Maryland.KEY WORDS: Partnerships; Stewardship; International; Habitats

  2. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  3. Corporate philanthropy, lobbying, and public health policy.

    PubMed

    Tesler, Laura E; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-12-01

    To counter negative publicity about the tobacco industry, Philip Morris has widely publicized its philanthropy initiatives. Although corporate philanthropy is primarily a public relations tool, contributions may be viewed as offsetting the harms caused by corporate products and practices. That such donations themselves have harmful consequences has been little considered. Drawing on internal company documents, we explored the philanthropy undertaken as part of Philip Morris's PM21 image makeover. Philip Morris explicitly linked philanthropy to government affairs and used contributions as a lobbying tool against public health policies. Through advertising, covertly solicited media coverage, and contributions to legislators' pet causes, Philip Morris improved its image among key voter constituencies, influenced public officials, and divided the public health field as grantees were converted to stakeholders.

  4. The Network of Global Corporate Control

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B.; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic “super-entity” that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers. PMID:22046252

  5. Transnational corporations and health: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Baum, Frances Elaine; Margaret Anaf, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Transnational corporations (TNCs) are part of an economic system of global capitalism that operates under a neoliberal regime underpinned by strong support from international organisations such as the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and most nation states. Although TNCs have grown in power and influence and have had a significant impact on population health over the past three decades, public health has not developed an integrated research agenda to study them. This article outlines the shape of such an agenda and argues that it is vital that research into the public health impact of TNCs be pursued and funded as a matter of priority. The four areas of the agenda are: assessing the health and equity impacts of TNCs; evaluating the effectiveness of government regulation to mitigate health and equity impacts of TNCs; studying the work of activist groups and networks that highlight adverse impacts of TNCs; and considering how regulation of capitalism could better promote a healthier and more equitable corporate sector.

  6. Corporate Philanthropy, Lobbying, and Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Tesler, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    To counter negative publicity about the tobacco industry, Philip Morris has widely publicized its philanthropy initiatives. Although corporate philanthropy is primarily a public relations tool, contributions may be viewed as offsetting the harms caused by corporate products and practices. That such donations themselves have harmful consequences has been little considered. Drawing on internal company documents, we explored the philanthropy undertaken as part of Philip Morris's PM21 image makeover. Philip Morris explicitly linked philanthropy to government affairs and used contributions as a lobbying tool against public health policies. Through advertising, covertly solicited media coverage, and contributions to legislators’ pet causes, Philip Morris improved its image among key voter constituencies, influenced public officials, and divided the public health field as grantees were converted to stakeholders. PMID:18923118

  7. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  8. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves. PMID:20200865

  9. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-8 - Allocation of earnings and profits and foreign income taxes in certain foreign corporate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... income taxes in certain foreign corporate separations. 1.367(b)-8 Section 1.367(b)-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-8 Allocation of earnings and profits and foreign income...

  10. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-8 - Allocation of earnings and profits and foreign income taxes in certain foreign corporate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... income taxes in certain foreign corporate separations. 1.367(b)-8 Section 1.367(b)-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-8 Allocation of earnings and profits and foreign income...

  11. 26 CFR 1.955-2 - Amount of a controlled foreign corporation's qualified investments in less developed countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified investments in less developed countries. 1.955-2 Section 1.955-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...'s “qualified investments in less developed countries” are items of property (other than property... following: (1) Stock of a less developed country corporation if the controlled foreign corporation...

  12. 26 CFR 1.50B-2 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.50B-2... business corporations. (a) General rule—(1) In general. In the case of an electing small business... be apportioned separately. In determining who are shareholders of an electing small...

  13. 26 CFR 1.56-1 - Adjustment for the book income of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjustment for the book income of corporations... TAX INCOME TAXES Tax Surcharge § 1.56-1 Adjustment for the book income of corporations. (a) Computation of the book income adjustment—(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 1987, 1988, and...

  14. 26 CFR 1.56-1 - Adjustment for the book income of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Adjustment for the book income of corporations. 1... INCOME TAXES Tax Surcharge § 1.56-1 Adjustment for the book income of corporations. (a) Computation of the book income adjustment—(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 1987, 1988, and 1989,...

  15. 26 CFR 1.56-1 - Adjustment for the book income of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjustment for the book income of corporations... TAX INCOME TAXES Tax Surcharge § 1.56-1 Adjustment for the book income of corporations. (a) Computation of the book income adjustment—(1) In general. For taxable years beginning in 1987, 1988, and...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... Returns and Records § 301.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions concerning the requirement of declarations of estimated income tax by corporations, see §§ 1.6016-1 to...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or partnerships... and additions to the tax, additional amounts and assessable penalties allowed by chapter 68 of...

  18. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or partnerships... and additions to the tax, additional amounts and assessable penalties allowed by chapter 68 of...

  19. 26 CFR 301.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... Returns and Records § 301.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions concerning the requirement of declarations of estimated income tax by corporations, see §§ 1.6016-1 to...

  20. Different Preferences in Learning between American and French Learners in a Multinational Corporate Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossi, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    The way training is delivered in a corporate environment has a tremendous effect on its results. This study investigated the role of culture in the learning styles of adult French and American learners working in an international corporate setting. The assumption was that Americans prefer to learn from action-oriented methods and are more…

  1. "Just Plain Murder": Public Debate and Corporate Diplomacy in Donora's Fight for Clean Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Gabe

    2011-01-01

    One modern definition of "corporate diplomacy" states "executives engage in the private sector version of international diplomacy... advancing their objectives through interactions with the leaders of other corporations, governments, analysts, the media and interest groups." The smog in Donora, Pennsylvania, brought the previously ignored issue of…

  2. 26 CFR 1.358-7 - Transfers by partners and partnerships to corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfers by partners and partnerships to... Transfers by partners and partnerships to corporations. (a) Transfers by partners of partnership interests. For purposes of section 358(h), a transfer of a partnership interest to a corporation is treated as...

  3. 26 CFR 1.50B-2 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.50B-2... business corporations. (a) General rule—(1) In general. In the case of an electing small business... be apportioned separately. In determining who are shareholders of an electing small...

  4. 26 CFR 1.941-1 - Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special deduction for China Trade Act... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-1 Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations. In addition to the deductions from taxable income otherwise allowed such...

  5. 78 FR 17023 - Certain Outbound Property Transfers by Domestic Corporations; Certain Stock Distributions by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... their contents might become material in the administration of any internal revenue law. Generally, tax... distributions of stock of a foreign corporation by a domestic corporation (REG-209006-89; 73 FR 49278, 2008-41... September 26, 2008 (73 FR 56535; 2008-41 IRB 867). No public hearing on the 2008 proposed regulations...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... Returns and Records § 301.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions concerning the requirement of declarations of estimated income tax by corporations, see §§ 1.6016-1 to...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or partnerships... and additions to the tax, additional amounts and assessable penalties allowed by chapter 68 of...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or partnerships... and additions to the tax, additional amounts and assessable penalties allowed by chapter 68 of...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... Returns and Records § 301.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions concerning the requirement of declarations of estimated income tax by corporations, see §§ 1.6016-1 to...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or partnerships... and additions to the tax, additional amounts and assessable penalties allowed by chapter 68 of...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... Returns and Records § 301.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. For provisions concerning the requirement of declarations of estimated income tax by corporations, see §§ 1.6016-1 to...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1036-1 - Stock for stock of the same corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stock for stock of the same corporation. 1.1036...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1036-1 Stock for stock of the same corporation. (a) Section 1036 permits the exchange, without the recognition of gain or loss, of common...

  13. 26 CFR 1.941-1 - Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special deduction for China Trade Act... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-1 Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations. In addition to the deductions from taxable income...

  14. 26 CFR 1.941-1 - Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special deduction for China Trade Act... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-1 Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations. In addition to the deductions from taxable income...

  15. 26 CFR 1.941-1 - Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special deduction for China Trade Act... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-1 Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations. In addition to the deductions from taxable income...

  16. 26 CFR 1.941-1 - Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Special deduction for China Trade Act... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-1 Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations. In addition to the deductions from taxable income...

  17. 27 CFR 41.234 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41... Processed Tobacco § 41.234 Corporate documents. Every corporation that files an application for a permit as....231 a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of corporate existence or...

  18. 27 CFR 40.494 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 40... Processed Tobacco § 40.494 Corporate documents. Every corporation that files an application for a permit as... § 40.492 a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of corporate existence or...

  19. 12 CFR 5.42 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 5.42 Section 5.42 Banks and... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Other Changes in Activities and Operations § 5.42 Corporate title. (a) Authority. 12 U... change its corporate title. (c) Standards. A national bank may change its corporate title provided...

  20. On hitting children: a review of corporal punishment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Knox, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Research has clearly demonstrated associations between corporal punishment of children and maladaptive behavior patterns such as aggression and delinquency. Hitting children is an act of violence and a clear violation of children's human rights. In this article, the position of the United States on corporal punishment of children is discussed. Professional and international progress on ending corporal punishment is explained, and the relationship between corporal punishment and child abuse is discussed. An appeal is made for prevention efforts such as parent education and removal of social sanctions for hitting children that may hold significant promise for preventing child maltreatment.

  1. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  2. Substance misuse prevention as corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Radacsi, Gergely; Hardi, Peter

    2014-03-01

    All sectors of society should be involved in reducing substance misuse, including businesses. However, the business sector is typically involved only to the extent that their products compel them to be (e.g., alcohol producers promoting responsible alcohol consumption). This article examines why business participation has been limited and how embedding prevention within a framework of health promotion could increase participation. It reviews both Hungarian and international cases, concluding that although corporate social responsibility (CSR) offers a framework to approach substance misuse reduction, a different perception of the role of the business sector is necessary to make it viable.

  3. Corporate compliance: framework and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, N

    1999-01-01

    The federal government has created numerous programs to combat fraud and abuse. The government now encourages healthcare facilities to have a corporate compliance program (CCP), a plan that reduces the chances that the facility will violate laws or regulations. A CCP is an organization-wide program comprised of a code of conduct and written policies, internal monitoring and auditing standards, employee training, feedback mechanisms and other features, all designed to prevent and detect violations of governmental laws, regulations and policies. It is a system or method ensuring that employees understand and will comply with laws that apply to what they do every day. Seven factors, based on federal sentencing guidelines, provide the framework for developing a CCP. First, a facility must establish rules that are reasonably capable of reducing criminal conduct. Second, high-level personnel must oversee the compliance effort. Third, a facility must use due care in delegating authority in the compliance initiative. Fourth, standards must be communicated effectively to employees, and fifth, a facility must take reasonable steps to achieve compliance. Sixth, standards must be enforced consistently across the organization and last, standards must be modified or changed for reported concerns, to ensure they are not repeated. PROMINA Health System, Inc. in Atlanta, Ga., designed a program to meet federal guidelines. It started with a self-assessment to define its areas or risk. Next, it created the internal structure and assigned organizational responsibility for running the CCP. PROMINA then developed standards of business and professional conduct, established vehicles of communication and trained employees on the standards. Finally, it continues to develop evidence of the program's effectiveness by monitoring and documenting its compliance activities. PMID:10346652

  4. Corporate compliance: framework and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, N

    1999-01-01

    The federal government has created numerous programs to combat fraud and abuse. The government now encourages healthcare facilities to have a corporate compliance program (CCP), a plan that reduces the chances that the facility will violate laws or regulations. A CCP is an organization-wide program comprised of a code of conduct and written policies, internal monitoring and auditing standards, employee training, feedback mechanisms and other features, all designed to prevent and detect violations of governmental laws, regulations and policies. It is a system or method ensuring that employees understand and will comply with laws that apply to what they do every day. Seven factors, based on federal sentencing guidelines, provide the framework for developing a CCP. First, a facility must establish rules that are reasonably capable of reducing criminal conduct. Second, high-level personnel must oversee the compliance effort. Third, a facility must use due care in delegating authority in the compliance initiative. Fourth, standards must be communicated effectively to employees, and fifth, a facility must take reasonable steps to achieve compliance. Sixth, standards must be enforced consistently across the organization and last, standards must be modified or changed for reported concerns, to ensure they are not repeated. PROMINA Health System, Inc. in Atlanta, Ga., designed a program to meet federal guidelines. It started with a self-assessment to define its areas or risk. Next, it created the internal structure and assigned organizational responsibility for running the CCP. PROMINA then developed standards of business and professional conduct, established vehicles of communication and trained employees on the standards. Finally, it continues to develop evidence of the program's effectiveness by monitoring and documenting its compliance activities.

  5. 12 CFR 211.5 - Edge and agreement corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... notice. The Board shall publish in the Federal Register notice of any proposal to organize an Edge...) Factors considered by Board. The factors considered by the Board in acting on a proposal to organize an... inconsistent with the international and foreign business purposes for which Edge corporations are...

  6. Current Status of Diversity Initiatives in Selected Multinational Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with eight diversity managers in multinational corporations revealed a variety of domestic and international diversity initiatives, especially in leadership and management. Formal and informal methods were used to plan them. Business unit managers were responsible for implementation. Evaluation was difficult and time consuming. (SK)

  7. 76 FR 66239 - Effect of Election on Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Treasury Department and the IRS published in the Federal Register (71 FR 50007) a notice of proposed... rulemaking (REG-158677-05) that was published in the Federal Register on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50007) is... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 RIN 1545-BF24 Effect of Election on Corporation AGENCY:...

  8. 75 FR 15610 - Exclusions From Gross Income of Foreign Corporations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 Exclusions From Gross Income of Foreign Corporations CFR Correction In Title 26 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1 (Sec. Sec. 1.851 to 1.907), revised as...

  9. 26 CFR 1.542-4 - Corporations filing consolidated returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corporations filing consolidated returns. 1.542-4... consolidated returns. (a) General rule. A consolidated return under section 1501 shall determine the... consolidated gross income and consolidated personal holding company income of the group, as determined...

  10. 26 CFR 1.542-4 - Corporations filing consolidated returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Corporations filing consolidated returns. 1.542-4... consolidated returns. (a) General rule. A consolidated return under section 1501 shall determine the... consolidated gross income and consolidated personal holding company income of the group, as determined...

  11. 75 FR 61790 - Capital Southwest Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    .... Applicant's Representations 1. Capital Southwest, a Texas corporation, is an internally managed, non... and four are not interested persons (the ``Non-interested Directors''). Capital Southwest has four... of the Board (the ``Compensation Committee'') is comprised solely of the Non-interested Directors....

  12. Marketing Across Cultures: Learning from U.S. Corporate Blunders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    Errors in judgment made in international marketing as a result of American corporate provincialism or cultural ignorance are chronicled, and ways to avoid similar problems in the future are discussed. The marketing blunders, which have been both expensive and embarrassing, include errors in language use and mistaken assumptions about cultural…

  13. The Intranet: A New Concept for Corporate Information Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbera, Jose

    The World Wide Web model has evolved within companies from a repository for notice boards to a new tool that can improve work productivity. Intranets, the internal or corporate internets, are likely to be the key information technology revolution for the remainder of this century. The intranet concept is derived from the present Internet as a…

  14. Utilizing Educational Corporate Culture To Create a Quality School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Bill

    Strategies for utilizing educational corporate culture to create a quality school are presented in this paper, which argues that the understanding of the shared belief system of organizational members is crucial to the process. Creating a quality school entails moving from a "teach the process" oriented model to one that internalizes the desired…

  15. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context.

  16. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  17. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries. PMID:17208716

  18. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context. PMID:27595527

  19. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries.

  20. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(3)-1 - Termination of agreement by domestic corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership. 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Internal... OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(3)-1... domestic corporation. (1) A domestic corporation which has entered into an agreement under section...

  1. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(3)-1 - Termination of agreement by domestic corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership. 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Internal... OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(3)-1... domestic corporation. (1) A domestic corporation which has entered into an agreement under section...

  2. Corporate U. Takes the Job Training Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Discusses corporations such as Sears, Motorola, Saturn, and Intel that have created their own corporate universities to train and retrain their workers. Highlights Motorola, the largest of the corporate universities. (JOW)

  3. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  4. 76 FR 53819 - Methods of Accounting Used by Corporations That Acquire the Assets of Other Corporations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... for Correction As published on August 1, 2011 (76 FR 45673), the final regulations (TD 9534) contain... Accordingly, the publication of the final regulations (TD 9534), which were the subject of FR Doc. 2011-19256... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BD81 Methods of Accounting Used by Corporations...

  5. Corporal Punishment and Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aucoin, Katherine J.; Frick, Paul J.; Bodin, S. Doug

    2006-01-01

    The association between corporal punishment and children's emotional and behavioral functioning was studied in a sample of 98 non-referred children with a mean age of 12.35 (SD=1.72) recruited from two school systems in the southeastern United States. Children were divided into those who had experienced no corporal punishment over approximately a…

  6. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  7. The Changing Shape of Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains two articles dealing with the changing shape of corporations. The article "Trends in Business Culture" argues that Wal-Mart's emergence as the largest corporation in the United States reflects the larger economic shift in the U.S. economy from production of goods to provision of abstract goods such as services and…

  8. Corporate Support of Education, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    This document was published by the Council for Aid to Education, the only national nonprofit organization that focuses on education and private giving, particularly corporate giving. The first part presents national estimates for corporate contributions made during 1993. Preliminary data for 1994 indicate little if any growth, though the outlook…

  9. Theory "W": The Corporate Warrior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes power structure of corporations functioning under Theory W in which single leaders, in partnership with trusted followers, achieve corporate success. Basis of this industrial structure is attributed to social and developmental structures of prehistoric man and city states. Dimensions of W, X, Y, and Z theories are discussed. (MBR)

  10. 12 CFR 559.4 - What activities are preapproved for service corporations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... financial clients or are generally finance-related: (1) Accounting or internal audit; (2) Advertising... corporation that is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as organized for charitable purposes under 26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and making a reasonable contribution to capitalize...

  11. 26 CFR 1.6038B-1 - Reporting of certain transfers to foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of certain transfers to foreign corporations. 1.6038B-1 Section 1.6038B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... either: (1) The transferor (or one or more successors) properly entered into a gain recognition...

  12. 26 CFR 1.565-5 - Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations. 1.565-5 Section 1.565-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Deduction for Dividends Paid § 1.565-5 Nonresident...

  13. 26 CFR 1.565-5 - Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations. 1.565-5 Section 1.565-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Deduction for Dividends Paid § 1.565-5 Nonresident...

  14. 26 CFR 1.565-5 - Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations. 1.565-5 Section 1.565-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Deduction for Dividends Paid § 1.565-5 Nonresident...

  15. 26 CFR 1.565-5 - Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations. 1.565-5 Section 1.565-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Deduction for Dividends Paid § 1.565-5 Nonresident...

  16. 26 CFR 1.565-5 - Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nonresident aliens and foreign corporations. 1.565-5 Section 1.565-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Deduction for Dividends Paid § 1.565-5 Nonresident...

  17. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act...

  18. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation...

  19. The Solar Development Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a proposed stand alone company, the Solar Development Corporation (SDC), to be a business development and financing entity for photovoltaic operations with the potential to be commercially sustainable. SDC will have a fully integrated policy advocacy link to the World Bank. SDC will define target countries where the potential exists for significant early market expansion. In those countries it will provide: market and business development services that will accelerate the growth of private firms and deepen the penetration of Solar Home Systems (SHS) and other rural PV applications in the market; and access to pre-commercial and parallel financing for private firms to (1) expand their capability in PV distribution businesses, and (2) strengthen their ability to provide credit to end users. SDC itself will not engage in direct financing of the final consumer. It is intended that as far as possible SDC`s finance will be provided in parallel with financing from Financial Intermediaries.

  20. Corporate social responsibility and the tobacco industry: hope or hype?

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, N

    2004-12-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) emerged from a realisation among transnational corporations of the need to account for and redress their adverse impact on society: specifically, on human rights, labour practices, and the environment. Two transnational tobacco companies have recently adopted CSR: Philip Morris, and British American Tobacco. This report explains the origins and theory behind CSR; examines internal company documents from Philip Morris showing the company's deliberations on the matter, and the company's perspective on its own behaviour; and reflects on whether marketing tobacco is antithetical to social responsibility.

  1. 26 CFR 31.3121(l)-1 - Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. 31.3121(l)-1 Section 31.3121(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(l)-1 Agreements entered into...

  2. 26 CFR 1.952-2 - Determination of gross income and taxable income of a foreign corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of gross income and taxable income of a foreign corporation. 1.952-2 Section 1.952-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE..., and T of chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code shall not apply and, for taxable years of a...

  3. 26 CFR 31.3121(l)-1 - Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. 31.3121(l)-1 Section 31.3121(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(l)-1 Agreements entered into...

  4. 26 CFR 31.3121(l)-1 - Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. 31.3121(l)-1 Section 31.3121(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(l)-1 Agreements entered into...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3121(l)-1 - Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. 31.3121(l)-1 Section 31.3121(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(l)-1 Agreements entered into...

  6. 26 CFR 31.3121(l)-1 - Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. 31.3121(l)-1 Section 31.3121(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(l)-1 Agreements entered into...

  7. 26 CFR 1.882-1 - Taxation of foreign corporations engaged in U.S. business or of foreign corporations treated as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... business in the United States by that corporation, such income or gains shall be subject to a flat tax of... allowed by sections 33, 38, and 40 shall not be allowed against the flat tax of 30 percent imposed by... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX...

  8. Integrating International Business Law Concepts into a High School Business Law Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Cathleen J.; McDonald, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines international business content for a high school business law curriculum: history of international business law, World Trade Organization, international disputes, contracts and sales, financing/banking, currency, taxation, intellectual property, transportation, and multinational corporations. Considers whether to teach international…

  9. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  10. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  11. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41..., AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Tobacco Products Importers § 41.193 Corporate documents. Every corporation... permit, required by § 41.191, a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of...

  12. 75 FR 64785 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... changes to the structure of the corporate credit union (corporate) system were warranted. 74 FR 6004 (Feb... related rule provisions. 74 FR 65210 (Dec. 9, 2009). The proposed revisions covered corporate capital... corporate's directors be representatives of NPCUs. +36 months. 704.15 Audit requirements..... No N/A....

  13. Familial violence socialization in childhood and later life approval of corporal punishment: a cross-cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Emily M

    2006-01-01

    The use of corporal punishment has been associated with several negative outcomes for children. As a result, scholars have begun to study factors that are associated with the approval of corporal punishment. Using data from the International Dating Violence Study, the author implemented analysis of covariance and multilevel modeling analyses to determine that there were significant associations among culture, personal and group experiences of familial violence socialization, and attitudes about corporal punishment.

  14. Corporal punishment in Tanzania's schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were interviewed. It was found that corporal punishment was the most common form of punishment in secondary schools. The majority of teachers supported its continued use, but believed in moderation. The majority of students and teachers were unaware of national laws to restrict corporal punishment. There was agreement between students and teachers that corporal punishment was used for major and minor student offences such as misbehaviour and tardiness. Students reported disliking the practice and believed it was ineffective and resulted in emotional, as well as physical, distress.

  15. Hot on the Corporate Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truelson, Judith A.

    1976-01-01

    The key sources for public company information are annual reports, company reports published by Moody's Investors Service and Standard and Poor's Corporation, industry surveys, and periodical indexes. (Author/PF)

  16. Computers, Networks and the Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Thomas W.; Rockart, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The ways in which computer networks are forging new kinds of markets and new ways to manage organizations are described. Discussed are the results of these innovations, which include changes in corporate structure and management style. (KR)

  17. Successful Corporate ID Project Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chaoyun Chaucer; Schwen, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a literature review on project management related to corporate instructional design activities. Highlights include project integration, strategic planning, resource allocation, optimizing performance and quality, constructing a project team, generating a productive working climate, and implementation strategies. (LRW)

  18. Making corporate compliance programs work.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, M J; Colyer, C

    2000-05-01

    Healthcare organizations have created corporate compliance programs in an effort to adhere to Federal government recommendations, minimize the risk of wrongful behavior, and possibly reduce fines that may result from a government investigation. Compliance programs may have undetected weaknesses. Corporate compliance officers, executives, and board members need to be certain that their organization's program has sufficient infrastructure, oversight, and resources; effective education and training; an effective mechanism (hotline) to receive reports of compliance problems; and ongoing auditing and monitoring capabilities.

  19. Results of phase change paint heat transfer tests utilizing 0.040 scale 50% forebody models (No. 82-0) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in AEDC VKF hypersonic tunnel B (test OH54A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    Results of aerodynamic heating tests conducted in October 1974 on a space shuttle orbiter model using the phase change paint technique are presented. The model was a 0.040 scale representation of the forward 50 percent of the orbiter. Surface roughness effects on boundary layer transition were investigated. Roughness was simulated by using steel balls varying in diameter from 0 (no balls) to 0.039 inch with 0.040 inch wide by 0.080 inch deep gaps. A nominal Mach number of 8 was tested with Reynolds number varying from 0.75 through 3.5 million per foot. Angle of attack was varied from 20 deg to 40 deg.

  20. Results of a landing gear loads test using a 0.0405-scale model (16-0) of the space shuttle orbiter in the Rockwell International NAAL wind tunnel (OA163), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a sting mounted scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter configuration in the low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to define the orbiter landing gear system pressure loading and to record landing gear door and strut hingemoment levels. Secondary objectives included recording the aerodynamic influence of various landing gear configurations on orbiter force data as well as investigating 40 x 80 ft. Ames Wind Tunnel strut simulation effects on both orbiter landing gear loads and aerodynamic characteristics. Testing was conducted at a Mach number of 0.17, free stream dynamic pressure of 42.5 PSF, and Reynolds number per unit length of 1.2 million per foot. Angle of attack variation was 0 to 20 while yaw angles ranged from -10 to 10 deg.

  1. Results from a convective heat transfer rate distribution test on a 0.0175 scale model (22-0) of the Rockwell International vehicle 4 space shuttle configuration in the AEDC-VKF tunnel B (OH49B), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The tests were conducted in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach number 8 to investigate reentry mode convective heat--transfer rates to the vehicle 4 shuttle orbiter. The thin skin thermocouple technique was used to obtain the heat transfer rate measurements. A complete set of tabulated data is presented.

  2. Subsonic and transonic hinge moment and wing bending/torsion characteristics of .015 scale space shuttle models 49-0 and 67-TS in the Rockwell International trisonic wind tunnel (IA70), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, M. T.; Mennell, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.015-scale representation of the integrated space shuttle launch vehicle in the trisonic wind tunnel. The primary test objective was to obtain subsonic and transonic elevon and bodyflap hinge moments and wing bending-torsion moments in the presence of the launch vehicle. Wing pressures were also recorded for the upper and lower right wing surfaces at two spanwise stations. The hinge moment, wing bending/torsion moments and wing pressure data were recorded over an angle-of-attack (alpha) range from -8 deg to +8 deg, and angle-of-sideslip (beta) range from -8 deg to +8 deg and at Mach numbers of 0.90, 1.12, 1.24 and 1.50. Tests were also conducted to determine the effects of the orbiter rear attach cross beam and the forward attach wedge and strut diameter. The orbiter alone was tested at 0.90 and 1.24 Mach number only.

  3. Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (model 49-O) in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (OA36)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Gillins, R. L.; Cleary, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of the 140A/B configuration components are reported for the fuselage, canopy, elevons, bodyflaps, pods, engine nozzles, rudder, vertical tail, and wing. The test facility, and data reduction procedures are described. Test results for each component are graphed, and tabulated source data are included.

  4. Results of investigations with an 0.015-scale model (49-0) of the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle 140A/B configuration with modified OMS pods and elevons in the AEDC VKF tunnel B (0A79)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.; Lindsay, A. I.

    1975-01-01

    Aerodynamic data obtained from wind tunnel tests of an 0.015-scale space shuttle vehicle Orbiter model of a 140A/B configuration with modified orbital manuevering system pods and elevons are documented. Force data was obtained at various control surface settings and Reynolds numbers in the angle of attack range of 15 deg to 45 deg and at angles of sideslip of -5 deg to +5 deg. Control surface variables included elevon, rudder, speed brake, and body flap configurations.

  5. Results of phase change paint heat transfer test utilizing 0.040-scale 50% forebody models (no. 82-0) of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Orbiter in AEDC VKF hypersonic tunnel B (test OH54B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating phase change paint tests for the space shuttle orbiter are reported. The model was a 0.040 scale representation of the forward 50% of the orbiter. Surface roughness effects on boundary layer transition were investigated. The roughness was simulated by steel balls 0.020 and 0.025 inch in diameter and a 0.25 in. diameter hole simulating the forward ET attach socket. A nominal Mach number of was tested with unit Reynolds number varying from 0.75 x 1 million ft through 3.5x 1 million ft. Angle of attack was varied from 20 degrees to 40 degrees.

  6. Heat transfer phase change paint tests of 0.0175-scale models (nos. 21-0 and 46-0) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the AEDC tunnel B hypersonic wind tunnel (test OH25A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a hypersonic wind tunnel using various truncated space shuttle orbiter configurations in an attempt to establish the optimum model size for other tests examining body shock-wing leading edge interference effects. The tests were conducted at Mach number 8 using the phase change paint technique. A test description, tabulated data, and tracings of isotherms made from photographs taken during the test are presented.

  7. Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale model (49-0) of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle orbiter in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (0A98)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Dzuibala, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test are presented; the model used for this test was 0.015-scale 140 A/B hybrid configuration of the space shuttle orbiter. The primary test objectives were to obtain incremental data on the effects of a sting mount on base pressures and force and moment data. The increments obtained included the addition of MPS nozzles as well as the deletion of the simulated sting mount. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from 12 to 42 degrees at 0 and 5 degrees angles of sideslip. The testing was accomplished at Mach 5.3 and Mach 10.3. The effects of various elevon, body flap, and speed brake settings were investigated, and static pressures were measured at the fuselage base for use in force-data reduction.

  8. Results of tests on a Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (-139 configuration) 0.0175-scale model (no. 29-0) in AEDC tunnel B to determine boundary layer characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, M.

    1975-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine boundary layer characteristics on the lower surface of a space shuttle orbiter. Total pressure and temperature profile data at various model stations were obtained using a movable, four-degree-of-freedom probe mechanism and static pressure taps on the model surface. During a typical run, the probe was located over a preselected model location, then driven down through the bondary layer until contact was made with the model surface.

  9. Aerodynamic results of an abort separation effects test (IA8) conducted in the NASA/ARC 14-foot transonic wind tunnel on a model (6-OTS) of the Rockwell International launch configuration integrated vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a 6-OTS 0.015-scale model. The Ames dual sting support separation rig was used to obtain grid-type data for tank-booster abort from orbiter (SSV). Freestream data were obtained for the orbiter to provide a baseline for evaluation of proximity effects. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 1.1, and Reynolds number per foot varying from 2.1 million to 3.9 million. Data are not presented. Because of balance failure, a very substantial portion of the test was run with a dummy balance in the tank boosters configuration.

  10. Results of a landing gear loads test using a 0.0405-scale model (16-0) of the space shuttle orbiter in the Rockwell International NAAL wind tunnel (OA163B), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic loads on a sting mounted 0.045-scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter configuration were measured to verify orbiter landing gear system pressure loading and hinge moment levels. Pressure, force, and hinge moment data, recorded over smaller increments of the landing gear deployment schedule to insure data accuracy and to investigate the effects of asymmetric gear deployment on all parameters, are presented. Tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.17, and freestream dynamic pressure of 42.5 psf, and a Reynolds number per unit length of 1.2 million foot. Angle of attack variation was -2 to 10 degrees while angles of sideslip varied from -5 to 5 degrees.

  11. 26 CFR 1.56-0 - Table of contents to § 1.56-1, adjustment for book income of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... book income of corporations. 1.56-0 Section 1.56-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE..., adjustment for book income of corporations. (a) Computation of the book income adjustment. (1) In general. (2) Taxpayers subject to the book income adjustment. (3) Consolidated returns. (4) Examples. (b) Adjusted...

  12. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....6103(l)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-3 - Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and return information. 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE...(l)(2)-3 Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of...

  14. 26 CFR 1.56-0 - Table of contents to § 1.56-1, adjustment for book income of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... book income of corporations. 1.56-0 Section 1.56-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE..., adjustment for book income of corporations. (a) Computation of the book income adjustment. (1) In general. (2) Taxpayers subject to the book income adjustment. (3) Consolidated returns. (4) Examples. (b) Adjusted...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-3 - Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and return information. 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE...(l)(2)-3 Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-3 - Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and return information. 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE...(l)(2)-3 Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-3 - Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and return information. 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE...(l)(2)-3 Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of...

  18. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....6103(l)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...

  19. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....6103(l)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...

  20. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....6103(l)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...

  1. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-3 - Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Benefit Guaranty Corporation of certain returns and return information. 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE...(l)(2)-3 Disclosure to Department of Labor and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation of...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....6103(l)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information to Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...

  3. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(1)-1 - Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. 36.3121(l)(1)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(1)-1 Internal Revenue... TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(1)-1 Agreements entered into by domestic corporations with respect to foreign subsidiaries. (a) In general. (1)...

  4. A Billion-Dollar "Typo" Is Found in IRS Data on Corporate Giving to Non-Profit Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassmuck, Karen

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study by officials of the Council for Aid to Education uncovered a major error in the Internal Revenue Service's 1987 corporate-contributions data. The new figures, representing contributions from 1986 to 1989, reflect a continued but less dramatic growth in corporate philanthropy. (MLW)

  5. 26 CFR 1.882-2 - Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Income of foreign corporations treated as... § 1.882-2 Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business. (a... such real property, may elect, pursuant to section 882(d) and § 1.871-10, to treat all such income...

  6. 26 CFR 1.882-2 - Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Income of foreign corporations treated as... § 1.882-2 Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business. (a... such real property, may elect, pursuant to section 882(d) and § 1.871-10, to treat all such income...

  7. 26 CFR 1.882-2 - Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Income of foreign corporations treated as... § 1.882-2 Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business. (a... such real property, may elect, pursuant to section 882(d) and § 1.871-10, to treat all such income...

  8. 26 CFR 1.882-2 - Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Income of foreign corporations treated as... § 1.882-2 Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business. (a... such real property, may elect, pursuant to section 882(d) and § 1.871-10, to treat all such income...

  9. 26 CFR 1.882-2 - Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Income of foreign corporations treated as... Income of foreign corporations treated as effectively connected with U.S. business. (a) Election as to... property, may elect, pursuant to section 882(d) and § 1.871-10, to treat all such income as income which...

  10. 26 CFR 1.941-2 - Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Meaning of terms used in connection with China... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-2 Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations. (a) A China Trade Act...

  11. 26 CFR 1.6072-3 - Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Income tax due dates postponed in case of China... Documents § 1.6072-3 Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations. (a) With... tax return of any corporation organized under the China Trade Act of 1922 (15 U.S.C. ch. 4),...

  12. 26 CFR 1.6072-3 - Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Income tax due dates postponed in case of China... and Other Documents § 1.6072-3 Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations..., 1956, the income tax return of any corporation organized under the China Trade Act of 1922 (15...

  13. 26 CFR 1.941-2 - Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Meaning of terms used in connection with China... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-2 Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations. (a) A China Trade...

  14. 26 CFR 1.941-2 - Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Meaning of terms used in connection with China... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-2 Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations. (a) A China Trade...

  15. 26 CFR 1.941-2 - Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Meaning of terms used in connection with China... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-2 Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations. (a) A China Trade...

  16. 26 CFR 1.6072-3 - Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Income tax due dates postponed in case of China... and Other Documents § 1.6072-3 Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations..., 1956, the income tax return of any corporation organized under the China Trade Act of 1922 (15...

  17. 26 CFR 1.941-2 - Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Meaning of terms used in connection with China... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-2 Meaning of terms used in connection with China Trade Act corporations. (a) A China Trade...

  18. 26 CFR 1.6072-3 - Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Income tax due dates postponed in case of China... and Other Documents § 1.6072-3 Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations..., 1956, the income tax return of any corporation organized under the China Trade Act of 1922 (15...

  19. 26 CFR 1.6072-3 - Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Income tax due dates postponed in case of China... and Other Documents § 1.6072-3 Income tax due dates postponed in case of China Trade Act corporations..., 1956, the income tax return of any corporation organized under the China Trade Act of 1922 (15...

  20. 26 CFR 1.1375-1 - Tax imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax imposed when passive investment income of... imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and profits exceed 25...) imposes a tax on the income of certain S corporations that have passive investment income. In the case...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1375-1 - Tax imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Tax imposed when passive investment income of... passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and profits exceed 25 percent of... on the income of certain S corporations that have passive investment income. In the case of a...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1375-1 - Tax imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax imposed when passive investment income of... imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and profits exceed 25...) imposes a tax on the income of certain S corporations that have passive investment income. In the case...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1375-1 - Tax imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax imposed when passive investment income of... imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and profits exceed 25...) imposes a tax on the income of certain S corporations that have passive investment income. In the case...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1375-1 - Tax imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax imposed when passive investment income of... imposed when passive investment income of corporation having subchapter C earnings and profits exceed 25...) imposes a tax on the income of certain S corporations that have passive investment income. In the case...

  5. 26 CFR 1.956-1T - Shareholder's pro rata share of a controlled foreign corporation's increase in earnings invested...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shareholder's pro rata share of a controlled foreign corporation's increase in earnings invested in United States property (temporary). 1.956-1T... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.956-1T Shareholder's pro rata...

  6. 26 CFR 1.956-1 - Shareholder's pro rata share of a controlled foreign corporation's increase in earnings invested...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shareholder's pro rata share of a controlled...) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.956-1 Shareholder's pro rata share of a controlled...) and the regulations thereunder, a United States shareholder of a controlled foreign corporation...

  7. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley),\\1\\ a Class III rail carrier... White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and was indirectly controlled by Berkshire Hathaway...

  8. 77 FR 41808 - General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics... Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Sunrise, Florida. The determination was issued on...

  9. 78 FR 36523 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Toshiba International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... 400) including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 13857, 03-01-2013). The...; Toshiba International Corporation; (Hybrid Electric Vehicle Motors and Generators Production);...

  10. Transnational corporations and health: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Baum, Frances Elaine; Margaret Anaf, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Transnational corporations (TNCs) are part of an economic system of global capitalism that operates under a neoliberal regime underpinned by strong support from international organisations such as the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and most nation states. Although TNCs have grown in power and influence and have had a significant impact on population health over the past three decades, public health has not developed an integrated research agenda to study them. This article outlines the shape of such an agenda and argues that it is vital that research into the public health impact of TNCs be pursued and funded as a matter of priority. The four areas of the agenda are: assessing the health and equity impacts of TNCs; evaluating the effectiveness of government regulation to mitigate health and equity impacts of TNCs; studying the work of activist groups and networks that highlight adverse impacts of TNCs; and considering how regulation of capitalism could better promote a healthier and more equitable corporate sector. PMID:25674798

  11. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector

  12. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector PMID:15779471

  13. 75 FR 8796 - Use of Controlled Corporations To Avoid the Application of Section 304; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... were published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 (74 FR 69021) regarding certain... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI14 Use of Controlled Corporations To Avoid the Application of Section 304; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION:...

  14. Using English as the Common Corporate Language in a German Multinational

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Jonathan S.; Wallace, James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine a German multinational that uses English as the common corporate language (CCL) for internal communications with its international subsidiaries/agencies. It examines use of English within the workplace, and problems/opportunities it presents to those who use it. Design/methodology: The questionnaire was piloted…

  15. 76 FR 78591 - Corporate Reorganizations; Guidance on the Measurement of Continuity of Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BK43 Corporate Reorganizations; Guidance on the Measurement of Continuity of Interest AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice...

  16. 75 FR 63380 - Exclusions From Gross Income of Foreign Corporations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Friday, September 17, 2010 (75 FR 56858) under section 883(a) and (c) of the Internal Revenue Code, concerning the exclusion from gross income of income derived by certain foreign corporations from the... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BF90 Exclusions From Gross Income of Foreign...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1081-4 - Exchanges of property for property by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporations. 1.1081-4 Section 1.1081-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exchanges in Obedience to S.e.c. Orders § 1.1081... gain is not recognized are set forth in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section....

  18. 26 CFR 1.1081-4 - Exchanges of property for property by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporations. 1.1081-4 Section 1.1081-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exchanges in Obedience to S.e.c. Orders § 1.1081... gain is not recognized are set forth in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section....

  19. 26 CFR 1.1081-4 - Exchanges of property for property by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporations. 1.1081-4 Section 1.1081-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exchanges in Obedience to S.e.c. Orders § 1.1081... gain is not recognized are set forth in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section....

  20. 26 CFR 1.1081-4 - Exchanges of property for property by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporations. 1.1081-4 Section 1.1081-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exchanges in Obedience to S.e.c. Orders § 1.1081... gain is not recognized are set forth in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section....

  1. 26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related corporations with... this section. Section 3121(s) and this section apply only to remuneration disbursed in the form...

  2. Corporate compliance and voluntary disclosure.

    PubMed

    Schiff, A B

    1995-09-01

    In any event, the decision to institute a corporate compliance program is a relatively simple one. In view of the ambiguity surrounding certain fraud and abuse provisions, and the corporate "death sentence" that may result from program exclusion, a compliance program is always sound corporate policy. To be sure, if the compliance program is administered improperly, it can actually increase the likelihood of whistleblower actions and create a body of potentially hurtful documentation. But these dangers can be minimized by structuring the program to protect the self-evaluative process through relevant privileges. The risks also pale in comparison to the exposure to criminal or exclusionary sanctions when improper conduct goes undetected by an organization. PMID:10144892

  3. Corporate compliance and voluntary disclosure.

    PubMed

    Schiff, A B

    1995-09-01

    In any event, the decision to institute a corporate compliance program is a relatively simple one. In view of the ambiguity surrounding certain fraud and abuse provisions, and the corporate "death sentence" that may result from program exclusion, a compliance program is always sound corporate policy. To be sure, if the compliance program is administered improperly, it can actually increase the likelihood of whistleblower actions and create a body of potentially hurtful documentation. But these dangers can be minimized by structuring the program to protect the self-evaluative process through relevant privileges. The risks also pale in comparison to the exposure to criminal or exclusionary sanctions when improper conduct goes undetected by an organization.

  4. 26 CFR 1.1363-1 - Effect of election on corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect of election on corporation. 1.1363-1...) Effective date. This section applies to taxable years of corporations beginning after December 31, 1992. For... legislative history and these regulations. See Notice 92-56, 1992-49 I.R.B. (see § 601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b)...

  5. Identification of Aircraft Tubing by Rockwell Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, Horace C.

    1930-01-01

    Seamless steel tubing is today the principal material of construction for aircraft. The commercial grade of tubing containing about 0.10 to 0.20% carbon at first used is being superseded by two grades which are approved by the army and navy, and which are also becoming standard for commercial airplanes.

  6. Unmuzzling America's Corporations: Corporate Speech and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbeck, Wayne

    Under the "commercial speech doctrine," corporations were restricted for many years from speaking out on public issues or engaging in certain advertising practices. This "doctrine" was based on a case from the 1940s, in which the court ruled that purely commercial advertising had no constitutional protection from government restraint. Since 1975,…

  7. Education for International Competence in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinniman, Andrew, Ed.; Holzner, Burkart, Ed.

    This book discusses international education and the emergence of Pennsylvania's Partnership for International Competence (PPIC), a partnership that evolved to guarantee that Pennsylvania remains a major actor in the world economy. Individuals from the corporate, labor, educational, and government sectors contributed articles to the areas of…

  8. 26 CFR 1.514(d)-1 - Basis of debt-financed property acquired in corporate liquidation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Basis of debt-financed property acquired in corporate liquidation. 1.514(d)-1 Section 1.514(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of...

  9. 26 CFR 1.108(i)-2T - Application of section 108(i) to partnerships and S corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application of section 108(i) to partnerships and S corporations (temporary). 1.108(i)-2T Section 1.108(i)-2T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Excluded from Gross Income §...

  10. 26 CFR 1.108(i)-2 - Application of section 108(i) to partnerships and S corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application of section 108(i) to partnerships and S corporations. 1.108(i)-2 Section 1.108(i)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Excluded from Gross Income § 1.108(i)-2...

  11. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-3 - Treatment of transfers of stock or securities to foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of transfers of stock or securities to foreign corporations. 1.367(a)-3 Section 1.367(a)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... enters into a five-year gain recognition agreement with respect to the transferred stock or securities...

  12. Save Money with a Corporate Style Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Paul R.

    1995-01-01

    Argues that corporate style guides create consistency in documents, promote a professional image, train new employees, and define document generation. Describes how to develop a corporate style guide. (SR)

  13. Beyond Compliance: Integrating Nonproliferation into Corporate Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates nonproliferation as a potential corporate sustainability value. It reviews the history of corporate sustainability, builds the case for nonproliferation as a sustainability value, and develops recommendations for the integration of nonproliferation into the frameworks of sustainability.

  14. Developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Janice A; Sullivan, Trent

    2002-09-01

    This article presents the process that a large urban tertiary care hospital engaged in when developing a corporate compliance program for nursing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how nurse executives can successfully implement a comprehensive and practical nursing corporate compliance program. This article describes in detail the 5 steps the hospital took to develop its nursing corporate compliance program and provides examples of tools to guide you in developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

  15. Corporal Punishment in Tanzania's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were…

  16. Corporation Schools: 1900-1930.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Colleen A.

    Because of the increased need for a trained labor force to work in growing industries and because the public schools had failed to provide such workers, many corporations conducted their own training programs during the period 1900-1930. Departing from the older methods of training foremen and having them train the workers, these schools provided…

  17. Power, ethics, and corporate dentistry.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Alec; Parker, M Alec

    2013-01-01

    The North Carolina Dental Association recently sought to place clear statutory limits on the influence of corporate, nondental interests over dentists practices' decision-making. This report describes the two-year legislative battle with well-funded and politically connected parties that ultimately resulted in laws that protect patients' rights to be treated by a dentist free of outside commercial interests.

  18. Canonical considerations in corporate restructuring.

    PubMed

    Holland, S

    1985-03-01

    Religious institutes sponsoring Catholic health facilities face competitive economic pressures that impel them to seek corporate restructuring and joint ventures to fulfill their mission to the poor. They especially must look to the Church's Code of Canon Law to protect ecclesiastical goods and maintain their Catholic identity when entering such ventures. The U.S. bishops directives also assist in guaranteeing patient expectations that the health facility will observe the Church's ethical principles. Institutes first must ensure that subsidiaries will operate according to Catholic mission and philosophy. The canons delineate proper protection of assets and identify ends toward which the religious must apply temporal goods, such as supporting clergy and performing charitable works. Alienation, or conveyance of goods, is a critical consideration in such financial transactions; canons specify the institute's administrative limits and require superiors' written permission along with their councils' consent. All involved must be "thoroughly informed concerning the economic situation," show "just cause" for the transaction, and obtain expert estimates of property values. Religious administrators retain certain faith and executive obligations, such as amending the charter, appointing the board, and merging or dissolving the corporation. With the canons they help to ensure that collaborative efforts preserve the institute's corporate mission and allow religious to carry out their responsibility for ecclesiastical goods. Though alternatives to corporate ventures may be limited, options regarding how to structure and with whom to affiliate do exist. Sponsoring bodies dedicated to providing high-quality care must explore these options

  19. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, James F.; Maynard, William S.

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the possible implications of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for employee expectations and satisfactions. Specifically, interest centered on the question of how perceptions of an organization's involvement in the resolution of current societal problems might relate to members' expectations of equitable job rewards and…

  20. Corporal Punishment Foes Strike Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaar, Karen

    1977-01-01

    Discussion of U.S. Supreme Court decision (Ingrahm V. Wright) asserting that the Constitution's Eighth Amendment does not protect school children against cruel and unusual punishment and that the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment does not require notice and a hearing prior to the imposition of corporal punishment in the public…

  1. Black Managers in White Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, John P.

    The study examines the major determinants of the career patterns of black managers in white businesses and the effects of corporations on their black managers' identities and relationships to the black community. Analyzed were occupational mobility theories; white and black managers' career patterns, goals, and related factors; company employment…

  2. Business Web: Discovering Corporate Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakshminarayanan, Sambhavi; Rain, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Business education requires students to have knowledge about corporations and the relationships between them. Sometimes students, in particular non-traditional ones, may not have either this knowledge or the skills required to obtain it. The Business Web guides students in acquiring information about businesses and understanding their…

  3. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs). 704.11 Section 704.11 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.11 Corporate Credit Union Service...

  4. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123 Section 31.123 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to...

  5. Corporal Punishment: Legalities, Realities, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchey, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a quiz that will help readers determine the reliability of their own perceptions relating to corporal punishment in schools. Discusses U.S. Courts and corporal punishment, worldwide and nationwide legality, and the realities of corporal punishment in the United States. Discusses implications for what teachers can do to address corporal…

  6. 12 CFR 583.8 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporation. 583.8 Section 583.8 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.8 Corporation. The term Corporation means the Federal...

  7. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  8. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  9. 12 CFR 563.201 - Corporate opportunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-OPERATIONS Reporting and Bonding § 563.201 Corporate opportunity. (a) If you are a director or officer of a... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate opportunity. 563.201 Section 563.201... duty to a savings association, you must not take advantage of corporate opportunities belonging to...

  10. 76 FR 10209 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... recently finalized changes to its Corporate Credit Union Rule, 12 CFR part 704. 75 FR 64786 (October 20... requirements and process for chartering corporate Federal credit unions (FCUs). 75 FR 60651 (October 1, 2010... requisite skills--including leadership--to make the proposed corporate a success. One commenter...

  11. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  12. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  13. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  14. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  15. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  16. 27 CFR 40.63 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 40.63... PROCESSED TOBACCO Qualification Requirements for Manufacturers of Tobacco Products § 40.63 Corporate... furnish with its application for permit, required by § 40.62, a true copy of the corporate charter or...

  17. 27 CFR 44.83 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 44.83... Proprietors § 44.83 Corporate documents. Every corporation, before commencing business as an export warehouse proprietor, shall furnish with its application for permit required by § 44.82, a true copy of the...

  18. 46 CFR 67.39 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.39 Corporation. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or a recreational endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It is... purpose of obtaining a fishery endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It...

  19. 46 CFR 67.39 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.39 Corporation. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or a recreational endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It is... purpose of obtaining a fishery endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It...

  20. Corporate Support of Higher Education, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Some of the results of the fourth Annual Survey of Corporate Contributions are presented in this report on corporate support of higher education for 1977. Usable questionnaires were returned by 816 companies. A discussion of national trends considers corporate support of higher education vs. college and university expenditures, increased student…

  1. Efficiency, Corporate Power, and the Bigness Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Walter; Brock, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Concludes that (1) the current infatuation with corporate bigness is void of credible empirical support; (2) disproportionate corporate size and industry concentration are incompatible with and destructive to good economic performance; and (3) structurally oriented antitrust policy must be revitalized to combat the burdens of corporate bigness.…

  2. Managing corporate knowledge can yield significant dividends.

    PubMed

    Sauer, S D

    1996-12-01

    Integrated delivery systems (IDSs) that track projects, initiatives, and task force undertakings system-wide are better able to effectively manage their corporate knowledge. IDS executives must understand how valuable corporate knowledge is, and should manage their organizations' corporate knowledge as carefully as their capital investments. PMID:10163001

  3. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies for... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL...

  4. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  5. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  6. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  7. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  8. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  9. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  10. The Knowledge-Productive Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansink, Femke; Kwakman, Kitty; Streumer, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper the concept of knowledge production is used as a framework to study Dutch corporate universities. Knowledge production serves not simply as a desirable aim of corporate universities, as the concept also offers guidelines for the design of corporate universities. The purpose is to clarify the extent to which corporate…

  11. Proficiency English Language Testing of International Employees: A Case History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arena, Louis A.

    Developments in one major corporation's ongoing program to evaluate employees' English language proficiency are discussed. The testing program was developed by the multinational E. I. DuPont de Nemours corporation for use with international employees. The history and rationale for the selection of the five English tests used are outlined, the…

  12. Multinational Corporations and Health Care in the United States and Latin America: Strategies, Actions, and Effects*

    PubMed Central

    JASSO-AGUILAR, REBECA; WAITZKIN, HOWARD; LANDWEHR, ANGELA

    2010-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations’ access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector. PMID:15779471

  13. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals.

  14. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... second-tier corporation in the third-tier corporation. (ii) Fourth-, fifth-, or sixth-tier corporation. In the case of dividends paid to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-tier corporation by a foreign corporation in a taxable year beginning after August 5, 1997, the foreign corporation is a fourth-, fifth-,...

  15. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... second-tier corporation in the third-tier corporation. (ii) Fourth-, fifth-, or sixth-tier corporation. In the case of dividends paid to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-tier corporation by a foreign corporation in a taxable year beginning after August 5, 1997, the foreign corporation is a fourth-, fifth-,...

  16. Economic values and corporate financial statements.

    PubMed

    Magness, Vanessa

    2003-07-01

    Corporate financial statements do not include environmental values. This deficiency has contributed to the criticism that company managers do not include environmental impacts in the internal decision-making process. The accounting profession has not developed effective environmental reporting guidelines. This situation contributes to a second problem: the apparent inability of corporate reports to provide useful information to external parties. It has been suggested that by using nonmarket valuation methodologies, financial statements can be used to measure progress toward sustainable development. Nonmarket valuations are not generally accepted by the accounting profession. They are too subjective to support effective decisions, and too costly to obtain. Furthermore, demand for this sort of information appears small. Some of these issues may be resolved over time. The most serious challenge, however, concerns how enhanced financial reports would be used. Financial statements are supposed to help investors assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of future cash flows. A substantial portion of environmental value is based on nonuse benefits, much of which will never be realized in company cash flows. In other words, the role of financial statements would have to change. Furthermore, since there is no general agreement as to the meaning of "sustainable development," efforts to operationalize the term have been fraught with difficulty. Moreover, monetization of environmental values could jeopardize their preservation, leaving some to question the overall objective of this form of reporting. For these reasons, while it is to be hoped that better reporting of environmental impacts will be forthcoming, the greatest advances will likely be outside the financial statements themselves.

  17. Economic values and corporate financial statements.

    PubMed

    Magness, Vanessa

    2003-07-01

    Corporate financial statements do not include environmental values. This deficiency has contributed to the criticism that company managers do not include environmental impacts in the internal decision-making process. The accounting profession has not developed effective environmental reporting guidelines. This situation contributes to a second problem: the apparent inability of corporate reports to provide useful information to external parties. It has been suggested that by using nonmarket valuation methodologies, financial statements can be used to measure progress toward sustainable development. Nonmarket valuations are not generally accepted by the accounting profession. They are too subjective to support effective decisions, and too costly to obtain. Furthermore, demand for this sort of information appears small. Some of these issues may be resolved over time. The most serious challenge, however, concerns how enhanced financial reports would be used. Financial statements are supposed to help investors assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of future cash flows. A substantial portion of environmental value is based on nonuse benefits, much of which will never be realized in company cash flows. In other words, the role of financial statements would have to change. Furthermore, since there is no general agreement as to the meaning of "sustainable development," efforts to operationalize the term have been fraught with difficulty. Moreover, monetization of environmental values could jeopardize their preservation, leaving some to question the overall objective of this form of reporting. For these reasons, while it is to be hoped that better reporting of environmental impacts will be forthcoming, the greatest advances will likely be outside the financial statements themselves. PMID:14703909

  18. Effective health care corporate compliance.

    PubMed

    Saum, T B; Byassee, J

    2000-01-01

    The pace and intensity of oversight and investigation of health care organizations has greatly increased at all levels. Well run organizations with ethical management committed to following all laws and regulations are still at risk for compliance violations and punitive penalties. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, organizations with an "effective" corporate compliance program may receive reduced penalties. The seven components of an effective program as defined in the guidelines are: (1) Standards and procedures; (2) oversight responsibilities; (3) employee training; (4) monitoring and auditing; (5) reporting systems; (6) enforcement and discipline; and (7) response and prevention. Lack of a compliance program needlessly exposes the organization to an avoidable risk of damage from non-compliance--whether intentional or not. Moreover, an effective program can contribute to the efficient operation of the organization and be a key piece of its corporate culture. PMID:10947465

  19. A look at Bodies Corporate.

    PubMed

    Chope, J

    1997-10-11

    One of the most exclusive clubs in the dental world comprises the 27 members who can call themselves Dental Bodies Corporate (DBCs). Among this elite are well-known names such as Dental World, Dencare, Whitecross, Benedent and also Oakley, which is owned by Denplan. In the UK only dentists and DBCs are permitted to carry on the business of dentistry. DBCs are simply companies whose directors (the majority of whom must be dentists) are protected by the laws of limited liability, with the purpose of encouraging investment by shareholders (who need not be dentists). This article outlines the story of how this select band of Corporate Bodies gained their exclusive status which goes back to the very earliest days of our profession.

  20. Effective health care corporate compliance.

    PubMed

    Saum, T B; Byassee, J

    2000-01-01

    The pace and intensity of oversight and investigation of health care organizations has greatly increased at all levels. Well run organizations with ethical management committed to following all laws and regulations are still at risk for compliance violations and punitive penalties. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, organizations with an "effective" corporate compliance program may receive reduced penalties. The seven components of an effective program as defined in the guidelines are: (1) Standards and procedures; (2) oversight responsibilities; (3) employee training; (4) monitoring and auditing; (5) reporting systems; (6) enforcement and discipline; and (7) response and prevention. Lack of a compliance program needlessly exposes the organization to an avoidable risk of damage from non-compliance--whether intentional or not. Moreover, an effective program can contribute to the efficient operation of the organization and be a key piece of its corporate culture.

  1. Stakeholder demands and corporate environmental coping strategies in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Tang, Shui-Yan; Lo, Carlos Wing-Hung; Zhan, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how stakeholder demand and compliance capacity jointly shape corporate environmental coping strategies and subsequently environmental protection practices. A four-dimensional classification of coping strategies-formalism, accommodation, referencing, and self-determination-is conceptualized. Drawing on survey and interview data collected from manufacturing enterprises in China between 2010 and 2012, the paper shows that compared with formalism and accommodation, coping strategies of referencing and self-determination are associated with stronger environmental protection practices. Enterprises adjust their coping strategies by taking into account the constraints defined by both their internal and external environments. The results also demonstrate the potential synergetic effects of state and non-state stakeholders working together in promoting better corporate environmental coping strategies and environmental practices in China.

  2. Corporate psychopathy: Talking the walk.

    PubMed

    Babiak, Paul; Neumann, Craig S; Hare, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    There is a very large literature on the important role of psychopathy in the criminal justice system. We know much less about corporate psychopathy and its implications, in large part because of the difficulty in obtaining the active cooperation of business organizations. This has left us with only a few small-sample studies, anecdotes, and speculation. In this study, we had a unique opportunity to examine psychopathy and its correlates in a sample of 203 corporate professionals selected by their companies to participate in management development programs. The correlates included demographic and status variables, as well as in-house 360 degrees assessments and performance ratings. The prevalence of psychopathic traits-as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and a Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV) "equivalent"-was higher than that found in community samples. The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that the underlying latent structure of psychopathy in our corporate sample was consistent with that model found in community and offender studies. Psychopathy was positively associated with in-house ratings of charisma/presentation style (creativity, good strategic thinking and communication skills) but negatively associated with ratings of responsibility/performance (being a team player, management skills, and overall accomplishments).

  3. Covenant model of corporate compliance. "Corporate integrity" program meets mission, not just legal, requirements.

    PubMed

    Tuohey, J F

    1998-01-01

    Catholic healthcare should establish comprehensive compliance strategies, beyond following Medicare reimbursement laws, that reflect mission and ethics. A covenant model of business ethics--rather than a self-interest emphasis on contracts--can help organizations develop a creed to focus on obligations and trust in their relationships. The corporate integrity program (CIP) of Mercy Health System Oklahoma promotes its mission and interests, educates and motivates its employees, provides assurance of systemwide commitment, and enforces CIP policies and procedures. Mercy's creed, based on its mission statement and core values, articulates responsibilities regarding patients and providers, business partners, society and the environment, and internal relationships. The CIP is carried out through an integrated network of committees, advocacy teams, and an expanded institutional review board. Two documents set standards for how Mercy conducts external affairs and clarify employee codes of conduct. PMID:10181597

  4. Covenant model of corporate compliance. "Corporate integrity" program meets mission, not just legal, requirements.

    PubMed

    Tuohey, J F

    1998-01-01

    Catholic healthcare should establish comprehensive compliance strategies, beyond following Medicare reimbursement laws, that reflect mission and ethics. A covenant model of business ethics--rather than a self-interest emphasis on contracts--can help organizations develop a creed to focus on obligations and trust in their relationships. The corporate integrity program (CIP) of Mercy Health System Oklahoma promotes its mission and interests, educates and motivates its employees, provides assurance of systemwide commitment, and enforces CIP policies and procedures. Mercy's creed, based on its mission statement and core values, articulates responsibilities regarding patients and providers, business partners, society and the environment, and internal relationships. The CIP is carried out through an integrated network of committees, advocacy teams, and an expanded institutional review board. Two documents set standards for how Mercy conducts external affairs and clarify employee codes of conduct.

  5. Corporate moral responsibility in health care.

    PubMed

    Wilmot, S

    2000-01-01

    The question of corporate moral responsibility--of whether it makes sense to hold an organisation corporately morally responsible for its actions, rather than holding responsible the individuals who contributed to that action--has been debated over a number of years in the business ethics literature. However, it has had little attention in the world of health care ethics. Health care in the United Kingdom (UK) is becoming an increasingly corporate responsibility, so the issue is increasingly relevant in the health care context, and it is worth considering whether the specific nature of health care raises special questions around corporate moral responsibility. For instance, corporate responsibility has usually been considered in the context of private corporations, and the organisations of health care in the UK are mainly state bodies. However, there is enough similarity in relevant respects between state organisations and private corporations, for the question of corporate responsibility to be equally applicable. Also, health care is characterised by professions with their own systems of ethical regulation. However, this feature does not seriously diminish the importance of the corporate responsibility issue, and the importance of the latter is enhanced by recent developments. But there is one major area of difference. Health care, as an activity with an intrinsically moral goal, differs importantly from commercial activities that are essentially amoral, in that it narrows the range of opportunities for corporate wrongdoing, and also makes such organisations more difficult to punish.

  6. Corporal punishment by parents and associated child behaviors and experiences: a meta-analytic and theoretical review.

    PubMed

    Gershoff, Elizabeth Thompson

    2002-07-01

    Although the merits of parents using corporal punishment to discipline children have been argued for decades, a thorough understanding of whether and how corporal punishment affects children has not been reached. Toward this end, the author first presents the results of meta-analyses of the association between parental corporal punishment and 11 child behaviors and experiences. Parental corporal punishment was associated with all child constructs, including higher levels of immediate compliance and aggression and lower levels of moral internalization and mental health. The author then presents a process-context model to explain how parental corporal punishment might cause particular child outcomes and considers alternative explanations. The article concludes by identifying 7 major remaining issues for future research.

  7. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide. PMID:25080670

  8. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide.

  9. 78 FR 52982 - Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ..., Business Information Services, Corporate Marketing, Credit Services, Data ] Management, Decision Analytics..., Global Corporate Systems, Legal & Regulatory, Risk Management, Strategic Business Development and... & Regulatory, Risk Management, Strategic Business Development and Investor Relations), Credit Services,...

  10. 26 CFR 1.972-1 - Consolidation of group of export trade corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... owns 20 percent of the stock of C Corporation. Domestic corporations N and R own 30 percent and 10... indirectly owned (through F Corporation) interest in C Corporation. Either N Corporation or R Corporation, or..., neither N Corporation nor R Corporation may elect to consolidate the “A” chain unless M Corporation...

  11. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1991-01-01

    In the 1980s, competitive success came mostly from achieving cost and quality advantages over rivals in existing markets. In the 1990s, it will come from building and dominating fundamentally new markets. Core competencies are one prerequisite for creating new markets. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing are the keys that unlock them. McKinsey Award winners Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad argue that corporate imagination quickens when companies escape the tyranny of their served markets. (Motorola, for example, sees itself as a leader in wireless communications, not just as a maker of beepers and mobile phones). Think about needs and functionalities instead of marketing's more conventional customer-product grid. Overturn traditional price/performance assumptions. (Fidelity Investments unlocked a vast new market by packaging sophisticated investment vehicles for middle-income investors.) And lead customers rather than simply follow them. Creating new markets is a risky business, however--a lot like shooting arrows into the mist. Imaginative companies minimize the risk not by being fast followers but through the process the authors call expeditionary marketing: low-cost, fast-paced market incursions designed to bring the target quickly into view. Toshiba introduced laptop computers to the market at such a blistering pace that it could explore every conceivable niche--and afford an occasional failure without compromising its credibility with customers. To stimulate corporate imagination, top management needs to redefine failure and develop new time- and risk-adjusted yardsticks for managerial performance. Managers must be encouraged to stretch their company's opportunity horizon well beyond the boundaries of its current businesses. PMID:10112922

  12. The end of corporate imperialism.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be.

  13. The end of corporate imperialism.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be. PMID:12884671

  14. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  15. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  16. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  17. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  18. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  19. 26 CFR 1.6074-1 - Time and place for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... estimated income tax by corporations. 1.6074-1 Section 1.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Time for Filing Returns and Other Documents § 1.6074-1 Time and place for filing declarations of estimated income tax...

  20. 26 CFR 1.963-5 - Foreign corporations with variation in foreign tax rate because of distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subject to foreign income tax at a flat rate of 40 percent; and B Corporation is subject to a foreign... tax rate because of distributions. 1.963-5 Section 1.963-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign...

  1. 26 CFR 1.963-5 - Foreign corporations with variation in foreign tax rate because of distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... subject to foreign income tax at a flat rate of 40 percent; and B Corporation is subject to a foreign... tax rate because of distributions. 1.963-5 Section 1.963-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled...

  2. Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Sustainability Education in AACSB Undergraduate and Graduate Marketing Curricula: A Benchmark Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Jeananne; Hair, Joseph F., Jr.; Ragland, Charles B.; Schimmel, Kurt E.

    2013-01-01

    AACSB International advocates integration of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability in all business school disciplines. This study provides an overview of the implementation of these three topics in teaching initiatives and assessment in business schools accredited by AACSB International. Since no comprehensive studies have…

  3. 26 CFR 1.897-9T - Treatment of certain interest in publicly traded corporations, definition of foreign person, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporations, definition of foreign person, and foreign governments and international organizations (temporary... international organizations (temporary). (a) Purpose and scope. This section provides a temporary regulation... organizations, see paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Regularly traded—(1) General rule—(i) Trading...

  4. 26 CFR 1.6074-1 - Time and place for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... estimated income tax by corporations. 1.6074-1 Section 1.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Time for Filing Returns and Other Documents § 1.6074-1 Time and place for filing declarations of estimated income tax...

  5. 26 CFR 1.6074-1 - Time and place for filing declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... estimated income tax by corporations. 1.6074-1 Section 1.6074-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Time for Filing Returns and Other Documents § 1.6074-1 Time and place for filing declarations of estimated income tax...

  6. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations... AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.11 Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations... union; (2) Primarily serves credit unions; (3) Restricts its services to those related to the...

  7. Transnational Corporations and Corporate Citizenship: Analyzing New Roles of Organization Development Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Ingo Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that too few transnational corporations (TNCs) have the organizational capacity to manage corporate citizenship. Evidence exists that ever more TNCs adopt programs of corporate citizenship development in order to increase this capacity. However, both in academic and practical literature, there is a general lack of a strategic…

  8. Does Conservative Protestantism Moderate the Association between Corporal Punishment and Child Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Christopher G.; Musick, Marc A.; Holden, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from a sample of 456 focal children in the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), this study examined two research questions: (a) Does corporal punishment of young children (ages 2-4 at baseline) predict increases in levels of externalizing and internalizing problems over a 5-year study period? (b) Does the…

  9. The Federal Communications Commission and the Communications Satellite Corporation: A Question of Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, William E.

    When NASA announced in 1960 that private enterprise would produce communication satellites, rather than the Federal government, several large corporations proposed a joint venture involving a group of international carriers and electronic manufacturers, while American Telephone and Telegraph requested sole ownership. At that time, the Federal…

  10. 26 CFR 301.6425-1 - Adjustment of overpayment of estimated income tax by corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... income tax by corporation. For regulations under section 6425, see §§ 1.6425-1 to 1.6425-3, inclusive, of this chapter (Income Tax Regulations). ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of overpayment of estimated...

  11. 26 CFR 1.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Returns Or Statements § 1.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. (a) Requirement. For taxable years ending on or...

  12. 26 CFR 1.6016-1 - Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Declarations of estimated income tax by... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax Returns Or Statements § 1.6016-1 Declarations of estimated income tax by corporations. (a) Requirement. For taxable years ending on or after December...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6425-1 - Adjustment of overpayment of estimated income tax by corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... income tax by corporation. For regulations under section 6425, see §§ 1.6425-1 to 1.6425-3, inclusive, of this chapter (Income Tax Regulations). ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjustment of overpayment of estimated...

  14. Use of the Systems Approach to Training Design and Delivery in Japanese Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, John M.; Taguchi, Mina

    1996-01-01

    Surveyed 45 Japanese corporations to determine common training methods and use of systematic design and development processes. Results indicate that overall there was more internal classroom training than on-the-job training and that only two of the companies had a formal, systematic approach to instruction design and development. (JMV)

  15. Management of Corporate Culture through Local Managers' Training in Foreign Companies in China: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    Corporate culture is a complex phenomenon in foreign companies located in the People's Republic of China. For the management team of an international enterprise, it is a challenging task to manage cultural differences. Education and training provided to local managers might be one of the important solutions. Therefore, this study explores the…

  16. A Framework to Support Global Corporate M-Learning: Learner Initiative and Technology Acceptance across Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Corporations are growing more and more international and accordingly need to train and develop an increasingly diverse and dispersed employee based. M-learning seems like it may be the solution if it can cross cultures. Learner initiative has been shown to be a disadvantage of distant learning environments, which would include m-learning.…

  17. English as a Lingua Franca in Nordic Corporate Mergers: Two Case Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhiala-Salminen, L.; Charles, M.; Kankaanranta, A.

    2005-01-01

    The article is based on findings from research into communication and language use in two international corporations, both formed as a result of a merger between a Swedish and a Finnish company. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of each case company, focusing on language use, communication practices, and cultural views. Using some of the…

  18. Transnational Private Authority in Education Policy in Jordan and South Africa: The Case of Microsoft Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhanji, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore Microsoft Corporation as a new international actor shaping educational reforms and practices. This study examines how the implementation of Microsoft's global Partners in Learning (PiL) program varied and was mediated by national politics and national institutional practices in two different contexts,…

  19. 26 CFR 1.367(d)-1T - Transfers of intangible property to foreign corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intangible property for a principal purpose of avoiding the effect of section 367(d) if the property is... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transfers of intangible property to foreign... § 1.367(d)-1T Transfers of intangible property to foreign corporations (temporary). (a) Purpose...

  20. 26 CFR 1.367(d)-1T - Transfers of intangible property to foreign corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intangible property for a principal purpose of avoiding the effect of section 367(d) if the property is... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transfers of intangible property to foreign... § 1.367(d)-1T Transfers of intangible property to foreign corporations (temporary). (a) Purpose...